WorldWideScience

Sample records for functional requirement variations

  1. Variational functionals which admit discontinuous trial functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, P. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    It is argued that variational synthesis with discontinuous trial functions requires variational principles applicable to equations involving operators acting between distinct Hilbert spaces. A description is given of a Roussopoulos-type variational principle generalized to cover this situation. This principle is suggested as the basis for a unified approach to the derivation of variational functionals. In addition to esthetics, this approach has the advantage that the mathematical details increase the understanding of the derived functional, particularly the sense in which a synthesized solution should be regarded as an approximation to the true solution. By way of illustration, the generalized Roussopoulos principle is applied to derive a class of first-order diffusion functionals which admit trial functions containing approximations at an interface. These ''asymptotic'' interface quantities are independent of the limiting approximations from either side and permit use of different trial spectra at and on either side of an interface. The class of functionals derived contains as special cases both the Lagrange multiplier method of Buslik and two functionals of Lambropoulos and Luco. Some numerical results for a simple two-group model confirm that the ''multipliers'' can closely approximate the appropriate quantity in the region near an interface. (U.S.)

  2. Functional requirements of road lighting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    The functional, technical and visual requirements for public lighting are discussed. The improvement of the presentation of information to the road user is the main functional requirement. The visual requirements can be deduced from the functional requirement of enabling drivers to follow the

  3. Requirements in Functional IT Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer, F.A.; Blaauboer, F.A.

    Requirements engineering and functional IT management have never been researched as to containing similar activities. This paper describes and compares both disciplines, where the BiSL-framework is used for functional IT management. The similarities and differences between the two disciplines are

  4. Non-functional Avionics Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulitsch, Michael; Ruess, Harald; Sorea, Maria

    Embedded systems in aerospace become more and more integrated in order to reduce weight, volume/size, and power of hardware for more fuel-effi ciency. Such integration tendencies change architectural approaches of system ar chi tec tures, which subsequently change non-functional requirements for plat forms. This paper provides some insight into state-of-the-practice of non-func tional requirements for developing ultra-critical embedded systems in the aero space industry, including recent changes and trends. In particular, formal requi re ment capture and formal analysis of non-functional requirements of avionic systems - including hard-real time, fault-tolerance, reliability, and per for mance - are exemplified by means of recent developments in SAL and HiLiTE.

  5. Smart variations: Functional substructures for part compatibility

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Youyi

    2013-05-01

    As collections of 3D models continue to grow, reusing model parts allows generation of novel model variations. Naïvely swapping parts across models, however, leads to implausible results, especially when mixing parts across different model families. Hence, the user has to manually ensure that the final model remains functionally valid. We claim that certain symmetric functional arrangements (sFarr-s), which are special arrangements among symmetrically related substructures, bear close relation to object functions. Hence, we propose a purely geometric approach based on such substructures to match, replace, and position triplets of parts to create non-trivial, yet functionally plausible, model variations. We demonstrate that starting even from a small set of models such a simple geometric approach can produce a diverse set of non-trivial and plausible model variations. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The JPL functional requirements tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffin, Geoff; Skinner, Judith; Stoller, Richard

    1987-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft are complex vehicles which are built according to many thousands of requirements. Problems encountered in documenting and maintaining these requirements led to the current attempt to reduce or eliminate these problems by a computer automated data base Functional Requirements Tool. The tool developed at JPL and in use on several JPL Projects is described. The organization and functionality of the Tool, together with an explanation of the data base inputs, their relationships, and use are presented. Methods of interfacing with external documents, representation of tables and figures, and methods of approval and change processing are discussed. The options available for disseminating information from the Tool are identified. The implementation of the Requirements Tool is outlined, and the operation is summarized. The conclusions drawn from this work is that the Requirements Tool represents a useful addition to the System Engineer's Tool kit, it is not currently available elsewhere, and a clear development path exists to expand the capabilities of the Tool to serve larger and more complex projects.

  7. Total Variation Depth for Functional Data

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Huang

    2016-11-15

    There has been extensive work on data depth-based methods for robust multivariate data analysis. Recent developments have moved to infinite-dimensional objects such as functional data. In this work, we propose a new notion of depth, the total variation depth, for functional data. As a measure of depth, its properties are studied theoretically, and the associated outlier detection performance is investigated through simulations. Compared to magnitude outliers, shape outliers are often masked among the rest of samples and harder to identify. We show that the proposed total variation depth has many desirable features and is well suited for outlier detection. In particular, we propose to decompose the total variation depth into two components that are associated with shape and magnitude outlyingness, respectively. This decomposition allows us to develop an effective procedure for outlier detection and useful visualization tools, while naturally accounting for the correlation in functional data. Finally, the proposed methodology is demonstrated using real datasets of curves, images, and video frames.

  8. Airspace Operations Demo Functional Requirements Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The Flight IPT assessed the reasonableness of demonstrating each of the Access 5 Step 1 functional requirements. The functional requirements listed in this matrix are from the September 2005 release of the Access 5 Functional Requirements Document. The demonstration mission considered was a notional Western US mission (WUS). The conclusion of the assessment is that 90% of the Access 5 Step 1 functional requirements can be demonstrated using the notional Western US mission.

  9. Specifying Functional Requirements Dependency in the REWiki

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Most of the individual requirements cannot be treated in isolation. Requirements may affect each other in various ways. The dependency between requirements impacts a number of software development aspects and activities. How to classify and specify requirements dependency remains a classic research topic. This research aims at providing an approach of specifying functional requirements dependency. In this thesis we generalize a classification of functional requirements dependency. We also pro...

  10. On Gap Functions for Quasi-Variational Inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Taji

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For variational inequalities, various merit functions, such as the gap function, the regularized gap function, the D-gap function and so on, have been proposed. These functions lead to equivalent optimization formulations and are used to optimization-based methods for solving variational inequalities. In this paper, we extend the regularized gap function and the D-gap functions for a quasi-variational inequality, which is a generalization of the variational inequality and is used to formulate generalized equilibrium problems. These extensions are shown to formulate equivalent optimization problems for quasi-variational inequalities and are shown to be continuous and directionally differentiable.

  11. Specifying semantic information on functional requirements

    OpenAIRE

    YAO, WUPING

    2012-01-01

    Requirements engineering is a challenging process in software development projects. Requirements, in general, are documented in natural language. They often have issues related to ambiguity, completeness and consistency. How to improve the quality of requirements documentation remains a classic research topic. This research aims at improving the way of editing and documenting functional requirements. We propose a meta-model to specify the semantic information of functional requirements, and d...

  12. 47 CFR 80.1081 - Functional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Functional requirements. 80.1081 Section 80... STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1081 Functional requirements. Ships, while at sea, must be capable: (a) Except...

  13. The penalty: function and requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Meini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Legitimacy of criminal sanction is originated on its own purposes pursued in a state governed by the Rule of Law. That legitimacy should include the penalty as well as security measures, bearing in mind that both are imposed to someone breaking a rule of conduct, and therefore, someone capable to do it. Reviewing penal capacity or criminal liability concepts is required because if penal capacity means the capacity to understand the reality and adjust the behavior to it, and if every legitimate criminal sanction have to be imposed to someone who have the capacity of break it, then security measures also have to be imposed only to people responsible, capable to understand rules and act in accordance. With regard to people not subject to criminal liability they are standing outside Criminal Law and punish them would be illegitimate. In this line, criminal liability should be seen not only as a crime assumption but also as a basic statement for any dialogue the state shall have with the citizens: at the level of crime itself, proceedings and sentence execution .

  14. Functional Requirements and the Theory of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, R. Jean

    1982-01-01

    Responding to Willower's earlier questioning of the concept of systems' functional requirements, the author outlines the Parsonian theory of action, discussing action systems' components (values, norms, organizations, and facilities) and their functional imperatives or requirements (pattern maintenance, integration, goal attainment, and…

  15. Smart variations: Functional substructures for part compatibility

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Youyi; Cohen-Or, Daniel; Mitra, Niloy J.

    2013-01-01

    As collections of 3D models continue to grow, reusing model parts allows generation of novel model variations. Naïvely swapping parts across models, however, leads to implausible results, especially when mixing parts across different model families

  16. Are functional foods redefining nutritional requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter J; Varady, Krista A

    2008-02-01

    Functional foods are increasing in popularity owing to their ability to confer health and physiological benefits. Nevertheless, the notion that functional foods improve health when providing nutrients at levels above and beyond existing recommended intakes is inconsistent with the definition of requirement. This disparity highlights the need for an alternative definition of nutrient requirement. The present objective is to examine distinctions between optimization of health, as defined by what we currently deem as required intakes, versus adding physiological benefit using bioactive agents found in functional foods. Presently, requirement is defined as the lowest amount of intake of a nutrient that will maintain a defined level of nourishment for a specific indicator of adequacy. In contrast, functional foods are described as ingredients that are not necessary for body function, yet provide added physiological benefit that confer better overall health. Plant sterols are one example of such an ingredient. Plant sterols lower plasma cholesterol concentrations, and may thus be considered essential nutrients in physiological situations where circulating cholesterol concentrations are high. Similarly, intakes of omega-3 fats beyond existing requirement may confer additional health benefits such as hypolipidemic and anti-diabetic effects. These examples underscore the inconsistencies between what is defined as a nutrient requirement versus what is identified as a health benefit of a functional food. Such discrepancies emphasize the need for a more all-encompassing definition of a nutrient requirement; that is, one that moves beyond the prevention of overt deficiency to encompass improved health and disease risk reduction.

  17. Construction of A Trial Function In The Variational Procedure of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A form of variational method for calculating the ground state energy of a quantum mechanical system is considered. The method is based on a systematic construction of a trial variational function at each step of the calculation of the ground state energy. The construction involves introducing more variational parameters to ...

  18. Human Systems Integration: Requirements and Functional Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, Barry; Gershzohn, Gary; Boltz, Laura; Wolf, Russ; Schultz, Mike

    2005-01-01

    This deliverable was intended as an input to the Access 5 Policy and Simulation Integrated Product Teams. This document contains high-level pilot functionality for operations in the National Airspace System above FL430. Based on the derived pilot functions the associated pilot information and control requirements are given.

  19. Do key dimensions of seed and seedling functional trait variation capture variation in recruitment probability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Plant functional traits provide a mechanistic basis for understanding ecological variation among plant species and the implications of this variation for species distribution, community assembly and restoration. 2. The bulk of our functional trait understanding, however, is centered on traits rel...

  20. HTGR Industrial Application Functional and Operational Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demick, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    This document specifies the functional and performance requirements to be used in the development of the conceptual design of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) based plant supplying energy to a typical industrial facility. These requirements were developed from collaboration with industry and HTGR suppliers over the preceding three years to identify the energy needs of industrial processes for which the HTGR technology is technically and economically viable. The functional and performance requirements specified herein are an effective representation of the industrial sector energy needs and an effective basis for developing a conceptual design of the plant that will serve the broadest range of industrial applications.

  1. Total Variation Depth for Functional Data

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Huang; Sun, Ying

    2016-01-01

    that are associated with shape and magnitude outlyingness, respectively. This decomposition allows us to develop an effective procedure for outlier detection and useful visualization tools, while naturally accounting for the correlation in functional data. Finally

  2. Functional variation in the gut microbiome of wild Drosophila populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, Alyssa; Martinson, Vincent G; Franzenburg, Soeren; Adair, Karen L; Albasi, Alice; Wells, Martin T; Douglas, Angela E

    2018-05-26

    Most of the evidence that the gut microbiome of animals is functionally variable, with consequences for the health and fitness of the animal host, is based on laboratory studies, often using inbred animals under tightly controlled conditions. It is largely unknown whether these microbiome effects would be evident in outbred animal populations under natural conditions. In this study, we quantified the functional traits of the gut microbiota (metagenome) and host (gut transcriptome) and the taxonomic composition of the gut microorganisms (16S rRNA gene sequence) in natural populations of three mycophagous Drosophila species. Variation in microbiome function and composition was driven principally by the period of sample collection, while host function varied mostly with Drosophila species, indicating that variation in microbiome traits is determined largely by environmental factors, and not host taxonomy. Despite this, significant correlations between microbiome and host functional traits were obtained. In particular, microbiome functions dominated by metabolism were positively associated with host functions relating to gut epithelial turnover. Much of the functional variation in the microbiome could be attributed to variation in abundance of Bacteroidetes, rather than the two other abundant groups, the γ-Proteobacteria or Lactobacillales. We conclude that functional variation in the interactions between animals and their gut microbiome can be detectable in natural populations and, in mycophagous Drosophila, this variation relates primarily to metabolism and homeostasis of the gut epithelium. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Departments as teams: Functioning, variations and alternatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witziers, B.; Sleegers, P.J.C.; Imants, J.G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Complex, multi-dimensional and often conflicting reform has led in The Netherlands to a situation in which the management of schools is no longer seen as the exclusive preserve of senior management. In order to manage changes within schools it is deemed necessary to expand the management function to

  4. Functional Foods Baseline and Requirements Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M. R.; Bermudez-Aguirre, L. D.; Douglas, G.

    2015-01-01

    Current spaceflight foods were evaluated to determine if their nutrient profile supports positioning as a functional food and if the stability of the bioactive compound within the food matrix over an extended shelf-life correlated with the expected storage duration during the mission. Specifically, the research aims were: Aim A. To determine the amount of each nutrient in representative spaceflight foods immediately after processing and at predetermined storage time to establish the current nutritional state. Aim B. To identify the requirements to develop foods that stabilize these nutrients such that required concentrations are maintained in the space food system throughout long duration missions (up to five years). Aim C. To coordinate collaborations with health and performance groups that may require functional foods as a countermeasure.

  5. Gas Test Loop Functional and Technical Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Soli T. Khericha; James L. Jones

    2004-01-01

    This document defines the technical and functional requirements for a gas test loop (GTL) to be constructed for the purpose of providing a high intensity fast-flux irradiation environment for developers of advanced concept nuclear reactors. This capability is needed to meet fuels and materials testing requirements of the designers of Generation IV (GEN IV) reactors and other programs within the purview of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Space nuclear power development programs may also benefit by the services the GTL will offer. The overall GTL technical objective is to provide developers with the means for investigating and qualifying fuels and materials needed for advanced reactor concepts. The testing environment includes a fast-flux neutron spectrum of sufficient intensity to perform accelerated irradiation testing. Appropriate irradiation temperature, gaseous environment, test volume, diagnostics, and access and handling features are also needed. This document serves to identify those requirements as well as generic requirements applicable to any system of this kind

  6. Gas Test Loop Functional and Technical Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Soli T. Khericha; James L. Jones

    2004-09-01

    This document defines the technical and functional requirements for a gas test loop (GTL) to be constructed for the purpose of providing a high intensity fast-flux irradiation environment for developers of advanced concept nuclear reactors. This capability is needed to meet fuels and materials testing requirements of the designers of Generation IV (GEN IV) reactors and other programs within the purview of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Space nuclear power development programs may also benefit by the services the GTL will offer. The overall GTL technical objective is to provide developers with the means for investigating and qualifying fuels and materials needed for advanced reactor concepts. The testing environment includes a fast-flux neutron spectrum of sufficient intensity to perform accelerated irradiation testing. Appropriate irradiation temperature, gaseous environment, test volume, diagnostics, and access and handling features are also needed. This document serves to identify those requirements as well as generic requirements applicable to any system of this kind.

  7. Functional Requirement Analysis and Function Allocation for APR 1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuraslinda, Anuar; Florah, Kamanja; Noloyiso, Mtoko and others

    2013-01-01

    This paper intends to fulfill the FRA and FA of the HFE as required in Chapter 4 of NUREG-0711 rev. 3 for APR1400 to satisfy both plant safety and power generation objectives. This paper aims to evaluate the FRA and FA for APR1400. The allocation of function is done at the system level for all processes for both the power generation and safety goals, following the NUREG/CR-3331 guideline. As a conclusion, this paper has successfully implemented the requirements and methodology specified in NUREG-0711 for APR 1400. The Functional Requirement Analysis (FRA) and Function Allocation (FA) are required by the regulation in the Human Factors Engineering (HFE) program. The FRA defines the functions, processes, and system for plant safety and power generation. The FA allocates the functions to human operator, automation, or a combination of two. The FRA and FA for APR1400 have been performed in the very early stage of development but only for the plant safety. However, the analysis did not include the goal of power generation and also did not fully satisfy the latest revision of NUREG-0711

  8. Schwann cell myelination requires Dynein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langworthy Melissa M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interaction of Schwann cells with axons triggers signal transduction that drives expression of Pou3f1 and Egr2 transcription factors, which in turn promote myelination. Signal transduction appears to be mediated, at least in part, by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP because elevation of cAMP levels can stimulate myelination in the absence of axon contact. The mechanisms by which the myelinating signal is conveyed remain unclear. Results By analyzing mutations that disrupt myelination in zebrafish, we learned that Dynein cytoplasmic 1 heavy chain 1 (Dync1h1, which functions as a motor for intracellular molecular trafficking, is required for peripheral myelination. In dync1h1 mutants, Schwann cell progenitors migrated to peripheral nerves but then failed to express Pou3f1 and Egr2 or make myelin membrane. Genetic mosaic experiments revealed that robust Myelin Basic Protein expression required Dync1h1 function within both Schwann cells and axons. Finally, treatment of dync1h1 mutants with a drug to elevate cAMP levels stimulated myelin gene expression. Conclusion Dync1h1 is required for retrograde transport in axons and mutations of Dync1h1 have been implicated in axon disease. Our data now provide evidence that Dync1h1 is also required for efficient myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells, perhaps by facilitating signal transduction necessary for myelination.

  9. Functional characterization of genetic enzyme variations in human lipoxygenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Horn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian lipoxygenases play a role in normal cell development and differentiation but they have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular, hyperproliferative and neurodegenerative diseases. As lipid peroxidizing enzymes they are involved in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis since they produce lipid hydroperoxides, which serve as an efficient source for free radicals. There are various epidemiological correlation studies relating naturally occurring variations in the six human lipoxygenase genes (SNPs or rare mutations to the frequency for various diseases in these individuals, but for most of the described variations no functional data are available. Employing a combined bioinformatical and enzymological strategy, which included structural modeling and experimental site-directed mutagenesis, we systematically explored the structural and functional consequences of non-synonymous genetic variations in four different human lipoxygenase genes (ALOX5, ALOX12, ALOX15, and ALOX15B that have been identified in the human 1000 genome project. Due to a lack of a functional expression system we resigned to analyze the functionality of genetic variations in the hALOX12B and hALOXE3 gene. We found that most of the frequent non-synonymous coding SNPs are located at the enzyme surface and hardly alter the enzyme functionality. In contrast, genetic variations which affect functional important amino acid residues or lead to truncated enzyme variations (nonsense mutations are usually rare with a global allele frequency<0.1%. This data suggest that there appears to be an evolutionary pressure on the coding regions of the lipoxygenase genes preventing the accumulation of loss-of-function variations in the human population.

  10. Robust design principles for reducing variation in functional performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Martin Ebro; Howard, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper identifies, describes and classifies a comprehensive collection of variation reduction principles (VRP) that can be used to increase the robustness of a product and reduce its variation in functional performance. Performance variation has a negative effect on the reliability and percei......This paper identifies, describes and classifies a comprehensive collection of variation reduction principles (VRP) that can be used to increase the robustness of a product and reduce its variation in functional performance. Performance variation has a negative effect on the reliability...... and perceived quality of a product and efforts should be made to minimise it. The design principles are identified by a systematic decomposition of the Taguchi Transfer Function in combination with the use of existing literature and the authors’ experience. The paper presents 15 principles and describes...... their advantages and disadvantages along with example cases. Subsequently, the principles are classified based on their applicability in the various development and production stages. The VRP are to be added to existing robust design methodologies, helping the designer to think beyond robust design tool and method...

  11. Variational principles for the spectral radius of functional operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonevich, A B; Zajkowski, K

    2006-01-01

    The spectral radius of a functional operator with positive coefficients generated by a set of maps (a dynamical system) is shown to be a logarithmically convex functional of the logarithms of the coefficients. This yields the following variational principle: the logarithm of the spectral radius is the Legendre transform of a convex functional T defined on a set of vector-valued probability measures and depending only on the original dynamical system. A combinatorial construction of the functional T by means of the random walk process corresponding to the dynamical system is presented in the subexponential case. Examples of the explicit calculation of the functional T and the spectral radius are presented.

  12. Functional Requirements for Continuation Period Equipment and Drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    For geophysical measurements, creating a functional requirement based on finding a specific-sized target at a specific depth is difficult because of the wide variation of subsurface and surface geologic conditions that can be encountered. An alternative approach used in this paper is to specify functional requirements based on what is needed to search for the effects of a given target within a reasonable background of environmental or geological variation (noise). There is a gap between what the state-of-the-art expert with a large amount of experience can be expected to accomplish and what a non-expert inspector with limited experience can do. There are also limitations because of the Treaty environment (equipment certification, transparency, managed access, etc.); thus, for OSI, we must opt for pragmatic approach. Equipment must be easy to use, rugged, and functional over a wide range of environmental conditions. Equipment should consist of commercially available technology. Well-established operational procedures should be used for taking measurements, reducing data, and presenting data, with software mostly provided by the manufacturer along with the equipment. Equipment should be used in conjunction with WGB-approved position-finding equipment capable of relative position determinations pertinent to the type of equipment and measurement

  13. A functionally gradient variational porosity architecture for hollowed scaffolds fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoda, A K M [Department of Industrial Engineering, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Ozbolat, Ibrahim T [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Center for Computer Aided Design, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1527 (United States); Koc, Bahattin, E-mail: bahattinkoc@sabanciuniv.edu [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanci University, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey)

    2011-09-15

    This paper presents a novel continuous tool-path planning methodology for hollowed scaffold fabrication in tissue engineering. A new functionally gradient porous architecture is proposed with a continuous material deposition planning scheme. A controllable variational pore size and hence the porosity have been achieved with a combination of two geometrically oriented consecutive layers. The desired porosity has been achieved with consecutive layers by geometrically partitioning each layer into sub-regions based on the area and the tissue scaffold design constraints. A continuous, interconnected and optimized tool-path for layers has been generated for a three-dimensional biomaterial deposition/printing process. A zigzag pattern tool-path has been proposed for an accumulated sub-region layer, and a concentric spiral-like optimal tool-path pattern has been generated for the successive layer to ensure continuity along the structure. Three-dimensional layers, formed by the proposed tool-path plan, vary the pore size and the porosity based on the biological and mechanical requirements. Several examples demonstrate the proposed methodology along with illustrative results. Also a comparative study between the proposed design and conventional Cartesian coordinate scaffolds has been performed. The results demonstrate a significant reduction in design error with the proposed method. Moreover, sample examples have been fabricated using a micro-nozzle biomaterial deposition system, and characterized for validation.

  14. A functionally gradient variational porosity architecture for hollowed scaffolds fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoda, A K M; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T; Koc, Bahattin

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel continuous tool-path planning methodology for hollowed scaffold fabrication in tissue engineering. A new functionally gradient porous architecture is proposed with a continuous material deposition planning scheme. A controllable variational pore size and hence the porosity have been achieved with a combination of two geometrically oriented consecutive layers. The desired porosity has been achieved with consecutive layers by geometrically partitioning each layer into sub-regions based on the area and the tissue scaffold design constraints. A continuous, interconnected and optimized tool-path for layers has been generated for a three-dimensional biomaterial deposition/printing process. A zigzag pattern tool-path has been proposed for an accumulated sub-region layer, and a concentric spiral-like optimal tool-path pattern has been generated for the successive layer to ensure continuity along the structure. Three-dimensional layers, formed by the proposed tool-path plan, vary the pore size and the porosity based on the biological and mechanical requirements. Several examples demonstrate the proposed methodology along with illustrative results. Also a comparative study between the proposed design and conventional Cartesian coordinate scaffolds has been performed. The results demonstrate a significant reduction in design error with the proposed method. Moreover, sample examples have been fabricated using a micro-nozzle biomaterial deposition system, and characterized for validation.

  15. A functionally gradient variational porosity architecture for hollowed scaffolds fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoda, A K M; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T; Koc, Bahattin

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a novel continuous tool-path planning methodology for hollowed scaffold fabrication in tissue engineering. A new functionally gradient porous architecture is proposed with a continuous material deposition planning scheme. A controllable variational pore size and hence the porosity have been achieved with a combination of two geometrically oriented consecutive layers. The desired porosity has been achieved with consecutive layers by geometrically partitioning each layer into sub-regions based on the area and the tissue scaffold design constraints. A continuous, interconnected and optimized tool-path for layers has been generated for a three-dimensional biomaterial deposition/printing process. A zigzag pattern tool-path has been proposed for an accumulated sub-region layer, and a concentric spiral-like optimal tool-path pattern has been generated for the successive layer to ensure continuity along the structure. Three-dimensional layers, formed by the proposed tool-path plan, vary the pore size and the porosity based on the biological and mechanical requirements. Several examples demonstrate the proposed methodology along with illustrative results. Also a comparative study between the proposed design and conventional Cartesian coordinate scaffolds has been performed. The results demonstrate a significant reduction in design error with the proposed method. Moreover, sample examples have been fabricated using a micro-nozzle biomaterial deposition system, and characterized for validation.

  16. Total Variation Regularization for Functions with Values in a Manifold

    KAUST Repository

    Lellmann, Jan; Strekalovskiy, Evgeny; Koetter, Sabrina; Cremers, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    While total variation is among the most popular regularizers for variational problems, its extension to functions with values in a manifold is an open problem. In this paper, we propose the first algorithm to solve such problems which applies to arbitrary Riemannian manifolds. The key idea is to reformulate the variational problem as a multilabel optimization problem with an infinite number of labels. This leads to a hard optimization problem which can be approximately solved using convex relaxation techniques. The framework can be easily adapted to different manifolds including spheres and three-dimensional rotations, and allows to obtain accurate solutions even with a relatively coarse discretization. With numerous examples we demonstrate that the proposed framework can be applied to variational models that incorporate chromaticity values, normal fields, or camera trajectories. © 2013 IEEE.

  17. Total Variation Regularization for Functions with Values in a Manifold

    KAUST Repository

    Lellmann, Jan

    2013-12-01

    While total variation is among the most popular regularizers for variational problems, its extension to functions with values in a manifold is an open problem. In this paper, we propose the first algorithm to solve such problems which applies to arbitrary Riemannian manifolds. The key idea is to reformulate the variational problem as a multilabel optimization problem with an infinite number of labels. This leads to a hard optimization problem which can be approximately solved using convex relaxation techniques. The framework can be easily adapted to different manifolds including spheres and three-dimensional rotations, and allows to obtain accurate solutions even with a relatively coarse discretization. With numerous examples we demonstrate that the proposed framework can be applied to variational models that incorporate chromaticity values, normal fields, or camera trajectories. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Requirements for effective functional breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, I.N.; Zawarzin, V.; Adler, L.P.; Pani, R.; DeVincentis, G.; Khalkhali, I.; Vargas, H.; Venegas, R.; Kim, S.C.; Bakale, G.; Levine, E.; Perrier, N.; Freimanis, R.I.; Lesko, N.M.; Newman, D.P.; Geisinger, K.R.; Berg, W.A.; Masood, S.

    2003-01-01

    Most nuclear medicine physicists were trained on devices aimed at functional neuroimaging. The clinical goals of brain-centered devices differ dramatically from the parameters needed to be useful in the breast clinic. We will discuss similarities and differences that impact on design considerations, and describe our latest generation of positron emission mammography and intraoperative products. - Source of physiologic contrast: Clinical neuroimaging depends on flow agents to detect the presence of breaks in the blood-brain barrier. Breast flow agents are nonspecific, and may miss preinvasive lesions. - Resolution: Brain cancers are generally diagnosed at late stages, so resolution is not so critical. Detecting early breast cancers, and specifying margins for surgery requires 3 mm spatial resolution or better. - Prevalence: Primary brain cancer is uncommon, and lesions mimicking brain cancer are rare. Primary breast cancer is common, and benign lesions are even more common, so specificity and biopsy capability are very important. - Anatomic references: Brain structure is standard, while breast structure is highly variable, requiring immobilization/compression for physiologic imaging and biopsy. - Surgery: Complete cancer resections for brain are very rare, but are possible for breast with appropriate imaging guidance, implying the need for rapid and reliable imaging. To summarize, the breast clinic needs a rapid and highly sensitive method of assessing breast physiology, compatible with biopsy and surgery. Positron emission mammography devices, in handheld and X-ray platform based configurations, are ideal for this mission

  19. Towards the Proper Integration of Extra-Functional Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Elke Hochmuller

    1999-01-01

    In spite of the many achievements in software engineering, proper treatment of extra-functional requirements (also known as non-functional requirements) within the software development process is still a challenge to our discipline. The application of functionality-biased software development methodologies can lead to major contradictions in the joint modelling of functional and extra-functional requirements. Based on a thorough discussion on the nature of extra-functional requirements as wel...

  20. Key requirements for future control room functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornelli, Carlo; Zuelli, Roberto; Marinelli, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    ) and the observability needs highlighted within WP5 led to the definition of the requirements with a Web of Cell (WoC) point of view. The main European Distribution System Operators (DSOs) provided a valuable contribution in the definition of the evolvDSO Use Cases. Their analysis lead to the definition of further...

  1. Freight advanced traveler information system : functional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    This report describes the System Requirement Specifications (SyRS) for a Freight Advanced Traveler Information System : (FRATIS). The SyRS is based on user needs described in the FRATIS Concept of Operations (ConOps), which cover the essential : func...

  2. PDSS/IMC requirements and functional specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    The system (software and hardware) requirements for the Payload Development Support System (PDSS)/Image Motion Compensator (IMC) are provided. The PDSS/IMC system provides the capability for performing Image Motion Compensator Electronics (IMCE) flight software test, checkout, and verification and provides the capability for monitoring the IMC flight computer system during qualification testing for fault detection and fault isolation.

  3. Scope Management of Non-Functional Requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassab, M.; Daneva, Maia; Ormandjieva, O.; Mueller, P.; Lyggesmeyer, P.; Maehle, E.

    2007-01-01

    In order to meet commitments in software projects, a realistic assessment must be made of project scope. Such an assessment relies on the availability of knowledge on the user-defined project requirements and their effort estimates and priorities, as well as their risk. This knowledge enables

  4. Towards the Proper Integration of Extra-Functional Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Hochmuller

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the many achievements in software engineering, proper treatment of extra-functional requirements (also known as non-functional requirements within the software development process is still a challenge to our discipline. The application of functionality-biased software development methodologies can lead to major contradictions in the joint modelling of functional and extra-functional requirements. Based on a thorough discussion on the nature of extra-functional requirements as well as on open issues in coping with them, this paper emphasizes the role of extra-functional requirements in the software development process. Particularly, a framework supporting the explicit integration of extra functional requirements into a conventional phase-driven process model is proposed and outlined.

  5. Tank waste remediation system functions and requirements document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, K.E

    1996-01-01

    This is the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Functions and Requirements Document derived from the TWRS Technical Baseline. The document consists of several text sections that provide the purpose, scope, background information, and an explanation of how this document assists the application of Systems Engineering to the TWRS. The primary functions identified in the TWRS Functions and Requirements Document are identified in Figure 4.1 (Section 4.0) Currently, this document is part of the overall effort to develop the TWRS Functional Requirements Baseline, and contains the functions and requirements needed to properly define the top three TWRS function levels. TWRS Technical Baseline information (RDD-100 database) included in the appendices of the attached document contain the TWRS functions, requirements, and architecture necessary to define the TWRS Functional Requirements Baseline. Document organization and user directions are provided in the introductory text. This document will continue to be modified during the TWRS life-cycle

  6. Tank waste remediation system functions and requirements document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, K.E

    1996-10-03

    This is the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Functions and Requirements Document derived from the TWRS Technical Baseline. The document consists of several text sections that provide the purpose, scope, background information, and an explanation of how this document assists the application of Systems Engineering to the TWRS. The primary functions identified in the TWRS Functions and Requirements Document are identified in Figure 4.1 (Section 4.0) Currently, this document is part of the overall effort to develop the TWRS Functional Requirements Baseline, and contains the functions and requirements needed to properly define the top three TWRS function levels. TWRS Technical Baseline information (RDD-100 database) included in the appendices of the attached document contain the TWRS functions, requirements, and architecture necessary to define the TWRS Functional Requirements Baseline. Document organization and user directions are provided in the introductory text. This document will continue to be modified during the TWRS life-cycle.

  7. Functional requirements for core surveillance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, T.

    2000-01-01

    Operating experience at Ringhals-2 has demonstrated the feasibility of a mixed core surveillance system comprised of fixed in-core detectors combined with the original movable detector system. A small number of fixed in-core detectors provide continuous measurement of the thermal margins while the movable detectors are used mainly at start-up to verify the expected power distribution. Reactor noise diagnostics and neural networks can further improve the monitoring system. The reliability of the movable detector system can be improved by mechanical simplification. Wear and maintenance costs are lowered if the required flux-mapping frequency is reduced. Improved computer codes make the measurement uncertainties less dependent on the number of instrumented positions. A mixed system requires new types of technical specifications. (author)

  8. Single cell wound generates electric current circuit and cell membrane potential variations that requires calcium influx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxardi, Guillaume; Reid, Brian; Maillard, Pauline; Zhao, Min

    2014-07-24

    Breaching of the cell membrane is one of the earliest and most common causes of cell injury, tissue damage, and disease. If the compromise in cell membrane is not repaired quickly, irreversible cell damage, cell death and defective organ functions will result. It is therefore fundamentally important to efficiently repair damage to the cell membrane. While the molecular aspects of single cell wound healing are starting to be deciphered, its bio-physical counterpart has been poorly investigated. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes as a model for single cell wound healing, we describe the temporal and spatial dynamics of the wound electric current circuitry and the temporal dynamics of cell membrane potential variation. In addition, we show the role of calcium influx in controlling electric current circuitry and cell membrane potential variations. (i) Upon wounding a single cell: an inward electric current appears at the wound center while an outward electric current is observed at its sides, illustrating the wound electric current circuitry; the cell membrane is depolarized; calcium flows into the cell. (ii) During cell membrane re-sealing: the wound center current density is maintained for a few minutes before decreasing; the cell membrane gradually re-polarizes; calcium flow into the cell drops. (iii) In conclusion, calcium influx is required for the formation and maintenance of the wound electric current circuitry, for cell membrane re-polarization and for wound healing.

  9. Describing functional requirements for knowledge sharing communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Sandra; Caldwell, Barrett

    2002-01-01

    Human collaboration in distributed knowledge sharing groups depends on the functionality of information and communication technologies (ICT) to support performance. Since many of these dynamic environments are constrained by time limits, knowledge must be shared efficiently by adapting the level of information detail to the specific situation. This paper focuses on the process of knowledge and context sharing with and without mediation by ICT, as well as issues to be resolved when determining appropriate ICT channels. Both technology-rich and non-technology examples are discussed.

  10. Speech and Language Functions that Require a Functioning Broca's Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Cameron; Kleinman, Jonathan T.; Newhart, Melissa; Gingis, Leila; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Hillis, Argye E.

    2008-01-01

    A number of previous studies have indicated that Broca's area has an important role in understanding and producing syntactically complex sentences and other language functions. If Broca's area is critical for these functions, then either infarction of Broca's area or temporary hypoperfusion within this region should cause impairment of these…

  11. Non-Functional Requirements Elicitation and Incorporation into Class Diagrams

    OpenAIRE

    Song , Xiaoyu; Duan , Zhenhua; Tian , Cong

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Top-quality software architecture should consider both functional and non-functional aspects of systems and their association. In the the existing literature, considerable efforts have been directed at functional requirement analysis and design, regardless of the non-functional aspects. This disassociation makes architecture comprehension and evolution hard. This paper proposes a strategy on how to elicit non-functional requirements and incorporate them into the design...

  12. NON FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENT TRACEABILITY AUTOMATION-AN MOBILE MULTIMEDIA APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    J. Selvakumar; M. Rajaram

    2012-01-01

    Requirements Engineering (RE) is the area of software engineering that deals with the discovery and specification of the objectives for the system under development and the environment in which it is used including the human activities it supports. Requirement Elicitation is process of gathering requirements from stakeholders. Incorporating RE to identify non Functional Requirements (NFR) in early stages of design and implementation avoids ambiguities, conflicting requirement and other defect...

  13. 33 CFR 157.12f - Workshop functional test requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.12f Workshop functional test requirements... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Workshop functional test requirements. 157.12f Section 157.12f Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...

  14. Experimentation on accuracy of non functional requirement prioritization approaches for different complexity projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar Chopra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Non functional requirements must be selected for implementation together with functional requirements to enhance the success of software projects. Three approaches exist for performing the prioritization of non functional requirements using the suitable prioritization technique. This paper performs experimentation on three different complexity versions of the industrial software project using cost-value prioritization technique employing three approaches. Experimentation is conducted to analyze the accuracy of individual approaches and the variation of accuracy with the complexity of the software project. The results indicate that selecting non functional requirements separately, but in accordance with functionality has higher accuracy amongst the other two approaches. Further, likewise other approaches, it witnesses the decrease in accuracy with increase in software complexity but the decrease is minimal.

  15. Collision Avoidance Functional Requirements for Step 1. Revision 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This Functional Requirements Document (FRD) describes the flow of requirements from the high level operational objectives down to the functional requirements specific to cooperative collision avoidance for high altitude, long endurance unmanned aircraft systems. These are further decomposed into performance and safety guidelines that are backed up by analysis or references to various documents or research findings. The FRD should be considered when establishing future policies, procedures, and standards pertaining to cooperative collision avoidance.

  16. Functional requirements for gas characterization system computer software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tate, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    This document provides the Functional Requirements for the Computer Software operating the Gas Characterization System (GCS), which monitors the combustible gasses in the vapor space of selected tanks. Necessary computer functions are defined to support design, testing, operation, and change control. The GCS requires several individual computers to address the control and data acquisition functions of instruments and sensors. These computers are networked for communication, and must multi-task to accommodate operation in parallel

  17. Functional Requirements for an Electronic Work Package System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This document provides a set of high level functional requirements for a generic electronic work package (eWP) system. The requirements have been identified by the U.S. nuclear industry as a part of the Nuclear Electronic Work Packages - Enterprise Requirements (NEWPER) initiative. The functional requirements are mainly applied to eWP system supporting Basic and Moderate types of smart documents, i.e., documents that have fields for recording input such as text, dates, numbers, and equipment status, and documents which incorporate additional functionalities such as form field data “type“ validation (e.g. date, text, number, and signature) of data entered and/or self-populate basic document information (usually from existing host application meta data) on the form when the user first opens it. All the requirements are categorized by the roles; Planner, Supervisor, Craft, Work Package Approval Reviewer, Operations, Scheduling/Work Control, and Supporting Functions. The categories Statistics, Records, Information Technology are also included used to group the requirements. All requirements are presented in Section 2 through Section 11. Examples of more detailed requirements are provided for the majority of high level requirements. These examples are meant as an inspiration to be used as each utility goes through the process of identifying their specific requirements. The report’s table of contents provides a summary of the high level requirements.

  18. A conformal gauge invariant functional for Weyl structures and the first variation formula

    OpenAIRE

    Ichiyama, Toshiyuki; Furuhata, Hitoshi; Urakawa, Hajime

    1999-01-01

    We consider a new conformal gauge invariant functional which is a natural curvature functional on the space of Weyl structures. We derive the first variation formula of its functional and characterize its critical points.

  19. Commonsense Psychology and the Functional Requirements of Cognitive Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gordon, Andrew S

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we argue that previous models of cognitive abilities (e.g. memory, analogy) have been constructed to satisfy functional requirements of implicit commonsense psychological theories held by researchers and nonresearchers alike...

  20. Quantifying Functional Reuse from Object Oriented Requirements Specifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Condori-Fernandez, Nelly; Condori-Fernández, N.; Pastor, O; Daneva, Maia; Abran, A.; Castro, J.; Quer, C.; Carvallo, J. B.; Fernandes da Silva, L.

    2008-01-01

    Software reuse is essential in improving efficiency and productivity in the software development process. This paper analyses reuse within requirements engineering phase by taking and adapting a standard functional size measurement method, COSMIC FFP. Our proposal attempts to quantify reusability

  1. Department of Energy Emergency Management Functional Requirements Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    This Study, the Emergency Management Functional Requirements Study (EMFRS), identifies the physical environment, information resources, and equipment required in the DOE Headquarters Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to support the DOE staff in managing an emergency. It is the first step toward converting the present Forrestal EOC into a practical facility that will function well in each of the highly diverse types of emergencies in which the Department could be involved. 2 figs

  2. Variational divergence in wave scattering theory with Kirchhoffean trial functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    In a recent study of variational improvement of the Kirchhoff approximation for electromagnetic scattering by rough surfaces, a key ingredient in the variational principle was found to diverge for important configurations (e.g., backscatter) if the polarization had any vertical component. The cause and a cure of this divergence are discussed here. The divergence is demonstrated to occur for arbitrary perfectly conducting scatterers and its universal characterstics are determined, by means of a general divergence criterion that is derived. A variational cure for the divergence is prescribed, and it is tested successfully on a standard scattering model.

  3. Individual diet variation in a marine fish assemblage: Optimal Foraging Theory, Niche Variation Hypothesis and functional identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachera, M.; Ernande, B.; Villanueva, M. C.; Lefebvre, S.

    2017-02-01

    Individual diet variation (i.e. diet variation among individuals) impacts intra- and inter-specific interactions. Investigating its sources and relationship with species trophic niche organization is important for understanding community structure and dynamics. Individual diet variation may increase with intra-specific phenotypic (or "individual state") variation and habitat variability, according to Optimal Foraging Theory (OFT), and with species trophic niche width, according to the Niche Variation Hypothesis (NVH). OFT proposes "proximate sources" of individual diet variation such as variations in habitat or size whereas NVH relies on "ultimate sources" related to the competitive balance between intra- and inter-specific competitions. The latter implies as a corollary that species trophic niche overlap, taken as inter-specific competition measure, decreases as species niche width and individual niche variation increase. We tested the complementary predictions of OFT and NVH in a marine fish assemblage using stomach content data and associated trophic niche metrics. The NVH predictions were tested between species of the assemblage and decomposed into a between- and a within-functional group component to assess the potential influence of species' ecological function. For most species, individual diet variation and niche overlap were consistently larger than expected. Individual diet variation increased with intra-specific variability in individual state and habitat, as expected from OFT. It also increased with species niche width but in compliance with the null expectation, thus not supporting the NVH. In contrast, species niche overlap increased significantly less than null expectation with both species niche width and individual diet variation, supporting NVH corollary. The between- and within-functional group components of the NVH relationships were consistent with those between species at the assemblage level. Changing the number of prey categories used to

  4. Identifying Similarities in Cognitive Subtest Functional Requirements: An Empirical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Craig L.; Parkin, Jason R.

    2007-01-01

    In the cognitive test interpretation literature, a Rational/Intuitive, Indirect Empirical, or Combined approach is typically used to construct conceptual taxonomies of the functional (behavioral) similarities between subtests. To address shortcomings of these approaches, the functional requirements for 49 subtests from six individually…

  5. Functional Size Measurement applied to UML-based user requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Klaas; Dekkers, Ton; Oudshoorn, Rogier; Dekkers, T.

    There is a growing interest in applying standardized methods for Functional Size Measurement (FSM) to Functional User Requirements (FUR) based on models in the Unified Modelling Language (UML). No consensus exists on this issue. We analyzed the demands that FSM places on FURs. We propose a

  6. Human feeding biomechanics: performance, variation, and functional constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin A. Ledogar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the modern human (Homo sapiens cranium is characterized by a reduction in the size of the feeding system, including reductions in the size of the facial skeleton, postcanine teeth, and the muscles involved in biting and chewing. The conventional view hypothesizes that gracilization of the human feeding system is related to a shift toward eating foods that were less mechanically challenging to consume and/or foods that were processed using tools before being ingested. This hypothesis predicts that human feeding systems should not be well-configured to produce forceful bites and that the cranium should be structurally weak. An alternate hypothesis, based on the observation that humans have mechanically efficient jaw adductors, states that the modern human face is adapted to generate and withstand high biting forces. We used finite element analysis (FEA to test two opposing mechanical hypotheses: that compared to our closest living relative, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, the modern human craniofacial skeleton is (1 less well configured, or (2 better configured to generate and withstand high magnitude bite forces. We considered intraspecific variation in our examination of human feeding biomechanics by examining a sample of geographically diverse crania that differed notably in shape. We found that our biomechanical models of human crania had broadly similar mechanical behavior despite their shape variation and were, on average, less structurally stiff than the crania of chimpanzees during unilateral biting when loaded with physiologically-scaled muscle loads. Our results also show that modern humans are efficient producers of bite force, consistent with previous analyses. However, highly tensile reaction forces were generated at the working (biting side jaw joint during unilateral molar bites in which the chewing muscles were recruited with bilateral symmetry. In life, such a configuration would have increased the risk of joint

  7. Human feeding biomechanics: performance, variation, and functional constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechow, Paul C.; Wang, Qian; Gharpure, Poorva H.; Baab, Karen L.; Smith, Amanda L.; Weber, Gerhard W.; Grosse, Ian R.; Ross, Callum F.; Richmond, Brian G.; Wright, Barth W.; Byron, Craig; Wroe, Stephen; Strait, David S.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the modern human (Homo sapiens) cranium is characterized by a reduction in the size of the feeding system, including reductions in the size of the facial skeleton, postcanine teeth, and the muscles involved in biting and chewing. The conventional view hypothesizes that gracilization of the human feeding system is related to a shift toward eating foods that were less mechanically challenging to consume and/or foods that were processed using tools before being ingested. This hypothesis predicts that human feeding systems should not be well-configured to produce forceful bites and that the cranium should be structurally weak. An alternate hypothesis, based on the observation that humans have mechanically efficient jaw adductors, states that the modern human face is adapted to generate and withstand high biting forces. We used finite element analysis (FEA) to test two opposing mechanical hypotheses: that compared to our closest living relative, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), the modern human craniofacial skeleton is (1) less well configured, or (2) better configured to generate and withstand high magnitude bite forces. We considered intraspecific variation in our examination of human feeding biomechanics by examining a sample of geographically diverse crania that differed notably in shape. We found that our biomechanical models of human crania had broadly similar mechanical behavior despite their shape variation and were, on average, less structurally stiff than the crania of chimpanzees during unilateral biting when loaded with physiologically-scaled muscle loads. Our results also show that modern humans are efficient producers of bite force, consistent with previous analyses. However, highly tensile reaction forces were generated at the working (biting) side jaw joint during unilateral molar bites in which the chewing muscles were recruited with bilateral symmetry. In life, such a configuration would have increased the risk of joint dislocation and

  8. Continuity in Λ-variation of functions of several variables and convergence of multiple Fourier series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhvalov, A N

    2002-01-01

    The behaviour of rectangular partial sums of the Fourier series of functions of several variables having bounded Λ-variation is considered. It is proved that if a continuous function is also continuous in harmonic variation, then its Fourier series uniformly converges in the sense of Pringsheim. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that in dimensions greater than 2 there always exists a continuous function of bounded harmonic variation with Fourier series divergent over cubes at the origin

  9. Functional requirements regarding medical registries--preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbichler, Stefan; Hörbst, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The term medical registry is used to reference tools and processes to support clinical or epidemiologic research or provide a data basis for decisions regarding health care policies. In spite of this wide range of applications the term registry and the functional requirements which a registry should support are not clearly defined. This work presents preliminary results of a literature review to discover functional requirements which form a registry. To extract these requirements a set of peer reviewed articles was collected. These set of articles was screened by using methods from qualitative research. Up to now most discovered functional requirements focus on data quality (e. g. prevent transcription error by conducting automatic domain checks).

  10. Functions and requirements for single-shell tank leakage mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruse, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides the initial functions and requirements for the leakage mitigation mission applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site's 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineering principles are being applied to this effort. A Mission Analysis has been completed, this document reflects the next step in the systems engineering approach to decompose the mission into primary functions and requirements. The functions and requirements in this document apply to mitigative actions to be taken regarding below ground leaks from SST containment boundaries and the resulting soil contamination. Leakage mitigation is invoked in the TWRS Program in three fourth level functions: (1) Store Waste, (2) Retrieve Waste, and (3) Disposition Excess Facilities

  11. Reactivity variation's analysis in nuclear propulsion considering the operational real conditions requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, Leonardo Paredes; Santos, Rubens Souza dos; Lapa, Marcelo Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The work presented in this paper highlights the need for the study to determine the reactivity variation ramps needed and possible to meet the real operational conditions required by a nuclear submarine in this several operating phases. In accordance with the operational needs and necessary maneuvers in certain tactical situations, large power variations in the propulsion are demanded. As these sudden and severe changes in propulsion come from the thermal power of nuclear origin, the operation of the nuclear island has to know what kind of answers and criticality variations are necessary to meet each demand speed required. It should be noted that these criticality inserts are conditioned, not only by the propulsion needs, but fundamentally by the imperative need to ensure the core integrity and the chain reaction sustainability considering the phenomenons and complex effects, nonlinear and retro-fed involved. It has to be determined what is the past and required time for each criticality insertion is perceived as motor power. Considering the highlighted aspects, this article concludes and indicates to its end, the need to establish a base operating transitional agenda, according to the naval combat doctrine, to be tested and analyzed under the aspects and peculiarities of kinetic reactors, with the purpose of being generated the appropriate criticality curves for each real need and their respective times of anticipated action. (author)

  12. Reactivity variation's analysis in nuclear propulsion considering the operational real conditions requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Leonardo Paredes; Santos, Rubens Souza dos; Lapa, Marcelo Franklin, E-mail: leonardo_paredes@icloud.com, E-mail: lapa@ien.gov.br, E-mail: rsantos@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The work presented in this paper highlights the need for the study to determine the reactivity variation ramps needed and possible to meet the real operational conditions required by a nuclear submarine in this several operating phases. In accordance with the operational needs and necessary maneuvers in certain tactical situations, large power variations in the propulsion are demanded. As these sudden and severe changes in propulsion come from the thermal power of nuclear origin, the operation of the nuclear island has to know what kind of answers and criticality variations are necessary to meet each demand speed required. It should be noted that these criticality inserts are conditioned, not only by the propulsion needs, but fundamentally by the imperative need to ensure the core integrity and the chain reaction sustainability considering the phenomenons and complex effects, nonlinear and retro-fed involved. It has to be determined what is the past and required time for each criticality insertion is perceived as motor power. Considering the highlighted aspects, this article concludes and indicates to its end, the need to establish a base operating transitional agenda, according to the naval combat doctrine, to be tested and analyzed under the aspects and peculiarities of kinetic reactors, with the purpose of being generated the appropriate criticality curves for each real need and their respective times of anticipated action. (author)

  13. Pelvic incidence variation among individuals: functional influence versus genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Fang; Zhao, Chang-Qing

    2018-03-20

    Pelvic incidence has become one of the most important sagittal parameters in spinal surgery. Despite its great importance, pelvic incidence can vary from 33° to 85° in the normal population. The reasons for this great variability in pelvic incidence remain unexplored. The objective of this article is to present some possible interpretations for the great variability in pelvic incidence under both normal and pathological conditions and to further understand the determinants of pelvic incidence from the perspective of the functional requirements for bipedalism and genetic backgrounds via a literature review. We postulate that both pelvic incidence and pelvic morphology may be genetically predetermined, and a great variability in pelvic incidence may already exist even before birth. This great variability may also serve as a further reminder that the sagittal profile, bipedal locomotion mode, and genetic background of every individual are unique and specific, and clinicians should avoid making universally applying broad generalizations of pelvic incidence. Although PI is an important parameter and there are many theories behind its variability, we still do not have clear mechanistic answers.

  14. Modelling the Probability Density Function of IPTV Traffic Packet Delay Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Halas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with modelling the Probability density function of IPTV traffic packet delay variation. The use of this modelling is in an efficient de-jitter buffer estimation. When an IP packet travels across a network, it experiences delay and its variation. This variation is caused by routing, queueing systems and other influences like the processing delay of the network nodes. When we try to separate these at least three types of delay variation, we need a way to measure these types separately. This work is aimed to the delay variation caused by queueing systems which has the main implications to the form of the Probability density function.

  15. Space Tug avionics definition study. Volume 2: Avionics functional requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Flight and ground operational phases of the tug/shuttle system are analyzed to determine the general avionics support functions that are needed during each of the mission phases and sub-phases. Each of these general support functions is then expanded into specific avionics system requirements, which are then allocated to the appropriate avionics subsystems. This process is then repeated at the next lower level of detail where these subsystem requirements are allocated to each of the major components that comprise a subsystem.

  16. Thermal conditions and functional requirements for molten fuel containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, C.S.; Torri, A.

    1980-05-01

    This paper discusses the configuration and functional requirements for the molten fuel containment system (MFCS) in the GCFR demonstration plant design. Meltdown conditions following a loss of shutdown cooling (LOSC) accident were studied to define the core debris volume for a realistic meltdown case. Materials and thicknesses of the molten fuel container were defined. Stainless steel was chosen as the sacrificial material and magnesium oxide was chosen as the crucible material. Thermal conditions for an expected quasi-steady state were analyzed. Highlights of the functional requirements which directly affect the MFCS design are discussed

  17. Quality functions for requirements engineering in system development methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, M; Timpka, T

    1996-01-01

    Based on a grounded theory framework, this paper analyses the quality characteristics for methods to be used for requirements engineering in the development of medical decision support systems (MDSS). The results from a Quality Function Deployment (QFD) used to rank functions connected to user value and a focus group study were presented to a validation focus group. The focus group studies take advantage of a group process to collect data for further analyses. The results describe factors considered by the participants as important in the development of methods for requirements engineering in health care. Based on the findings, the content which, according to the user a MDSS method should support is established.

  18. Variation of functional clonal traits along elevation in two fern species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.B.; Chen, L.Y.; Xiong, W.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypical plasticity is generally considered among adaptive strategies by which plants can cope with environmental variation in space and time. Although much is known about plasticity in seed plants in terms of functional clonal traits while little is known about ferns. Variation of functional clonal traits of two ferns Dicranopteris dichotoma and Diplopterygium glaucum among plots differing in elevation in a subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest in southern China was investigated. Along with elevation increasing the two fern species showed similar variation pattern of functional clonal traits: stable spacer length, increasing specific spacer length and decreasing spacer weight per ramet and specific spacer weight. The two ferns species had similar variation pattern of ramet performance traits but different variation pattern of ramet population properties. These results suggest an evolutionary trade-off between functions of foraging for and storing of resources in the two ferns, with a functional preference for the foraging in response to environmental change. (author)

  19. Variation of left heart function and thyroid hormone in cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junchi; Du Sujun; Mao Shaorong; Lu Jun; Tang Xiaoling

    1996-01-01

    The observation of 52 cases of cirrhosis left heart function indices traced with 113 In m in quiet and motion, and the combining determination of thyroid hormone serum levels with RIA are described. The cirrhosis to the function of liver damage increased, the indices of left heart function has great change. Moreover, the serum levels of T 3 , FT 3 in thyroid hormone are decreased obviously and the serum level of rT 3 is also increased significantly

  20. Functional requirement specification in the packaging development chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutters, Diederick; ten Klooster, Roland

    2008-01-01

    As it is clear that the full packaging life cycle – at least partially – coincides with the product life cycle, both cycles are interwoven. Each has a network of functional requirements, with specific hierarchic propensities. These networks overlap, with prevailing hierarchies playing important

  1. 305 Building K basin mockup facility functions and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    This document develops functions and requirements for installation and operation of a cold mockup test facility within the 305 Building. The test facility will emulate a portion of a typical spent nuclear fuel storage basin (e.g., 105-KE Basin) to support evaluation of equipment and processes for safe storage and disposition of the spent nuclear fuel currently within the K Basins

  2. Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records: An Investigation of Two Prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanski, Jan; Zumer, Maja

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to establish how the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR) conceptual model, which holds a lot of potential in theory, works in practice. It also aims to identify, and if possible, give solutions to problems found in two of the existing prototypes. Design/methodology/approach: An independent evaluation…

  3. Early Quantitative Assessment of Non-Functional Requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassab, M.; Daneva, Maia; Ormandjieva, O.

    2007-01-01

    Non-functional requirements (NFRs) of software systems are a well known source of uncertainty in effort estimation. Yet, quantitatively approaching NFR early in a project is hard. This paper makes a step towards reducing the impact of uncertainty due to NRF. It offers a solution that incorporates

  4. Requirements for VICTORIA Class Fire Control System: Contact Management Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Requirements for VICTORIA Class Fire Control System Contact Management Function Tab Lamoureux CAE Integrated Enterprise Solutions...Contract Report DRDC-RDDC-2014-C190 July 2014 © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the...i Abstract …….. The VICTORIA Class Submarines (VCS) are subject to a continuing program of technical upgrades. One such program is

  5. Model Penentuan Nilai Target Functional Requirement Berbasis Utilitas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cucuk Nur Rosyidi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a product design and development process, a designer faces a problem to decide functional requirement (FR target values. That decision is made under a risk since it is conducted in the early design phase using incomplete information. Utility function can be used to reflect the decision maker attitude towards the risk in making such decision. In this research, we develop a utility-based model to determine FR target values using quadratic utility function and information from Quality Function Deployment (QFD. A pencil design is used as a numerical example using quadratic utility function for each FR. The model can be applied for balancing customer and designer interest in determining FR target values.

  6. Non-linear variation of the beta function with momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzen, G.

    1983-07-01

    A theory is presented for computing the non-linear dependence of the β-functions on momentum. Results are found for the quadratic term. The results of the theory are compared with computed results. A procedure is proposed for computing the strengths of the sextupole correctors to correct the dependence of the β-function on momentum

  7. A morphological classification capturing functional variation in phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruk, C.; Huszar, V.M.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Bonilla, S.; Costa, L.; Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Reynolds, C.S.; Scheffer, M.

    2010-01-01

    1. A logical way of distinguishing functional groups of phytoplankton is to cluster species according to their functional traits, such as growth rate and nutrient assimilation constants. However, data for such an approach are lacking for the vast majority of the species. 2. In this study, we show

  8. The development of functional requirement for integrated test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, B.S.; Oh, I.S.; Cha, K.H.; Lee, H.C.

    1994-01-01

    An Integrated Test Facility (ITF) is a human factors experimental environment comprised of a nuclear power plant function simulator, man-machine interfaces (MMI), human performance recording systems, and signal control and data analysis systems. In this study, we are going to describe how the functional requirements are developed by identification of both the characteristics of generic advanced control rooms and the research topics of world-wide research interest in human factors community. The functional requirements of user interface developed in this paper together with those of the other elements will be used for the design and implementation of the ITF which will serve as the basis for experimental research on a line of human factors topics. (author). 15 refs, 1 fig

  9. Functional requirements for a central research imaging data repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Thomas; Gruetz, Romanus; Dickmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The current situation at many university medical centers regarding the management of biomedical research imaging data leaves much to be desired. In contrast to the recommendations of the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the German Council of Sciences and Humanities regarding the professional management of research data, there are commonly many individual data pools for research data in each institute and the management remains the responsibility of the researcher. A possible solution for this situation would be to install local central repositories for biomedical research imaging data. In this paper, we developed a scenario based on abstracted use-cases for institutional research undertakings as well as collaborative biomedical research projects and analyzed the functional requirements that a local repository would have to fulfill. We determined eight generic categories of functional requirements, which can be viewed as a basic guideline for the minimum functionality of a central repository for biomedical research imaging data.

  10. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KLEM, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    In 1998, a major change in the technical strategy for managing Multi Canister Overpacks (MCO) while stored within the Canister Storage Building (CSB) occurred. The technical strategy is documented in Baseline Change Request (BCR) No. SNF-98-006, Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing) (FDH 1998). This BCR deleted the hot conditioning process initially adopted for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) as documented in WHC-SD-SNF-SP-005, Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel (WHC 199.5). In summary, MCOs containing Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from K Basins would be placed in interim storage following processing through the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility. With this change, the needs for the Hot Conditioning System (HCS) and inerting/pressure retaining capabilities of the CSB storage tubes and the MCO Handling Machine (MHM) were eliminated. Mechanical seals will be used on the MCOs prior to transport to the CSB. Covers will be welded on the MCOs for the final seal at the CSB. Approval of BCR No. SNF-98-006, imposed the need to review and update the CSB functions and requirements baseline documented herein including changing the document title to ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements.'' This revision aligns the functions and requirements baseline with the CSB Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing). This document represents the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Subproject technical baseline. It establishes the functions and requirements baseline for the implementation of the CSB Subproject. The document is organized in eight sections. Sections 1.0 Introduction and 2.0 Overview provide brief introductions to the document and the CSB Subproject. Sections 3.0 Functions, 4.0 Requirements, 5.0 Architecture, and 6.0 Interfaces provide the data described by their titles. Section 7.0 Glossary lists the acronyms and defines the terms used in this document. Section 8.0 References lists the

  11. Intraspecific diversity among partners drives functional variation in coral symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, John Everett; Banaszak, Anastazia T; Altman, Naomi S; LaJeunesse, Todd C; Baums, Iliana B

    2015-10-26

    The capacity of coral-dinoflagellate mutualisms to adapt to a changing climate relies in part on standing variation in host and symbiont populations, but rarely have the interactions between symbiotic partners been considered at the level of individuals. Here, we tested the importance of inter-individual variation with respect to the physiology of coral holobionts. We identified six genetically distinct Acropora palmata coral colonies that all shared the same isoclonal Symbiodinium 'fitti' dinoflagellate strain. No other Symbiodinium could be detected in host tissues. We exposed fragments of each colony to extreme cold and found that the stress-induced change in symbiont photochemical efficiency varied up to 3.6-fold depending on host genetic background. The S. 'fitti' strain was least stressed when associating with hosts that significantly altered the expression of 184 genes under cold shock; it was most stressed in hosts that only adjusted 14 genes. Key expression differences among hosts were related to redox signaling and iron availability pathways. Fine-scale interactions among unique host colonies and symbiont strains provide an underappreciated source of raw material for natural selection in coral symbioses.

  12. An analysis of cross-sectional variations in total household energy requirements in India using micro survey data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachauri, Shonali

    2004-01-01

    Using micro level household survey data from India, we analyse the variation in the pattern and quantum of household energy requirements, both direct and indirect, and the factors causing such variation. An econometric analysis using household survey data from India for the year 1993-1994 reveals that household socio-economic, demographic, geographic, family and dwelling attributes influence the total household energy requirements. There are also large variations in the pattern of energy requirements across households belonging to different expenditure classes. Results from the econometric estimation show that total household expenditure or income level is the most important explanatory variable causing variation in energy requirements across households. In addition, the size of the household dwelling and the age of the head of the household are related to higher household energy requirements. In contrast, the number of members in the household and literacy of the head are associated with lower household energy requirements

  13. An analysis of cross-sectional variations in total household energy requirements in India using micro survey data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pachauri, Shonali E-mail: shonali.pachauri@cepe.mavt.ethz.ch

    2004-10-01

    Using micro level household survey data from India, we analyse the variation in the pattern and quantum of household energy requirements, both direct and indirect, and the factors causing such variation. An econometric analysis using household survey data from India for the year 1993-1994 reveals that household socio-economic, demographic, geographic, family and dwelling attributes influence the total household energy requirements. There are also large variations in the pattern of energy requirements across households belonging to different expenditure classes. Results from the econometric estimation show that total household expenditure or income level is the most important explanatory variable causing variation in energy requirements across households. In addition, the size of the household dwelling and the age of the head of the household are related to higher household energy requirements. In contrast, the number of members in the household and literacy of the head are associated with lower household energy requirements.

  14. Advanced flight deck/crew station simulator functional requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, R. L.; Tate, J. L.; Moss, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    This report documents a study of flight deck/crew system research facility requirements for investigating issues involved with developing systems, and procedures for interfacing transport aircraft with air traffic control systems planned for 1985 to 2000. Crew system needs of NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and industry were investigated and reported. A matrix of these is included, as are recommended functional requirements and design criteria for simulation facilities in which to conduct this research. Methods of exploiting the commonality and similarity in facilities are identified, and plans for exploiting this in order to reduce implementation costs and allow efficient transfer of experiments from one facility to another are presented.

  15. Towards an Early Software Effort Estimation Based on Functional and Non-Functional Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, Mohamed; Daneva, Maya; Ormandjieva, Olga

    The increased awareness of the non-functional requirements as a key to software project and product success makes explicit the need to include them in any software project effort estimation activity. However, the existing approaches to defining size-based effort relationships still pay insufficient attention to this need. This paper presents a flexible, yet systematic approach to the early requirements-based effort estimation, based on Non-Functional Requirements ontology. It complementarily uses one standard functional size measurement model and a linear regression technique. We report on a case study which illustrates the application of our solution approach in context and also helps evaluate our experiences in using it.

  16. Spectral and geometrical variation of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of diffuse reflectance standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Alejandro; Rabal, Ana María; Campos, Joaquín; Pons, Alicia; Hernanz, María Luisa

    2012-12-20

    A study on the variation of the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of four diffuse reflectance standards (matte ceramic, BaSO(4), Spectralon, and white Russian opal glass) is accomplished through this work. Spectral BRDF measurements were carried out and, using principal components analysis, its spectral and geometrical variation respect to a reference geometry was assessed from the experimental data. Several descriptors were defined in order to compare the spectral BRDF variation of the four materials.

  17. Variational approach to dense relativistic matter using functional techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoodbhoy, P.

    1982-01-01

    The zero temperature ground state of an infinite system of baryons interacting with each other through the exchange of scalar and vector mesons is studied by means of a variational principle appropriate to relativistic systems. A trial wavefunctional is constructed which represents the fluctuation of the quantum fields about their mean values. The renormalized ground-state energy is subsequently calculated at a point where the vacuum is stable. Renormalization to all orders in the strong coupling constants is thereby obtained. A simple expression for the binding energy per particle with three free parameters is found. These parameters are fixed by fitting to the observed nucleon mass and to the values of the fermi momentum and binding energy of nuclear matter. A prediction for the binding energy and equation of state of nuclear and neutron matter is obtained for densities far away from the density of normal nuclei. Finally, a comparison is made with results obtained by other authors who have used classical-perturbative methods for the same system

  18. Functions and requirements for a cesium demonstration unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howden, G.F.

    1994-04-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company is investigating alternative means to pretreat the wastes in the Hanford radioactive waste storage tanks. Alternatives include (but are not limited to) in-tank pretreatment, use of above ground transportable compact processing units (CPU) located adjacent to a tank farm, and fixed processing facilities. This document provides the functions and requirements for a CPU to remove cesium from tank waste as a demonstration of the CPU concept. It is therefore identified as the Cesium Demonstration Unit CDU

  19. Variations in body morphology explain sex differences in thermoeffector function during compensable heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notley, Sean R; Park, Joonhee; Tagami, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Norikazu; Taylor, Nigel A S

    2017-05-01

    What is the central question of this study? Can sex-related differences in cutaneous vascular and sudomotor responses be explained primarily by variations in the ratio between body surface area and mass during compensable exercise that elicits equivalent heat-loss requirements and mean body temperature changes across participants? What is the main finding and its importance? Mass-specific surface area was a significant determinant of vasomotor and sudomotor responses in men and women, explaining 10-48% of the individual thermoeffector variance. Nonetheless, after accounting for changes in mean body temperature and morphological differences, sex explained only 5% of that inter-individual variability. It was concluded that sex differences in thermoeffector function are morphologically dependent, but not sex dependent. Sex is sometimes thought to be an independent modulator of cutaneous vasomotor and sudomotor function during heat exposure. Nevertheless, it was hypothesized that, when assessed during compensable exercise that evoked equal heat-loss requirements across participants, sex differences in those thermoeffectors would be explained by variations in the ratio between body surface area and mass (specific surface area). To evaluate that possibility, vasomotor and sudomotor functions were assessed in 60 individuals (36 men and 24 women) with widely varying (overlapping) specific surface areas (range, 232.3-292.7 and 241.2-303.1 cm 2  kg -1 , respectively). Subjects completed two trials in compensable conditions (28°C, 36% relative humidity) involving rest (20 min) and steady-state cycling (45 min) at fixed, area-specific metabolic heat-production rates (light, ∼135 W m -2 ; moderate, ∼200 W m -2 ). Equivalent heat-loss requirements and mean body temperature changes were evoked across participants. Forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were positively related to specific surface area during light work in men (r = 0.67 and r = 0

  20. Getting the balance right between functional and non-functional requirements: the case of requirement specification in IT procurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Johansson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available IT procurement represents a business process of high importance, including the ability to articulate requirements that the procurement deals with. Furthermore, specifying requirements is of importance for both procurer and potential supplier, as it functions as central contractual element between the two. The purpose of this article is two-fold: (i to show how established terminology for requirement specification is represented in current call for bids for the procurement of IT; and (ii to introduce an organizing framework that may assist procurers in actively addressing functional requirements and business requirements. Ten “call for bids” were examined from a Swedish national procurement database. From the analysis of the bids, it can be concluded that: (i the call for bids displays a high degree of precision regarding hardware aspects, but less precision regarding software; (ii supplier experience and competence is stressed, but rarely elaborated on in detail; and (iii call for bids vagueness may be used as a lock-in opportunity for suppliers. From the discussion on this, a tentative procurement framework is suggested, aiming on increasing the logical transparency for the procurement of IT.

  1. Regional variation in the structure and function of parrotfishes on Arabian reefs

    KAUST Repository

    Hoey, Andrew; Feary, David A.; Burt, John A.; Vaughan, Grace; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Berumen, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    the southern Arabian Gulf, and as such rates of grazing and erosion were negligible. This regional variation in abundance and functional composition of parrotfishes appears to be related to local environmental conditions.

  2. Variation in Differential and Total Cross Sections Due to Different Radial Wave Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, W., Jr.; Greene, T.

    1976-01-01

    Three sets of analytical wave functions are used to calculate the Na (3s---3p) transition differential and total electron excitation cross sections by Born approximations. Results show expected large variations in values. (Author/CP)

  3. Implicit functions and solution mappings a view from variational analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Dontchev, Asen L

    2014-01-01

    The implicit function theorem is one of the most important theorems in analysis and its many variants are basic tools in partial differential equations and numerical analysis. This second edition of Implicit Functions and Solution Mappings presents an updated and more complete picture of the field by including solutions of problems that have been solved since the first edition was published, and places old and new results in a broader perspective. The purpose of this self-contained work is to provide a reference on the topic and to provide a unified collection of a number of results which are currently scattered throughout the literature. Updates to this edition include new sections in almost all chapters, new exercises and examples, updated commentaries to chapters and an enlarged index and references section. From reviews of the first edition: “The book commences with a helpful context-setting preface followed by six chapters. Each chapter starts with a useful preamble and concludes with a careful and ins...

  4. Iterative method of the parameter variation for solution of nonlinear functional equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidenko, D.F.

    1975-01-01

    The iteration method of parameter variation is used for solving nonlinear functional equations in Banach spaces. The authors consider some methods for numerical integration of ordinary first-order differential equations and construct the relevant iteration methods of parameter variation, both one- and multifactor. They also discuss problems of mathematical substantiation of the method, study the conditions and rate of convergence, estimate the error. The paper considers the application of the method to specific functional equations

  5. Regularization by Functions of Bounded Variation and Applications to Image Enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, E.; Kunisch, K.; Pola, C.

    1999-01-01

    Optimization problems regularized by bounded variation seminorms are analyzed. The optimality system is obtained and finite-dimensional approximations of bounded variation function spaces as well as of the optimization problems are studied. It is demonstrated that the choice of the vector norm in the definition of the bounded variation seminorm is of special importance for approximating subspaces consisting of piecewise constant functions. Algorithms based on a primal-dual framework that exploit the structure of these nondifferentiable optimization problems are proposed. Numerical examples are given for denoising of blocky images with very high noise

  6. Uncertainty Analysis via Failure Domain Characterization: Unrestricted Requirement Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an uncertainty analysis framework based on the characterization of the uncertain parameter space. This characterization enables the identification of worst-case uncertainty combinations and the approximation of the failure and safe domains with a high level of accuracy. Because these approximations are comprised of subsets of readily computable probability, they enable the calculation of arbitrarily tight upper and lower bounds to the failure probability. The methods developed herein, which are based on nonlinear constrained optimization, are applicable to requirement functions whose functional dependency on the uncertainty is arbitrary and whose explicit form may even be unknown. Some of the most prominent features of the methodology are the substantial desensitization of the calculations from the assumed uncertainty model (i.e., the probability distribution describing the uncertainty) as well as the accommodation for changes in such a model with a practically insignificant amount of computational effort.

  7. Uncertainty Analysis via Failure Domain Characterization: Polynomial Requirement Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an uncertainty analysis framework based on the characterization of the uncertain parameter space. This characterization enables the identification of worst-case uncertainty combinations and the approximation of the failure and safe domains with a high level of accuracy. Because these approximations are comprised of subsets of readily computable probability, they enable the calculation of arbitrarily tight upper and lower bounds to the failure probability. A Bernstein expansion approach is used to size hyper-rectangular subsets while a sum of squares programming approach is used to size quasi-ellipsoidal subsets. These methods are applicable to requirement functions whose functional dependency on the uncertainty is a known polynomial. Some of the most prominent features of the methodology are the substantial desensitization of the calculations from the uncertainty model assumed (i.e., the probability distribution describing the uncertainty) as well as the accommodation for changes in such a model with a practically insignificant amount of computational effort.

  8. Turboelectric Aircraft Drive Key Performance Parameters and Functional Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Ralph H.; Brown, Gerald V.; Felder, James L.; Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose specific power and efficiency as the key performance parameters for a turboelectric aircraft power system and investigate their impact on the overall aircraft. Key functional requirements are identified that impact the power system design. Breguet range equations for a base aircraft and a turboelectric aircraft are found. The benefits and costs that may result from the turboelectric system are enumerated. A break-even analysis is conducted to find the minimum allowable electric drive specific power and efficiency that can preserve the range, initial weight, operating empty weight, and payload weight of the base aircraft.

  9. Functional requirements of the yellow fever virus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patkar, Chinmay G; Jones, Christopher T; Chang, Yu-hsuan; Warrier, Ranjit; Kuhn, Richard J

    2007-06-01

    Although it is known that the flavivirus capsid protein is essential for genome packaging and formation of infectious particles, the minimal requirements of the dimeric capsid protein for virus assembly/disassembly have not been characterized. By use of a trans-packaging system that involved packaging a yellow fever virus (YFV) replicon into pseudo-infectious particles by supplying the YFV structural proteins using a Sindbis virus helper construct, the functional elements within the YFV capsid protein (YFC) were characterized. Various N- and C-terminal truncations, internal deletions, and point mutations of YFC were analyzed for their ability to package the YFV replicon. Consistent with previous reports on the tick-borne encephalitis virus capsid protein, YFC demonstrates remarkable functional flexibility. Nearly 40 residues of YFC could be removed from the N terminus while the ability to package replicon RNA was retained. Additionally, YFC containing a deletion of approximately 27 residues of the C terminus, including a complete deletion of C-terminal helix 4, was functional. Internal deletions encompassing the internal hydrophobic sequence in YFC were, in general, tolerated to a lesser extent. Site-directed mutagenesis of helix 4 residues predicted to be involved in intermonomeric interactions were also analyzed, and although single mutations did not affect packaging, a YFC with the double mutation of leucine 81 and valine 88 was nonfunctional. The effects of mutations in YFC on the viability of YFV infection were also analyzed, and these results were similar to those obtained using the replicon packaging system, thus underscoring the flexibility of YFC with respect to the requirements for its functioning.

  10. Variation and Evolution of the Meiotic Requirement for Crossing Over in Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Beth L

    2017-01-01

    The segregation of homologous chromosomes at the first meiotic division is dependent on the presence of at least one well-positioned crossover per chromosome. In some mammalian species, however, the genomic distribution of crossovers is consistent with a more stringent baseline requirement of one crossover per chromosome arm. Given that the meiotic requirement for crossing over defines the minimum frequency of recombination necessary for the production of viable gametes, determining the chromosomal scale of this constraint is essential for defining crossover profiles predisposed to aneuploidy and understanding the parameters that shape patterns of recombination rate evolution across species. Here, I use cytogenetic methods for in situ imaging of crossovers in karyotypically diverse house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) and voles (genus Microtus) to test how chromosome number and configuration constrain the distribution of crossovers in a genome. I show that the global distribution of crossovers in house mice is thresholded by a minimum of one crossover per chromosome arm, whereas the crossover landscape in voles is defined by a more relaxed requirement of one crossover per chromosome. I extend these findings in an evolutionary metaanalysis of published recombination and karyotype data for 112 mammalian species and demonstrate that the physical scale of the genomic crossover distribution has undergone multiple independent shifts from one crossover per chromosome arm to one per chromosome during mammalian evolution. Together, these results indicate that the chromosomal scale constraint on crossover rates is itself a trait that evolves among species, a finding that casts light on an important source of crossover rate variation in mammals. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Functional requirements document for measuring emissions of airborne radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Alvarez, J.L.; Hoover, M.D.; Newton, G.C.; McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    This document states the general functional requirements for systems and procedures for measuring emissions of airborne radioactive materials from facilities administered by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The following issues are addressed in this document: lg-bullet definition of the program objectives lg-bullet selection of the overall approach to collecting the samples lg-bullet sampling equipment design lg-bullet sampling equipment maintenance and quality assurance issues. The following issues are not addressed in this document: lg-bullet air sampling in work areas or containments lg-bullet selection of specific on-line sample monitoring instrumentation lg-bullet analyzing collected samples lg-bullet reporting and interpreting results. The document provides equipment design guidance that is performance based rather than prescriptive. Locations from which samples are obtained should exhibit mixing of the contaminants with the airstream and acceptable air flow characteristics. Sample collection equipment and effluent and sample flow elements should meet defined performance standards. Quality control and assurance requirements specific to sample collection, equipment inspection, and calibration are presented. Key sample collection performance requirements are summarized in Section 5.4. The intent of this document is to assist WHC in demonstrating a high quality of air emission measurements with verified system performance based on documented system design, testing, inspection, and maintenance

  12. Establishing functional requirements for emergency management information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, J.H.; Rogers, G.O.; Sorensen, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    The advancement of computer technologies has led to the development of a number of emergency management information systems (e.g., EIS, CAMEO, IEMIS). The design of these systems has tended to be technologically driven rather than oriented to meeting information management needs during an emergency. Of course, emergency management needs vary depending on the characteristics of the emergency. For example, in hurricanes, onset is typically slow enough to allow emergency managers to simulate evacuations dynamically while in chemical disasters onset may be sufficiently rapid to preclude such simulation(s). This paper describes a system design process in which the analysis of widely recognized emergency management functions was used to identify information requirements and the requisite software and hardware capabilities to deal with rapid onset, low probability, high consequence events. These requirements were then implemented as a prototype emergency management system using existing hardware and software to assure feasibility. Data, hardware, and software requirements were further developed, refined, and made more concrete through an iterative prototyping effort. This approach focuses attention directly on meeting emergency management information needs while avoiding unneeded technological innovations. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Fatty acids are required for epidermal permeability barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao-Qiang, M; Elias, P M; Feingold, K R

    1993-08-01

    The permeability barrier is mediated by a mixture of ceramides, sterols, and free fatty acids arranged as extracellular lamellar bilayers in the stratum corneum. Whereas prior studies have shown that cholesterol and ceramides are required for normal barrier function, definitive evidence for the importance of nonessential fatty acids is not available. To determine whether epidermal fatty acid synthesis also is required for barrier homeostasis, we applied 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furancarboxylic acid (TOFA), an inhibitor of acetyl CoA carboxylase, after disruption of the barrier by acetone or tape stripping. TOFA inhibits epidermal fatty acid by approximately 50% and significantly delays barrier recovery. Moreover, coadministration of palmitate with TOFA normalizes barrier recovery, indicating that the delay is due to a deficiency in bulk fatty acids. Furthermore, TOFA treatment also delays the return of lipids to the stratum corneum and results in abnormalities in the structure of lamellar bodies, the organelle which delivers lipid to the stratum corneum. In addition, the organization of secreted lamellar body material into lamellar bilayers within the stratum corneum interstices is disrupted by TOFA treatment. Finally, these abnormalities in lamellar body and stratum corneum membrane structure are corrected by coapplication of palmitate with TOFA. These results demonstrate a requirement for bulk fatty acids in barrier homeostasis. Thus, inhibiting the epidermal synthesis of any of the three key lipids that form the extracellular, lipid-enriched membranes of the stratum corneum results in an impairment in barrier homeostasis.

  14. Intraspecific variation in flight metabolic rate in the bumblebee Bombus impatiens: repeatability and functional determinants in workers and drones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darveau, Charles-A; Billardon, Fannie; Bélanger, Kasandra

    2014-02-15

    The evolution of flight energetics requires that phenotypes be variable, repeatable and heritable. We studied intraspecific variation in flight energetics in order to assess the repeatability of flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency, as well as the functional basis of phenotypic variation in workers and drones of the bumblebee species Bombus impatiens. We showed that flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency were highly repeatable in workers, even when controlling for body mass variation using residual analysis. We did not detect significant repeatability in drones, but a smaller range of variation might have prevented us from finding significant values in our sample. Based on our results and previous findings, we associated the high repeatability of flight phenotypes in workers to the functional links between body mass, thorax mass, wing size, wingbeat frequency and metabolic rate. Moreover, differences between workers and drones were as predicted from these functional associations, where drones had larger wings for their size, lower wingbeat frequency and lower flight metabolic rate. We also investigated thoracic muscle metabolic phenotypes by measuring the activity of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, and we found positive correlations between mass-independent metabolic rate and the activity of all enzymes measured, but in workers only. When comparing workers and drones that differ in flight metabolic rate, only the activity of the enzymes hexokinase and trehalase showed the predicted differences. Overall, our study indicates that there should be correlated evolution among physiological phenotypes at multiple levels of organization and morphological traits associated with flight.

  15. Dynamics of Gaussian Wigner functions derived from a time-dependent variational principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Aage Poulsen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available By using a time-dependent variational principle formulated for Wigner phase-space functions, we obtain the optimal time-evolution for two classes of Gaussian Wigner functions, namely those of either thawed real-valued or frozen but complex Gaussians. It is shown that tunneling effects are approximately included in both schemes.

  16. Genic intolerance to functional variation and the interpretation of personal genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavé Petrovski

    Full Text Available A central challenge in interpreting personal genomes is determining which mutations most likely influence disease. Although progress has been made in scoring the functional impact of individual mutations, the characteristics of the genes in which those mutations are found remain largely unexplored. For example, genes known to carry few common functional variants in healthy individuals may be judged more likely to cause certain kinds of disease than genes known to carry many such variants. Until now, however, it has not been possible to develop a quantitative assessment of how well genes tolerate functional genetic variation on a genome-wide scale. Here we describe an effort that uses sequence data from 6503 whole exome sequences made available by the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project (ESP. Specifically, we develop an intolerance scoring system that assesses whether genes have relatively more or less functional genetic variation than expected based on the apparently neutral variation found in the gene. To illustrate the utility of this intolerance score, we show that genes responsible for Mendelian diseases are significantly more intolerant to functional genetic variation than genes that do not cause any known disease, but with striking variation in intolerance among genes causing different classes of genetic disease. We conclude by showing that use of an intolerance ranking system can aid in interpreting personal genomes and identifying pathogenic mutations.

  17. Community functional responses to soil and climate at multiple spatial scales: when does intraspecific variation matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Siefert

    Full Text Available Despite increasing evidence of the importance of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities, its role in community trait responses to environmental variation, particularly along broad-scale climatic gradients, is poorly understood. We analyzed functional trait variation among early-successional herbaceous plant communities (old fields across a 1200-km latitudinal extent in eastern North America, focusing on four traits: vegetative height, leaf area, specific leaf area (SLA, and leaf dry matter content (LDMC. We determined the contributions of species turnover and intraspecific variation to between-site functional dissimilarity at multiple spatial scales and community trait responses to edaphic and climatic factors. Among-site variation in community mean trait values and community trait responses to the environment were generated by a combination of species turnover and intraspecific variation, with species turnover making a greater contribution for all traits. The relative importance of intraspecific variation decreased with increasing geographic and environmental distance between sites for SLA and leaf area. Intraspecific variation was most important for responses of vegetative height and responses to edaphic compared to climatic factors. Individual species displayed strong trait responses to environmental factors in many cases, but these responses were highly variable among species and did not usually scale up to the community level. These findings provide new insights into the role of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities and the factors controlling its relative importance. The contribution of intraspecific variation to community trait responses was greatest at fine spatial scales and along edaphic gradients, while species turnover dominated at broad spatial scales and along climatic gradients.

  18. Qualitative and quantitative estimations of the effect of geomagnetic field variations on human brain functional state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belisheva, N.K.; Popov, A.N.; Petukhova, N.V.; Pavlova, L.P.; Osipov, K.S.; Tkachenko, S.Eh.; Baranova, T.I.

    1995-01-01

    The comparison of functional dynamics of human brain with reference to qualitative and quantitative characteristics of local geomagnetic field (GMF) variations was conducted. Steady and unsteady states of human brain can be determined: by geomagnetic disturbances before the observation period; by structure and doses of GMF variations; by different combinations of qualitative and quantitative characteristics of GMF variations. Decrease of optimal GMF activity level and the appearance of aperiodic disturbances of GMF can be a reason of unsteady brain's state. 18 refs.; 3 figs

  19. On choice of trial functions in integro-differential variational principles of transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyalka, S.K.; Cipolla, J.W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In several problems of particle transport, quantities of macroscopic interest can be related to stationary values of variational functionals based on general integro-differential equations and boundary conditions. Within the context of the jump (Milne's) problem, it is shown how highly accurate results can be obtained by using trial functions based on the eigenfunctions of the relevant integrodifferential equations. Such choices of trial functions should apply equally effectively to problems in curved geometries, both internal and external

  20. NGSI: Function Requirements for a Cylinder Tracking System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branney, S.

    2012-01-01

    While nuclear suppliers currently track uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) cylinders in various ways, for their own purposes, industry practices vary significantly. The NNSA Office of Nonproliferation and International Security's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) has begun a 5-year program to investigate the concept of a global monitoring scheme that uniquely identifies and tracks UF 6 cylinders. As part of this effort, NGSI's multi-laboratory team has documented the 'life of a UF 6 cylinder' and reviewed IAEA practices related to UF 6 cylinders. Based on this foundation, this paper examines the functional requirements of a system that would uniquely identify and track UF 6 cylinders. There are many considerations for establishing a potential tracking system. Some of these factors include the environmental conditions a cylinder may be expected to be exposed to, where cylinders may be particularly vulnerable to diversion, how such a system may be integrated into the existing flow of commerce, how proprietary data generated in the process may be protected, what a system may require in terms of the existing standard for UF 6 cylinder manufacture or modifications to it and what the limiting technology factors may be. It is desirable that a tracking system should provide benefit to industry while imposing as few additional constraints as possible and still meeting IAEA safeguards objectives. This paper includes recommendations for this system and the analysis that generated them.

  1. Towards an Early Software Effort Estimation Based on Functional and Non-Functional Requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassab, M.; Daneva, Maia; Ormanjieva, Olga; Abran, A.; Braungarten, R.; Dumke, R.; Cuadrado-Gallego, J.; Brunekreef, J.

    2009-01-01

    The increased awareness of the non-functional requirements as a key to software project and product success makes explicit the need to include them in any software project effort estimation activity. However, the existing approaches to defining size-based effort relationships still pay insufficient

  2. Environmental Drivers of Benthic Flux Variation and Ecosystem Functioning in Salish Sea and Northeast Pacific Sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rénald Belley

    Full Text Available The upwelling of deep waters from the oxygen minimum zone in the Northeast Pacific from the continental slope to the shelf and into the Salish Sea during spring and summer offers a unique opportunity to study ecosystem functioning in the form of benthic fluxes along natural gradients. Using the ROV ROPOS we collected sediment cores from 10 sites in May and July 2011, and September 2013 to perform shipboard incubations and flux measurements. Specifically, we measured benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients to evaluate potential environmental drivers of benthic flux variation and ecosystem functioning along natural gradients of temperature and bottom water dissolved oxygen concentrations. The range of temperature and dissolved oxygen encountered across our study sites allowed us to apply a suite of multivariate analyses rarely used in flux studies to identify bottom water temperature as the primary environmental driver of benthic flux variation and organic matter remineralization. Redundancy analysis revealed that bottom water characteristics (temperature and dissolved oxygen, quality of organic matter (chl a:phaeo and C:N ratios and sediment characteristics (mean grain size and porosity explained 51.5% of benthic flux variation. Multivariate analyses identified significant spatial and temporal variation in benthic fluxes, demonstrating key differences between the Northeast Pacific and Salish Sea. Moreover, Northeast Pacific slope fluxes were generally lower than shelf fluxes. Spatial and temporal variation in benthic fluxes in the Salish Sea were driven primarily by differences in temperature and quality of organic matter on the seafloor following phytoplankton blooms. These results demonstrate the utility of multivariate approaches in differentiating among potential drivers of seafloor ecosystem functioning, and indicate that current and future predictive models of organic matter remineralization and ecosystem functioning of soft-muddy shelf and

  3. Useful variational principle for the scattering length for the target ground-state wave function imprecisely known

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blau, R.; Rosenberg, L.; Spruch, L.

    1977-01-01

    A minimum principle for the calculation of the scattering length, applicable when the ground-state wave function of the target system is known precisely, has been available for some time. When, as is almost always the case, the target wave function is imprecisely known, a minimum principle is available but the simple minimum principle noted above is not applicable. Further, as recent calculations show, numerical instabilities usually arise which severely limit the utility of even an ordinary variational approach. The difficulty, which can be traced to the appearance of singularities in the variational construction, is here removed through the introduction of a minimum principle, not for the true scattering length, but for one associated with a closely connected problem. This guarantees that no instability difficulties can arise as the trial scattering wave function and the trial target wave function are improved. The calculations are little different from those required when the target ground-state wave function is known, and, in fact, the original version of the minimum principle is recovered as the trial target wave function becomes exact. A careful discussion is given of the types of problems to which the method can be applied. In particular, the effects of the Pauli principle, and the existence of a finite number of composite bound states, can be accounted for

  4. Hedgehog signaling mediates adaptive variation in a dynamic functional system in the cichlid feeding apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yinan; Albertson, R Craig

    2014-06-10

    Adaptive variation in the craniofacial skeleton is a key component of resource specialization and habitat divergence in vertebrates, but the proximate genetic mechanisms that underlie complex patterns of craniofacial variation are largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway mediates widespread variation across a complex functional system that affects the kinematics of lower jaw depression--the opercular four-bar linkage apparatus--among Lake Malawi cichlids. By using a combined quantitative trait locus mapping and population genetics approach, we show that allelic variation in the Hh receptor, ptch1, affects the development of distinct bony elements in the head that represent two of three movable links in this functional system. The evolutionarily derived allele is found in species that feed from the water column, and is associated with shifts in anatomy that translate to a four-bar system capable of faster jaw rotation. Alternatively, the ancestral allele is found in species that feed on attached algae, and is associated with the development of a four-bar system that predicts slower jaw movement. Experimental manipulation of the Hh pathway during cichlid development recapitulates functionally salient natural variation in craniofacial geometry. In all, these results significantly extend our understanding of the mechanisms that fine-tune the craniofacial skeletal complex during adaptation to new foraging niches.

  5. Rapid adjustment of bird community compositions to local climatic variations and its functional consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaüzère, Pierre; Jiguet, Frédéric; Devictor, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    The local spatial congruence between climate changes and community changes has rarely been studied over large areas. We proposed one of the first comprehensive frameworks tracking local changes in community composition related to climate changes. First, we investigated whether and how 12 years of changes in the local composition of bird communities were related to local climate variations. Then, we tested the consequences of this climate-induced adjustment of communities on Grinnellian (habitat-related) and Eltonian (function-related) homogenization. A standardized protocol monitoring spatial and temporal trends of birds over France from 2001 to 2012 was used. For each plot and each year, we used the spring temperature and the spring precipitations and calculated three indices reflecting the thermal niche, the habitat specialization, and the functional originality of the species within a community. We then used a moving-window approach to estimate the spatial distribution of the temporal trends in each of these indices and their congruency with local climatic variations. Temperature fluctuations and community dynamics were found to be highly variable in space, but their variations were finely congruent. More interestingly, the community adjustment to temperature variations was nonmonotonous. Instead, unexplained fluctuations in community composition were observed up to a certain threshold of climate change intensity, above which a change in community composition was observed. This shift corresponded to a significant decrease in the relative abundance of habitat specialists and functionally original species within communities, regardless of the direction of temperature change. The investigation of variations in climate and community responses appears to be a central step toward a better understanding of climate change effects on biodiversity. Our results suggest a fine-scale and short-term adjustment of community composition to temperature changes. Moreover

  6. On Ostrowski Type Inequalities for Functions of Two Variables with Bounded Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Budak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we establish a new generalization of Ostrowski type inequalities for functions of two independent variables with bounded variation and apply it for qubature formulae. Some connections with the rectangle, the midpoint and Simpson's rule are also given.

  7. Variational second-order Moller-Plesset theory based on the Luttinger-Ward functional

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlen, NE; von Barth, U

    2004-01-01

    In recent years there have been some rather successful applications of a new variational technique for calculating the total energies of electronic systems. The new method is based on many-body perturbation theory and uses the one-electron Green function as the basic "variable" rather than the wave

  8. The effect of variation in donor platelet function on transfusion outcome: a semirandomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Anne M; Garner, Stephen F; Foukaneli, Theodora; Godec, Thomas R; Herbert, Nina; Kahan, Brennan C; Deary, Alison; Bakrania, Lekha; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Ouwehand, Willem H; Williamson, Lorna M; Cardigan, Rebecca A

    2017-07-13

    The effect of variation in platelet function in platelet donors on patient outcome following platelet transfusion is unknown. This trial assessed the hypothesis that platelets collected from donors with highly responsive platelets to agonists in vitro assessed by flow cytometry (high-responder donors) are cleared more quickly from the circulation than those from low-responder donors, resulting in lower platelet count increments following transfusion. This parallel group, semirandomized double-blinded trial was conducted in a single center in the United Kingdom. Eligible patients were those 16 or older with thrombocytopenia secondary to bone marrow failure, requiring prophylactic platelet transfusion. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a platelet donation from a high- or low-responder donor when both were available, or when only 1 type of platelet was available, patients received that. Participants, investigators, and those assessing outcomes were masked to group assignment. The primary end point was the platelet count increment 10 to 90 minutes following transfusion. Analysis was by intention to treat. Fifty-one patients were assigned to receive platelets from low-responder donors, and 49 from high-responder donors (47 of which were randomized and 53 nonrandomized). There was no significant difference in platelet count increment 10 to 90 minutes following transfusion in patients receiving platelets from high-responder (mean, 21.0 × 10 9 /L; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.9-37.2) or low-responder (mean, 23.3 × 10 9 /L; 95% CI, 7.8-38.9) donors (mean difference, 2.3; 95% CI, -1.1 to 5.7; P = .18). These results support the current policy of not selecting platelet donors on the basis of platelet function for prophylactic platelet transfusion. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. Epigenetic variation predicts regional and local intraspecific functional diversity in a perennial herb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Mónica; Herrera, Carlos M; Bazaga, Pilar

    2014-10-01

    The ecological significance of epigenetic variation has been generally inferred from studies on model plants under artificial conditions, but the importance of epigenetic differences between individuals as a source of intraspecific diversity in natural plant populations remains essentially unknown. This study investigates the relationship between epigenetic variation and functional plant diversity by conducting epigenetic (methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphisms, MSAP) and genetic (amplified fragment length polymorphisms, AFLP) marker-trait association analyses for 20 whole-plant, leaf and regenerative functional traits in a large sample of wild-growing plants of the perennial herb Helleborus foetidus from ten sampling sites in south-eastern Spain. Plants differed widely in functional characteristics, and exhibited greater epigenetic than genetic diversity, as shown by per cent polymorphism of MSAP fragments (92%) or markers (69%) greatly exceeding that for AFLP ones (41%). After controlling for genetic structuring and possible cryptic relatedness, every functional trait considered exhibited a significant association with at least one AFLP or MSAP marker. A total of 27 MSAP (13.0% of total) and 12 AFLP (4.4%) markers were involved in significant associations, which explained on average 8.2% and 8.0% of trait variance, respectively. Individual MSAP markers were more likely to be associated with functional traits than AFLP markers. Between-site differences in multivariate functional diversity were directly related to variation in multilocus epigenetic diversity after multilocus genetic diversity was statistically accounted for. Results suggest that epigenetic variation can be an important source of intraspecific functional diversity in H. foetidus, possibly endowing this species with the capacity to exploit a broad range of ecological conditions despite its modest genetic diversity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Modeling the Non-functional Requirements in the Context of Usability, Performance, Safety and Security

    OpenAIRE

    Sadiq, Mazhar

    2007-01-01

    Requirement engineering is the most significant part of the software development life cycle. Until now great emphasis has been put on the maturity of the functional requirements. But with the passage of time it reveals that the success of software development does not only pertain to the functional requirements rather non-functional requirements should also be taken into consideration. Among the non-functional requirements usability, performance, safety and security are considered important. ...

  11. Space station data system analysis/architecture study. Task 1: Functional requirements definition, DR-5. Appendix: Requirements data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Appendix A contains data that characterize the system functions in sufficient depth as to determine the requirements for the Space Station Data System (SSDS). This data is in the form of: (1) top down traceability report; (2) bottom up traceability report; (3) requirements data sheets; and (4) cross index of requirements paragraphs of the source documents and the requirements numbers. A data base users guide is included that interested parties can use to access the requirements data base and get up to date information about the functions.

  12. Space shuttle orbiter guidance, naviagation and control software functional requirements: Horizontal flight operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The shuttle GN&C software functions for horizontal flight operations are defined. Software functional requirements are grouped into two categories: first horizontal flight requirements and full mission horizontal flight requirements. The document privides the intial step in the shuttle GN&C software design process. It also serves as a management tool to identify analyses which are required to define requirements.

  13. Humeral torsion revisited: a functional and ontogenetic model for populational variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowgill, Libby W

    2007-12-01

    Anthropological interest in humeral torsion has a long history, and several functional explanations for observed variation in the orientation of the humeral head have been proposed. Recent clinical studies have revived this topic by linking patterns of humeral torsion to habitual activities such as overhand throwing. However, the precise functional implications and ontogenetic history of humeral torsion remain unclear. This study examines the ontogeny of humeral torsion in a large sample of primarily immature remains from six different skeletal collections (n = 407). The results of this research confirm that humeral torsion displays consistent developmental variation within all populations of growing children; neonates display relatively posteriorly oriented humeral heads, and the level of torsion declines steadily into adulthood. As in adults, variation in the angle of humeral torsion in immature individuals varies by population, and these differences arise early in development. However, when examined in the context of the developing muscles of the shoulder complex, it becomes apparent that variation in the angle of humeral torsion is not necessarily related to specific habitual activities. Variability in this feature is more likely caused by a generalized functional imbalance between muscles of medial and lateral rotation that can be produced by a wide variety of upper limb activity patterns during growth. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Identifying an unknown function in a parabolic equation with overspecified data via He's variational iteration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehghan, Mehdi; Tatari, Mehdi

    2008-01-01

    In this research, the He's variational iteration technique is used for computing an unknown time-dependent parameter in an inverse quasilinear parabolic partial differential equation. Parabolic partial differential equations with overspecified data play a crucial role in applied mathematics and physics, as they appear in various engineering models. The He's variational iteration method is an analytical procedure for finding solutions of differential equations, is based on the use of Lagrange multipliers for identification of an optimal value of a parameter in a functional. To show the efficiency of the new approach, several test problems are presented for one-, two- and three-dimensional cases

  15. Variations in erosive wear of metallic materials with temperature via the electron work function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xiaochen; Yu, Bin; Yan, X.G.; Li, D.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical properties of metals are intrinsically determined by their electron behavior, which is largely reflected by the electron work function (EWF or φ). Since the work function varies with temperature, the dependence of material properties on temperature could be predicted via variations in work function with temperature. Combining a hardness – φ relationship and the dependence of work function on temperature, a temperature-dependent model for predicting solid-particle erosion is proposed. Erosive wear losses of copper, nickel, and carbon steel as sample materials were measured at different temperatures. Results of the tests are consistent with the theoretical prediction. This study demonstrates a promising parameter, electron work function, for looking into fundamental aspects of wear phenomena, which would also help develop alternative methodologies for material design. - Highlights: • Metallic materials' wear resistance is influenced by temperature. • Electron work function (EWF) intrinsically determines materials' wear resistance. • An EWF-based temperature-dependent solid-particle erosion model is proposed.

  16. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis genetic variation and early stress moderates amygdala function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, Christina R; Carey, Caitlin E; Michalski, Lindsay J; Corral-Frias, Nadia S; Conley, Emily Drabant; Hariri, Ahmad R; Bogdan, Ryan

    2017-06-01

    Early life stress may precipitate psychopathology, at least in part, by influencing amygdala function. Converging evidence across species suggests that links between childhood stress and amygdala function may be dependent upon hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function. Using data from college-attending non-Hispanic European-Americans (n=308) who completed the Duke Neurogenetics Study, we examined whether early life stress (ELS) and HPA axis genetic variation interact to predict threat-related amygdala function as well as psychopathology symptoms. A biologically-informed multilocus profile score (BIMPS) captured HPA axis genetic variation (FKBP5 rs1360780, CRHR1 rs110402; NR3C2 rs5522/rs4635799) previously associated with its function (higher BIMPS are reflective of higher HPA axis activity). BOLD fMRI data were acquired while participants completed an emotional face matching task. ELS and depression and anxiety symptoms were measured using the childhood trauma questionnaire and the mood and anxiety symptom questionnaire, respectively. The interaction between HPA axis BIMPS and ELS was associated with right amygdala reactivity to threat-related stimuli, after accounting for multiple testing (empirical-p=0.016). Among individuals with higher BIMPS (i.e., the upper 21.4%), ELS was positively coupled with threat-related amygdala reactivity, which was absent among those with average or low BIMPS. Further, higher BIMPS were associated with greater self-reported anxious arousal, though there was no evidence that amygdala function mediated this relationship. Polygenic variation linked to HPA axis function may moderate the effects of early life stress on threat-related amygdala function and confer risk for anxiety symptomatology. However, what, if any, neural mechanisms may mediate the relationship between HPA axis BIMPS and anxiety symptomatology remains unclear. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Measure functional differential equations in the space of functions of bounded variation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Afonso, S.; Rontó, András

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, č. 582161 (2013), s. 582161 ISSN 1085-3375 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : measure differential equations * functional differential equations Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.274, year: 2013 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ aaa /2013/582161/

  18. Effects of functionally asexual reproduction on quantitative genetic variation in the evening primroses (Oenothera, Onagraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Ryan M; Johnson, Marc T J

    2014-11-01

    It has long been predicted that a loss of sexual reproduction leads to decreased heritable variation within populations and increased differentiation between populations. Despite an abundance of theory, there are few empirical tests of how sex affects genetic variation in phenotypic traits, especially for plants. Here we test whether repeated losses of two critical components of sex (recombination and segregation) in the evening primroses (Oenothera L., Onagraceae) affect quantitative genetic variation within and between populations. We sampled multiple genetic families from 3-5 populations from each of eight Oenothera species, which represented four independent transitions between sexual reproduction and a functionally asexual genetic system called "permanent translocation heterozygosity." We used quantitative genetics methods to partition genetic variation within and between populations for eight plant traits related to growth, leaf physiology, flowering, and resistance to herbivores. Heritability was, on average, 74% higher in sexual Oenothera populations than in functionally asexual populations, with plant growth rate, specific leaf area, and the percentage of leaf water content showing the strongest differences. By contrast, genetic differentiation among populations was 2.8× higher in functionally asexual vs. sexual Oenothera species. This difference was particularly strong for specific leaf area. Sexual populations tended to exhibit higher genetic correlations among traits, but this difference was weakly supported. These results support the prediction that sexual reproduction maintains higher genetic variation within populations, which may facilitate adaptive evolution. We also found partial support for the prediction that a loss of sex leads to greater population differentiation, which may elevate speciation rates. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  19. Scintigraphic assessment of liver function in patients requiring liver surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cieślak, K.P.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis addresses various aspects of assessment of liver function using a quantitative liver function test, 99mTc-mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS). HBS enables direct measurement of at least one of the liver’s true processes with minimal external interference and offers the

  20. Genetic Variation in Functional Traits Influences Arthropod Community Composition in Aspen (Populus tremula L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kathryn M.; Ingvarsson, Pär K.; Jansson, Stefan; Albrectsen, Benedicte R.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a study of natural variation in functional leaf traits and herbivory in 116 clones of European aspen, Populus tremula L., the Swedish Aspen (SwAsp) collection, originating from ten degrees of latitude across Sweden and grown in a common garden. In surveys of phytophagous arthropods over two years, we found the aspen canopy supports nearly 100 morphospecies. We identified significant broad-sense heritability of plant functional traits, basic plant defence chemistry, and arthropod community traits. The majority of arthropods were specialists, those coevolved with P. tremula to tolerate and even utilize leaf defence compounds. Arthropod abundance and richness were more closely related to plant growth rates than general chemical defences and relationships were identified between the arthropod community and stem growth, leaf and petiole morphology, anthocyanins, and condensed tannins. Heritable genetic variation in plant traits in young aspen was found to structure arthropod community; however no single trait drives the preferences of arthropod folivores among young aspen genotypes. The influence of natural variation in plant traits on the arthropod community indicates the importance of maintaining genetic variation in wild trees as keystone species for biodiversity. It further suggests that aspen can be a resource for the study of mechanisms of natural resistance to herbivores. PMID:22662190

  1. Genetic variation in functional traits influences arthropod community composition in aspen (Populus tremula L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Robinson

    Full Text Available We conducted a study of natural variation in functional leaf traits and herbivory in 116 clones of European aspen, Populus tremula L., the Swedish Aspen (SwAsp collection, originating from ten degrees of latitude across Sweden and grown in a common garden. In surveys of phytophagous arthropods over two years, we found the aspen canopy supports nearly 100 morphospecies. We identified significant broad-sense heritability of plant functional traits, basic plant defence chemistry, and arthropod community traits. The majority of arthropods were specialists, those coevolved with P. tremula to tolerate and even utilize leaf defence compounds. Arthropod abundance and richness were more closely related to plant growth rates than general chemical defences and relationships were identified between the arthropod community and stem growth, leaf and petiole morphology, anthocyanins, and condensed tannins. Heritable genetic variation in plant traits in young aspen was found to structure arthropod community; however no single trait drives the preferences of arthropod folivores among young aspen genotypes. The influence of natural variation in plant traits on the arthropod community indicates the importance of maintaining genetic variation in wild trees as keystone species for biodiversity. It further suggests that aspen can be a resource for the study of mechanisms of natural resistance to herbivores.

  2. Study of gain variation as a function of physical parameters of GEM foil

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Supriya

    2015-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at LHC has planned to upgrade the TPC by replacing the MWPC with GEM based detecting elements to restrict the IBF to a tolerable value. However the variation of the gain as a function of physical parameters of industrially produced large size GEM foils is needed to be studied as a part of the QA procedure for the detector. The size of the electron avalanche and consequently the gain for GEM based detectors depend on the electric field distribution inside the holes. Geometry of a hole plays an important role in defining the electric field inside it. In this work we have studied the variation of the gain as a function of the hole diameters using Garfield++ simulation package.

  3. Analysis of substructural variation in families of enzymatic proteins with applications to protein function prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fofanov Viacheslav Y

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural variations caused by a wide range of physico-chemical and biological sources directly influence the function of a protein. For enzymatic proteins, the structure and chemistry of the catalytic binding site residues can be loosely defined as a substructure of the protein. Comparative analysis of drug-receptor substructures across and within species has been used for lead evaluation. Substructure-level similarity between the binding sites of functionally similar proteins has also been used to identify instances of convergent evolution among proteins. In functionally homologous protein families, shared chemistry and geometry at catalytic sites provide a common, local point of comparison among proteins that may differ significantly at the sequence, fold, or domain topology levels. Results This paper describes two key results that can be used separately or in combination for protein function analysis. The Family-wise Analysis of SubStructural Templates (FASST method uses all-against-all substructure comparison to determine Substructural Clusters (SCs. SCs characterize the binding site substructural variation within a protein family. In this paper we focus on examples of automatically determined SCs that can be linked to phylogenetic distance between family members, segregation by conformation, and organization by homology among convergent protein lineages. The Motif Ensemble Statistical Hypothesis (MESH framework constructs a representative motif for each protein cluster among the SCs determined by FASST to build motif ensembles that are shown through a series of function prediction experiments to improve the function prediction power of existing motifs. Conclusions FASST contributes a critical feedback and assessment step to existing binding site substructure identification methods and can be used for the thorough investigation of structure-function relationships. The application of MESH allows for an automated

  4. The interpolation method of stochastic functions and the stochastic variational principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xianbin; Chen Qiu

    1993-01-01

    Uncertainties have been attaching more importance to increasingly in modern engineering structural design. Viewed on an appropriate scale, the inherent physical attributes (material properties) of many structural systems always exhibit some patterns of random variation in space and time, generally the random variation shows a small parameter fluctuation. For a linear mechanical system, the random variation is modeled as a random one of a linear partial differential operator and, in stochastic finite element method, a random variation of a stiffness matrix. Besides the stochasticity of the structural physical properties, the influences of random loads which always represent themselves as the random boundary conditions bring about much more complexities in structural analysis. Now the stochastic finite element method or the probabilistic finite element method is used to study the structural systems with random physical parameters, whether or not the loads are random. Differing from the general finite element theory, the main difficulty which the stochastic finite element method faces is the inverse operation of stochastic operators and stochastic matrices, since the inverse operators and the inverse matrices are statistically correlated to the random parameters and random loads. So far, many efforts have been made to obtain the reasonably approximate expressions of the inverse operators and inverse matrices, such as Perturbation Method, Neumann Expansion Method, Galerkin Method (in appropriate Hilbert Spaces defined for random functions), Orthogonal Expansion Method. Among these methods, Perturbation Method appear to be the most available. The advantage of these methods is that the fairly accurate response statistics can be obtained under the condition of the finite information of the input. However, the second-order statistics obtained by use of Perturbation Method and Neumann Expansion Method are not always the appropriate ones, because the relevant second

  5. Experimentation on accuracy of non functional requirement prioritization approaches for different complexity projects

    OpenAIRE

    Raj Kumar Chopra; Varun Gupta; Durg Singh Chauhan

    2016-01-01

    Non functional requirements must be selected for implementation together with functional requirements to enhance the success of software projects. Three approaches exist for performing the prioritization of non functional requirements using the suitable prioritization technique. This paper performs experimentation on three different complexity versions of the industrial software project using cost-value prioritization technique employing three approaches. Experimentation is conducted to analy...

  6. Variation in the thermionic work function of semiconductor powders exposed to electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourasseau, S.; Martin, J. R.; Juillet, F.; Teichner, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    The study of the variation of thermoelectronic work function potential of TiO2 in the presence of isobutane shows that this gas is not adsorbed on this solid, in either the presence or the absence of ultraviolet radiation. These results, as well as those obtained in a previous work, lead to the mechanism of the photo-oxidation of isobutane at room temperature, in which excited atomic oxygen is the active species.

  7. Opposite variations in maternal and neonatal thyroid function induced by iodine supplementation during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, S B; Laurberg, P

    2000-01-01

    pregnancy, and 95 took no artificial iodine supplementation. Iodine supplementation (+I) induced opposite variations in thyroid function in the mother and the fetus. In +I mothers, TSH was 7.6% lower than in mothers with no supplementation (P ... in the +I group (P caused by opposite shifts in TSH frequency distribution in mothers and neonates. The association between iodine supplementation and high serum TSH in the neonates was further substantiated by an inverse correlation between thyroglobulin and TSH in cord blood...

  8. EEG sensorimotor rhythms' variation and functional connectivity measures during motor imagery: linear relations and classification approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano Filho, Carlos A; Attux, Romis; Castellano, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Hands motor imagery (MI) has been reported to alter synchronization patterns amongst neurons, yielding variations in the mu and beta bands' power spectral density (PSD) of the electroencephalography (EEG) signal. These alterations have been used in the field of brain-computer interfaces (BCI), in an attempt to assign distinct MI tasks to commands of such a system. Recent studies have highlighted that information may be missing if knowledge about brain functional connectivity is not considered. In this work, we modeled the brain as a graph in which each EEG electrode represents a node. Our goal was to understand if there exists any linear correlation between variations in the synchronization patterns-that is, variations in the PSD of mu and beta bands-induced by MI and alterations in the corresponding functional networks. Moreover, we (1) explored the feasibility of using functional connectivity parameters as features for a classifier in the context of an MI-BCI; (2) investigated three different types of feature selection (FS) techniques; and (3) compared our approach to a more traditional method using the signal PSD as classifier inputs. Ten healthy subjects participated in this study. We observed significant correlations ( p  < 0.05) with values ranging from 0.4 to 0.9 between PSD variations and functional network alterations for some electrodes, prominently in the beta band. The PSD method performed better for data classification, with mean accuracies of (90 ± 8)% and (87 ± 7)% for the mu and beta band, respectively, versus (83 ± 8)% and (83 ± 7)% for the same bands for the graph method. Moreover, the number of features for the graph method was considerably larger. However, results for both methods were relatively close, and even overlapped when the uncertainties of the accuracy rates were considered. Further investigation regarding a careful exploration of other graph metrics may provide better alternatives.

  9. Inter-doctor variations in the assessment of functional incapacities by insurance physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellart Antonius JM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine the - largely unexplored - extent of systematic variation in the work disability assessment by Dutch insurance physicians (IPs of employees on long-term sick leave, and to ascertain whether this variation was associated with the individual characteristics and opinions of IPs. Methods In March 2008 we conducted a survey among IPs on the basis of the 'Attitude - Social norm - self-Efficacy' (ASE model. We used the ensuing data to form latent variables for the ASE constructs. We then linked the background variables and the measured constructs for IPs (n = 199 working at regional offices (n = 27 to the work disability assessments of clients (n = 83,755 and their characteristics. These assessments were carried out between July 2003 and April 2008. We performed multilevel regression analysis on three important assessment outcomes: No Sustainable Capacity or Restrictions for Working Hours (binominal, Functional Incapacity Score (scale 0-6 and Maximum Work Disability Class (binominal. We calculated Intra Class Correlations (ICCs at IP level and office level and explained variances (R2 for the three outcomes. A higher ICC reflects stronger systematic variation. Results The ICCs at IP level were approximately 6% for No Sustainable Capacity or Restrictions for Working Hours and Maximum Work Disability Class and 12% for Functional Incapacity Score. Background IP variables and the measured ASE constructs for physicians contributed very little to the variation - at most 1%. The ICCs at office level ranged from 0% to around 1%. The R2 was 11% for No Sustainable Capacity or Restrictions for Working Hours, 19% for Functional Incapacity Score and 37% for Maximum Work Disability Class. Conclusion Our study uncovered small to moderate systematic variations in the outcome of disability assessments in the Netherlands. However, the individual characteristics and opinions of insurance physicians have very

  10. Functional requirements for design of the Space Ultrareliable Modular Computer (SUMC) system simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, R. T.; Hornfeck, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    The functional requirements for the design of an interpretive simulator for the space ultrareliable modular computer (SUMC) are presented. A review of applicable existing computer simulations is included along with constraints on the SUMC simulator functional design. Input requirements, output requirements, and language requirements for the simulator are discussed in terms of a SUMC configuration which may vary according to the application.

  11. Functional limit theorems for generalized variations of the fractional Brownian sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Mikko; Réveillac, Anthony

    and on the smallest component of the Hurst parameter vector of the fBs. The limiting process in the former result is another fBs, independent of the original fBs, whereas the limit given by the latter result is an Hermite sheet, which is driven by the same white noise as the original fBs. As an application, we derive...... functional limit theorems for power variations of the fBs and discuss what is a proper way to interpolate them to ensure functional convergence....

  12. Functional limit theorems for generalized variations of the fractional Brownian sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Mikko; Réveillac, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    and on the smallest component of the Hurst parameter vector of the fBs. The limiting process in the former result is another fBs, independent of the original fBs, whereas the limit given by the latter result is an Hermite sheet, which is driven by the same white noise as the original fBs. As an application, we derive...... functional limit theorems for power variations of the fBs and discuss what is a proper way to interpolate them to ensure functional convergence....

  13. Variational Iteration Method for Volterra Functional Integrodifferential Equations with Vanishing Linear Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Konuralp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Application process of variational iteration method is presented in order to solve the Volterra functional integrodifferential equations which have multi terms and vanishing delays where the delay function θ(t vanishes inside the integral limits such that θ(t=qt for 0

  14. Genome Wide Distributions and Functional Characterization of Copy Number Variations between Chinese and Western Pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyang Wang

    Full Text Available Copy number variations (CNVs refer to large insertions, deletions and duplications in the genomic structure ranging from one thousand to several million bases in size. Since the development of next generation sequencing technology, several methods have been well built for detection of copy number variations with high credibility and accuracy. Evidence has shown that CNV occurring in gene region could lead to phenotypic changes due to the alteration in gene structure and dosage. However, it still remains unexplored whether CNVs underlie the phenotypic differences between Chinese and Western domestic pigs. Based on the read-depth methods, we investigated copy number variations using 49 individuals derived from both Chinese and Western pig breeds. A total of 3,131 copy number variation regions (CNVRs were identified with an average size of 13.4 Kb in all individuals during domestication, harboring 1,363 genes. Among them, 129 and 147 CNVRs were Chinese and Western pig specific, respectively. Gene functional enrichments revealed that these CNVRs contribute to strong disease resistance and high prolificacy in Chinese domestic pigs, but strong muscle tissue development in Western domestic pigs. This finding is strongly consistent with the morphologic characteristics of Chinese and Western pigs, indicating that these group-specific CNVRs might have been preserved by artificial selection for the favored phenotypes during independent domestication of Chinese and Western pigs. In this study, we built high-resolution CNV maps in several domestic pig breeds and discovered the group specific CNVs by comparing Chinese and Western pigs, which could provide new insight into genomic variations during pigs' independent domestication, and facilitate further functional studies of CNV-associated genes.

  15. The 30/20 GHz communications system functional requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siperko, C. M.; Frankfort, M.; Markham, R.; Wall, M.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of 30/20 GHz usage in satellite systems to be used in support of projected communication requirements of the 1990's are defined. A requirements analysis which develops projected market demand for satellite services by general and specialized carriers and an analysis of the impact of propagation and system constraints on 30/20 GHz operation are included. A set of technical performance characteristics for the 30/20 GHz systems which can serve the resulting market demand and the experimental program necessary to verify technical and operational aspects of the proposed systems is also discussed.

  16. Quantitative and Functional Requirements for Bioluminescent Cancer Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vermeulen, Stefan; Vandesompele, J O; Vanderheyden, Katrien; Messens, Kathy; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescent cancer models are widely used but detailed quantification of the luciferase signal and functional comparison with a non-transfected control cell line are generally lacking. In the present study, we provide quantitative and functional tests for luciferase-transfected cells. We quantified the luciferase expression in BLM and HCT8/E11 transfected cancer cells, and examined the effect of long-term luciferin exposure. The present study also investigated functional differences between parental and transfected cancer cells. Our results showed that quantification of different single-cell-derived populations are superior with droplet digital polymerase chain reaction. Quantification of luciferase protein level and luciferase bioluminescent activity is only useful when there is a significant difference in copy number. Continuous exposure of cell cultures to luciferin leads to inhibitory effects on mitochondrial activity, cell growth and bioluminescence. These inhibitory effects correlate with luciferase copy number. Cell culture and mouse xenograft assays showed no significant functional differences between luciferase-transfected and parental cells. Luciferase-transfected cells should be validated by quantitative and functional assays before starting large-scale experiments. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. Robust design requirements specification: a quantitative method for requirements development using quality loss functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Nygaard; Christensen, Martin Ebro; Howard, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Product requirements serve many purposes in the product development process. Most importantly, they are meant to capture and facilitate product goals and acceptance criteria, as defined by stakeholders. Accurately communicating stakeholder goals and acceptance criteria can be challenging and more...

  18. Towards a Scope Management of Non-Functional Requirements in Requirements Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassab, M.; Ormandjieva, O.; Daneva, Maia; Ebert, C.; Herrmann, A.; Rupp, C.

    2007-01-01

    Getting business stakeholders’ goals formulated clearly and project scope defined realistically increases the chance of success for any application development process. As a consequence, stakeholders at early project stages acquire as much as possible knowledge about the requirements, their risk

  19. Step 1: Human System Interface (HSI) Functional Requirements Document (FRD). Version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This Functional Requirements Document (FRD) establishes a minimum set of Human System Interface (HSI) functional requirements to achieve the Access 5 Vision of "operating High Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) routinely, safely, and reliably in the National Airspace System (NAS)". Basically, it provides what functions are necessary to fly UAS in the NAS. The framework used to identify the appropriate functions was the "Aviate, Navigate, Communicate, and Avoid Hazards" structure identified in the Access 5 FRD. As a result, fifteen high-level functional requirements were developed. In addition, several of them have been decomposed into low-level functional requirements to provide more detail.

  20. Functional requirements for an Exercise Evaluation and Simulation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The Exercise Evaluation and Simulation Facility (EESF) is a computer-based resource that will improve FEMA's capabilities for evaluating radiological emergency plans and preparedness around commercial nuclear sites. The EESF is being designed from the perspective of the organizations involved (i.e., FEMA Regional and National, and state and local response teams) and takes into account the evolution of radiological and other emergency preparedness activities. Like radiological emergency planning, EESF will evolve to suit FEMA (National and Regional) needs and interests and will be increasingly useful as a resource for radiological emergency planning and evaluation. Table ES-1 briefly describes seven functions for which EESF is currently being designed. They are listed in the approximate order in which they will be designed, developed, and implemented. The only exception is the data base function, which will be developed parallel with the other six functions and enhanced to support these functions, as well as be a source of information on sites, plans, exercises, and evaluations

  1. Thyroid hormone is required for hypothalamic neurons regulating cardiovascular functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mittag, J.; Lyons, D.J.; Sällström, J.; Vujoviv, M.; Dudazy-Gralla, S.; Warner, A.; Wallis, K.; Alkemade, A.; Nordström, K.; Monyer, H.; Broberger, C.; Arner, A.; Vennström, B.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is well known for its profound direct effects on cardiovascular function and metabolism. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the hormone also regulates these systems indirectly through the central nervous system. While some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormone’s

  2. Functional Requirements for the Next Generation of Mass Notification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbo, Berkly

    2012-01-01

    While the latest update to National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) redefines mass notification as "emergency communications systems" (ECS), the end user community is formulating expectations related to the future functionality of today's alerting solutions. Numerous best practices have surfaced since alerting technology began its rapid,…

  3. Functional requirements of a mathematical model of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Joseph L; Noordergraaf, Abraham

    2009-01-01

    Functional descriptions of the heart, especially the left ventricle, are often based on the measured variables pressure and ventricular outflow, embodied as a time-varying elastance. The fundamental difficulty of describing the mechanical properties of the heart with a time-varying elastance function that is set a priori is described. As an alternative, a new functional model of the heart is presented, which characterizes the ventricle's contractile state with parameters, rather than variables. Each chamber is treated as a pressure generator that is time and volume dependent. The heart's complex dynamics develop from a single equation based on the formation and relaxation of crossbridge bonds. This equation permits the calculation of ventricular elastance via E(v) = partial differentialp(v)/ partial differentialV(v). This heart model is defined independently from load properties, and ventricular elastance is dynamic and reflects changing numbers of crossbridge bonds. In this paper, the functionality of this new heart model is presented via computed work loops that demonstrate the Frank-Starling mechanism and the effects of preload, the effects of afterload, inotropic changes, and varied heart rate, as well as the interdependence of these effects. Results suggest the origin of the equivalent of Hill's force-velocity relation in the ventricle.

  4. Mechatronics engineering : New requirements on cross-functional integration

    OpenAIRE

    Adamsson, Niklas

    2005-01-01

    Several industrial sectors experience an increased reliance on mechatronic systems as electronics and software are being embedded into the traditional mechanical systems of these industries. Important challenges within mechatronics engineering comes from management of multi-disciplinary development project teams and the highly complex scope of problems, which in turn require extensive coordination and integration, both in terms of technical and organisational matters. The concept of cross-fun...

  5. Temporal and Spatial Variation of Soil Bacteria Richness, Composition, and Function in a Neotropical Rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivlin, Stephanie N; Hawkes, Christine V

    2016-01-01

    The high diversity of tree species has traditionally been considered an important controller of belowground processes in tropical rainforests. However, soil water availability and resources are also primary regulators of soil bacteria in many ecosystems. Separating the effects of these biotic and abiotic factors in the tropics is challenging because of their high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. To determine the drivers of tropical soil bacteria, we examined tree species effects using experimental tree monocultures and secondary forests at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. A randomized block design captured spatial variation and we sampled at four dates across two years to assess temporal variation. We measured bacteria richness, phylogenetic diversity, community composition, biomass, and functional potential. All bacteria parameters varied significantly across dates. In addition, bacteria richness and phylogenetic diversity were affected by the interaction of vegetation type and date, whereas bacteria community composition was affected by the interaction of vegetation type and block. Shifts in bacteria community richness and composition were unrelated to shifts in enzyme function, suggesting physiological overlap among taxa. Based on the observed temporal and spatial heterogeneity, our understanding of tropical soil bacteria will benefit from additional work to determine the optimal temporal and spatial scales for sampling. Understanding spatial and temporal variation will facilitate prediction of how tropical soil microbes will respond to future environmental change.

  6. Local climate and cultivation, but not ploidy, predict functional trait variation in Bouteloua gracilis (Poaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Bradley J.; Wood, Troy E.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to improve the diversity of seed 18 resources for important restoration species has become a high priority for land managers in many parts of the world. Relationships between functional trait values and the environment from which seed sources are collected can provide important insights into patterns of local adaptation and guidelines for seed transfer. However, little is known about which functional traits exhibit genetic differentiation across populations of restoration species and thus may contribute to local adaptation. Here, we report the results of a common garden experiment aimed at assessing genetic (including ploidy level) and environmental regulation of several functional traits among populations of Bouteloua gracilis, a dominant C4 grass and the most highly utilized restoration species across much of the Colorado Plateau. We found that leaf size and specific leaf area (SLA) varied significantly among populations, and were strongly correlated with the source population environment from which seeds were collected. However, variation in ploidy level had no significant effect on functional traits. Leaves of plants grown from commercial seed releases were significantly larger and had lower SLA than those from natural populations, a result that is concordant with the overall relation between climate and these two functional traits. We suggest that the patterns of functional trait variation shown here may extend to other grass species in the western USA, and may serve as useful proxies for more extensive genecology research. Furthermore, we argue that care should be taken to develop commercial seed lines with functional trait values that match those of natural populations occupying climates similar to target restoration sites.

  7. Transrepressive function of TLX requires the histone demethylase LSD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Atsushi; Takezawa, Shinichiro; Schüle, Roland; Kitagawa, Hirochika; Kato, Shigeaki

    2008-06-01

    TLX is an orphan nuclear receptor (also called NR2E1) that regulates the expression of target genes by functioning as a constitutive transrepressor. The physiological significance of TLX in the cytodifferentiation of neural cells in the brain is known. However, the corepressors supporting the transrepressive function of TLX have yet to be identified. In this report, Y79 retinoblastoma cells were subjected to biochemical techniques to purify proteins that interact with TLX, and we identified LSD1 (also called KDM1), which appears to form a complex with CoREST and histone deacetylase 1. LSD1 interacted with TLX directly through its SWIRM and amine oxidase domains. LSD1 potentiated the transrepressive function of TLX through its histone demethylase activity as determined by a luciferase assay using a genomically integrated reporter gene. LSD1 and TLX were recruited to a TLX-binding site in the PTEN gene promoter, accompanied by the demethylation of H3K4me2 and deacetylation of H3. Knockdown of either TLX or LSD1 derepressed expression of the endogenous PTEN gene and inhibited cell proliferation of Y79 cells. Thus, the present study suggests that LSD1 is a prime corepressor for TLX.

  8. Inheritance and world variation in thermal requirements for egg hatch in Lymantria dispar (Lepidoptera: Erebidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.A. Keena

    2016-01-01

    Mode of inheritance of hatch traits in Lymantria dispar L. was determined by crossing populations nearly fixed for the phenotypic extremes. The nondiapausing phenotype was inherited via a single recessive gene and the phenotype with reduced low temperature exposure requirements before hatch was inherited via a single dominant gene. There was no...

  9. Functional SOCS1 polymorphisms are associated with variation in obesity in whites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gylvin, T; Ek, J; Nolsøe, R.

    2009-01-01

    . A total of more than 8100 individuals were genotyped. RESULTS: Eight variations were identified in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) region. Two of these had allele frequencies below 1% and were not further examined. The six other variants were analysed in groups of T1D families (n = 1461 subjects) and T2D...... of both the rs33977706 and the rs243330 (-1656G > A) variants to obesity were found (p = 0.047 and p = 0.015) respectively. The rs33977706 affected both binding of a nuclear protein to and the transcriptional activity of the SOCS1 promoter, indicating a relationship between this polymorphism and gene...... regulation. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: This study demonstrates that functional variations in the SOCS1 promoter may associate with alterations in BMI in the general white population....

  10. Functional analysis and applied optimization in Banach spaces applications to non-convex variational models

    CERN Document Server

    Botelho, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the basic concepts of real and functional analysis. It presents the fundamentals of the calculus of variations, convex analysis, duality, and optimization that are necessary to develop applications to physics and engineering problems. The book includes introductory and advanced concepts in measure and integration, as well as an introduction to Sobolev spaces. The problems presented are nonlinear, with non-convex variational formulation. Notably, the primal global minima may not be attained in some situations, in which cases the solution of the dual problem corresponds to an appropriate weak cluster point of minimizing sequences for the primal one. Indeed, the dual approach more readily facilitates numerical computations for some of the selected models. While intended primarily for applied mathematicians, the text will also be of interest to engineers, physicists, and other researchers in related fields.

  11. Genetic variation in HTR4 and lung function: GWAS follow-up in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, John S; Li, Huiling; DeGraff, Laura M; Flake, Gordon; Zeldin, Darryl C; London, Stephanie J

    2015-01-01

    Human genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified numerous associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and pulmonary function. Proving that there is a causal relationship between GWAS SNPs, many of which are noncoding and without known functional impact, and these traits has been elusive. Furthermore, noncoding GWAS-identified SNPs may exert trans-regulatory effects rather than impact the proximal gene. Noncoding variants in 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 4 (HTR4) are associated with pulmonary function in human GWASs. To gain insight into whether this association is causal, we tested whether Htr4-null mice have altered pulmonary function. We found that HTR4-deficient mice have 12% higher baseline lung resistance and also increased methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) as measured by lung resistance (27%), tissue resistance (48%), and tissue elastance (30%). Furthermore, Htr4-null mice were more sensitive to serotonin-induced AHR. In models of exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, bleomycin, and allergic airway inflammation induced by house dust mites, pulmonary function and cytokine profiles in Htr4-null mice differed little from their wild-type controls. The findings of altered baseline lung function and increased AHR in Htr4-null mice support a causal relationship between genetic variation in HTR4 and pulmonary function identified in human GWAS. © FASEB.

  12. Coherent molecular transistor: control through variation of the gate wave function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2014-03-21

    In quantum interference transistors (QUITs), the current through the device is controlled by variation of the gate component of the wave function that interferes with the wave function component joining the source and the sink. Initially, mesoscopic QUITs have been studied and more recently, QUITs at the molecular scale have been proposed and implemented. Typically, in these devices the gate lead is subjected to externally adjustable physical parameters that permit interference control through modifications of the gate wave function. Here, we present an alternative model of a molecular QUIT in which the gate wave function is directly considered as a variable and the transistor operation is discussed in terms of this variable. This implies that we specify the gate current as well as the phase of the gate wave function component and calculate the resulting current through the source-sink channel. Thus, we extend on prior works that focus on the phase of the gate wave function component as a control parameter while having zero or certain discrete values of the current. We address a large class of systems, including finite graphene flakes, and obtain analytic solutions for how the gate wave function controls the transistor.

  13. Coherent molecular transistor: Control through variation of the gate wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    In quantum interference transistors (QUITs), the current through the device is controlled by variation of the gate component of the wave function that interferes with the wave function component joining the source and the sink. Initially, mesoscopic QUITs have been studied and more recently, QUITs at the molecular scale have been proposed and implemented. Typically, in these devices the gate lead is subjected to externally adjustable physical parameters that permit interference control through modifications of the gate wave function. Here, we present an alternative model of a molecular QUIT in which the gate wave function is directly considered as a variable and the transistor operation is discussed in terms of this variable. This implies that we specify the gate current as well as the phase of the gate wave function component and calculate the resulting current through the source-sink channel. Thus, we extend on prior works that focus on the phase of the gate wave function component as a control parameter while having zero or certain discrete values of the current. We address a large class of systems, including finite graphene flakes, and obtain analytic solutions for how the gate wave function controls the transistor

  14. Topological variation in the evolution of new reactions in functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Elaine C; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2011-06-01

    In functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies (SFs), conserved structural and active site features reflect catalytic capabilities 'hard-wired' in each SF architecture. Overlaid on this foundation, evolutionary changes in active site machinery, structural topology and other aspects of structural organization and interactions support the emergence of new reactions, mechanisms, and substrate specificity. This review connects topological with functional variation in each of the haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase (HAD) and vicinal oxygen chelate fold (VOC) SFs and a set of redox-active thioredoxin (Trx)-fold SFs to illustrate a few of the varied themes nature has used to evolve new functions from a limited set of structural scaffolds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regional variation in the structure and function of parrotfishes on Arabian reefs

    KAUST Repository

    Hoey, Andrew

    2015-11-20

    Parrotfishes (f. Labridae) are a unique and ubiquitous group of herbivorous reef fishes. We compared the distribution and ecosystem function (grazing and erosion) of parrotfishes across 75 reefs in Arabia. Our results revealed marked regional differences in the abundance, and taxonomic and functional composition of parrotfishes between the Red Sea, Arabian Sea, and Arabian Gulf. High densities and diversity of parrotfishes, and high rates of grazing (210% year) and erosion (1.57 kg m year) characterised Red Sea reefs. Despite Arabian Sea and Red Sea reefs having broadly comparable abundances of parrotfishes, estimates of grazing (150% year) and erosion (0.43 kg m year) were markedly lower in the Arabian Sea. Parrotfishes were extremely rare within the southern Arabian Gulf, and as such rates of grazing and erosion were negligible. This regional variation in abundance and functional composition of parrotfishes appears to be related to local environmental conditions.

  16. Space Station flight telerobotic servicer functional requirements development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberright, John; Mccain, Harry; Whitman, Ruth I.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station flight telerobotic servicer (FTS), a flight robotic system for use on the first Space Station launch, is described. The objectives of the FTS program include: (1) the provision of an alternative crew EVA by supporting the crew in assembly, maintenance, and servicing activities, and (2) the improvement of crew safety by performing hazardous tasks such as spacecraft refueling or thermal and power system maintenance. The NASA/NBS Standard Reference Model provides the generic, hierarchical, structured functional control definition for the system. It is capable of accommodating additional degrees of machine intelligence in the future.

  17. Functional requirements driving the gene duplication in 12 Drosophila species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yan; Jia, Yanxiao; Gao, Yang; Tian, Dacheng; Yang, Sihai; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2013-08-15

    Gene duplication supplies the raw materials for novel gene functions and many gene families arisen from duplication experience adaptive evolution. Most studies of young duplicates have focused on mammals, especially humans, whereas reports describing their genome-wide evolutionary patterns across the closely related Drosophila species are rare. The sequenced 12 Drosophila genomes provide the opportunity to address this issue. In our study, 3,647 young duplicate gene families were identified across the 12 Drosophila species and three types of expansions, species-specific, lineage-specific and complex expansions, were detected in these gene families. Our data showed that the species-specific young duplicate genes predominated (86.6%) over the other two types. Interestingly, many independent species-specific expansions in the same gene family have been observed in many species, even including 11 or 12 Drosophila species. Our data also showed that the functional bias observed in these young duplicate genes was mainly related to responses to environmental stimuli and biotic stresses. This study reveals the evolutionary patterns of young duplicates across 12 Drosophila species on a genomic scale. Our results suggest that convergent evolution acts on young duplicate genes after the species differentiation and adaptive evolution may play an important role in duplicate genes for adaption to ecological factors and environmental changes in Drosophila.

  18. Casing of preinsulated district heating pipes. Functional Requirements. Scientific report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryder, K.L.; Feld, T.; Randloev, P.; Vestergaard, J.B.; Noergaard Pedersen, H.; Palle, S.; Amby, L.

    1996-10-01

    Requirements for the wall thickness of the casing pipes in Europe were formulated to clarify the laying conditions, representative for the European district heating areas. We achieved a broad estimate by defining four scenarios for the laying of district heating pipes. It is common to the four scenarios that that all bends, branches etc. are always laid in sand. The four scenarios are differentiated by soil types. The soil types include: Uniform sand, Well graded gravel, Sand with fines and Sand with crushed stone. In the following analysis it was possible to examine the influence from following parameters: Casing thickness; Diameter of steel pipe; Diameter of casing; Material properties (PUR and PE); Soil type. The results from the model showed that uniform sand is the absolute best soil type. Based on the results from and earlier project a laboratory method has been developed. The result was a test method based on the indentation of three mandrels with a diameter of {phi}30 mm with a taper with an angle of 45 deg. and with roundings on the apex of R5 mm, R10 mm and R15 mm, respectively. The mandrels simulate stones. The examinations among other things showed that even a 1.5 mm casing demands an indentation of 20 mm with a R5 mm mandrel before it is perforated. The demanded force is 1.6 kN, which is considerably higher than the theoretically highest force in an actual situation. On this background it is recommended that the minimum requirement for the wall thickness of the casings with diameters less than 200 mm should still follow the EN 253, whereas the minimum requirement for the larger casing pipes securely can be reduced. Based on the tests and an evaluation of the safety factors it is proposed that the wall thickness for the largest pipes can be reduced 50%. Thus the wall thickness of an 800 mm casing should be 6.6 mm with a linear reduction down to 3 mm for 180 mm casing. (EG)

  19. Casing of preinsulated district heating pipes. Functional Requirements. Enclosures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryder, K.L.; Feld, T.; Randloev, P.; Vestergaard, J.B.; Noergaard Pedersen, H.; Palle, S.; Amby, L.

    1996-10-01

    Requirements for the wall thickness of the casing pipes in Europe were formulated. In order to clarify the laying conditions, representative for the European district heating areas. It was possible to achieve a sufficiently broad estimate by defining four scenarios for the laying of district heating pipes. It is common to the four scenarios that that all bends, branches etc. are always laid in sand. The four scenarios are differentiated by soil types. The soil types include: Uniform sand, Well graded gravel, Sand with fines and Sand with crushed stone. In the following analysis it was possible to examine the influence from following parameters: Casing thickness; Diameter of steel pipe; Diameter of casing; Material properties (PUR and PE); Soil type. The results from the model showed that uniform sand is the absolute best soil type. Based on the results from and earlier project a laboratory method has been developed. The result was a test method based on the indentation of three mandrels with a diameter of {phi}30 mm with a taper with an angle of 45 deg. and with roundings on the apex of R5 mm, R10 mm and R15 mm, respectively. The mandrels simulate stones. The examinations among other things showed that even a 1.5 mm casing demands an indentation of 20 mm with a R5 mm mandrel before it is perforated. The demanded force is 1.6 kN, which is considerably higher than the theoretically highest force in an actual situation. On this background it is recommended that the minimum requirement for the wall thickness of the casings with diameters less than 200 mm should still follow the EN 253, whereas the minimum requirement for the larger casing pipes securely can be reduced. Based on the tests and an evaluation of the safety factors it is proposed that the wall thickness for the largest pipes can be reduced 50%. Thus the wall thickness of an 800 mm casing should be 6.6 mm with a linear reduction down to 3 mm for 180 mm casing. (EG)

  20. International variation in ethics committee requirements: comparisons across five Westernised nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachson Israel

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethics committees typically apply the common principles of autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence and justice to research proposals but with variable weighting and interpretation. This paper reports a comparison of ethical requirements in an international cross-cultural study and discusses their implications. Discussion The study was run concurrently in New Zealand, UK, Israel, Canada and USA and involved testing hypotheses about believability of testimonies regarding alleged child sexual abuse. Ethics committee requirements to conduct this study ranged from nil in Israel to considerable amendments designed to minimise participant harm in New Zealand. Assessment of minimal risk is a complex and unreliable estimation further compounded by insufficient information on probabilities of particular individuals suffering harm. Estimating potential benefits/ risks ratio and protecting participants' autonomy similarly are not straightforward exercises. Summary Safeguarding moral/humane principles should be balanced with promotion of ethical research which does not impede research posing minimal risk to participants. In ensuring that ethical standards are met and research has scientific merit, ethics committees have obligations to participants (to meet their rights and protect them from harm; to society (to ensure good quality research is conducted; and to researchers (to treat their proposals with just consideration and respect. To facilitate meeting all these obligations, the preferable focus should be promotion of ethical research, rather than the prevention of unethical research, which inevitably results in the impediment of researchers from doing their work. How the ethical principles should be applied and balanced requires further consideration.

  1. Functional requirements of cellular differentiation: lessons from Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Jatin; Fujita, Masaya; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2016-12-01

    Successful execution of differentiation programs requires cells to assess multitudes of internal and external cues and respond with appropriate gene expression programs. Here, we review how Bacillus subtilis sporulation network deals with these tasks focusing on the lessons generalizable to other systems. With feedforward loops controlling both production and activation of downstream transcriptional regulators, cells achieve ultrasensitive threshold-like responses. The arrangement of sporulation network genes on the chromosome and transcriptional feedback loops allow coordination of sporulation decision with DNA-replication. Furthermore, to assess the starvation conditions without sensing specific metabolites, cells respond to changes in their growth rates with increased activity of sporulation master regulator. These design features of the sporulation network enable cells to robustly decide between vegetative growth and sporulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A genome-wide analysis of putative functional and exonic variation associated with extremely high intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, S L; Pedroso, I; Kadeva, N; Miller, M B; Iacono, W G; McGue, M; Stergiakouli, E; Davey Smith, G; Putallaz, M; Lubinski, D; Meaburn, E L; Plomin, R; Simpson, M A

    2016-08-01

    Although individual differences in intelligence (general cognitive ability) are highly heritable, molecular genetic analyses to date have had limited success in identifying specific loci responsible for its heritability. This study is the first to investigate exome variation in individuals of extremely high intelligence. Under the quantitative genetic model, sampling from the high extreme of the distribution should provide increased power to detect associations. We therefore performed a case-control association analysis with 1409 individuals drawn from the top 0.0003 (IQ >170) of the population distribution of intelligence and 3253 unselected population-based controls. Our analysis focused on putative functional exonic variants assayed on the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. We did not observe any individual protein-altering variants that are reproducibly associated with extremely high intelligence and within the entire distribution of intelligence. Moreover, no significant associations were found for multiple rare alleles within individual genes. However, analyses using genome-wide similarity between unrelated individuals (genome-wide complex trait analysis) indicate that the genotyped functional protein-altering variation yields a heritability estimate of 17.4% (s.e. 1.7%) based on a liability model. In addition, investigation of nominally significant associations revealed fewer rare alleles associated with extremely high intelligence than would be expected under the null hypothesis. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that rare functional alleles are more frequently detrimental than beneficial to intelligence.

  3. Beyond sex differences: new approaches for thinking about variation in brain structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel, Daphna; Fausto-Sterling, Anne

    2016-02-19

    In the study of variation in brain structure and function that might relate to sex and gender, language matters because it frames our research questions and methods. In this article, we offer an approach to thinking about variation in brain structure and function that pulls us outside the sex differences formulation. We argue that the existence of differences between the brains of males and females does not unravel the relations between sex and the brain nor is it sufficient to characterize a population of brains. Such characterization is necessary for studying sex effects on the brain as well as for studying brain structure and function in general. Animal studies show that sex interacts with environmental, developmental and genetic factors to affect the brain. Studies of humans further suggest that human brains are better described as belonging to a single heterogeneous population rather than two distinct populations. We discuss the implications of these observations for studies of brain and behaviour in humans and in laboratory animals. We believe that studying sex effects in context and developing or adopting analytical methods that take into account the heterogeneity of the brain are crucial for the advancement of human health and well-being. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Variations in erosive wear of metallic materials with temperature via the electron work function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaochen; Yu, Bin [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Yan, X.G. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Li, D.Y., E-mail: dongyang.li@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2V4 (Canada); School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China)

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical properties of metals are intrinsically determined by their electron behavior, which is largely reflected by the electron work function (EWF or φ). Since the work function varies with temperature, the dependence of material properties on temperature could be predicted via variations in work function with temperature. Combining a hardness – φ relationship and the dependence of work function on temperature, a temperature-dependent model for predicting solid-particle erosion is proposed. Erosive wear losses of copper, nickel, and carbon steel as sample materials were measured at different temperatures. Results of the tests are consistent with the theoretical prediction. This study demonstrates a promising parameter, electron work function, for looking into fundamental aspects of wear phenomena, which would also help develop alternative methodologies for material design. - Highlights: • Metallic materials' wear resistance is influenced by temperature. • Electron work function (EWF) intrinsically determines materials' wear resistance. • An EWF-based temperature-dependent solid-particle erosion model is proposed.

  5. Mitochondrial metabolism in hematopoietic stem cells requires functional FOXO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Bigarella, Carolina L; Kocabas, Fatih; Xie, Jingjing; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Chipuk, Jerry; Sadek, Hesham; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are primarily dormant but have the potential to become highly active on demand to reconstitute blood. This requires a swift metabolic switch from glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Maintenance of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of mitochondrial metabolism, is also necessary for sustaining HSC dormancy. Little is known about mechanisms that integrate energy metabolism with hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis. Here, we identify the transcription factor FOXO3 as a new regulator of metabolic adaptation of HSC. ROS are elevated in Foxo3−/− HSC that are defective in their activity. We show that Foxo3−/− HSC are impaired in mitochondrial metabolism independent of ROS levels. These defects are associated with altered expression of mitochondrial/metabolic genes in Foxo3−/− hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We further show that defects of Foxo3−/− HSC long-term repopulation activity are independent of ROS or mTOR signaling. Our results point to FOXO3 as a potential node that couples mitochondrial metabolism with HSC homeostasis. These findings have critical implications for mechanisms that promote malignant transformation and aging of blood stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26209246

  6. Functions and requirements document for interim store solidified high-level and transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith-Fewell, M.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-17

    The functions, requirements, interfaces, and architectures contained within the Functions and Requirements (F{ampersand}R) Document are based on the information currently contained within the TWRS Functions and Requirements database. The database also documents the set of technically defensible functions and requirements associated with the solidified waste interim storage mission.The F{ampersand}R Document provides a snapshot in time of the technical baseline for the project. The F{ampersand}R document is the product of functional analysis, requirements allocation and architectural structure definition. The technical baseline described in this document is traceable to the TWRS function 4.2.4.1, Interim Store Solidified Waste, and its related requirements, architecture, and interfaces.

  7. Functions and Requirements and Specifications for Replacement of the Computer Automated Surveillance System (CASS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCAIEF, C.C.

    1999-01-01

    This functions, requirements and specifications document defines the baseline requirements and criteria for the design, purchase, fabrication, construction, installation, and operation of the system to replace the Computer Automated Surveillance System (CASS) alarm monitoring

  8. 43 CFR 422.8 - Requirements for law enforcement functions and programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., and clear lines of authority and communication. This organizational structure must apply both within... PROJECTS Program Requirements § 422.8 Requirements for law enforcement functions and programs. The...

  9. A function space framework for structural total variation regularization with applications in inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermüller, Michael; Holler, Martin; Papafitsoros, Kostas

    2018-06-01

    In this work, we introduce a function space setting for a wide class of structural/weighted total variation (TV) regularization methods motivated by their applications in inverse problems. In particular, we consider a regularizer that is the appropriate lower semi-continuous envelope (relaxation) of a suitable TV type functional initially defined for sufficiently smooth functions. We study examples where this relaxation can be expressed explicitly, and we also provide refinements for weighted TV for a wide range of weights. Since an integral characterization of the relaxation in function space is, in general, not always available, we show that, for a rather general linear inverse problems setting, instead of the classical Tikhonov regularization problem, one can equivalently solve a saddle-point problem where no a priori knowledge of an explicit formulation of the structural TV functional is needed. In particular, motivated by concrete applications, we deduce corresponding results for linear inverse problems with norm and Poisson log-likelihood data discrepancy terms. Finally, we provide proof-of-concept numerical examples where we solve the saddle-point problem for weighted TV denoising as well as for MR guided PET image reconstruction.

  10. Opposite variations in maternal and neonatal thyroid function induced by iodine supplementation during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, S B; Laurberg, P

    2000-01-01

    Whereas the consequences of extremes in iodine intake are well described, much less is known about the effect of more moderate variations in maternal iodine intake on fetal thyroid function. The present study performed in Denmark with mild to moderate iodine deficiency dealt with the effect...... (P iodine intake in both mothers and neonates. The results suggest that the fetal thyroid, at least in areas of mild iodine deficiency, is more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of iodine...... of maternal iodine supplementation on thyroid function in the mother at term and in the fetus/neonate. Serum was collected consecutively from pregnant women at term (n = 144) and from cord blood (n = 139). Forty-nine women had a regular intake of vitamin and mineral tablets with iodine (150 microg/day) during...

  11. Assembling Components using SysML with Non-Functional Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Chouali , Samir; Hammad , Ahmed; Mountassir , Hassan

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Non-functional requirements of component based systems are important as their functional requirements, therefore they must be considered in components assembly. These properties are beforehand specified with SysML requirement diagram. We specify component based system architecture with SysML block definition diagram, and component behaviors with sequence diagrams. We propose to specify formally component interfaces with interface automata, obtained from requirement and...

  12. Functional Fit Evaluation to Determine Optimal Ease Requirements in Canadian Forces Chemical Protective Gloves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tremblay-Lutter, Julie

    1995-01-01

    A functional fit evaluation of the Canadian Forces (CF) chemical protective lightweight glove was undertaken in order to quantify the amount of ease required within the glove for optimal functional fit...

  13. Functional Requirements Document for HALE UAS Operations in the NAS: Step 1. Version 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this Functional Requirements Document (FRD) is to compile the functional requirements needed to achieve the Access 5 Vision of "operating High Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) routinely, safely, and reliably in the national airspace system (NAS)" for Step 1. These functional requirements could support the development of a minimum set of policies, procedures and standards by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and various standards organizations. It is envisioned that this comprehensive body of work will enable the FAA to establish and approve regulations to govern safe operation of UAS in the NAS on a routine or daily "file and fly" basis. The approach used to derive the functional requirements found within this FRD was to decompose the operational requirements and objectives identified within the Access 5 Concept of Operations (CONOPS) into the functions needed to routinely and safely operate a HALE UAS in the NAS. As a result, four major functional areas evolved to enable routine and safe UAS operations for an on-demand basis in the NAS. These four major functions are: Aviate, Navigate, Communicate, and Avoid Hazards. All of the functional requirements within this document can be directly traceable to one of these four major functions. Some functions, however, are traceable to several, or even all, of these four major functions. These cross-cutting functional requirements support the "Command / Control: function as well as the "Manage Contingencies" function. The requirements associated to these high-level functions and all of their supporting low-level functions are addressed in subsequent sections of this document.

  14. The Spaces of Functions of Two Variables of Bounded κΦ-Variation in the Sense of Schramm-Korenblum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Azócar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is twofold. Firstly, we introduce the concept of bounded κΦ-variation in the sense of Schramm-Korenblum for real functions with domain in a rectangle of R2. Secondly, we study some properties of these functions and we prove that the space generated by these functions has a structure of Banach algebra.

  15. Variation in exemptions to school immunization requirements among New York State private and public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yun-Kuang; Nadeau, Jessica; McNutt, Louise-Anne; Shaw, Jana

    2014-12-12

    School immunization requirements have ensured high vaccination rates and have helped to control vaccine-preventable diseases. However, vaccine exemptions have increased in the last decade. This study compared New York State private versus public schools with respect to medical and religious exemption rates. This retrospective study utilizes New York State Department of Health Immunization Survey data from the 2003 through 2012 academic years. Schools were categorized as private or public, the former further categorized by religious affiliation. Rates of medical and religious vaccine exemptions were compared by school category. From 2003 to 2012, religious exemptions increased in private and public schools from 0.63% to 1.35% and 0.17% to 0.29% (Spearman's R: 0.89 and 0.81), respectively. Among private schools, increases in religious exemption rates during the study period were observed in Catholic/Eastern Orthodox, Protestant/Other Christian, Jewish, and secular schools (Spearman's R=0.66, 0.99, 0.89, and 0.93), respectively. Exemption rate ratios in private schools compared to public schools were 1.39 (95% CI 1.15-1.68) for medical and 3.94 (95% CI: 3.20-4.86) for religious exemptions. Among private school students, all school types except for Catholic/Eastern Orthodox and Episcopal affiliates were more likely to report religious exemptions compared to children in public schools. Medical and religious exemption rates increased over time and higher rates were observed among New York State private schools compared to public schools. Low exemption rates are critical to minimize disease outbreaks in the schools and their community. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Photographic Records Showing the Variations of the Virtual Height of Reflection as a Function of the Radio Frequency

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standard (analog) ionosonde produces photographic records known as ionograms, which show the variations of the virtual height of reflection as a function of the...

  17. Ground-state densities from the Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle and from density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaal, Simen; Helgaker, Trygve

    2015-11-14

    The relationship between the densities of ground-state wave functions (i.e., the minimizers of the Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle) and the ground-state densities in density-functional theory (i.e., the minimizers of the Hohenberg-Kohn variation principle) is studied within the framework of convex conjugation, in a generic setting covering molecular systems, solid-state systems, and more. Having introduced admissible density functionals as functionals that produce the exact ground-state energy for a given external potential by minimizing over densities in the Hohenberg-Kohn variation principle, necessary and sufficient conditions on such functionals are established to ensure that the Rayleigh-Ritz ground-state densities and the Hohenberg-Kohn ground-state densities are identical. We apply the results to molecular systems in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. For any given potential v ∈ L(3/2)(ℝ(3)) + L(∞)(ℝ(3)), we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the mixed ground-state densities of the Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle and the mixed ground-state densities of the Hohenberg-Kohn variation principle when the Lieb density-matrix constrained-search universal density functional is taken as the admissible functional. A similar one-to-one correspondence is established between the pure ground-state densities of the Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle and the pure ground-state densities obtained using the Hohenberg-Kohn variation principle with the Levy-Lieb pure-state constrained-search functional. In other words, all physical ground-state densities (pure or mixed) are recovered with these functionals and no false densities (i.e., minimizing densities that are not physical) exist. The importance of topology (i.e., choice of Banach space of densities and potentials) is emphasized and illustrated. The relevance of these results for current-density-functional theory is examined.

  18. Interaction Between Functional Genetic Variation of DRD2 and Cannabis Use on Risk of Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colizzi, Marco; Iyegbe, Conrad; Powell, John; Ursini, Gianluca; Porcelli, Annamaria; Bonvino, Aurora; Taurisano, Paolo; Romano, Raffaella; Masellis, Rita; Blasi, Giuseppe; Morgan, Craig; Aitchison, Katherine; Mondelli, Valeria; Luzi, Sonija; Kolliakou, Anna; David, Anthony; Murray, Robin M.; Bertolino, Alessandro; Forti, Marta Di

    2015-01-01

    Both cannabis use and the dopamine receptor (DRD2) gene have been associated with schizophrenia, psychosis-like experiences, and cognition. However, there are no published data investigating whether genetically determined variation in DRD2 dopaminergic signaling might play a role in individual susceptibility to cannabis-associated psychosis. We genotyped (1) a case-control study of 272 patients with their first episode of psychosis and 234 controls, and also from (2) a sample of 252 healthy subjects, for functional variation in DRD2, rs1076560. Data on history of cannabis use were collected on all the studied subjects by administering the Cannabis Experience Questionnaire. In the healthy subjects’ sample, we also collected data on schizotypy and cognitive performance using the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire and the N-back working memory task. In the case-control study, we found a significant interaction between the rs1076560 DRD2 genotype and cannabis use in influencing the likelihood of a psychotic disorder. Among cannabis users, carriers of the DRD2, rs1076560, T allele showed a 3-fold increased probability to suffer a psychotic disorder compared with GG carriers (OR = 3.07; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22–7.63). Among daily users, T carrying subjects showed a 5-fold increase in the odds of psychosis compared to GG carriers (OR = 4.82; 95% CI: 1.39–16.71). Among the healthy subjects, T carrying cannabis users had increased schizotypy compared with T carrying cannabis-naïve subjects, GG cannabis users, and GG cannabis-naïve subjects (all P ≤ .025). T carrying cannabis users had reduced working memory accuracy compared with the other groups (all P ≤ .008). Thus, variation of the DRD2, rs1076560, genotype may modulate the psychosis-inducing effect of cannabis use. PMID:25829376

  19. Age-Related Decline in the Variation of Dynamic Functional Connectivity: A Resting State Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal aging is typically characterized by abnormal resting-state functional connectivity (FC, including decreasing connectivity within networks and increasing connectivity between networks, under the assumption that the FC over the scan time was stationary. In fact, the resting-state FC has been shown in recent years to vary over time even within minutes, thus showing the great potential of intrinsic interactions and organization of the brain. In this article, we assumed that the dynamic FC consisted of an intrinsic dynamic balance in the resting brain and was altered with increasing age. Two groups of individuals (N = 36, ages 20–25 for the young group; N = 32, ages 60–85 for the senior group were recruited from the public data of the Nathan Kline Institute. Phase randomization was first used to examine the reliability of the dynamic FC. Next, the variation in the dynamic FC and the energy ratio of the dynamic FC fluctuations within a higher frequency band were calculated and further checked for differences between groups by non-parametric permutation tests. The results robustly showed modularization of the dynamic FC variation, which declined with aging; moreover, the FC variation of the inter-network connections, which mainly consisted of the frontal-parietal network-associated and occipital-associated connections, decreased. In addition, a higher energy ratio in the higher FC fluctuation frequency band was observed in the senior group, which indicated the frequency interactions in the FC fluctuations. These results highly supported the basis of abnormality and compensation in the aging brain and might provide new insights into both aging and relevant compensatory mechanisms.

  20. Sound velocity variation as function of polarization state in Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essolaani, W; Farhat, N

    2012-01-01

    There are several ultrasonic techniques to measure the sound velocity, for example, the pulse-echo method. In such method, the size of transducer used to measure the sound velocity must be in the same order of the sample size. If not, the incompatibility of sizes becomes an error source of the sound velocity measurement. In this work, the Laser Induced Pressure Pulse (LIPP) method is used as ultrasonic method. This method has been very useful for studying the spatial distribution of charges and polarization in dielectrics. We take advantage of the fact that the method allows the sound velocity measurement, to study its variation as function of polarization state in (PZT) ceramics. In a sample with a known thickness e, the sound velocity ν is deduced from the measurement of the transit time T. The sound velocity depends on the elastic constants which in turn they depend on poling conditions. Thus, the variation of the sound velocity is related to the direction and the amplitude of the polarization.

  1. Diurnal Variation of Plasma Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Women with Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakopoulos, Panagiotis; Casarosa, Elena; Bucci, Fiorella; Piccinino, Manuela; Wenger, Jean-Marie; Nappi, Rossella Elena; Polyzos, Nicholas; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo; Pluchino, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is strongly related to hormonal networks and is modulated by hypothalamic activity. To evaluate plasma BDNF concentration in patients with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA), with reference to the BDNF circadian rhythm and its relation with the cortisol (F) rhythm, and to assess whether the duration of amenorrhea might influence the BDNF:F ratio in FHA. This was an observational study evaluating 36 amenorrheic and 30 eumenorrheic women. Basal values of BDNF and hormones were examined in blood samples collected from 7:00 to 9:00 h in all the women. Basal BDNF and F levels were determined in blood samples collected in 12 subjects from each group at 8:00, 12:00, 16:00, 20:00, and 24:00 h. BDNF plasma levels are significantly lower in amenorrheic women (p 0.05), sex steroids, and F in FHA. Low plasma BDNF levels in FHA are not significantly correlated with duration of amenorrhea. The 24-hour variation of BDNF in amenorrheic women is significantly lower when compared to the control group, and normal daily variations of BDNF disappeared in FHA patients. F preserved its circadian rhythm in both groups. Interactions between BDNF, the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, and sex steroids might be critical in clinical conditions of modified homeostasis/adaptation, such as FHA. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Time evolution of coupled-bunch modes from beta function variation in storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Meng Hock

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an analytical and numerical study of the equations of motion for bunches coupled by transverse wakefields. We base our study on a recent lattice design for the damping rings in the baseline configuration of the International Linear Collider. Using the macroparticle model, and assuming resistive wall wakefield coupling, we present numerical results on the time evolution of the multibunch modes. Decay modes display growth after initial decay, and mode amplitudes exhibit high-frequency oscillations. These phenomena are not expected if the beta function is assumed to have a constant, averaged value. We show analytically that they can come from coupling between modes caused by variation of the beta function in a real lattice. The effect is shown to be comparable to the effect of a nonuniform fill pattern and significantly larger than that of the higher-order mode wakefield localized in the rf cavities. Turning to the case of constant beta function, we develop a more complete treatment of the equations of motion. We derive general formulas for the bunch trajectories, and show that such formulas can only be valid in the limit of small wakefield coupling.

  3. Investigation of the spatial generalization of Kato's theorem by a variational density-functional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csavinszky, P.

    1990-01-01

    In a recent work, March has considered the quantum-mechanical system of an arbitrary number of closed electronic shells around an atomic nucleus of charge Z a e. March has assumed that the shells are filled by noninteracting electrons, moving in the bare Coulomb potential energy of V(r) = -Z a e 2 /r. In this framework, the basic quantity is the total electron (number) density ρ(r), built by summing the (number) density ρ n (r) of the nth closed electronic shell over the principal quantum number n. March has shown that Kato's theorem, (∂ρ(r)/∂r) r=0 = -(2Z a /a 0 )ρ (r = 0), with a 0 = ℎ 2 /me 2 , is amenable to a spatially dependent generalization that can be expressed by ∂ρ(r)/∂r = -(2Z a /a 0 )ρ s (r), where ρ s (r) is the s-state contribution from the n closed electronic shells to ρ(r). The present work investigates the spatially dependent generalization of Kato's theorem for the Ne atom by making use of a variational density-functional approach and adopting several expressions for the kinetic-energy functional of the electrons. The intriguing question of identifying the best kinetic-energy functional is raised and discussed

  4. Functional-analytic and numerical issues in splitting methods for total variation-based image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintermüller, Michael; Rautenberg, Carlos N; Hahn, Jooyoung

    2014-01-01

    Variable splitting schemes for the function space version of the image reconstruction problem with total variation regularization (TV-problem) in its primal and pre-dual formulations are considered. For the primal splitting formulation, while existence of a solution cannot be guaranteed, it is shown that quasi-minimizers of the penalized problem are asymptotically related to the solution of the original TV-problem. On the other hand, for the pre-dual formulation, a family of parametrized problems is introduced and a parameter dependent contraction of an associated fixed point iteration is established. Moreover, the theory is validated by numerical tests. Additionally, the augmented Lagrangian approach is studied, details on an implementation on a staggered grid are provided and numerical tests are shown. (paper)

  5. Association of functional variations in COMT and GCH1 genes with postherniotomy pain and related impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belfer, Inna; Dai, Feng; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Persistent postoperative pain is a well-established clinical problem with potential severe personal and socioeconomic implications. The prevalence of persistent pain varies across surgery types. Severe persistent pain and related impairment occur in 5% to 10% of patients after groin hernia repair....... The substantial interindividual variability in pain-related phenotypes within each surgery type cannot be explained by environmental factors alone, suggesting that genetic variation may play a role. We investigated the contribution of COMT and GCH1 to persistent postherniotomy pain (PPP)-related functional...... moderate-to-severe pain-related activity impairment 6 months postoperatively as measured by Activity Assessment Scale (≥8.3). Patients with the G allele of COMT SNP rs6269 and C allele of COMT SNP rs4633 had less impairment (P = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively); in addition, the COMT haplotype GCG...

  6. Functions and requirements for the INEL light duty utility arm gripper end effector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pace, D.P.; Barnes, G.E.

    1995-02-01

    This gripper end effector system functions and requirements document defines the system functions that the end effector must perform as well as the requirements the design must meet. Safety, quality assurance, operations, environmental conditions, and regulatory requirements have been considered. The main purpose of this document is to provide a basis for the end effector engineering, design, and fabrication activities. The document shall be the living reference document to initiate the development activities and will be updated as system technologies are finalized

  7. Functions and requirements for the INEL light duty utility arm sampler end effector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pace, D.P.; Barnes, G.E.

    1995-02-01

    This sampler end effector system functions and requirements document defines the system functions that the end effector must perform as well as the requirements the design must meet. Safety, quality assurance, operations, environmental conditions, and regulatory requirements have been considered. The main purpose of this document is to provide a basis for the end effector engineering, design, and fabrication activities. The document shall be the living reference document to initiate the development activities and will be updated as system technologies are finalized

  8. MODIS information, data and control system (MIDACS) level 2 functional requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D.; Salomonson, V.; Ormsby, J.; Sharts, B.; Folta, D.; Ardanuy, P.; Mckay, A.; Hoyt, D.; Jaffin, S.; Vallette, B.

    1988-01-01

    The MODIS Information, Data and Control System (MIDACS) Level 2 Functional Requirements Document establishes the functional requirements for MIDACS and provides a basis for the mutual understanding between the users and the designers of the EosDIS, including the requirements, operating environment, external interfaces, and development plan. In defining the requirements and scope of the system, this document describes how MIDACS will operate as an element of the EOS within the EosDIS environment. This version of the Level 2 Requirements Document follows an earlier release of a preliminary draft version. The sections on functional and performance requirements do not yet fully represent the requirements of the data system needed to achieve the scientific objectives of the MODIS instruments and science teams. Indeed, the team members have not yet been selected and the team has not yet been formed; however, it has been possible to identify many relevant requirements based on the present concept of EosDIS and through interviews and meetings with key members of the scientific community. These requirements have been grouped by functional component of the data system, and by function within each component. These requirements have been merged with the complete set of Level 1 and Level 2 context diagrams, data flow diagrams, and data dictionary.

  9. Pattern-Driven Architectural Partitioning. Balancing Functional and Non-functional Requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, Neil; Avgeriou, Paris

    2007-01-01

    One of the vexing challenges of software architecture is the problem of satisfying the functional specifications of the system to be created while at the same time meeting its non-functional needs. In this work we focus on the early stages of the software architecture process, when initial

  10. On the existence and uniqueness of minima and maxima on spheres of the integral functional of the calculus of variations

    OpenAIRE

    Ricceri, Biagio

    2005-01-01

    We deal with the integral functional of the calculus of variations assuming that the gradient of the integrand is Lipschitzian. We then prove that if this gradient does not vanish at zero, then the functional has a unique minimum and a unique maximum on each sphere, centered at zero, with radius small enough.

  11. Functions and requirements for Project W-236B, Initial Pretreatment Module: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    Hanford Site tank waste supernatants will be pretreated to separate the low-level and high-level fractions. The low-level waste fraction, containing the bulk of the chemical constituents, must be processed into a vitrified waste product which will be disposed of onsite, in a safe, environmentally sound, and cost effective manner. The high-level waste fraction separated during supernatant pretreatment (primarily cesium) will be recombined with an additional high-level waste fraction generated from pretreatment of the tank waste sludges and solids. This combined high-level waste fraction will be immobilized as glass and disposed in a geological repository. The purpose of this document is to establish the functional requirements baseline for Project W-236B, Initial Pretreatment Module, by defining the level 5 and 6 functions and requirements for the project. A functional analysis approach has been used to break down the program functions and associated physical requirements that each function must meet. As the systems engineering process evolves, the design requirements document will replace this preliminary functions and requirements document. The design requirements document (DRD) will identify key decisions and associated uncertainties that impact the project. A revision of this document to a DRD is not expected to change the performance requirements or open issues. However, additional requirements and issues may be identified

  12. Transforming User Needs into Functional Requirements for an Antibiotic Clinical Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Many informatics studies use content analysis to generate functional requirements for system development. Explication of this translational process from qualitative data to functional requirements can strengthen the understanding and scientific rigor when applying content analysis in informatics studies. Objective To describe a user-centered approach transforming emergent themes derived from focus group data into functional requirements for informatics solutions and to illustrate these methods to the development of an antibiotic clinical decision support system (CDS). Methods The approach consisted of five steps: 1) identify unmet therapeutic planning information needs via Focus Group Study-I, 2) develop a coding framework of therapeutic planning themes to refine the domain scope to antibiotic therapeutic planning, 3) identify functional requirements of an antibiotic CDS system via Focus Group Study-II, 4) discover informatics solutions and functional requirements from coded data, and 5) determine the types of information needed to support the antibiotic CDS system and link with the identified informatics solutions and functional requirements. Results The coding framework for Focus Group Study-I revealed unmet therapeutic planning needs. Twelve subthemes emerged and were clustered into four themes; analysis indicated a need for an antibiotic CDS intervention. Focus Group Study-II included five types of information needs. Comments from the Barrier/Challenge to information access and Function/Feature themes produced three informatics solutions and 13 functional requirements of an antibiotic CDS system. Comments from the Patient, Institution, and Domain themes generated required data elements for each informatics solution. Conclusion This study presents one example explicating content analysis of focus group data and the analysis process to functional requirements from narrative data. Illustration of this 5-step method was used to develop an

  13. Variation in Functional Independence among Stroke Survivors Having Fatigue and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badaru, Umaru Muhammad; Ogwumike, Omoyemi Olubunmi; Adeniyi, Ade Fatai; Olowe, Olajide Olubanji

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study evaluated variation in functional independence in activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) among individuals with poststroke fatigue (PSF) and poststroke depression (PSD). Methods. A cross-sectional survey involved 65 consenting poststroke survivors who were purposively recruited from physiotherapy clinics of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Adeoyo Maternity Teaching Hospital, Ibadan, and Federal Medical Center, Gusau. Participants were assessed for symptoms of PSD with short geriatric depression scale-15, PSF with fatigue severity scale, ADL with Barthel Index and IADL with Nottingham extended ADL scale. Data analysis was done using Chi-square and unpaired t-test with significance level being 0.05. Results. Participants' age ranged from 58 to 80 years. PSD alone (P = 0.002) and both PSF and PSD (P = 0.02) were significantly associated with ADL, while PSF alone was not (P = 0.233). PSD alone (P = 0.001) and both PSF and PSD (P = 0.001) significantly negatively affected IADL, while PSF alone had no significant effect (P = 0.2). Conclusions. Participants with PSD alone and those with both PSF and PSD had lower functional independence in ADL and IADL.

  14. Functional impact of global rare copy number variation in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Dalila; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Klei, Lambertus; Anney, Richard; Merico, Daniele; Regan, Regina; Conroy, Judith; Magalhaes, Tiago R; Correia, Catarina; Abrahams, Brett S; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Bader, Gary D; Bailey, Anthony J; Baird, Gillian; Battaglia, Agatino; Berney, Tom; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Bryson, Susan E; Carson, Andrew R; Casallo, Guillermo; Casey, Jillian; Chung, Brian H Y; Cochrane, Lynne; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L; Crossett, Andrew; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Dawson, Geraldine; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Drmic, Irene; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A; Folstein, Susan E; Fombonne, Eric; Freitag, Christine M; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T; Goldberg, Jeremy; Green, Andrew; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J; Hakonarson, Hakon; Heron, Elizabeth A; Hill, Matthew; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Kim, Cecilia; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Korvatska, Olena; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M; Lamb, Janine A; Laskawiec, Magdalena; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L; Lionel, Anath C; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C; Maestrini, Elena; Mahoney, William; Mantoulan, Carine; Marshall, Christian R; McConachie, Helen; McDougle, Christopher J; McGrath, Jane; McMahon, William M; Merikangas, Alison; Migita, Ohsuke; Minshew, Nancy J; Mirza, Ghazala K; Munson, Jeff; Nelson, Stanley F; Noakes, Carolyn; Noor, Abdul; Nygren, Gudrun; Oliveira, Guiomar; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Parr, Jeremy R; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Pilorge, Marion; Piven, Joseph; Ponting, Chris P; Posey, David J; Poustka, Annemarie; Poustka, Fritz; Prasad, Aparna; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Renshaw, Katy; Rickaby, Jessica; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L; Bierut, Laura J; Rice, John P; Salt, Jeff; Sansom, Katherine; Sato, Daisuke; Segurado, Ricardo; Sequeira, Ana F; Senman, Lili; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stein, Olaf; Sykes, Nuala; Stoppioni, Vera; Strawbridge, Christina; Tancredi, Raffaella; Tansey, Katherine; Thiruvahindrapduram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann P; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B; Volkmar, Fred; Wallace, Simon; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhouzhi; Wassink, Thomas H; Webber, Caleb; Weksberg, Rosanna; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Wu, Jing; Yaspan, Brian L; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Cantor, Rita M; Cook, Edwin H; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L; Devlin, Bernie; Ennis, Sean; Gallagher, Louise; Geschwind, Daniel H; Gill, Michael; Haines, Jonathan L; Hallmayer, Joachim; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P; Nurnberger, John I; Paterson, Andrew D; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Szatmari, Peter; Vicente, Astrid M; Vieland, Veronica J; Wijsman, Ellen M; Scherer, Stephen W; Sutcliffe, James S; Betancur, Catalina

    2010-07-15

    The autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of conditions characterized by impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, and the presence of restricted and repetitive behaviours. Individuals with an ASD vary greatly in cognitive development, which can range from above average to intellectual disability. Although ASDs are known to be highly heritable ( approximately 90%), the underlying genetic determinants are still largely unknown. Here we analysed the genome-wide characteristics of rare (variation in ASD using dense genotyping arrays. When comparing 996 ASD individuals of European ancestry to 1,287 matched controls, cases were found to carry a higher global burden of rare, genic copy number variants (CNVs) (1.19 fold, P = 0.012), especially so for loci previously implicated in either ASD and/or intellectual disability (1.69 fold, P = 3.4 x 10(-4)). Among the CNVs there were numerous de novo and inherited events, sometimes in combination in a given family, implicating many novel ASD genes such as SHANK2, SYNGAP1, DLGAP2 and the X-linked DDX53-PTCHD1 locus. We also discovered an enrichment of CNVs disrupting functional gene sets involved in cellular proliferation, projection and motility, and GTPase/Ras signalling. Our results reveal many new genetic and functional targets in ASD that may lead to final connected pathways.

  15. Symmetry-Adapted Ro-vibrational Basis Functions for Variational Nuclear Motion Calculations: TROVE Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N; Yachmenev, Andrey; Ovsyannikov, Roman I

    2017-09-12

    We present a general, numerically motivated approach to the construction of symmetry-adapted basis functions for solving ro-vibrational Schrödinger equations. The approach is based on the property of the Hamiltonian operator to commute with the complete set of symmetry operators and, hence, to reflect the symmetry of the system. The symmetry-adapted ro-vibrational basis set is constructed numerically by solving a set of reduced vibrational eigenvalue problems. In order to assign the irreducible representations associated with these eigenfunctions, their symmetry properties are probed on a grid of molecular geometries with the corresponding symmetry operations. The transformation matrices are reconstructed by solving overdetermined systems of linear equations related to the transformation properties of the corresponding wave functions on the grid. Our method is implemented in the variational approach TROVE and has been successfully applied to many problems covering the most important molecular symmetry groups. Several examples are used to illustrate the procedure, which can be easily applied to different types of coordinates, basis sets, and molecular systems.

  16. Variation in Functional Independence among Stroke Survivors Having Fatigue and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umaru Muhammad Badaru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study evaluated variation in functional independence in activities of daily living (ADL and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL among individuals with poststroke fatigue (PSF and poststroke depression (PSD. Methods. A cross-sectional survey involved 65 consenting poststroke survivors who were purposively recruited from physiotherapy clinics of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Adeoyo Maternity Teaching Hospital, Ibadan, and Federal Medical Center, Gusau. Participants were assessed for symptoms of PSD with short geriatric depression scale-15, PSF with fatigue severity scale, ADL with Barthel Index and IADL with Nottingham extended ADL scale. Data analysis was done using Chi-square and unpaired t-test with significance level being 0.05. Results. Participants’ age ranged from 58 to 80 years. PSD alone (P=0.002 and both PSF and PSD (P=0.02 were significantly associated with ADL, while PSF alone was not (P=0.233. PSD alone (P=0.001 and both PSF and PSD (P=0.001 significantly negatively affected IADL, while PSF alone had no significant effect (P=0.2. Conclusions. Participants with PSD alone and those with both PSF and PSD had lower functional independence in ADL and IADL.

  17. Definition of Specific Functions and Procedural Skills Required by Cuban Specialists in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véliz, Pedro L; Berra, Esperanza M; Jorna, Ana R

    2015-07-01

    INTRODUCTION Medical specialties' core curricula should take into account functions to be carried out, positions to be filled and populations to be served. The functions in the professional profile for specialty training of Cuban intensive care and emergency medicine specialists do not include all the activities that they actually perform in professional practice. OBJECTIVE Define the specific functions and procedural skills required of Cuban specialists in intensive care and emergency medicine. METHODS The study was conducted from April 2011 to September 2013. A three-stage methodological strategy was designed using qualitative techniques. By purposive maximum variation sampling, 82 professionals were selected. Documentary analysis and key informant criteria were used in the first stage. Two expert groups were formed in the second stage: one used various group techniques (focus group, oral and written brainstorming) and the second used a three-round Delphi method. In the final stage, a third group of experts was questioned in semistructured in-depth interviews, and a two-round Delphi method was employed to assess priorities. RESULTS Ultimately, 78 specific functions were defined: 47 (60.3%) patient care, 16 (20.5%) managerial, 6 (7.7%) teaching, and 9 (11.5%) research. Thirty-one procedural skills were identified. The specific functions and procedural skills defined relate to the profession's requirements in clinical care of the critically ill, management of patient services, teaching and research at the specialist's different occupational levels. CONCLUSIONS The specific functions and procedural skills required of intensive care and emergency medicine specialists were precisely identified by a scientific method. This product is key to improving the quality of teaching, research, administration and patient care in this specialty in Cuba. The specific functions and procedural skills identified are theoretical, practical, methodological and social contributions to

  18. Functions and Requirements for Debris Removal System-Project A.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PRECECHTEL, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    This revision of the Functions and Requirements Document updates the approved Functions and Requirements for Debris Removal Subproject WHC-SD-SNF-FRD-009, Rev. 0. It has been revised in its entirety to reflect the current scope of work for Debris Removal as canisters and lids under the K Basin Projects work breakdown structure (WBS). In this revision the canisters and lids will be consider debris and a new set of Functions and Requirements have been developed to remove the canisters and lids from the basin

  19. The Translation between Functional Requirements and Design Parameters for Robust Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göhler, Simon Moritz; Husung, Stephan; Howard, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The specification of and justification for design parameter (DP) tolerances are primarily based on the acceptable variation of the functions’ performance and the functions’ sensitivity to the design parameters. However, why certain tolerances are needed is often not transparent, especially...... computer aided functional tolerancing. Non-optimal tolerances yield potentials for cost improvements in manufacturing and more consistency of the functional performance of the product. In this contribution a framework is proposed to overcome the observed problems and increase the clarity, transparency...... and traceability of tolerances by analyzing the translation between the DPs and their influence on the final function....

  20. Functional Coding Variation in Recombinant Inbred Mouse Lines Reveals Novel Serotonin Transporter-Associated Phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Ana [Vanderbilt University; Airey, David [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Thompson, Brent [Vanderbilt University; Zhu, C [Vanderbilt University; Rinchik, Eugene M [ORNL; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Erikson, Keith [University of North Carolina; Blakely, Randy [Vanderbilt University

    2009-01-01

    The human serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (hSERT, SLC6A4) figures prominently in the etiology or treatment of many prevalent neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety, alcoholism, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we utilize naturally occurring polymorphisms in recombinant inbred (RI) lines to identify novel phenotypes associated with altered SERT function. The widely used mouse strain C57BL/6J, harbors a SERT haplotype defined by two nonsynonymous coding variants (Gly39 and Lys152 (GK)). At these positions, many other mouse lines, including DBA/2J, encode Glu39 and Arg152 (ER haplotype), assignments found also in hSERT. Synaptosomal 5-HT transport studies revealed reduced uptake associated with the GK variant. Heterologous expression studies confirmed a reduced SERT turnover rate for the GK variant. Experimental and in silico approaches using RI lines (C57Bl/6J X DBA/2J=BXD) identifies multiple anatomical, biochemical and behavioral phenotypes specifically impacted by GK/ER variation. Among our findings are multiple traits associated with anxiety and alcohol consumption, as well as of the control of dopamine (DA) signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis of BXD phenotypes, combined with biochemical evaluation of SERT knockout mice, nominates SERT-dependent 5-HT signaling as a major determinant of midbrain iron homeostasis that, in turn, dictates ironregulated DA phenotypes. Our studies provide a novel example of the power of coordinated in vitro, in vivo and in silico approaches using murine RI lines to elucidate and quantify the system-level impact of gene variation.

  1. Interaction Between Functional Genetic Variation of DRD2 and Cannabis Use on Risk of Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colizzi, Marco; Iyegbe, Conrad; Powell, John; Ursini, Gianluca; Porcelli, Annamaria; Bonvino, Aurora; Taurisano, Paolo; Romano, Raffaella; Masellis, Rita; Blasi, Giuseppe; Morgan, Craig; Aitchison, Katherine; Mondelli, Valeria; Luzi, Sonija; Kolliakou, Anna; David, Anthony; Murray, Robin M; Bertolino, Alessandro; Di Forti, Marta

    2015-09-01

    Both cannabis use and the dopamine receptor (DRD2) gene have been associated with schizophrenia, psychosis-like experiences, and cognition. However, there are no published data investigating whether genetically determined variation in DRD2 dopaminergic signaling might play a role in individual susceptibility to cannabis-associated psychosis. We genotyped (1) a case-control study of 272 patients with their first episode of psychosis and 234 controls, and also from (2) a sample of 252 healthy subjects, for functional variation in DRD2, rs1076560. Data on history of cannabis use were collected on all the studied subjects by administering the Cannabis Experience Questionnaire. In the healthy subjects' sample, we also collected data on schizotypy and cognitive performance using the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire and the N-back working memory task. In the case-control study, we found a significant interaction between the rs1076560 DRD2 genotype and cannabis use in influencing the likelihood of a psychotic disorder. Among cannabis users, carriers of the DRD2, rs1076560, T allele showed a 3-fold increased probability to suffer a psychotic disorder compared with GG carriers (OR = 3.07; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-7.63). Among daily users, T carrying subjects showed a 5-fold increase in the odds of psychosis compared to GG carriers (OR = 4.82; 95% CI: 1.39-16.71). Among the healthy subjects, T carrying cannabis users had increased schizotypy compared with T carrying cannabis-naïve subjects, GG cannabis users, and GG cannabis-naïve subjects (all P ≤ .025). T carrying cannabis users had reduced working memory accuracy compared with the other groups (all P ≤ .008). Thus, variation of the DRD2, rs1076560, genotype may modulate the psychosis-inducing effect of cannabis use. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Variation in Crustal Structure of the Lesser Caucasus Region from Teleseismic Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. M.; Tseng, T. L.; Huang, B. S.; Legendre, C. P.; Karakhanian, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Caucasus, including the mountains of Greater and Lesser Caucasus, is formed by the continental collision between Arabia and Eurasia. The crustal thickness for this region was mostly constrained by joint analysis of receiver functions and surface waves. Although the thickest value of 52 km was reported under the Lesser Caucasus, the resolution of earlier studies were often limited by sparse array. Large gradient across Moho also makes the definition of Moho difficult. Moreover, higher value of the Vp/Vs ratio is commonly reported in the northeastern Turkey but no estimates had been made for the Caucasus. To further investigate the detail structure around the Lesser Caucasus, we constructed a new seismic network in Georgia and Armenia. We also include other broadband stations to enhance the coverage. The average interval in the Lesser Caucasus is roughly 30 km, much denser than any previous experiments. We selected P-waveforms from teleseismic earthquakes during the operation (January 2012 - June 2016) to calculate receiver functions and then estimate the crustal thickness (H) and Vp/Vs ratio (k) with the H-k stacking technique. Our preliminary results show that Moho depth increases from 40 km under the northeastern Turkey to 50 km beneath northern Georgia, no station with Moho deeper than 50 km under the Lesser Caucasus. The Vp/Vs ratios in the northeastern Anatolian plateau are around 1.8, which is slightly higher than the average of global continents but consistent with the previous estimates. Further to the east, some stations show anomalously higher Vp/Vs ratio in central & southern Armenia that may be associated with Holocene volcanism. In the future, we plan to join locally measured dispersion curves to invert the velocity model without velocity-depth trade-off. We expect to resolve the velocity variations of the crust beneath this region in small scale that may be tied to the continental collision and surface volcanism. Keywords: Caucasus, receiver

  3. An Approach for Integrating the Prioritization of Functional and Nonfunctional Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Dabbagh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the budgetary deadlines and time to market constraints, it is essential to prioritize software requirements. The outcome of requirements prioritization is an ordering of requirements which need to be considered first during the software development process. To achieve a high quality software system, both functional and nonfunctional requirements must be taken into consideration during the prioritization process. Although several requirements prioritization methods have been proposed so far, no particular method or approach is presented to consider both functional and nonfunctional requirements during the prioritization stage. In this paper, we propose an approach which aims to integrate the process of prioritizing functional and nonfunctional requirements. The outcome of applying the proposed approach produces two separate prioritized lists of functional and non-functional requirements. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been evaluated through an empirical experiment aimed at comparing the approach with the two state-of-the-art-based approaches, analytic hierarchy process (AHP and hybrid assessment method (HAM. Results show that our proposed approach outperforms AHP and HAM in terms of actual time-consumption while preserving the quality of the results obtained by our proposed approach at a high level of agreement in comparison with the results produced by the other two approaches.

  4. An approach for integrating the prioritization of functional and nonfunctional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh, Mohammad; Lee, Sai Peck

    2014-01-01

    Due to the budgetary deadlines and time to market constraints, it is essential to prioritize software requirements. The outcome of requirements prioritization is an ordering of requirements which need to be considered first during the software development process. To achieve a high quality software system, both functional and nonfunctional requirements must be taken into consideration during the prioritization process. Although several requirements prioritization methods have been proposed so far, no particular method or approach is presented to consider both functional and nonfunctional requirements during the prioritization stage. In this paper, we propose an approach which aims to integrate the process of prioritizing functional and nonfunctional requirements. The outcome of applying the proposed approach produces two separate prioritized lists of functional and non-functional requirements. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been evaluated through an empirical experiment aimed at comparing the approach with the two state-of-the-art-based approaches, analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and hybrid assessment method (HAM). Results show that our proposed approach outperforms AHP and HAM in terms of actual time-consumption while preserving the quality of the results obtained by our proposed approach at a high level of agreement in comparison with the results produced by the other two approaches.

  5. Thyroid Function Variations Within the Reference Range Do Not Affect Quality of Life, Mood, or Cognitive Function in Community-Dwelling Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Mary H; Kaimal, Rajani; Waring, Avantika; Fink, Howard A; Yaffe, Kristine; Hoffman, Andrew R; Orwoll, Eric; Bauer, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    Variations in thyroid function within the laboratory reference range have been associated with a number of clinical outcomes. However, quality of life, mood, and cognitive function have not been extensively studied, and it is not clear whether mild variations in thyroid function have major effects on these neurocognitive outcomes. Data were analyzed from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study, a cohort of community-dwelling men aged 65 years and older in the United States. A total of 539 participants who were not taking thyroid medications and had age-adjusted TSH levels within the reference range underwent detailed testing of quality of life, mood, and cognitive function at baseline. The same quality of life, mood, and cognitive outcomes were measured again in 193 of the men after a mean follow-up of 6 years. Outcomes were analyzed using thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) levels as continuous independent variables, adjusting for relevant covariates. At baseline, there were no associations between TSH or FT4 levels and measures of quality of life, mood, or cognition in the 539 euthyroid men. Baseline thyroid function did not predict changes in these outcomes over a mean of 6 years in the 193 men in the longitudinal analysis. Variations in thyroid function within the age-adjusted laboratory reference range are not associated with variations in quality of life, mood, or cognitive function in community-dwelling older men.

  6. Functions and requirements for 105-KE Basin sludge retrieval and packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigenbutz, L.V.

    1994-01-01

    Sludge, and the clouding due to sludge, interferes with basin operation and maintenance activities. This document defines the overall functions and requirements for sludge retrieval and packaging activities to be performed in the 105-KE Basin

  7. Functional requirements for portable exhauster system to be used during saltwell pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, O.D.

    1998-01-01

    This document defines functional requirements for portable exhausters used to ventilate primary tanks during saltwell pumping, and provide back-up to primary and annulus ventilation systems at C-106 and AY-102

  8. Worldwide variation in within-canopy photosynthetic acclimation: differences in temporal and environmental controls among plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Keenan, Trevor

    2017-04-01

    Major light gradients, characteristically 10- to 50-fold, constitute the most prominent feature of plant canopies. These gradients drive within-canopy variation in foliage structural, chemical and physiological traits. As a key acclimation response to variation in light availability, foliage photosynthetic capacity per area (Aarea) increases with increasing light availability within the canopy, maximizing whole canopy photosynthesis. Recently, a worldwide database including 831 within-canopy gradients with standardized light estimates for 304 species belonging to major vascular plant functional types was constructed and within-canopy variation in photosynthetic acclimation was characterized (Niinemets Ü, Keenan TF, Hallik L (2015) Tansley review. A worldwide analysis of within-canopy variations in leaf structural, chemical and physiological traits across plant functional types. The New Phytologist 205: 973-993). However, the understanding of how within-canopy photosynthetic gradients vary during the growing season and in response to site and stand characteristics is still limited. Here we analyzed temporal, environmental and site (nutrient availability, stand density, ambient CO2 concentration, water availability) sources of variation in within-canopy photosynthetic acclimation in different plant functional types. Variation in key structural (leaf dry mass per unit area, MA), chemical (nitrogen content per dry mass, NM, and area, NA) and physiological (photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, EN) photosynthetic capacity per dry mass, Amass and area, Aarea) was examined. The analysis demonstrates major, typically 1.5-2-fold, time-, environment and site-dependent modifications in within-canopy variation in foliage photosynthetic capacity. However, the magnitude and direction of temporal and environmental variations in plasticity significantly varied among functional types. Species with longer leaf life span and low rates of canopy expansion or flush-type canopy

  9. Functional diversification of hsp40: distinct j-protein functional requirements for two prions allow for chaperone-dependent prion selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Julia M; Nguyen, Phil P; Patel, Milan J; Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2014-07-01

    Yeast prions are heritable amyloid aggregates of functional yeast proteins; their propagation to subsequent cell generations is dependent upon fragmentation of prion protein aggregates by molecular chaperone proteins. Mounting evidence indicates the J-protein Sis1 may act as an amyloid specificity factor, recognizing prion and other amyloid aggregates and enabling Ssa and Hsp104 to act in prion fragmentation. Chaperone interactions with prions, however, can be affected by variations in amyloid-core structure resulting in distinct prion variants or 'strains'. Our genetic analysis revealed that Sis1 domain requirements by distinct variants of [PSI+] are strongly dependent upon overall variant stability. Notably, multiple strong [PSI+] variants can be maintained by a minimal construct of Sis1 consisting of only the J-domain and glycine/phenylalanine-rich (G/F) region that was previously shown to be sufficient for cell viability and [RNQ+] prion propagation. In contrast, weak [PSI+] variants are lost under the same conditions but maintained by the expression of an Sis1 construct that lacks only the G/F region and cannot support [RNQ+] propagation, revealing mutually exclusive requirements for Sis1 function between these two prions. Prion loss is not due to [PSI+]-dependent toxicity or dependent upon a particular yeast genetic background. These observations necessitate that Sis1 must have at least two distinct functional roles that individual prions differentially require for propagation and which are localized to the glycine-rich domains of the Sis1. Based on these distinctions, Sis1 plasmid-shuffling in a [PSI+]/[RNQ+] strain permitted J-protein-dependent prion selection for either prion. We also found that, despite an initial report to the contrary, the human homolog of Sis1, Hdj1, is capable of [PSI+] prion propagation in place of Sis1. This conservation of function is also prion-variant dependent, indicating that only one of the two Sis1-prion functions may have

  10. Functional conservation of nucleosome formation selectively biases presumably neutral molecular variation in yeast genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Gregory A; Cotter, C R

    2011-01-01

    One prominent pattern of mutational frequency, long appreciated in comparative genomics, is the bias of purine/pyrimidine conserving substitutions (transitions) over purine/pyrimidine altering substitutions (transversions). Traditionally, this transitional bias has been thought to be driven by the underlying rates of DNA mutation and/or repair. However, recent sequencing studies of mutation accumulation lines in model organisms demonstrate that substitutions generally do not accumulate at rates that would indicate a transitional bias. These observations have called into question a very basic assumption of molecular evolution; that naturally occurring patterns of molecular variation in noncoding regions accurately reflect the underlying processes of randomly accumulating neutral mutation in nuclear genomes. Here, in Saccharomyces yeasts, we report a very strong inverse association (r = -0.951, P < 0.004) between the genome-wide frequency of substitutions and their average energetic effect on nucleosome formation, as predicted by a structurally based energy model of DNA deformation around the nucleosome core. We find that transitions occurring at sites positioned nearest the nucleosome surface, which are believed to function most importantly in nucleosome formation, alter the deformation energy of DNA to the nucleosome core by only a fraction of the energy changes typical of most transversions. When we examined the same substitutions set against random background sequences as well as an existing study reporting substitutions arising in mutation accumulation lines of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we failed to find a similar relationship. These results support the idea that natural selection acting to functionally conserve chromatin organization may contribute significantly to genome-wide transitional bias, even in noncoding regions. Because nucleosome core structure is highly conserved across eukaryotes, our observations may also help to further explain locally elevated

  11. Business Process Quality Computation : Computing Non-Functional Requirements to Improve Business Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidari, F.

    2015-01-01

    Business process modelling is an important part of system design. When designing or redesigning a business process, stakeholders specify, negotiate, and agree on business requirements to be satisfied, including non-functional requirements that concern the quality of the business process. This thesis

  12. Functional Behavior Assessments and Behavior Intervention Plans: Legal Requirements and Professional Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Lauren W.; Zirkel, Perry A.

    2017-01-01

    Functional behavior assessments (FBAs) and behavior intervention plans (BIPs) are critical components in the education of students with, or at risk for, emotional disturbance (ED). The purpose of this article is to compare the legal requirements with the professional requirements for FBAs and BIPs. The comparison is first according to the…

  13. Genetic influences on variation in female orgasmic function: a twin study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kate M; Cherkas, Lynn F; Spector, Tim D

    2005-01-01

    Orgasmic dysfunction in females is commonly reported in the general population with little consensus on its aetiology. We performed a classical twin study to explore whether there were observable genetic influences on female orgasmic dysfunction. Adult females from the TwinsUK register were sent a confidential survey including questions on sexual problems. Complete responses to the questions on orgasmic dysfunction were obtained from 4037 women consisting of 683 monozygotic and 714 dizygotic pairs of female twins aged between 19 and 83 years. One in three women (32%) reported never or infrequently achieving orgasm during intercourse, with a corresponding figure of 21% during masturbation. A significant genetic influence was seen with an estimated heritability for difficulty reaching orgasm during intercourse of 34% (95% confidence interval 27–40%) and 45% (95% confidence interval 38–52%) for orgasm during masturbation. These results show that the wide variation in orgasmic dysfunction in females has a genetic basis and cannot be attributed solely to cultural influences. These results should stimulate further research into the biological and perhaps evolutionary processes governing female sexual function. PMID:17148182

  14. Relational Stability in the Expression of Normality, Variation, and Control of Thyroid Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoermann, Rudolf; Midgley, John E. M.; Larisch, Rolf; Dietrich, Johannes W.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone concentrations only become sufficient to maintain a euthyroid state through appropriate stimulation by pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). In such a dynamic system under constant high pressure, guarding against overstimulation becomes vital. Therefore, several defensive mechanisms protect against accidental overstimulation, such as plasma protein binding, conversion of T4 into the more active T3, active transmembrane transport, counter-regulatory activities of reverse T3 and thyronamines, and negative hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid feedback control of TSH. TSH has gained a dominant but misguided role in interpreting thyroid function testing in assuming that its exceptional sensitivity thereby translates into superior diagnostic performance. However, TSH-dependent thyroid disease classification is heavily influenced by statistical analytic techniques such as uni- or multivariate-defined normality. This demands a separation of its conjoint roles as a sensitive screening test and accurate diagnostic tool. Homeostatic equilibria (set points) in healthy subjects are less variable and do not follow a pattern of random variation, rather indicating signs of early and progressive homeostatic control across the euthyroid range. In the event of imminent thyroid failure with a reduced FT4 output per unit TSH, conversion efficiency increases in order to maintain FT3 stability. In such situations, T3 stability takes priority over set point maintenance. This suggests a concept of relational stability. These findings have important implications for both TSH reference limits and treatment targets for patients on levothyroxine. The use of archival markers is proposed to facilitate the homeostatic interpretation of all parameters. PMID:27872610

  15. Gutzwiller variational wave function for a two-orbital Hubbard model on a square lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenster, Kevin Torben zu

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we formulated and applied the Gutzwiller variational many-body approach to multi-band Hubbard models. In chapter 1, we gave a short introduction to the problem and an outline of the scope of the work. In the chapter 2, we developed a complete, concise diagrammatic formalism for a perturbative evaluation of expectation values for Gutzwiller-correlated wave functions on finite lattices. The derivation of the diagrammatic expansion consists of three steps. In a first step, we introduced a one-to-one mapping between a sequence of fermion operators and their Hartree-Fock counterparts in order to eliminate all local contractions. We explicitly showed the consistency of the mapping. In a second step, we derived and applied the linked-cluster theorem. To this end, we expanded numerator and denominator in the Gutzwiller expectation value of one-site and two-site operators in terms of a perturbation series, and used Wick's theorem to express the coefficients in terms of diagrams. The introduction of the Hartree-Fock operators excludes all local contractions so that lines between identical lattice sites are zero by definition. The normal ordering of the operators and the sum over distinctive lattice sites permitted the introduction of Grassmann variables. For multi-band Gutzwiller wave functions, we had to introduce a formal representation of local operators in terms of an exponential series which led to a re-definition of the values of external and internal vertices. Then, the linked-cluster theorem applied, both for infinite and finite lattices, i.e., the unconnected diagrams in the numerator are canceled by the denominator. In this way, the nth-order in perturbation theory corresponds to summing all connected diagrams with n internal nodes. As a third and last step, we eliminated all internal nodes with two lines by fixing a subset of our variational parameters. We showed that, for our applications, this gauge fixing does not restrict the variational

  16. Variational estimate of the vacuum state of the SU(2) lattice gauge theory with a disordered trial wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heys, D.W.; Stump, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The variational principle is used to estimate the ground state of the Kogut-Susskind Hamiltonian of the SU(2) lattice gauge theory, with a trial wave function for which the magnetic fields on different plaquettes are uncorrelated. This trial function describes a disordered state. The energy expectation value is evaluated by a Monte Carlo method. The variational results are compared to similar results for a related Abelian gauge theory. Also, the expectation value of the Wilson loop operator is computed for the trial state, and the resulting estimate of the string tension is compared to the prediction of asymptotic freedom

  17. The NERV Methodology: Non-Functional Requirements Elicitation, Reasoning and Validation in Agile Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domah, Darshan

    2013-01-01

    Agile software development has become very popular around the world in recent years, with methods such as Scrum and Extreme Programming (XP). Literature suggests that functionality is the primary focus in Agile processes while non-functional requirements (NFR) are either ignored or ill-defined. However, for software to be of good quality both…

  18. Space Station data system analysis/architecture study. Task 1: Functional requirements definition, DR-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The initial task in the Space Station Data System (SSDS) Analysis/Architecture Study is the definition of the functional and key performance requirements for the SSDS. The SSDS is the set of hardware and software, both on the ground and in space, that provides the basic data management services for Space Station customers and systems. The primary purpose of the requirements development activity was to provide a coordinated, documented requirements set as a basis for the system definition of the SSDS and for other subsequent study activities. These requirements should also prove useful to other Space Station activities in that they provide an indication of the scope of the information services and systems that will be needed in the Space Station program. The major results of the requirements development task are as follows: (1) identification of a conceptual topology and architecture for the end-to-end Space Station Information Systems (SSIS); (2) development of a complete set of functional requirements and design drivers for the SSIS; (3) development of functional requirements and key performance requirements for the Space Station Data System (SSDS); and (4) definition of an operating concept for the SSIS. The operating concept was developed both from a Space Station payload customer and operator perspective in order to allow a requirements practicality assessment.

  19. Transforming Functional Requirements from UML into BPEL to Efficiently Develop SOA-Based Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulapalli, Anisha; Subramanian, Nary

    The intended behavior of any system such as services, tasks or functions can be captured by functional requirements of the system. As our dependence on online services has grown steadily, the web applications are being developed employing the SOA. BPEL4WS provides a means for expressing functional requirements of an SOA-based system by providing constructs to capture business goals and objectives for the system. In this paper we propose an approach for transforming user-centered requirements captured using UML into a corresponding BPEL specification, where the business processes are captured by means of use-cases from which UML sequence diagrams and activity diagrams are extracted. Subsequently these UML models are mapped to BPEL specifications that capture the essence of the initial business requirements to develop the SOA-based system by employing CASE tools. A student housing system is used as a case study to illustrate this approach and the system is validated using NetBeans.

  20. Development of utility generic functional requirements for electronic work packages and computer-based procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The Nuclear Electronic Work Packages - Enterprise Requirements (NEWPER) initiative is a step toward a vision of implementing an eWP framework that includes many types of eWPs. This will enable immediate paper-related cost savings in work management and provide a path to future labor efficiency gains through enhanced integration and process improvement in support of the Nuclear Promise (Nuclear Energy Institute 2016). The NEWPER initiative was organized by the Nuclear Information Technology Strategic Leadership (NITSL) group, which is an organization that brings together leaders from the nuclear utility industry and regulatory agencies to address issues involved with information technology used in nuclear-power utilities. NITSL strives to maintain awareness of industry information technology-related initiatives and events and communicates those events to its membership. NITSL and LWRS Program researchers have been coordinating activities, including joint organization of NEWPER-related meetings and report development. The main goal of the NEWPER initiative was to develop a set of utility generic functional requirements for eWP systems. This set of requirements will support each utility in their process of identifying plant-specific functional and non-functional requirements. The NEWPER initiative has 140 members where the largest group of members consists of 19 commercial U.S. nuclear utilities and eleven of the most prominent vendors of eWP solutions. Through the NEWPER initiative two sets of functional requirements were developed; functional requirements for electronic work packages and functional requirements for computer-based procedures. This paper will describe the development process as well as a summary of the requirements.

  1. Inter-doctor variations in the assessment of functional incapacities by insurance physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, A.J.; Mulders, H.; Steenbeek, R.; Anema, J.R.; Kroneman, H.; Besseling, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to determine the - largely unexplored - extent of systematic variation in the work disability assessment by Dutch insurance physicians (IPs) of employees on long-term sick leave, and to ascertain whether this variation was associated with the individual

  2. Development of functional requirements for electronic health communication: preliminary results from the ELIN project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Tom; Grimsmo, Anders

    2005-01-01

    User participation is important for developing a functional requirements specification for electronic communication. General practitioners and practising specialists, however, often work in small practices without the resources to develop and present their requirements. It was necessary to find a method that could engage practising doctors in order to promote their needs related to electronic communication. Qualitative research methods were used, starting a process to develop and study documents and collect data from meetings in project groups. Triangulation was used, in that the participants were organised into a panel of experts, a user group, a supplier group and an editorial committee. The panel of experts created a list of functional requirements for electronic communication in health care, consisting of 197 requirements, in addition to 67 requirements selected from an existing Norwegian standard for electronic patient records (EPRs). Elimination of paper copies sent in parallel with electronic messages, optimal workflow, a common electronic 'envelope' with directory services for units and end-users, and defined requirements for content with the possibility of decision support were the most important requirements. The results indicate that we have found a method of developing functional requirements which provides valid results both for practising doctors and for suppliers of EPR systems.

  3. FBI fingerprint identification automation study: AIDS 3 evaluation report. Volume 9: Functional requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The current system and subsystem used by the Identification Division are described. System constraints that dictate the system environment are discussed and boundaries within which solutions must be found are described. The functional requirements were related to the performance requirements. These performance requirements were then related to their applicable subsystems. The flow of data, documents, or other pieces of information from one subsystem to another or from the external world into the identification system is described. Requirements and design standards for a computer based system are presented.

  4. mathematical model of thermal explosion, the dual variational formulation of nonlinear problem, alternative functional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2016-01-01

    in its plane, and in the circular cylinder unlimited in length.An approximate numerical solution of the differential equation that is included in a nonlinear mathematical model of the thermal explosion enables us to obtain quantitative estimates of combination of determining parameters at which the limit state occurs in areas of not only canonical form. A capability to study of the thermal explosion state can be extended in the context of development of mathematical modeling methods, including methods of model analysis to describe the thermal state of solids.To analyse a mathematical model of the thermal explosion in a homogeneous solid the paper uses a variational approach based on the dual variational formulation of the appropriate nonlinear stationary problem of heat conduction in such a body. This formulation contains two alternative functional reaching the matching values in their stationary points corresponding to the true temperature distribution. This functional feature allows you to not only get an approximate quantitative estimate of the combination of parameters that determine the thermal explosion state, but also to find the greatest possible error in such estimation.

  5. The variation of the density functions on chaotic spheres in chaotic space-like Minkowski space time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ahmady, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we introduce types of chaotic spheres in chaotic space-like Minkowski space time M n+1 . The variations of the density functions under the folding of these chaotic spheres are defined. The foldings restriction imposed on the density function are also discussed. The relations between the folding of geometry and pure chaotic manifolds are deduced. Some theorems concerning these relations are presented

  6. Revisiting Field Capacity (FC: variation of definition of FC and its estimation from pedotransfer functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theophilo Benedicto Ottoni Filho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the nature of the hydrological processes involved in in situ measurement of Field Capacity (FC, this study proposes a variation of the definition of FC aiming not only at minimizing the inadequacies of its determination, but also at maintaining its original, practical meaning. Analysis of FC data for 22 Brazilian soils and additional FC data from the literature, all measured according to the proposed definition, which is based on a 48-h drainage time after infiltration by shallow ponding, indicates a weak dependency on the amount of infiltrated water, antecedent moisture level, soil morphology, and the level of the groundwater table, but a strong dependency on basic soil properties. The dependence on basic soil properties allowed determination of FC of the 22 soil profiles by pedotransfer functions (PTFs using the input variables usually adopted in prediction of soil water retention. Among the input variables, soil moisture content θ (6 kPa had the greatest impact. Indeed, a linear PTF based only on it resulted in an FC with a root mean squared residue less than 0.04 m³ m-3 for most soils individually. Such a PTF proved to be a better FC predictor than the traditional method of using moisture content at an arbitrary suction. Our FC data were compatible with an equivalent and broader USA database found in the literature, mainly for medium-texture soil samples. One reason for differences between FCs of the two data sets of fine-textured soils is due to their different drainage times. Thus, a standardized procedure for in situ determination of FC is recommended.

  7. Functional variation in the arginine vasopressin 2 receptor as a modifier of human plasma von Willebrand factor levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nossent, Anne Yaël; Robben, J H; Deen, P M T

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVES: Stimulation of arginine vasopressin 2 receptor (V2R) with arginine vasopressin (AVP) results in a rise in von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII plasma levels. We hypothesized that gain-of-function variations in the V2R gene (AVPR2) would lead to higher plasma levels of V...

  8. Functions and requirements for Hanford single-shell tank leakage detection and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruse, J.M.; Ohl, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the initial functions and requirements for leakage detection and monitoring applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site's 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineering principles are being applied to this effort. This document reflects the an initial step in the systems engineering approach to decompose the mission into primary functions and requirements. The document is considered approximately 30% complete relative to the effort required to produce a final version that can be used to support demonstration and/or procurement of technologies. The functions and requirements in this document apply to detection and monitoring of below ground leaks from SST containment boundaries and the resulting soil contamination. Leakage detection and monitoring is invoked in the TWRS Program in three fourth level functions: (1) Store Waste, (2) Retrieve Waste, and (3) Disposition Excess Facilities (as identified in DOE/RL-92-60 Rev. 1, Tank Waste Remediation System Functions and Requirements)

  9. Functional Mobility Testing: A Novel Method to Create Suit Design Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Scott A.; Benson, Elizabeth A.; Rajulu, Sudhakar L.

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to aide in the creation of design requirements for the next generation of space suits that more accurately describe the level of mobility necessary for a suited crewmember through the use of an innovative methodology utilizing functional mobility. A novel method was utilized involving the collection of kinematic data while 20 subjects (10 male, 10 female) performed pertinent functional tasks that will be required of a suited crewmember during various phases of a lunar mission. These tasks were selected based on relevance and criticality from a larger list of tasks that may be carried out by the crew. Kinematic data was processed through Vicon BodyBuilder software to calculate joint angles for the ankle, knee, hip, torso, shoulder, elbow, and wrist. Maximum functional mobility was consistently lower than maximum isolated mobility. This study suggests that conventional methods for establishing design requirements for human-systems interfaces based on maximal isolated joint capabilities may overestimate the required mobility. Additionally, this method provides a valuable means of evaluating systems created from these requirements by comparing the mobility available in a new spacesuit, or the mobility required to use a new piece of hardware, to this newly established database of functional mobility.

  10. Microbial community variation and functions to excess sludge reduction in a novel gravel contact oxidation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Shanshan; Jin, Y.; Fu, L. [School of Urban and Environmental Science, Northeast Normal University, Changchun (China); Quan, C. [Jilin University, College of medicine, Changchun (China); Yang, Y.S., E-mail: yangy6@cf.ac.uk [Cardiff University, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff CF10 3YE (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    Excess biomass produced within the degradation processes of organic pollutants is creating environmental challenges. The gravel contact oxidation reactor (GCOR) filled with crushed stone globular aggregates as carriers, has been demonstrated capable of reducing the excess sludge effectively in some pilot and small-scale engineering studies. In order to evaluate the variation and structure of the microbial community and their functions to excess sludge reduction in GCOR, a conventional activated sludge reactor (ASR) was studied as a comparison. The 16S rDNA library of the universal bacteria was constructed, Shannon's diversity index (H) and Species evenness (E) were calculated with distance-based operational taxonomic unit and richness (DOTUR) for microbial diversity. Real-time quantity PCR and optical microscope were used for absolute bacterial DNA concentration and eukarya identification, respectively. Meanwhile, the suspended solid index in GCOR and ASR was detected for assessing the excess sludge production. The results indicated that the most abundant bacteria in GCOR were those related to the {beta}-Proteobacteria group, then {gamma}-Proteobacteria and to Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteriode (CFB). In the ASR samples major bacteria were in the closest match with {gamma}-Proteobacteria, then {beta}-Proteobacteria and CFB. Shannon's index (H) was higher (3.41) for diversity of bacteria extracted from the carrier samples in GCOR than that (2.71) from the sludge sample in ASR. Species evenness (E) for the isolates from GCOR and ASR samples was 0.97 and 0.96, respectively. Comparison of the universal bacteria population in GCOR and ASR shows that the total bacterial DNA concentration on the GCOR carriers were 8.98 x 10{sup 5} {mu}g/{mu}l, twice that in ASR of 4.67 x 10{sup 5} {mu}g/{mu}l under normal operation of two reactors. But the MLSS in GCOR was only 4.5 mg/L, 25 times less than that in ASR of 115.4 mg/L. The most representative eukarya were protozoa

  11. Microbial community variation and functions to excess sludge reduction in a novel gravel contact oxidation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Shanshan; Jin, Y.; Fu, L.; Quan, C.; Yang, Y.S.

    2009-01-01

    Excess biomass produced within the degradation processes of organic pollutants is creating environmental challenges. The gravel contact oxidation reactor (GCOR) filled with crushed stone globular aggregates as carriers, has been demonstrated capable of reducing the excess sludge effectively in some pilot and small-scale engineering studies. In order to evaluate the variation and structure of the microbial community and their functions to excess sludge reduction in GCOR, a conventional activated sludge reactor (ASR) was studied as a comparison. The 16S rDNA library of the universal bacteria was constructed, Shannon's diversity index (H) and Species evenness (E) were calculated with distance-based operational taxonomic unit and richness (DOTUR) for microbial diversity. Real-time quantity PCR and optical microscope were used for absolute bacterial DNA concentration and eukarya identification, respectively. Meanwhile, the suspended solid index in GCOR and ASR was detected for assessing the excess sludge production. The results indicated that the most abundant bacteria in GCOR were those related to the β-Proteobacteria group, then γ-Proteobacteria and to Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteriode (CFB). In the ASR samples major bacteria were in the closest match with γ-Proteobacteria, then β-Proteobacteria and CFB. Shannon's index (H) was higher (3.41) for diversity of bacteria extracted from the carrier samples in GCOR than that (2.71) from the sludge sample in ASR. Species evenness (E) for the isolates from GCOR and ASR samples was 0.97 and 0.96, respectively. Comparison of the universal bacteria population in GCOR and ASR shows that the total bacterial DNA concentration on the GCOR carriers were 8.98 x 10 5 μg/μl, twice that in ASR of 4.67 x 10 5 μg/μl under normal operation of two reactors. But the MLSS in GCOR was only 4.5 mg/L, 25 times less than that in ASR of 115.4 mg/L. The most representative eukarya were protozoa both in GCOR (15 no. per 20 ml) and in ASR (15

  12. Shoulder Strength Requirements for Upper Limb Functional Tasks: Do Age and Rotator Cuff Tear Status Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santago, Anthony C; Vidt, Meghan E; Li, Xiaotong; Tuohy, Christopher J; Poehling, Gary G; Freehill, Michael T; Saul, Katherine R

    2017-12-01

    Understanding upper limb strength requirements for daily tasks is imperative for early detection of strength loss that may progress to disability due to age or rotator cuff tear. We quantified shoulder strength requirements for 5 upper limb tasks performed by 3 groups: uninjured young adults and older adults, and older adults with a degenerative supraspinatus tear prior to repair. Musculoskeletal models were developed for each group representing age, sex, and tear-related strength losses. Percentage of available strength used was quantified for the subset of tasks requiring the largest amount of shoulder strength. Significant differences in strength requirements existed across tasks: upward reach 105° required the largest average strength; axilla wash required the largest peak strength. However, there were limited differences across participant groups. Older adults with and without a tear used a larger percentage of their shoulder elevation (p functional tasks to effectively detect early strength loss, which may lead to disability.

  13. Parameterization of aquatic ecosystem functioning and its natural variation: Hierarchical Bayesian modelling of plankton food web dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norros, Veera; Laine, Marko; Lignell, Risto; Thingstad, Frede

    2017-10-01

    Methods for extracting empirically and theoretically sound parameter values are urgently needed in aquatic ecosystem modelling to describe key flows and their variation in the system. Here, we compare three Bayesian formulations for mechanistic model parameterization that differ in their assumptions about the variation in parameter values between various datasets: 1) global analysis - no variation, 2) separate analysis - independent variation and 3) hierarchical analysis - variation arising from a shared distribution defined by hyperparameters. We tested these methods, using computer-generated and empirical data, coupled with simplified and reasonably realistic plankton food web models, respectively. While all methods were adequate, the simulated example demonstrated that a well-designed hierarchical analysis can result in the most accurate and precise parameter estimates and predictions, due to its ability to combine information across datasets. However, our results also highlighted sensitivity to hyperparameter prior distributions as an important caveat of hierarchical analysis. In the more complex empirical example, hierarchical analysis was able to combine precise identification of parameter values with reasonably good predictive performance, although the ranking of the methods was less straightforward. We conclude that hierarchical Bayesian analysis is a promising tool for identifying key ecosystem-functioning parameters and their variation from empirical datasets.

  14. Functional diversity of the superfamily of K⁺ transporters to meet various requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diskowski, Marina; Mikusevic, Vedrana; Stock, Charlott; Hänelt, Inga

    2015-09-01

    The superfamily of K+ transporters unites proteins from plants, fungi, bacteria, and archaea that translocate K+ and/or Na+ across membranes. These proteins are key components in osmotic regulation, pH homeostasis, and resistance to high salinity and dryness. The members of the superfamily are closely related to K+ channels such as KcsA but also show several striking differences that are attributed to their altered functions. This review highlights these functional differences, focusing on the bacterial superfamily members KtrB, TrkH, and KdpA. The functional variations within the family and comparison to MPM-type K+ channels are discussed in light of the recently solved structures of the Ktr and Trk systems.

  15. HALE UAS Command and Control Communications: Step 1 - Functional Requirements Document. Version 4.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) unmanned aircraft system (UAS) communicates with an off-board pilot-in-command in all flight phases via the C2 data link, making it a critical component for the UA to fly in the NAS safely and routinely. This is a new requirement in current FAA communications planning and monitoring processes. This document provides a set of comprehensive C2 communications functional requirements and performance guidelines to help facilitate the future FAA certification process for civil UAS to operate in the NAS. The objective of the guidelines is to provide the ability to validate the functional requirements and in future be used to develop performance-level requirements.

  16. Characterization and potential functional significance of human-chimpanzee large INDEL variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polavarapu Nalini

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although humans and chimpanzees have accumulated significant differences in a number of phenotypic traits since diverging from a common ancestor about six million years ago, their genomes are more than 98.5% identical at protein-coding loci. This modest degree of nucleotide divergence is not sufficient to explain the extensive phenotypic differences between the two species. It has been hypothesized that the genetic basis of the phenotypic differences lies at the level of gene regulation and is associated with the extensive insertion and deletion (INDEL variation between the two species. To test the hypothesis that large INDELs (80 to 12,000 bp may have contributed significantly to differences in gene regulation between the two species, we categorized human-chimpanzee INDEL variation mapping in or around genes and determined whether this variation is significantly correlated with previously determined differences in gene expression. Results Extensive, large INDEL variation exists between the human and chimpanzee genomes. This variation is primarily attributable to retrotransposon insertions within the human lineage. There is a significant correlation between differences in gene expression and large human-chimpanzee INDEL variation mapping in genes or in proximity to them. Conclusions The results presented herein are consistent with the hypothesis that large INDELs, particularly those associated with retrotransposons, have played a significant role in human-chimpanzee regulatory evolution.

  17. Floristic-functional variation of tree component along an altitudinal gradient in araucaria forest areas, in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboleski, Vanessa F; Higuchi, Pedro; Silva, Ana Carolina DA; Silva, Mariele A F DA; Nunes, Amanda S; Loebens, Rodineli; Souza, Karine DE; Ferrari, Jheniffer; Lima, Carla L; Kilca, Ricardo V

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the taxonomic and functional variations of tree component of Araucaria Forest (AF) areas located along an altitudinal gradient (700, 900 and 1,600 m asl), in the southern region of Brazil. The functional traits determined were leaf area, specific leaf area, wood density, maximum potential height and dispersal syndromes and deciduousness. The data were analyzed through a functional and taxonomic dissimilarity dendrograms, community-weighted mean trait values, parametric and nonparametric tests, and Principal Component Analysis. The largest floristic-structural similarity was observed between the lower altitude areas (700 and 900 m asl), whose Bray-Curtis distance was 0.63. The area at 700 m asl was characterized by a predominance of deciduous and semi-deciduous species, with a high number of self- and wind-dispersed species, whereas the area at 1,600 m asl exhibited a predominance of animal-dispersed and evergreen species. It was also observed that there were significant variations for leaf traits, basic wood density and maximum potential height. Over all altitudinal gradient, the ordinations indicated that there was no evidence of functional differentiation among dispersal and deciduousness groups. In conclusion, the evaluated Araucaria Forest areas presented high floristic-functional variation of the tree component along the altitudinal gradient.

  18. An Architectural Decision Tool Based on Scenarios and Non-functional Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. Mahesh Parmar; Prof. W.U. Khan; Dr. Binod Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Software architecture design is often based on architects intuition and previous experience. Little methodological support is available, but there are still no effective solutions to guide the architectural design. The most difficult activity is the transformation from non-functional requirement specification into software architecture. To achieve above things proposed “An Architectural Decision Tool Based on Scenarios and Nonfunctional Requirementsâ€. In this proposed tool scenarios are fi...

  19. Report on task 4.1.3. - Survey of anticipated functional requirement for operator support systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvani, V.

    1993-01-01

    This is a preliminary report summarizing some topics related to the surveillance activity on anticipated functional requirements of the Operator Support Systems (OSS's) in NPP's. Additional information are expected will be available by analyzing the questionnaire. Functionalities examined are those referring to system functions, user's needs, technology trend, standard status. For practical purposes this document is divided in two main sections: the first section presents a summary of major OSS requirements and related problems as derived from the existing literature; the second section presents a study of OSS to be used to support the operator training presently under development in ENEA. Finally, appendix 2 reports a summary of major functions performed by the OSS's presently in operation or under development in laboratories. Refs, 1 tab

  20. Myocardin-related transcription factors are required for cardiac development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Mokalled, Mayssa H.; Carroll, Kelli J.; Cenik, Bercin K.; Chen, Beibei; Liu, Ning; Olson, Eric N.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2015-01-01

    Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors A and B (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) are highly homologous proteins that function as powerful coactivators of serum response factor (SRF), a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor essential for cardiac development. The SRF/MRTF complex binds to CArG boxes found in the control regions of genes that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and muscle contraction, among other processes. While SRF is required for heart development and function, the role of MRTFs in the d...

  1. Stable MCC binding to the APC/C is required for a functional spindle assembly checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Jamin B; Nilsson, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    stably to the APC/C. Whether MCC formation per se is sufficient for a functional SAC or MCC association with the APC/C is required remains unclear. Here, we analyze the role of two conserved motifs in Cdc20, IR and C-Box, in binding of the MCC to the APC/C. Mutants in both motifs assemble the MCC....../C is critical for a functional SAC....

  2. New Requirements of the Voltage/VAR Function for Smart Inverter in Distributed Generation Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Su Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available International Electronical Committee (IEC 61850-90-7 is a part of the IEC 61850 series which specifies the advanced functions and object models for power converter based Distributed Energy Resources (DERs. One of its functions, the Voltage/VAR (V/V control function, is used to enhance the stability and the reliability of the voltage in the distribution system. The conventional V/V function acts mainly for flattening the voltage profile as for a basic grid support function. Currently, other objectives such as the minimization of line loss and the operational costs reduction are coming into the spotlight. In order to attain these objectives, the V/V function and hence the DER units shall actively respond to the change of distribution system conditions. In this paper, the modification of V/V function and new requirements are proposed. To derive new requirements of V/V function, loss minimization is applied to a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm where the condition of voltage constraint is considered not to deteriorate the voltage stability of the distribution system.

  3. Intra- and interspecific trait variations reveal functional relationships between specific leaf area and soil niche within a subtropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dong; Chen, Yongfa; Zhao, Kangning; Cornelissen, J H C; Chu, Chengjin

    2018-02-03

    How functional traits vary with environmental conditions is of fundamental importance in trait-based community ecology. However, how intraspecific variability in functional traits is connected to species distribution is not well understood. This study investigated inter- and intraspecific variation of a key functional trait, i.e. specific leaf area (leaf area per unit dry mass; SLA), in relation to soil factors and tested if trait variation is more closely associated with specific environmental regimes for low-variability species than for high-variability species. In a subtropical evergreen forest plot (50 ha, southern China), 106 700 leaves from 5335 individuals of 207 woody species were intensively collected, with 30 individuals sampled for most species to ensure a sufficient sample size representative of intraspecific variability. Soil conditions for each plant were estimated by kriging from more than 1700 observational soil locations across the plot. Intra- and interspecific variation in SLA were separately related to environmental factors. Based on the species-specific variation of SLA, species were categorized into three groups: low-, intermediate- and high-intraspecific variability. Intraspecific habitat ranges and the strength of SLA-habitat relationships were compared among these three groups. Interspecific variation in SLA overrides the intraspecific variation (77 % vs. 8 %). Total soil nitrogen (TN, positively) and total organic carbon (TOC, negatively) are the most important explanatory factors for SLA variation at both intra- and interspecific levels. SLA, both within and between species, decreases with decreasing soil nitrogen availability. As predicted, species with low intraspecific variability in SLA have narrower habitat ranges with respect to soil TOC and TN and show a stronger SLA-habitat association than high-variability species. For woody plants low SLA is a phenotypic and probably adaptive response to nitrogen stress, which drives the

  4. Understanding Functional Reuse of ERP Requirements in the Telecommunication Sector: an Empirical Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, Maia

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an empirical study on the application of Function Points (FP) and a FP-based reuse measurement model in Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) projects in three organizations in the telecommunication sector. The findings of the study are used to compare the requirements reuse for one

  5. A Functional Model of Quality Assurance for Psychiatric Hospitals and Corresponding Staffing Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamis-Gould, Edna; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A model for quality assurance (QA) in psychiatric hospitals is described. Its functions (general QA, utilization review, clinical records, evaluation, management information systems, risk management, and infection control), subfunctions, and corresponding staffing requirements are reviewed. This model was designed to foster standardization in QA…

  6. What Is Next for Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records? A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Salaba, Athena

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on a Delphi study conducted to determine key issues and challenges facing Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR) research and practice. The Delphi panel consisted of thirty-three experts in the field who participated in a three-round issue-raising and consensus-building process via a Web-based survey…

  7. Inertial subsystem functional and design requirements for the orbiter (Phase B extension baseline)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanders, J. H.; Green, J. P., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The design requirements use the Phase B extension baseline system definition. This means that a GNC computer is specified for all command control functions instead of a central computer communicating with the ISS through a databus. Forced air cooling is used instead of cold plate cooling.

  8. Functional requirements for onboard management of space shuttle consumables, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, P. J.; Herwig, H. A.; Neel, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the functional requirements for onboard management of space shuttle consumables. A generalized consumable management concept was developed for application to advanced spacecraft. The subsystems and related consumables selected for inclusion in the consumables management system are: (1) propulsion, (2) power generation, and (3) environmental and life support.

  9. The Australian National Bibliographic Database and the Functional Requirements for the Bibliographic Database (FRBR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapatirana, Bemal; Missingham, Roxanne

    2005-01-01

    The development of the conceptual "Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records" (FRBR) Model enables records to be considered in terms of contextual relationships. Developments in software can capitalise on this to significantly improve the display of works through surfacing of these relationships. This paper reports on an investigation of…

  10. A Meta-model for the Assessment of Non-Functional Requirement Size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassab, M.; Daneva, Maia; Ormandjieva, O.; Mirandola, R.

    2008-01-01

    Non-functional requirements (NFRs) pose unique challenges in estimating the effort it would take to implement them. This is mainly because of their unique nature; NFRs are subjective, relative, interactive and tending to have a broad impact on the system as a whole. Nevertheless, it is crucial, when

  11. Linking Library Automation Systems in the Internet: Functional Requirements, Planning, and Policy Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Clifford A.

    1989-01-01

    This guide to functions to consider in selecting an academic library automation system to operate in a networked environment covers (1) the current academic networking environment; (2) library automation hardware and software platforms; (3) user interface requirements for public access; and (4) security and authentication. (10 references) (MES)

  12. Functional requirements for bacteriophage growth: gene essentiality and expression in mycobacteriophage Giles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedrick, Rebekah M; Marinelli, Laura J; Newton, Gerald L; Pogliano, Kit; Pogliano, Joseph; Hatfull, Graham F

    2013-05-01

    Bacteriophages represent a majority of all life forms, and the vast, dynamic population with early origins is reflected in their enormous genetic diversity. A large number of bacteriophage genomes have been sequenced. They are replete with novel genes without known relatives. We know little about their functions, which genes are required for lytic growth, and how they are expressed. Furthermore, the diversity is such that even genes with required functions - such as virion proteins and repressors - cannot always be recognized. Here we describe a functional genomic dissection of mycobacteriophage Giles, in which the virion proteins are identified, genes required for lytic growth are determined, the repressor is identified, and the transcription patterns determined. We find that although all of the predicted phage genes are expressed either in lysogeny or in lytic growth, 45% of the predicted genes are non-essential for lytic growth. We also describe genes required for DNA replication, show that recombination is required for lytic growth, and that Giles encodes a novel repressor. RNAseq analysis reveals abundant expression of a small non-coding RNA in a lysogen and in late lytic growth, although it is non-essential for lytic growth and does not alter lysogeny. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Generic functional requirements for a NASA general-purpose data base management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Generic functional requirements for a general-purpose, multi-mission data base management system (DBMS) for application to remotely sensed scientific data bases are detailed. The motivation for utilizing DBMS technology in this environment is explained. The major requirements include: (1) a DBMS for scientific observational data; (2) a multi-mission capability; (3) user-friendly; (4) extensive and integrated information about data; (5) robust languages for defining data structures and formats; (6) scientific data types and structures; (7) flexible physical access mechanisms; (8) ways of representing spatial relationships; (9) a high level nonprocedural interactive query and data manipulation language; (10) data base maintenance utilities; (11) high rate input/output and large data volume storage; and adaptability to a distributed data base and/or data base machine configuration. Detailed functions are specified in a top-down hierarchic fashion. Implementation, performance, and support requirements are also given.

  14. Survival-variation within and between functional categories of the African multimammate rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julliard, Romain; Leirs, Herwig; Stenseth, Nils Chr.

    1999-01-01

    in the population immediately after their first capture; (iv) subadults survival in later months is, however, positively related to density; and (v) adult survival shows negative density-dependence. 3. Both density-dependent and density-independent factors simultaneously determine stage-dependent survival variation...

  15. Functional diversity of non-lethal effects, chemical camouflage, and variation in fish avoidance in colonizing beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resetarits, William J; Pintar, Matthew R

    2016-12-01

    Predators play an extremely important role in natural communities. In freshwater systems, fish can dominate sorting both at the colonization and post-colonization stage. Specifically, for many colonizing species, fish can have non-lethal, direct effects that exceed the lethal direct effects of predation. Functionally diverse fish species with a range of predatory capabilities have previously been observed to elicit functionally equivalent responses on oviposition in tree frogs. We tested this hypothesis of functional equivalence of non-lethal effects for four predatory fish species, using naturally colonizing populations of aquatic beetles. Among taxa other than mosquitoes, and with the exception of the chemically camouflaged pirate perch, Aphredoderus sayanus, we provide the first evidence of variation in colonization or oviposition responses to different fish species. Focusing on total abundance, Fundulus chrysotus, a gape-limited, surface-feeding fish, elicited unique responses among colonizing Hydrophilidae, with the exception of the smallest and most abundant taxa, Paracymus, while Dytiscidae responded similarly to all avoided fish. Neither family responded to A. sayanus. Analysis of species richness and multivariate characterization of the beetle assemblages for the four fish species and controls revealed additional variation among the three avoided species and confirmed that chemical camouflage in A. sayanus results in assemblages essentially identical to fishless controls. The origin of this variation in beetle responses to different fish is unknown, but may involve variation in cue sensitivity, different behavioral algorithms, or differential responses to species-specific fish cues. The identity of fish species occupying aquatic habitats is crucial to understanding community structure, as varying strengths of lethal and non-lethal effects, as well as their interaction, create complex landscapes of predator effects and challenge the notion of functional

  16. Modeling traceability information and functionality requirement in export-oriented tilapia chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoshuan; Feng, Jianying; Xu, Mark; Hu, Jinyou

    2011-05-01

    Tilapia has been named as the 'food fish of the 21st century' and has become the most important farmed fish. China is the world leader in tilapia production and export. Identifying information and functional requirements is critical in developing an efficient traceability system because traceability has become a fundamental prerequisite for exporting aquaculture products. This paper examines the export-oriented tilapia chains and information flow in the chains, and identifies the key actors, information requirements and information-capturing points. Unified Modeling Language (UML) technology is adopted to describe the information and functionality requirement for chain traceability. The barriers of traceability system adoption are also identified. The results show that the traceability data consist of four categories that must be recorded by each link in the chain. The functionality requirement is classified into four categories from the fundamental information record to decisive quality control; the top three barriers to the traceability system adoption are: high costs of implementing the system, lack of experienced and professional staff; and low level of government involvement and support. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. The NOS1 variant rs6490121 is associated with variation in prefrontal function and grey matter density in healthy individuals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rose, Emma J

    2012-03-01

    A common polymorphism within the nitric oxide sythanse-1 (NOS1) gene (rs6490121), initially identified as risk variant for schizophrenia, has been associated with variation in working memory and IQ. Here we investigated how this variation might be mediated at the level of brain structure and function. In healthy individuals (N=157), voxel based morphometry was used to compare grey matter (GM) volume between homozygous and heterozygous carriers of the \\'G\\' allele (i.e. the allele associated with impaired cognition and schizophrenia risk) and homozygous carriers of the non-risk \\'A\\' allele. Functional brain imaging data were also acquired from 48 participants during performance of a spatial working memory (SWM) task, and analysed to determine any effect of NOS1 risk status. An a priori region-of-interest analysis identified a significant reduction in ventromedial prefrontal GM volume in \\'G\\' allele carriers. Risk carriers also exhibited altered patterns of activation in the prefrontal cortex, caudate, and superior parietal lobe, which were characteristic of abnormal increases in activation in frontoparietal working memory networks and a failure to disengage regions of the default mode network. These functional changes suggest a NOS1-mediated processing inefficiency, which may contribute to cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. While the mechanisms by which NOS1 may influence brain structure and\\/or function have not yet been well delineated, these data provide further evidence for a role of NOS1 in risk for schizophrenia via an impact upon cognitive function.

  18. The NIMA Kinase Is Required To Execute Stage-Specific Mitotic Functions after Initiation of Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraghavan, Meera; Lad, Alisha A.

    2014-01-01

    The G2-M transition in Aspergillus nidulans requires the NIMA kinase, the founding member of the Nek kinase family. Inactivation of NIMA results in a late G2 arrest, while overexpression of NIMA is sufficient to promote mitotic events independently of cell cycle phase. Endogenously tagged NIMA-GFP has dynamic mitotic localizations appearing first at the spindle pole body and then at nuclear pore complexes before transitioning to within nuclei and the mitotic spindle and back at the spindle pole bodies at mitotic exit, suggesting that it functions sequentially at these locations. Since NIMA is indispensable for mitotic entry, it has been difficult to determine the requirement of NIMA for subaspects of mitosis. We show here that when NIMA is partially inactivated, although mitosis can be initiated, a proportion of cells fail to successfully generate two daughter nuclei. We further define the mitotic defects to show that normal NIMA function is required for the formation of a bipolar spindle, nuclear pore complex disassembly, completion of chromatin segregation, and the normal structural rearrangements of the nuclear envelope required to generate two nuclei from one. In the remaining population of cells that enter mitosis with inadequate NIMA, two daughter nuclei are generated in a manner dependent on the spindle assembly checkpoint, indicating highly penetrant defects in mitotic progression without sufficient NIMA activity. This study shows that NIMA is required not only for mitotic entry but also sequentially for successful completion of stage-specific mitotic events. PMID:24186954

  19. On the co-variation between form and function of adnominal possessive modifiers in Dutch and English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2009-01-01

    in the noun phrase (section 3); a tentative explanation is given in section 4. The more general point this paper wants to make is that functional modifier categories like CLASSIFYING MODIFIER or QUALIFYING MODIFIER can be characterized in grammatical terms and, furthermore, that important grammatical...... that the remarkable variation in the grammatical properties of this possessive construction directly correlates with the kind of modifier function it has in the noun phrase. It is first shown that lexical possessive modifiers with van ‘of’ (“adnominal possessives” for short) are used to express most of the modifier...... functions recognized in a semantic, five-layered model of the noun phrase (section 2). I will then argue that the values for certain grammatical parameters (here subsumed under the labels MODIFICATION, PREDICATION, REFERENCE) correlate with the kind of modifier function the adnominal possessive has...

  20. Calculation of the exchange coupling constants of copper binuclear systems based on spin-flip constricted variational density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhekova, Hristina R; Seth, Michael; Ziegler, Tom

    2011-11-14

    We have recently developed a methodology for the calculation of exchange coupling constants J in weakly interacting polynuclear metal clusters. The method is based on unrestricted and restricted second order spin-flip constricted variational density functional theory (SF-CV(2)-DFT) and is here applied to eight binuclear copper systems. Comparison of the SF-CV(2)-DFT results with experiment and with results obtained from other DFT and wave function based methods has been made. Restricted SF-CV(2)-DFT with the BH&HLYP functional yields consistently J values in excellent agreement with experiment. The results acquired from this scheme are comparable in quality to those obtained by accurate multi-reference wave function methodologies such as difference dedicated configuration interaction and the complete active space with second-order perturbation theory. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  1. Quantum statistical field theory an introduction to Schwinger's variational method with Green's function nanoapplications, graphene and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenstern Horing, Norman J

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the methods of coupled quantum statistical field theory and Green's functions. The methods of coupled quantum field theory have played a major role in the extensive development of nonrelativistic quantum many-particle theory and condensed matter physics. This introduction to the subject is intended to facilitate delivery of the material in an easily digestible form to advanced undergraduate physics majors at a relatively early stage of their scientific development. The main mechanism to accomplish this is the early introduction of variational calculus and the Schwinger Action Principle, accompanied by Green's functions. Important achievements of the theory in condensed matter and quantum statistical physics are reviewed in detail to help develop research capability. These include the derivation of coupled field Green's function equations-of-motion for a model electron-hole-phonon system, extensive discussions of retarded, thermodynamic and nonequilibrium Green's functions...

  2. Functional and performance requirements of the next NOAA-Kasas City computer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, F. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System for the 1990's (AWIPS-90) will result in more timely and accurate forecasts with improved cost effectiveness. As part of the AWIPS-90 initiative, the National Meteorological Center (NMC), the National Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC), and the National Hurricane Center (NHC) are to receive upgrades of interactive processing systems. This National Center Upgrade program will support the specialized inter-center communications, data acquisition, and processing needs of these centers. The missions, current capabilities and general functional requirements for the upgrade to the NSSFC are addressed. System capabilities are discussed along with the requirements for the upgraded system.

  3. Exploration of Structural and Functional Variations Owing to Point Mutations in α-NAGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshach Paul, D; Rajasekaran, R

    2018-03-01

    Schindler disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused due to deficiency or defective activity of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (α-NAGA). Mutations in gene encoding α-NAGA cause wide range of diseases, characterized with mild to severe clinical features. Molecular effects of these mutations are yet to be explored in detail. Therefore, this study was focused on four missense mutations of α-NAGA namely, S160C, E325K, R329Q and R329W. Native and mutant structures of α-NAGA were analysed to determine geometrical deviations such as the contours of root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuation, percentage of residues in allowed regions of Ramachandran plot and solvent accessible surface area, using conformational sampling technique. Additionally, global energy-minimized structures of native and mutants were further analysed to compute their intra-molecular interactions, hydrogen bond dilution and distribution of secondary structure. In addition, docking studies were also performed to determine variations in binding energies between native and mutants. The deleterious effects of mutants were evident due to variations in their active site residues pertaining to spatial conformation and flexibility, comparatively. Hence, variations exhibited by mutants, namely S160C, E325K, R329Q and R329W to that of native, consequently, lead to the detrimental effects causing Schindler disease. This study computationally explains the underlying reasons for the pathogenesis of the disease, thereby aiding future researchers in drug development and disease management.

  4. Functional translation and linguistic variation: the use of didactic sequence in teaching languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecy Oliveira Pontes

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the approach of the linguistic variation of Spanish and the use of Functionalist Translation in Foreign Language classes, this article aims to report the results of the application of a Didactic Sequence (SD, in the style of the Geneva School, Hispanic plays for the teaching of linguistic variation in the pronominal treatment forms of the Spanish-Portuguese Brazilian language pair. SD was applied in the subject "Introduction to Translation Studies in Spanish Language" (2nd semester, offered by the course in Letters - Spanish Language and its Literatures, of the Federal University of Ceará. This article was based on the theoretical foundations of Functionalist Translation (NORD, 1994, 1996, 2009, 2012, Translation and Sociolinguistics (BOLAÑOS-CUELLAR, 2000; MAYORAL, 1998, elaboration of SD (DOLZ; NOVERRAZ; SCHNEUWLY, 2004; CRISTÓVÃO, 2010; BARROS, 2012 and research on the variation in the forms of treatment of Spanish and Portuguese (FONTANELLA DE WEINBER, 1999; SCHERRE et al, 2015.

  5. Identification of high-level functional/system requirements for future civil transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swink, Jay R.; Goins, Richard T.

    1992-01-01

    In order to accommodate the rapid growth in commercial aviation throughout the remainder of this century, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is faced with a formidable challenge to upgrade and/or modernize the National Airspace System (NAS) without compromising safety or efficiency. A recurring theme in both the Aviation System Capital Investment Plan (CIP), which has replaced the NAS Plan, and the new FAA Plan for Research, Engineering, and Development (RE&D) rely on the application of new technologies and a greater use of automation. Identifying the high-level functional and system impacts of such modernization efforts on future civil transport operational requirements, particularly in terms of cockpit functionality and information transfer, was the primary objective of this project. The FAA planning documents for the NAS of the 2005 era and beyond were surveyed; major aircraft functional capabilities and system components required for such an operating environment were identified. A hierarchical structured analysis of the information processing and flows emanating from such functional/system components were conducted and the results documented in graphical form depicting the relationships between functions and systems.

  6. Establishment of functional requirements to DC-connected wind turbine and their use in concept selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dincan, Catalin Gabriel; Kjær, Philip Carne; Chen, Yu-Hsing

    2017-01-01

    , but they are all still at an immature technology level, as no substantial experience from full-scale detailed design exists. By employing a functional failure mode and effects analysis (F-FMEA) with a decision making tool (Pugh Matrix), the paper presents a structured set of functionalities and design drivers...... required from the turbine DC converter and uses these to compare 6 distinct candidate circuit topologies. The end goal is not to select the best topology, but to narrow down from a vast list of options and give a method that will increase confidence and guide towards the characteristics of reliable design....

  7. A comparison of the difference of requirements between functional safety and nuclear safety controllers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.K.; Lee, C.L.; Shyu, S.S. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    In order to establish self-reliant capabilities of nuclear I&C systems in Taiwan, Taiwan's Nuclear I&C System (TNICS) project had been established by Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER). A Triple Modular Redundant (TMR) safety controller (SCS-2000) has been completed and gone through the IEC 61508 Safety Integrity Level 3 (SIL3) certification of Functional Safety for industries. Based on the certification processes, the difference of requirements between Functional Safety and Nuclear Safety controllers in term of hardware and software are addressed in this study. Besides, the measures used to determine and verify the reliability of the safety control system design are presented. (author)

  8. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of interacting tunneling transport: variational grand potential, density functional formulation and nature of steady-state forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyldgaard, P

    2012-01-01

    The standard formulation of tunneling transport rests on an open-boundary modeling. There, conserving approximations to nonequilibrium Green function or quantum statistical mechanics provide consistent but computational costly approaches; alternatively, the use of density-dependent ballistic-transport calculations (e.g., Lang 1995 Phys. Rev. B 52 5335), here denoted ‘DBT’, provides computationally efficient (approximate) atomistic characterizations of the electron behavior but has until now lacked a formal justification. This paper presents an exact, variational nonequilibrium thermodynamic theory for fully interacting tunneling and provides a rigorous foundation for frozen-nuclei DBT calculations as a lowest-order approximation to an exact nonequilibrium thermodynamic density functional evaluation. The theory starts from the complete electron nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics and I identify the operator for the nonequilibrium Gibbs free energy which, generally, must be treated as an implicit solution of the fully interacting many-body dynamics. I demonstrate a minimal property of a functional for the nonequilibrium thermodynamic grand potential which thus uniquely identifies the solution as the exact nonequilibrium density matrix. I also show that the uniqueness-of-density proof from a closely related Lippmann-Schwinger collision density functional theory (Hyldgaard 2008 Phys. Rev. B 78 165109) makes it possible to express the variational nonequilibrium thermodynamic description as a single-particle formulation based on universal electron-density functionals; the full nonequilibrium single-particle formulation improves the DBT method, for example, by a more refined account of Gibbs free energy effects. I illustrate a formal evaluation of the zero-temperature thermodynamic grand potential value which I find is closely related to the variation in the scattering phase shifts and hence to Friedel density oscillations. This paper also discusses the

  9. Three domains of SLP-76 are required for its optimal function in a T cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musci, M A; Motto, D G; Ross, S E; Fang, N; Koretzky, G A

    1997-08-15

    We and others have shown that overexpression of SLP-76 augments TCR-stimulated IL-2 promoter activity in the Jurkat T cell line. In this report we investigate the signaling mechanisms through which SLP-76 mediates its effect on T cell activation. We show that overexpressed SLP-76 acts downstream of TCR-stimulated protein tyrosine kinases, but does not affect calcium signaling. Overexpression of SLP-76 does, however, augment TCR stimulation of both ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) activity and a reporter construct driven by activating protein-1 binding sites. Structure/function analysis reveals that three distinct regions of SLP-76, each important for protein associations, are required for augmentation of TCR-induced nuclear factor-AT activity. These data suggest that SLP-76 functions as an adapter molecule that requires three unique domains to link proximal TCR signals in T cells.

  10. The rapidly evolving centromere-specific histone has stringent functional requirements in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Maruthachalam; Kwong, Pak N; Menorca, Ron M G; Valencia, Joel T; Ramahi, Joseph S; Stewart, Jodi L; Tran, Robert K; Sundaresan, Venkatesan; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon W-L

    2010-10-01

    Centromeres control chromosome inheritance in eukaryotes, yet their DNA structure and primary sequence are hypervariable. Most animals and plants have megabases of tandem repeats at their centromeres, unlike yeast with unique centromere sequences. Centromere function requires the centromere-specific histone CENH3 (CENP-A in human), which replaces histone H3 in centromeric nucleosomes. CENH3 evolves rapidly, particularly in its N-terminal tail domain. A portion of the CENH3 histone-fold domain, the CENP-A targeting domain (CATD), has been previously shown to confer kinetochore localization and centromere function when swapped into human H3. Furthermore, CENP-A in human cells can be functionally replaced by CENH3 from distantly related organisms including Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have used cenh3-1 (a null mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana) to replace endogenous CENH3 with GFP-tagged variants. A H3.3 tail domain-CENH3 histone-fold domain chimera rescued viability of cenh3-1, but CENH3's lacking a tail domain were nonfunctional. In contrast to human results, H3 containing the A. thaliana CATD cannot complement cenh3-1. GFP-CENH3 from the sister species A. arenosa functionally replaces A. thaliana CENH3. GFP-CENH3 from the close relative Brassica rapa was targeted to centromeres, but did not complement cenh3-1, indicating that kinetochore localization and centromere function can be uncoupled. We conclude that CENH3 function in A. thaliana, an organism with large tandem repeat centromeres, has stringent requirements for functional complementation in mitosis.

  11. Cold Pump Test and Training and Mock-Up Facility Functions and Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BELLOMY, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    This document defines the functions and requirements (F and R) for a test facility to provide for pre-deployment, checkout, testing, and training for the underground storage tank retrieval equipment, systems, and crews that will be developed or deployed as part of Waste Feed Delivery. The F and R for a River Protection Project retrieval test facility, one that supports a production mode tank farm system, are identified

  12. Guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to gut and immune function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Dietetic Products Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) to draft guidance on scientific requirements for health claims related to gut and immune function. This guidance has been drawn from scientific opinions of the NDA Panel on such health......, was subjected to public consultation (28 September 2010 to 22 October 2010), and was also discussed at a technical meeting with experts in the field on 2 December 2010 in Amsterdam....

  13. 45 CFR 307.10 - Functional requirements for computerized support enforcement systems in operation by October 1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Functional requirements for computerized support... ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.10 Functional requirements for computerized support enforcement systems in operation... necessary to meet Federal Reporting Requirements on a timely basis as prescribed by the Office; (4...

  14. Context-specific requirements of functional domains of the Spectraplakin Short stop in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottenberg, Wolfgang; Sanchez-Soriano, Natalia; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Hahn, Ines; Mende, Michael; Prokop, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    Spectraplakins are large multifunctional cytoskeletal interacting molecules implicated in various processes, including gastrulation, wound healing, skin blistering and neuronal degeneration. It has been speculated that the various functional domains and regions found in Spectraplakins are used in context-specific manners, a model which would provide a crucial explanation for the multifunctional nature of Spectraplakins. Here we tested this possibility by studying domain requirements of the Drosophila Spectraplakin Short stop (Shot) in three different cellular contexts in vivo: (1) neuronal growth, which requires dynamic actin-microtubule interaction; (2) formation and maintenance of tendon cells, which depends on highly stabilised arrays of actin filaments and microtubules, and (3) compartmentalisation in neurons, which is likely to involve cortical F-actin networks. Using these cellular contexts for rescue experiments with Shot deletion constructs in shot mutant background, a number of differential domain requirements were uncovered. First, binding of Shot to F-actin through the first Calponin domain is essential in neuronal contexts but dispensable in tendon cells. This finding is supported by our analyses of shot(kakP2) mutant embryos, which produce only endogenous isoforms lacking the first Calponin domain. Thus, our data demonstrate a functional relevance for these isoforms in vivo. Second, we provide the first functional role for the Plakin domain of Shot, which has a strong requirement for compartmentalisation in neurons and axonal growth, demonstrating that Plakin domains of long Spectraplakin isoforms are of functional relevance. Like the Calponin domain, also the Plakin domain is dispensable in tendon cells, and the currently assumed role of Shot as a linker of microtubules to the tendon cell surface may have to be reconsidered. Third, we demonstrate a function of Shot as an actin-microtubule linker in dendritic growth, thus shedding new light into

  15. Functions of Memory Sharing and Mother-Child Reminiscing Behaviors: Individual and Cultural Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkofsky, Sarah; Wang, Qi; Koh, Jessie Bee Kim

    2009-01-01

    This study examined maternal beliefs about the functions of memory sharing and the relations between these beliefs and mother-child reminiscing behaviors in a cross-cultural context. Sixty-three European American and 47 Chinese mothers completed an open-ended questionnaire concerning their beliefs about the functions of parent-child memory…

  16. Climate, soil and plant functional types as drivers of global fine-root trait variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freschet, Grégoire T.; Valverde-Barrantes, Oscar J.; Tucker, Caroline M.; Craine, Joseph M.; McCormack, M. Luke; Violle, Cyrille; Fort, Florian; Blackwood, Christopher B.; Urban-Mead, Katherine R.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Bonis, Anne; Comas, Louise H.; Cornelissen, Johannes H.C.; Dong, Ming; Guo, Dali; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Holdaway, Robert J.; Kembel, Steven W.; Makita, Naoki; Onipchenko, Vladimir G.; Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Reich, Peter B.; de la Riva, Enrique G.; Smith, Stuart W.; Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A.; Tjoelker, Mark G.; Wardle, David A.; Roumet, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Ecosystem functioning relies heavily on below-ground processes, which are largely regulated by plant fine-roots and their functional traits. However, our knowledge of fine-root trait distribution relies to date on local- and regional-scale studies with limited numbers of species, growth forms and

  17. Production of ABA responses requires both the nuclear and cytoplasmic functional involvement of PYR1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, EunJoo; Kim, Tae-Houn

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) enhances stress tolerant responses in plants against unfavorable environmental conditions. In Arabidopsis, ABA promotes interactions between PYR/PYL/RCARs and PP2C, thereby allowing SnRK2s to phosphorylate downstream components required for the regulation of gene expression or for gating ion channels. Because PYR1 is known to localize to nucleus and cytoplasm it is a question whether nuclear or cytoplasmic PYR1 confer different functions to the ABA signaling pathway, as has been previously shown for regulatory proteins. In order to answer this question, transgenic lines expressing nuclear PYR1 were generated in an ABA insensitive mutant background. Enforced nuclear expression of PYR1 was examined by confocal microscopy and western blot analysis. Physiological analyses of the transgenic lines demonstrated that nuclear PYR1 is sufficient to generate ABA responses, such as, the inhibition of seed germination, root growth inhibition, the induction of gene expression, and stomatal closing movement. However, for the full recovery of ABA responses in the mutant background cytoplasmic PYR1 was required. The study suggests both nuclear and cytoplasmic PYR1 participate in the control of ABA signal transduction. - Highlights: • Nuclear and cytoplasmic functions of PYR1 were studied in the mutant which lacked majority of ABA responses. • Nuclear PYR1 reconstituted partially the ABA responses during seed germination, root growth, and guard cell movement. • Both the nuclear and cytoplasmic functions of PYR1 were required for the full generation of ABA responses.

  18. Functional Requirements for Onboard Management of Space Shuttle Consumables. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, P. J.; Herwig, H. A.; Neel, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    This report documents the results of the study "Functional Requirements for Onboard Management of Space Shuttle Consumables." The study was conducted for the Mission Planning and Analysis Division of the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, between 3 July 1972 and 16 November 1973. The overall study program objective was two-fold. The first objective was to define a generalized consumable management concept which is applicable to advanced spacecraft. The second objective was to develop a specific consumables management concept for the Space Shuttle vehicle and to generate the functional requirements for the onboard portion of that concept. Consumables management is the process of controlling or influencing the usage of expendable materials involved in vehicle subsystem operation. The report consists of two volumes. Volume I presents a description of the study activities related to general approaches for developing consumable management, concepts for advanced spacecraft applications, and functional requirements for a Shuttle consumables management concept. Volume II presents a detailed description of the onboard consumables management concept proposed for use on the Space Shuttle.

  19. 239pu alpha spectrum analysis based on PIPS detector response function and variations with vacuum and distance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Shi; Xian-Guo Tuo; Huai-Liang Li; Jian-Bo Yang; Yi Cheng; Hong-Long Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Effect factors of the absorption of the source,air,entrance window,and dead layer of a detector must be considered in the measurement of monoenergetic alpha particles,along with statsfical noise and other factors that collectively cause the alpha spectrum to exhibit a well-known low-energy tail.Therefore,the establishment of an alpha spectrum detector response function from the perspective of a signaling system must consider the various factors mentioned above.The detector response function is the convolution of an alphaparticle pulse function,two exponential functions,and a Gaussian function,followed by calculation of the parameters of the detector response function using the weighted leastsquares fitting method as proposed in this paper.In our experiment,239pu alpha spectra were measured by a highresolution,passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS)detector at 10 levels of vacuum and 10 source-detector distances.The spectrum-fitting results were excellent as evaluated by reduced Chi-square (x2) and correlation coefficients.Finally,the variation of parameters with vacuum level and source-detector distance was studied.Results demonstrate that ο,τ1,and τ2 exhibit no obvious trend of variation with vacuum in the range 2000-20,000 mTorr,and at a confidence level of 95%,the values of τ1 and τ2 decline in a similar fashion with source-detector distance by the power exponential function,while the value of ο declines linearly.

  20. Rate variation in parasitic plants: correlated and uncorrelated patterns among plastid genes of different function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    dePamphilis Claude W

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous rates of DNA change can help in the choice among competing explanations for rate variation, such as differences in constraint, mutation rate, or the strength of genetic drift. Nonphotosynthetic plants of the Orobanchaceae have increased rates of DNA change. In this study 38 taxa of Orobanchaceae and relatives were used and 3 plastid genes were sequenced for each taxon. Results Phylogenetic reconstructions of relative rates of sequence evolution for three plastid genes (rbcL, matK and rps2 show significant rate heterogeneity among lineages and among genes. Many of the non-photosynthetic plants have increases in both synonymous and nonsynonymous rates, indicating that both (1 selection is relaxed, and (2 there has been a change in the rate at which mutations are entering the population in these species. However, rate increases are not always immediate upon loss of photosynthesis. Overall there is a poor correlation of synonymous and nonsynonymous rates. There is, however, a strong correlation of synonymous rates across the 3 genes studied and the lineage-speccific pattern for each gene is strikingly similar. This indicates that the causes of synonymous rate variation are affecting the whole plastid genome in a similar way. There is a weaker correlation across genes for nonsynonymous rates. Here the picture is more complex, as could be expected if there are many causes of variation, differing from taxon to taxon and gene to gene. Conclusions The distinctive pattern of rate increases in Orobanchaceae has at least two causes. It is clear that there is a relaxation of constraint in many (though not all non-photosynthetic lineages. However, there is also some force affecting synonymous sites as well. At this point, it is not possible to tell whether it is generation time, speciation rate, mutation rate, DNA repair efficiency or some combination of these factors.

  1. Caliciviruses differ in their functional requirements for eIF4F components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhry, Y.; Nayak, A.; Bordeleau, M-E.

    2006-01-01

    proteins can interact directly with the initiation factors eIF4E and eIF3. Translation initiation on feline calicivirus (FCV) RNA requires eIF4E because it is inhibited by recombinant 4E-BP1. However, to date, there have been no functional studies carried out with respect to norovirus translation...... translation require the RNA helicase component of the eIF4F complex, namely eIF4A, because translation was sensitive (albeit to different degrees) to a dominant negative form and to a small molecule inhibitor of eIF4A (hippuristanol). These results suggest that calicivirus RNAs differ with respect...... to their requirements for the components of the eIF4F translation initiation complex....

  2. Functional diversity of Csk, Chk, and Src SH2 domains due to a single residue variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrapetov, Marina K; Nam, Nguyen Hai; Ye, Guofeng; Kumar, Anil; Parang, Keykavous; Sun, Gongqin

    2005-07-08

    The C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) family of protein tyrosine kinases contains two members: Csk and Csk homologous kinase (Chk). Both phosphorylate and inactivate Src family kinases. Recent reports suggest that the Src homology (SH) 2 domains of Csk and Chk may bind to different phosphoproteins, which provides a basis for different cellular functions for Csk and Chk. To verify and characterize such a functional divergence, we compared the binding properties of the Csk, Chk, and Src SH2 domains and investigated the structural basis for the functional divergence. First, the study demonstrated striking functional differences between the Csk and Chk SH2 domains and revealed functional similarities between the Chk and Src SH2 domains. Second, structural analysis and mutagenic studies revealed that the functional differences among the three SH2 domains were largely controlled by one residue, Glu127 in Csk, Ile167 in Chk, and Lys200 in Src. Mutating these residues in the Csk or Chk SH2 domain to the Src counterpart resulted in dramatic gain of function similar to Src SH2 domain, whereas mutating Lys200 in Src SH2 domain to Glu (the Csk counterpart) resulted in loss of Src SH2 function. Third, a single point mutation of E127K rendered Csk responsive to activation by a Src SH2 domain ligand. Finally, the optimal phosphopeptide sequence for the Chk SH2 domain was determined. These results provide a compelling explanation for the functional differences between two homologous protein tyrosine kinases and reveal a new structure-function relationship for the SH2 domains.

  3. TU-F-17A-09: Four-Dimensional Cone Beam CT Ventilation Imaging Can Detect Interfraction Lung Function Variations for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipritidis, J; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 Australia (Australia); Hugo, G; Weiss, E; Williamson, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond VA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI) is a novel functional lung imaging modality requiring validation. We hypothesize that 4D-CBCT VI satisfies a necessary condition for validity: that intrafraction variations (e.g. due to poor 4D-CBCT image quality) are substantially different to interfraction variations (e.g. due to changes in underlying function). We perform the first comparison of intrafraction (pre/post fraction) and interfraction (week-to-week) 4D-CBCT VIs for locally advanced non small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods: A total of 215 4D-CBCT scans were acquired for 19 LA NSCLC patients over 4-6 weeks of radiation therapy, including 75 pairs of pre-/post-fraction scans on the same day. 4D-CBCT VIs were obtained by applying state-of-the-art, B-spline deformable image registration to obtain the Jacobian determinant of deformation between the end-exhale and end-inhale phases. All VIs were deformably registered to the corresponding first day scan, normalized between the 10th and 90th percentile values and cropped to the ipsilateral lung only. Intrafraction variations were assessed by computing the mean and standard deviation of voxel-wise differences between all same-day pairs of pre-/post-fraction VIs. Interfraction differences were computed between first-day VIs and treatment weeks 2, 4 and 6 for all 19 patients. We tested the hypothesis by comparing cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of intrafraction and interfraction ventilation differences using two-sided Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit tests. Results: The (mean ± std. dev.) of intrafraction differences was (−0.007 ± 0.079). Interfraction differences for weeks 2, 4 and 6 were (−0.035 ± 0.103), (−0.006 ± 0.094) and (−0.019 ± 0.127) respectively. For week 2, the changes in CDFs for intrafraction and interfraction differences approached statistical significance (p=0.099). Conclusion: We have shown that 4D-CBCT VI

  4. Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soli T. Khericha

    2006-01-01

    This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T and FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T and FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420 C. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation

  5. Apoptosis-Inducing-Factor-Dependent Mitochondrial Function Is Required for T Cell but Not B Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milasta, Sandra; Dillon, Christopher P; Sturm, Oliver E; Verbist, Katherine C; Brewer, Taylor L; Quarato, Giovanni; Brown, Scott A; Frase, Sharon; Janke, Laura J; Perry, S Scott; Thomas, Paul G; Green, Douglas R

    2016-01-19

    The role of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in promoting cell death versus survival remains controversial. We report that the loss of AIF in fibroblasts led to mitochondrial electron transport chain defects and loss of proliferation that could be restored by ectopic expression of the yeast NADH dehydrogenase Ndi1. Aif-deficiency in T cells led to decreased peripheral T cell numbers and defective homeostatic proliferation, but thymic T cell development was unaffected. In contrast, Aif-deficient B cells developed and functioned normally. The difference in the dependency of T cells versus B cells on AIF for function and survival correlated with their metabolic requirements. Ectopic Ndi1 expression rescued homeostatic proliferation of Aif-deficient T cells. Despite its reported roles in cell death, fibroblasts, thymocytes and B cells lacking AIF underwent normal death. These studies suggest that the primary role of AIF relates to complex I function, with differential effects on T and B cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Narrow intra-individual variation of maternal thyroid function in pregnancy based on a longitudinal study on 132 women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, M.; Forman, Julie Lyng; Juul, A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adaptive alterations in maternal physiology cause changes in thyroid hormone levels throughout pregnancy, and precise biochemical evaluation is thus highly dependent on gestation-specific reference intervals and expected intra-individual variation. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study...... was the assessment of the intra-individual variation as well as the longitudinal course of thyroid hormones during normal pregnancy and factors that influence the normal reference range for thyroid function. For this purpose, a longitudinal statistical model was applied. DESIGN: In a cohort of 132 pregnant women......, serial blood samples were obtained and ultrasound scans were performed throughout pregnancy. METHODS: Serum levels of TSH, free and total thyroxine (T(4)), free and total triiodothyronine (T(3)) as well as autoantibodies against thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin were measured in 979 serum samples...

  7. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Variation of the Stellar Initial Mass Function in Spiral and Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyu; Ge, Junqiang; Mao, Shude; Cappellari, Michele; Long, R. J.; Li, Ran; Emsellem, Eric; Dutton, Aaron A.; Li, Cheng; Bundy, Kevin; Thomas, Daniel; Drory, Niv; Lopes, Alexandre Roman

    2017-04-01

    We perform Jeans anisotropic modeling (JAM) on elliptical and spiral galaxies from the MaNGA DR13 sample. By comparing the stellar mass-to-light ratios estimated from stellar population synthesis and from JAM, we find a systematic variation of the initial mass function (IMF) similar to that in the earlier {{ATLAS}}3{{D}} results. Early-type galaxies (elliptical and lenticular) with lower velocity dispersions within one effective radius are consistent with a Chabrier-like IMF, while galaxies with higher velocity dispersions are consistent with a more bottom-heavy IMF such as the Salpeter IMF. Spiral galaxies have similar systematic IMF variations, but with slightly different slopes and larger scatters, due to the uncertainties caused by the higher gas fractions and extinctions for these galaxies. Furthermore, we examine the effects of stellar mass-to-light ratio gradients on our JAM modeling, and we find that the trends become stronger after considering the gradients.

  8. General trend and local variations of neutron resonance cascade gamma-decay radiative strength functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.; Furman, W.I.; Khitrov, V.A.; Jovancevic, N.

    2012-01-01

    A new hypothesis on the dependence of the form of the radiative strength functions of electric and magnetic dipole gamma transitions in a heated nucleus on the excited level density was suggested and tested experimentally. For this purpose, the region of possible values of random values of the level density and radiative strength functions which precisely reproduced experimental intensity of two-step cascades for 41 nuclei from 40K to 200Hg was determined. It was obtained that the suggested hypothesis can provide the maximal increase of radiative strength functions values by order of magnitude in comparison with existing notations as a result of collective effects enhancement. This result points to the necessity to take into account this possibility in existing and future models of radiative strength functions

  9. Time variation of the electromagnetic transfer function of the earth estimated by using wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Noriko; Harada, Makoto; Izutsu, Jun; Nagao, Toshiyasu

    2006-07-01

    In order to accurately estimate the geomagnetic transfer functions in the area of the volcano Mt. Iwate (IWT), we applied the interstation transfer function (ISTF) method to the three-component geomagnetic field data observed at Mt. Iwate station (IWT), using the Kakioka Magnetic Observatory, JMA (KAK) as remote reference station. Instead of the conventional Fourier transform, in which temporary transient noises badly degrade the accuracy of long term properties, continuous wavelet transform has been used. The accuracy of the results was as high as that of robust estimations of transfer functions obtained by the Fourier transform method. This would provide us with possibilities for routinely monitoring the transfer functions, without sophisticated statistical procedures, to detect changes in the underground electrical conductivity structure.

  10. Genetic Variation in GSTP1, Lung Function, Risk of Lung Cancer, and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Marianne S.; Dahl, Morten; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    66,069 individuals from the white general population for two common functional variants in the glutathione S-transferase pi 1 gene (GSTP1)—amino acid isoleucine 105 changed to a valine (Ile105Val) and amino acid alanine 114 changed to a valine (Ala114Val)—and recorded lung function, lung cancer......Introduction Glutathione S-transferase pi 1 metabolizes carcinogens from tobacco smoke in the lung. We tested whether genetically altered glutathione S-transferase pi 1 activity affects lung function and risk for tobacco-related cancer and mortality in the general population. Methods We genotyped......, tobacco-related cancer, and death as outcomes. Results Lung function was increased stepwise with the Ile105Val genotype overall (p

  11. Variation in singing style use in the reed bunting Emberiza schoeniclus: influencing factors and possible functions

    OpenAIRE

    Brunner, P; Pasinelli, G

    2010-01-01

    The two main functions of bird song are territory defence and mate attraction. Considerable progress has been made in understanding how species adjust the use of songs to serve these and other (presumed) functions of bird song, but the striking variety of singing behavior observable in wild birds remains enigmatic. Some species make do with simple songs and small repertoires, while others show large, complex repertoires and still others have evolved several distinct singing styles. In most sp...

  12. Variation of phytoplankton functional groups modulated by hydraulic controls in Hongze Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chang; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Hao, Daping; Doblin, Martina A; Ren, Ying; Wei, Jielin; Feng, Yawei

    2015-11-01

    Hongze Lake is a large, shallow, polymictic, eutrophic lake in the eastern China. Phytoplankton functional groups in this lake were investigated from March 2011 to February 2013, and a comparison was made between the eastern, western, and northern regions. The lake shows strong fluctuations in water level caused by monsoon rains and regular hydraulic controls. By application of the phytoplankton functional group approach, this study aims to investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics and analyze their influencing factors. Altogether, 18 functional groups of phytoplankton were identified, encompassing 187 species. In order to seek the best variable describing the phytoplankton functional group distribution, 14 of the groups were analyzed in detail using redundancy analysis. Due to the turbid condition of the lake, the dominant functional groups were those tolerant of low light. The predominant functional groups in the annual succession were D (Cyclotella spp. and Synedra acus), T (Planctonema lauterbornii), P (Fragilaria crotonensis), X1 (Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella pyrenoidosa), C (Cyclotella meneghiniana and Cyclotella ocellata), and Y (Cryptomonas erosa). An opposite relationship between water level and the biomass of predominant groups was observed in the present study. Water level fluctuations, caused by monsoonal climate and artificial drawdown, were significant factors influencing phytoplankton succession in Hongze Lake, since they alter the hydrological conditions and influence light and nutrient availability. The clearly demonstrated factors, which significantly influence phytoplankton dynamics in Hongze Lake, will help government manage the large shallow lakes with frequent water level fluctuations.

  13. Space-based multifunctional end effector systems functional requirements and proposed designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, A. H.; Jau, B. M.

    1988-01-01

    The end effector is an essential element of teleoperator and telerobot systems to be employed in space in the next decade. The report defines functional requirements for end effector systems to perform operations that are currently only feasible through Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA). Specific tasks and functions that the end effectors must be capable of performing are delineated. Required capabilities for forces and torques, clearances, compliance, and sensing are described, using current EVA requirements as guidelines where feasible. The implications of these functional requirements on the elements of potential end effector systems are discussed. The systems issues that must be considered in the design of space-based manipulator systems are identified; including impacts on subsystems tightly coupled to the end effector, i.e., control station, information processing, manipulator arm, tool and equipment stowage. Possible end effector designs are divided into three categories: single degree-of-freedom end effectors, multiple degree of freedom end effectors, and anthropomorphic hands. Specific design alternatives are suggested and analyzed within the individual categories. Two evaluations are performed: the first considers how well the individual end effectors could substitute for EVA; the second compares how manipulator systems composed of the top performers from the first evaluation would improve the space shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) capabilities. The analysis concludes that the anthropomorphic hand is best-suited for EVA tasks. A left- and right-handed anthropomorphic manipulator arm configuration is suggested as appropriate to be affixed to the RMS, but could also be used as part of the Smart Front End for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The technical feasibility of the anthropomorphic hand and its control are demonstrated. An evolutionary development approach is proposed and approximate scheduling provided for implementing the suggested

  14. A discussion of higher order software concepts as they apply to functional requirements and specifications. [space shuttles and guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, M.

    1973-01-01

    The entry guidance software functional requirements (requirements design phase), its architectural requirements (specifications design phase), and the entry guidance software verified code are discussed. It was found that the proper integration of designs at both the requirements and specifications levels are of high priority consideration.

  15. To what extent does IQ 'explain' socio-economic variations in function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Eijk Jacques

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to examine the extent to which higher intellectual abilities protect higher socio-economic groups from functional decline and to examine whether the contribution of intellectual abilities is independent of childhood deprivation and low birth weight and other socio-economic and developmental factors in early life. Methods The Maastricht Aging Study (MAAS is a prospective cohort study based upon participants in a registration network of general practices in The Netherlands. Information was available on 1211 men and women, 24 – 81 years old, who were without cognitive impairment at baseline (1993 – 1995, who ever had a paid job, and who participated in the six-year follow-up. Main outcomes were longitudinal decline in important components of quality of life and successful aging, i.e., self-reported physical, affective, and cognitive functioning. Results Persons with a low occupational level at baseline showed more functional decline than persons with a high occupational level. Socio-economic and developmental factors from early life hardly contributed to the adult socio-economic differences in functional decline. Intellectual abilities, however, took into account more than one third of the association between adult socio-economic status and functional decline. The contribution of the intellectual abilities was independent of the early life factors. Conclusion Rather than developmental and socio-economic characteristics of early life, the findings substantiate the importance of intellectual abilities for functional decline and their contribution – as potential, but neglected confounders – to socio-economic differences in functioning, successful aging, and quality of life. The higher intellectual abilities in the higher socio-economic status groups may also underlie the higher prevalences of mastery, self-efficacy and efficient coping styles in these groups.

  16. Translating inter-individual genetic variation to biological function in complex phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yadav, Rachita

    , Chapter 1 provides an introduction to various methodologies utilised in this thesis work. Subsequently, chapters 2, 3 and 4 in the second section, address finding causal variations in childhood asthma. Chapter 2 focuses on a genome wide association study (GWAS) performed on asthma exacerbation case cohort....... This study reports a new susceptibility locus within the gene CDHR3 for exacerbation phenotype of childhood asthma. Chapter 3 of the thesis presents a pilot study, which aims at designing a candidate gene panel for childhood asthma to identify the causal variants from known asthma genes. Chapter 4 describes...... in adipose depots, which is a major tissue implicated in obesity. Chapter 5 sheds light on different mechanisms that result in the replacement of metabolism efficient brown fat with the storage-type white fat in large mammals (including human) especially within the first few months following birth...

  17. Variational Optimization of the Second-Order Density Matrix Corresponding to a Seniority-Zero Configuration Interaction Wave Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelmans, Ward; Van Raemdonck, Mario; Verstichel, Brecht; De Baerdemacker, Stijn; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E; Alcoba, Diego R; Bultinck, Patrick; Van Neck, Dimitri

    2015-09-08

    We perform a direct variational determination of the second-order (two-particle) density matrix corresponding to a many-electron system, under a restricted set of the two-index N-representability P-, Q-, and G-conditions. In addition, we impose a set of necessary constraints that the two-particle density matrix must be derivable from a doubly occupied many-electron wave function, i.e., a singlet wave function for which the Slater determinant decomposition only contains determinants in which spatial orbitals are doubly occupied. We rederive the two-index N-representability conditions first found by Weinhold and Wilson and apply them to various benchmark systems (linear hydrogen chains, He, N2, and CN(-)). This work is motivated by the fact that a doubly occupied many-electron wave function captures in many cases the bulk of the static correlation. Compared to the general case, the structure of doubly occupied two-particle density matrices causes the associate semidefinite program to have a very favorable scaling as L(3), where L is the number of spatial orbitals. Since the doubly occupied Hilbert space depends on the choice of the orbitals, variational calculation steps of the two-particle density matrix are interspersed with orbital-optimization steps (based on Jacobi rotations in the space of the spatial orbitals). We also point to the importance of symmetry breaking of the orbitals when performing calculations in a doubly occupied framework.

  18. Myocardin-related transcription factors are required for cardiac development and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokalled, Mayssa H.; Carroll, Kelli J.; Cenik, Bercin K.; Chen, Beibei; Liu, Ning; Olson, Eric N.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors A and B (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) are highly homologous proteins that function as powerful coactivators of serum response factor (SRF), a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor essential for cardiac development. The SRF/MRTF complex binds to CArG boxes found in the control regions of genes that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and muscle contraction, among other processes. While SRF is required for heart development and function, the role of MRTFs in the developing or adult heart has not been explored. Through cardiac-specific deletion of MRTF alleles in mice, we show that either MRTF-A or MRTF-B is dispensable for cardiac development and function, whereas deletion of both MRTF-A and MRTF-B causes a spectrum of structural and functional cardiac abnormalities. Defects observed in MRTF-A/B null mice ranged from reduced cardiac contractility and adult onset heart failure to neonatal lethality accompanied by sarcomere disarray. RNA-seq analysis on neonatal hearts identified the most altered pathways in MRTF double knockout hearts as being involved in cytoskeletal organization. Together, these findings demonstrate redundant but essential roles of the MRTFs in maintenance of cardiac structure and function and as indispensible links in cardiac cytoskeletal gene regulatory networks. PMID:26386146

  19. Framework conditions and requirements to ensure the technical functional safety of reprocessed medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Marc

    2008-09-03

    Testing and restoring technical-functional safety is an essential part of medical device reprocessing. Technical functional tests have to be carried out on the medical device in the course of the validation of reprocessing procedures. These ensure (in addition to the hygiene tests) that the reprocessing procedure is suitable for the medical device. Functional tests are, however, also a part of reprocessing procedures. As a stage in the reprocessing, they ensure for the individual medical device that no damage or other changes limit the performance. When determining which technical-functional tests are to be carried out, the current technological standard has to be taken into account in the form of product-specific and process-oriented norms. Product-specific norms primarily define safety-relevant requirements. The risk management method described in DIN EN ISO 14971 is the basis for recognising hazards; the likelihood of such hazards arising can be minimised through additional technical-functional tests, which may not yet have been standardised. Risk management is part of a quality management system, which must be bindingly certified for manufacturers and processors of critical medical devices with particularly high processing demands by a body accredited by the competent authority.

  20. Proton channel HVCN1 is required for effector functions of mouse eosinophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Proton currents are required for optimal respiratory burst in phagocytes. Recently, HVCN1 was identified as the molecule required for the voltage-gated proton channel activity associated with the respiratory burst in neutrophils. Although there are similarities between eosinophils and neutrophils regarding their mechanism for respiratory burst, the role of proton channels in eosinophil functions has not been fully understood. Results In the present study, we first identified the expression of the proton channel HVCN1 in mouse eosinophils. Furthermore, using HVCN1-deficient eosinophils, we demonstrated important cell-specific effector functions for HVCN1. Similar to HVCN1-deficient neutrophils, HVCN1-deficient eosinophils produced significantly less reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation compared with WT eosinophils. In contrast to HVCN1-deficient neutrophils, HVCN1-deficient eosinophils did not show impaired calcium mobilization or migration ability compared with wild-type (WT) cells. Uniquely, HVCN1-deficient eosinophils underwent significantly increased cell death induced by PMA stimulation compared with WT eosinophils. The increased cell death was dependent on NADPH oxidase activation, and correlated with the failure of HVCN1-deficient cells to maintain membrane polarization and intracellular pH in the physiological range upon activation. Conclusions Eosinophils require proton channel HVCN1 for optimal ROS generation and prevention of activation-induced cell death. PMID:23705768

  1. Salmonella Persistence in Tomatoes Requires a Distinct Set of Metabolic Functions Identified by Transposon Insertion Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Prerak; Porwollik, Steffen; Canals, Rocio; Perez, Daniel R.; Chu, Weiping; McClelland, Michael; Teplitski, Max

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and verotoxigenic Escherichia coli, are increasingly recognized as causes of gastroenteritis outbreaks associated with the consumption of fruits and vegetables. Persistence in plants represents an important part of the life cycle of these pathogens. The identification of the full complement of Salmonella genes involved in the colonization of the model plant (tomato) was carried out using transposon insertion sequencing analysis. With this approach, 230,000 transposon insertions were screened in tomato pericarps to identify loci with reduction in fitness, followed by validation of the screen results using competition assays of the isogenic mutants against the wild type. A comparison with studies in animals revealed a distinct plant-associated set of genes, which only partially overlaps with the genes required to elicit disease in animals. De novo biosynthesis of amino acids was critical to persistence within tomatoes, while amino acid scavenging was prevalent in animal infections. Fitness reduction of the Salmonella amino acid synthesis mutants was generally more severe in the tomato rin mutant, which hyperaccumulates certain amino acids, suggesting that these nutrients remain unavailable to Salmonella spp. within plants. Salmonella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was required for persistence in both animals and plants, exemplifying some shared pathogenesis-related mechanisms in animal and plant hosts. Similarly to phytopathogens, Salmonella spp. required biosynthesis of amino acids, LPS, and nucleotides to colonize tomatoes. Overall, however, it appears that while Salmonella shares some strategies with phytopathogens and taps into its animal virulence-related functions, colonization of tomatoes represents a distinct strategy, highlighting this pathogen's flexible metabolism. IMPORTANCE Outbreaks of gastroenteritis caused by human pathogens have been increasingly associated with foods of plant origin, with tomatoes

  2. Day-to-day variations in health behaviors and daily functioning: two intensive longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueckiger, Lavinia; Lieb, Roselind; Meyer, Andrea H; Witthauer, Cornelia; Mata, Jutta

    2017-04-01

    In two intensive longitudinal studies we examined the daily dynamics in health behaviors and their associations with two important indicators of young adults' daily functioning, namely, affect and academic performance. Over a period of 8 months, university students (Study 1: N = 292; Study 2: N = 304) reported sleep, physical activity, snacking, positive and negative affect, and learning goal achievement. A subsample wore an actigraph to provide an additional measurement of sleep and physical activity and participated in a controlled laboratory snacking situation. Multilevel structural equation models showed that better day-to-day sleep quality or more physical activity than usual, but not snacking, were associated with improved daily functioning, namely, affect and learning goal achievement. Importantly, self-report measurements of health behaviors correlated with behavioral measurements. These findings have the potential to inform health promotion programs aimed at supporting young adults in their daily functioning in good physical and mental health.

  3. The Gemin associates of survival motor neuron are required for motor function in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Rebecca; Cauchi, Ruben J

    2013-01-01

    Membership of the survival motor neuron (SMN) complex extends to nine factors, including the SMN protein, the product of the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) disease gene, Gemins 2-8 and Unrip. The best-characterised function of this macromolecular machine is the assembly of the Sm-class of uridine-rich small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles and each SMN complex member has a key role during this process. So far, however, only little is known about the function of the individual Gemin components in vivo. Here, we make use of the Drosophila model organism to uncover loss-of-function phenotypes of Gemin2, Gemin3 and Gemin5, which together with SMN form the minimalistic fly SMN complex. We show that ectopic overexpression of the dead helicase Gem3(ΔN) mutant or knockdown of Gemin3 result in similar motor phenotypes, when restricted to muscle, and in combination cause lethality, hence suggesting that Gem3(ΔN) overexpression mimics a loss-of-function. Based on the localisation pattern of Gem3(ΔN), we predict that the nucleus is the primary site of the antimorphic or dominant-negative mechanism of Gem3(ΔN)-mediated interference. Interestingly, phenotypes induced by human SMN overexpression in Drosophila exhibit similarities to those induced by overexpression of Gem3(ΔN). Through enhanced knockdown we also uncover a requirement of Gemin2, Gemin3 and Gemin5 for viability and motor behaviour, including locomotion as well as flight, in muscle. Notably, in the case of Gemin3 and Gemin5, such function also depends on adequate levels of the respective protein in neurons. Overall, these findings lead us to speculate that absence of any one member is sufficient to arrest the SMN-Gemins complex function in a nucleocentric pathway, which is critical for motor function in vivo.

  4. Galectin-1 is required for the regulatory function of B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhabbab, R; Blair, P; Smyth, L A; Ratnasothy, K; Peng, Q; Moreau, A; Lechler, R; Elgueta, R; Lombardi, G

    2018-02-09

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1) is required for the development of B cells in the bone marrow (BM), however very little is known about the contribution of Gal-1 to the development of B cell regulatory function. Here, we report an important role for Gal-1 in the induction of B cells regulatory function. Mice deficient of Gal-1 (Gal-1 -/- ) showed significant loss of Transitional-2 (T2) B cells, previously reported to include IL-10 + regulatory B cells. Gal-1 -/- B cells stimulated in vitro via CD40 molecules have impaired IL-10 and Tim-1 expression, the latter reported to be required for IL-10 production in regulatory B cells, and increased TNF-α expression compared to wild type (WT) B cells. Unlike their WT counterparts, T2 and T1 Gal-1 -/- B cells did not suppress TNF-α expression by CD4 + T cells activated in vitro with allogenic DCs (allo-DCs), nor were they suppressive in vivo, being unable to delay MHC-class I mismatched skin allograft rejection following adoptive transfer. Moreover, T cells stimulated with allo-DCs show an increase in their survival when co-cultured with Gal-1 -/- T2 and MZ B cells compared to WT T2 and MZ B cells. Collectively, these data suggest that Gal-1 contributes to the induction of B cells regulatory function.

  5. DNA Replication Is Required for Circadian Clock Function by Regulating Rhythmic Nucleosome Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Dang, Yunkun; Matsu-Ura, Toru; He, Yubo; He, Qun; Hong, Christian I; Liu, Yi

    2017-07-20

    Although the coupling between circadian and cell cycles allows circadian clocks to gate cell division and DNA replication in many organisms, circadian clocks were thought to function independently of cell cycle. Here, we show that DNA replication is required for circadian clock function in Neurospora. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of DNA replication abolished both overt and molecular rhythmicities by repressing frequency (frq) gene transcription. DNA replication is essential for the rhythmic changes of nucleosome composition at the frq promoter. The FACT complex, known to be involved in histone disassembly/reassembly, is required for clock function and is recruited to the frq promoter in a replication-dependent manner to promote replacement of histone H2A.Z by H2A. Finally, deletion of H2A.Z uncoupled the dependence of the circadian clock on DNA replication. Together, these results establish circadian clock and cell cycle as interdependent coupled oscillators and identify DNA replication as a critical process in the circadian mechanism. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Functions and requirements for subsurface barriers used in support of single-shell tank waste retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, S.S.

    1993-01-01

    The mission of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The scope of the TWRS Program includes project and program activities for receiving, storing, maintaining, treating, and disposing onsite, or packaging for offsite disposal, all Hanford tank waste. Hanford tank waste includes the contents of 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs), plus any new waste added to these facilities, and all encapsulated cesium and strontium stored onsite and returned from offsite users. A key element of the TWRS Program is retrieval of the waste in the SSTs. The waste stored in these underground tanks must be removed in order to minimize environmental, safety, and health risks associated with continuing waste storage. Subsurface barriers are being considered as a means to mitigate the effects of tank leaks including those occurring during SST waste retrieval. The functions to be performed by subsurface barriers based on their role in retrieving waste from the SSTs are described, and the requirements which constrain their application are identified. These functions and requirements together define the functional baseline for subsurface barriers

  7. Circadian variations of thyrotropin (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) in surgical and functional pinealectomy in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrowska, Z.; Zwirska-Korczala, K.; Buntner, B.; Jarzab, B.; Kucharzewski, M.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the regulatory influence of surgical and functional pinealectomy on circadian variations of thyrotropin (TSH), triiodothyronine (T 3 ) and thyroxine (T 4 ) in male Wistar rats. The serum hormone levels were estimated with RIA method, and the circadian rhythm secretion was analyzed by means of cosinor method. Our study shows that there are marked differences in circadian fluctuations of T 3 and T 4 between the two generally used models of pinealectomy. (author). 55 refs, 4 figs

  8. High-confidence assessment of functional impact of human mitochondrial non-synonymous genome variations by APOGEE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Castellana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available 24,189 are all the possible non-synonymous amino acid changes potentially affecting the human mitochondrial DNA. Only a tiny subset was functionally evaluated with certainty so far, while the pathogenicity of the vast majority was only assessed in-silico by software predictors. Since these tools proved to be rather incongruent, we have designed and implemented APOGEE, a machine-learning algorithm that outperforms all existing prediction methods in estimating the harmfulness of mitochondrial non-synonymous genome variations. We provide a detailed description of the underlying algorithm, of the selected and manually curated training and test sets of variants, as well as of its classification ability.

  9. Brand to brand variation in the disintegrant functionality of Polacrilin Potassium, NF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrudula H. Bele

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The current monograph for Polacrilin Potassium, NF does not specify tests that could assist in distinguishing between different brands of this disintegrant. The objective of this work was to examine the physical characteristics of four brands of Polacrilin Potassium, NF and relate the observed differences to differences in their functionality. Significant differences were observed in the particle size, true density, porosity, surface area and morphology of the samples. Functionality tests, such as settling volume, intrinsic swelling, rate and extent of water uptake were carried out. Significant differences were observed in intrinsic swelling and the initial rate of water uptake. The disintegration times of the tablets were found to be a function of the initial rate of water uptake. Since the disintegration times were shown to be significantly different despite negligible differences in settling volumes, wicking and water uptake, as opposed to the magnitude of swelling, appear to be the major mechanisms that distinguish disintegration performance between different brands of Polacrilin Potassium, NF when incorporated into insoluble tablet matrices. Thus, the measurement of the rate of water uptake may be a useful functionality test for Polacrilin Potassium in particular, and for ion exchange resin type disintegrants in general.

  10. Distribution and functional impact of DNA copy number variation in the rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guryev, V.; Saar, K.; Adamovic, T.; Verheul, M.; van Heesch, S.; Cook, S.; Pravenec, M.; Aitman, T.; Jacob, H.; Shull, J.D.; Hubner, N.; Cuppen, E.

    2008-01-01

    The abundance and dynamics of copy number variants (CNVs) in mammalian genomes poses new challenges in the identification of their impact on natural and disease phenotypes. We used computational and experimental methods to catalog CNVs in rat and found that they share important functional

  11. Aggressive Forms and Functions on School Playgrounds: Profile Variations in Interaction Styles, Bystander Actions, and Victimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Karin S.; Newman, Jodi Burrus; Onyewuenyi, Adaurennaya C.

    2014-01-01

    Coders used real-time focal-child sampling methods to observe the playground behavior and victimization experiences of 600 third to sixth grade youth. Person-centered analyses yielded three profiles that specified aggressive function (reactive, proactive) and form (direct, indirect), and conformed to social-information-processing functional…

  12. Acoustic Variations in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia as a Function of Speech Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Christine M.; Walton, Suzanne; Murry, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic phonatory events were identified in 14 women diagnosed with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD), a focal laryngeal dystonia that disturbs phonatory function, and compared with those of 14 age-matched women with no vocal dysfunction. Findings indicated ADSD subjects produced more aberrant acoustic events than controls during tasks of…

  13. Replicated landscape genetic and network analyses reveal wide variation in functional connectivity for American pikas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jessica A; Epps, Clinton W; Jeffress, Mackenzie R; Ray, Chris; Rodhouse, Thomas J; Schwalm, Donelle

    2016-09-01

    Landscape connectivity is essential for maintaining viable populations, particularly for species restricted to fragmented habitats or naturally arrayed in metapopulations and facing rapid climate change. The importance of assessing both structural connectivity (physical distribution of favorable habitat patches) and functional connectivity (how species move among habitat patches) for managing such species is well understood. However, the degree to which functional connectivity for a species varies among landscapes, and the resulting implications for conservation, have rarely been assessed. We used a landscape genetics approach to evaluate resistance to gene flow and, thus, to determine how landscape and climate-related variables influence gene flow for American pikas (Ochotona princeps) in eight federally managed sites in the western United States. We used empirically derived, individual-based landscape resistance models in conjunction with predictive occupancy models to generate patch-based network models describing functional landscape connectivity. Metareplication across landscapes enabled identification of limiting factors for dispersal that would not otherwise have been apparent. Despite the cool microclimates characteristic of pika habitat, south-facing aspects consistently represented higher resistance to movement, supporting the previous hypothesis that exposure to relatively high temperatures may limit dispersal in American pikas. We found that other barriers to dispersal included areas with a high degree of topographic relief, such as cliffs and ravines, as well as streams and distances greater than 1-4 km depending on the site. Using the empirically derived network models of habitat patch connectivity, we identified habitat patches that were likely disproportionately important for maintaining functional connectivity, areas in which habitat appeared fragmented, and locations that could be targeted for management actions to improve functional connectivity

  14. Expansion of the Kano model to identify relevant customer segments and functional requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlason, Reynir Smari; Stefansson, Arnaldur Smari; Wietz, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    The Kano model of customer satisfaction has been widely used to analyse perceived needs of customers. The model provides product developers valuable information about if, and then how much a given functional requirement (FR) will impact customer satisfaction if implemented within a product, system...... or a service. A current limitation of the Kano model is that it does not allow developers to visualise which combined sets of FRs would provide the highest satisfaction between different customer segments. In this paper, a stepwise method to address this particular shortcoming is presented. First......, a traditional Kano analysis is conducted for the different segments of interest. Second, for each FR, relationship functions are integrated between x=0 and x=1. Third, integrals are inserted into a combination matrix crossing segments and FRs, where FRs with the highest sum across the chosen segments...

  15. Functional requirements of AID's higher order structures and their interaction with RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Samiran; Begum, Nasim A; Hu, Wenjun; Honjo, Tasuku

    2016-03-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for the somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes. Although both the N and C termini of AID have unique functions in DNA cleavage and recombination, respectively, during SHM and CSR, their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay combined with glycerol gradient fractionation, we revealed that the AID C terminus is required for a stable dimer formation. Furthermore, AID monomers and dimers form complexes with distinct heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). AID monomers associate with DNA cleavage cofactor hnRNP K whereas AID dimers associate with recombination cofactors hnRNP L, hnRNP U, and Serpine mRNA-binding protein 1. All of these AID/ribonucleoprotein associations are RNA-dependent. We propose that AID's structure-specific cofactor complex formations differentially contribute to its DNA-cleavage and recombination functions.

  16. Functions and requirements for tank farm restoration and safe operations, Project W-314. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    This Functions and Requirements document (FRD) establishes the basic performance criteria for Project W-314, in accordance with the guidance outlined in the letter from R.W. Brown, RL, to President, WHC, ''Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Documentation Methodology,'' 94-PRJ-018, dated 3/18/94. The FRD replaces the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) as the project technical baseline documentation. Project W-314 will improve the reliability of safety related systems, minimize onsite health and safety hazards, and support waste retrieval and disposal activities by restoring and/or upgrading existing Tank Farm facilities and systems. The scope of Project W-314 encompasses the necessary restoration upgrades of the Tank Farms' instrumentation, ventilation, electrical distribution, and waste transfer systems

  17. Directional resolution of head-related transfer functions required in binaural synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minnaar, Pauli; Plogsties, Jan; Christensen, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    In binaural synthesis a virtual sound source is implemented by convolving an anechoic signal with a pair of head-related transfer functions (HRTFs). In order to represent all possible directions of the sound source with respect to the listener a discrete number of HRTFs are measured and interpola......In binaural synthesis a virtual sound source is implemented by convolving an anechoic signal with a pair of head-related transfer functions (HRTFs). In order to represent all possible directions of the sound source with respect to the listener a discrete number of HRTFs are measured...... and moving sound sources. A criterion was found that predicts the experimental results. This criterion was used to estimate the directional resolution required in binaural synthesis for all directions on the sphere around the head....

  18. A study to develop the domestic functional requirements of the specific safety systems of CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Man Woong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Park, Kun Chul [Handong Global Univ., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2003-03-15

    The present research has been made to develop and review critically the functional requirements of the specific safety systems of CANDU such as SDS-1, SDS2, ECCS, and containment. Based on R documents for this, a systematic study was made to develop the domestic regulation statements. Also, the conventional laws are carefully reviewed to see the compatibility to CANDU. Also, the safety assessment method for CANDU was studied by reviewing C documents and recommendation of IAEA. Through the present works, the vague policy in the CANDU safety regulation is cleaning up in a systematic form and a new frame to measure the objective risk of nuclear power plants was developed.

  19. SP-100 nuclear assembly test: Test assembly functional requirements and system arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallas, T.T.; Gluck, R.; Motwani, K.; Clay, H.; O'Neill, G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the functional requirements and the system that will be tested to validate the reactor, flight shield, and flight controller of the SP-100 Generic Flight System (GFS). The Nuclear Assembly Test (NAT) consists of the test article (SP-100 reactor with control devices and the flight shield) and its supporting systems. The NAT test assembly is being designed by GE. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is designing the test cell and vacuum vessel system that will contain the NAT test assembly (Renkey et al. 1989). Preliminary design reviews have been completed and the final design is under way

  20. High-Level Functional and Operational Requirements for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles Park

    2006-01-01

    This document describes the principal functional and operational requirements for the proposed Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). The AFCF is intended to be the world's foremost facility for nuclear fuel cycle research, technology development, and demonstration. The facility will also support the near-term mission to develop and demonstrate technology in support of fuel cycle needs identified by industry, and the long-term mission to retain and retain U.S. leadership in fuel cycle operations. The AFCF is essential to demonstrate a more proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and make long-term improvements in fuel cycle effectiveness, performance and economy

  1. Mobile health systems for bipolar disorder: the relevance of non-functional requirements in MONARCA project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayora, Oscar; Frost, Mads; Arnrich, Bert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a series of challenges for developing mobile health solutions for mental health as a result of MONARCA project three-year activities. The lessons learnt on the design, development and evaluation of a mobile health system for supporting the treatment of bipolar disorder....... The findings presented here are the result of over 3 years of activity within the MONARCA EU project. The challenges listed and detailed in this paper may be used in future research as a starting point for identifying important non-functional requirements involved in mobile health provisioning...

  2. A study to develop the domestic functional requirements of the specific safety systems of CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Man Woong; Lee, Jae Young; Bang, Kwang Hyun [Handong Global Univ., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2001-03-15

    The present research has been made to develop and review critically the functional requirements of the specific safety systems of CANDU such as SOS-1, SOS-2, ECCS and containment. Based on R documents for this, a systematic study was made to develop the domestic regulation statements. Also, the conventional laws are carefully reviewed to see the compatibility to CANDU. Also, the safety assessment method for CANDU was studied by reviewing C documents and recommendation of IAEA. Through the present works, the vague policy in the CANDU safety regulation is cleaning up in a systematic form and a new frame to measure the objective risk of nuclear power plants was developed.

  3. Functions and Requirements for West Valley Demonstration Project Tank Lay-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, Monte R.; Henderson, Colin

    2002-01-01

    Documents completion of Milestone A.1-1, ''Issue Functions and Requirements for WVDP Tank Lay-Up,'' in Technical Task Plan TTP RL3-WT21A - ''Post-Retrieval and Pre-Closure HLW Tank Lay-Up.'' This task is a collaborative effort among Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., and West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS). Because of the site-specific nature of this task, the involvement of WVNS personnel is critical to the success of this task

  4. Myocardial temperature variation: effect on regional function and coronary flow in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambra, M.N.; Magrassi, P.; Lowenstein, E.; Kyo, S.; Austen, W.G.; Buckley, M.J.; LaRaia, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Incremental changes in the temperature (28-42.5 0 C) of the anterior left ventricular wall in a canine, working, beating right heart bypass preparation (constant preload, afterload, and heart rate) were produced to measure the effect of regional temperature on myocardial function and blood flow. Circumferential-axis segment lengths were measured with sonomicrometry in both the temperature-varied, left-anterior descending coronary artery (LAD)-supplied myocardium and the normothermic (38 0 C) circumflex-supplied myocardium. Fast thermistors (time constant 0 C), regional systolic shortening decreased 42.2 +/- 10% at 41 0 C and increased 23.3 +/- 6% at 31 0 C. There was no significant change in coronary blood flow or distribution at the three temperatures. Pressure-length areas varied inversely with myocardial temperature. These data demonstrate that there is a reversible inverse relationship between midwall T and ventricular function when heart rate, preload, and afterload are controlled

  5. Guaranteed and computable bounds of the limit load for variational problems with linear growth energy functionals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haslinger, Jaroslav; Repin, S.; Sysala, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 5 (2016), s. 527-564 ISSN 0862-7940 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LQ1602 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : functionals with linear growth * limit load * truncation method * perfect plasticity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.618, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10492-016-0146-6

  6. Variation in Cancer Incidence among Patients with ESRD during Kidney Function and Nonfunction Intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Clarke, Christina A; Snyder, Jon J; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Engels, Eric A

    2016-05-01

    Among patients with ESRD, cancer risk is affected by kidney dysfunction and by immunosuppression after transplant. Assessing patterns across periods of dialysis and kidney transplantation may inform cancer etiology. We evaluated 202,195 kidney transplant candidates and recipients from a linkage between the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients and cancer registries, and compared incidence in kidney function intervals (time with a transplant) with incidence in nonfunction intervals (waitlist or time after transplant failure), adjusting for demographic factors. Incidence of infection-related and immune-related cancer was higher during kidney function intervals than during nonfunction intervals. Incidence was most elevated for Kaposi sarcoma (hazard ratio [HR], 9.1; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 4.7 to 18), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (HR, 3.2; 95% CI, 2.8 to 3.7), Hodgkin's lymphoma (HR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7 to 5.3), lip cancer (HR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.0 to 6.0), and nonepithelial skin cancers (HR, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.5 to 5.8). Conversely, ESRD-related cancer incidence was lower during kidney function intervals (kidney cancer: HR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.7 to 0.8 and thyroid cancer: HR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6 to 0.8). With each successive interval, incidence changed in alternating directions for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, melanoma, and lung, pancreatic, and nonepithelial skin cancers (higher during function intervals), and kidney and thyroid cancers (higher during nonfunction intervals). For many cancers, incidence remained higher than in the general population across all intervals. These data indicate strong short-term effects of kidney dysfunction and immunosuppression on cancer incidence in patients with ESRD, suggesting a need for persistent cancer screening and prevention. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Effects of climate variability and functional changes on the interannual variation of the carbon balance in a temperate deciduous forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jian; van der Linden, Leon; Lasslop, G.

    2012-01-01

    scale, direct climatic variability and changes in ecosystem functional properties regulated the IAV of the carbon balance at this site. Correlation analysis showed that the sensitivity of carbon fluxes to climatic variability was significantly higher at shorter than at longer time scales and changed...... seasonally. Ecosystem response anomalies implied that changes in the distribution of climate anomalies during the vegetation period will have stronger impacts on future ecosystem carbon balances than changes in average climate. We improved a published modelling approach which distinguishes the direct....... At the annual time scale as much as 80% of the IAV in NEE was attributed to the variation in photosynthesis and respiration related model parameters. Our results suggest that the observed decadal NEE trend at the investigated site was dominated by changes in ecosystem functioning. In general this study showed...

  8. Determining Criteria to Predict Repeatability of Performance in Older Adults: Using Coefficients of Variation for Strength and Functional Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Isaac Selva; Bird, Stephen R; Westfold, Ben A; Shield, Anthony J

    2017-01-01

    Reliable measures of muscle strength and functional capacity in older adults are essential. The aim of this study was to determine whether coefficients of variation (CVs) of individuals obtained at the first session can infer repeatability of performance in a subsequent session. Forty-eight healthy older adults (mean age 68.6 ± 6.1 years; age range 60-80 years) completed two assessment sessions, and on each occasion undertook: dynamometry for isometric and isokinetic quadriceps strength, 6 meter fast walk (6MFWT), timed up and go (TUG), stair climb and descent, and vertical jump. Significant linear relationships were observed between CVs in session 1 and the percentage difference between sessions 1 and 2 for torque at 60, 120, 240 and 360°/s, 6MFWT, TUG, stair climb, and stair descent. The results of this study could be used to establish criteria for determining an acceptably reliable performance in strength and functional tests.

  9. Radial variation in sap velocity as a function of stem diameter and sapwood thickness in yellow-poplar trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; King, Anthony W.

    2000-04-01

    Canopy transpiration and forest water use are frequently estimated as the product of sap velocity and cross-sectional sapwood area. Few studies, however, have considered whether radial variation in sap velocity and the proportion of sapwood active in water transport are significant sources of uncertainty in the extrapolation process. Therefore, radial profiles of sap velocity were examined as a function of stem diameter and sapwood thickness for yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) trees growing on two adjacent watersheds in eastern Tennessee. The compensation heat pulse velocity technique was used to quantify sap velocity at four equal-area depths in 20 trees that ranged in stem diameter from 15 to 69 cm, and in sapwood thickness from 2.1 to 14.8 cm. Sap velocity was highly dependent on the depth of probe insertion into the sapwood. Rates of sap velocity were greatest for probes located in the two outer sapwood annuli (P1 and P2) and lowest for probes in closest proximity to the heartwood (P3 and P4). Relative sap velocities averaged 0.98 at P1, 0.66 at P2, 0.41 at P3 and 0.35 at P4. Tree-specific sap velocities measured at each of the four probe positions, divided by the maximum sap velocity measured (usually at P1 or P2), indicated that the fraction of sapwood functional in water transport (f(S)) varied between 0.49 and 0.96. There was no relationship between f(S) and sapwood thickness, or between f(S) and stem diameter. The fraction of functional sapwood averaged 0.66 +/- 0.13 for trees on which radial profiles were determined. No significant depth-related differences were observed for sapwood density, which averaged 469 kg m(-3) across all four probe positions. There was, however, a significant decline in sapwood water content between the two outer probe positions (1.04 versus 0.89 kg kg(-1)). This difference was not sufficient to account for the observed radial variation in sap velocity. A Monte-Carlo analysis indicated that the standard error in

  10. The genetic variation in Monocarboxylic acid transporter 2 (MCT2 has functional and clinical relevance with male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinu Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Monocarboxylic acid transporter 2 (MCT2 transports pyruvate and lactate outside and inside of sperms, mainly as energy sources and plays roles in the regulation of spermatogenesis. We investigated the association among genetic variations in the MCT2 gene, male infertility and MCT2 expression levels in sperm. The functional and genetic significance of the intron 2 (+28201A > G, rs10506398 and 3' untranslated region (UTR single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP (+2626G > A, rs10506399 of MCT2 variants were investigated. Two MCT2 polymorphisms were associated with male infertility (n = 471, P A had a strong association with the oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT group. The +2626GG type had an almost 2.4-fold higher sperm count than that of the +2626AA type (+2626GG; 66 × 10 6 vs +2626AA; 27 × 10 6 , P < 0.0001. The MCT2-3' UTR SNP may be important for expression, as it is located at the MCT2 3' UTR. The average MCT2 protein amount in sperm of the +2626GG type was about two times higher than that of the +2626AA type. The results suggest that genetic variation in MCT2 has functional and clinical relevance with male infertility.

  11. SLC26A4 Variations Among Graves’ Hyper-Functioning Thyroid Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen Hadj-Kacem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Deleterious mutations of SLC26A4 cause Pendred syndrome (PS, an autosomal recessive disorder comprising goitre and deafness with enlarged vestibular aqueducts (EVA, and nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL. However, the SLC26A4 hyperactivity was recently associated with the emergence of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD and asthma among human and mouse model. Here, by direct sequencing, we investigate the sequences of the 20 coding exons (2 to 21 of SLC26A4 and their flanking intron-exon junctions among patients affected with Graves' disease (GD hyperthyroidism. Ten mono-allelic variants were identified, seven of which are intronic and previously unreported. Two, c.898A>C (p.I300L and c.1061T>C (p.F354S, of the three exonic variants are non synonymous. The p.F354S variant is already described to be involved in PS or NSHL inheritances. The exploration by PCR-RFLP of p.I300L and p.F354S variants among 132 GD patients, 105 Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT, 206 Healthy subjects and 102 families with NSHL have shown the presence of both variants. The p.F354S variation was identified both among patients (1~HT and 3 GD and healthy subjects (n=5. Whereas, the p.I300L variant was identified only in GD patients (n=3. Our studies provide evidence of the importance of systematic analysis of SLC26A4 gene sequences on models other than deafness. This approach allows the identification of new variants and the review of the pathogenic effects of certain mono-allelic variants reported responsible for PS and NSHL development.

  12. User Requirements Analysis For Digital Library Application Using Quality Function Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulandari, Lily; Sularto, Lana; Yusnitasari, Tristyanti; Ikasari, Diana

    2017-03-01

    This study attemp to build Smart Digital Library to be used by the wider community wherever they are. The system is built in the form of Smart Digital Library portal which uses semantic similarity method (Semantic Similarity) to search journals, articles or books by title or author name. This method is also used to determine the recommended books to be read by visitors of Smart Digital Library based on testimony from a previous reader automatically. Steps being taken in the development of Smart Digital Library system is the analysis phase, design phase, testing and implementation phase. At this stage of the analysis using WebQual for the preparation of the instruments to be distributed to the respondents and the data obtained from the respondents will be processed using Quality Function Deployment. In the analysis phase has the purpose of identifying consumer needs and technical requirements. The analysis was performed to a digital library on the web digital library Gunadarma University, Bogor Institute of Agriculture, University of Indonesia, etc. The questionnaire was distributed to 200 respondents. The research methodology begins with the collection of user requirements and analyse it using QFD. Application design is funded by the government through a program of Featured Universities Research by the Directorate General of Higher Education (DIKTI). Conclusions from this research are identified which include the Consumer Requirements of digital library application. The elements of the consumers requirements consists of 13 elements and 25 elements of Engineering Characteristics digital library requirements. Therefore the design of digital library applications that will be built, is designed according to the findings by eliminating features that are not needed by restaurant based on QFD House of Quality.

  13. Functional Requirements for Fab-7 Boundary Activity in the Bithorax Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolle, Daniel; Cleard, Fabienne; Aoki, Tsutomu; Deshpande, Girish; Karch, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin boundaries are architectural elements that determine the three-dimensional folding of the chromatin fiber and organize the chromosome into independent units of genetic activity. The Fab-7 boundary from the Drosophila bithorax complex (BX-C) is required for the parasegment-specific expression of the Abd-B gene. We have used a replacement strategy to identify sequences that are necessary and sufficient for Fab-7 boundary function in the BX-C. Fab-7 boundary activity is known to depend on factors that are stage specific, and we describe a novel ∼700-kDa complex, the late boundary complex (LBC), that binds to Fab-7 sequences that have insulator functions in late embryos and adults. We show that the LBC is enriched in nuclear extracts from late, but not early, embryos and that it contains three insulator proteins, GAF, Mod(mdg4), and E(y)2. Its DNA binding properties are unusual in that it requires a minimal sequence of >65 bp; however, other than a GAGA motif, the three Fab-7 LBC recognition elements display few sequence similarities. Finally, we show that mutations which abrogate LBC binding in vitro inactivate the Fab-7 boundary in the BX-C. PMID:26303531

  14. Functional Requirements for Fab-7 Boundary Activity in the Bithorax Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolle, Daniel; Cleard, Fabienne; Aoki, Tsutomu; Deshpande, Girish; Schedl, Paul; Karch, Francois

    2015-11-01

    Chromatin boundaries are architectural elements that determine the three-dimensional folding of the chromatin fiber and organize the chromosome into independent units of genetic activity. The Fab-7 boundary from the Drosophila bithorax complex (BX-C) is required for the parasegment-specific expression of the Abd-B gene. We have used a replacement strategy to identify sequences that are necessary and sufficient for Fab-7 boundary function in the BX-C. Fab-7 boundary activity is known to depend on factors that are stage specific, and we describe a novel ∼700-kDa complex, the late boundary complex (LBC), that binds to Fab-7 sequences that have insulator functions in late embryos and adults. We show that the LBC is enriched in nuclear extracts from late, but not early, embryos and that it contains three insulator proteins, GAF, Mod(mdg4), and E(y)2. Its DNA binding properties are unusual in that it requires a minimal sequence of >65 bp; however, other than a GAGA motif, the three Fab-7 LBC recognition elements display few sequence similarities. Finally, we show that mutations which abrogate LBC binding in vitro inactivate the Fab-7 boundary in the BX-C. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Functional proteomic analyses of Bothrops atrox venom reveals phenotypes associated with habitat variation in the Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Leijiane F; Portes-Junior, José A; Nicolau, Carolina A; Bernardoni, Juliana L; Nishiyama, Milton Y; Amazonas, Diana R; Freitas-de-Sousa, Luciana A; Mourão, Rosa Hv; Chalkidis, Hipócrates M; Valente, Richard H; Moura-da-Silva, Ana M

    2017-04-21

    Venom variability is commonly reported for venomous snakes including Bothrops atrox. Here, we compared the composition of venoms from B. atrox snakes collected at Amazonian conserved habitats (terra-firme upland forest and várzea) and human modified areas (pasture and degraded areas). Venom samples were submitted to shotgun proteomic analysis as a whole or compared after fractionation by reversed-phase chromatography. Whole venom proteomes revealed a similar composition among the venoms with predominance of SVMPs, CTLs, and SVSPs and intermediate amounts of PLA 2 s and LAAOs. However, when distribution of particular isoforms was analyzed by either method, the venom from várzea snakes showed a decrease in hemorrhagic SVMPs and an increase in SVSPs, and procoagulant SVMPs and PLA 2 s. These differences were validated by experimental approaches including both enzymatic and in vivo assays, and indicated restrictions in respect to antivenom efficacy to variable components. Thus, proteomic analysis at the isoform level combined to in silico prediction of functional properties may indicate venom biological activity. These results also suggest that the prevalence of functionally distinct isoforms contributes to the variability of the venoms and could reflect the adaptation of B. atrox to distinct prey communities in different Amazon habitats. In this report, we compared isoforms present in venoms from snakes collected at different Amazonian habitats. By means of a species venom gland transcriptome and the in silico functional prediction of each isoform, we were able to predict the principal venom activities in vitro and in animal models. We also showed remarkable differences in the venom pools from snakes collected at the floodplain (várzea habitat) compared to other habitats. Not only was this venom less hemorrhagic and more procoagulant, when compared to the venom pools from the other three habitats studied, but also this enhanced procoagulant activity was not

  16. Contextual Learning Requires Functional Diversity at Excitatory and Inhibitory Synapses onto CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Mitsushima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the hippocampus is processing temporal and spatial information in particular context, the encoding rule creating memory is completely unknown. To examine the mechanism, we trained rats on an inhibitory avoidance (IA task, a hippocampus-dependent rapid one-trial contextual learning paradigm. By combining Herpes virus-mediated in vivo gene delivery with in vitro patch-clamp recordings, I reported contextual learning drives GluR1-containing AMPA receptors into CA3-CA1 synapses. The molecular event is required for contextual memory, since bilateral expression of delivery blocker in CA1 successfully blocked IA learning. Moreover, I found a logarithmic correlation between the number of delivery blocking cells and learning performance. Considering that one all-or-none device can process 1-bit of data per clock (Nobert Wiener 1961, the logarithmic correlation may provides evidence that CA1 neurons transmit essential data of contextual information. Further, I recently reported critical role of acetylcholine as an intrinsic trigger of learning-dependent synaptic plasticity. IA training induced ACh release in CA1 that strengthened not only AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory synapses, but also GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory synapses on each CA1 neuron. More importantly, IA-trained rats showed individually different excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs with wide variation on each CA1 neuron. Here I propose a new hypothesis that the diversity of synaptic inputs on CA1 neurons may depict cell-specific outputs processing experienced episodes after training.

  17. Cookie- versus cracker-baking--what's the difference? Flour functionality requirements explored by SRC and alveography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Meera; Slade, Louise; Levine, Harry; Gannon, Diane

    2014-01-01

    The many differences between cookie- and cracker-baking are discussed and described in terms of the functionality, and functional requirements, of the major biscuit ingredients--flour and sugar. Both types of products are similar in their major ingredients, but different in their formulas and processes. One of the most important and consequential differences between traditional cracker and cookie formulas is sugar (i.e., sucrose) concentration: usually lower than 30% in a typical cracker formula and higher than 30% in a typical cookie formula. Gluten development is facilitated in lower-sugar cracker doughs during mixing and sheeting; this is a critical factor linked to baked-cracker quality. Therefore, soft wheat flours with greater gluten quality and strength are typically preferred for cracker production. In contrast, the concentrated aqueous sugar solutions existing in high-sugar cookie doughs generally act as an antiplasticizer, compared with water alone, so gluten development during dough mixing and starch gelatinization/pasting during baking are delayed or prevented in most cookie systems. Traditional cookies and crackers are low-moisture baked goods, which are desirably made from flours with low water absorption [low water-holding capacity (WHC)], and low levels of damaged starch and water-soluble pentosans (i.e., water-accessible arabinoxylans). Rheological (e.g., alveography) and baking tests are often used to evaluate flour quality for baked-goods applications, but the solvent retention capacity (SRC) method (AACC 56-11) is a better diagnostic tool for predicting the functional contribution of each individual flour functional component, as well as the overall functionality of flours for cookie- and/or cracker-baking.

  18. Clueless, a protein required for mitochondrial function, interacts with the PINK1-Parkin complex in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Sen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Loss of mitochondrial function often leads to neurodegeneration and is thought to be one of the underlying causes of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD. However, the precise events linking mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death remain elusive. PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1 and Parkin (Park, either of which, when mutated, are responsible for early-onset PD, mark individual mitochondria for destruction at the mitochondrial outer membrane. The specific molecular pathways that regulate signaling between the nucleus and mitochondria to sense mitochondrial dysfunction under normal physiological conditions are not well understood. Here, we show that Drosophila Clueless (Clu, a highly conserved protein required for normal mitochondrial function, can associate with Translocase of the outer membrane (TOM 20, Porin and PINK1, and is thus located at the mitochondrial outer membrane. Previously, we found that clu genetically interacts with park in Drosophila female germ cells. Here, we show that clu also genetically interacts with PINK1, and our epistasis analysis places clu downstream of PINK1 and upstream of park. In addition, Clu forms a complex with PINK1 and Park, further supporting that Clu links mitochondrial function with the PINK1-Park pathway. Lack of Clu causes PINK1 and Park to interact with each other, and clu mutants have decreased mitochondrial protein levels, suggesting that Clu can act as a negative regulator of the PINK1-Park pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that Clu directly modulates mitochondrial function, and that Clu's function contributes to the PINK1-Park pathway of mitochondrial quality control.

  19. Stomatal Function Requires Pectin De-methyl-esterification of the Guard Cell Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsbury, Sam; Hunt, Lee; Elhaddad, Nagat; Baillie, Alice; Lundgren, Marjorie; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Scheller, Henrik V; Knox, J Paul; Fleming, Andrew J; Gray, Julie E

    2016-11-07

    Stomatal opening and closure depends on changes in turgor pressure acting within guard cells to alter cell shape [1]. The extent of these shape changes is limited by the mechanical properties of the cells, which will be largely dependent on the structure of the cell walls. Although it has long been observed that guard cells are anisotropic due to differential thickening and the orientation of cellulose microfibrils [2], our understanding of the composition of the cell wall that allows them to undergo repeated swelling and deflation remains surprisingly poor. Here, we show that the walls of guard cells are rich in un-esterified pectins. We identify a pectin methylesterase gene, PME6, which is highly expressed in guard cells and required for stomatal function. pme6-1 mutant guard cells have walls enriched in methyl-esterified pectin and show a decreased dynamic range in response to triggers of stomatal opening/closure, including elevated osmoticum, suggesting that abrogation of stomatal function reflects a mechanical change in the guard cell wall. Altered stomatal function leads to increased conductance and evaporative cooling, as well as decreased plant growth. The growth defect of the pme6-1 mutant is rescued by maintaining the plants in elevated CO 2 , substantiating gas exchange analyses, indicating that the mutant stomata can bestow an improved assimilation rate. Restoration of PME6 rescues guard cell wall pectin methyl-esterification status, stomatal function, and plant growth. Our results establish a link between gene expression in guard cells and their cell wall properties, with a corresponding effect on stomatal function and plant physiology. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional Connectivity of Multiple Brain Regions Required for the Consolidation of Social Recognition Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimizu, Toshiyuki; Kenney, Justin W; Okano, Emiko; Kadoma, Kazune; Frankland, Paul W; Kida, Satoshi

    2017-04-12

    Social recognition memory is an essential and basic component of social behavior that is used to discriminate familiar and novel animals/humans. Previous studies have shown the importance of several brain regions for social recognition memories; however, the mechanisms underlying the consolidation of social recognition memory at the molecular and anatomic levels remain unknown. Here, we show a brain network necessary for the generation of social recognition memory in mice. A mouse genetic study showed that cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-mediated transcription is required for the formation of social recognition memory. Importantly, significant inductions of the CREB target immediate-early genes c-fos and Arc were observed in the hippocampus (CA1 and CA3 regions), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and amygdala (basolateral region) when social recognition memory was generated. Pharmacological experiments using a microinfusion of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin showed that protein synthesis in these brain regions is required for the consolidation of social recognition memory. These findings suggested that social recognition memory is consolidated through the activation of CREB-mediated gene expression in the hippocampus/mPFC/ACC/amygdala. Network analyses suggested that these four brain regions show functional connectivity with other brain regions and, more importantly, that the hippocampus functions as a hub to integrate brain networks and generate social recognition memory, whereas the ACC and amygdala are important for coordinating brain activity when social interaction is initiated by connecting with other brain regions. We have found that a brain network composed of the hippocampus/mPFC/ACC/amygdala is required for the consolidation of social recognition memory. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here, we identify brain networks composed of multiple brain regions for the consolidation of social recognition memory. We

  1. Preliminary study of lateral variation in crustal structure of Northeast China from teleseismic receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Youlin; Liu, Ruifeng; Huang, Zhibin; Sun, Li

    2011-02-01

    We conducted comprehensive receiver function analyses for a large amount of high-quality broadband teleseismic waveforms data recorded at 19 China National Digital Seismic Network (CNDSN) stations deployed in Northeast China. An advanced H- κ domain search method was adopted to accurately estimate the crustal thickness and ν P/ ν S ratio. The crust has an average thickness of about 34.4 km. The thinnest crust occurs in the central region of Northeast China, while the thickest crust is beneath the Yanshan belt. The ν P/ ν S ratio is relatively uniform with an average of about 1.733. The highest ν P/ ν S ratio is found beneath the Changbaishan, likely associated with its volcanic activities. We found significant lateral heterogeneity beneath three stations CN2, MDJ, and MIH located along the Suolon suture from the back-zimuthal dependence of Moho depth. The velocity modeling from receiver functions indicated complicated Earth structure beneath these stations with large crust-mantle transition zone, noticeable velocity jump in upper mantle, and low velocity zone in middle crust. Dipping velocity interface in the crust with strike approximately parallel to the Suolon suture and down-dip to the south or southeast might explain the observed lateral heterogeneity.

  2. Impact of blood processing variations on Natural Killer cell frequency, activation, chemokine receptor expression and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranbhai, Vivek; Bartman, Pat; Ndlovu, Dudu; Ramkalawon, Pamela; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Wilson, Douglas; Altfeld, Marcus; Carr, William H

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the role of natural killer (NK) cells in human disease pathogenesis is crucial and necessitates study of patient samples directly ex vivo. Manipulation of whole blood by density gradient centrifugation or delays in sample processing due to shipping, however, may lead to artifactual changes in immune response measures. Here, we assessed the impact of density gradient centrifugation and delayed processing of both whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at multiple timepoints (2–24 hrs) on flow cytometric measures of NK cell frequency, activation status, chemokine receptor expression, and effector functions. We found that density gradient centrifugation activated NK cells and modified chemokine receptor expression. Delays in processing beyond 8 hours activated NK cells in PBMC but not in whole blood. Likewise, processing delays decreased chemokine receptor (CCR4 and CCR7) expression in both PBMC and whole blood. Finally, delays in processing PBMC were associated with a decreased ability of NK cells to degranulate (as measured by CD107a expression) or secrete cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF-α). In summary, our findings suggest that density gradient centrifugation and delayed processing of PBMC can alter measures of clinically relevant NK cell characteristics including effector functions; and therefore should be taken into account in designing clinical research studies. PMID:21255578

  3. Probability density function evolution of power systems subject to stochastic variation of renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, J. Q.; Cong, Y. C.; Xiao, M. Q.

    2018-05-01

    As renewable energies are increasingly integrated into power systems, there is increasing interest in stochastic analysis of power systems.Better techniques should be developed to account for the uncertainty caused by penetration of renewables and consequently analyse its impacts on stochastic stability of power systems. In this paper, the Stochastic Differential Equations (SDEs) are used to represent the evolutionary behaviour of the power systems. The stationary Probability Density Function (PDF) solution to SDEs modelling power systems excited by Gaussian white noise is analysed. Subjected to such random excitation, the Joint Probability Density Function (JPDF) solution to the phase angle and angular velocity is governed by the generalized Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation. To solve this equation, the numerical method is adopted. Special measure is taken such that the generalized FPK equation is satisfied in the average sense of integration with the assumed PDF. Both weak and strong intensities of the stochastic excitations are considered in a single machine infinite bus power system. The numerical analysis has the same result as the one given by the Monte Carlo simulation. Potential studies on stochastic behaviour of multi-machine power systems with random excitations are discussed at the end.

  4. Biomechanics on the half shell: functional performance influences patterns of morphological variation in the emydid turtle carapace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stayton, C Tristan

    2011-09-01

    This study uses the carapace of emydid turtles to address hypothesized differences between terrestrial and aquatic species. Geometric morphometrics are used to quantify shell shape, and performance is estimated for two shell functions: shell strength and hydrodynamics. Aquatic turtle shells differ in shape from terrestrial turtle shells and are characterized by lower frontal areas and presumably lower drag. Terrestrial turtle shells are stronger than those of aquatic turtles; many-to-one mapping of morphology to function does not entirely mitigate a functional trade-off between mechanical strength and hydrodynamic performance. Furthermore, areas of morphospace characterized by exceptionally poor performance in either of the functions are not occupied by any emydid species. Though aquatic and terrestrial species show no significant differences in the rate of morphological evolution, aquatic species show a higher lineage density, indicative of a greater amount of convergence in their evolutionary history. The techniques employed in this study, including the modeling of theoretical shapes to assess performance in unoccupied areas of morphospace, suggest a framework for future studies of morphological variation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Balancing functional and nutritional quality of oils and fats: Current requirements and future trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van den Bremt Karen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oils and fats play an important role in the structure, aroma and stability of a wide variety of food products, as well as in their nutritional properties. For Puratos, a producer of ingredients for bakery, patisserie and chocolate sector, functionality and taste are of utmost importance, but the company also wants to contribute to the balanced diet of consumers. Vegetable oils and fats are used in margarines and releasing agents, vegetable creams, compound chocolate, fillings and emulsifiers. Each application requires an oil or fat with specific physicochemical properties in order to ensure the optimal structure, stability and taste of the end product. Traditionally, (partially hydrogenated vegetable oils deliver important functional characteristics concerning crystallization behaviour, directly linked with the workability, melting properties, stability and mouth feel of the food product. However, due to negative nutritional implications, trans fats are to be replaced by healthier alternatives, preferably not by saturated fats. Consumers – and in some regions, legal instances – demand transfree or hydro-free products while not compromising on taste. Alternative fats and oils will be discussed concerning their functional and nutritional properties.

  6. Metatranscriptomes reveal functional variation in diatom communities from the Antarctic Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Pearson, Gareth A

    2015-04-14

    Functional genomics of diatom-dominated communities fromthe Antarctic Peninsula was studied using comparative metatranscriptomics. Samples obtained from diatom-rich communities in the Bransfield Strait, the western Weddell Sea and sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea/Wilkins Ice Shelf yielded more than 500K pyrosequencing reads that were combined to produce a global metatranscriptome assembly. Multi-gene phylogenies recovered three distinct communities, and diatom-assigned contigs further indicated little read-sharing between communities, validating an assembly-based annotation and analysis approach. Although functional analysis recovered a core of abundant shared annotations that were expressed across the three diatom communities, over 40% of annotations (but accounting for <10% of sequences) were community-specific. The two pelagic communities differed in their expression of N-metabolism and acquisition genes, which was almost absent in post-bloom conditions in the Weddell Sea community, while enrichment of transporters for ammonia and urea in Bransfield Strait diatoms suggests a physiological stance towards acquisition of reduced N-sources. The depletion of carbohydrate and energy metabolism pathways in sea ice relative to pelagic communities, together with increased light energy dissipation (via LHCSR proteins), photorespiration, and NO3 - uptake and utilization all pointed to irradiance stress and/or inorganic carbon limitation within sea ice. Ice-binding proteins and cold-shock transcription factors were also enriched in sea ice diatoms. Surprisingly, the abundance of gene transcripts for the translational machinery tracked decreasing environmental temperature across only a 4 °C range, possibly reflecting constraints on translational efficiency and protein production in cold environments. © 2015 International Society for Microbial Ecology All rights reserved.

  7. Uncertainty in Earthquake Source Imaging Due to Variations in Source Time Function and Earth Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Razafindrakoto, H. N. T.

    2014-03-25

    One way to improve the accuracy and reliability of kinematic earthquake source imaging is to investigate the origin of uncertainty and to minimize their effects. The difficulties in kinematic source inversion arise from the nonlinearity of the problem, nonunique choices in the parameterization, and observational errors. We analyze particularly the uncertainty related to the choice of the source time function (STF) and the variability in Earth structure. We consider a synthetic data set generated from a spontaneous dynamic rupture calculation. Using Bayesian inference, we map the solution space of peak slip rate, rupture time, and rise time to characterize the kinematic rupture in terms of posterior density functions. Our test to investigate the effect of the choice of STF reveals that all three tested STFs (isosceles triangle, regularized Yoffe with acceleration time of 0.1 and 0.3 s) retrieve the patch of high slip and slip rate around the hypocenter. However, the use of an isosceles triangle as STF artificially accelerates the rupture to propagate faster than the target solution. It additionally generates an artificial linear correlation between rupture onset time and rise time. These appear to compensate for the dynamic source effects that are not included in the symmetric triangular STF. The exact rise time for the tested STFs is difficult to resolve due to the small amount of radiated seismic moment in the tail of STF. To highlight the effect of Earth structure variability, we perform inversions including the uncertainty in the wavespeed only, and variability in both wavespeed and layer depth. We find that little difference is noticeable between the resulting rupture model uncertainties from these two parameterizations. Both significantly broaden the posterior densities and cause faster rupture propagation particularly near the hypocenter due to the major velocity change at the depth where the fault is located.

  8. Uncertainty in Earthquake Source Imaging Due to Variations in Source Time Function and Earth Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Razafindrakoto, H. N. T.; Mai, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    One way to improve the accuracy and reliability of kinematic earthquake source imaging is to investigate the origin of uncertainty and to minimize their effects. The difficulties in kinematic source inversion arise from the nonlinearity of the problem, nonunique choices in the parameterization, and observational errors. We analyze particularly the uncertainty related to the choice of the source time function (STF) and the variability in Earth structure. We consider a synthetic data set generated from a spontaneous dynamic rupture calculation. Using Bayesian inference, we map the solution space of peak slip rate, rupture time, and rise time to characterize the kinematic rupture in terms of posterior density functions. Our test to investigate the effect of the choice of STF reveals that all three tested STFs (isosceles triangle, regularized Yoffe with acceleration time of 0.1 and 0.3 s) retrieve the patch of high slip and slip rate around the hypocenter. However, the use of an isosceles triangle as STF artificially accelerates the rupture to propagate faster than the target solution. It additionally generates an artificial linear correlation between rupture onset time and rise time. These appear to compensate for the dynamic source effects that are not included in the symmetric triangular STF. The exact rise time for the tested STFs is difficult to resolve due to the small amount of radiated seismic moment in the tail of STF. To highlight the effect of Earth structure variability, we perform inversions including the uncertainty in the wavespeed only, and variability in both wavespeed and layer depth. We find that little difference is noticeable between the resulting rupture model uncertainties from these two parameterizations. Both significantly broaden the posterior densities and cause faster rupture propagation particularly near the hypocenter due to the major velocity change at the depth where the fault is located.

  9. IL6R Variation Asp358Ala Is a Potential Modifier of Lung Function in Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Gregory A; Robinson, Mac B; Hastie, Annette T; Li, Xingnan; Li, Huashi; Moore, Wendy C; Howard, Timothy D; Busse, William W.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Peters, Stephen P; Meyers, Deborah A; Bleecker, Eugene R

    2012-01-01

    Background The IL6R SNP rs4129267 has recently been identified as an asthma susceptibility locus in subjects of European ancestry but has not been characterized with respect to asthma severity. The SNP rs4129267 is in linkage disequilibrium (r2=1) with the IL6R coding SNP rs2228145 (Asp358Ala). This IL6R coding change increases IL6 receptor shedding and promotes IL6 transsignaling. Objectives To evaluate the IL6R SNP rs2228145 with respect to asthma severity phenotypes. Methods The IL6R SNP rs2228145 was evaluated in subjects of European ancestry with asthma from the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP). Lung function associations were replicated in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Asthma (CSGA) cohort. Serum soluble IL6 receptor (sIL6R) levels were measured in subjects from SARP. Immunohistochemistry was used to qualitatively evaluate IL6R protein expression in BAL cells and endobronchial biopsies. Results The minor C allele of IL6R SNP rs2228145 was associated with lower ppFEV1 in the SARP cohort (p=0.005), the CSGA cohort (0.008), and in combined cohort analysis (p=0.003). Additional associations with ppFVC, FEV1/FVC, and PC20 were observed. The rs2228145 C allele (Ala358) was more frequent in severe asthma phenotypic clusters. Elevated serum sIL6R was associated with lower ppFEV1 (p=0.02) and lower ppFVC (p=0.008) (N=146). IL6R protein expression was observed in BAL macrophages, airway epithelium, vascular endothelium, and airway smooth muscle. Conclusions The IL6R coding SNP rs2228145 (Asp358Ala) is a potential modifier of lung function in asthma and may identify subjects at risk for more severe asthma. IL6 transsignaling may have a pathogenic role in the lung. PMID:22554704

  10. Metatranscriptomes reveal functional variation in diatom communities from the Antarctic Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Pearson, Gareth A; Lago-Leston, Asuncion; Cá novas, Fernando; Cox, Cymon J; Verret, Frederic; Lasternas, Sebastian; Duarte, Carlos M.; Agusti, Susana; Serrã o, Ester A

    2015-01-01

    Functional genomics of diatom-dominated communities fromthe Antarctic Peninsula was studied using comparative metatranscriptomics. Samples obtained from diatom-rich communities in the Bransfield Strait, the western Weddell Sea and sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea/Wilkins Ice Shelf yielded more than 500K pyrosequencing reads that were combined to produce a global metatranscriptome assembly. Multi-gene phylogenies recovered three distinct communities, and diatom-assigned contigs further indicated little read-sharing between communities, validating an assembly-based annotation and analysis approach. Although functional analysis recovered a core of abundant shared annotations that were expressed across the three diatom communities, over 40% of annotations (but accounting for <10% of sequences) were community-specific. The two pelagic communities differed in their expression of N-metabolism and acquisition genes, which was almost absent in post-bloom conditions in the Weddell Sea community, while enrichment of transporters for ammonia and urea in Bransfield Strait diatoms suggests a physiological stance towards acquisition of reduced N-sources. The depletion of carbohydrate and energy metabolism pathways in sea ice relative to pelagic communities, together with increased light energy dissipation (via LHCSR proteins), photorespiration, and NO3 - uptake and utilization all pointed to irradiance stress and/or inorganic carbon limitation within sea ice. Ice-binding proteins and cold-shock transcription factors were also enriched in sea ice diatoms. Surprisingly, the abundance of gene transcripts for the translational machinery tracked decreasing environmental temperature across only a 4 °C range, possibly reflecting constraints on translational efficiency and protein production in cold environments. © 2015 International Society for Microbial Ecology All rights reserved.

  11. Pregnancy outcomes are not altered by variation in thyroid function within the normal range in women free of thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Flora; Kleynen, Pierre; Grabczan, Lidia; Salajan, Alexandra; Rozenberg, Serge; Pepersack, Thierry; Poppe, Kris

    2018-02-01

    In the recently revised guidelines on the management of thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy, treatment with thyroid hormone (LT4) is not recommended in women without thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) and TSH levels in the range 2.5-4.0 mIU/L, and in a recent study in that particular group of pregnant women, more complications were observed when a treatment with LT4 was given. The objective of the study was therefore to investigate whether variation in thyroid function within the normal (non-pregnant) range in women free of thyroid disease was associated with altered pregnancy outcomes? Cross-sectional data analysis of 1321 pregnant women nested within an ongoing prospective collection of pregnant women's data in a single centre in Brussels, Belgium. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-abs), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free T4 (FT4) and ferritin levels were measured and baseline characteristics were recorded. Women taking LT4, with TAI and thyroid function outside the normal non-pregnant range were excluded. Pregnancy outcomes and baseline characteristics were correlated with all TSH and FT4 levels within the normal range and compared between two groups (TSH cut-off 500 mL) was inversely associated with serum FT4 levels (OR: 0.35; CI 95%: 0.13-0.96); P  = 0.040. Also 10% of women free of thyroid disease had serum TSH levels ≥2.5 mIU/L. Variation in thyroid function during the first trimester within the normal (non-pregnant) range in women free of thyroid disease was not associated with altered pregnancy outcomes. These results add evidence to the recommendation against LT4 treatment in pregnant women with high normal TSH levels and without TPO antibodies. © 2018 European Society of Endocrinology.

  12. Individual variation of human S1P₁ coding sequence leads to heterogeneity in receptor function and drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obinata, Hideru; Gutkind, Sarah; Stitham, Jeremiah; Okuno, Toshiaki; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Hwa, John; Hla, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P₁), an abundantly-expressed G protein-coupled receptor which regulates key vascular and immune responses, is a therapeutic target in autoimmune diseases. Fingolimod/Gilenya (FTY720), an oral medication for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, targets S1P₁ receptors on immune and neural cells to suppress neuroinflammation. However, suppression of endothelial S1P₁ receptors is associated with cardiac and vascular adverse effects. Here we report the genetic variations of the S1P₁ coding region from exon sequencing of >12,000 individuals and their functional consequences. We conducted functional analyses of 14 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the S1PR1 gene. One SNP mutant (Arg¹²⁰ to Pro) failed to transmit sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)-induced intracellular signals such as calcium increase and activation of p44/42 MAPK and Akt. Two other mutants (Ile⁴⁵ to Thr and Gly³⁰⁵ to Cys) showed normal intracellular signals but impaired S1P-induced endocytosis, which made the receptor resistant to FTY720-induced degradation. Another SNP mutant (Arg¹³ to Gly) demonstrated protection from coronary artery disease in a high cardiovascular risk population. Individuals with this mutation showed a significantly lower percentage of multi-vessel coronary obstruction in a risk factor-matched case-control study. This study suggests that individual genetic variations of S1P₁ can influence receptor function and, therefore, infer differential disease risks and interaction with S1P₁-targeted therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Variation of Radon Emanation in Workplaces as a Function of Room Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norafatin Khalid; Amran Abdul Majid; Aznan Fazli Ismail; Muhamad Samudi Yasir; Redzuwan Yahaya; Izzaty Azani Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Modern life style requires people to spend most of their time indoors either in a house or in the workplace. Most modern buildings are made from soil based material which may consist of low concentration of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). It is known that one of the daughters of natural uranium is 226 Ra which eventually produce radon ( 222 Rn) gas. Recently, more evidence has linked lung cancer to exposure to high levels of radon and also to cigarette-smoking. Consequently, this research was conducted to study the radon emanation rates in different workplaces. The radon emanations in 27 rooms with three different dimension (54 m 3 , 210 m 3 and 351 m 3 ) and different building materials were determined for 96 hours using Sun Nuclear Radon Monitor. The radon emanations in the rooms studied were found to be in the range of 20.6 Bq m -3 hour -1 to 134.3 Bq m -3 hour -1 .The increase in humidity was found to significantly increase the radon emanation rates in the building, whereas the increase in temperature will result the decrease of radon emanation rates. In addition, the findings shows that the radon emanation rates in building were higher during the night until early in the morning which is in agreement with the findings on humidity and temperature factors. (author)

  14. Variation of the binary encounter peak energy as a function of projectile atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The energy of the binary encounter peak, in spectra of electrons emitted at 0 degrees with respect to the projectile beam direction, has been studied to investigate its dependence on the atomic number of the projectile ion. The projectiles all had the same squared velocity of 0.6 MeV/u, and all had the same charge q=7. The Z of the projectiles ranged from 8 to 35, and the target was H 2 . The Energy E BEP of the binary encounter peak and also the energy t of the cusp formed by electron loss or electron capture to the projectile continuum (ELC or ECC) were obtained from fits to the spectra. Considerable care was required in fitting the cusp in order to properly ascertain the cusp energy. The energy shift ΔE, defined as the difference between 4t and E BEP , was obtained for each projectile. It is found that the energy shift decreases as the projectile Z increases. This trend is the opposite of that seen for projectile charge where the shift increases as q increases. Such a trend is not well described by the simple elastic scattering model of binary encounter electron production

  15. Moho Depth Variations in the Northeastern North China Craton Revealed by Receiver Function Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Chen, L.; Yao, H.; Fang, L.

    2016-12-01

    The North China Craton (NCC), one of the oldest cratons in the world, has attracted wide attention in Earth Science for decades because of the unusual Mesozoic destruction of its cratonic lithosphere. Understanding the deep processes and mechanism of this craton destruction demands detailed knowledge about the deep structure of the region. In this study, we used two-year teleseismic receiver function data from the North China Seismic Array consisting of 200 broadband stations deployed in the northeastern NCC to image the Moho undulation of the region. A 2-D wave equation-based poststack depth migration method was employed to construct the structural images along 19 profiles, and a pseudo 3D crustal velocity model of the region based on previous ambient noise tomography and receiver function study was adopted in the migration. We considered both the Ps and PpPs phases, but in some cases we also conducted PpSs+PsPs migration using different back azimuth ranges of the data, and calculated the travel times of all the considered phases to constrain the Moho depths. By combining the structure images along the 19 profiles, we got a high-resolution Moho depth map beneath the northeastern NCC. Our results broadly consist with the results of previous active source studies [http://www.craton.cn/data], and show a good correlation of the Moho depths with geological and tectonic features. Generally, the Moho depths are distinctly different on the opposite sides of the North-South Gravity Lineament. The Moho in the west are deeper than 40 km and shows a rapid uplift from 40 km to 30 km beneath the Taihang Mountain Range in the middle. To the east in the Bohai Bay Basin, the Moho further shallows to 30-26 km depth and undulates by 3 km, coinciding well with the depressions and uplifts inside the basin. The Moho depth beneath the Yin-Yan Mountains in the north gradually decreases from 42 km in the west to 25 km in the east, varying much smoother than that to the south.

  16. Splines and variational methods

    CERN Document Server

    Prenter, P M

    2008-01-01

    One of the clearest available introductions to variational methods, this text requires only a minimal background in calculus and linear algebra. Its self-contained treatment explains the application of theoretic notions to the kinds of physical problems that engineers regularly encounter. The text's first half concerns approximation theoretic notions, exploring the theory and computation of one- and two-dimensional polynomial and other spline functions. Later chapters examine variational methods in the solution of operator equations, focusing on boundary value problems in one and two dimension

  17. Predicting ethnic variation in adaptation to later life: styles of socioemotional functioning and constrained heterotypy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consedine, Nathan S; Magai, Carol; Conway, Francine

    2004-06-01

    It is an axiom of social gerontology that populations of older individuals become increasingly differentiated as they age. Adaptations to physical and social losses and the increased dependency that typically accompany greater age are likely to be similarly heterogeneous, with different individuals adjusting to the aging process in widely diverse ways. In this paper we consider how individuals with diverse emotional and regulatory profiles, different levels of religiosity, and varied patterns of social relatedness fare as they age. Specifically, we examine the relation between ethnicity and patterns of socioemotional adaptation in a large, ethnically diverse sample (N = 1118) of community-dwelling older adults. Cluster analysis was applied to 11 measures of socioemotional functioning. Ten qualitatively different profiles were extracted and then related to a measure of physical resiliency. Consistent with ethnographic and psychological theory, individuals from different ethnic backgrounds were unevenly distributed across the clusters. Resilient participants of African descent (African Americans, Jamaicans, Trinidadians, Barbadians) were more likely to manifest patterns of adaptation characterized by religious beliefs, while resilient US-born Whites and Immigrant Whites were more likely to be resilient as a result of non-religious social connectedness. Taken together, although these data underscore the diversity of adaptation to later life, we suggest that patterns of successful adaptation vary systematically across ethnic groups. Implications for the continued study of ethnicity in aging and directions for future research are given.

  18. Variation of the count-dependent Metz filter with imaging system modulation transfer function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, M.A.; Schwinger, R.B.; Penney, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic investigation was conducted of how a number of parameters which alter the system modulation transfer function (MTF) influence the count-dependent Metz filter. Since restoration filters are most effective at those frequencies where the object power spectrum dominates that of the noise, it was observed that parameters which significantly degrade the MTF at low spatial frequencies strongly influence the formation of the Metz filter. Thus the radionuclide imaged and the depth of the source in a scattering medium had the most influence. This is because they alter the relative amount of scattered radiation being imaged. For low-energy photon emitters, the collimator employed and the distance from the collimator were found to have less of an influence but still to be significant. These cause alterations in the MTF which are more gradual, and hence are most pronounced at mid to high spatial frequencies. As long as adequate spatial sampling is employed, the Metz filter was determined to be independent of the exact size of the sampling bin width, to a first approximation. For planar and single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging, it is shown that two-dimensional filtering with the Metz filter optimized for the imaging conditions is able to deconvolve scatter and other causes of spatial resolution loss while diminishing noise, all in a balanced manner

  19. Geometric morphometrics of functionally distinct floral organs in Iris pumila: Analyzing patterns of symmetric and asymmetric shape variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radović Sanja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Iris flower is a complex morphological structure composed of two trimerous whorls of functionally distinct petaloid organs (the falls and the standards, one whorl of the stamens and one tricarpellary gynoecium. The petal-like style arms of the carpels are banded over the basal part of the falls, forming three pollination tunnels, each of which is perceived by the Iris pollinators as a single bilaterally symmetrical flower. Apart from the stamens, all petaloid floral organs are preferentially involved in advertising rewards to potential pollinators. Here we used the methods of geometric morphometrics to explore the shape variation in falls, standards and style arms of the Iris pumila flowers and to disentangle the symmetric and the asymmetric component of the total shape variance. Our results show that symmetric variation contributes mostly to the total shape variance in each of the three floral organs. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA was the dominant component of the asymmetric shape variation in the falls and the standards, but appeared to be marginally significant in the style arms. The values of FA indexes for the shape of falls (insects’ landing platforms and for the shape of standards (long-distance reward signals were found to be two orders of magnitude greater compared to that of the style arms. Directional asymmetry appeared to be very low, but highly statistically significant for all analyzed floral organs. Because floral symmetry can reliably indicate the presence of floral rewards, an almost perfect symmetry recorded for the style arm shape might be the outcome of pollinator preferences for symmetrical pollination units. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 173007

  20. Geographic variation in nasal cavity form among three human groups from the Japanese Archipelago: Ecogeographic and functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukase, Hitoshi; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Ishida, Hajime

    2016-05-01

    Geographic variation in human nasal form has often been interpreted as a climatic adaptation, owing to the nasal air-conditioning function. The aim of this study was to further address morphofunctional issues of the nasal cavity, using three human groups from subarctic, temperate, and subtropical regions of the Japanese Archipelago: prehistoric Okhotsk, early-modern Honshu and Okinawa groups. Using three-dimensional coordinates of craniometric landmarks surrounding the nasal cavity, we compared linear measurements regarding nasal cavity form among the three groups and also conducted 3D geometric morphometrics. Both linear measurements and morphometric analyses corroborate the previously reported covariation pattern of nasal cavity shape with climate, where humans from a cold/dry climate tend to possess a relatively tall, narrow, and deep nasal cavity compared with those from a warm/humid environment. The northern Okhotsk group had overall larger cranial airways, which may be attributable to their large facial skeleton. However, the ratio of nasal/bimaxillary breadth was significantly lower in the Okhotsk group, indicating that maxillary size does not necessarily constrain the nasal breadth. In addition, despite the presence of obvious geographic clines in anterior nasal shape, posterior choanal shape lacked the north-south geographic cline. This suggests a certain level of morphofunctional independence between the anterior and posterior nasal openings. The observed geographic variations must, however, be partly considered as a reflection of different ancestral traits and population histories of the three groups. Nevertheless, the results indicate that intergroup variations in nasal cavity morphology can be largely explained by climatic conditions. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:343-351, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Summertime Spatial Variations in Atmospheric Particulate Matter and Its Chemical Components in Different Functional Areas of Xiamen, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhui Zhao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the highly heterogeneous and dynamic nature of urban areas in Chinese cities, air pollution exhibits well-defined spatial variations. Rapid urbanization in China has heightened the importance of understanding and characterizing atmospheric particulate matter (PM concentrations and their spatiotemporal variations. To investigate the small-scale spatial variations in PM in Xiamen, total suspended particulate (TSP, PM10, PM5 and PM2.5 measurements were collected between August and September in 2012. Their average mass concentrations were 102.50 μg∙m−3, 82.79 μg∙m−3, 55.67 μg∙m−3 and 43.70 μg∙m−3, respectively. Organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC in PM2.5 were measured using thermal optical transmission. Based on the PM concentrations for all size categories, the following order for the different functional areas studied was identified: hospital > park > commercial area > residential area > industrial area. OC contributed approximately 5%–23% to the PM2.5 mass, whereas EC accounted for 0.8%–6.95%. Secondary organic carbon constituted most of the carbonaceous particles found in the park, commercial, industrial and residential areas, with the exception of hospitals. The high PM and EC concentrations in hospitals were primarily caused by vehicle emissions. Thus, the results suggest that long-term plans should be to limit the number of vehicles entering hospital campuses, construct large-capacity underground parking structures, and choose hospital locations far from major roads.

  2. Steam generator thermal hydraulic design & functional architecture features and related operational and reliability issues requiring consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klarner, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Proper thermal hydraulic design and functional architecture are critical to successful steam generator operation and long term reliability. The evolution of steam generators has been a gradual learning process that has benefited from continuous industry operational experience (OPEX). Inadequate thermal hydraulic design can lead to numerous degradation mechanisms such as excessive deposition, corrosion, flow and level instabilities, fluid-elastic instabilities and tube wear. The functional architecture determines the health of the tube bundle and the other internals during manufacturing, handling and operation. It also determines thermal performance as well as establishing global thermal-hydraulic characteristics such as water level shrink and swell response. This paper discusses the range of operational and reliability issues and relates them to the thermal hydraulic attributes and functional architecture of steam generators (many SG reliability issues are further discussed in other presentations at this conference). In pursuing such issues, the paper focuses on the four major features of the equipment, identifying in each case the goals and requirements such features must meet. Typical approaches and the means by which such requirements are addressed in current equipment are discussed. The four features are: 1. Tubing Material and Tube Bundle Heat Transfer Performance; a. Two materials are in current use – Alloy 690 TT and Alloy 800. Both are good materials with excellent performance records which serve their owners very well (the reliability attributes of Alloy 800 and 690 are discussed in other papers at this conference). Caution is advised in the supply of any material: – material quality is only assured by what is specified to material suppliers in procurement specifications – i.e. - all the knowledge and research in the world assures nothing if its findings are not reflected in procurement requirements. b. Heat transfer performance in addition to being

  3. Visual pathway function and structure in Wolfram syndrome: patient age, variation and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekel, James; Narayanan, Anagha; Rutlin, Jerrel; Lugar, Heather; Al-Lozi, Amal; Hershey, Tamara; Tychsen, Lawrence

    2018-01-01

    To report alterations in visual acuity and visual pathway structure over an interval of 1-3 years in a cohort of children, adolescents and young adults who have Wolfram syndrome (WFS) and to describe the range of disease severity evident in patients with WFS whose ages differed by as much as 20 years at first examination. Annual, prospective ophthalmological examinations were performed in conjunction with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) analysis. Diffusion tensor MRI-derived fractional anisotropy was used to assess the microstructural integrity of the optic radiations (OR FA). Mean age of the 23 patients with WFS in the study was 13.8 years (range 5-25 years). Mean log minimum angle resolution visual acuity was 0.66 (20/91). RNFL thickness was subnormal in even the youngest patients with WFS. Average RNFL thickness in patients with WFS was 57±8 µ or ~40% thinner than that measured in normal (94±10 µ) children and adolescents (P<0.01). Lower OR FA correlated with worse visual acuity (P=0.006). Subsequent examinations showed declines (P<0.05) in visual acuity, RNFL thickness and OR FA at follow-up intervals of 12-36 months. However, a wide range of disease severity was evident across ages: some of the youngest patients at their first examination had deficits more severe than the oldest patients. The genetic mutation of WFS causes damage to both pregeniculate and postgeniculate regions of the visual pathway. The damage is progressive. The decline in visual pathway structure is accompanied by declines of visual function. Disease severity differs widely in individual patients and cannot be predicted from their age.

  4. Different requirements of functional telomeres in neural stem cells and terminally differentiated neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanova, Anastasia; She, Robert; Pieraut, Simon; Clapp, Charlie; Maximov, Anton; Denchi, Eros Lazzerini

    2017-04-01

    Telomeres have been studied extensively in peripheral tissues, but their relevance in the nervous system remains poorly understood. Here, we examine the roles of telomeres at distinct stages of murine brain development by using lineage-specific genetic ablation of TRF2, an essential component of the shelterin complex that protects chromosome ends from the DNA damage response machinery. We found that functional telomeres are required for embryonic and adult neurogenesis, but their uncapping has surprisingly no detectable consequences on terminally differentiated neurons. Conditional knockout of TRF2 in post-mitotic immature neurons had virtually no detectable effect on circuit assembly, neuronal gene expression, and the behavior of adult animals despite triggering massive end-to-end chromosome fusions across the brain. These results suggest that telomeres are dispensable in terminally differentiated neurons and provide mechanistic insight into cognitive abnormalities associated with aberrant telomere length in humans. © 2017 Lobanova et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Characterization of the functional requirements of West Nile virus membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesker, Bastiaan; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M

    2010-02-01

    Flaviviruses infect their host cells by a membrane fusion reaction. In this study, we performed a functional analysis of the membrane fusion properties of West Nile virus (WNV) with liposomal target membranes. Membrane fusion was monitored continuously using a lipid mixing assay involving the fluorophore, pyrene. Fusion of WNV with liposomes occurred on the timescale of seconds and was strictly dependent on mildly acidic pH. Optimal fusion kinetics were observed at pH 6.3, the threshold for fusion being pH 6.9. Preincubation of the virus alone at pH 6.3 resulted in a rapid loss of fusion capacity. WNV fusion activity is strongly promoted by the presence of cholesterol in the target membrane. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence that cleavage of prM to M is a requirement for fusion activity of WNV.

  6. SEC23B is required for pancreatic acinar cell function in adult mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoriaty, Rami; Vogel, Nancy; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.; Sans, M. Dolors; Zhu, Guojing; Everett, Lesley; Nelson, Bradley; Durairaj, Haritha; McKnight, Brooke; Zhang, Bin; Ernst, Stephen A.; Ginsburg, David; Williams, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Mice with germline absence of SEC23B die perinatally, exhibiting massive pancreatic degeneration. We generated mice with tamoxifen-inducible, pancreatic acinar cell–specific Sec23b deletion. Inactivation of Sec23b exclusively in the pancreatic acinar cells of adult mice results in decreased overall pancreatic weights from pancreatic cell loss (decreased pancreatic DNA, RNA, and total protein content), as well as degeneration of exocrine cells, decreased zymogen granules, and alterations in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), ranging from vesicular ER to markedly expanded cisternae with accumulation of moderate-density content or intracisternal granules. Acinar Sec23b deletion results in induction of ER stress and increased apoptosis in the pancreas, potentially explaining the loss of pancreatic cells and decreased pancreatic weight. These findings demonstrate that SEC23B is required for normal function of pancreatic acinar cells in adult mice. PMID:28539403

  7. TA-55 facility control system upgrade project - human-system interface functional requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, W.H.; Pope, N.G.; Turner, W.J.; Brown, R.E.

    1995-11-01

    The functional requirements for that part of the Technical Area (TA)-55 Operations Center Upgrade Project that involves the human-system interface (HSI) are described in this document. The upgrade project seeks to replace completely the center's existing computerized data acquisition and display system, which consists of the field multiplexer units, Data General computer systems, and associated peripherals and software. The upgrade project has two parts-the Facility Data Acquisition Interface System (FDAIS) and the HSI. The HSI comprises software and hardware to provide a high-level graphical operator interface to the data acquisition system, as well as data archiving, alarm annunciation, and logging. The new system will be built with modern, commercially available components; it will improve reliability and maintainability, and it can be expanded for future needs

  8. Relevance of variations in the opposing dentition for the functionality of fixed and removable partial dentures: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommer, Bernhard; Krainhöfner, Martin; Watzek, Georg; Tepper, Gabor; Dintsios, Charalabos-Markos

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the functionality of fixed and removable partial dentures as test interventions in relation to variations in the opposing dentition and their prosthetic restoration. The abstracts identified in the respective databases were screened independently by two investigators. RCTs and uncontrolled studies were considered, provided the patients were included consecutively and the confounding variables were adequately monitored. Seventeen papers were included. The study and publication quality was assessed using a "biometric quality" tool showing an overall poor quality. The reported outcomes, such as survival rates, were in each case obtained from a single study. Two possible trends could be deduced for the endpoint longevity: (a) the first trend in favor of removable partial dentures, compared to fixed partial dentures, with a fully edentulous opposing arch fitted with a removable prosthesis; (b) the second trend in favor of implant-supported partial dentures, compared to conventionally fixed partial dentures, with natural opposing dentition or with a removable partial denture in the opposing arch. No evidence could be generated as to whether, and if so how, variations in the opposing dentition have a bearing on the decision to fit a partially edentulous arch with a fixed or removable partial denture.

  9. Relevance of Variations in the Opposing Dentition for the Functionality of Fixed and Removable Partial Dentures: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Pommer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the functionality of fixed and removable partial dentures as test interventions in relation to variations in the opposing dentition and their prosthetic restoration. The abstracts identified in the respective databases were screened independently by two investigators. RCTs and uncontrolled studies were considered, provided the patients were included consecutively and the confounding variables were adequately monitored. Seventeen papers were included. The study and publication quality was assessed using a “biometric quality” tool showing an overall poor quality. The reported outcomes, such as survival rates, were in each case obtained from a single study. Two possible trends could be deduced for the endpoint longevity: (a the first trend in favor of removable partial dentures, compared to fixed partial dentures, with a fully edentulous opposing arch fitted with a removable prosthesis; (b the second trend in favor of implant-supported partial dentures, compared to conventionally fixed partial dentures, with natural opposing dentition or with a removable partial denture in the opposing arch. No evidence could be generated as to whether, and if so how, variations in the opposing dentition have a bearing on the decision to fit a partially edentulous arch with a fixed or removable partial denture.

  10. Induction of functional Fc receptors in P388 leukemia cells. Requirement for multiple differentiation signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D A; Stotelmyer, N L; Kaplan, A M

    1985-04-01

    The development of functional Fc receptors (FcR) during induced differentiation with the tumor promoter, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), was studied in the murine tumor cell line, P388. PMA induced the appearance of FcR on the membranes of P388 cells as indicated by the binding of IgG-coated sheep red blood cells (IgG-SRBC). Concentrations of PMA as low as 1 ng/ml were sufficient to induce the expression of FcR as well as to inhibit cellular division and to induce adherence in the P388 tumor cell line; however, optimal FcR induction occurred at PMA concentrations of 10-100 ng/ml. Immunofluorescent analysis with heat-aggregated myeloma proteins indicated that PMA induced FcR which were capable of binding IgG2a and IgG2b immunoglobulins, but not IgG1. Adherence to a substratum was determined to be a second required signal for expression of FcR, since PMA induction of P388 tumor cells in teflon dishes failed to fully develop FcR and adherence of P388 cells to poly-L-lysine-coated culture dishes in the absence of PMA was insufficient for FcR expression. FcR which appeared after PMA induction were non-functional in the sense that membrane-bound IgG-SRBC were not ingested to any significant extent by the tumor cells. However, if FcR induction occurred in the presence conA-induced rat spleen cell culture supernatants, phagocytosis of membrane-bound erythrocytes occurred. These findings suggest that for the expression of FcR which are capable of particle internalization, at least three identifiable membrane-transmitted signals are required during differentiation.

  11. Transfer-function modelling between environmental variation and mesozooplankton in the Baltic Sea [review article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, I.; Hänninen, J.; Kornilovs, G.

    2003-12-01

    Time series of freshwater runoff, seawater salinity, temperature and oxygen were used in transfer functions (TF) to model changes of mesozooplankton taxa in the Baltic Sea from the 1960’s to the 1990’s. The models were then compared with long term zooplankton monitoring data from the same period. The TF models for all taxa over the whole Baltic proper and at different depth layers showed statistically significant estimates in t-tests. TF models were further compared using parsimony as a criterion. We present models showing 1) r2 > 0.4, 2) the smallest residual standard error with the combination of exploratory variables, 3) the lowest number of parameters and 4) the highest proportional decrease in error term when the TF model residual standard error was compared with those of the univariate ARIMA model of the same response variable. Most often (7 taxa out of a total of 8), zooplankton taxa were dependent on freshwater runoff and/or seawater salinity. Cladocerans and estuarine copepods were more conveniently modelled through the inclusion of seawater temperature and oxygen data as independent variables. Our modelling, however, explains neither the overall increase in zooplankton abundance nor a simultaneous decrease found in the neritic copepod, Temora longicornis. Therefore, biotic controlling agents (e.g. nutrients, primary production and planktivore diets) are suggested as independent variables for further TF modelling. TF modelling enabled us to put the controlling factors in a time frame. It was then possible, despite the inherent multiple correlation among parameters studied to deduce a chain-of-events from the environmental controls and biotic feedback mechanisms to changes in zooplankton species. We suggest that the documented long-term changes in zooplankton could have been driven by climatic regulation only. The control by climate could be mediated to zooplankton through marine chemical and physical factors, as well as biotic factors if all of these

  12. Sources of variation influencing concordance between functional MRI and direct cortical stimulation in brain tumor surgery

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    Melanie A Morrison

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Object: Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI remains a promising method to aid in the surgical management of patients diagnosed with brain tumors. For patients that are candidates for awake craniotomies, surgical decisions can potentially be improved by fMRI but this depends on the level of concordance between preoperative brain maps and the maps provided by the gold standard intraoperative method, direct cortical stimulation (DCS. There have been numerous studies of the concordance between fMRI and DCS using sensitivity and specificity measures, however the results are variable across studies and the key factors influencing variability are not well understood. Thus, the present work addresses the influence of technical factors on fMRI and DCS concordance. Methods: Motor and language mapping data were collected for a group of glioma patients (n = 14 who underwent both preoperative fMRI and intraoperative DCS in an awake craniotomy procedure for tumor removal. Normative fMRI data were also acquired in a healthy control group (n = 12. The fMRI and DCS mapping data were co-registered; true positive (TP, true negative (TN, false positive (FP and false negative (FN occurrences were tabulated over the exposed brain surface. Sensitivity and specificity were measured for the total group, and the motor and language sub-groups. The influence of grid placement, fMRI statistical thresholding, and task standardization were assessed. Correlations between proportions of agreement and error were carefully scrutinized to evaluate concordance more in-depth. Results: Concordance was significantly better for motor versus language mapping. There was an inverse relationship between TP and TN with increasing statistical threshold, and FP dominated the total error. Sensitivity and specificity were reduced when tasks were not standardized across fMRI and DCS. Conclusions: Although the agreement between fMRI and DCS is good, variability is introduced

  13. Sequential variation in brain functional magnetic resonance imaging after peripheral nerve injury: A rat study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Okihiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Oda, Ryo; Yamazaki, Tetsuro; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Yamada, Shunji; Tanaka, Masaki; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2018-04-23

    Although treatment protocols are available, patients experience both acute neuropathic pain and chronic neuropathic pain, hyperalgesia, and allodynia after peripheral nerve injury. The purpose of this study was to identify the brain regions activated after peripheral nerve injury using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sequentially and assess the relevance of the imaging results using histological findings. To model peripheral nerve injury in male Sprague-Dawley rats, the right sciatic nerve was crushed using an aneurysm clip, under general anesthesia. We used a 7.04T MRI system. T 2 * weighted image, coronal slice, repetition time, 7 ms; echo time, 3.3 ms; field of view, 30 mm × 30 mm; pixel matrix, 64 × 64 by zero-filling; slice thickness, 2 mm; numbers of slices, 9; numbers of average, 2; and flip angle, 8°. fMR images were acquired during electrical stimulation to the rat's foot sole; after 90 min, c-Fos immunohistochemical staining of the brain was performed in rats with induced peripheral nerve injury for 3, 6, and 9 weeks. Data were pre-processed by realignment in the Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 software. A General Linear Model first level analysis was used to obtain T-values. One week after the injury, significant changes were detected in the cingulate cortex, insular cortex, amygdala, and basal ganglia; at 6 weeks, the brain regions with significant changes in signal density were contracted; at 9 weeks, the amygdala and hippocampus showed activation. Histological findings of the rat brain supported the fMRI findings. We detected sequential activation in the rat brain using fMRI after sciatic nerve injury. Many brain regions were activated during the acute stage of peripheral nerve injury. Conversely, during the chronic stage, activation of the amygdala and hippocampus may be related to chronic-stage hyperalgesia, allodynia, and chronic neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Oral vitamin C supplementation reduces erythropoietin requirement in hemodialysis patients with functional iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Tanjim; DeVita, Maria V; Michelis, Michael F

    2016-09-01

    Functional iron deficiency (FID) is a major cause of persistent anemia in dialysis patients and also contributes to a suboptimal response to erythropoietin (Epo) administration. Vitamin C acts as an enzyme cofactor and enhances mobilization of the ferrous form of iron to transferrin thus increasing its bioavailability. High-dose intravenous vitamin C has been shown to decrease the Epo requirement and improve hemoglobin levels in previous studies. This study assessed the effect of low-dose oral vitamin C on possible reduction in Epo dose requirements in stable hemodialysis patients with FID. This prospective study included 22 stable hemodialysis patients with FID defined as transferrin saturation (T sat) 100 mcg/L with Epo requirement of ≥4000 U/HD session. Patients received oral vitamin C 250 mg daily for 3 months. Hemoglobin, iron and T sat levels were recorded monthly. No one received iron supplementation during the study period. There was a significant reduction in median Epo dose requirement in the 15 patients who completed the study, from 203.1 U/kg/week (95 % CI 188.4-270.6) to 172.8 U/kg/week (95 % CI 160.2-214.8), (P = 0.01). In the seven responders, there was 33 % reduction in Epo dose from their baseline. Despite adjustment of Epo dose, the mean hemoglobin level was significantly increased from 10.1 ± 0.6 to 10.7 ± 0.6 mg/dL (P = 0.03). No adverse effects of oral vitamin C were observed. Daily low-dose oral vitamin C supplementation reduced Epo dose requirements in hemodialysis patients with FID. Limitations of this study include a small sample size and the lack of measurements of vitamin C and oxalate levels. Despite concerns regarding oral vitamin C absorption in dialysis patients, this study indicates vitamin C was well tolerated by all participants without reported adverse effect.

  15. Host ESCRT proteins are required for bromovirus RNA replication compartment assembly and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Diaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses genome replication invariably is associated with vesicles or other rearranged cellular membranes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV RNA replication occurs on perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes in ~70 nm vesicular invaginations (spherules. BMV RNA replication vesicles show multiple parallels with membrane-enveloped, budding retrovirus virions, whose envelopment and release depend on the host ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport membrane-remodeling machinery. We now find that deleting components of the ESCRT pathway results in at least two distinct BMV phenotypes. One group of genes regulate RNA replication and the frequency of viral replication complex formation, but had no effect on spherule size, while a second group of genes regulate RNA replication in a way or ways independent of spherule formation. In particular, deleting SNF7 inhibits BMV RNA replication > 25-fold and abolishes detectable BMV spherule formation, even though the BMV RNA replication proteins accumulate and localize normally on perinuclear ER membranes. Moreover, BMV ESCRT recruitment and spherule assembly depend on different sets of protein-protein interactions from those used by multivesicular body vesicles, HIV-1 virion budding, or tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV spherule formation. These and other data demonstrate that BMV requires cellular ESCRT components for proper formation and function of its vesicular RNA replication compartments. The results highlight growing but diverse interactions of ESCRT factors with many viruses and viral processes, and potential value of the ESCRT pathway as a target for broad-spectrum antiviral resistance.

  16. Human T cell colony formation in microculture: analysis of growth requirements and functional activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, E W; Lee, J W; Dosch, H M; Price, G B

    1981-03-01

    A microculture method in methylcellulose has been developed for the study of human T cell colony formation. The technique is simple, reliable, does not require preincubation with lectin and requires small numbers of cells. Colony formation was dependent on the presence of phytohemagglutin-conditioned medium, a T colony precursor cell (TCPC), and a "helper" or accessory T cell. Plating efficiency was increased 10-fold in the presence of irradiated feeder cells. Progenitors of the T colony cells were identified in peripheral blood, tonsil, and spleen but not in thymus or thoracic duct. They were isolated in the E-rosetting, theophylline-resistant, Fc-IgG-negative cell populations. In peripheral blood the frequency of TCPC and accessory cells, the T colony forming unit, was estimated to be 8 X 10(-3). Colony cells proliferated in response to lectins and allogeneic cells. Forty to 80% of the cells were Ia-positive and stimulated both autologous and allogeneic mixed lymphocyte responses. They were incapable of mediating antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. In contrast, they were effective in assays of spontaneous cytotoxicity but only against certain target cells. This method for the analysis of T colony formation should prove valuable in the functional analysis of T cell subsets in immunodeficiency states or the transplant recipient.

  17. RET Functions as a Dual-Specificity Kinase that Requires Allosteric Inputs from Juxtamembrane Elements

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    Iván Plaza-Menacho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases exhibit a variety of activation mechanisms despite highly homologous catalytic domains. Such diversity arises through coupling of extracellular ligand-binding portions with highly variable intracellular sequences flanking the tyrosine kinase domain and specific patterns of autophosphorylation sites. Here, we show that the juxtamembrane (JM segment enhances RET catalytic domain activity through Y687. This phospho-site is also required by the JM region to rescue an otherwise catalytically deficient RET activation-loop mutant lacking tyrosines. Structure-function analyses identified interactions between the JM hinge, αC helix, and an unconventional activation-loop serine phosphorylation site that engages the HRD motif and promotes phospho-tyrosine conformational accessibility and regulatory spine assembly. We demonstrate that this phospho-S909 arises from an intrinsic RET dual-specificity kinase activity and show that an equivalent serine is required for RET signaling in Drosophila. Our findings reveal dual-specificity and allosteric components for the mechanism of RET activation and signaling with direct implications for drug discovery.

  18. LRGUK-1 is required for basal body and manchette function during spermatogenesis and male fertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Male infertility affects at least 5% of reproductive age males. The most common pathology is a complex presentation of decreased sperm output and abnormal sperm shape and motility referred to as oligoasthenoteratospermia (OAT. For the majority of OAT men a precise diagnosis cannot be provided. Here we demonstrate that leucine-rich repeats and guanylate kinase-domain containing isoform 1 (LRGUK-1 is required for multiple aspects of sperm assembly, including acrosome attachment, sperm head shaping and the initiation of the axoneme growth to form the core of the sperm tail. Specifically, LRGUK-1 is required for basal body attachment to the plasma membrane, the appropriate formation of the sub-distal appendages, the extension of axoneme microtubules and for microtubule movement and organisation within the manchette. Manchette dysfunction leads to abnormal sperm head shaping. Several of these functions may be achieved in association with the LRGUK-1 binding partner HOOK2. Collectively, these data establish LRGUK-1 as a major determinant of microtubule structure within the male germ line.

  19. Transforming user needs into functional requirements for an antibiotic clinical decision support system: explicating content analysis for system design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, T J

    2013-01-01

    Many informatics studies use content analysis to generate functional requirements for system development. Explication of this translational process from qualitative data to functional requirements can strengthen the understanding and scientific rigor when applying content analysis in informatics studies. To describe a user-centered approach transforming emergent themes derived from focus group data into functional requirements for informatics solutions and to illustrate these methods to the development of an antibiotic clinical decision support system (CDS). THE APPROACH CONSISTED OF FIVE STEPS: 1) identify unmet therapeutic planning information needs via Focus Group Study-I, 2) develop a coding framework of therapeutic planning themes to refine the domain scope to antibiotic therapeutic planning, 3) identify functional requirements of an antibiotic CDS system via Focus Group Study-II, 4) discover informatics solutions and functional requirements from coded data, and 5) determine the types of information needed to support the antibiotic CDS system and link with the identified informatics solutions and functional requirements. The coding framework for Focus Group Study-I revealed unmet therapeutic planning needs. Twelve subthemes emerged and were clustered into four themes; analysis indicated a need for an antibiotic CDS intervention. Focus Group Study-II included five types of information needs. Comments from the Barrier/Challenge to information access and Function/Feature themes produced three informatics solutions and 13 functional requirements of an antibiotic CDS system. Comments from the Patient, Institution, and Domain themes generated required data elements for each informatics solution. This study presents one example explicating content analysis of focus group data and the analysis process to functional requirements from narrative data. Illustration of this 5-step method was used to develop an antibiotic CDS system, resolving unmet antibiotic prescribing

  20. PRMT1 mediated methylation of TAF15 is required for its positive gene regulatory function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobert, Laure; Argentini, Manuela [Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), CNRS UMR 7104, INSERM U 596, Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, BP 10142 - 67404 Illkirch Cedex, CU de Strasbourg (France); Tora, Laszlo, E-mail: laszlo@igbmc.u-strasbg.fr [Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), CNRS UMR 7104, INSERM U 596, Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, BP 10142 - 67404 Illkirch Cedex, CU de Strasbourg (France)

    2009-04-15

    TAF15 (formerly TAF{sub II}68) is a nuclear RNA-binding protein that is associated with a distinct population of TFIID and RNA polymerase II complexes. TAF15 harbours an N-terminal activation domain, an RNA recognition motif (RRM) and many Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) repeats at its C-terminal end. The N-terminus of TAF15 serves as an essential transforming domain in the fusion oncoprotein created by chromosomal translocation in certain human chondrosarcomas. Post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) of proteins are known to regulate their activity, however, nothing is known on how PTMs affect TAF15 function. Here we demonstrate that endogenous human TAF15 is methylated in vivo at its numerous RGG repeats. Furthermore, we identify protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a TAF15 interactor and the major PRMT responsible for its methylation. In addition, the RGG repeat-containing C-terminus of TAF15 is responsible for the shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and the methylation of RGG repeats affects the subcellular localization of TAF15. The methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is required for the ability of TAF15 to positively regulate the expression of the studied endogenous TAF15-target genes. Our findings demonstrate that arginine methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is a crucial event determining its proper localization and gene regulatory function.

  1. Genome-Wide Requirements for Resistance to Functionally Distinct DNA-Damaging Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanistic and therapeutic differences in the cellular response to DNA-damaging compounds are not completely understood, despite intense study. To expand our knowledge of DNA damage, we assayed the effects of 12 closely related DNA-damaging agents on the complete pool of ~4,700 barcoded homozygous deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In our protocol, deletion strains are pooled together and grown competitively in the presence of compound. Relative strain sensitivity is determined by hybridization of PCR-amplified barcodes to an oligonucleotide array carrying the barcode complements. These screens identified genes in well-characterized DNA-damage-response pathways as well as genes whose role in the DNA-damage response had not been previously established. High-throughput individual growth analysis was used to independently confirm microarray results. Each compound produced a unique genome-wide profile. Analysis of these data allowed us to determine the relative importance of DNA-repair modules for resistance to each of the 12 profiled compounds. Clustering the data for 12 distinct compounds uncovered both known and novel functional interactions that comprise the DNA-damage response and allowed us to define the genetic determinants required for repair of interstrand cross-links. Further genetic analysis allowed determination of epistasis for one of these functional groups.

  2. Functional Requirements for Heparan Sulfate Biosynthesis in Morphogenesis and Nervous System Development in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Cassandra R; Thackeray, Andrea; Perrat, Paola N; Hekimi, Siegfried; Bénard, Claire Y

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of cell migration is essential to animal development and physiology. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans shape the interactions of morphogens and guidance cues with their respective receptors to elicit appropriate cellular responses. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans consist of a protein core with attached heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains, which are synthesized by glycosyltransferases of the exostosin (EXT) family. Abnormal HS chain synthesis results in pleiotropic consequences, including abnormal development and tumor formation. In humans, mutations in either of the exostosin genes EXT1 and EXT2 lead to osteosarcomas or multiple exostoses. Complete loss of any of the exostosin glycosyltransferases in mouse, fish, flies and worms leads to drastic morphogenetic defects and embryonic lethality. Here we identify and study previously unavailable viable hypomorphic mutations in the two C. elegans exostosin glycosyltransferases genes, rib-1 and rib-2. These partial loss-of-function mutations lead to a severe reduction of HS levels and result in profound but specific developmental defects, including abnormal cell and axonal migrations. We find that the expression pattern of the HS copolymerase is dynamic during embryonic and larval morphogenesis, and is sustained throughout life in specific cell types, consistent with HSPGs playing both developmental and post-developmental roles. Cell-type specific expression of the HS copolymerase shows that HS elongation is required in both the migrating neuron and neighboring cells to coordinate migration guidance. Our findings provide insights into general principles underlying HSPG function in development.

  3. PRMT1 mediated methylation of TAF15 is required for its positive gene regulatory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobert, Laure; Argentini, Manuela; Tora, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    TAF15 (formerly TAF II 68) is a nuclear RNA-binding protein that is associated with a distinct population of TFIID and RNA polymerase II complexes. TAF15 harbours an N-terminal activation domain, an RNA recognition motif (RRM) and many Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) repeats at its C-terminal end. The N-terminus of TAF15 serves as an essential transforming domain in the fusion oncoprotein created by chromosomal translocation in certain human chondrosarcomas. Post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) of proteins are known to regulate their activity, however, nothing is known on how PTMs affect TAF15 function. Here we demonstrate that endogenous human TAF15 is methylated in vivo at its numerous RGG repeats. Furthermore, we identify protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a TAF15 interactor and the major PRMT responsible for its methylation. In addition, the RGG repeat-containing C-terminus of TAF15 is responsible for the shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and the methylation of RGG repeats affects the subcellular localization of TAF15. The methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is required for the ability of TAF15 to positively regulate the expression of the studied endogenous TAF15-target genes. Our findings demonstrate that arginine methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is a crucial event determining its proper localization and gene regulatory function.

  4. Variation in Music Player Listening Level as a Function of Campus Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yunea; Guercio, Diana; Ledon, Victoria; Le Prell, Colleen G

    2017-04-01

    function of race. After accounting for daily and weekly use patterns, 5% were deemed at risk based on the criteria put forward by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and 9% were deemed at risk based on the guidance provided by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Some 5-10% of the participants were deemed at risk; this finding is consistent with other studies using similar methods. It is possible that the same listeners would have selected different listening levels in other noise backgrounds, however. This unknown variable makes it difficult to estimate risk with a single listening level measurement. American Academy of Audiology

  5. Identifying Functional Requirements for Flexible Airspace Management Concept Using Human-In-The-Loop Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul U.; Bender, Kim; Pagan, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Flexible Airspace Management (FAM) is a mid- term Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept that allows dynamic changes to airspace configurations to meet the changes in the traffic demand. A series of human-in-the-loop (HITL) studies have identified procedures and decision support requirements needed to implement FAM. This paper outlines a suggested FAM procedure and associated decision support functionality based on these HITL studies. A description of both the tools used to support the HITLs and the planned NextGen technologies available in the mid-term are presented and compared. The mid-term implementation of several NextGen capabilities, specifically, upgrades to the Traffic Management Unit (TMU), the initial release of an en route automation system, the deployment of a digital data communication system, a more flexible voice communications network, and the introduction of a tool envisioned to manage and coordinate networked ground systems can support the implementation of the FAM concept. Because of the variability in the overall deployment schedule of the mid-term NextGen capabilities, the dependency of the individual NextGen capabilities are examined to determine their impact on a mid-term implementation of FAM. A cursory review of the different technologies suggests that new functionality slated for the new en route automation system is a critical enabling technology for FAM, as well as the functionality to manage and coordinate networked ground systems. Upgrades to the TMU are less critical but important nonetheless for FAM to be fully realized. Flexible voice communications network and digital data communication system could allow more flexible FAM operations but they are not as essential.

  6. Characterization of the TRBP domain required for Dicer interaction and function in RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Far Mohamed

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dicer, Ago2 and TRBP are the minimum components of the human RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC. While Dicer and Ago2 are RNases, TRBP is the double-stranded RNA binding protein (dsRBP that loads small interfering RNA into the RISC. TRBP binds directly to Dicer through its C-terminal domain. Results We show that the TRBP binding site in Dicer is a 165 amino acid (aa region located between the ATPase and the helicase domains. The binding site in TRBP is a 69 aa domain, called C4, located at the C-terminal end of TRBP. The TRBP1 and TRBP2 isoforms, but not TRBPs lacking the C4 site (TRBPsΔC4, co-immunoprecipitated with Dicer. The C4 domain is therefore necessary to bind Dicer, irrespective of the presence of RNA. Immunofluorescence shows that while full-length TRBPs colocalize with Dicer, TRBPsΔC4 do not. tarbp2-/- cells, which do not express TRBP, do not support RNA interference (RNAi mediated by short hairpin or micro RNAs against EGFP. Both TRBPs, but not TRBPsΔC4, were able to rescue RNAi function. In human cells with low RNAi activity, addition of TRBP1 or 2, but not TRBPsΔC4, rescued RNAi function. Conclusion The mapping of the interaction sites between TRBP and Dicer show unique domains that are required for their binding. Since TRBPsΔC4 do not interact or colocalize with Dicer, we suggest that TRBP and Dicer, both dsRBPs, do not interact through bound dsRNA. TRBPs, but not TRBPsΔC4, rescue RNAi activity in RNAi-compromised cells, indicating that the binding of Dicer to TRBP is critical for RNAi function.

  7. A Functional Core of IncA Is Required for Chlamydia trachomatis Inclusion Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Mary M; Noriea, Nicholas F; Bauler, Laura D; Lam, Jennifer L; Sager, Janet; Wesolowski, Jordan; Paumet, Fabienne; Hackstadt, Ted

    2016-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen that is the etiological agent of a variety of human diseases, including blinding trachoma and sexually transmitted infections. Chlamydiae replicate within a membrane-bound compartment, termed an inclusion, which they extensively modify by the insertion of type III secreted proteins called Inc proteins. IncA is an inclusion membrane protein that encodes two coiled-coil domains that are homologous to eukaryotic SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor) motifs. Recent biochemical evidence suggests that a functional core, composed of SNARE-like domain 1 (SLD-1) and part of SNARE-like domain 2 (SLD-2), is required for the characteristic homotypic fusion of C. trachomatis inclusions in multiply infected cells. To verify the importance of IncA in homotypic fusion in Chlamydia, we generated an incA::bla mutant. Insertional inactivation of incA resulted in the formation of nonfusogenic inclusions, a phenotype that was completely rescued by complementation with full-length IncA. Rescue of homotypic inclusion fusion was dependent on the presence of the functional core consisting of SLD-1 and part of SLD-2. Collectively, these results confirm in vitro membrane fusion assays identifying functional domains of IncA and expand the genetic tools available for identification of chlamydia with a method for complementation of site-specific mutants. Chlamydia trachomatis replicates within a parasitophorous vacuole termed an inclusion. The chlamydial inclusions are nonfusogenic with vesicles in the endocytic pathway but, in multiply infected cells, fuse with each other to form a single large inclusion. This homotypic fusion is dependent upon the presence of a chlamydial inclusion membrane-localized protein, IncA. Specificity of membrane fusion in eukaryotic cells is regulated by SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment receptor) proteins on the cytosolic face of vesicles and target

  8. Sample size requirements for studies of treatment effects on beta-cell function in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachin, John M; McGee, Paula L; Greenbaum, Carla J; Palmer, Jerry; Pescovitz, Mark D; Gottlieb, Peter; Skyler, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Preservation of β-cell function as measured by stimulated C-peptide has recently been accepted as a therapeutic target for subjects with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. In recently completed studies conducted by the Type 1 Diabetes Trial Network (TrialNet), repeated 2-hour Mixed Meal Tolerance Tests (MMTT) were obtained for up to 24 months from 156 subjects with up to 3 months duration of type 1 diabetes at the time of study enrollment. These data provide the information needed to more accurately determine the sample size needed for future studies of the effects of new agents on the 2-hour area under the curve (AUC) of the C-peptide values. The natural log(x), log(x+1) and square-root (√x) transformations of the AUC were assessed. In general, a transformation of the data is needed to better satisfy the normality assumptions for commonly used statistical tests. Statistical analysis of the raw and transformed data are provided to estimate the mean levels over time and the residual variation in untreated subjects that allow sample size calculations for future studies at either 12 or 24 months of follow-up and among children 8-12 years of age, adolescents (13-17 years) and adults (18+ years). The sample size needed to detect a given relative (percentage) difference with treatment versus control is greater at 24 months than at 12 months of follow-up, and differs among age categories. Owing to greater residual variation among those 13-17 years of age, a larger sample size is required for this age group. Methods are also described for assessment of sample size for mixtures of subjects among the age categories. Statistical expressions are presented for the presentation of analyses of log(x+1) and √x transformed values in terms of the original units of measurement (pmol/ml). Analyses using different transformations are described for the TrialNet study of masked anti-CD20 (rituximab) versus masked placebo. These results provide the information needed to accurately

  9. Sample size requirements for studies of treatment effects on beta-cell function in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Lachin

    Full Text Available Preservation of β-cell function as measured by stimulated C-peptide has recently been accepted as a therapeutic target for subjects with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. In recently completed studies conducted by the Type 1 Diabetes Trial Network (TrialNet, repeated 2-hour Mixed Meal Tolerance Tests (MMTT were obtained for up to 24 months from 156 subjects with up to 3 months duration of type 1 diabetes at the time of study enrollment. These data provide the information needed to more accurately determine the sample size needed for future studies of the effects of new agents on the 2-hour area under the curve (AUC of the C-peptide values. The natural log(x, log(x+1 and square-root (√x transformations of the AUC were assessed. In general, a transformation of the data is needed to better satisfy the normality assumptions for commonly used statistical tests. Statistical analysis of the raw and transformed data are provided to estimate the mean levels over time and the residual variation in untreated subjects that allow sample size calculations for future studies at either 12 or 24 months of follow-up and among children 8-12 years of age, adolescents (13-17 years and adults (18+ years. The sample size needed to detect a given relative (percentage difference with treatment versus control is greater at 24 months than at 12 months of follow-up, and differs among age categories. Owing to greater residual variation among those 13-17 years of age, a larger sample size is required for this age group. Methods are also described for assessment of sample size for mixtures of subjects among the age categories. Statistical expressions are presented for the presentation of analyses of log(x+1 and √x transformed values in terms of the original units of measurement (pmol/ml. Analyses using different transformations are described for the TrialNet study of masked anti-CD20 (rituximab versus masked placebo. These results provide the information needed to

  10. The influence of D2O, perchlorate, and variation in temperature on the potential-dependent contractile function of frog skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulks, J.G.; Morishita, L.

    1985-01-01

    D 2 O and perchlorate manifest opposing effects on the contractile function of skeletal muscle (amplitude of twitches and maximum K contractures, potential dependence of contraction and inactivation), and when combined the influence of one may effectively antagonize that of the other. The ratio of perchlorate concentrations required to produce effects of equal intensity, (e.g., twitch enhancement and restoration of maximum K contractures in media lacking divalent cations or containing a depressant concentration of a cationic amphipath) in H 2 O and D 2 O solutions was generally rather constant. These findings are compatible with the view that both agents can influence contractile function by virtue of their effects on solvent structure. In the absence of divalent cations, the effects of reduced temperature resemble those of D 2 O whereas the effects of increased temperature resemble those of the chaotropic anion. However, in other media, variation in temperature was found to result in additional nonsolvent effects so that low temperature could oppose rather than enhance the effects of D 2 O. These observations are discussed in terms of a model which postulates a role for solvent influences on the kinetics of two separate potential-dependent conformational transitions of membrane proteins which mediate the activation and inactivation of contraction in skeletal muscle

  11. Regional Variation in Acute Kidney Injury Requiring Dialysis in the English National Health Service from 2000 to 2015 - A National Epidemiological Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin V Kolhe

    Full Text Available The absence of effective interventions in presence of increasing national incidence and case-fatality in acute kidney injury requiring dialysis (AKI-D warrants a study of regional variation to explore any potential for improvement. We therefore studied regional variation in the epidemiology of AKI-D in English National Health Service over a period of 15 years.We analysed Hospital Episode Statistics data for all patients with a diagnosis of AKI-D, using ICD-10-CM codes, in English regions between 2000 and 2015 to study temporal changes in regional incidence and case-fatality.Of 203,758,879 completed discharges between 1st April 2000 and 31st March 2015, we identified 54,252 patients who had AKI-D in the nine regions of England. The population incidence of AKI-D increased variably in all regions over 15 years; however, the regional variation decreased from 3·3-fold to 1·3-fold (p<0·01. In a multivariable adjusted model, using London as the reference, in the period of 2000-2005, the North East (odd ratio (OR 1·38; 95%CI 1·01, 1·90, East Midlands (OR 1·38; 95%CI 1·01, 1·90 and West Midlands (OR 1·38; 95%CI 1·01, 1·90 had higher odds for death, while East of England had lower odds for death (OR 0·66; 95% CI 0·49, 0·90. The North East had higher OR in all three five-year periods as compared to the other eight regions. Adjusted case-fatality showed significant variability with temporary improvement in some regions but overall there was no significant improvement in any region over 15 years.We observed considerable regional variation in the epidemiology of AKI-D that was not entirely attributable to variations in demographic or other identifiable clinical factors. These observations make a compelling case for further research to elucidate the reasons and identify interventions to reduce the incidence and case-fatality in all regions.

  12. Autonomous Integrated Receive System (AIRS) requirements definition. Volume 4: Functional specification for the prototype Automated Integrated Receive System (AIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chie, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The functional requirements for the performance, design, and testing for the prototype Automated Integrated Receive System (AIRS) to be demonstrated for the TDRSS S-Band Single Access Return Link are presented.

  13. Joint Simulation System (JSIMS) Functional Requirements Document (FRD); A User's Perspective on the Future, Version 1.O

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to define JSIMS functional requirements in a level of detail that is meaningful to both the JSIMS developmental community and the expected future users of the system...

  14. Functional Significance of Labellum Pattern Variation in a Sexually Deceptive Orchid (Ophrys heldreichii: Evidence of Individual Signature Learning Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Stejskal

    Full Text Available Mimicking female insects to attract male pollinators is an important strategy in sexually deceptive orchids of the genus Ophrys, and some species possess flowers with conspicuous labellum patterns. The function of the variation of the patterns remains unresolved, with suggestions that these enhance pollinator communication. We investigated the possible function of the labellum pattern in Ophrys heldreichii, an orchid species in which the conspicuous and complex labellum pattern contrasts with a dark background. The orchid is pollinated exclusively by males of the solitary bee, Eucera berlandi. Comparisons of labellum patterns revealed that patterns within inflorescences are more similar than those of other conspecific plants. Field observations showed that the males approach at a great speed and directly land on flowers, but after an unsuccessful copulation attempt, bees hover close and visually scan the labellum pattern for up to a minute. Learning experiments conducted with honeybees as an accessible model of bee vision demonstrated that labellum patterns of different plants can be reliably learnt; in contrast, patterns of flowers from the same inflorescence could not be discriminated. These results support the hypothesis that variable labellum patterns in O. heldreichii are involved in flower-pollinator communication which would likely help these plants to avoid geitonogamy.

  15. Radionuclide assessment of left ventricular function in patients requiring intraoperative balloon pump assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.A.; Laks, H.; Wackers, F.J.; Berger, H.J.; Williams, B.; Hammond, G.L.; Geha, A.S.; Gottschalk, A.; Zaret, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-three surviving patients who were weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass with intraaortic balloon pump assistance returned for follow-up radionuclide left ventricular (LV) function and thallium 201 perfusion studies at a mean of 23 +/- 3 months following operation. It was found that despite profound intraoperative myocardial depression requiring intraaortic balloon assistance, 13 patients had no change (within 10%) in the resting LV ejection fraction compared with the preoperative measurement. Among all 23 patients, there was no difference between mean (+/- standard error of the mean) preoperative and postoperative resting LV ejection fraction (48 +/- 4 vs 46 +/- 4%, p . not significant [NS]). Only 11 patients had perioperative myocardial infarction documented by new Q waves in the electrocardiogram, by elevation of creatine kinase-MB fraction, or by defects on thallium 201 imaging not explained by documented myocardial infarction before operation. Overall, postoperative resting LV ejection fraction was not different from the preoperative value in patients with perioperative myocardial infarction (44 +/- 7 vs 47 +/- 5%, p . NS). Postoperative resting LV ejection fraction rose by greater than 10% compared with preoperative values in 4 patients (3 with aortic valve replacement), remained within the 10% limit in 9 patients, and fell by greater than 10% in 10 patients (7 with perioperative myocardial infarction). Only 4 out of 16 patients studied at follow-up with exercise radionuclide studies demonstrated a normal LV response to exercise (greater than 5% increase in LV ejection fraction). Thus, among survivors requiring intraaortic balloon pump assistance for weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass, LV performance at rest is frequently preserved. In addition, 11 of the 23 patients had evidence of perioperative myocardial infarction, indicating a component of reversible intraoperative LV dysfunction

  16. Inkjet Printing of Functional and Structural Materials: Fluid Property Requirements, Feature Stability, and Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Brian

    2010-08-01

    Inkjet printing is viewed as a versatile manufacturing tool for applications in materials fabrication in addition to its traditional role in graphics output and marking. The unifying feature in all these applications is the dispensing and precise positioning of very small volumes of fluid (1-100 picoliters) on a substrate before transformation to a solid. The application of inkjet printing to the fabrication of structures for structural or functional materials applications requires an understanding as to how the physical processes that operate during inkjet printing interact with the properties of the fluid precursors used. Here we review the current state of understanding of the mechanisms of drop formation and how this defines the fluid properties that are required for a given liquid to be printable. The interactions between individual drops and the substrate as well as between adjacent drops are important in defining the resolution and accuracy of printed objects. Pattern resolution is limited by the extent to which a liquid drop spreads on a substrate and how spreading changes with the overlap of adjacent drops to form continuous features. There are clearly defined upper and lower bounds to the width of a printed continuous line, which can be defined in terms of materials and process variables. Finer-resolution features can be achieved through appropriate patterning and structuring of the substrate prior to printing, which is essential if polymeric semiconducting devices are to be fabricated. Low advancing and receding contact angles promote printed line stability but are also more prone to solute segregation or “coffee staining” on drying.

  17. LRRC10 is required to maintain cardiac function in response to pressure overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Matthew J; Feng, Li; Grimes, Adrian C; Hacker, Timothy A; Olson, Timothy M; Kamp, Timothy J; Balijepalli, Ravi C; Lee, Youngsook

    2016-01-15

    We previously reported that the cardiomyocyte-specific leucine-rich repeat containing protein (LRRC)10 has critical functions in the mammalian heart. In the present study, we tested the role of LRRC10 in the response of the heart to biomechanical stress by performing transverse aortic constriction on Lrrc10-null (Lrrc10(-/-)) mice. Mild pressure overload induced severe cardiac dysfunction and ventricular dilation in Lrrc10(-/-) mice compared with control mice. In addition to dilation and cardiomyopathy, Lrrc10(-/-) mice showed a pronounced increase in heart weight with pressure overload stimulation and a more dramatic loss of cardiac ventricular performance, collectively suggesting that the absence of LRRC10 renders the heart more disease prone with greater hypertrophy and structural remodeling, although rates of cardiac fibrosis and myocyte dropout were not different from control mice. Lrrc10(-/-) cardiomyocytes also exhibited reduced contractility in response to β-adrenergic stimulation, consistent with loss of cardiac ventricular performance after pressure overload. We have previously shown that LRRC10 interacts with actin in the heart. Here, we show that His(150) of LRRC10 was required for an interaction with actin, and this interaction was reduced after pressure overload, suggesting an integral role for LRRC10 in the response of the heart to mechanical stress. Importantly, these experiments demonstrated that LRRC10 is required to maintain cardiac performance in response to pressure overload and suggest that dysregulated expression or mutation of LRRC10 may greatly sensitize human patients to more severe cardiac disease in conditions such as chronic hypertension or aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Functional characterization of human COQ4, a gene required for Coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casarin, Alberto; Jimenez-Ortega, Jose Carlos; Trevisson, Eva; Pertegato, Vanessa; Doimo, Mara; Ferrero-Gomez, Maria Lara; Abbadi, Sara; Artuch, Rafael; Quinzii, Catarina; Hirano, Michio; Basso, Giuseppe; Ocana, Carlos Santos; Navas, Placido; Salviati, Leonardo

    2008-01-01

    Defects in genes involved in coenzyme Q (CoQ) biosynthesis cause primary CoQ deficiency, a severe multisystem disorders presenting as progressive encephalomyopathy and nephropathy. The COQ4 gene encodes an essential factor for biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have identified and cloned its human ortholog, COQ4, which is located on chromosome 9q34.13, and is transcribed into a 795 base-pair open reading frame, encoding a 265 amino acid (aa) protein (Isoform 1) with a predicted N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence. It shares 39% identity and 55% similarity with the yeast protein. Coq4 protein has no known enzymatic function, but may be a core component of multisubunit complex required for CoQ biosynthesis. The human transcript is detected in Northern blots as a ∼1.4 kb single band and is expressed ubiquitously, but at high levels in liver, lung, and pancreas. Transcription initiates at multiple sites, located 333-23 nucleotides upstream of the ATG. A second group of transcripts originating inside intron 1 of the gene encodes a 241 aa protein, which lacks the mitochondrial targeting sequence (isoform 2). Expression of GFP-fusion proteins in HeLa cells confirmed that only isoform 1 is targeted to mitochondria. The functional significance of the second isoform is unknown. Human COQ4 isoform 1, expressed from a multicopy plasmid, efficiently restores both growth in glycerol, and CoQ content in COQ4 null yeast strains. Human COQ4 is an interesting candidate gene for patients with isolated CoQ 10 deficiency

  19. The functional requirements of mammalian hair: a compromise between crypsis and thermoregulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Chris B; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Körtner, Gerhard; Geiser, Fritz

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian fur often shows agouti banding with a proximal dark band near the skin and a lighter distal band. We examined the function of both bands in relation to camouflage, thermal properties of pelts, and thermal energetics of dunnarts (Sminthopsis crassicaudata), which are known to use torpor and basking. Although the distal band of dunnart fur darkened with increasing latitude, which is important for camouflage, it did not affect the thermal properties and the length of the dark band and total hair length were not correlated. In contrast, the length of the proximal dark band of preserved pelts exposed to sunlight was positively correlated (r (2) = 0.59) with the temperature underneath the pelt (T pelt). All dunnarts offered radiant heat basked by exposing the dark band of the hair during both rest and torpor. Basking dunnarts with longer dark bands had lower resting metabolism (r (2) = 0.69), warmed faster from torpor (r (2) = 0.77), required less energy to do so (r (2) = 0.32), and reached a higher subcutaneous temperature (T sub) at the end of rewarming (r (2) = 0.75). We provide the first experimental evidence on the possible dual function of the color banding of mammalian fur. The distal colored band appears to be important for camouflage, whereas the length of the dark proximal hair band facilitates heat gain for energy conservation and allows animals to rewarm quickly and economically from torpor.

  20. A TOCA/CDC-42/PAR/WAVE functional module required for retrograde endocytic recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhiyong; Grant, Barth D.

    2015-01-01

    Endosome-to-Golgi transport is required for the function of many key membrane proteins and lipids, including signaling receptors, small-molecule transporters, and adhesion proteins. The retromer complex is well-known for its role in cargo sorting and vesicle budding from early endosomes, in most cases leading to cargo fusion with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Transport from recycling endosomes to the TGN has also been reported, but much less is understood about the molecules that mediate this transport step. Here we provide evidence that the F-BAR domain proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 (Transducer of Cdc42 dependent actin assembly), the small GTPase CDC-42 (Cell division control protein 42), associated polarity proteins PAR-6 (Partitioning defective 6) and PKC-3/atypical protein kinase C, and the WAVE actin nucleation complex mediate the transport of MIG-14/Wls and TGN-38/TGN38 cargo proteins from the recycling endosome to the TGN in Caenorhabditis elegans. Our results indicate that CDC-42, the TOCA proteins, and the WAVE component WVE-1 are enriched on RME-1–positive recycling endosomes in the intestine, unlike retromer components that act on early endosomes. Furthermore, we find that retrograde cargo TGN-38 is trapped in early endosomes after depletion of SNX-3 (a retromer component) but is mainly trapped in recycling endosomes after depletion of CDC-42, indicating that the CDC-42–associated complex functions after retromer in a distinct organelle. Thus, we identify a group of interacting proteins that mediate retrograde recycling, and link these proteins to a poorly understood trafficking step, recycling endosome-to-Golgi transport. We also provide evidence for the physiological importance of this pathway in WNT signaling. PMID:25775511

  1. Ensembl variation resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin-Garcia Pablo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maturing field of genomics is rapidly increasing the number of sequenced genomes and producing more information from those previously sequenced. Much of this additional information is variation data derived from sampling multiple individuals of a given species with the goal of discovering new variants and characterising the population frequencies of the variants that are already known. These data have immense value for many studies, including those designed to understand evolution and connect genotype to phenotype. Maximising the utility of the data requires that it be stored in an accessible manner that facilitates the integration of variation data with other genome resources such as gene annotation and comparative genomics. Description The Ensembl project provides comprehensive and integrated variation resources for a wide variety of chordate genomes. This paper provides a detailed description of the sources of data and the methods for creating the Ensembl variation databases. It also explores the utility of the information by explaining the range of query options available, from using interactive web displays, to online data mining tools and connecting directly to the data servers programmatically. It gives a good overview of the variation resources and future plans for expanding the variation data within Ensembl. Conclusions Variation data is an important key to understanding the functional and phenotypic differences between individuals. The development of new sequencing and genotyping technologies is greatly increasing the amount of variation data known for almost all genomes. The Ensembl variation resources are integrated into the Ensembl genome browser and provide a comprehensive way to access this data in the context of a widely used genome bioinformatics system. All Ensembl data is freely available at http://www.ensembl.org and from the public MySQL database server at ensembldb.ensembl.org.

  2. Crustal thickness variations in the Zagros continental collision zone (Iran) from joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, M.; Nasrabadi, A.

    2013-10-01

    Variations in crustal thickness in the Zagros determined by joint inversion of P wave receiver functions (RFs) and Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity dispersion. The time domain iterative deconvolution procedure was employed to compute RFs from teleseismic recordings at seven broadband stations of INSN network. Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion curves were estimated employing two-station method. Fundamental mode Rayleigh wave group velocities for each station is taken from a regional scale surface wave tomographic imaging. The main variations in crustal thickness that we observe are between stations located in the Zagros fold and thrust belt with those located in the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (SSZ) and Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic assemblage (UDMA). Our results indicate that the average crustal thickness beneath the Zagros Mountain Range varies from ˜46 km in Western and Central Zagros beneath SHGR and GHIR up to ˜50 km beneath BNDS located in easternmost of the Zagros. Toward NE, we observe an increase in Moho depth where it reaches ˜58 km beneath SNGE located in the SSZ. Average crustal thickness also varies beneath the UDMA from ˜50 km in western parts below ASAO to ˜58 in central parts below NASN. The observed variation along the SSZ and UDMA may be associated to ongoing slab steepening or break off in the NW Zagros, comparing under thrusting of the Arabian plate beneath Central Zagros. The results show that in Central Iran, the crustal thickness decrease again to ˜47 km below KRBR. There is not a significant crustal thickness difference along the Zagros fold and thrust belt. We found the same crystalline crust of ˜34 km thick beneath the different parts of the Zagros fold and thrust belt. The similarity of crustal structure suggests that the crust of the Zagros fold and thrust belt was uniform before subsidence and deposition of the sediments. Our results confirm that the shortening of the western and eastern parts of the Zagros basement is small and

  3. Association of genetic variation in cannabinoid mechanisms and gastric motor functions and satiation in overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Roque, M I; Camilleri, M; Vella, A; Carlson, P; Laugen, J; Zinsmeister, A R

    2011-07-01

    The endocannabinoid system is associated with food intake. We hypothesized that genes regulating cannabinoids are associated with obesity. Genetic variations in fatty acid amide hydroxylase (FAAH) and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) are associated with satiation and gastric motor function. In 62 overweight or obese adults of European ancestry, single nucleotide polymorphisms of rs806378 (nearest gene CNR1) and rs324420 (nearest gene FAAH) were genotyped and the associations with gastric emptying (GE) of solids and liquids, gastric volume (GV), and satiation [maximum tolerated volume (MTV) and symptoms after Ensure(®) nutrient drink test] were explored using a dominant genetic model, with gender and BMI as covariates. rs806378 CC genotype was associated with reduced fasting GV (210.2±11.0mL for CC group compared to 242.5±11.3mL for CT/TT group, P=0.031) and a modest, non-significant association with GE of solids (P=0.17). rs324420 genotype was not associated with alterations in gastric motor functions; however, there was a difference in the Ensure(®) MTV (1174.6±37.2mL for CC group compared to 1395.0±123.1mL for CA/AA group, P=0.046) suggesting higher satiation with CC genotype. Our data suggest that CNR1 and FAAH are associated with altered gastric functions or satiation that may predispose to obesity. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Production of grooming-associated sounds by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) at Ngogo: variation, social learning, and possible functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, David P

    2016-01-01

    Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) use some communicative signals flexibly and voluntarily, with use influenced by learning. These signals include some vocalizations and also sounds made using the lips, oral cavity, and/or teeth, but not the vocal tract, such as "attention-getting" sounds directed at humans by captive chimpanzees and lip smacking during social grooming. Chimpanzees at Ngogo, in Kibale National Park, Uganda, make four distinct sounds while grooming others. Here, I present data on two of these ("splutters" and "teeth chomps") and consider whether social learning contributes to variation in their production and whether they serve social functions. Higher congruence in the use of these two sounds between dyads of maternal relatives than dyads of non-relatives implies that social learning occurs and mostly involves vertical transmission, but the results are not conclusive and it is unclear which learning mechanisms may be involved. In grooming between adult males, tooth chomps and splutters were more likely in long than in short bouts; in bouts that were bidirectional rather than unidirectional; in grooming directed toward high-ranking males than toward low-ranking males; and in bouts between allies than in those between non-allies. Males were also more likely to make these sounds while they were grooming other males than while they were grooming females. These results are expected if the sounds promote social bonds and induce tolerance of proximity and of grooming by high-ranking males. However, the alternative hypothesis that the sounds are merely associated with motivation to groom, with no additional social function, cannot be ruled out. Limited data showing that bouts accompanied by teeth chomping or spluttering at their initiation were longer than bouts for which this was not the case point toward a social function, but more data are needed for a definitive test. Comparison to other research sites shows that the possible existence of grooming

  5. Functions and Requirements for Automated Liquid Level Gauge Instruments in Single-Shell and Double-Shell Tank Farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARPENTER, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    This functions and requirements document defines the baseline requirements and criteria for the design, purchase, fabrication, construction, installation, and operation of automated liquid level gauge instruments in the Tank Farms. This document is intended to become the technical baseline for current and future installation, operation and maintenance of automated liquid level gauges in single-shell and double-shell tank farms

  6. Joint Service Common Operating Environment (COE) Common Geographic Information System functional requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meitzler, W.D.

    1992-06-01

    In the context of this document and COE, the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are decision support systems involving the integration of spatially referenced data in a problem solving environment. They are digital computer systems for capturing, processing, managing, displaying, modeling, and analyzing geographically referenced spatial data which are described by attribute data and location. The ability to perform spatial analysis and the ability to combine two or more data sets to create new spatial information differentiates a GIS from other computer mapping systems. While the CCGIS allows for data editing and input, its primary purpose is not to prepare data, but rather to manipulate, analyte, and clarify it. The CCGIS defined herein provides GIS services and resources including the spatial and map related functionality common to all subsystems contained within the COE suite of C4I systems. The CCGIS, which is an integral component of the COE concept, relies on the other COE standard components to provide the definition for other support computing services required.

  7. Real-Time, Interactive Echocardiography Over High-Speed Networks: Feasibility and Functional Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobinsky, Eric A.

    1998-01-01

    Real-time, Interactive Echocardiography Over High Speed Networks: Feasibility and Functional Requirements is an experiment in advanced telemedicine being conducted jointly by the NASA Lewis Research Center, the NASA Ames Research Center, and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. In this project, a patient undergoes an echocardiographic examination in Cleveland while being diagnosed remotely by a cardiologist in California viewing a real-time display of echocardiographic video images transmitted over the broadband NASA Research and Education Network (NREN). The remote cardiologist interactively guides the sonographer administering the procedure through a two-way voice link between the two sites. Echocardiography is a noninvasive medical technique that applies ultrasound imaging to the heart, providing a "motion picture" of the heart in action. Normally, echocardiographic examinations are performed by a sonographer and cardiologist who are located in the same medical facility as the patient. The goal of telemedicine is to allow medical specialists to examine patients located elsewhere, typically in remote or medically underserved geographic areas. For example, a small, rural clinic might have access to an echocardiograph machine but not a cardiologist. By connecting this clinic to a major metropolitan medical facility through a communications network, a minimally trained technician would be able to carry out the procedure under the supervision and guidance of a qualified cardiologist.

  8. Isolated human islets require hyperoxia to maintain islet mass, metabolism, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Hirotake; Kang, Dongyang; Medrano, Leonard; Barriga, Alyssa; Mendez, Daniel; Rawson, Jeffrey; Omori, Keiko; Ferreri, Kevin; Tai, Yu-Chong; Kandeel, Fouad; Mullen, Yoko

    2016-02-12

    Pancreatic islet transplantation has been recognized as an effective treatment for Type 1 diabetes; however, there is still plenty of room to improve transplantation efficiency. Because islets are metabolically active they require high oxygen to survive; thus hypoxia after transplant is one of the major causes of graft failure. Knowing the optimal oxygen tension for isolated islets would allow a transplant team to provide the best oxygen environment during pre- and post-transplant periods. To address this issue and begin to establish empirically determined guidelines for islet maintenance, we exposed in vitro cultured islets to different partial oxygen pressures (pO2) and assessed changes in islet volume, viability, metabolism, and function. Human islets were cultured for 7 days in different pO2 media corresponding to hypoxia (90 mmHg), normoxia (160 mmHg), and hyerpoxia (270 or 350 mmHg). Compared to normoxia and hypoxia, hyperoxia alleviated the loss of islet volume, maintaining higher islet viability and metabolism as measured by oxygen consumption and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion responses. We predict that maintaining pre- and post-transplanted islets in a hyperoxic environment will alleviate islet volume loss and maintain islet quality thereby improving transplant outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diverse Requirements for Microglial Survival, Specification, and Function Revealed by Defined-Medium Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlen, Christopher J; Bennett, F Chris; Tucker, Andrew F; Collins, Hannah Y; Mulinyawe, Sara B; Barres, Ben A

    2017-05-17

    Microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, engage in various CNS-specific functions that are critical for development and health. To better study microglia and the properties that distinguish them from other tissue macrophage populations, we have optimized serum-free culture conditions to permit robust survival of highly ramified adult microglia under defined-medium conditions. We find that astrocyte-derived factors prevent microglial death ex vivo and that this activity results from three primary components, CSF-1/IL-34, TGF-β2, and cholesterol. Using microglial cultures that have never been exposed to serum, we demonstrate a dramatic and lasting change in phagocytic capacity after serum exposure. Finally, we find that mature microglia rapidly lose signature gene expression after isolation, and that this loss can be reversed by engrafting cells back into an intact CNS environment. These data indicate that the specialized gene expression profile of mature microglia requires continuous instructive signaling from the intact CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Statistics of the hubble diagram. II. The form of the luminosity function and density variations with application to quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    New techniques for deriving a luminosity function LF and a spatial density distribution rho (r) from magnitude-redshift data are presented. These techniques do not require iterative improvement of an initially guessed solution or the adoption of arbitrary analytic forms; instead, they provide explicit numerical estimates of the LF and rho (r). Thus, sources of systematic uncertainty are eliminated. This is achieved at the cost of an increase in the statistical noise. As in Paper I of this series, it is necessary to assume that the LF does not vary in functional form. An internal test of this assumption is described.These techniques are illustrated by application to a sample of 3 CR and 4C quasars. The radio luminosity function is found to be a steep power law with no features. The optical luminosity function is found to be a shallow power law cut off roughly exponentially above a characteristic luminosity L/sub opt/* (Z) corresponding roughly to M/sub B/=-22-6 log (1+Z) The comoving density evolution is not well fitted by any simple function of 1+Z [e.g., (1+Z) 6 errs by factors as large as approx.5 at some redshifts] but is well represented by an exponential of look-back time. Specific analytic fits and numerical tabulations are given for each of these functions. The constant LF form assumption is found to be a reasonable first approximation for the quasars.Other possible applications of the new methods to problems in extragalactic and stellar astronomy are suggested

  11. Direct and indirect effects of nutritional status, physical function and cognitive function on activities of daily living in Japanese older adults requiring long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tomohiko; Nishida, Yuusuke

    2014-10-01

    To identify the direct and indirect effects of nutritional status, physical function, and cognitive function on activities of daily living in Japanese older adults requiring long-term care. In total, 179 participants aged ≥ 65 years who were eligible for long-term care insurance (mean age 85.5 ± 7.8 years) were recruited for this study. Nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment, Short Form) and physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery) were examined. Activities of daily living, cognitive function and frailty were assessed using the Barthel Index, Mini-Mental State Examination and Clinical Frailty Scale, respectively. Path analysis was used to determine relationships between these factors and the activities of daily living. For Japanese older adults requiring long-term care, pathways were modeled for nutritional status, physical function and the activities of daily living. The total effect of nutritional status was 0.516 (Pphysical function on the activities of daily living was 0.458 (Pphysical function in aged Japanese people requiring long-term care. These findings suggest that maintaining good nutritional status and nutritional support might delay physical function decline, and prolong the activities of daily living. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. Development of requirements and functional specifications for crash event data recorders : final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    The U.S. DOT has conducted research on the requirements for a Crash Event Data Recorder to facilitate the reconstruction of commercial motor vehicle crashes. This report documents the work performed on the Development of Requirements and Functiona...

  13. A Sensorless Predictive Current Controlled Boost Converter by Using an EKF with Load Variation Effect Elimination Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qiaoling; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Qiao; Zou, Xuecheng

    2015-04-28

    To realize accurate current control for a boost converter, a precise measurement of the inductor current is required to achieve high resolution current regulating. Current sensors are widely used to measure the inductor current. However, the current sensors and their processing circuits significantly contribute extra hardware cost, delay and noise to the system. They can also harm the system reliability. Therefore, current sensorless control techniques can bring cost effective and reliable solutions for various boost converter applications. According to the derived accurate model, which contains a number of parasitics, the boost converter is a nonlinear system. An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is proposed for inductor current estimation and output voltage filtering. With this approach, the system can have the same advantages as sensored current control mode. To implement EKF, the load value is necessary. However, the load may vary from time to time. This can lead to errors of current estimation and filtered output voltage. To solve this issue, a load variation elimination effect elimination (LVEE) module is added. In addition, a predictive average current controller is used to regulate the current. Compared with conventional voltage controlled system, the transient response is greatly improved since it only takes two switching cycles for the current to reach its reference. Finally, experimental results are presented to verify the stable operation and output tracking capability for large-signal transients of the proposed algorithm.

  14. Physical Therapy Activities in Stroke, Knee Arthroplasty, and Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation: Their Variation, Similarities, and Association With Functional Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ching-Hui; Putman, Koen; Smout, Randall J.; Horn, Susan D.; Tian, Wenqiang

    2011-01-01

    Background The mix of physical therapy services is thought to be different with different impairment groups. However, it is not clear how much variation there is across impairment groups. Furthermore, the extent to which the same physical therapy activities are associated with functional outcomes across different types of patients is unknown. Objective The purposes of this study were: (1) to examine similarities and differences in the mix of physical therapy activities used in rehabilitation among patients from different impairment groups and (2) to examine whether the same physical therapy activities are associated with functional improvement across impairment groups. Design This was a prospective observational cohort study. Methods The study was conducted in inpatient rehabilitation facilities. The participants were 433 patients with stroke, 429 patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and 207 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Measures used in this study included: (1) the Comprehensive Severity Index to measure the severity of each patient's medical condition, (2) the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) to measure function, and (3) point-of-care instruments to measure time spent in specific physical therapy activities. Results All 3 groups had similar admission motor FIM scores but varying cognitive FIM scores. Patients with TKA spent more time on exercise than the other 2 groups (average=31.7 versus 6.2 minutes per day). Patients with TKA received the most physical therapy (average=65.3 minutes per day), whereas the TBI group received the least physical therapy (average=38.3 minutes per day). Multivariate analysis showed that only 2 physical therapy activities (gait training and community mobility) were both positively associated with discharge motor FIM outcomes across all 3 groups. Three physical therapy activities (assessment time, bed mobility, and transfers) were negatively associated with discharge motor FIM outcome. Limitations The study

  15. Physical therapy activities in stroke, knee arthroplasty, and traumatic brain injury rehabilitation: their variation, similarities, and association with functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, Gerben; Hsieh, Ching-Hui; Putman, Koen; Smout, Randall J; Horn, Susan D; Tian, Wenqiang

    2011-12-01

    The mix of physical therapy services is thought to be different with different impairment groups. However, it is not clear how much variation there is across impairment groups. Furthermore, the extent to which the same physical therapy activities are associated with functional outcomes across different types of patients is unknown. The purposes of this study were: (1) to examine similarities and differences in the mix of physical therapy activities used in rehabilitation among patients from different impairment groups and (2) to examine whether the same physical therapy activities are associated with functional improvement across impairment groups. This was a prospective observational cohort study. The study was conducted in inpatient rehabilitation facilities. The participants were 433 patients with stroke, 429 patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and 207 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Measures used in this study included: (1) the Comprehensive Severity Index to measure the severity of each patient's medical condition, (2) the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) to measure function, and (3) point-of-care instruments to measure time spent in specific physical therapy activities. All 3 groups had similar admission motor FIM scores but varying cognitive FIM scores. Patients with TKA spent more time on exercise than the other 2 groups (average=31.7 versus 6.2 minutes per day). Patients with TKA received the most physical therapy (average=65.3 minutes per day), whereas the TBI group received the least physical therapy (average=38.3 minutes per day). Multivariate analysis showed that only 2 physical therapy activities (gait training and community mobility) were both positively associated with discharge motor FIM outcomes across all 3 groups. Three physical therapy activities (assessment time, bed mobility, and transfers) were negatively associated with discharge motor FIM outcome. The study focused primarily on physical therapy without

  16. A Traceability Metamodel for Change Management of Non-functional Requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassab, M.; Ormanjieva, O.; Daneva, Maia; Dosch, W.; Lee, R.Y.; Tuma, P.; Coupaye, T

    2008-01-01

    Requirements changes are an issue in the software development life cycle which often originates from an incomplete knowledge of the domain of interest. Hardly any requirement manifests in isolation, and usually the provision of one requirement may affect the level of provision of another.

  17. Variations of the stellar initial mass function in semi-analytical models - II. The impact of cosmic ray regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanot, Fabio; De Lucia, Gabriella; Xie, Lizhi; Hirschmann, Michaela; Bruzual, Gustavo; Charlot, Stéphane

    2018-04-01

    Recent studies proposed that cosmic rays (CRs) are a key ingredient in setting the conditions for star formation, thanks to their ability to alter the thermal and chemical state of dense gas in the ultraviolet-shielded cores of molecular clouds. In this paper, we explore their role as regulators of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) variations, using the semi-analytic model for GAlaxy Evolution and Assembly (GAEA). The new model confirms our previous results obtained using the integrated galaxy-wide IMF (IGIMF) theory. Both variable IMF models reproduce the observed increase of α-enhancement as a function of stellar mass and the measured z = 0 excess of dynamical mass-to-light ratios with respect to photometric estimates assuming a universal IMF. We focus here on the mismatch between the photometrically derived (M^app_{\\star }) and intrinsic (M⋆) stellar masses, by analysing in detail the evolution of model galaxies with different values of M_{\\star }/M^app_{\\star }. We find that galaxies with small deviations (i.e. formally consistent with a universal IMF hypothesis) are characterized by more extended star formation histories and live in less massive haloes with respect to the bulk of the galaxy population. In particular, the IGIMF theory does not change significantly the mean evolution of model galaxies with respect to the reference model, a CR-regulated IMF instead implies shorter star formation histories and higher peaks of star formation for objects more massive than 1010.5 M⊙. However, we also show that it is difficult to unveil this behaviour from observations, as the key physical quantities are typically derived assuming a universal IMF.

  18. Spatial Variations of Turbulent Properties of Neutral Hydrogen Gas in the Small Magellanic Cloud Using Structure-function Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestingen-Palm, David; Stanimirović, Snežana; González-Casanova, Diego F.; Babler, Brian [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Jameson, Katherine; Bolatto, Alberto, E-mail: sstanimi@astro.wisc.edu [Astronomy Department and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    We investigate spatial variations of turbulent properties in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) by using neutral hydrogen (H i) observations. With the goal of testing the importance of stellar feedback on H i turbulence, we define central and outer SMC regions based on the star formation rate (SFR) surface density, as well as the H i integrated intensity. We use the structure function and the velocity channel analysis to calculate the power-law index ( γ ) for both underlying density and velocity fields in these regions. In all cases, our results show essentially no difference in γ between the central and outer regions. This suggests that H i turbulent properties are surprisingly homogeneous across the SMC when probed at a resolution of 30 pc. Contrary to recent suggestions from numerical simulations, we do not find a significant change in γ due to stellar feedback as traced by the SFR surface density. This could be due to the stellar feedback being widespread over the whole of the SMC, but more likely due to a large-scale gravitational driving of turbulence. We show that the lack of difference between central and outer SMC regions cannot be explained by the high optical depth H I.

  19. Reserpine-induced reduction in norepinephrine transporter function requires catecholamine storage vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandela, Prashant; Chandley, Michelle; Xu, Yao-Yu; Zhu, Meng-Yang; Ordway, Gregory A

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of rats with reserpine, an inhibitor of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT), depletes norepinephrine (NE) and regulates NE transporter (NET) expression. The present study examined the molecular mechanisms involved in regulation of the NET by reserpine using cultured cells. Exposure of rat PC12 cells to reserpine for a period as short as 5min decreased [(3)H]NE uptake capacity, an effect characterized by a robust decrease in the V(max) of the transport of [(3)H]NE. As expected, reserpine did not displace the binding of [(3)H]nisoxetine from the NET in membrane homogenates. The potency of reserpine for reducing [(3)H]NE uptake was dramatically lower in SK-N-SH cells that have reduced storage capacity for catecholamines. Reserpine had no effect on [(3)H]NE uptake in HEK-293 cells transfected with the rat NET (293-hNET), cells that lack catecholamine storage vesicles. NET regulation by reserpine was independent of trafficking of the NET from the cell surface. Pre-exposure of cells to inhibitors of several intracellular signaling cascades known to regulate the NET, including Ca(2+)/Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent kinase and protein kinases A, C and G, did not affect the ability of reserpine to reduce [(3)H]NE uptake. Treatment of PC12 cells with the catecholamine depleting agent, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine, increased [(3)H]NE uptake and eliminated the inhibitory effects of reserpine on [(3)H]NE uptake. Reserpine non-competitively inhibits NET activity through a Ca(2+)-independent process that requires catecholamine storage vesicles, revealing a novel pharmacological method to modify NET function. Further characterization of the molecular nature of reserpine's action could lead to the development of alternative therapeutic strategies for treating disorders known to be benefitted by treatment with traditional competitive NET inhibitors. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional requirements for inhibitory signal transmission by the immunomodulatory receptor CD300a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBell, Karen E; Simhadri, Venkateswara R; Mariano, John L; Borrego, Francisco

    2012-04-26

    Activation signals can be negatively regulated by cell surface receptors bearing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). CD300a, an ITIM bearing type I transmembrane protein, is expressed on many hematopoietic cells, including subsets of lymphocytes. We have taken two approaches to further define the mechanism by which CD300a acts as an inhibitor of immune cell receptor signaling. First, we have expressed in Jurkat T cells a chimeric receptor consisting of the extracellular domains of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)2DL2 fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic segments of CD300a (KIR-CD300a) to explore surrogate ligand-stimulated inhibition of superantigen stimulated T cell receptor (TCR) mediated cell signaling. We found that intact CD300a ITIMs were essential for inhibition and that the tyrosine phosphorylation of these ITIMs required the src tyrosine kinase Lck. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the CD300a ITIMs created docking sites for both src homology 2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP)-1 and SHP-2. Suppression of SHP-1 and SHP-2 expression in KIR-CD300a Jurkat T cells with siRNA and the use of DT40 chicken B cell lines expressing CD300a and deficient in several phosphatases revealed that SHP-1, but not SHP-2 or the src homology 2 domain containing inositol 5' phosphatase SHIP, was utilized by CD300a for its inhibitory activity. These studies provide new insights into the function of CD300a in tuning T and B cell responses.

  1. Analyzing Requirements for and Designing a Collaborative Tool Based on Functional and User Input

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curtis, Christopher K; Burneka, Chris; Whited, Vaughan; Kancler, David E

    2006-01-01

    .... Technology provides a multitude of potential collaborative tools and techniques, and this must be balanced against the requirement to leverage and/or support maintainer's existing interaction skills...

  2. Low Immunogenic Endothelial Cells Maintain Morphological and Functional Properties Required for Vascular Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Skadi; Eicke, Dorothee; Carvalho Oliveira, Marco; Wiegmann, Bettina; Schrimpf, Claudia; Haverich, Axel; Blasczyk, Rainer; Wilhelmi, Mathias; Figueiredo, Constança; Böer, Ulrike

    2018-03-01

    functional properties required for vascular tissue engineering. This extends the spectrum of available cell sources from autologous to allogeneic sources, thereby accelerating the generation of tissue-engineered vascular grafts in acute clinical cases.

  3. Identifying the Functional Requirements for an Arizona Astronomy Data Hub (AADH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlman, G.; Heidorn, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Astronomy data represent a curation challenge for information managers, as well as for astronomers. Extracting knowledge from these heterogeneous and complex datasets is particularly complicated and requires both interdisciplinary and domain expertise to accomplish true curation, with an overall goal of facilitating reproducible science through discoverability and persistence. A group of researchers and professional staff at the University of Arizona held several meetings during the spring of 2015 about astronomy data and the role of the university in curation of that data. The group decided that it was critical to obtain a broader consensus on the needs of the community. With assistance from a Start for Success grant provided by the University of Arizona Office of Research and Discovery and funding from the American Astronomical Society (AAS), a workshop was held in early July 2015, with 28 participants plus 4 organizers in attendance. Representing University researchers as well as astronomical facilities and a scholarly society, the group verified that indeed there is a problem with the long-term curation of some astronomical data not associated with major facilities, and that a repository or "data hub" with the correct functionality could facilitate research and the preservation and use of astronomy data. The workshop members also identified a set of next steps, including the identification of possible data and metadata to be included in the Hub. The participants further helped to identify additional information that must be gathered before construction of the AADH could begin, including identifying significant datasets that do not currently have sufficient preservation and dissemination infrastructure, as well as some data associated with journal publications and the broader context of the data beyond that directly published in the journals. Workshop participants recommended that a set of grant proposal should be developed that ensures community buy-in and

  4. Ethnic variation in the correlation between waist to height ratio and total daily insulin requirement in children with type 1 diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uday, Suma; Gorman, Shaun; Feltbower, Richard G; Mathai, Mathew

    2017-03-01

    Total daily insulin required to achieve glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes (T1D) depends on numerous factors. Correlation of insulin requirement to body mass index and waist circumference has been variably reported in the literature and that of waist-to-height ratio has not been studied. To study the correlation between daily insulin requirement [total daily dose (TDD)] and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) in a multiethnic population. A cross-sectional study of children (5-18 years) with T1D attending a diabetes clinic in a multiethnic population in Bradford, UK was conducted. Physical measurements were undertaken in the clinic setting and data collected from case notes and patients/carers. Sixty nine patients with mean age 12.7(±3.1) yr, duration of diabetes 5.4(±3.5) yr and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) 80(±18)mmol/mol(9.5 ± 1.6%) were recruited. Nearly 54% (n = 37) were white and 46% were non-white (29 Asian Pakistani; 1 Indian; 2 mixed White Afro-Caribbean). The two groups had similar demographics and disease profiles. Non-whites compared with whites had a higher prevalence of obesity (15 vs 5%, p 1), family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D) (49% vs. 33%), microalbuminuria (22% vs. 11%, p 1). WHtR and TDD were poorly correlated in the whole group. There was however a significant positive correlation in Caucasians (r = 0.583, N = 37, p 1) and a negative correlation in Asian Pakistanis (r = -0.472, N = 32, p 1); with a significant negative correlation seen in subjects with relatives with T2D (r = -0.86, N = 6, p = 0.02). The variation in correlations highlights that the two ethnic groups behave differently and should therefore be studied separately with regards to factors influencing insulin requirements with careful consideration to the presence of parental IR. Further prospective studies are required to explore the reasons for these differences. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Form follows function: the architecture of operational requirements. [Winstow Mine of UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C W

    1984-07-01

    Wistow Mine, in the Selby Coalfield (UK) has recently received a Festival of Architecture Award. The success of the visual appearance of the site is the result of careful consideration of the NCB's operational requirements, by a special design team, and the subsequent development of designs for all the buildings on the site and the layout of the site itself, which satisfy those requirements.

  6. Exploiting a Goal-Decomposition Technique to Prioritize Non-functional Requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, Maia; Kassab, M.; Ponisio, Laura; Wieringa, Roelf J.; Ormandjieva, O.; Alves Frota, C.; Werneck, V.; Cysneyros, L.M.

    2007-01-01

    Business stakeholders need to have clear and realistic goals if they want to meet commitments in application development. As a consequence, at early stages they prioritize requirements. However, requirements do change. The effect of change forces the stakeholders to balance alternatives and

  7. KINETyS II: Constraints on spatial variations of the stellar initial mass function from K-band spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, P. D.; Smith, R. J.; Lucey, J. R.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the spatially resolved stellar populations of a sample of seven nearby massive Early-type galaxies (ETGs), using optical and near infrared data, including K-band spectroscopy. This data offers good prospects for mitigating the uncertainties inherent in stellar population modelling by making a wide variety of strong spectroscopic features available. We report new VLT-KMOS measurements of the average empirical radial gradients out to the effective radius in the strengths of the Ca I 1.98 μm and 2.26 μm features, the Na I 2.21 μm line, and the CO 2.30 μm bandhead. Following previous work, which has indicated an excess of dwarf stars in the cores of massive ETGs, we pay specific attention to radial variations in the stellar initial mass function (IMF) as well as modelling the chemical abundance patterns and stellar population ages in our sample. Using state-of-the-art stellar population models we infer an [Fe/H] gradient of -0.16±0.05 per dex in fractional radius and an average [Na/Fe] gradient of -0.35±0.09. We find a large but radially-constant enhancement to [Mg/Fe] of ˜ 0.4 and a much lower [Ca/Fe] enhancement of ˜ 0.1. Finally, we find no significant IMF radial gradient in our sample on average and find that most galaxies in our sample are consistent with having a Milky Way-like IMF, or at most a modestly bottom heavy IMF (e.g. less dwarf enriched than a single power law IMF with the Salpeter slope).

  8. Study of the variation of radiation dose in function of the radiological techniques used in X-ray diagnosis exams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: marfernandes@fmb.unesp.br [Faculty of Medicine. UNESP, Botucatu (FMB), SP (Brazil); Reis, Charlene O.; Garcia, Paulo L. [Institute of Biosciences of Botucatu. UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Nucleate Radiometry Ltd., Aracatuba, SP (Brazil); Lima, Marcelo A.F.; Dalaqua, Fernando L.D. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Hospital. Radiology Service

    2011-07-01

    This paper values the importance of the implantation of a quality control program in medical x-ray diagnosis services that it seeks mainly to the reduction of the radiation dose applied in the radiology exams, and attempt to the precepts of the Effective Legislation as for the Basic Guidelines of Radiological Protection (law decree MS no. 453 in June 1{sup st} 1998). The study was accomplished Radiology Section of the Medicine Faculty - FMB (UNESP - Botucatu) and it consisted of the accomplishment of measures of the radiation dose applied in the radiological exams, taking as base the x-rays techniques realized by four technicians in radiology the service, using only one x-rays equipment. Was intended analyze the variation of the radiation dose in function of the different applied technical parameters, and this way, guide the professionals as for the possibility of obtaining of x-ray images of better quality and smaller patient exposition. For radiation dose measure a detector of solid state was utilized. During the accomplishment of the measures it was verified that there no a general consensus among the technicians of the section being observed differences of the order of 80% in the mAs. In terms of radiation dose measured, the largest value of verified was 4.752 mGy (exam of lateral lumbar column) and the smallest value of 0.165 mGy (child's thorax).The results showed that a standardization in the x-ray techniques executed by the professionals of the section will be able to reduce significantly the radiation exposition of the assisted patients. (author)

  9. Community variations in population exposure to near-field tsunami hazards as a function of pedestrian travel time to safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Nathan J.; Schmidtlein, Mathew C.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to characterize population exposure to near-field tsunami threats typically focus on quantifying the number and type of people in tsunami-hazard zones. To develop and prioritize effective risk-reduction strategies, emergency managers also need information on the potential for successful evacuations and how this evacuation potential varies among communities. To improve efforts to properly characterize and differentiate near-field tsunami threats among multiple communities, we assess community variations in population exposure to tsunamis as a function of pedestrian travel time to safety. We focus our efforts on the multiple coastal communities in Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties (State of Washington, USA), where a substantial resident and visitor population is threatened by near-field tsunamis related to a potential Cascadia subduction zone earthquake. Anisotropic, path-distance modeling is conducted to estimate travel times to safety and results are merged with various population data, including residents, employees, public venues, and dependent-care facilities. Results suggest that there is substantial variability among communities in the number of people that may have insufficient time to evacuate. Successful evacuations may be possible in some communities assuming slow-walking speeds, are plausible in others if travel speeds are increased, and are unlikely in another set of communities given the large distances and short time horizon. Emergency managers can use these results to prioritize the location and determine the most appropriate type of tsunami risk-reduction strategies, such as education and training in areas where evacuations are plausible and vertical-evacuation structures in areas where they are not.

  10. Study of the variation of radiation dose in function of the radiological techniques used in X-ray diagnosis exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Marco A.R.; Reis, Charlene O.; Garcia, Paulo L.; Lima, Marcelo A.F.; Dalaqua, Fernando L.D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper values the importance of the implantation of a quality control program in medical x-ray diagnosis services that it seeks mainly to the reduction of the radiation dose applied in the radiology exams, and attempt to the precepts of the Effective Legislation as for the Basic Guidelines of Radiological Protection (law decree MS no. 453 in June 1 st 1998). The study was accomplished Radiology Section of the Medicine Faculty - FMB (UNESP - Botucatu) and it consisted of the accomplishment of measures of the radiation dose applied in the radiological exams, taking as base the x-rays techniques realized by four technicians in radiology the service, using only one x-rays equipment. Was intended analyze the variation of the radiation dose in function of the different applied technical parameters, and this way, guide the professionals as for the possibility of obtaining of x-ray images of better quality and smaller patient exposition. For radiation dose measure a detector of solid state was utilized. During the accomplishment of the measures it was verified that there no a general consensus among the technicians of the section being observed differences of the order of 80% in the mAs. In terms of radiation dose measured, the largest value of verified was 4.752 mGy (exam of lateral lumbar column) and the smallest value of 0.165 mGy (child's thorax).The results showed that a standardization in the x-ray techniques executed by the professionals of the section will be able to reduce significantly the radiation exposition of the assisted patients. (author)

  11. Genetic contributions to variation in general cognitive function: A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in the CHARGE consortium (N=53 949)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Davies (Gail); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola J.); J.C. Bis (Joshua); J. Bressler (Jan); V. Chouraki (Vincent); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); E. Hofer; C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); M. Kirin (Mirna); J. Lahti; S.J. van der Lee (Sven); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); T. Liu; R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); D. Postmus (Douwe); G.D. Smith; J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); R. Thomson (Russell); V. Vitart (Veronique); J. Wang; L. Yu; L. Zgaga (Lina); W. Zhao (Wei); R. Boxall (Ruth); S.E. Harris (Sarah); W.D. Hill (W. David); D.C. Liewald (David C.); M. Luciano (Michelle); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); D. Ames (David); N. Amin (Najaf); P. Amouyel (Philippe); A.A. Assareh; R. Au; J.T. Becker (James); A. Beiser; C. Berr (Claudine); L. Bertram (Lars); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); H. Campbell (Harry); J. Corley; P.L. De Jager; C. Dufouil (Carole); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); T. Espeseth (Thomas); J.D. Faul; I. Ford; G. Scotland (Generation); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); M.D. Griswold (Michael); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); T.B. Harris; G. Heiss (Gerardo); A. Hofman (Albert); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); N.A. Kochan (Nicole A.); D.S. Knopman (David); J.B. Kwok; J.-C. Lambert; T. Lee; G. Li; S.-C. Li; M. Loitfelder (Marisa); O.L. Lopez (Oscar); A.J. Lundervold; A. Lundqvist; R. Mather; S.S. Mirza (Saira); L. Nyberg; B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Palotie (Aarno); G. Papenberg; A. Pattie (Alison); K. Petrovic (Katja); O. Polasek (Ozren); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); P. Redmond (Paul); S. Reppermund; J.I. Rotter; R. Schmidt (Reinhold); M. Schuur (Maaike); P.W. Schofield; R.J. Scott; V.M. Steen (Vidar); D.J. Stott (David J.); J.C. van Swieten (John); K.D. Taylor (Kent); J. Trollor; S. Trompet (Stella); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); G. Weinstein; E. Widen (Elisabeth); B.G. Windham (B Gwen); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); A. Wright (Alan); M.J. Wright (Margaret); Q. Yang (Qiong Fang); H. Amieva (Hélène); J. Attia (John); D.A. Bennett (David); H. Brodaty (Henry); A.J. de Craen (Anton); C. Hayward; M.A. Ikram (Arfan); U. Lindenberger; L.-G. Nilsson; D.J. Porteous (David J.); K. Räikkönen (Katri); I. Reinvang (Ivar); I. Rudan (Igor); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); R. Schmidt; P. Schofield (Peter); V. Srikanth; J.M. Starr (John); S.T. Turner (Stephen); D.R. Weir (David R.); J.F. Wilson (James F); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A.L. Fitzpatrick (Annette); S. Seshadri (Sudha); T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.); I.J. Deary (Ian J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGeneral cognitive function is substantially heritable across the human life course from adolescence to old age. We investigated the genetic contribution to variation in this important, health- and well-being-related trait in middle-aged and older adults. We conducted a meta-analysis of

  12. The two-hole ground state of the Hubbard-Anderson model, approximated by a variational RVB-type wave function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traa, M.R.M.J.; Traa, M.R.M.J.; Caspers, W.J.; Caspers, W.J.; Banning, E.J.; Banning, E.J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the Hubbard-Anderson model on a square lattice with two holes is studied. The ground state (GS) is approximated by a variational RVB-type wave function. The holes interact by exchange of a localized spin excitation (SE), which is created or absorbed if a hole moves to a

  13. Lateral Variations of the Mantle Transition Zone Structure beneath the Southeastern Tibetan Plateau Revealed by P-wave Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y.; Ai, Y.; Jiang, M.; He, Y.; Chen, Q.

    2017-12-01

    The deep structure of the southeastern Tibetan plateau is of great scientific importance to a better understanding of the India-Eurasia collision as well as the evolution of the magnificent Tibetan plateau. In this study, we collected 566 permanent and temporary seismic stations deployed in SE Tibet, with a total of 77853 high quality P-wave receiver functions been extracted by maximum entropy deconvolution method. On the basis of the Common Conversion Point (CCP) stacking technique, we mapped the topography of the 410km and 660km discontinuities (hereinafter called the `410' and the `660'), and further investigated the lateral variation of the mantle transition zone (MTZ) thickness beneath this region. The background velocity model deduced from H-κ stacking results and a previous body-wave tomographic research was applied for the correction of the crustal and upper mantle heterogeneities beneath SE Tibet for CCP stacking. Our results reveal two significantly thickened MTZ anomalies aligned nearly in the south-north direction. The magnitude of both anomalies are 30km above the global average of 250km. The southern anomaly located beneath the Dianzhong sub-block and the Indo-China block is characterized by a slightly deeper `410' and a greater-than-normal `660', while the northern anomaly beneath western Sichuan has an uplifted `410' and a depressed `660'. Combining with previous studies in the adjacent region, we suggest that slab break-off may occurred during the eastward subduction of the Burma plate, with the lower part of the cold slab penetrated into the MTZ and stagnated at the bottom of the `660' which may cause the southern anomaly in our receiver function images. The origin of the Tengchong volcano is probably connected to the upwelling of the asthenospheric material caused by the slab break-off or to the ascending of the hot and wet material triggered by the dehydration of stagnant slab in the MTZ. The anomaly in the north, on the other hand, might be

  14. Station set requirements document. Volume 82: Fire support. Book 2: Preliminary functional fire plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, N. C.

    1974-01-01

    The fire prevention/protection requirements for all shuttle facility and ground support equipment are presented for the hazardous operations. These include: preparing the orbiter for launch, launch operations, landing operations, safing operations, and associated off-line activities.

  15. Report on functional requirements and software architecture for the IDTO prototype : phase I demonstration site (Columbus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    This report documents the System Requirements and Architecture for the Phase I implementation of the Integrated Dynamic : Transit Operations (IDTO) Prototype bundle within the Dynamic Mobility Applications (DMA) portion of the Connected Vehicle : Pro...

  16. Report on functional requirements and software architecture for the IDTO prototype phase 2 : central Florida demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report documents the System Requirements and Architecture for the Phase 2 implementation of the Integrated Dynamic : Transit Operations (IDTO) Prototype bundle within the Dynamic Mobility Applications (DMA) portion of the Connected Vehicle : Pro...

  17. Incorporating functional requirements into the structural design of the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiu, F.J.; Ng, C.K.; Almuti, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Vitrification Building-type structures have unique features and design needs. The structural design requires new concepts and custom detailing. The above special structural designs have demonstrated the importance of the five design considerations listed in the introduction. Innovative ideas and close coordination are required to achieve the design objectives. Many of these innovations have been applied to the DWPF facility which is a first of a kind

  18. Hepatitis E virus ORF3 is a functional ion channel required for release of infectious particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qiang; Heller, Brigitte; Capuccino, Juan M V; Song, Bokai; Nimgaonkar, Ila; Hrebikova, Gabriela; Contreras, Jorge E; Ploss, Alexander

    2017-01-31

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the leading cause of enterically transmitted viral hepatitis globally. Of HEV's three ORFs, the function of ORF3 has remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate that via homophilic interactions ORF3 forms multimeric complexes associated with intracellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived membranes. HEV ORF3 shares several structural features with class I viroporins, and the function of HEV ORF3 can be maintained by replacing it with the well-characterized viroporin influenza A virus (IAV) matrix-2 protein. ORF3's ion channel function is further evidenced by its ability to mediate ionic currents when expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Furthermore, we identified several positions in ORF3 critical for its formation of multimeric complexes, ion channel activity, and, ultimately, release of infectious particles. Collectively, our data demonstrate a previously undescribed function of HEV ORF3 as a viroporin, which may serve as an attractive target in developing direct-acting antivirals.

  19. Transrepressive Function of TLX Requires the Histone Demethylase LSD1 ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Atsushi; Takezawa, Shinichiro; Schüle, Roland; Kitagawa, Hirochika; Kato, Shigeaki

    2008-01-01

    TLX is an orphan nuclear receptor (also called NR2E1) that regulates the expression of target genes by functioning as a constitutive transrepressor. The physiological significance of TLX in the cytodifferentiation of neural cells in the brain is known. However, the corepressors supporting the transrepressive function of TLX have yet to be identified. In this report, Y79 retinoblastoma cells were subjected to biochemical techniques to purify proteins that interact with TLX, and we identified L...

  20. Vagal innervation is required for pulmonary function phenotype in Htr4-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, John S; Nichols, Cody E; Li, Huiling; Brandenberger, Christina; Virgincar, Rohan S; DeGraff, Laura M; Driehuys, Bastiaan; Zeldin, Darryl C; London, Stephanie J

    2017-04-01

    Human genome-wide association studies have identified over 50 loci associated with pulmonary function and related phenotypes, yet follow-up studies to determine causal genes or variants are rare. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in serotonin receptor 4 ( HTR4 ) are associated with human pulmonary function in genome-wide association studies and follow-up animal work has demonstrated that Htr4 is causally associated with pulmonary function in mice, although the precise mechanisms were not identified. We sought to elucidate the role of neural innervation and pulmonary architecture in the lung phenotype of Htr4 -/- animals. We report here that the Htr4 -/- phenotype in mouse is dependent on vagal innervation to the lung. Both ex vivo tracheal ring reactivity and in vivo flexiVent pulmonary functional analyses demonstrate that vagotomy abrogates the Htr4 -/- airway hyperresponsiveness phenotype. Hyperpolarized 3 He gas magnetic resonance imaging and stereological assessment of wild-type and Htr4 -/- mice reveal no observable differences in lung volume, inflation characteristics, or pulmonary microarchitecture. Finally, control of breathing experiments reveal substantive differences in baseline breathing characteristics between mice with/without functional HTR4 in breathing frequency, relaxation time, flow rate, minute volume, time of inspiration and expiration and breathing pauses. These results suggest that HTR4's role in pulmonary function likely relates to neural innervation and control of breathing. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Fine-scale mapping of natural variation in fly fecundity identifies neuronal domain of expression and function of an aquaporin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan O Bergland

    Full Text Available To gain insight into the molecular genetic basis of standing variation in fitness related traits, we identify a novel factor that regulates the molecular and physiological basis of natural variation in female Drosophila melanogaster fecundity. Genetic variation in female fecundity in flies derived from a wild orchard population is heritable and largely independent of other measured life history traits. We map a portion of this variation to a single QTL and then use deficiency mapping to further refine this QTL to 5 candidate genes. Ubiquitous expression of RNAi against only one of these genes, an aquaporin encoded by Drip, reduces fecundity. Within our mapping population Drip mRNA level in the head, but not other tissues, is positively correlated with fecundity. We localize Drip expression to a small population of corazonin producing neurons located in the dorsolateral posterior compartments of the protocerebrum. Expression of Drip-RNAi using both the pan-neuronal ELAV-Gal4 and the Crz-Gal4 drivers reduces fecundity. Low-fecundity RILs have decreased Crz expression and increased expression of pale, the enzyme encoding the rate-limiting step in the production of dopamine, a modulator of insect life histories. Taken together these data suggest that natural variation in Drip expression in the corazonin producing neurons contributes to standing variation in fitness by altering the concentration of two neurohormones.

  2. C2 Link Security for UAS: Technical Literature Study and Preliminary Functional Requirements. Version 0.9 (Working Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This document provides a study of the technical literature related to Command and Control (C2) link security for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) for operation in the National Airspace System (NAS). Included is a preliminary set of functional requirements for C2 link security.

  3. A Case Study of Non-Functional Requirements and Continuous Improvement at a National Communications System Contractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Volney L. R.

    2010-01-01

    National communications systems (NCS) are critical elements of a government's infrastructure. Limited improvements to the non-functional requirements (NFR) of NCS have caused issues during national emergencies such as 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. The literature indicates that these issues result from a deficiency in understanding the roles NFRs and…

  4. Spent Nuclear Fuel project stage and store K basin SNF in canister storage building functions and requirements. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Womack, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document establishes the functions and requirements baseline for the implementation of the Canister Storage Building Subproject. The mission allocated to the Canister Storage Building Subproject is to provide safe, environmentally sound staging and storage of K Basin SNF until a decision on the final disposition is reached and implemented

  5. Choline: Clinical Nutrigenetic/Nutrigenomic Approaches for Identification of Functions and Dietary Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisel, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrigenetics/nutrigenomics (the study of the bidirectional interactions between genes and diet) is a rapidly developing field that is changing research and practice in human nutrition. Though eventually nutrition clinicians may be able to provide personalized nutrition recommendations, in the immediate future they are most likely to use this knowledge to improve dietary recommendations for populations. Currently, estimated average requirements are used to set dietary reference intakes because scientists cannot adequately identify subsets of the population that differ in requirement for a nutrient. Recommended intake levels must exceed the actual required intake for most of the population in order to assure that individuals with the highest requirement ingest adequate amounts of the nutrient. As a result, dietary reference intake levels often are set so high that diet guidelines suggest almost unattainable intakes of some foods. Once it is possible to identify common subgroups that differ in nutrient requirements using nutrigenetic/nutrigenomic profiling, targeted interventions and recommendations can be refined. In addition, when a large variance exists in response to a nutrient, statistical analyses often argue for a null effect. If responders could be differentiated from nonre-sponders based on nutrigenetic/nutrigenomic profiling, this statistical noise could be eliminated and the sensitivity of nutrition research greatly increased. PMID:20436254

  6. Drosophila pink1 is required for mitochondrial function and interacts genetically with parkin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ira E; Dodson, Mark W; Jiang, Changan; Cao, Joseph H; Huh, Jun R; Seol, Jae Hong; Yoo, Soon Ji; Hay, Bruce A; Guo, Ming

    2006-06-29

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder and is characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as an important trigger for Parkinson's disease-like pathogenesis because exposure to environmental mitochondrial toxins leads to Parkinson's disease-like pathology. Recently, multiple genes mediating familial forms of Parkinson's disease have been identified, including PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1; PARK6) and parkin (PARK2), which are also associated with sporadic forms of Parkinson's disease. PINK1 encodes a putative serine/threonine kinase with a mitochondrial targeting sequence. So far, no in vivo studies have been reported for pink1 in any model system. Here we show that removal of Drosophila PINK1 homologue (CG4523; hereafter called pink1) function results in male sterility, apoptotic muscle degeneration, defects in mitochondrial morphology and increased sensitivity to multiple stresses including oxidative stress. Pink1 localizes to mitochondria, and mitochondrial cristae are fragmented in pink1 mutants. Expression of human PINK1 in the Drosophila testes restores male fertility and normal mitochondrial morphology in a portion of pink1 mutants, demonstrating functional conservation between human and Drosophila Pink1. Loss of Drosophila parkin shows phenotypes similar to loss of pink1 function. Notably, overexpression of parkin rescues the male sterility and mitochondrial morphology defects of pink1 mutants, whereas double mutants removing both pink1 and parkin function show muscle phenotypes identical to those observed in either mutant alone. These observations suggest that pink1 and parkin function, at least in part, in the same pathway, with pink1 functioning upstream of parkin. The role of the pink1-parkin pathway in regulating mitochondrial function underscores the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction as a central mechanism of Parkinson's disease

  7. ‘tripleint_cc’: A program for 2-centre variational leptonic Coulomb potential matrix elements using Hylleraas-type trial functions, with a performance optimization study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, M.; Armour, E. A. G.; Todd, A. C.; Franklin, C. P.; Cooper, J. N.

    2009-12-01

    nuclear calculations). Specifically the integrals are defined by Eq. (16) in the main text and contain terms proportional to r×r/r,i≠j,i≠k,j≠k, with r the distance between leptons i and j. The article also briefly describes the performance optimizations used to increase the speed of evaluation of the integrals enough to allow detailed testing and mapping of the effect of varying non-linear parameters in the variational trial functions. Solution method: Each integral is solved using prolate spheroidal coordinates and series expansions (with cut-offs) of the many-lepton expressions. 1-d integrals and sub-integrals are solved analytically by various means (the program automatically chooses the most accurate of the available methods for each set of parameters and function arguments), while two of the three integrations over the prolate spheroidal coordinates ' λ' are carried out numerically. Many similar integrals with identical non-linear variational parameters may be calculated with one call of the code. Restrictions: There are limits to the number of points for the numerical integrations, to the cut-off variable itaumax for the many-lepton series expansions, and to the maximum powers of Slater-like input functions. For runs near the limit of the cut-off variable and with certain small-magnitude values of variational non-linear parameters, the code can require large amounts of memory (an option using some intermediate I/O is included to offset this). Unusual features: In addition to the program, we also present a summary description of the techniques and ideology used to optimize the code, together with accuracy tests and indications of performance improvement. Running time: The test runs take 1-15 minutes on HPCx [2] as indicated in Section 5 of the main text. A practical run with 729 integrals, 40 quadrature points per dimension and itaumax = 8 took 150 minutes on a PC (e.g., [1]): a similar run with 'medium' accuracy, e.g. for parameter optimization (see Section

  8. Functional requirements of computer systems for the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, 1988-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, R.M.; McNellis, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Investigating the occurrence, quantity, quality, distribution, and movement of the Nation 's water resources is the principal mission of the U.S. Geological Survey 's Water Resources Division. Reports of these investigations are published and available to the public. To accomplish this mission, the Division requires substantial computer technology to process, store, and analyze data from more than 57,000 hydrologic sites. The Division 's computer resources are organized through the Distributed Information System Program Office that manages the nationwide network of computers. The contract that provides the major computer components for the Water Resources Division 's Distributed information System expires in 1991. Five work groups were organized to collect the information needed to procure a new generation of computer systems for the U. S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division. Each group was assigned a major Division activity and asked to describe its functional requirements of computer systems for the next decade. The work groups and major activities are: (1) hydrologic information; (2) hydrologic applications; (3) geographic information systems; (4) reports and electronic publishing; and (5) administrative. The work groups identified 42 functions and described their functional requirements for 1988, 1992, and 1997. A few new functions such as Decision Support Systems and Executive Information Systems, were identified, but most are the same as performed today. Although the number of functions will remain about the same, steady growth in the size, complexity, and frequency of many functions is predicted for the next decade. No compensating increase in the Division 's staff is anticipated during this period. To handle the increased workload and perform these functions, new approaches will be developed that use advanced computer technology. The advanced technology is required in a unified, tightly coupled system that will support all functions simultaneously

  9. Functional requirements for the Automated Transportation Management System: TTP number: RL 439002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portsmouth, J.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    This requirements analysis, documents Department of Energy (DOE) transportation management procedures for the purpose of providing a clear and mutual understanding between users and designers of the proposed Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS). It is imperative that one understand precisely how DOE currently performs traffic management tasks; only then can an integrated system be proposed that successfully satisfies the major requirements of transportation managers and other system users. Accordingly, this report describes the current workings of DOE transportation organizations and then proposes a new system which represents a synthesis of procedures (both current and desired) which forms the basis for further systems development activities.

  10. Functional requirements for the man-vehicle systems research facility. [identifying and correcting human errors during flight simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, W. F.; Allen, R. W.; Heffley, R. K.; Jewell, W. F.; Jex, H. R.; Mcruer, D. T.; Schulman, T. M.; Stapleford, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center proposed a man-vehicle systems research facility to support flight simulation studies which are needed for identifying and correcting the sources of human error associated with current and future air carrier operations. The organization of research facility is reviewed and functional requirements and related priorities for the facility are recommended based on a review of potentially critical operational scenarios. Requirements are included for the experimenter's simulation control and data acquisition functions, as well as for the visual field, motion, sound, computation, crew station, and intercommunications subsystems. The related issues of functional fidelity and level of simulation are addressed, and specific criteria for quantitative assessment of various aspects of fidelity are offered. Recommendations for facility integration, checkout, and staffing are included.

  11. Are Protected Areas Required to Maintain Functional Diversity in Human-Modified Landscapes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottee-Jones, H. Eden W.; Matthews, Thomas J.; Bregman, Tom P.; Barua, Maan; Tamuly, Jatin; Whittaker, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of forest to agriculture across the world’s tropics, and the limited space for protected areas, has increased the need to identify effective conservation strategies in human-modified landscapes. Isolated trees are believed to conserve elements of ecological structure, providing micro-sites for conservation in matrix landscapes, and facilitating seed dispersal and forest restoration. Here we investigate the role of isolated Ficus trees, which are of critical importance to tropical forest ecosystems, in conserving frugivore composition and function in a human-modified landscape in Assam, India. We surveyed the frugivorous birds feeding at 122 isolated Ficus trees, 33 fruit trees, and 31 other large trees across a range of 32 km from the nearest intact forest. We found that Ficus trees attracted richer and more abundant assemblages of frugivores than the other tree categories. However, incidence function estimates revealed that forest specialist species decreased dramatically within the first kilometre of the forest edge. Despite this, species richness and functional diversity remained consistent across the human-modified landscape, as habitat generalists replaced forest-dependent frugivores, and accounted for most of the ecological function found in Ficus trees near the forest edge. We recommend that isolated Ficus trees are awarded greater conservation status, and suggest that their conservation can support ecologically functional networks of frugivorous bird communities. PMID:25946032

  12. Cavin4b/Murcb Is Required for Skeletal Muscle Development and Function in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housley, Michael P; Njaine, Brian; Ricciardi, Filomena; Stone, Oliver A; Hölper, Soraya; Krüger, Marcus; Kostin, Sawa; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscles provide metazoans with the ability to feed, reproduce and avoid predators. In humans, a heterogeneous group of genetic diseases, termed muscular dystrophies (MD), lead to skeletal muscle dysfunction. Mutations in the gene encoding Caveolin-3, a principal component of the membrane micro-domains known as caveolae, cause defects in muscle maintenance and function; however it remains unclear how caveolae dysfunction underlies MD pathology. The Cavin family of caveolar proteins can form membrane remodeling oligomers and thus may also impact skeletal muscle function. Changes in the distribution and function of Cavin4/Murc, which is predominantly expressed in striated muscles, have been reported to alter caveolae structure through interaction with Caveolin-3. Here, we report the generation and phenotypic analysis of murcb mutant zebrafish, which display impaired swimming capacity, skeletal muscle fibrosis and T-tubule abnormalities during development. To understand the mechanistic importance of Murc loss of function, we assessed Caveolin-1 and 3 localization and found it to be abnormal. We further identified an in vivo function for Murc in Erk signaling. These data link Murc with developmental defects in T-tubule formation and progressive muscle dysfunction, thereby providing a new candidate for the etiology of muscular dystrophy.

  13. Cavin4b/Murcb Is Required for Skeletal Muscle Development and Function in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Housley

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscles provide metazoans with the ability to feed, reproduce and avoid predators. In humans, a heterogeneous group of genetic diseases, termed muscular dystrophies (MD, lead to skeletal muscle dysfunction. Mutations in the gene encoding Caveolin-3, a principal component of the membrane micro-domains known as caveolae, cause defects in muscle maintenance and function; however it remains unclear how caveolae dysfunction underlies MD pathology. The Cavin family of caveolar proteins can form membrane remodeling oligomers and thus may also impact skeletal muscle function. Changes in the distribution and function of Cavin4/Murc, which is predominantly expressed in striated muscles, have been reported to alter caveolae structure through interaction with Caveolin-3. Here, we report the generation and phenotypic analysis of murcb mutant zebrafish, which display impaired swimming capacity, skeletal muscle fibrosis and T-tubule abnormalities during development. To understand the mechanistic importance of Murc loss of function, we assessed Caveolin-1 and 3 localization and found it to be abnormal. We further identified an in vivo function for Murc in Erk signaling. These data link Murc with developmental defects in T-tubule formation and progressive muscle dysfunction, thereby providing a new candidate for the etiology of muscular dystrophy.

  14. THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES: EVIDENCE FOR IMF VARIATIONS WITH GALACTIC ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geha, Marla [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Ferguson, Henry C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Simon, Joshua D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Kirby, Evan N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); VandenBerg, Don A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Munoz, Ricardo R. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Guhathakurta, Puragra, E-mail: marla.geha@yale.edu, E-mail: tbrown@stsci.edu, E-mail: tumlinson@stsci.edu [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    We present constraints on the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in two ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, Hercules and Leo IV, based on deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging. The Hercules and Leo IV galaxies are extremely low luminosity (M{sub V} = -6.2, -5.5), metal-poor (([Fe/H]) = -2.4, -2.5) systems that have old stellar populations (>11 Gyr). Because they have long relaxation times, we can directly measure the low-mass stellar IMF by counting stars below the main-sequence turnoff without correcting for dynamical evolution. Over the stellar mass range probed by our data, 0.52-0.77 M{sub Sun }, the IMF is best fit by a power-law slope of {alpha}= 1.2{sub -0.5}{sup +0.4} for Hercules and {alpha} = 1.3 {+-} 0.8 for Leo IV. For Hercules, the IMF slope is more shallow than a Salpeter ({alpha} = 2.35) IMF at the 5.8{sigma} level, and a Kroupa ({alpha} = 2.3 above 0.5 M{sub Sun }) IMF slope at 5.4{sigma} level. We simultaneously fit for the binary fraction, f{sub binary}, finding f{sub binary}= 0.47{sup +0.16}{sub -0.14} for Hercules, and 0.47{sup +0.37}{sub -0.17} for Leo IV. The UFD binary fractions are consistent with that inferred for Milky Way stars in the same mass range, despite very different metallicities. In contrast, the IMF slopes in the UFDs are shallower than other galactic environments. In the mass range 0.5-0.8 M{sub Sun }, we see a trend across the handful of galaxies with directly measured IMFs such that the power-law slopes become shallower (more bottom-light) with decreasing galactic velocity dispersion and metallicity. This trend is qualitatively consistent with results in elliptical galaxies inferred via indirect methods and is direct evidence for IMF variations with galactic environment.

  15. Kyphoplasty increases vertebral height, decreases both pain score and opiate requirements while improving functional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, Reda; Bolash, Robert B; Shroll, Joshua; Costandi, Shrif; Dalton, Jarrod E; Sanghvi, Chirag; Mekhail, Nagy

    2014-03-01

    Vertebral compression fractures can result from advanced osteoporosis, or less commonly from metastatic or traumatic insults to the vertebral column, and result in disabling pain and decreased functional capacity. Various vertebral augmentation options including kyphoplasty aim at preventing the sequelae of pain and immobility that can develop as the result of the vertebral fractures. The mechanism for pain relief following kyphoplasty is not entirely understood, and the restoration of a portion of the lost vertebral height is a subject of debate. We retrospectively reviewed radiographic imaging, pain relief, analgesic intake and functional outcomes in 67 consecutive patients who underwent single- or multilevel kyphoplasty with the primary goal of quantifying the restoration of lost vertebral height. We observed a mean of 45% of the lost vertebral height restored postprocedurally. Secondarily, kyphoplasty was associated with significant decreases in pain scores, daily morphine consumption and improvement in patient-reported functional measures. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  16. Functional requirements for an intelligent RPC. [remote power controller for spaceborne electrical distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, B. M.; Heller, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    An intelligent remote power controller (RPC) based on microcomputer technology can implement advanced functions for the accurate and secure detection of all types of faults on a spaceborne electrical distribution system. The intelligent RPC will implement conventional protection functions such as overcurrent, under-voltage, and ground fault protection. Advanced functions for the detection of soft faults, which cannot presently be detected, can also be implemented. Adaptive overcurrent protection changes overcurrent settings based on connected load. Incipient and high-impedance fault detection provides early detection of arcing conditions to prevent fires, and to clear and reconfigure circuits before soft faults progress to a hard-fault condition. Power electronics techniques can be used to implement fault current limiting to prevent voltage dips during hard faults. It is concluded that these techniques will enhance the overall safety and reliability of the distribution system.

  17. Structural and functional adaptations of the mammalian nuclear envelope to meet the meiotic requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Jana; Jahn, Daniel; Alsheimer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies in the past years provided definite evidence that the nuclear envelope is much more than just a simple barrier. It rather constitutes a multifunctional platform combining structural and dynamic features to fulfill many fundamental functions such as chromatin organization, regulation of transcription, signaling, but also structural duties like maintaining general nuclear architecture and shape. One additional and, without doubt, highly impressive aspect is the recently identified key function of selected nuclear envelope components in driving meiotic chromosome dynamics, which in turn is essential for accurate recombination and segregation of the homologous chromosomes. Here, we summarize the recent work identifying new key players in meiotic telomere attachment and movement and discuss the latest advances in our understanding of the actual function of the meiotic nuclear envelope.

  18. Functions and requirements of conserved RNA structures in the 3’ untranslated region of Flaviviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agostinho Gonçalves Costa da Silva, Patrícia

    2011-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus contains nearly 80 viruses, including many important human pathogens such as dengue virus, yellow fever virus, West Nile virus and tick-borne encephalitis virus. To reduce and prevent the impact of flavivirus infection on society, vaccines and effective therapies are required.

  19. Evaluation of Requirements for Volt/Var Control and Optimization Function in Distribution Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Saaed; Marinelli, Mattia; Silvestro, Federico

    2012-01-01

    To meet the requirement from new visions within “smart grid” and to provide solutions for many challenges that DSOs (Distribution System Operators) are facing today, we need to develop advanced DMS (Distribution Management System) applications. A centralized Volt/Var Control (VVC) is one of the m...

  20. Synergy of Technical Specification, functional specifications and scenarios in requirements specifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, J.; van der Voort, Mascha C.; Lutters, Diederick; van Houten, Frederikus J.A.M.; Krause, Frank-Lothar

    2007-01-01

    In the (mechanical) design process, the requirements specification is a formal registration of the conditions that are imposed on a new or altered product design, both preceding as well as during the corresponding product development cycle. For a long time, the use of technical specifications has

  1. Functional Mobility Testing: A Novel Method to Establish Human System Interface Design Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Scott A.; Benson, Elizabeth A.; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2008-01-01

    Across all fields of human-system interface design it is vital to posses a sound methodology dictating the constraints on the system based on the capabilities of the human user. These limitations may be based on strength, mobility, dexterity, cognitive ability, etc. and combinations thereof. Data collected in an isolated environment to determine, for example, maximal strength or maximal range of motion would indeed be adequate for establishing not-to-exceed type design limitations, however these restraints on the system may be excessive over what is basally needed. Resources may potentially be saved by having a technique to determine the minimum measurements a system must accommodate. This paper specifically deals with the creation of a novel methodology for establishing mobility requirements for a new generation of space suit design concepts. Historically, the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station vehicle and space hardware design requirements documents such as the Man-Systems Integration Standards and International Space Station Flight Crew Integration Standard explicitly stated that the designers should strive to provide the maximum joint range of motion capabilities exhibited by a minimally clothed human subject. In the course of developing the Human-Systems Integration Requirements (HSIR) for the new space exploration initiative (Constellation), an effort was made to redefine the mobility requirements in the interest of safety and cost. Systems designed for manned space exploration can receive compounded gains from simplified designs that are both initially less expensive to produce and lighter, thereby, cheaper to launch.

  2. Formal Functional Test Designs: Bridging the Gap Between Test Requirements and Test Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hops, Jonathan

    1993-01-01

    This presentation describes the testing life cycle, the purpose of the test design phase, and test design methods and gives an example application. Also included is a description of Test Representation Language (TRL), a summary of the language, and an example of an application of TRL. A sample test requirement and sample test design are included.

  3. Student-Centered Learning: Functional Requirements for Integrated Systems to Optimize Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowa, Liz; Goodell, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The realities of the 21st-century learner require that schools and educators fundamentally change their practice. "Educators must produce college- and career-ready graduates that reflect the future these students will face. And, they must facilitate learning through means that align with the defining attributes of this generation of…

  4. 77 FR 76382 - Payout Requirements for Type III Supporting Organizations That Are Not Functionally Integrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... required by 26 U.S.C. 6103. Background This document contains amendments to the Income Tax Regulations (26... supporting organization to: (1) Make payments of substantially all of its income to or for the use of one or... involve producing income and [[Page 76388

  5. Information rich mapping requirement to product architecture through functional system deployment: The multi entity domain approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauksdóttir, Dagný; Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    2017-01-01

    may impede the ability to evolve, maintain or reuse systems. In this paper the Multi Entity Domain Approach (MEDA) is presented. The approach combines different design information within the domain views, incorporates both Software and Hardware design and supports iterative requirements definition...

  6. Systems engineering functions and requirements for the Hanford cleanup mission. First issue, Addendum 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    This addendum provides the technical detail of a systems engineering functional analysis for the Hanford cleanup mission. Details of the mission analysis including mission statement, scope, problem statement, initial state definition, and final state definition are provided in the parent document. The functional analysis consists of Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams an definitions, which will be understood by systems engineers, but which may be difficult for others to comprehend. For a more complete explanation of this work, refer to the parent document. The analysis covers the total Hanford cleanup mission including the decomposition levels at which the various Hanford programs or integrated activities are encountered.

  7. Antibody-Mediated Targeting of Tau In Vivo Does Not Require Effector Function and Microglial Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hye Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The spread of tau pathology correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease. In vitro, tau antibodies can block cell-to-cell tau spreading. Although mechanisms of anti-tau function in vivo are unknown, effector function might promote microglia-mediated clearance. In this study, we investigated whether antibody effector function is required for targeting tau. We compared efficacy in vivo and in vitro of two versions of the same tau antibody, with and without effector function, measuring tau pathology, neuron health, and microglial function. Both antibodies reduced accumulation of tau pathology in Tau-P301L transgenic mice and protected cultured neurons against extracellular tau-induced toxicity. Only the full-effector antibody enhanced tau uptake in cultured microglia, which promoted release of proinflammatory cytokines. In neuron-microglia co-cultures, only effectorless anti-tau protected neurons, suggesting full-effector tau antibodies can induce indirect toxicity via microglia. We conclude that effector function is not required for efficacy, and effectorless tau antibodies may represent a safer approach to targeting tau.

  8. Associations between Depressive State and Impaired Higher-Level Functional Capacity in the Elderly with Long-Term Care Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Soshiro; Hayashi, Chisato; Sugiura, Keiko; Hayakawa, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Depressive state has been reported to be significantly associated with higher-level functional capacity among community-dwelling elderly. However, few studies have investigated the associations among people with long-term care requirements. We aimed to investigate the associations between depressive state and higher-level functional capacity and obtain marginal odds ratios using propensity score analyses in people with long-term care requirements. We conducted a cross-sectional study based on participants aged ≥ 65 years (n = 545) who were community dwelling and used outpatient care services for long-term preventive care. We measured higher-level functional capacity, depressive state, and possible confounders. Then, we estimated the marginal odds ratios (i.e., the change in odds of impaired higher-level functional capacity if all versus no participants were exposed to depressive state) by logistic models using generalized linear models with the inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) for propensity score and design-based standard errors. Depressive state was used as the exposure variable and higher-level functional capacity as the outcome variable. The all absolute standardized differences after the IPTW using the propensity scores were functional capacity.

  9. Variations in the response of AECL random coil seals as a function of the angular position of the probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, M.G.

    1986-04-01

    The AECL random coil seal is to be used as a Nuclear Safeguards seal to deter and detect tampering with nuclear material in store. To be effective the ultrasonic signature from the seal must remain constant and be different from that of other seals. Angular variations in the ultrasonic response from certain seals have, however, been observed and the programme of study reported here has been carried out in order to clarify the source of this variation. It is shown that the variation observed may most probably be attributed to the ultrasonic probes used in the investigation and, in particular, to deviation of the probe beam from circularity. However it is probable that the angle of the beam with respect to the probe case (squint) is also a contributory factor. In addition, to reduce the degree of angular variation it is important to exclude air bubbles and to ensure that the coil is placed as centrally in the beam as possible. It is anticipated that the exclusion of air bubbles will be easier in the field than in the laboratory studies. The need to place the seal reasonably centrally with respect to the beam places some minor limits on the coil design and also makes it essential that the probe fits closely into its holder in the seal as any slackness may give rise to signature variations. (author)

  10. 33 CFR 96.240 - What functional requirements must a safety management system meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... a safety management system meet? 96.240 Section 96.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY VESSEL OPERATING REGULATIONS RULES FOR THE SAFE OPERATION OF VESSELS AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Company and Vessel Safety Management Systems § 96.240 What functional...

  11. 26 CFR 1.985-5 - Adjustments required upon change in functional currency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... LC historical basis) 150,000 100,000 Fixed assets: Property 200,000 400,000 Plant 500,000 1,000,000..., basis of an asset, and amount of a liability, as of the first day of a taxpayer's first taxable year... difference between the branch's total old functional currency basis of its assets and its total old...

  12. Functional and operational requirements document : building 1012, Battery and Energy Storage Device Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, William H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report provides an overview of information, prior studies, and analyses relevant to the development of functional and operational requirements for electrochemical testing of batteries and energy storage devices carried out by Sandia Organization 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D. Electrochemical operations for this group are scheduled to transition from Sandia Building 894 to a new Building located in Sandia TA-II referred to as Building 1012. This report also provides background on select design considerations and identifies the Safety Goals, Stakeholder Objectives, and Design Objectives required by the Sandia Design Team to develop the Performance Criteria necessary to the design of Building 1012. This document recognizes the Architecture-Engineering (A-E) Team as the primary design entity. Where safety considerations are identified, suggestions are provided to provide context for the corresponding operational requirement(s).

  13. Science and Measurement Requirements for a Plant Physiology and Functional Types Mission: Measuring the Composition, Function and Health of Global Land and Coastal Ocean Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert O.; Rogez, Francois; Green, Rob; Ungar, Steve; Knox, Robert; Asner, Greg; Muller-Karger, Frank; Bissett, Paul; Chekalyuk, Alex; Dierssen, Heidi; hide

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the proposed Plant Physiology and Functional Types (PPFT) Mission. The National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey, placed a critical priority on a Mission to observe distribution and changes in ecosystem functions. The PPFT satellite mission provides the essential measurements needed to assess drivers of change in biodiversity and ecosystem services that affect human welfare. The presentation reviews the science questions that the mission will be designed to answer, the science rationale, the science measurements, the mission concept, the planned instrumentation, the calibration method, and key signal to noise ratios and uniformity requirements.

  14. Within- and between-individual variation in energy and nutrient intake in Japanese adults: effect of age and sex differences on group size and number of records required for adequate dietary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Azusa; Asakura, Keiko; Murakami, Kentaro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Okubo, Hitomi; Hirota, Naoko; Notsu, Akiko; Todoriki, Hidemi; Miura, Ayako; Fukui, Mitsuru; Date, Chigusa

    2013-01-01

    Information on within- and between-individual variation in energy and nutrient intake is critical for precisely estimating usual dietary intake; however, data from Japanese populations are limited. We used dietary records to examine within- and between-individual variation by age and sex in the intake of energy and 31 selected nutrients among Japanese adults. We also calculated the group size required to estimate mean intake for a group and number of days required both to rank individuals within a group and to assess an individual's usual intake, all with appropriate arbitrary precision. A group of Japanese women (younger: 30-49 years, n = 58; older: 50-69 years, n = 63) and men (younger: 30-49 years, n = 54; older: 50-76 years, n = 67) completed dietary records for 4 nonconsecutive days in each season (16 days in total). Coefficients of within-individual variation and between-individual variation were generally larger in the younger group than in the older group and in men as compared with women. The group size required to estimate a group's mean intake, and number of days required to assess an individual's usual intake, were generally larger for the younger group and for men. In general, a longer period was required to rank women and older adults. In a group of Japanese adults, coefficients of within-individual variation and between-individual variation, which were used to estimate the group size and number of records required for adequate dietary assessment, differed by age, sex, and nutrient.

  15. Tissue Engineering of Blood Vessels: Functional Requirements, Progress, and Future Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek A; Brewster, Luke P; Caves, Jeffrey M; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2011-09-01

    Vascular disease results in the decreased utility and decreased availability of autologus vascular tissue for small diameter (requires combined approaches from biomaterials science, cell biology, and translational medicine to develop feasible solutions with the requisite mechanical support, a non-fouling surface for blood flow, and tissue regeneration. Over the past two decades interest in blood vessel tissue engineering has soared on a global scale, resulting in the first clinical implants of multiple technologies, steady progress with several other systems, and critical lessons-learned. This review will highlight the current inadequacies of autologus and synthetic grafts, the engineering requirements for implantation of tissue-engineered grafts, and the current status of tissue-engineered blood vessel research.

  16. Requirements for implementing real-time control functional modules on a hierarchical parallel pipelined system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Thomas E.; Michaloski, John L.; Lumia, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of a robot control system leads to a broad range of processing requirements. One fundamental requirement of a robot control system is the necessity of a microcomputer system in order to provide sufficient processing capability.The use of multiple processors in a parallel architecture is beneficial for a number of reasons, including better cost performance, modular growth, increased reliability through replication, and flexibility for testing alternate control strategies via different partitioning. A survey of the progression from low level control synchronizing primitives to higher level communication tools is presented. The system communication and control mechanisms of existing robot control systems are compared to the hierarchical control model. The impact of this design methodology on the current robot control systems is explored.

  17. Functional dissection of the alphavirus capsid protease: sequence requirements for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Saijo; Rai, Jagdish; John, Lijo; Günther, Stephan; Drosten, Christian; Pützer, Brigitte M; Schaefer, Stephan

    2010-11-18

    The alphavirus capsid is multifunctional and plays a key role in the viral life cycle. The nucleocapsid domain is released by the self-cleavage activity of the serine protease domain within the capsid. All alphaviruses analyzed to date show this autocatalytic cleavage. Here we have analyzed the sequence requirements for the cleavage activity of Chikungunya virus capsid protease of genus alphavirus. Amongst alphaviruses, the C-terminal amino acid tryptophan (W261) is conserved and found to be important for the cleavage. Mutating tryptophan to alanine (W261A) completely inactivated the protease. Other amino acids near W261 were not having any effect on the activity of this protease. However, serine protease inhibitor AEBSF did not inhibit the activity. Through error-prone PCR we found that isoleucine 227 is important for the effective activity. The loss of activity was analyzed further by molecular modelling and comparison of WT and mutant structures. It was found that lysine introduced at position 227 is spatially very close to the catalytic triad and may disrupt electrostatic interactions in the catalytic site and thus inactivate the enzyme. We are also examining other sequence requirements for this protease activity. We analyzed various amino acid sequence requirements for the activity of ChikV capsid protease and found that amino acids outside the catalytic triads are important for the activity.

  18. Oct1 and OCA-B are selectively required for CD4 memory T cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Arvind; Goren, Alon; Shalek, Alex; German, Cody N; Snook, Jeremy; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Yosef, Nir; Chan, Raymond C; Regev, Aviv; Williams, Matthew A; Tantin, Dean

    2015-11-16

    Epigenetic changes are crucial for the generation of immunological memory. Failure to generate or maintain these changes will result in poor memory responses. Similarly, augmenting or stabilizing the correct epigenetic states offers a potential method of enhancing memory. Yet the transcription factors that regulate these processes are poorly defined. We find that the transcription factor Oct1 and its cofactor OCA-B are selectively required for the in vivo generation of CD4(+) memory T cells. More importantly, the memory cells that are formed do not respond properly to antigen reencounter. In vitro, both proteins are required to maintain a poised state at the Il2 target locus in resting but previously stimulated CD4(+) T cells. OCA-B is also required for the robust reexpression of multiple other genes including Ifng. ChIPseq identifies ∼50 differentially expressed direct Oct1 and OCA-B targets. We identify an underlying mechanism involving OCA-B recruitment of the histone lysine demethylase Jmjd1a to targets such as Il2, Ifng, and Zbtb32. The findings pinpoint Oct1 and OCA-B as central mediators of CD4(+) T cell memory. © 2015 Shakya et al.

  19. SU-E-J-164: Estimation of DVH Variation for PTV Due to Interfraction Organ Motion in Prostate VMAT Using Gaussian Error Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, C; Jiang, R; Chow, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We developed a method to predict the change of DVH for PTV due to interfraction organ motion in prostate VMAT without repeating the CT scan and treatment planning. The method is based on a pre-calculated patient database with DVH curves of PTV modelled by the Gaussian error function (GEF). Methods: For a group of 30 patients with different prostate sizes, their VMAT plans were recalculated by shifting their PTVs 1 cm with 10 increments in the anterior-posterior, left-right and superior-inferior directions. The DVH curve of PTV in each replan was then fitted by the GEF to determine parameters describing the shape of curve. Information of parameters, varying with the DVH change due to prostate motion for different prostate sizes, was analyzed and stored in a database of a program written by MATLAB. Results: To predict a new DVH for PTV due to prostate interfraction motion, prostate size and shift distance with direction were input to the program. Parameters modelling the DVH for PTV were determined based on the pre-calculated patient dataset. From the new parameters, DVH curves of PTVs with and without considering the prostate motion were plotted for comparison. The program was verified with different prostate cases involving interfraction prostate shifts and replans. Conclusion: Variation of DVH for PTV in prostate VMAT can be predicted using a pre-calculated patient database with DVH curve fitting. The computing time is fast because CT rescan and replan are not required. This quick DVH estimation can help radiation staff to determine if the changed PTV coverage due to prostate shift is tolerable in the treatment. However, it should be noted that the program can only consider prostate interfraction motions along three axes, and is restricted to prostate VMAT plan using the same plan script in the treatment planning system

  20. Justification of the technical requirements of a fully functional modular robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlyakhov Nikita

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modular robots are characterized by limited built-in resources necessary for communication, connection and movement of modules, when performing reconfiguration tasks at rigidly interconnected elements. In developing the technological fundamentals of designing modular robots with pairwise connection mechanisms, we analysed modern hardware and model algorithms typical of a fully functional robot, which provide independent locomotion, communication, navigation, decentralized power and control. A survey of actuators, batteries, sensors, communication means, suitable for modular robotics is presented.