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Sample records for function tar decoy

  1. Improved protein structure selection using decoy-dependent discriminatory functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitt Michael

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A key component in protein structure prediction is a scoring or discriminatory function that can distinguish near-native conformations from misfolded ones. Various types of scoring functions have been developed to accomplish this goal, but their performance is not adequate to solve the structure selection problem. In addition, there is poor correlation between the scores and the accuracy of the generated conformations. Results We present a simple and nonparametric formula to estimate the accuracy of predicted conformations (or decoys. This scoring function, called the density score function, evaluates decoy conformations by performing an all-against-all Cα RMSD (Root Mean Square Deviation calculation in a given decoy set. We tested the density score function on 83 decoy sets grouped by their generation methods (4state_reduced, fisa, fisa_casp3, lmds, lattice_ssfit, semfold and Rosetta. The density scores have correlations as high as 0.9 with the Cα RMSDs of the decoy conformations, measured relative to the experimental conformation for each decoy. We previously developed a residue-specific all-atom probability discriminatory function (RAPDF, which compiles statistics from a database of experimentally determined conformations, to aid in structure selection. Here, we present a decoy-dependent discriminatory function called self-RAPDF, where we compiled the atom-atom contact probabilities from all the conformations in a decoy set instead of using an ensemble of native conformations, with a weighting scheme based on the density scores. The self-RAPDF has a higher correlation with Cα RMSD than RAPDF for 76/83 decoy sets, and selects better near-native conformations for 62/83 decoy sets. Self-RAPDF may be useful not only for selecting near-native conformations from decoy sets, but also for fold simulations and protein structure refinement. Conclusions Both the density score and the self-RAPDF functions are decoy

  2. Lentiviral transduction of Tar Decoy and CCR5 ribozyme into CD34+ progenitor cells and derivation of HIV-1 resistant T cells and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi John

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA based antiviral approaches against HIV-1 are among the most promising for long-term gene therapy. These include ribozymes, aptamers (decoys, and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs. Lentiviral vectors are ideal for transduction of such inhibitory RNAs into hematopoietic stem cells due to their ability to transduce non-dividing cells and their relative refractiveness to gene silencing. The objective of this study is to introduce an HIV-1 Tar aptamer either alone or in combination with an anti-CCR5 ribozyme into CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells via an HIV-based lentiviral vector to derive viral resistant progeny T cells and macrophages. Results High efficiency and sustained gene transfer into CD34+ cells were achieved with lentiviral vector constructs harboring either Tar decoy or Tar decoy in combination with CCR5 ribozyme. Cells transduced with these constructs differentiated normally into T-lymphocytes in vivo in thy/liv grafts of SCID-hu mice, and into macrophages in vitro in the presence of appropriate growth factors. When challenged in vitro, the differentiated T lymphocytes and macrophages showed marked resistance against HIV-1 infection. Conclusions Viral resistant transgenic T cells and macrophages that express HIV-1 Tar aptamer either alone or in combination with an anti-CCR5 ribozyme could be obtained by lentiviral gene transduction of CD34+ progenitor cells. These results showed for the first time that expression of these anti-HIV-1 transgenes in combination do not interfere with normal thymopoiesis and thus have set the stage for their application in stem cell based gene therapy for HIV/AIDS.

  3. Preintegration HIV-1 inhibition by a combination lentiviral vector containing a chimeric TRIM5 alpha protein, a CCR5 shRNA, and a TAR decoy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joseph S; Javien, John; Nolta, Jan A; Bauer, Gerhard

    2009-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gene therapy offers a promising alternative approach to current antiretroviral treatments to inhibit HIV-1 infection. Various stages of the HIV life cycle including pre-entry, preintegration, and postintegration can be targeted by gene therapy to block viral infection and replication. By combining multiple highly potent anti-HIV transgenes in a single gene therapy vector, HIV-1 resistance can be achieved in transduced cells while prohibiting the generation of escape mutants. Here, we describe a combination lentiviral vector that encodes three highly effective anti-HIV genes functioning at separate stages of the viral life cycle including a CCR5 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) (pre-entry), a human/rhesus macaque chimeric TRIM5 alpha (postentry/preintegration), and a transactivation response element (TAR) decoy (postintegration). The major focus on designing this anti-HIV vector was to block productive infection of HIV-1 and to inhibit any formation of provirus that would maintain the viral reservoir. Upon viral challenge, potent preintegration inhibition of HIV-1 infection was achieved in combination vector-transduced cells in both cultured and primary CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC)-derived macrophages. The generation of escape mutants was also blocked as evaluated by long-term culture of challenged cells. The ability of this combination anti-HIV lentiviral vector to prevent HIV-1 infection, in vitro, warrants further evaluation of its in vivo efficacy.

  4. Quantum Decoys

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, P

    2003-01-01

    Alice communicates with words drawn uniformly amongst $\\{\\ket{j}\\}_{j=1..n}$, the canonical orthonormal basis. Sometimes however Alice interleaves quantum decoys $\\{\\frac{\\ket{j}+i\\ket{k}}{\\sqrt{2}}\\}$ between her messages. Such pairwise superpositions of possible words cannot be distinguished from the message words. Thus as malevolent Eve observes the quantum channel, she runs the risk of damaging the superpositions (by causing a collapse). At the receiving end honest Bob, whom we assume is warned of the quantum decoys' distribution, checks upon their integrity with a measurement. The present work establishes, in the case of individual attacks, the tradeoff between Eve's information gain (her chances, if a message word was sent, of guessing which) and the disturbance she induces (Bob's chances, if a quantum decoy was sent, to detect tampering). Besides secure channel protocols, quantum decoys seem a powerful primitive for constructing n-dimensional quantum cryptographic applications. Moreover the methods emp...

  5. Discriminating the native structure from decoys using scoring functions based on the residue packing in globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2009-12-28

    Setting the rules for the identification of a stable conformation of a protein is of utmost importance for the efficient generation of structures in computer simulation. For structure prediction, a considerable number of possible models are generated from which the best model has to be selected. Two scoring functions, Rs and Rp, based on the consideration of packing of residues, which indicate if the conformation of an amino acid sequence is native-like, are presented. These are defined using the solvent accessible surface area (ASA) and the partner number (PN) (other residues that are within 4.5 A) of a particular residue. The two functions evaluate the deviation from the average packing properties (ASA or PN) of all residues in a polypeptide chain corresponding to a model of its three-dimensional structure. While simple in concept and computationally less intensive, both the functions are at least as efficient as any other energy functions in discriminating the native structure from decoys in a large number of standard decoy sets, as well as on models submitted for the targets of CASP7. Rs appears to be slightly more effective than Rp, as determined by the number of times the native structure possesses the minimum value for the function and its separation from the average value for the decoys. Two parameters, Rs and Rp, are discussed that can very efficiently recognize the native fold for a sequence from an ensemble of decoy structures. Unlike many other algorithms that rely on the use of composite scoring function, these are based on a single parameter, viz., the accessible surface area (or the number of residues in contact), but still able to capture the essential attribute of the native fold.

  6. Iterative Knowledge-Based Scoring Functions Derived from Rigid and Flexible Decoy Structures: Evaluation with the 2013 and 2014 CSAR Benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chengfei; Grinter, Sam Z; Merideth, Benjamin Ryan; Ma, Zhiwei; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2016-06-27

    In this study, we developed two iterative knowledge-based scoring functions, ITScore_pdbbind(rigid) and ITScore_pdbbind(flex), using rigid decoy structures and flexible decoy structures, respectively, that were generated from the protein-ligand complexes in the refined set of PDBbind 2012. These two scoring functions were evaluated using the 2013 and 2014 CSAR benchmarks. The results were compared with the results of two other scoring functions, the Vina scoring function and ITScore, the scoring function that we previously developed from rigid decoy structures for a smaller set of protein-ligand complexes. A graph-based method was developed to evaluate the root-mean-square deviation between two conformations of the same ligand with different atom names and orders due to different file preparations, and the program is freely available. Our study showed that the two new scoring functions developed from the larger training set yielded significantly improved performance in binding mode predictions. For binding affinity predictions, all four scoring functions showed protein-dependent performance. We suggest the development of protein-family-dependent scoring functions for accurate binding affinity prediction.

  7. Decoy receptor 3 suppresses B cell functions and has a negative correlation with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Han; Liu, Po-Chun; Chang, Chien-Wen; Chen, Yi-Ann; Chen, Ming-Huang; Liu, Chun-Yu; Leu, Chuen-Miin; Lin, Hsiao-Yi

    2014-01-01

    The decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is a member of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily and may regulate inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of DcR3 in B cell functions and its correlation to disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The concentrations of DcR3 and TNF-α were measured by ELISA. B cell proliferation was assessed by quantification of 3H-thymidine uptake. Staphylococcus aureus Cowan (SAC) strain were used to stimulate B cell proliferation and TNF-α production. Compared to the osteoarthritis (OA) patients, the RA group had higher synovial DcR3 levels (3273.6±1623.2 vs. 1594.8±1190.0 pg/ml, p=0.003), which were negatively correlated with the serum erythrocyte sedimentation rate and Disease Activity Score using 28 joint counts (DAS28) scores (r=-0.560, p=0.002; r=-0.579, pnegative correlation between DcR3 level and disease activity in RA patients. Our findings imply that DcR3 may be used as a biomarker for disease activity and a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of RA.

  8. Improving decoy databases for protein folding algorithms

    KAUST Repository

    Lindsey, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Copyright © 2014 ACM. Predicting protein structures and simulating protein folding are two of the most important problems in computational biology today. Simulation methods rely on a scoring function to distinguish the native structure (the most energetically stable) from non-native structures. Decoy databases are collections of non-native structures used to test and verify these functions. We present a method to evaluate and improve the quality of decoy databases by adding novel structures and removing redundant structures. We test our approach on 17 different decoy databases of varying size and type and show significant improvement across a variety of metrics. We also test our improved databases on a popular modern scoring function and show that they contain a greater number of native-like structures than the original databases, thereby producing a more rigorous database for testing scoring functions.

  9. Decoy State Quantum Key Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2005-10-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows two parties to communicate in absolute security based on the fundamental laws of physics. Up till now, it is widely believed that unconditionally secure QKD based on standard Bennett-Brassard (BB84) protocol is limited in both key generation rate and distance because of imperfect devices. Here, we solve these two problems directly by presenting new protocols that are feasible with only current technology. Surprisingly, our new protocols can make fiber-based QKD unconditionally secure at distances over 100km (for some experiments, such as GYS) and increase the key generation rate from O(η2) in prior art to O(η) where η is the overall transmittance. Our method is to develop the decoy state idea (first proposed by W.-Y. Hwang in "Quantum Key Distribution with High Loss: Toward Global Secure Communication", Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 057901 (2003)) and consider simple extensions of the BB84 protocol. This part of work is published in "Decoy State Quantum Key Distribution", . We present a general theory of the decoy state protocol and propose a decoy method based on only one signal state and two decoy states. We perform optimization on the choice of intensities of the signal state and the two decoy states. Our result shows that a decoy state protocol with only two types of decoy states--a vacuum and a weak decoy state--asymptotically approaches the theoretical limit of the most general type of decoy state protocols (with an infinite number of decoy states). We also present a one-decoy-state protocol as a special case of Vacuum+Weak decoy method. Moreover, we provide estimations on the effects of statistical fluctuations and suggest that, even for long distance (larger than 100km) QKD, our two-decoy-state protocol can be implemented with only a few hours of experimental data. In conclusion, decoy state quantum key distribution is highly practical. This part of work is published in "Practical Decoy State for Quantum Key Distribution

  10. Taxa-area Relationship (TAR) of Microbial Functional Genes with Long-TGerm Fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yuting; Wu, Liyou; Clark, Ian; Xue, Kai; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Hirsch, Penny; Mcgrath, Steve; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Diversity and spatial patterns in plant and animal communities are well documented as a positive-power law of a taxa-area relationship (TAR). At present little is known whether this also applies to soil microbial communities and whether long-term fertilization has an influence on the underlying microbial diversity. To test the effects of long-term fertilization on above-ground botanical diversity and below-ground microbial diversity, a nested sampling approach on Park Grass plots (12d& 11/2c) of Rothamsted Reseach in United Kingdom, both at ~;; pH 5 but with plant diversities of between 42 and 13 respectively were used. GeoChip 3.0, covering approximately 57, 000 gene sequences of 292 gene families involved in nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus cycling, metal reduction and resistance, and organic contaminant degradation, was used to determine the gene area relationships for both functional and phylogenetic groups and the relationship to plant diversity. Our analysis indicated that the microbial communities were separated by different plant diversity based on DCA. The soil microbial diversity was in accord with plant diversity. Soil microbial community exhibited different z value with different plant diversity, z = 0.0449 with higher plant diversity and z = 0.0583 with lower plant diversity (P< 0.0001). These results suggest that the turnover in space of microorganisms may be higher with long-term fertilization.

  11. Catalytic pyrolysis of tars. A kinetic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faundez, J.; Garcia, X.; Gordon, A. [Universidad de Concepcion (Chile). Dept. de Ingeniera Quimica

    1997-12-31

    A kinetic model to describe the catalytic pyrolysis of tars is proposed and validated through pyrolysis of two tars of different characteristics and origin. Calcinated limestone (11 m{sup 2}/g) was used as catalyst. The model assumes that tars are composed of two pseudo-components: (i) heavy tar, and (ii) light tar. Tar pyrolysis is described by two simultaneous chemical reactions; catalyst deactivation due to carbon deposition is also considered. After mathematical resolution, expressions for product`s concentration as functions of residence time, selectivity and the deactivation were obtained. (orig.)

  12. Mistic and TarCF as fusion protein partners for functional expression of the cannabinoid receptor 2 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ananda; Feng, Rentian; Tong, Qin; Zhang, Yuxun; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2012-06-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key players in signal recognition and cellular communication making them important therapeutic targets. Large-scale production of these membrane proteins in their native form is crucial for understanding their mechanism of action and target-based drug design. Here we report the overexpression system for a GPCR, the cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2), in Escherichia coli C43(DE3) facilitated by two fusion partners: Mistic, an integral membrane protein expression enhancer at the N-terminal, and TarCF, a C-terminal fragment of the bacterial chemosensory transducer Tar at the C-terminal of the CB2 open reading frame region. Multiple histidine tags were added on both ends of the fusion protein to facilitate purification. Using individual and combined fusion partners, we found that CB2 fusion protein expression was maximized only when both partners were used. Variable growth and induction conditions were conducted to determine and optimize protein expression. More importantly, this fusion protein Mistic-CB2-TarCF can localize into the E. coli membrane and exhibit functional binding activities with known CB2 ligands including CP55,940, WIN55,212-2 and SR144,528. These results indicate that this novel expression and purification system provides us with a promising strategy for the preparation of biologically active GPCRs, as well as general application for the preparation of membrane-bound proteins using the two new fusion partners described.

  13. Decoys in Predation and Parasitism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2003-01-01

    Predator-prey or host-parasite dynamics can be altered by the presence of other species through several mechanisms. One such mechanism is the ‘‘decoy effect,’’ which itself can take a variety of forms. In its simplest form, the third species, which is inedible to the predator, nonetheless interferes

  14. Decoys in Predation and Parasitism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2003-01-01

    Predator-prey or host-parasite dynamics can be altered by the presence of other species through several mechanisms. One such mechanism is the ‘‘decoy effect,’’ which itself can take a variety of forms. In its simplest form, the third species, which is inedible to the predator, nonetheless interferes

  15. Airborne target tracking algorithm against oppressive decoys in infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiechang; Zhang, Tianxu

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents an approach for tracking airborne target against oppressive infrared decoys. Oppressive decoy lures infrared guided missile by its high infrared radiation. Traditional tracking algorithms have degraded stability even come to tracking failure when airborne target continuously throw out many decoys. The proposed approach first determines an adaptive tracking window. The center of the tracking window is set at a predicted target position which is computed based on uniform motion model. Different strategies are applied for determination of tracking window size according to target state. The image within tracking window is segmented and multi features of candidate targets are extracted. The most similar candidate target is associated to the tracking target by using a decision function, which calculates a weighted sum of normalized feature differences between two comparable targets. Integrated intensity ratio of association target and tracking target, and target centroid are examined to estimate target state in the presence of decoys. The tracking ability and robustness of proposed approach has been validated by processing available real-world and simulated infrared image sequences containing airborne targets and oppressive decoys.

  16. Lipid-modified G4-decoy oligonucleotide anchored to nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cogoi, S; Jakobsen, U; Pedersen, E B

    2016-01-01

    KRAS is mutated in >90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. As its inactivation leads to tumour regression, mutant KRAS is considered an attractive target for anticancer drugs. In this study we report a new delivery strategy for a G4-decoy oligonucleotide that sequesters MAZ, a transcription...... factor essential for KRAS transcription. It is based on the use of palmitoyl-oleyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) liposomes functionalized with lipid-modified G4-decoy oligonucleotides and a lipid-modified cell penetrating TAT peptide. The potency of the strategy in pancreatic cancer cells is demonstrated...

  17. Tar sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLendon, T.R.; Bartke, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    Research on tar sand is briefly discussed. The research program supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) includes a variety of surface extraction schemes. The University of Utah has process development units (PDU) employing fluidized bed, hot, water-assisted, and fluidized-bed/heat-pipe, coupled combustor technology. Considerable process variable test data have been gathered on these systems: (1) a rotary kiln unit has been built recently; (2) solvent extraction processing is being examined; and (3) an advanced hydrogenation upgrading scheme (hydropyrolysis) has been developed. The University of Arkansas, in collaboration with Diversified Petroleum, Inc., has been working on a fatty acid, solvent extraction process. Oleic acid is the solvent/surfactant. Solvent is recovered by adjusting processing fluid concentrations to separate without expensive operations. Western Research Institute has a PDU-scale scheme called the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process, which combines solvent (hot recycle bitumen) and pyrolytic extraction. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  18. Research on Partner-fly Infrared Decoys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Yang; LI Yan-jun; WANG Qi

    2006-01-01

    With the rapid development of new generation of infrared-guided missiles, it is very difficult for the traditional point-source infrared decoys to confront them. Therefore it is important to research the jamming mechanism and tactical application of infrared decoys. Through the research on rocket-propelled infrared decoys, a movement model and a radiation pattern of partner-fly infrared decoy are established based on the jamming mechanism of infrared centroid effect, the aerodynamics principle as well as the aeronautical dynamics principle. A dynamic simulation seeking superiority is conducted for its firing range and direction, a tactical application method of partner-fly infrared decoy against infrared-guided missile is explored, and the technical conditions of partner-fly infrared decoys are determined.

  19. Altered localization and functionality of TAR DNA Binding Protein 43 (TDP-43) in niemann- pick disease type C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardis, A; Zampieri, S; Canterini, S; Newell, K L; Stuani, C; Murrell, J R; Ghetti, B; Fiorenza, M T; Bembi, B; Buratti, E

    2016-05-18

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the occurrence of visceral and neurological symptoms. At present, the molecular mechanisms causing neurodegeneration in this disease are unknown. Here we report the altered expression and/or mislocalization of the TAR-DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) in both NPC mouse and in a human neuronal model of the disease. We also report the neuropathologic study of a NPC patient's brain, showing that while TDP-43 is below immunohistochemical detection in nuclei of cerebellar Purkinje cells, it has a predominant localization in the cytoplasm of these cells. From a functional point of view, the TDP-43 mislocalization, that occurs in a human experimental neuronal model system, is associated with specific alterations in TDP-43 controlled genes. Most interestingly, treatment with N-Acetyl-cysteine (NAC) or beta-cyclodextrin (CD) can partially restore TDP-43 nuclear localization. Taken together, the results of these studies extend the role of TDP-43 beyond the Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)/frontotemporal dementia (FTD)/Alzheimer disease (AD) spectrum. These findings may open novel research/therapeutic avenues for a better understanding of both NPC disease and the TDP-43 proteinopathy disease mechanism.

  20. Effect of nuclear factor-kappa B decoy oligodeoxynncleotides on respiratory function and cytokine expression after severe lung contusion in rabbits%NF-kB双链寡脱氧核苷酸圈套对严重肺挫伤兔呼吸功能及炎性因子表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方丹青; 于涛; 万丽

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) decoy oligode-oxynucleotides (ODN) on respiratory function and expressions of IL-1β and IL-13 in serum following se-vere lung contusion in rabbits. Methods A total of 40 New-Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into four groups, ie, severe lung contusion group (Group A, n=12), severe lung contusion with NF-κB scrambled decoy ODN intervention group (Group B, n=12), severe lung contusion with sense NF- B de-coy ODN intervention group (Group C, n=12) and normal control group (Group D, n =4). After the contusion model was set up, the sense and scrambled NF-κB decoy ODN were infused into the rabbits via the jugular veins in different groups, with 20 g per experimental rabbit. After contusion, respiratory fre-quency, tidal volume, airway pressure, respiration flow rate curve and end expiration nitric oxide concen-tration were detected at 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours. The expressions of IL-1β and IL-13 in serum were observed by means of ELISA. Results After sense NF-κB decoy ODN intervention, alveolar ventilation, arteri-al PO_2 and pulmonary compliance were improved, compared with Group A and Group B, with statistical difference (P0.01).血清炎性因子IL-1β在挫伤后1 h升至高峰,并持续至实验结束,IL-13的表达在肺挫伤后1 h下降,4 h降至最低值.经正链decoy ODN治疗后可使挫伤后显著升高的IL-1β明显降低,而IL-13的表达维持于高水平,与挫伤组、杂链组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 在严重胸外伤肺挫伤早期呼吸功能出现损害时给予NF-κB正链decoy ODN治疗,对挫伤肺通气功能、换气功能、呼吸力学有明显的保护作用,且血清炎性因子IL-1β的表达减少,IL-13表达升高.

  1. Coal tar in dermatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofzen, J.H.J.; Aben, K.K.H.; Van Der Valk, P.G.M.; Van Houtum, J.L.M.; Van De Kerkhof, P.C.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Dermatology

    2007-07-01

    Coal tar is one of the oldest treatments for psoriasis and eczema. It has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antipruritic and antimitotic effects. The short-term side effects are folliculitis, irritation and contact allergy. Coal tar contains carcinogens. The carcinogenicity of coal tar has been shown in animal studies and studies in occupational settings. There is no clear evidence of an increased risk of skin tumors or internal tumors. Until now, most studies have been fairly small and they did not investigate the risk of coal tar alone, but the risk of coal tar combined with other therapies. New, well-designed, epidemiological studies are necessary to assess the risk of skin tumors and other malignancies after dermatological use of coal tar.

  2. Buckwheat in Tibet (TAR)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sabine Scheucher

    2004-01-01

    The Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) is one of the poorest provinces in China. Buckwheat is mostly cultivated in areas with sloping infertile land on which other crops cannot be grown. It is a valuable crop in remote and food deficient mountain areas, and the potential of enhanced buckwheat utilization in TAR is high and diverse.

  3. Development of novel decoy oligonucleotides: advantages of circular dumb-bell decoy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Naruya; Tomita, Tetsuya; Yuyama, Kazuhiko; Tougan, Takahiro; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Ogihara, Toshio; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2003-04-01

    The inhibition of specific transcription regulatory proteins is a novel approach to regulate gene expression. The transcriptional activities of DNA binding proteins can be inhibited by the use of double-stranded oligonucleotides (ODNs) that compete for binding to their specific target sequences in promoters and enhancers. Transfection of this cis-element double-stranded ODN, referred to as decoy ODN, has been reported to be a powerful tool that provides a new class of anti-gene strategies to gene therapy and permits examination of specific gene regulation. We have demonstrated the usefulness of this decoy ODN strategy in animal models of restenosis, myocardial infarction, glomerulonephritis and rheumatoid arthritis. However, one of the major limitations of decoy ODN technology is the rapid degradation of phosphodiester ODNs by intracellular nucleases. To date, several different types of double-stranded decoy ODNs have been developed to overcome this issue. Circular dumb-bell (CD) double-stranded decoy ODNs that were developed to resolve this issue have attracted a high level of interest. In this review, the applications of decoy ODN strategy and the advantages of modified CD double-stranded decoy ODNs will be discussed.

  4. IR decoys modeling method based on particle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-yu; Wu, Kai-feng; Dong, Yan-bing

    2016-10-01

    Due to the complexity in combustion processes of IR decoys, it is difficult to describe its infrared radiation characteristics by deterministic model. In this work, the IR decoys simulation based on particle system was found. The measured date of the IR decoy is used to analyze the typical characteristic of the IR decoy. A semi-empirical model of the IR decoy motion law has been set up based on friction factors and a IR decoys simulation model has been build up based on particle system. The infrared imaging characteristic and time varying characteristic of the IR decoy were simulated by making use of the particle feature such as lifetime, speed and color. The dynamic IR decoys simulation is realized with the VC++6.0 and OpenGL.

  5. Quantum Key Distribution Using Decoy State Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sellami Ali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Quantum key distribution provides unconditional security guaranteed by the fundamental laws of quantum physics. Unfortunately, for real-life experimental set-ups, which mainly based on faint laser pulses, the occasional production of multi-photons and channel loss make it possible for sophisticated eavesdroppers to launch various subtle eavesdropping attacks including the Photon Number Splitting (PNS attack. The decoy state protocols recently proposed to beat PNS attack and to improve dramatically distance and secure key generation rate of Quantum Key Distribution (QKD. Approach: Objective of this study was experimental implementation of weak decoy + vacuum states QKD for increasing the performance of QKD system. To show conceptually how simple it was to apply the weak decoy + vacuum state idea to a commercial QKD system, we chosen ID-3000 commercial quantum key distribution system manufactured by id quantique. To implement the weak decoy + vacuum state protocol, we had to add some new optical and electronics components to id quantique and to attenuate each signal to the intensity of either signal state or weak decoy or vacuum state randomly. Results: In our implementation, the attenuation will be done by placing a VOA (variable optical attenuator in Alice’s side. Specifically, our QKD system required the polarizations of 2 pulses from the same signal to be orthogonal. Therefore the VOA must be polarization independent so as to attenuate the two pulses equally. The VOA utilized in experiment to attenuate signals dynamically was Intensity Modulator (IM. We had implemented weak + vacuum protocol on a modified commercial QKD system over a 25 km of telecom fibers with an unconditionally secure key rate of 6.2931x10-4 per pulse. Conclusion: By making simple modifications to a commercial quantum key distribution system, we could achieve much better performance with substantially higher key generation rate and longer distance than

  6. STAT3 Decoy Oligodeoxynucleotides-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Induce Cell Death and Inhibit Invasion in Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhui Ma

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the synthesis of multi-functional nanoparticles have opened up tremendous opportunities for the targeted delivery of genes of interest. Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN can efficiently bind nucleic acid molecules and transfect genes in vitro. Few reports have combined SLN with therapy using decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN. In the present study, we prepared SLN to encapsulate STAT3 decoy ODN; then, the properties and in vitro behavior of SLN-STAT3 decoy ODN complexes were investigated. SLN-STAT3 decoy ODN complexes were efficiently taken up by human ovarian cancer cells and significantly suppressed cell growth. Blockage of the STAT3 pathway by SLN-STAT3 decoy ODN complexes resulted in an evident induction of cell death, including apoptotic and autophagic death. The mechanism involved the increased expression of cleaved caspase 3, Bax, Beclin-1 and LC3-II and reduced expression of Bcl-2, pro-caspase 3, Survivin, p-Akt and p-mTOR. In addition, SLN-STAT3 decoy ODN complexes inhibited cell invasion by up-regulating E-cadherin expression and down-regulating Snail and MMP-9 expression. These findings confirmed that SLN as STAT3 decoy ODN carriers can induce cell death and inhibit invasion of ovarian cancer cells. We propose that SLN represent a potential approach for targeted gene delivery in cancer therapy.

  7. The decoy matters! Hormonal and behavioural differences in the reaction of territorial European robins towards stuffed and live decoys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriba, Madeleine; Goymann, Wolfgang

    2008-02-01

    Simulated territorial intrusions (STIs) represent a commonly used experimental manipulation to test behavioural and hormonal responses of birds towards conspecific intruders. They are typically either conducted with live birds in a cage or with stuffed decoys. To our knowledge, nobody has tested whether these two different kinds of stimuli elicit the same kind of behavioural and hormonal response. We compared the reactions of European robins to STIs with stuffed and live decoys to see whether these stimuli are perceived in similar ways. We conducted STIs by placing a stuffed or a live decoy in a territory, played-back robin song and recorded the behaviour for at least 10min. Then, the focal bird was caught, and a blood sample was taken to measure hormone concentrations. Males challenged with a stuffed decoy responded with more threats and movements around the decoy than males that were exposed to a live decoy. Furthermore, males challenged with a stuffed decoy had significantly higher corticosterone levels than males challenged with a live decoy. Androgen levels did not differ between treatments. The differential behavioural and corticosterone response of robins to stuffed and live decoys suggests that robins may perceive stuffed decoys as more threatening than live decoys. Future investigations using STI experiments should be aware of the potential impact different kinds of decoys may have on the behavioural and hormonal response of birds during STIs.

  8. Role of decoy molecules in neuronal ischemic preconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerselvam, Mathivadhani; Patel, Piyush M.; Roth, David M.; Kidd, Michael W.; Chin-Lee, Blake; Head, Brian P.; Niesman, Ingrid R.; Inoue, Satoki; Patel, Hemal H.; Davis, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Decoy receptors bind with TNF related apoptosis inducing ligands (TRAIL) but do not contain the cytoplasmic domains necessary to transduce apoptotic signals. We hypothesized that decoy receptors may confer neuronal protection against lethal ischemia after ischemic preconditioning (IPC). Mixed cortical neurons were exposed to IPC one day prior to TRAIL treatment or lethal ischemia. IPC increased decoy receptor but reduced death receptor expression compared to lethal ischemia. IPC-induced increase in decoy receptor expression was reduced by prior treatment with CAPE, a nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitor (NFκB). Expression of decoy molecules, dependent on NFκB, may mediate neuronal survival induced by IPC. PMID:21315738

  9. "Junk" DNA as a genetic decoy

    OpenAIRE

    Magueijo, Joao

    2003-01-01

    We propose that the evolutionary purpose of junk DNA is to protect the gene. Mutation agents, such as retro-viruses, hit ``decoy'' DNA most of the time. Although the argument is far from general, we propose that the percentage of junk DNA should correlate with the number of retroviruses attacking a given species. It should also anti-correlate with the ideal mutation rates (higher in insects than in mammals).

  10. Infrared ship/decoy/missile encounter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Josee; Reid, Francoise; Morin, Andre

    1993-08-01

    Simulations of missile-ship-countermeasures engagements are used to determine the effective ways of defending a ship against infrared-guided missile threats. This paper describes one type of simulation that models the engagement of a ship deploying IR decoys by an infrared-guided seeker-head missile. This model was developed to assess the efficiency of IR decoys in protecting ships against these missiles. The simulation, Missile Infrared Decoy And Ship (MIDAS), is composed of three major blocks, the infrared scene generation, the seeker simulation and the missile dynamics simulation. The infrared scene generation block produces a three-dimensional IR scene from the target ship and flare models and transforms it into the two-dimensional IR image viewed by the seeker. The seeker simulation block is based on a generic conical scan seeker which uses a crossed-detector array for target detection. It processes the IR image to select a target and generates a steering command. The missile dynamics block computes the changes in missile trajectory according to the seeker steering command. The computations performed by each of the three blocks are explained in detail.

  11. Exosomes from HIV-1-infected Cells Stimulate Production of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines through Trans-activating Response (TAR) RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampey, Gavin C; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Schwab, Angela; Barclay, Robert; Punya, Shreya; Chung, Myung-Chul; Hakami, Ramin M; Zadeh, Mohammad Asad; Lepene, Benjamin; Klase, Zachary A; El-Hage, Nazira; Young, Mary; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-01-15

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic illness because long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy can lower viral titers to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases virus burden. Moreover, patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy frequently develop various metabolic disorders, neurocognitive abnormalities, and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that exosomes containing trans-activating response (TAR) element RNA enhance susceptibility of undifferentiated naive cells to HIV-1 infection. This study indicates that exosomes from HIV-1-infected primary cells are highly abundant with TAR RNA as detected by RT-real time PCR. Interestingly, up to a million copies of TAR RNA/μl were also detected in the serum from HIV-1-infected humanized mice suggesting that TAR RNA may be stable in vivo. Incubation of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells with primary macrophages resulted in a dramatic increase of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-β, indicating that exosomes containing TAR RNA could play a direct role in control of cytokine gene expression. The intact TAR molecule was able to bind to PKR and TLR3 effectively, whereas the 5' and 3' stems (TAR microRNAs) bound best to TLR7 and -8 and none to PKR. Binding of TAR to PKR did not result in its phosphorylation, and therefore, TAR may be a dominant negative decoy molecule in cells. The TLR binding through either TAR RNA or TAR microRNA potentially can activate the NF-κB pathway and regulate cytokine expression. Collectively, these results imply that exosomes containing TAR RNA could directly affect the proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and may explain a possible mechanism of inflammation observed in HIV-1-infected patients under cART.

  12. Experimental passive decoy-state quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi-Chao; Wang, Wei-Long; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Fei; Pelc, Jason S.; Fejer, M. M.; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Chen, Xianfeng; Ma, Xiongfeng; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2014-08-01

    The decoy-state method is widely used in practical quantum key distribution systems to replace ideal single photon sources with realistic light sources of varying intensities. Instead of active modulation, the passive decoy-state method employs built-in decoy states in a parametric down-conversion photon source, which can decrease the side channel information leakage in decoy-state preparation and hence increase the security. By employing low dark count up-conversion single photon detectors, we experimentally demonstrate the passive decoy-state method over a 50 km long optical fiber and obtain a key rate of about 100 bit s-1. Our result suggests that the passive decoy-state source is a practical candidate for future quantum communication implementation.

  13. Virus encoded MHC-like decoys diversify the inhibitory KIR repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Carrillo-Bustamante

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are circulating lymphocytes that play an important role in the control of viral infections and tumors. Their functions are regulated by several activating and inhibitory receptors. A subset of these receptors in human NK cells are the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, which interact with the highly polymorphic MHC class I molecules. One important function of NK cells is to detect cells that have down-regulated MHC expression (missing-self. Because MHC molecules have non polymorphic regions, their expression could have been monitored with a limited set of monomorphic receptors. Surprisingly, the KIR family has a remarkable genetic diversity, the function of which remains poorly understood. The mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV is able to evade NK cell responses by coding "decoy" molecules that mimic MHC class I. This interaction was suggested to have driven the evolution of novel NK cell receptors. Inspired by the MCMV system, we develop an agent-based model of a host population infected with viruses that are able to evolve MHC down-regulation and decoy molecules. Our simulations show that specific recognition of MHC class I molecules by inhibitory KIRs provides excellent protection against viruses evolving decoys, and that the diversity of inhibitory KIRs will subsequently evolve as a result of the required discrimination between host MHC molecules and decoy molecules.

  14. Decoy States and Two Way Quantum Key Distribution Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Shaari, J S; Ali, Sellami

    2010-01-01

    We study the possible application of the decoy state method on a basic two way quantum key distribution (QKD) scheme to extend its distance. Noting the obvious advantage of such a QKD scheme in allowing for single as well as double photon contributions, we derive relevant lower-bounds on the corresponding gains in a practical decoy state implementation using two intensities for decoy states. We work with two different approaches in this vein and compare these with an ideal infinite decoy state case as well as the simulation of the original LM05.

  15. Decoy State Quantum Key Distribution: Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Ma, Xiongfeng; Qi, Bing; Chen, Kai; Qian, Li

    2007-03-01

    Decoy state quantum key distribution (QKD) has been proposed as a novel approach to improve dramatically both the security and the performance of practical QKD set-ups. We proved its security, and proposed the first practical decoy state QKD protocols, including the one-decoy protocol, the weak+vacuum protocol, and the general two-decoy protocol. Our further study shows that the two-way communication can effectively improve the performance of decoy state QKD. We performed the first experiments of decoy state QKD. Two protocols -- the one-decoy protocol and the weak+vacuum protocol -- were implemented with a maximum transmission distance of 60km. We implemented the decoy state method by adding commercial acousto-optic modulator to a commercial QKD system. Our theoretical and experimental studies show explicitly the power and the feasibility of decoy method, and brings it to our real- life. Our works are published in [1-5]. [1] H. -K. Lo, X. Ma, and K. Chen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 230504 (2005) [2] X. Ma et. al., Phys. Rev. A 72, 012326 (2005) [3] Y. Zhao et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 96, 070502 (2006) [4] Y. Zhao et. al., in Proceedings of IEEE ISIT (IEEE, 2006) pp. 2094-2098 [5] X. Ma et. al., Phys. Rev. A 74, 032330 (2006)

  16. Decoy State Quantum Key Distribution with Odd Coherent State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shi-Hai; GAO Ming; DAI Hong-Yi; CHEN Ping-Xing; LI Cheng-Zu

    2008-01-01

    We propose a decoy state quantum key distribution scheme with odd coherent state which follows sub-Poissonian distributed photon count and has low probability of the multi-photon event and vacuum event in each pulse. The numerical calculations show that our scheme can improve efficiently the key generation rate and secure communication distance. Furthermore, only one decoy state is necessary to approach to the perfect asymptotic limit with infinite decoy states in our scheme, but at least two decoy states are needed in other scheme.

  17. Application of decoy oligonucleotides as novel therapeutic strategy: a contemporary overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad Zaki; Akhter, Sohail; Mallik, Neha; Anwar, Mohammad; Tabassum, Wajda; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2013-03-01

    Molecular therapy is emerging as a potential strategy for the treatment of many diseases. Correct regulation of gene expression is essential for both, to normal development and proper functioning of the all the organisms. Even after four decades of intensive research, it is still a major problem from regulatory and technical point of view, to replace defective genes. The technology of decoy oligonucleotides has received considerable attention to treat and cure a variety of diseases and abnormal physiological conditions, because they provide a rational way to design and selective regulation of a specific gene expression. Decoy oligonucleotides are widely used as inhibitors of specific gene expression because they can offer exciting possibility of expression and blocking of a particular gene without any changes in the functions of other genes. Advances in the decoy oligonucleotides are rapidly paving the way to new insights into the origin and treatment of inflammatory, cancer and/or other immune disorders. The review covers the progress achieved towards the development of decoy oligonucleotides as a potential strategy in a new class of molecular therapy.

  18. Marine Tar Residues: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, April M; Hagen, Scott C; Passeri, Davina L

    Marine tar residues originate from natural and anthropogenic oil releases into the ocean environment and are formed after liquid petroleum is transformed by weathering, sedimentation, and other processes. Tar balls, tar mats, and tar patties are common examples of marine tar residues and can range in size from millimeters in diameter (tar balls) to several meters in length and width (tar mats). These residues can remain in the ocean environment indefinitely, decomposing or becoming buried in the sea floor. However, in many cases, they are transported ashore via currents and waves where they pose a concern to coastal recreation activities, the seafood industry and may have negative effects on wildlife. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on marine tar residue formation, transport, degradation, and distribution. Methods of detection and removal of marine tar residues and their possible ecological effects are discussed, in addition to topics of marine tar research that warrant further investigation. Emphasis is placed on benthic tar residues, with a focus on the remnants of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in particular, which are still affecting the northern Gulf of Mexico shores years after the leaking submarine well was capped.

  19. Progress in synthesis and applications of functional carbon materials from coal tar pitch%煤沥青基功能碳材料的研究现状及前景

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖南; 邱介山

    2016-01-01

    Coal tar pitch is abundant as a byproduct of coke production in iron-steel industry in China. However,the traditional methods cannot efficiently convert coal tar pitch into value-added products and how to make effective use of coal tar pitch remains a big challenge. This review has summarized several techniques for further processing of coal tar pitch,with a focus on the synthesis and applications of high performance functional materials including mesophase pitch, porous carbons, carbon fibers,two dimensional nano-sized carbon materials and carbon based composites. This review highlights that the strongπ-π interactions between highly condensed polycyclic aromatic molecules in coal tar pitch is the bottle-neck that hinders the efficient conversion of coal tar pitch into functional carbon materials with tuned structure and properties. The molecular structure and properties of coal tar pitch can be improved through catalytic condensation,oxidization orco-pyrolysis. With coal tar pitch as precursor,methods including templating, physical/chemical activation, surface induction and catalytic graphitization have been developed for the controlled synthesis of high performance carbon materials. Novel methods that can tune the molecular structure of coal tar pitch are highly demanded to improve the performance of coal tar pitch based carbon materials and related researches should be intensified.%我国煤沥青资源丰富,但深加工技术落后,产品附加值低,实现煤沥青高附加值利用是亟待解决的重大课题。本文介绍了以煤沥青为原料合成高性能功能碳材料的主要技术,重点阐述了以煤沥青为原料制备中间相沥青、多孔碳材料、碳纤维、二维纳米碳材料及碳基复合材料的研究进展。分析表明,高芳香性和高缩合度分子结构所引起的强π-π相互作用是阻碍煤沥青基高性能功能碳材料设计合成的瓶颈问题。通过催化聚合、氧化、共热解等技术

  20. Juniper tar poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koruk, Suda Tekin; Ozyilkan, Esin; Kaya, Pinar; Colak, Dilsen; Donderici, Omer; Cesaretli, Yildirim

    2005-01-01

    Juniper tar (cade oil) is distilled from the branches and wood of Juniperus oxycedrus. It contains etheric oils, triterpene and phenols, and is used for many purposes in folk medicine. A case is reported of a previously healthy man who ingested a spoonful of home-made extract of Juniperus oxycedrus. The poisoning caused fever, severe hypotension, renal failure, hepatotoxicity, and severe cutaneous burns on the face. After supportive and symptomatic treatment, the patient improved and was discharged in a good condition on the eleventh day.

  1. Comparative quantitative prevalence of mycobacteria and functionally abundant nidA, nahAc, and nagAc Dioxygenase genes in coal tar contaminated sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennifer M. DeBruyn; Christopher S. Chewning; Gary S. Sayler [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    2007-08-01

    The Chattanooga Creek Superfund site is heavily contaminated with metals, pesticides, and coal tar with sediments exhibiting high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). High molecular weight PAHs are of concern because of their toxicity and recalcitrance in the environment; as such, there is great interest in microbes, such as fast-growing Mycobacterium spp., capable of degradation of these compounds. Real-time quantitative PCR assays were developed targeting multiple dioxygenase genes to assess the ecology and functional diversity of PAH-degrading communities. These assays target the Mycobacterium nidA, {beta}-proteobacteria nagAc, and {gamma}-proteobacteria nahAc with the specific goal of testing the hypothesis that Mycobacteria catabolic genes are enriched and may be functionally associated with high molecular weight PAH biodegradation in Chattanooga Creek. Dioxygenase gene abundances were quantitatively compared to naphthalene and pyrene mineralization, and temporal and spatial PAH concentrations. nidA abundances ranged from 5.69 x 10{sup 4} to 4.92 x 10{sup 6} copies per gram sediment; nagAc from 2.42 x 10{sup 3} to 1.21 x 10{sup 7}, and nahAc from below detection to 4.01 x 10{sup 6} copies per gram sediment. There was a significantly greater abundance of nidA and nagAc at sites with the greatest concentrations of PAHs. In addition, nidA and nagAc were significantly positively correlated, indicating a coexistence of organisms carrying these genes. A positive relationship was also observed between nidA and nagAc and pyrene mineralization indicating that these genes serve as biomarkers for pyrene degradation. A 16S rDNA clone library of fast-growing Mycobacteria indicated that the population is very diverse and likely plays an important role in attenuation of high molecular weight PAHs from Chattanooga Creek. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Heat Shock-induced Phosphorylation of TAR DNA-binding Protein 43 (TDP-43) by MAPK/ERK Kinase Regulates TDP-43 Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Reeb, Ashley N; Lin, Binyan; Subramanian, Praveen; Fey, Erin E; Knoverek, Catherine R; French, Rachel L; Bigio, Eileen H; Ayala, Yuna M

    2017-03-24

    TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) is a highly conserved and essential DNA- and RNA-binding protein that controls gene expression through RNA processing, in particular, regulation of splicing. Intracellular aggregation of TDP-43 is a hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and ubiquitin-positive frontotemporal lobar degeneration. This TDP-43 pathology is also present in other types of neurodegeneration including Alzheimer's disease. We report here that TDP-43 is a substrate of MEK, a central kinase in the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. TDP-43 dual phosphorylation by MEK, at threonine 153 and tyrosine 155 (p-T153/Y155), was dramatically increased by the heat shock response (HSR) in human cells. HSR promotes cell survival under proteotoxic conditions by maintaining protein homeostasis and preventing protein misfolding. MEK is activated by HSR and contributes to the regulation of proteome stability. Phosphorylated TDP-43 was not associated with TDP-43 aggregation, and p-T153/Y155 remained soluble under conditions that promote protein misfolding. We found that active MEK significantly alters TDP-43-regulated splicing and that phosphomimetic substitutions at these two residues reduce binding to GU-rich RNA. Cellular imaging using a phospho-specific p-T153/Y155 antibody showed that phosphorylated TDP-43 was specifically recruited to the nucleoli, suggesting that p-T153/Y155 regulates a previously unappreciated function of TDP-43 in the processing of nucleolar-associated RNA. These findings highlight a new mechanism that regulates TDP-43 function and homeostasis through phosphorylation and, therefore, may contribute to the development of strategies to prevent TDP-43 aggregation and to uncover previously unexplored roles of TDP-43 in cell metabolism. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Final Safety Assessment of Coal Tar as Used in Cosmetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Coal Tar is a semisolid by-product obtained in the destructive distillation of bituminous coal, which functions in cosmetic products as a cosmetic biocide and denaturant-antidandruff agent is also listed as a function, but this is considered an over-the-counter (OTC) drug use. In 2002, Coal Tar was reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be used in four formulations, all of which appear to be OTC drug products. Coal Tar is monographed by the FDA as Category I (safe and effective) OTC drug ingredient for use in the treatment of dandruff, seborrhoea, and psoriasis. Coal Tar is absorbed through the skin of animals and humans and is systemically distributed. Although the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel believes that Coal Tar use as an antidandruff ingredient in OTC drug preparations is adequately addressed by the FDA regulations, the Panel also believes that the appropriate concentration of use of Coal Tar in cosmetic formulations should be that level that does not have a biological effect in the user. Additional data needed to make a safety assessment include product types in which Coal Tar is used (other than as an OTC drug ingredient), use concentrations, and the maximum concentration that does not induce a biological effect in users.

  4. Numerical analysis of decoy state quantum key distribution protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Jim W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rice, Patrick R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Decoy state protocols are a useful tool for many quantum key distribution systems implemented with weak coherent pulses, allowing significantly better secret bit rates and longer maximum distances. In this paper we present a method to numerically find optimal three-level protocols, and we examine how the secret bit rate and the optimized parameters are dependent on various system properties, such as session length, transmission loss, and visibility. Additionally, we show how to modify the decoy state analysis to handle partially distinguishable decoy states as well as uncertainty in the prepared intensities.

  5. Recognition of HIV TAR RNA by triazole linked neomycin dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Arya, Dev P

    2011-08-15

    A series of neomycin dimers have been synthesized using 'click chemistry' with varying linker functionality and length to target the TAR RNA region of HIV virus. TAR (trans activation response) RNA region, a 59 base pair stem loop structure located at 5'-end of all nascent HIV-1 transcripts interacts with a key regulatory protein, Tat, and necessitates the replication of HIV-1 virus. Neomycin, an aminosugar, has been shown to exhibit more than one binding site with HIV TAR RNA. Multiple TAR binding sites of neomycin prompted us to design and synthesize a small library of neomycin dimers using click chemistry. The binding between neomycin dimers and HIV TAR RNA was characterized using spectroscopic techniques including FID (Fluorescent Intercalator Displacement) titration and UV-thermal denaturation. UV thermal denaturation studies demonstrate that neomycin dimer binding increase the melting temperature (T(m)) of the HIV TAR RNA up to 10°C. Ethidium bromide displacement titrations revealed nanomolar IC(50) between neomycin dimers and HIV TAR RNA, whereas with neomycin, a much higher IC(50) in the micromolar range is observed.

  6. 1994 Wisconsin trumpeter swan decoy-rearing final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This was the sixth year of the Wisconsin Trumpeter Swan Decoy-Rearing Program at Necedah National Wildlife Refuge. Necedah NWR staff and refuge manager Bud Oliveira...

  7. TAR syndrome with orofacial clefting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midro, A; Hubert, E; Preferansow, J; Iwaszkiewicz-Pawłowska, A

    1993-01-01

    A case of TAR syndrome with bilateral cleft lip and palate is presented. Bilateral symmetric focomelia, normal thumbs among five fingers of hands, synostosis of IVth and Vth metacarpal bones and some defects of lower limbs with associated thrombocytopenia were noted. Dysmorphic facial features included hypertelorism, epicanthus, blue sclerae, broad nasal root, micrognathia, low-set ears, sparse blond hair. To our knowledge this patient represents an unusual association of TAR syndrome with orofacial clefting. A common background of TAR and Roberts/SC syndrome is suggested.

  8. Double-stranded RNA transcribed from vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide acts as transcription factor decoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiao [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Gang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Department of Infectious Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710038, Shaanxi Province (China); Wang, Honghong [No. 518 Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Xi’an 710043, Shaanxi Province (China); Wang, Jiayin [The Genome Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63108 (United States); Zhao, Lina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Xu, Li, E-mail: lxuhelen@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Liu, Zhiguo, E-mail: liuzhiguo@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • A shRNA vector based transcription factor decoy, VB-ODN, was designed. • VB-ODN for NF-κB inhibited cell viability in HEK293 cells. • VB-ODN inhibited expression of downstream genes of target transcription factors. • VB-ODN may enhance nuclear entry ratio for its feasibility of virus production. - Abstract: In this study, we designed a short hairpin RNA vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide (VB-ODN) carrying transcription factor (TF) consensus sequence which could function as a decoy to block TF activity. Specifically, VB-ODN for Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) could inhibit cell viability and decrease downstream gene expression in HEK293 cells without affecting expression of NF-κB itself. The specific binding between VB-ODN produced double-stranded RNA and NF-κB was evidenced by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, similar VB-ODNs designed for three other TFs also inhibit their downstream gene expression but not that of themselves. Our study provides a new design of decoy for blocking TF activity.

  9. Toll-like receptor 4 decoy, TOY, attenuates gram-negative bacterial sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Keehoon; Lee, Jung-Eun; Kim, Hak-Zoo; Kim, Ho Min; Park, Beom Seok; Hwang, Seong-Ik; Lee, Jie-Oh; Kim, Sun Chang; Koh, Gou Young

    2009-10-09

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane glycolipid, induces sepsis through its interaction with myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). To block interaction between LPS/MD-2 complex and TLR4, we designed and generated soluble fusion proteins capable of binding MD-2, dubbed TLR4 decoy receptor (TOY) using 'the Hybrid leucine-rich repeats (LRR) technique'. TOY contains the MD-2 binding ectodomain of TLR4, the LRR motif of hagfish variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR), and the Fc domain of IgG1 to make it soluble, productive, and functional. TOY exhibited strong binding to MD-2, but not to the extracellular matrix (ECM), resulting in a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in vivo. TOY significantly extended the lifespan, when administered in either preventive or therapeutic manners, in both the LPS- and cecal ligation/puncture-induced sepsis models in mice. TOY markedly attenuated LPS-triggered NF-kappaB activation, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and thrombus formation in multiple organs. Taken together, the targeting strategy for sequestration of LPS/MD-2 complex using the decoy receptor TOY is effective in treating LPS- and bacteria-induced sepsis; furthermore, the strategy used in TOY development can be applied to the generation of other novel decoy receptor proteins.

  10. Infrared decoy and obscurant modelling and simulation for ship protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butters, Brian; Nicholls, Edgar; Walmsley, Roy; Ayling, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Imaging seekers used in modern Anti Ship Missiles (ASMs) use a variety of counter countermeasure (CCM) techniques including guard gates and aspect ratio assessment in order to counter the use of IR decoys. In order to improve the performance of EO/IR countermeasures it is necessary to accurately configure and place the decoys using a launcher that is trainable in azimuth and elevation. Control of the launcher, decoy firing times and burst sequences requires the development of algorithms based on multi-dimensional solvers. The modelling and simulation used to derive the launcher algorithms is described including the countermeasure, threat, launcher and ship models. The launcher model incorporates realistic azimuth and elevation rates with limits on azimuth and elevation arcs of fire. A Navier Stokes based model of the IR decoy includes thermal buoyancy, cooling of the IR smoke and its extinction properties. All of these factors affect the developing size, shape and radiance of the decoy. The hot smoke also influences the performance of any co-located chaff or other obscurant material. Typical simulations are described against generic imaging ASM seekers using shape discrimination or a guard gate.

  11. Topical tar: Back to the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paghdal, K.V.; Schwartz, R.A. [University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The use of medicinal tar for dermatologic disorders dates back to the ancient times. Although coal tar is utilized more frequently in modern dermatology, wood tars have also been widely employed. Tar is used mainly in the treatment of chronic stable plaque psoriasis, scalp psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and seborrheic dermatitis, either alone or in combination therapy with other medications, phototherapy, or both. Many modifications have been made to tar preparations to increase their acceptability, as some dislike its odor, messy application, and staining of clothing. One should consider a tried and true treatment with tar that has led to clearing of lesions and prolonged remission times. Occupational studies have demonstrated the carcinogenicity of tar; however, epidemiologic studies do not confirm similar outcomes when used topically. This article will review the pharmacology, formulations, efficacy, and adverse effects of crude coal tar and other tars in the treatment of selected dermatologic conditions.

  12. Coal tar phototherapy for psoriasis reevaluated: erythemogenic versus suberythemogenic ultraviolet with a tar extract in oil and crude coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, N.J.; Wortzman, M.S.; Breeding, J.; Koudsi, H.; Taylor, L.

    1983-06-01

    Recent studies have questioned the therapeutic value of coal tar versus ultraviolet (UV) radiation and their relative necessity in phototherapy for psoriasis. In this investigation, different aspects of tar phototherapy have been studied in single-blind bilateral paired comparison studies. The effects of 1% crude coal tar were compared with those of petrolatum in conjunction with erythemogenic and suberythemogenic doses of ultraviolet light (UVB) using a FS72 sunlamp tubed cabinet. Crude coal tar was clinically superior to petrolatum with suberythemogenic ultraviolet. With the erythemogenic UVB, petrolatum was equal in efficacy to crude coal tar. Suberythemogenic UVB was also used adjunctively to compare the effects of a 5% concentration of a tar extract in an oil base to 5% crude coal tar in petrolatum or the oil base without tar. The tar extract in oil plus suberythemogenic UVB produced significantly more rapid improvement than the oil base plus UVB. The direct bilateral comparison of equal concentrations of tar extract in oil base versus crude coal tar in petrolatum in a suberythemogenic UV photo regimen revealed no statistical differences between treatments. In a study comparing tar extract in oil and the oil base without ultraviolet radiation, the tar extract in oil side responded more rapidly.

  13. Effectiveness of spinning-wing decoys varies among dabbling duck species and locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Eadie, J.M.; Szymanski, M.L.; Caswell, J.H.; Vrtiska, Mark P.; Raedeke, Andrew H.; Checkett, J.M.; Afton, A.D.; Moore, T.G.; Caswell, F.D.; Walters, R.A.; Humburg, D.D.; Yee, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Spinning-wing decoys are strong attractants to ducks and inc rease kill rates over traditional decoying methods. However, it is unknown whether all duck species are attracted similarly to spinning-wing decoys and whether the effectiveness of these decoys changes with latitude. We examined the effectiveness of spinning-wing decoys for 9 species of dabbling ducks during 545 experimental hunts in California (1999-2000), Minnesota (2002), Manitoba (2001-2002), Nebraska (2000-2002), Missouri (2000-2001), and Arkansas (2001-2003). During each experimental hunt, we systematically alternated between 2 paired decoy treatments every 15-30 min (depending on study site): traditional decoys only and traditional decoys with a spinning-wing decoy. Overall, 70.2% (n=1,925) of dabbling ducks were harvested (shot and retrieved) when spinning-wing decoys were turned on, ranging from 63.6% (n=187) in Missouri to 76.4% (n=356) in Minnesota. Effectiveness of spinning-wing decoys increased with latitude of study sites. Proportions of ducks shot when spinning-wing decoys were turned on differed among species, from a low of 50.0% (n=8) for cinnamon teal (Anas cyanoptera) to a high of 79.0% (n=119) for American wigeon (A. americana). The probability of being shot when spinning-wing decoys were turned on increased with annual survival rates among species; for example, spinning-wing decoys were more effective for American wigeon and mallard (A. platyrhynchos) than they were for cinnamon teal and American green-winged teal (A. crecca). Effectiveness of spinning-wing decoys did not differ consistently by age or sex of harvested ducks. Our results indicate that the effectiveness of spinning-wing decoys differs among duck species and changes with latitude; thus, consideration of these effects may be warranted when setting harvest regulations and methods of take.

  14. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  15. Probing interaction of a fluorescent ligand with HIV TAR RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Liang; Zhang, Jing; He, Tian; Huo, Yuan; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2017-02-01

    Trans-activator of Transcription (Tat) antagonists could block the interaction between Tat protein and its target, trans-activation responsive region (TAR) RNA, to inhibit Tat function and prevent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. For the first time, a small fluorescence ligand, ICR 191, was found to interact with TAR RNA at the Tat binding site and compete with Tat. It was also observed that the fluorescence of ICR 191 could be quenched when binding to TAR RNA and recovered when discharged via competition with Tat peptide or a well-known Tat inhibitor, neomycin B. The binding parameters of ICR 191 to TAR RNA were determined through theoretical calculations. Mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and molecular docking were used to further confirm the interaction of ICR 191 with TAR RNA. Inspired by these discoveries, a primary fluorescence model for the discovery of Tat antagonists was built using ICR 191 as a fluorescence indicator and the feasibility of this model was evaluated. This ligand-RNA interaction could provide a new strategy for research aimed at discovering Tat antagonists.

  16. Effect of wastewater treatment processes on the pyrolysis properties of the pyrolysis tars from sewage sludges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xia; Xie, Li-Ping; Li, Xin-Yu; Dai, Xiao-Hong; Fei, Xue-Ning; Jiang, Yuan-Guang

    2011-06-01

    The pyrolysis properties of five different pyrolysis tars, which the tars from 1# to 5# are obtained by pyrolyzing the sewage sludges of anaerobic digestion and indigestion from the A2/O wastewater treatment process, those from the activated sludge process and the indigested sludge from the continuous SBR process respectively, were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis at a heating rate of 10 °C/min in the nitrogen atmosphere. The results show that the pyrolysis processes of the pyrolysis tars of 1#, 2#, 3# and 5# all can be divided into four stages: the stages of light organic compounds releasing, heavy polar organic compounds decomposition, heavy organic compounds decomposition and the residual organic compounds decomposition. However, the process of 4# pyrolysis tar is only divided into three stages: the stages of light organic compounds releasing, decomposition of heavy polar organic compounds and the residual heavy organic compounds respectively. Both the sludge anaerobic digestion and the "anaerobic" process in wastewater treatment processes make the content of light organic compounds in tars decrease, but make that of heavy organic compounds with complex structure increase. Besides, both make the pyrolysis properties of the tars become worse. The pyrolysis reaction mechanisms of the five pyrolysis tars have been studied with Coats-Redfern equation. It shows that there are the same mechanism functions in the first stage for the five tars and in the second and third stage for the tars of 1#, 2#, 3# and 5#, which is different with the function in the second stage for 4# tar. The five tars are easy to volatile.

  17. Quantification of the Relative Contributions of Loss-of-function and Gain-of-function Mechanisms in TAR DNA-binding Protein 43 (TDP-43) Proteinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Roberta; Capitini, Claudia; Fani, Giulia; Dobson, Christopher M; Cecchi, Cristina; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2016-09-09

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin positive inclusions (FTLD-U) are two clinically distinct neurodegenerative conditions sharing a similar histopathology characterized by the nuclear clearance of TDP-43 and its associated deposition into cytoplasmic inclusions in different areas of the central nervous system. Given the concomitant occurrence of TDP-43 nuclear depletion and cytoplasmic accumulation, it has been proposed that TDP-43 proteinopathies originate from either a loss-of-function (LOF) mechanism, a gain-of-function (GOF) process, or both. We have addressed this issue by transfecting murine NSC34 and N2a cells with siRNA for endogenous murine TDP-43 and with human recombinant TDP-43 inclusion bodies (IBs). These two strategies allowed the depletion of nuclear TDP-43 and the accumulation of cytoplasmic TDP-43 aggregates to occur separately and independently. Endogenous and exogenous TDP-43 were monitored and quantified using both immunofluorescence and Western blotting analysis, and nuclear functional TDP-43 was measured by monitoring the sortilin 1 mRNA splicing activity. Various degrees of TDP-43 cytoplasmic accumulation and nuclear TDP-43 depletion were achieved and the resulting cellular viability was evaluated, leading to a quantitative global analysis on the relative effects of LOF and GOF on the overall cytotoxicity. These were found to be ∼55% and 45%, respectively, in both cell lines and using both readouts of cell toxicity, showing that these two mechanisms are likely to contribute apparently equally to the pathologies of ALS and FTLD-U. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Experimental demonstration of passive decoy state quantum key distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yang; Wang Shuang; Yin Zhen-Qiang; Chen Wei; Liang Wen-Ye; Li Hong-Wei; Guo Guang-Can; Han Zheng-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Passive decoy state quantum key distribution (PDS-QKD) has advantages in high-speed scenarios.We propose a modified model to simulate the PDS-QKD with a weak coherent light source based on Curty's theory [Opt.Lett.343238 (2009)].The modified model can provide better performance in a practical PDS-QKD system.Moreover,we report an experimental demonstration of the PDS-QKD of over 22.0-dB channel loss.

  19. Antineoplastic effect of decoy oligonucleotide derived from MGMT enhancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Canello

    Full Text Available Silencing of O(6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT in tumors, mainly through promoter methylation, correlates with a better therapeutic response and with increased survival. Therefore, it is conceivable to consider MGMT as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancers. Our previous results demonstrated the pivotal role of NF-kappaB in MGMT expression, mediated mainly through p65/NF-kappaB homodimers. Here we show that the non-canonical NF-KappaB motif (MGMT-kappaB1 within MGMT enhancer is probably the major inducer of MGMT expression following NF-kappaB activation. Thus, in an attempt to attenuate the transcription activity of MGMT in tumors we designed locked nucleic acids (LNA modified decoy oligonucleotides corresponding to the specific sequence of MGMT-kappaB1 (MGMT-kB1-LODN. Following confirmation of the ability of MGMT-kB1-LODN to interfere with the binding of p65/NF-kappaB to the NF-KappaB motif within MGMT enhancer, the efficacy of the decoy was studied in-vitro and in-vivo. The results of these experiments show that the decoy MGMT-kB1-LODN have a substantial antineoplastic effect when used either in combination with temozolomide or as monotherapy. Our results suggest that MGMT-kB1-LODN may provide a novel strategy for cancer therapy.

  20. Antineoplastic effect of decoy oligonucleotide derived from MGMT enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canello, Tamar; Ovadia, Haim; Refael, Miri; Zrihan, Daniel; Siegal, Tali; Lavon, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Silencing of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) in tumors, mainly through promoter methylation, correlates with a better therapeutic response and with increased survival. Therefore, it is conceivable to consider MGMT as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancers. Our previous results demonstrated the pivotal role of NF-kappaB in MGMT expression, mediated mainly through p65/NF-kappaB homodimers. Here we show that the non-canonical NF-KappaB motif (MGMT-kappaB1) within MGMT enhancer is probably the major inducer of MGMT expression following NF-kappaB activation. Thus, in an attempt to attenuate the transcription activity of MGMT in tumors we designed locked nucleic acids (LNA) modified decoy oligonucleotides corresponding to the specific sequence of MGMT-kappaB1 (MGMT-kB1-LODN). Following confirmation of the ability of MGMT-kB1-LODN to interfere with the binding of p65/NF-kappaB to the NF-KappaB motif within MGMT enhancer, the efficacy of the decoy was studied in-vitro and in-vivo. The results of these experiments show that the decoy MGMT-kB1-LODN have a substantial antineoplastic effect when used either in combination with temozolomide or as monotherapy. Our results suggest that MGMT-kB1-LODN may provide a novel strategy for cancer therapy.

  1. Biomass gasification in ABFB : Tar mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Vera, Nemanova

    2014-01-01

    Biomass gasification may be an attractive alternative for meeting future energy demand. Although gasification is a mature technology, it has yet to be fully commercialised due to tar formation. This study focuses on the tar mitigation in gas produced in an atmospheric bubbling fluidised bed (ABFB) gasification system. Previous studies indicated significant tar variability along the system. In this work the experimental procedure has been improved for reliable results and better understanding ...

  2. Spectrum-based method to generate good decoy libraries for spectral library searching in peptide identifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chia-Ying; Tsai, Chia-Feng; Chen, Yu-Ju; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2013-05-01

    As spectral library searching has received increasing attention for peptide identification, constructing good decoy spectra from the target spectra is the key to correctly estimating the false discovery rate in searching against the concatenated target-decoy spectral library. Several methods have been proposed to construct decoy spectral libraries. Most of them construct decoy peptide sequences and then generate theoretical spectra accordingly. In this paper, we propose a method, called precursor-swap, which directly constructs decoy spectral libraries directly at the "spectrum level" without generating decoy peptide sequences by swapping the precursors of two spectra selected according to a very simple rule. Our spectrum-based method does not require additional efforts to deal with ion types (e.g., a, b or c ions), fragment mechanism (e.g., CID, or ETD), or unannotated peaks, but preserves many spectral properties. The precursor-swap method is evaluated on different spectral libraries and the results of obtained decoy ratios show that it is comparable to other methods. Notably, it is efficient in time and memory usage for constructing decoy libraries. A software tool called Precursor-Swap-Decoy-Generation (PSDG) is publicly available for download at http://ms.iis.sinica.edu.tw/PSDG/.

  3. Contextual effects and psychological features influencing decoy options: A review and research agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gonzalez-Prieto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop future research proposals aiming to contribute the extant theory which explains decoy effects.Design/methodology/approach: Firstly, a review of the existing literature about decoy options and its interactions with contextual effects that could affect their performance is presented. Next, two research proposals are presented: the introduction of a double decoy choice set and the evaluation of decoy effect under different levels of cognitive effort in a purchasing process.Findings and Originality/value: For the research proposal concerning double decoy choice sets, different hypothesis are introduced based on the different theories aiming to explain the effect of simple decoy choice sets. This hypothesis predict different outcomes for the same experimental design, fact that could provide further support for at least one of the current explanations for decoy effects. Regarding the effect of decoy options under different levels of cognitive effort, implications for experimental design for sequential purchasing process are expected. Especially for those designed with complex options, with many steps or high number of options.Originality/value: Two new research proposal approaches are presented in order enhance the current theory. Moreover, both have managerial implications concerning the real usage of decoy options in reduced choice sets as well as in sequential purchasing processes.

  4. Sydney Tar Ponds Remediation: Experience to China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Bryson, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    The infamous "Sydney Tar Ponds" are well known as one of the largest toxic waste sites of Canada, due to almost 100 years of steelmaking in Sydney, a once beautiful and peaceful city located on the east side of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. This article begins with a contextual overview of the Tar Ponds issue including a brief introduction and…

  5. Long distance decoy state quantum key distribution in optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, D; Hiskett, P A; Hughes, R J; Lita, A E; Nam, S W; Nordholt, J E; Peterson, C G; Rice, P R; Harrington, Jim W.; Hiskett, Philip A.; Hughes, Richard J.; Lita, Adriana E.; Nam, Sae Woo; Nordholt, Jane E.; Peterson, Charles G.; Rice, Patrick R.; Rosenberg, Danna

    2006-01-01

    The theoretical existence of photon-number-splitting attacks creates a security loophole for most quantum key distribution (QKD) demonstrations that use a highly attenuated laser source. Using ultra-low-noise, high-efficiency transition-edge sensor photo-detectors, we have implemented the first finite statistics version of a decoy state protocol in a one-way QKD system, enabling the creation of secure keys immune to both photon-number-splitting attacks and Trojan horse attacks over 107 km of optical fiber.

  6. IR seeker simulator and IR scene generation to evaluate IR decoy effectiveness; 2005BU1-EO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, W. de; Dam, F.A.M.; Kunz, G.J.; Schleijpen, H.M.A.

    2005-01-01

    IR decoys can be an effective countermeasure against IR guided anti ship missiles. However, it's not so easy to determine how the decoys should be deployed to get maximum effectiveness. A limitation of trials is that results are obtained for the specific trial condition only. Software tools have bee

  7. Adaptation of Decoy Fusion Strategy for Existing Multi-Stage Search Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Mark V.; Levitsky, Lev I.; Gorshkov, Mikhail V.

    2016-09-01

    A number of proteomic database search engines implement multi-stage strategies aiming at increasing the sensitivity of proteome analysis. These approaches often employ a subset of the original database for the secondary stage of analysis. However, if target-decoy approach (TDA) is used for false discovery rate (FDR) estimation, the multi-stage strategies may violate the underlying assumption of TDA that false matches are distributed uniformly across the target and decoy databases. This violation occurs if the numbers of target and decoy proteins selected for the second search are not equal. Here, we propose a method of decoy database generation based on the previously reported decoy fusion strategy. This method allows unbiased TDA-based FDR estimation in multi-stage searches and can be easily integrated into existing workflows utilizing popular search engines and post-search algorithms.

  8. Practical non-orthogonal decoy state quantum key distribution with heralded single photon source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mi Jing-Long; Wang Fa-Qiang; Lin Qing-Qun; Liang Rui-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    Recently the performance of the quantum key distribution (QKD) is substantially improved by the decoy state method and the non-orthogonal encoding protocol, separately. In this paper, a practical non-orthogonal decoy state protocol with a heralded single photon source (HSPS) for QKD is presented. The protocol is based on 4 states with different intensities, i.e. one signal state and three decoy states. The signal state is for generating keys; the decoy states arc for detecting the eavesdropping and estimating the fraction of single-photon and two-photon pulses. We have discussed three cases of this protocol, i.e. the general case, the optimal case and the special case. Moreover, the final key rate over transmission distance is simulated. For the low dark count of the HSPS and the utilization of the two-photon pulses, our protocol has a higher key rate and a longer transmission distance than any other decoy state protocol.

  9. Coal tar: past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thami, G.P.; Sarkar, R. [Government Medical College & Hospital, Chandigarh (India). Dept. of Dermatology & Venerology

    2002-03-01

    Crude coal tar has been used in the treatment of dermatoses for many decades. In the last few years its use has been limited to skin diseases such as psoriasis and chronic dermatitis. Newer topical modalities for psoriasis are being used increasingly for treatment, but have failed to replace crude coal tar as a first-line treatment of psoriasis. The authors review the pharmacology, chemistry and use of crude coal tar in order to reappraise its role as a therapeutic agent in dermatology.

  10. Cancer fear over coal tar products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a report by Dutch researchers which suggests that the regular use of coal tar shampoos may significantly increase the risk of cancer due to the high levels of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the products. The PAH exposure of volunteers using a coal tar anti-dandruff shampoo was studied by measuring the amount of hydroxypyrene, a PAH breakdown product in their urine. Volunteers who had used the shampoo excreted high levels of hydroxypyrene the day after exposure. Excretion by the control group using a non-coal tar anti-dandruff shampoo remained constant. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  11. Destabilization of the TAR hairpin leads to extension of the polyA hairpin and inhibition of HIV-1 polyadenylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrolijk, Martine M; Harwig, Alex; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T

    2009-02-11

    Two hairpin structures that are present at both the 5' and 3' end of the HIV-1 RNA genome have important functions in the viral life cycle. The TAR hairpin binds the viral Tat protein and is essential for Tat-mediated activation of transcription. The adjacent polyA hairpin encompasses the polyadenylation signal AAUAAA and is important for the regulation of polyadenylation. Specifically, this RNA structure represses polyadenylation at the 5' side, and enhancer elements on the 3' side overcome this suppression. We recently described that the replication of an HIV-1 variant that does not need TAR for transcription was severely impaired by destabilization of the TAR hairpin, even though a complete TAR deletion was acceptable. In this study, we show that the TAR-destabilizing mutations result in reduced 3' polyadenylation of the viral transcripts due to an extension of the adjacent polyA hairpin. Thus, although the TAR hairpin is not directly involved in polyadenylation, mutations in TAR can affect this process. The stability of the HIV-1 TAR hairpin structure is important for the proper folding of the viral RNA transcripts. This study illustrates how mutations that are designed to study the function of a specific RNA structure can change the structural presentation of other RNA domains and thus affect viral replication in an indirect way.

  12. Steam reforming of tars at low temperature and elevated pressure for model tar component naphthalene

    OpenAIRE

    Speidel, Michael; Fischer, Holger

    2016-01-01

    A process of pressurized gasification and power generation in a hybrid system of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and gas turbine enables an efficient use of biomass. This process requires tar reforming in order to protect the SOFC from plugging. Tars must be converted at 5 bar absolute pressure (bara) while avoiding secondary steam reforming of methane in order to reduce the required heat input for the tar reformer. This can be realized at low reforming temperatures (

  13. Simulation and Implementation of Decoy State Quantum Key Distribution over 60km Telecom Fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Y; Ma, X; Qi, B; Qian, L; Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Ma, Xiongfeng; Qi, Bing; Qian, Li; Zhao, Yi

    2006-01-01

    Decoy state quantum key distribution (QKD) has been proposed as a novel approach to improve dramatically both the security and the performance of practical QKD set-ups. Recently, many theoretical efforts have been made on this topic and have theoretically predicted the high performance of decoy method. However, the gap between theory and experiment remains open. In this paper, we report the first experiments on decoy state QKD, thus bridging the gap. Two protocols of decoy state QKD are implemented: one-decoy protocol over 15km of standard telecom fiber, and weak+vacuum protocol over 60km of standard telecom fiber. We implemented the decoy state method on a modified commercial QKD system. The modification we made is simply adding commercial acousto-optic modulator (AOM) on the QKD system. The AOM is used to modulate the intensity of each signal individually, thus implementing the decoy state method. As an important part of implementation, numerical simulation of our set-up is also performed. The simulation sh...

  14. Laboratory evaluation of selected tar sand asphalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, J.W.; Epps, J.A.; Gallaway, B.M.

    1980-12-01

    Three tar sand asphalts of similar grades prepared from one syncrude by three different refining methods were characterized by tests commonly used to specify paving asphalts together with certain special tests. Asphalt-aggregate mixtures were prepared using these asphalts and tested in the laboratory to determine strength stiffness stability, tensile properties, temperature effects and water susceptibility. Comparison of the tar sand asphalt properties to conventional petroleum asphalt properties reveal no striking differences.

  15. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  16. Fine-scale features on bioreplicated decoys of the emerald ash borer provide necessary visual verisimilitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingue, Michael J.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Narkhede, Mahesh S.; Engel, Leland G.; Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Kumar, Jayant; Baker, Thomas C.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2014-03-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an invasive tree-killing pest in North America. Like other buprestid beetles, it has an iridescent coloring, produced by a periodically layered cuticle whose reflectance peaks at 540 nm wavelength. The males perform a visually mediated ritualistic mating flight directly onto females poised on sunlit leaves. We attempted to evoke this behavior using artificial visual decoys of three types. To fabricate decoys of the first type, a polymer sheet coated with a Bragg-stack reflector was loosely stamped by a bioreplicating die. For decoys of the second type, a polymer sheet coated with a Bragg-stack reflector was heavily stamped by the same die and then painted green. Every decoy of these two types had an underlying black absorber layer. Decoys of the third type were produced by a rapid prototyping machine and painted green. Fine-scale features were absent on the third type. Experiments were performed in an American ash forest infested with EAB, and a European oak forest home to a similar pest, the two-spotted oak borer (TSOB), Agrilus biguttatus. When pinned to leaves, dead EAB females, dead TSOB females, and bioreplicated decoys of both types often evoked the complete ritualized flight behavior. Males also initiated approaches to the rapidly prototyped decoy, but would divert elsewhere without making contact. The attraction of the bioreplicated decoys was also demonstrated by providing a high dc voltage across the decoys that stunned and killed approaching beetles. Thus, true bioreplication with fine-scale features is necessary to fully evoke ritualized visual responses in insects, and provides an opportunity for developing insecttrapping technologies.

  17. New passive decoy-state quantum key distribution with thermal distributed parametric down-conversion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Wang, Qin

    2017-02-01

    We present a new scheme on implementing the passive quantum key distribution with thermal distributed parametric down-conversion source. In this scheme, only one-intensity decoy state is employed, but we can achieve very precise estimation on the single-photon-pulse contribution by utilizing those built-in decoy states. Moreover, we compare the new scheme with other practical methods, i.e., the standard three-intensity decoy-state BB84 protocol using either weak coherent states or parametric down-conversion source. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrate that our new scheme can drastically improve both the secure transmission distance and the key generation rate.

  18. General Theory of Decoy-State Quantum Cryptography with Dark Count Rate Fluctuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xiang; SUN Shi-Hai; LIANG Lin-Mei

    2009-01-01

    The existing theory of decoy-state quantum cryptography assumes that the dark count rate is a constant, but in practice there exists fluctuation. We develop a new scheme of the decoy state, achieve a more practical key generation rate in the presence of fluctuation of the dark count rate, and compare the result with the result of the decoy-state without fluctuation.It is found that the key generation rate and maximal secure distance will be decreased under the influence of the fluctuation of the dark count rate.

  19. Attenuating HIV Tat/TAR-mediated protein expression by exploring the side chain length of positively charged residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Chen, Yi-Ping; Liu, Shing-Lung; Chien, Fan-Ching; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Cheng, Richard P

    2015-12-07

    RNA is a drug target involved in diverse cellular functions and viral processes. Molecules that inhibit the HIV TAR RNA-Tat protein interaction may attenuate Tat/TAR-dependent protein expression and potentially serve as anti-HIV therapeutics. By incorporating positively charged residues with mixed side chain lengths, we designed peptides that bind TAR RNA with enhanced intracellular activity. Tat-derived peptides that were individually substituted with positively charged residues with varying side chain lengths were evaluated for TAR RNA binding. Positively charged residues with different side chain lengths were incorporated at each Arg and Lys position in the Tat-derived peptide to enhance TAR RNA binding. The resulting peptides showed enhanced TAR RNA binding affinity, cellular uptake, nuclear localization, proteolytic resistance, and inhibition of intracellular Tat/TAR-dependent protein expression compared to the parent Tat-derived peptide with no cytotoxicity. Apparently, the enhanced inhibition of protein expression by these peptides was not determined by RNA binding affinity, but by proteolytic resistance. Despite the high TAR binding affinity, a higher binding specificity would be necessary for practical purposes. Importantly, altering the positively charged residue side chain length should be a viable strategy to generate potentially useful RNA-targeting bioactive molecules.

  20. Porous Carbon Nanofibers from Electrospun Biomass Tar/Polyacrylonitrile/Silver Hybrids as Antimicrobial Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kunlin; Wu, Qinglin; Zhang, Zhen; Ren, Suxia; Lei, Tingzhou; Negulescu, Ioan I; Zhang, Quanguo

    2015-07-15

    A novel route to fabricate low-cost porous carbon nanofibers (CNFs) using biomass tar, polyacrylonitrile (PAN), and silver nanoparticles has been demonstrated through electrospinning and subsequent stabilization and carbonization processes. The continuous electrospun nanofibers had average diameters ranging from 392 to 903 nm. The addition of biomass tar resulted in increased fiber diameters, reduced thermal stabilities, and slowed cyclization reactions of PAN in the as-spun nanofibers. After stabilization and carbonization, the resultant CNFs showed more uniformly sized and reduced average diameters (226-507 nm) compared to as-spun nanofibers. The CNFs exhibited high specific surface area (>400 m(2)/g) and microporosity, attributed to the combined effects of phase separations of the tar and PAN and thermal decompositions of tar components. These pore characteristics increased the exposures and contacts of silver nanoparticles to the bacteria including Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli, leading to excellent antimicrobial performances of as-spun nanofibers and CNFs. A new strategy is thus provided for utilizing biomass tar as a low-cost precursor to prepare functional CNFs and reduce environmental pollutions associated with direct disposal of tar as an industrial waste.

  1. Dominant role of the 5' TAR bulge in dimerization of HIV-1 genomic RNA, but no evidence of TAR-TAR kissing during in vivo virus assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalirad, Mohammad; Saadatmand, Jenan; Laughrea, Michael

    2012-05-08

    The 5' untranslated region of HIV-1 genomic RNA (gRNA) contains two stem-loop structures that appear to be equally important for gRNA dimerization: the 57-nucleotide 5' TAR, at the very 5' end, and the 35-nucleotide SL1 (nucleotides 243-277). SL1 is well-known for containing the dimerization initiation site (DIS) in its apical loop. The DIS is a six-nucleotide palindrome. Here, we investigated the mechanism of TAR-directed gRNA dimerization. We found that the trinucleotide bulge (UCU24) of the 5' TAR has dominant impacts on both formation of HIV-1 RNA dimers and maturation of the formed dimers. The ΔUCU trinucleotide deletion strongly inhibited the first process and blocked the other, thus impairing gRNA dimerization as severely as deletion of the entire 5' TAR, and more severely than deletion of the DIS, inactivation of the viral protease, or most severe mutations in the nucleocapsid protein. The apical loop of TAR contains a 10-nucleotide palindrome that has been postulated to stimulate gRNA dimerization by a TAR-TAR kissing mechanism analogous to the one used by SL1 to stimulate dimerization. Using mutations that strongly destabilize formation of the TAR palindrome duplex, as well as compensatory mutations that restore duplex formation to a wild-type-like level, we found no evidence of TAR-TAR kissing, even though mutations nullifying the kissing potential of the TAR palindrome could impair dimerization by a mechanism other than hindering of SL1. However, nullifying the kissing potential of TAR had much less severe effects than ΔUCU. By not uncovering a dimerization mechanism intrinsic to TAR, our data suggest that TAR mutations exert their effect 3' of TAR, yet not on SL1, because TAR and SL1 mutations have synergistic effects on gRNA dimerization.

  2. Inhibition of cyclic AMP response element-directed transcription by decoy oligonucleotides enhances tumor-specific radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Serk In, E-mail: serkin@korea.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The BK21 Plus Program for Biomedical Sciences, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medicine and Center for Bone Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Park, Sung-Jun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Obesity and Aging Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lee, Junghan; Kim, Hye Eun; Park, Su Jin; Sohn, Jeong-Won [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yun Gyu, E-mail: parkyg@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The radiation stress induces cytotoxic responses of cell death as well as cytoprotective responses of cell survival. Understanding exact cellular mechanism and signal transduction pathways is important in improving cancer radiotherapy. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor (ATF) family proteins act as a survival factor and a signaling molecule in response to stress. We postulated that CREB inhibition via CRE decoy oligonucleotide increases tumor cell sensitization to γ-irradiation-induced cytotoxic stress. In the present study, we demonstrate that CREB phosphorylation and CREB DNA-protein complex formation increased in time- and radiation dose-dependent manners, while there was no significant change in total protein level of CREB. In addition, CREB was phosphorylated in response to γ-irradiation through p38 MAPK pathway. Further investigation revealed that CREB blockade by decoy oligonucleotides functionally inhibited transactivation of CREB, and significantly increased radiosensitivity of multiple human cancer cell lines including TP53- and/or RB-mutated cells with minimal effects on normal cells. We also demonstrate that tumor cells ectopically expressing dominant negative mutant CREB (KCREB) and the cells treated with p38 MAPK inhibitors were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than wild type parental cells or control-treated cells. Taken together, we conclude that CREB protects tumor cells from γ-irradiation, and combination of CREB inhibition plus ionizing radiation will be a promising radiotherapeutic approach. - Highlights: • γ-Irradiation induced CREB phosphorylation and CRE-directed transcription in tumor. • γ-Irradiation-induced transcriptional activation of CREB was via p38 MAPK pathway. • CRE blockade increased radiosensitivity of tumor cells but not of normal cells. • CRE decoy oligonucleotides or p38 MAPK inhibitors can be used as radiosensitizers.

  3. Practical issues in decoy-state quantum key distribution based on the central limit theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushechkin, A. S.; Kiktenko, E. O.; Fedorov, A. K.

    2017-08-01

    Decoy-state quantum key distribution (QKD) is a standard tool for long-distance quantum communications. An important issue in this field is processing the decoy-state statistics taking into account statistical fluctuations (or "finite-key effects"). In this work, we propose and analyze an option for decoy statistics processing, which is based on the central limit theorem. We discuss such practical issues as inclusion of the failure probability of the decoy-state statistical estimates in the total failure probability of a QKD protocol and also taking into account the deviations of the binomially distributed random variables used in the estimations from the Gaussian distribution. The results of numerical simulations show that the obtained estimations are quite tight. The proposed technique can be used as a part of post-processing procedures for industrial quantum key distribution systems.

  4. Simulation of two-dimensional ISAR decoys on a moving platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyi Pan; Wei Wang; Qixiang Fu; Dejun Feng; Guoyu Wang

    2015-01-01

    It is potential y useful to perform deception jamming using the digital image synthesizer (DIS) since it can form a two-dimensional (2D) decoy but suffers from multiple decoys ge-neration. Inspired by the intermittent sampling repeater jamming (ISRJ), the generation of inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) decoys is addressed, associated with the DIS and the ISRJ. Radar pulses are sampled intermittently and modulated by the scatter-ing model of a false target by mounting the jammer on a moving platform, and then the jamming signals are retransmitted to the radar and a train of decoys are induced after ISAR imaging. A scattering model of Yak-42 is adopted as the false-target mo-dulation model to verify the effectiveness of the jamming method based on the standard ISAR motion compensation and image for-mation procedure.

  5. Passive decoy-state quantum key distribution using weak coherent pulses with modulator attenuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李源; 鲍皖苏; 李宏伟; 周淳; 汪洋

    2015-01-01

    Passive decoy-state quantum key distribution is more desirable than the active one in some scenarios. It is also affected by the imperfections of the devices. In this paper, the influence of modulator attenuation on the passive decoy-state method is considered. We introduce and analyze the unbalanced Mach–Zehnder interferometer, briefly, and combining with the virtual source and imaginary unitary transformation, we characterize the passive decoy-state method using a weak coherent photon source with modulator attenuation. According to the attenuation parameterδ, the pass efficiencies are given. Then, the key generation rate can be acquired. From numerical simulations, it can be seen that modulator attenuation has a non-negligible influence on the performance of passive-state QKD protocol. Based on the research, the analysis method of virtual source and imaginary unitary transformation are preferred in analyzing passive decoy state protocol, and the passive decoy-state method is better than the active one and is close to the active vacuum+weak decoy state under the condition of having the same modulator attenuation.

  6. Passive decoy-state quantum key distribution using weak coherent pulses with modulator attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Bao, Wan-Su; Li, Hong-Wei; Zhou, Chun; Wang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Passive decoy-state quantum key distribution is more desirable than the active one in some scenarios. It is also affected by the imperfections of the devices. In this paper, the influence of modulator attenuation on the passive decoy-state method is considered. We introduce and analyze the unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer, briefly, and combining with the virtual source and imaginary unitary transformation, we characterize the passive decoy-state method using a weak coherent photon source with modulator attenuation. According to the attenuation parameter δ, the pass efficiencies are given. Then, the key generation rate can be acquired. From numerical simulations, it can be seen that modulator attenuation has a nonnegligible influence on the performance of passive-state QKD protocol. Based on the research, the analysis method of virtual source and imaginary unitary transformation are preferred in analyzing passive decoy state protocol, and the passive decoy-state method is better than the active one and is close to the active vacuum + weak decoy state under the condition of having the same modulator attenuation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11304397).

  7. Effect of Stathmin Decoy-oligodeoxynucleotides on the Proliferation and Differentiation of Precartilainous Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Fengjing; ZHANG Yibei; CHEN Anmin

    2007-01-01

    By using decoy-oligodeoxynucleotides (decoy-ODNS) technique, the effects of Stathmin gene on the proliferation and differentiation of in vitro cultured precartilainous stem cells (PSCs) were investigated. The Stathmin decoy-ODNs were transfected into PSCs in rats by using gene trans- fection technique. Under the induction of cortisol (1 μmol/L), electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used the inhibitory effects of decoy-ODNS on Stathmin gene. MTT and cytometry were used to test the cell proliferation. The expression of collagen Ⅱ and Ⅴ and Stathmin protein was detected by using Western blot. The results showed that Stathmin decoy-ODNs inhibited the Stathmin activity in a dose-dependent manner. When the concentration of decoy-ODNs was 10 times of standard con- centration, the proliferation of PSCs was obviously suppressed and the differentiation happened. Compared to the control group, the difference was significant (P<0.05). It was concluded that de-coy-ODNs could inhibit the proliferation and promote the differentiation of PSCs by antagonizing Stathmin activity.

  8. NFkappaB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides ameliorates osteoporosis through inhibition of activation and differentiation of osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, H; Nakagami, H; Tsukamoto, I; Morita, S; Kunugiza, Y; Tomita, T; Yoshikawa, H; Kaneda, Y; Ogihara, T; Morishita, R

    2006-06-01

    The transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappa B (NFkappaB), is believed to play a pivotal role in osteoclast formation. In this study, we focused on NFkappaB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) as a new therapeutic strategy to attenuate osteoporosis. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear osteoclasts formed in mononuclear cells including osteoclast precursors from neonatal rabbit bone marrow were increased in the presence of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, whereas transfection of NFkappaB decoy ODN decreased the number of TRAP-positive cells and attenuated RANKL and M-CSF-induced osteoclast formation. NFkappaB decoy ODN also inhibited the activity of osteoclasts, as assessed by pit formation. In rat ovariectomized model of estrogen deficiency, continuous administration of NFkappaB decoy ODN attenuated the increase of TRAP activity, accompanied by a significant increase in calcium concentration in tibia and femur and decrease in urinary deoxypyridinoline. In additional osteoporosis model using vitamin C-deficient rat, inhibition of NFkappaB by decoy ODN dramatically improved the bone length, weight, density as assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Overall, inhibition of NFkappaB by decoy strategy prevented osteoporosis through the inhibition of bone resorption. Targeting of NFkappaB might be potential therapy in various bone metabolic diseases.

  9. Tar Management and Recycling in Biomass Gasification and Syngas Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Zach

    Removal of tars is critical to the design and operation of biomass gasification systems as most syngas utilization processing equipment (e.g. internal combustion engines, gas turbines, fuel cells, and liquid fuel synthesis reactors) have a low tolerance for tar. Capturing and disposal of tar is expensive due to equipment costs, high hazardous waste disposal costs where direct uses cannot be found, and system energy losses incurred. Water scrubbing is an existing technique commonly used in gasification plants to remove contaminants and tar; however using water as the absorbent is non-ideal as tar compounds have low or no water solubility. Hydrophobic solvents can improve scrubber performance and this study evaluated tar solubility in selected solvents using slip-streams of untreated syngas from a laboratory fluidized bed reactor operated on almond composite feedstock using both air and steam gasification. Tar solubility was compared with Hansen's solubility theory to examine the extent to which the tar removal can be predicted. As collection of tar without utilization leads to a hazardous waste problem, the study investigated the effects of recycling tars back into the gasifier for destruction. Prior to experiments conducted on tar capture and recycle, characterizations of the air and steam gasification of the almond composite mix were made. This work aims to provide a better understanding of tar collection and solvent selection for wet scrubbers, and to provide information for designing improved tar management systems for biomass gasification.

  10. Using decoy effects to influence an online brand choice: the role of price-quality trade-offs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Huei-Chen; Liu, Wen-Liang

    2011-04-01

    This research aims to investigate decoy effects on online brand choices. To assess the influence of decoys, we test decoy effects on three constructs-product involvement, judgment conditions, and decoy conditions-within an online experiment. A survey of 635 Internet users and a 2 × 2 × 3 ANOVA between-subjects experimental design is used to guide the research design and the systematic analysis procedure. A major finding of this study is that a standard decoy seems to have a significant effect on an advertised (target) brand for high-involvement products; from the survey, it is also apparent that competitors can also use inferior decoys to increase brand preference for low-involvement products.

  11. MANPADS protection for civil aircraft using an expendable decoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Roy H.; Friede, Johan; Millwood, Nicolas; Butters, Brian

    2009-09-01

    With the ever present threat of MANPADS throughout the world the protection of civil aircraft is a desirable capability that has special requirements in terms of certification, safety, logistics, affordability, environmental impact and exportability. The Civil Aircraft Missile Protection System (CAMPS), which includes the CIV-IR (infrared) leaf-based pyrophoric (not pyrotechnic) expendable countermeasure, is a system designed to meet these requirements. This paper presents the operating aspects of the decoy, including discussion of design features necessary to ensure safety both on the ground and in flight and assure successful deployment. The characteristics of the CIV-IR have been measured, both on static single leaves in the laboratory and on deployed packs in field tests and aircraft trials. These measured properties have been used in engagement modelling and simulation to assess the level of protection that can be afforded to commercial airliners against generation 1 and 2 MANPADS threats. Aircraft flight trials with ground based seekers have also been carried out to validate the modelling work. These combine to define the deployment patterns necessary for a successful seduction of the MANPAD.

  12. Chemical structure of asphaltenes of tar semicoked from Kansk-Achinsk lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platanov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Klyavina, O.A. [Ln Tolstoi Tula State Pedagogical Institute, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1994-03-01

    The chemical structure has been studied of asphaltenes of tar semicoked from Kansk-Achinsk lignite and recovered at a temperature less than or equal to 350{degree}C. Asphaltenes have been found to be a complete mixture of aromatic, alicyclic, hydroaromatic, and heterocyclic compounds substituted by alkyl chains and various functional groups. A number of asphaltene compounds originate from steroids and triterpanes, which widely occur in lipid and tar fractions of plants and in the metabolites of microbes. A procedure based on adsorptive liquid chromatography has been developed to separate asphaltenes into a great number of eluates with considerably differing structural parameters and functional compositions.

  13. Tumor endothelium marker-8 based decoys exhibit superiority over capillary morphogenesis protein-2 based decoys as anthrax toxin inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenguang Cai

    Full Text Available Anthrax toxin is the major virulence factor produced by Bacillus anthracis. The toxin consists of three protein subunits: protective antigen (PA, lethal factor, and edema factor. Inhibition of PA binding to its receptors, tumor endothelium marker-8 (TEM8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2 can effectively block anthrax intoxication, which is particularly valuable when the toxin has already been overproduced at the late stage of anthrax infection, thus rendering antibiotics ineffectual. Receptor-like agonists, such as the mammalian cell-expressed von Willebrand factor type A (vWA domain of CMG2 (sCMG2, have demonstrated potency against the anthrax toxin. However, the soluble vWA domain of TEM8 (sTEM8 was ruled out as an anthrax toxin inhibitor candidate due to its inferior affinity to PA. In the present study, we report that L56A, a PA-binding-affinity-elevated mutant of sTEM8, could inhibit anthrax intoxication as effectively as sCMG2 in Fisher 344 rats. Additionally, pharmacokinetics showed that L56A and sTEM8 exhibit advantages over sCMG2 with better lung-targeting and longer plasma retention time, which may contribute to their enhanced protective ability in vivo. Our results suggest that receptor decoys based on TEM8 are promising anthrax toxin inhibitors and, together with the pharmacokinetic studies in this report, may contribute to the development of novel anthrax drugs.

  14. Pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryltsova, S.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Rozental, D.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.; Martynov, V.Y.; Chilachava, K.B.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar at 750-900 {degree}C and contact time of 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbon, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group and component composition of the liquid products and pyrolysis gas were determined. The main groups of compounds in liquid products were analysed.

  15. Experimental demonstration of passive-decoy-state quantum key distribution with two independent lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Tang, Guang-Zhao; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2016-09-01

    The decoy-state method could effectively enhance the performance of quantum key distribution (QKD) with a practical phase randomized weak coherent source. Although active modulation of the source intensity is effective and has been implemented in many experiments, passive preparation of decoy states is also an important addition to the family of decoy-state QKD protocols. In this paper, following the theory of Curty et al. [Phys. Rev. A 81, 022310 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevA.81.022310], we experimentally demonstrate the phase-encoding passive-decoy-state QKD with only linear optical setups and threshold single-photon detectors. In our experiment, two homemade independent pulsed lasers, with visibility of Hong-Ou-Mandel interference 0.53 (±0.003 ) , have been implemented and used to passively generate the different decoy states. Finally, a secret key rate of 1.5 ×10-5 /pulse is obtained with 10-km commercial fiber between Alice and Bob.

  16. Round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution with a passive decoy state method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Guo, Fen-Zhuo; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2017-02-01

    Recently, a new type of protocol named Round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution (RRDPS QKD) was proposed, where the security can be guaranteed without monitoring conventional signal disturbances. The active decoy state method can be used in this protocol to overcome the imperfections of the source. But, it may lead to side channel attacks and break the security of QKD systems. In this paper, we apply the passive decoy state method to the RRDPS QKD protocol. Not only can the more environment disturbance be tolerated, but in addition it can overcome side channel attacks on the sources. Importantly, we derive a new key generation rate formula for our RRDPS protocol using passive decoy states and enhance the key generation rate. We also compare the performance of our RRDPS QKD to that using the active decoy state method and the original RRDPS QKD without any decoy states. From numerical simulations, the performance improvement of the RRDPS QKD by our new method can be seen.

  17. Fabrication of Polymeric Visual Decoys for the Male Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Drew P. Pulsifer; Akhlesh Lakhtakia; Mahesh S. Narkhede; Michael J. Domingue; Beverly G. Post; Jayant Kumar; Raúl J. Martín-Palma

    2013-01-01

    Through a bioreplication approach,we have fabricated artificial visual decoys for the invasive species Agrilus planipennis—commonly known as the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB).The mating behavior of this species involves an overflying EAB male pouncing on an EAB female at rest on an ash leaflet before copulating.The male spots the female on the leaflet by visually detecting the iridescent green color of the female's elytra.As rearing EAB and then deploying dead females as decoys for trapping is both arduous and inconvenient,we decided to fabricate artificial decoys.We used a dead female to make a negative die of nickel and a positive die of epoxy.Decoys were then made by first depositing a quarter-wave-stack Bragg reflector on a polymer sheet and then stamping it with a pair of matched negative and positive dies to take the shape of the upper surface of an EAB female.As nearly 100 artificial decoys were fabricated from just one EAB female,this bioreplication process is industrially scalable.Preliminary results from a field trapping test are indicative of success.

  18. Induction of antagonistic soluble decoy receptor tyrosine kinases by intronic polyA activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorlová, Sandra; Rocco, Gina; Lefave, Clare V; Jodelka, Francine M; Hess, Ken; Hastings, Michelle L; Henke, Erik; Cartegni, Luca

    2011-09-16

    Alternative intronic polyadenylation (IPA) can generate truncated protein isoforms with significantly altered functions. Here, we describe 31 dominant-negative, secreted variant isoforms of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) that are produced by activation of intronic poly(A) sites. We show that blocking U1-snRNP can activate IPA, indicating a larger role for U1-snRNP in RNA surveillance. Moreover, we report the development of an antisense-based method to effectively and specifically activate expression of individual soluble decoy RTKs (sdRTKs) to alter signaling, with potential therapeutic implications. In particular, a quantitative switch from signal transducing full-length vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2/KDR) to a dominant-negative sKDR results in a strong antiangiogenic effect both on directly targeted cells and on naive cells exposed to conditioned media, suggesting a role for this approach in interfering with angiogenic paracrine and autocrine loops. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of the HIV-1 TAR RNA-Tat peptide and drug interactions by on-line acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassew, Nardos Gobena

    This thesis presents the application of the thickness shear-mode (TSM) acoustic wave sensor to the study of RNA-protein and RNA-drug interactions at the solid-liquid interface. The binding of the human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 Tat protein to the trans-activation responsive RNA element (TAR) has been studied using this sensor. Data from such measurements show that the sensor is able to discriminate between different Tat peptides derived from the parent protein based on size. The effects of mutations introduced at specific sites in the protein and RNA on the TAR-Tat binding have also been examined in detail. Reduced level of response in acoustic parameters due to mutations was observed indicating that the decrease in binding in response to site specific mutations can be acoustically detected. Data from acoustic wave sensor measurements indicate that the TAR-Tat binding is also affected by ionic strength. Both the frequency and motional resistance signals show periodic responses when varying concentrations of salt are introduced on a TAR-modified surface. The binding of the two molecules seems to be a function of the response of the nucleic acid to salt concentrations. The kinetics of binding of Tat peptides to TAR RNA and to a bulge mutant analogue (MTAR) is also examined from the rate of change of the series resonant frequency. Results from such analysis illustrate longer Tat peptides formed more stable complexes with TAR RNA and exhibited increased discrimination between mutant and wild type TAR. The binding of two aminoglycoside antibiotics, neomycin and streptomycin, to TAR RNA and their effectiveness in preventing TAR-Tat complex formation has been studied in detail. Binding affinity is directly correlated with the inhibitory potency of these molecules and the TSM sensor shows that neomycin exhibits at least a ten fold greater affinity to TAR and that it is also a more potent inhibitor than streptomycin. The results from this research involving TAR-Tat and

  20. pTAR-encoded proteins in plasmid partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnin, K; Stegalkina, S; Yarmolinsky, M

    2000-04-01

    Partition cassettes, essential for the segregational stability of low-copy-number bacterial plasmids, typically encode two autoregulated proteins and an adjacent cis-acting centromere analog to which one or perhaps both proteins bind. The diminutive partition region of pTAR of Agrobacterium spp. was reported to be exceptional, encoding only a single protein, ParA (D. R. Gallie and C. I. Kado, J. Mol. Biol. 193:465-478, 1987). However, resequencing of the region revealed two small downstream genes, parB and orf-84, of which only parB was found to be essential for partitioning in A. tumefaciens. Purified ParA exhibited a weak ATPase activity that was modestly increased by nonspecific DNA. ParB bound in vitro to repeated sequences present in a region, parS, that possesses centromere and operator functions and within which we identified the primary transcription start site by primer extension. In certain respects the Par proteins behave normally in the foreign host Escherichia coli. In E. coli, as in A. tumefaciens, ParB repressed the partition operon; ParA, inactive alone, augmented this repression. Functional similarities between the partition system of pTAR and those of other plasmids and bacteria are prominent, despite differences in size, organization, and amino acid sequence.

  1. Making the decoy-state measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution practically useful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi-Heng; Yu, Zong-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2016-04-01

    The relatively low key rate seems to be the major barrier to its practical use for the decoy-state measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD). We present a four-intensity protocol for the decoy-state MDI-QKD that hugely raises the key rate, especially in the case in which the total data size is not large. Also, calculations show that our method makes it possible for secure private communication with fresh keys generated from MDI-QKD with a delay time of only a few seconds.

  2. An enhanced proposal on decoy-state measurement device-independent quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Luo, Shunlong; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-09-01

    By employing pulses involving three-intensity, we propose a scheme for the measurement device-independent quantum key distribution with heralded single-photon sources. We make a comparative study of this scheme with the standard three-intensity decoy-state scheme using weak coherent sources or heralded single-photon sources. The advantage of this scheme is illustrated through numerical simulations: It can approach very closely the asymptotic case of using an infinite number of decoy-states and exhibits excellent behavior in both the secure transmission distance and the final key generation rate.

  3. Parameter optimization in biased decoy-state quantum key distribution with both source errors and statistical fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Rong; Li, Jian; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Wang, Qin

    2017-10-01

    The decoy-state method has been widely used in commercial quantum key distribution (QKD) systems. In view of the practical decoy-state QKD with both source errors and statistical fluctuations, we propose a universal model of full parameter optimization in biased decoy-state QKD with phase-randomized sources. Besides, we adopt this model to carry out simulations of two widely used sources: weak coherent source (WCS) and heralded single-photon source (HSPS). Results show that full parameter optimization can significantly improve not only the secure transmission distance but also the final key generation rate. And when taking source errors and statistical fluctuations into account, the performance of decoy-state QKD using HSPS suffered less than that of decoy-state QKD using WCS.

  4. Coal tar induces AHR-dependent skin barrier repair in atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaard, E.H. van den; Bergboer, J.G.M.; Vonk-Bergers, M.; Vlijmen-Willems, I.M. van; Hato, S.V.; Valk, P.G. van der; Schroder, J.M.; Joosten, I.; Zeeuwen, P.L.J.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    Topical application of coal tar is one of the oldest therapies for atopic dermatitis (AD), a T helper 2 (Th2) lymphocyte-mediated skin disease associated with loss-of-function mutations in the skin barrier gene, filaggrin (FLG). Despite its longstanding clinical use and efficacy, the molecular

  5. Chemical composition of hydrocarbons from semicoking tars of lignites from the near-Moscow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Antonio, T.Z.; Platonova, M.V. [Lev Tolstoi Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1998-09-01

    The chemical composition of hydrocarbons from the semicoking tar of lignites was studied by elemental, functional, emission spectrum, and structural-group analyses, cryoscopy, IR, UV and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, capillary gas chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A scheme was developed for adsorption liquid chromatography of the hydrocarbons.

  6. Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Rozental, D.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar in the range 750-900{degree}C at a contact time within 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbons, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group and component compositions of the liquid and gaseous products were determined. The optimal pyrolysis parameters from the viewpoint of obtaining the maximal yield of particular 'secondary' hydrocarbons were recommended.

  7. Pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Rozental, D.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar in the range 750-900{degree}C at a contact time within 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbons, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group composition of the liquid products were determined. The total analysis of the major groups of compounds present in the liquid products was performed, and the optimal conditions of pyrolysis, from the viewpoint of preparation of particular compounds, were recommended.

  8. Receiving demulsifying agent from the acid tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitina, A.A.; Belyaeva, A.S.; Kunakova, R.V. [FGBIHE ' Ufa State Academy of Economics and Services' , Ufa (Russian Federation); Movsumzade, E.M. [FGBIHE ' Ufa State Petroleum Technological Univ.' , Ufa (Russian Federation); Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    The processing of wastes of petrochemical production makes it possible to reduce the price of produced commodity of petroleum products substantially. Bitumen, fuel oils, tars and other mixture of heavy organic compounds are widely used in road construction, in paint and cable industries, manufacture of roofing materials, are used as boiler and furnace fuel, fuel for marine diesel engines, raw material for the production of modifying additives, fillers, surfaceactive substances, etc. (orig.)

  9. Insights into HIV-1 proviral transcription from integrative structure and dynamics of the Tat:AFF4:P-TEFb:TAR complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Echeverria, Ignacia; Stjepanovic, Goran; Bai, Yun; Lu, Huasong; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Doudna, Jennifer A; Zhou, Qiang; Sali, Andrej; Hurley, James H

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat hijacks the human superelongation complex (SEC) to promote proviral transcription. Here we report the 5.9 Å structure of HIV-1 TAR in complex with HIV-1 Tat and human AFF4, CDK9, and CycT1. The TAR central loop contacts the CycT1 Tat-TAR recognition motif (TRM) and the second Tat Zn2+-binding loop. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) shows that AFF4 helix 2 is stabilized in the TAR complex despite not touching the RNA, explaining how it enhances TAR binding to the SEC 50-fold. RNA SHAPE and SAXS data were used to help model the extended (Tat Arginine-Rich Motif) ARM, which enters the TAR major groove between the bulge and the central loop. The structure and functional assays collectively support an integrative structure and a bipartite binding model, wherein the TAR central loop engages the CycT1 TRM and compact core of Tat, while the TAR major groove interacts with the extended Tat ARM. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15910.001 PMID:27731797

  10. Trace metals in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J.G.

    1990-11-28

    Fe, Ni, and V are considered trace impurities in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens. In order to understand the importance of these metals, we have examined several properties: (1) bulk metals levels, (2) distribution in separated fractions, (3) size behavior in feeds and during processing, (4) speciation as a function of size, and (5) correlations with rheological properties. Some of the results of these studies show: (1) V and Ni have roughly bimodal size distributions, (2) groupings were seen based on location, size distribution, and Ni/V ratio of the sample, (3) Fe profiles are distinctively different, having a unimodal distribution with a maximum at relatively large molecular size, (4) Fe concentrations in the tar sand bitumens suggest possible fines solubilization in some cases, (5) SARA separated fractions show possible correlations of metals with asphaltene properties suggesting secondary and tertiary structure interactions, and (6) ICP-MS examination for soluble ultra-trace metal impurities show the possibility of unexpected elements such as U, Th, Mo, and others at concentrations in the ppB to ppM range. 39 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Absorptive removal of biomass tar using water and oily materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuphuakrat, Thana; Namioka, Tomoaki; Yoshikawa, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    Water is the most common choice of absorption medium selected in many gasification systems. Because of poor solubility of tar in water, hydrophobic absorbents (diesel fuel, biodiesel fuel, vegetable oil, and engine oil) were studied on their absorption efficiency of biomass tar and compared with water. The results showed that only 31.8% of gravimetric tar was removed by the water scrubber, whereas the highest removal of gravimetric tar was obtained by a vegetable oil scrubber with a removal efficiency of 60.4%. When focusing on light PAH tar removal, the absorption efficiency can be ranked in the following order; diesel fuel>vegetable oil>biodiesel fuel>engine oil>water. On the other hand, an increase in gravimetric tar was observed for diesel fuel and biodiesel fuel scrubbers because of their easy evaporation. Therefore, the vegetable oil is recommended as the best absorbent to be used in gasification systems.

  12. Human Milk Contains Novel Glycans That Are Potential Decoy Receptors for Neonatal Rotaviruses*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Mickum, Megan L.; Ashline, David J.; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Estes, Mary K.; Reinhold, Vernon N.; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Human milk contains a rich set of soluble, reducing glycans whose functions and bioactivities are not well understood. Because human milk glycans (HMGs) have been implicated as receptors for various pathogens, we explored the functional glycome of human milk using shotgun glycomics. The free glycans from pooled milk samples of donors with mixed Lewis and Secretor phenotypes were labeled with a fluorescent tag and separated via multidimensional HPLC to generate a tagged glycan library containing 247 HMG targets that were printed to generate the HMG shotgun glycan microarray (SGM). To investigate the potential role of HMGs as decoy receptors for rotavirus (RV), a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children, we interrogated the HMG SGM with recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the RV outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain, B223(G10P[11]). Glycans that were bound by RV attachment proteins were selected for detailed structural analyses using metadata-assisted glycan sequencing, which compiles data on each glycan based on its binding by antibodies and lectins before and after exo- and endo-glycosidase digestion of the SGM, coupled with independent MSn analyses. These complementary structural approaches resulted in the identification of 32 glycans based on RV VP8* binding, many of which are novel HMGs, whose detailed structural assignments by MSn are described in a companion report. Although sialic acid has been thought to be important as a surface receptor for RVs, our studies indicated that sialic acid is not required for binding of glycans to individual VP8* domains. Remarkably, each VP8* recognized specific glycan determinants within a unique subset of related glycan structures where specificity differences arise from subtle differences in glycan structures. PMID:25048705

  13. Iron-based materials as tar cracking catalyst in waste gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordgreen, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    's excellent tar cracking capacity led to the innovative manufacture of an iron catalytic tar cracking filter as well as a general knowledge of its tar cracking capacity. This filter with dual functionality would be a general improvement of the gasification process since it among other things would make the process denser

  14. Modelling infrared signatures of ships and decoys for countermeasure effectiveness studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleijpen, H.M.A.; Degache, M.A.C.; Veerman, H.E.T.; Sweeden, R. van; Devecchi, B.A.

    2012-01-01

    Infrared guided missiles are a threat for modern naval forces. The vulnerability of ships can be reduced by applying countermeasures such as infrared decoys and infrared signature reduction. This paper presents recent improvements in a simulation toolset which can be used for assessing the

  15. Delayed toxicity associated with soluble anthrax toxin receptor decoy-Ig fusion protein treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Thomas

    Full Text Available Soluble receptor decoy inhibitors, including receptor-immunogloubulin (Ig fusion proteins, have shown promise as candidate anthrax toxin therapeutics. These agents act by binding to the receptor-interaction site on the protective antigen (PA toxin subunit, thereby blocking toxin binding to cell surface receptors. Here we have made the surprising observation that co-administration of receptor decoy-Ig fusion proteins significantly delayed, but did not protect, rats challenged with anthrax lethal toxin. The delayed toxicity was associated with the in vivo assembly of a long-lived complex comprised of anthrax lethal toxin and the receptor decoy-Ig inhibitor. Intoxication in this system presumably results from the slow dissociation of the toxin complex from the inhibitor following their prolonged circulation. We conclude that while receptor decoy-Ig proteins represent promising candidates for the early treatment of B. anthracis infection, they may not be suitable for therapeutic use at later stages when fatal levels of toxin have already accumulated in the bloodstream.

  16. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter and Salmonella strains isolated from decoys and raptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado-Tarifa, E; Torralbo, A; Borge, C; Cerdà-Cuéllar, M; Ayats, T; Carbonero, A; García-Bocanegra, I

    2016-10-01

    Infections caused by thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. are the leading causes of human gastroenteritis worldwide. Wild birds can act as reservoirs of both pathogens. A survey was carried out to determine the prevalence, genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance of thermotolerant Campylobacter and Salmonella in waterfowl used as decoys and wild raptors in Andalusia (Southern Spain). The overall prevalence detected for Campylobacter was 5.9% (18/306; CI95%: 3.25-8.52) in decoys and 2.3% (9/387; CI95%: 0.82-3.83) in wild raptors. Isolates were identified as C. jejuni, C. coli and C. lari in both bird groups. Salmonella was isolated in 3.3% (10/306; CI95%: 2.3-4.3) and 4.6% (18/394; CI95%: 3.5-5.6) of the decoys and raptors, respectively. Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium were the most frequently identified serovars, although Salmonella serovars Anatum, Bredeney, London and Mikawasima were also isolated. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of isolates showed higher genetic diversity within Campylobacter species compared to Salmonella serovars. Campylobacter isolates showed resistance to gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline, while resistance to erythromycin and tetracycline was found in Salmonella isolates. The results indicate that both decoys and raptors can act as natural carriers of Campylobacter and Salmonella in Spain, which may have important implications for public and animal health.

  17. Estimating thermodynamic properties of coal, char, tar and ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisermann, W.; Johnson, P. Conger, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    Methods of predicting the specific heat, enthalpy, and entropy of coal, char, tar and ash as a function of temperature and material composition are presented. The standard entropy of coal is approximated by comparing the behaviour of the standard entropies of a number of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons as a function of the variables H/(C + N), O/(C + N), N/(C + N), and S/(C + N), where the variables are the atomic fractions of the respective elements. The standard entropy of a bituminous coal was found to be about 20 kJ/kmol carbon K and of the char to be about 10 kJ/kmol carbon K. Estimates of the enthalpy difference between 273 K and temperatures above 273 K deviated from published data by about 8.49% for chars and 8.55% for coals on the average. Maximum deviations of 18.3% and 17.6% respectively were found.

  18. CLUB-MARTINI: Selecting Favourable Interactions amongst Available Candidates, a Coarse-Grained Simulation Approach to Scoring Docking Decoys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhen Hou

    Full Text Available Large-scale identification of native binding orientations is crucial for understanding the role of protein-protein interactions in their biological context. Measuring binding free energy is the method of choice to estimate binding strength and reveal the relevance of particular conformations in which proteins interact. In a recent study, we successfully applied coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to measure binding free energy for two protein complexes with similar accuracy to full-atomistic simulation, but 500-fold less time consuming. Here, we investigate the efficacy of this approach as a scoring method to identify stable binding conformations from thousands of docking decoys produced by protein docking programs. To test our method, we first applied it to calculate binding free energies of all protein conformations in a CAPRI (Critical Assessment of PRedicted Interactions benchmark dataset, which included over 19000 protein docking solutions for 15 benchmark targets. Based on the binding free energies, we ranked all docking solutions to select the near-native binding modes under the assumption that the native-solutions have lowest binding free energies. In our top 100 ranked structures, for the 'easy' targets that have many near-native conformations, we obtain a strong enrichment of acceptable or better quality structures; for the 'hard' targets without near-native decoys, our method is still able to retain structures which have native binding contacts. Moreover, in our top 10 selections, CLUB-MARTINI shows a comparable performance when compared with other state-of-the-art docking scoring functions. As a proof of concept, CLUB-MARTINI performs remarkably well for many targets and is able to pinpoint near-native binding modes in the top selections. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time interaction free energy calculated from MD simulations have been used to rank docking solutions at a large scale.

  19. Prolongation of liver allograft survival by dendritic cells modified with NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Qing Xu; Yu-Ping Suo; Jian-Ping Gong; Ming-Man Zhang; Lü-Nan Yan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To induce the tolerance of rat liver allograft by dendritic cells (DCs) modified with NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs).METHODS: Bone marrow (BM)-derived DCs from SD rats were propagated in the presence of GM-CSF or GM-CSF+IL-4to obtain immature DCs or mature DCs. GM-CSF+IL-4-propagated DCs were treated with double-strand NF-κB decoy ODNs containing two NF-κB binding sites or scrambled ODNs to ascertain whether NF-κB decoy ODNs might prevent DC maturation. GM-CSF-propagated DCs, GMCSF+NF-κB decoy ODNs or scrambled ODNs-propagated DCs were treated with LPS for 18 h to determine whether NF-κB decoy ODNs could prevent LPS-induced IL-12production in DCs. NF-κB binding activities, costimulatory molecule (CD40, CD80, CD86) surface expression, IL-12protein expression and allostimulatory capacity of DCs were measured with electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA),flow cytometry, Western blotting, and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), respectively. GM-CSF-propagated DCs, GMCSF+IL-4 -propagated DCs, and GM-CSF+NF-κB decoy ODNs or scrambled ODNs-propagated DCs were injected intravenously into recipient LEW rats 7 d prior to liver transplantation and immediately after liver transplantation.Histological grading of liver graft rejection was determined 7 d after liver transplantation. Expression of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-γ mRNA in liver graft and in recipient spleen was analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Apoptosis of liver allograft-infiltrating cells was measured with TUNEL staining.RESULTS: GM-CSF-propagated DCs, GM-CSF+NF-κB decoy ODNs-propagated DCs and GM-CSF+ scrambled ODNspropagated DCs exhibited features of immature DCs, with similar low level of costimulatory molecule(CD40, CD80,CD86) surface expression, absence of NF-κB activation,and few allocostimulatory activities. GM-CSF+IL-4-propagated DCs displayed features of mature DCs, with high levels of costimulatory molecule (CD40, CD80, CD86) surface expression, marked NF-κB activation, and

  20. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  1. Evaluation of surfactant flushing for remediating EDC-tar contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chenju; Hsieh, Cheng-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Ethylene dichloride tar (EDC-tar) is a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) waste originated from the process of vinyl chloride production, with major constituents including chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. This study investigated the feasibility of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) for treating EDC-tar contaminated aquifers. Initial experiments explored the potential to enhance the apparent solubility of EDC-tar using single or mixed surfactants. The results showed that an aqueous solution mixed anionic and non-ionic surfactants (i.e., SDS/Tween 80) exhibited higher EDC-tar apparent solubility and lower surface tension than other surfactant systems tested. Additionally, alkaline pH aids in increasing the EDC-tar apparent solubility. In column flushing experiments, it was seen that the alkaline mixed SDS/Tween 80 solution showed better removal of pure EDC-tar from silica sand porous media. Furthermore, separation of EDC-tar in the surfactant solution was conducted employing a salting-out effect. Significant separation of DNAPL was observed when 13 wt.% or more NaCl was added to the solution. Overall, this study evaluates the feasibility of using SEAR for remediating EDC-tar contaminated subsurface soil and groundwater.

  2. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  3. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  4. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikas, John Michael; Colmenares, Tulio Rafael; Zhang, Etuan; Marino, Marian; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Ryan, Robert Charles; Beer, Gary Lee; Dombrowski, Robert James; Jaiswal, Namit

    2009-12-22

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  5. Síndrome TAR con tetrafocomelia

    OpenAIRE

    Miscione, H.; Primono, C.

    1997-01-01

    El síndrome TAR es un estigma genético recesivo de baja incidencia dentro de la patología ortopédica infantil general. El objetivo de este trabajo es la presentación de aquellos pacientes en donde la impregnación del síndrome es completa. Estos niños tienen en común la trombocitopenia intensa durante los primeros años de la vida, la amelia bilateral de sus miembros superiores, la fusión femorotibial y la agenesia de tibia de distinto grado. A estos síntomas se suman algunas otr...

  6. Mixture for removing tar and paraffin deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    kamenshchikov, F.A.; Frolov, M.A.; Golovin, I.N.; Khusainov, Z.M.; Smirnov, Ya.L.; Suchkov, B.M.

    1981-05-23

    Mixture is claimed for removing tar and paraffin deposits (TPD) on the basis of the butyl-benzene fraction (BBF), which is intended to more efficiently remove TPD from the surface of refinery equipment, additionally has piperylene, isoprene and isoamine with the following ratio of the components: piperylene, 19-31%; isoprene, 8-12%; isoamines, 8-12%, while BBF, the rest. The efficiency of the given compositions was assessed by the rate at which the plates were cleaned of TPD and pure commercial paraffin. It has been shown that BBF dissolves 4-6 times faster in the given mixture than in BBF and pyperylene.

  7. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  8. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  9. Phototoxic keratoconjunctivitis from coal-tar pitch volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, E A; Stetzer, L; Taphorn, B

    1977-11-25

    Roofers working with coal-tar pitch develop burning eyes and conjunctivitis which they subjectively associate with sun exposure. A coal-tar pitch distillate instilled in the conjunctivae of rabbits produced minimal or mild irritation in the absence of ultraviolet radiation, but irradiation with long-ultraviolet produced marked photophobia and severe keratoconjunctivitis.

  10. Evaluation of Gravimetric Tar Determination in Particle Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindsgaul, Claus; Henriksen, Ulrik B.; Bentzen, Jens Dall

    2000-01-01

    A comparison of tar determination of particles from a down-draft gasifier using soxhlet extractions (with anisole, dichloromethane and acetone) and pyrolysis of the particles.......A comparison of tar determination of particles from a down-draft gasifier using soxhlet extractions (with anisole, dichloromethane and acetone) and pyrolysis of the particles....

  11. 48 CFR Appendix to Part 1252 - Tar Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tar Matrix Appendix to Part 1252 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Pt. 1252, App. Appendix to Part 1252—Tar Matrix...

  12. DECOMPOSITION OF TARS IN MICROWAVE PLASMA – PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Wnukowski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers to the main problem connected with biomass gasification - a presence of tar in a product gas. This paper presents preliminary results of tar decomposition in a microwave plasma reactor. It gives a basic insight into the construction and work of the plasma reactor. During the experiment, researches were carried out on toluene as a tar surrogate. As a carrier gas for toluene and as a plasma agent, nitrogen was used. Flow rates of the gases and the microwave generator’s power were constant during the whole experiment. Results of the experiment showed that the decomposition process of toluene was effective because the decomposition efficiency attained above 95%. The main products of tar decomposition were light hydrocarbons and soot. The article also gives plans for further research in a matter of tar removal from the product gas.

  13. Steam-Reforming Characteristics of Heavy and Light Tars Derived from Cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hirotatsu; Morinaga, Yosuke; Okazaki, Ken

    In this study, tar formation and steam-reforming mechanisms are discussed by separating the tars into heavy, middle, and light tars. Cellulose was heated in a drop-tube furnace under an Ar or Ar/steam atmosphere. After the tars were passed through the furnace for thermal cracking and polymerization, they were trapped by filters set at different temperatures (573, 393, and 273 K), and were respectively defined as heavy, middle, and light tars. Incondensable volatiles and gaseous products were measured using gas chromatography with thermal conductivity (GC-TCD), and flame ionization (GC-FID) detectors. The middle and light tars obtained under an Ar atmosphere were first characterized using time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). The analysis showed that the middle tar did not contain any low-boiling-point light tar components, while the light tar did contain them. It was also found that complex species in the tars were separated to a certain degree by changing the trap temperature. Moreover, the formation of heavy tar was quite different from that of the light tar. With increasing temperature, the formation of heavy tar was inhibited, while that of the light tar was enhanced during pyrolysis. The steam-reforming characteristics of these tars were also different. The heavy tar was barely reformed at a low temperature of 873 K, even with a long residence time, while the middle tar was well reformed by steam. While it was difficult to describe the tar formation and steam-reforming characteristics when the tar was considered as a single condensable matter, the tar formation and steam-reforming characteristics were clarified by separating the tars. This study shows that, to prevent tar emissions, the formation of heavy tar, which barely reacts with steam, should be inhibited during pyrolysis by controlling the heating.

  14. TarNet: An Evidence-Based Database for Natural Medicine Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ruifeng; Ren, Guomin; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Complex diseases seriously threaten human health. Drug discovery approaches based on "single genes, single drugs, and single targets" are limited in targeting complex diseases. The development of new multicomponent drugs for complex diseases is imperative, and the establishment of a suitable solution for drug group-target protein network analysis is a key scientific problem that must be addressed. Herbal medicines have formed the basis of sophisticated systems of traditional medicine and have given rise to some key drugs that remain in use today. The search for new molecules is currently taking a different route, whereby scientific principles of ethnobotany and ethnopharmacognosy are being used by chemists in the discovery of different sources and classes of compounds. In this study, we developed TarNet, a manually curated database and platform of traditional medicinal plants with natural compounds that includes potential bio-target information. We gathered information on proteins that are related to or affected by medicinal plant ingredients and data on protein-protein interactions (PPIs). TarNet includes in-depth information on both plant-compound-protein relationships and PPIs. Additionally, TarNet can provide researchers with network construction analyses of biological pathways and protein-protein interactions (PPIs) associated with specific diseases. Researchers can upload a gene or protein list mapped to our PPI database that has been manually curated to generate relevant networks. Multiple functions are accessible for network topological calculations, subnetwork analyses, pathway analyses, and compound-protein relationships. TarNet will serve as a useful analytical tool that will provide information on medicinal plant compound-affected proteins (potential targets) and system-level analyses for systems biology and network pharmacology researchers. TarNet is freely available at http://www.herbbol.org:8001/tarnet, and detailed tutorials on the program are also

  15. TarNet: An Evidence-Based Database for Natural Medicine Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifeng Hu

    Full Text Available Complex diseases seriously threaten human health. Drug discovery approaches based on "single genes, single drugs, and single targets" are limited in targeting complex diseases. The development of new multicomponent drugs for complex diseases is imperative, and the establishment of a suitable solution for drug group-target protein network analysis is a key scientific problem that must be addressed. Herbal medicines have formed the basis of sophisticated systems of traditional medicine and have given rise to some key drugs that remain in use today. The search for new molecules is currently taking a different route, whereby scientific principles of ethnobotany and ethnopharmacognosy are being used by chemists in the discovery of different sources and classes of compounds.In this study, we developed TarNet, a manually curated database and platform of traditional medicinal plants with natural compounds that includes potential bio-target information. We gathered information on proteins that are related to or affected by medicinal plant ingredients and data on protein-protein interactions (PPIs. TarNet includes in-depth information on both plant-compound-protein relationships and PPIs. Additionally, TarNet can provide researchers with network construction analyses of biological pathways and protein-protein interactions (PPIs associated with specific diseases. Researchers can upload a gene or protein list mapped to our PPI database that has been manually curated to generate relevant networks. Multiple functions are accessible for network topological calculations, subnetwork analyses, pathway analyses, and compound-protein relationships.TarNet will serve as a useful analytical tool that will provide information on medicinal plant compound-affected proteins (potential targets and system-level analyses for systems biology and network pharmacology researchers. TarNet is freely available at http://www.herbbol.org:8001/tarnet, and detailed tutorials on the

  16. Differentiation of AmpC beta-lactamase binders vs. decoys using classification kNN QSAR modeling and application of the QSAR classifier to virtual screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Wang, Xiang S.; Teotico, Denise; Golbraikh, Alexander; Tropsha, Alexander

    2008-09-01

    The use of inaccurate scoring functions in docking algorithms may result in the selection of compounds with high predicted binding affinity that nevertheless are known experimentally not to bind to the target receptor. Such falsely predicted binders have been termed `binding decoys'. We posed a question as to whether true binders and decoys could be distinguished based only on their structural chemical descriptors using approaches commonly used in ligand based drug design. We have applied the k-Nearest Neighbor ( kNN) classification QSAR approach to a dataset of compounds characterized as binders or binding decoys of AmpC beta-lactamase. Models were subjected to rigorous internal and external validation as part of our standard workflow and a special QSAR modeling scheme was employed that took into account the imbalanced ratio of inhibitors to non-binders (1:4) in this dataset. 342 predictive models were obtained with correct classification rate (CCR) for both training and test sets as high as 0.90 or higher. The prediction accuracy was as high as 100% (CCR = 1.00) for the external validation set composed of 10 compounds (5 true binders and 5 decoys) selected randomly from the original dataset. For an additional external set of 50 known non-binders, we have achieved the CCR of 0.87 using very conservative model applicability domain threshold. The validated binary kNN QSAR models were further employed for mining the NCGC AmpC screening dataset (69653 compounds). The consensus prediction of 64 compounds identified as screening hits in the AmpC PubChem assay disagreed with their annotation in PubChem but was in agreement with the results of secondary assays. At the same time, 15 compounds were identified as potential binders contrary to their annotation in PubChem. Five of them were tested experimentally and showed inhibitory activities in millimolar range with the highest binding constant Ki of 135 μM. Our studies suggest that validated QSAR models could complement

  17. A tissue microarray study of toll-like receptor 4, decoy receptor 3, and external signal regulated kinase 1/2 expressions in astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Kung; Ting, Chun-Chieh; Tsai, Wen-Chiuan; Chen, Yuan-Wu; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) functions as a death decoy inhibiting apoptosis mediated by the tumor necrosis factor receptor family. It is highly expressed in many tumors and its expression can be regulated by the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway and ERK is a vital member of this pathway. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is expressed on immune cells. Increased TLR4 expression has been associated with various types of cancers. The study was conducted to investigate the expression of DcR3, ERK1/2, and TLR4 in astrocytomas and evaluate if they are validating markers for discriminating glioblastoma from anaplastic astrocytoma in limited surgical specimen. Expression of DcR3, ERK1/2, and TLR4 was determined by immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarray from 48 paraffin-embedded tissues. A binary logistic regression method was used to generate functions that discriminate between anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastomas. The expression of TLR4 and DcR3 was significantly higher in glioblastomas than in anaplastic astrocytomas. DcR3 could discriminate anaplastic astrocytomas from glioblastomas with high sensitivity (93.8%), specificity (90%), and accuracy (92.3%). Our results suggest that DcR3 may be a useful marker for discriminating anaplastic astrocytomas from glioblastomas.

  18. Experimental long-distance decoy-state quantum key distribution based on polarization encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Dong; Gao, Wei-Bo; Ma, Huai-Xin; Yin, Hao; Zeng, He-Ping; Yang, Tao; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2007-01-05

    We demonstrate the decoy-state quantum key distribution (QKD) with one-way quantum communication in polarization space over 102 km. Further, we simplify the experimental setup and use only one detector to implement the one-way decoy-state QKD over 75 km, with the advantage to overcome the security loopholes due to the efficiency mismatch of detectors. Our experimental implementation can really offer the unconditionally secure final keys. We use 3 different intensities of 0, 0.2, and 0.6 for the light sources in our experiment. In order to eliminate the influences of polarization mode dispersion in the long-distance single-mode optical fiber, an automatic polarization compensation system is utilized to implement the active compensation.

  19. Quantum secure direct communication network with superdense coding and decoy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Fuguo [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li Xihan [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li Chunyan [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhou Ping [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhou Hongyu [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2007-07-15

    A quantum secure direct communication network scheme is proposed with quantum superdense coding and decoy photons. The servers on a passive optical network prepare and measure the quantum signal, i.e. a sequence of the d-dimensional Bell states. After confirming the security of the photons received from the receiver, the sender codes his secret message on them directly. For preventing a dishonest server from eavesdropping, some decoy photons prepared by measuring one photon in the Bell states are used to replace some original photons. One of the users on the network can communicate to any other one. This scheme has the advantage of high capacity, and it is more convenient than others as only a sequence of photons is transmitted in quantum line.

  20. Radial shock waves effectively introduced NF-kappa B decoy into rat achilles tendon cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Kaori; Nakagawa, Koichi; Murata, Ryo; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Sasho, Takahisa; Arai, Momoko; Tsuruoka, Hiroaki; Ohtori, Seiji; Saisu, Takashi; Gemba, Takefumi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to test if radial shock waves could enhance the introduction of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) decoy oligodeoxynucleotides, which is reported to markedly inhibit NF-kappaB activation and suppress pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression, using rat Achilles tendon cells. In the presence of NF-kappaB decoy labeled with or without fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) in culture media, radial shock waves were applied to the tendon cells in variable conditions and cultivated for 24 h. The transfection rate was assessed by counting FITC-positive cells, and IL-1-induced NF-kappaB activation in the cells was assessed. Radial shock waves significantly enhanced introduction of NF-kappaB decoy-FITC into the tendon cells. IL-1-induced NF-kappaB activation was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with NF-kappaB decoy combined with radial shock wave exposure. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of radial shock waves on introduction of NF-kappaB decoy into tendon cells. Radial shock wave treatment combined with local NF-kappaB decoy administration could be a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic tendinopathy.

  1. Associations of the decoy receptor and osteoprotegerin gene polymorphisms with ulcerative colitis in Chinese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑香云

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between decoy receptor(DcR)1,DcR2 and osteoprotegerin(OPG)gene polymorphisms with the susceptibility to ulcerative colitis(UC)in Chinese population.Methods A total of352 patients with UC as well as 463 sex-and agematched healthy controls were recruited in the study.The genetic polymorphisms of DcR1(rs12549481),DcR2(rs1133782)and OPG(rs3102735)were deter-

  2. Surveillance of influenza viruses in waterfowl used as decoys in Andalusia, Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Jurado-Tarifa

    Full Text Available A longitudinal study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence of avian influenza viruses (AIVs in waterfowl used as decoys in Andalusia, southern Spain. A total of 2319 aquatic birds from 193 flocks were analyzed before and after the hunting season 2011-2012. In the first sampling, 403 out of 2319 (18.0%, CI95%: 15.8-19.0 decoys showed antibodies against AIVs by ELISA. The AI seroprevalence was significantly higher in geese (21.0% than in ducks (11.7% (P<0.001. Besides, the spatial distribution of AIVs was not homogeneous as significant differences among regions were observed. The prevalence of antibodies against AIVs subtypes H5 and H7 were 1.1% and 0.3%, respectively, using hemagglutination inhibition test (HI. The overall and H5 seroprevalences slightly increased after the hunting period (to 19.2% and 1.4%, respectively, while the H7 seroprevalence remained at the same level (0.3%. The proportion of flocks infected by AIVs was 65.3%, while 11.2% and 4.9% of flocks were positive for H5 and H7, respectively. Viral shedding was not detected in any of the 47 samples positive by both ELISA and HI, tested by RRT-PCR. The individual incidence after the hunting season was 3.4%. The fact that 57 animals seroconverted, 15 of which were confirmed by HI (12 H5 and 3 H7, was indication of contact with AIVs during the hunting period. The results indicate that waterfowl used as decoys are frequently exposed to AIVs and may be potentially useful as sentinels for AIVs monitoring. The seroprevalence detected and the seropositivity against AIVs H5 and H7, suggest that decoys can act as reservoirs of AIVs, which may be of animal and public health concern.

  3. TRAIL Death Receptor-4, Decoy Receptor-1 and Decoy Receptor-2 Expression on CD8+ T Cells Correlate with the Disease Severity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisgin Atil

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disorder. Although the pathogenesis of disease is unclear, it is well known that T cells play a major role in both development and perpetuation of RA through activating macrophages and B cells. Since the lack of TNF-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL expression resulted in defective thymocyte apoptosis leading to an autoimmune disease, we explored evidence for alterations in TRAIL/TRAIL receptor expression on peripheral T lymphocytes in the molecular mechanism of RA development. Methods The expression of TRAIL/TRAIL receptors on T cells in 20 RA patients and 12 control individuals were analyzed using flow cytometry. The correlation of TRAIL and its receptor expression profile was compared with clinical RA parameters (RA activity scored as per DAS28 using Spearman Rho Analysis. Results While no change was detected in the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T cells between controls and RA patient groups, upregulation of TRAIL and its receptors (both death and decoy was detected on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in RA patients compared to control individuals. Death Receptor-4 (DR4 and the decoy receptors DcR1 and DcR2 on CD8+ T cells, but not on CD4+ T cells, were positively correlated with patients' DAS scores. Conclusions Our data suggest that TRAIL/TRAIL receptor expression profiles on T cells might be important in revelation of RA pathogenesis.

  4. Decoy cells in the urine cytology of a renal transplant recipient: An immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillai K

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Human polyoma virus causes renal dysfunction and graft loss as a result of tubulo-interstial nephritis in renal transplant recipients after reactivation of latent virus in renal epithelium. The infected cells in the urinary sediments are characterized by large homogenous inclusions, which may cause diagnostic error in urine cytology. The epithelial cells with polyoma viral inclusions in urine cytology specimens are termed Decoy cells to caution pathologists not to misdiagnose these cells as cancer cells. We present a case of polyoma viral changes detected the first time in our laboratory in the urine of a 46year old male who underwent renal transplantation six months back and followed by immunotherapy. Urine cytological examination showed decoy cells and subsequently revealed on histopathology. Immunoperoxidase staining for SV-40 LT antigen (LT ag, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, p53 and Rb genes were also studied in the tissue sections for further observation. The expression of SV40 LT ag was negative, while PCNA showed strong positivity; p53 and Rb were expressed moderately in the nuclei of cells in the tubules. The report of a case of decoy cells in the urine of a patient with renal transplantation focuses the importance of cytologic analysis of urine as a diagnostic tool for screening renal transplant recipients at risk of polyoma viral infection.

  5. Decoy cells in the urine cytology of a renal transplant recipient: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, K Raveendran; Jayasree, K; Pisharody, Ramdas; Abraham, Elizabeth K

    2010-01-01

    Human polyoma virus causes renal dysfunction and graft loss as a result of tubulo-interstial nephritis in renal transplant recipients after reactivation of latent virus in renal epithelium. The infected cells in the urinary sediments are characterized by large homogenous inclusions, which may cause diagnostic error in urine cytology. The epithelial cells with polyoma viral inclusions in urine cytology specimens are termed Decoy cells to caution pathologists not to misdiagnose these cells as cancer cells. We present a case of polyoma viral changes detected the first time in our laboratory in the urine of a 46year old male who underwent renal transplantation six months back and followed by immunotherapy. Urine cytological examination showed decoy cells and subsequently revealed on histopathology. Immunoperoxidase staining for SV-40 LT antigen (LT ag), expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), p53 and Rb genes were also studied in the tissue sections for further observation. The expression of SV40 LT ag was negative, while PCNA showed strong positivity; p53 and Rb were expressed moderately in the nuclei of cells in the tubules. The report of a case of decoy cells in the urine of a patient with renal transplantation focuses the importance of cytologic analysis of urine as a diagnostic tool for screening renal transplant recipients at risk of polyoma viral infection.

  6. Atmospheric tar balls: aged primary droplets from biomass burning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, A.; Hoffer, A.; Nyirő-Kósa, I.; Pósfai, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2014-07-01

    Atmospheric tar balls are particles of special morphology and composition that are fairly abundant in the plumes of biomass smoke. These particles form a specific subset of brown carbon (BrC) which has been shown to play a significant role in atmospheric shortwave absorption and, by extension, climate forcing. Here we suggest that tar balls are produced by the direct emission of liquid tar droplets followed by heat transformation upon biomass burning. For the first time in atmospheric chemistry we generated tar-ball particles from liquid tar obtained previously by dry distillation of wood in an all-glass apparatus in the laboratory with the total exclusion of flame processes. The particles were perfectly spherical with a mean optical diameter of 300 nm, refractory, externally mixed, and homogeneous in the contrast of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. They lacked any graphene-like microstructure and exhibited a mean carbon-to-oxygen ratio of 10. All of the observed characteristics of laboratory-generated particles were very similar to those reported for atmospheric tar-ball particles in the literature, strongly supporting our hypothesis regarding the formation mechanism of atmospheric tar-ball particles.

  7. Chemical composition of phenols from tars produced in semicoking of lignite from the near Moscow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Manuel, A.; Nechaeva, E.A. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1998-10-01

    The chemical composition of phenols from semicoking tar produced in low-temperature carbonization of lignite from the near-Moscow fields was studied by elemental, chemical functional, emission spectral, and structural-group analyses, cryoscopy, IR, UV and {sup 1}H, and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, capillary gas chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A scheme was developed for adsorption liquid chromatography of phenols.

  8. Chemical composition of organic bases from semicoking tar of lignites from the near-Moscow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1999-02-01

    The chemical composition of organic bases from the semicoking tar of lignite from the near-Moscow fields was studied in detail by chemical functional, emission spectrum, and structural-group analyses, LR, UV and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, cryoscopy, capillary gas chromatography, and chromatography-mass spectrometry. A scheme was developed for separation of the organic bases by adsorption liquid chromatography.

  9. Cyclic PNA-based compound directed against HIV-1 TAR RNA: modelling, liquid-phase synthesis and TAR binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depecker, Geoffrey; Patino, Nadia; Di Giorgio, Christophe; Terreux, Raphael; Cabrol-Bass, Daniel; Bailly, Christian; Aubertin, Anne-Marie; Condom, Roger

    2004-01-07

    A cyclic molecule including a hexameric PNA sequence has been designed and synthesized in order to target the TAR RNA loop of HIV-1 through the formation of a "kissing complex". For comparison, its linear analogue has also been investigated. The synthesis of the cyclic and linear PNA has been accomplished following a liquid-phase strategy using mixed PNA and fully N-protected (aminoethylglycinamide) fragments. The interactions of this cyclic PNA and its linear analogue with TAR RNA have been studied and the results indicate clearly that no interaction occurs between the cyclic antisense PNA and TAR RNA, whereas a tenuous interaction has been detected with its linear PNA analogue.

  10. Production of oil from Intermountain West tar sands deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassett, J.M.; Glassett, J.A.

    1976-03-01

    Six tar sand deposits in the Intermountain West, each containing more than one billion barrels of oil in place, are identified. All of these deposits are in eastern Utah and contain a total of twenty-eight billion barrels of oil. The names of the six deposits arranged in descending order of desirability for large-scale surface-mining oil recovery operations are as follows: Sunnyside, Tar Sand Triangle, Asphalt Ridge, P.R. Spring, Circle Cliffs, and Hill Creek. An overview of each deposit is presented including geology, surface-mining variables, chemical processing variables, environmental aspects, and economics. A comparison of Utah tar sands and Athabasca, Alberta, Canada tar sands is also presented.

  11. Source identification of a tar residue from Mumbai Beach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kadam, A; Rokade, M.A

    A tar residue from Mumbai Beach, Maharashtra, India was matched with the suspected source sample from a tanker using UV, IR and GLC techniques. Negligible differences in several ratios of UV absorbances and ratios of infrared transmittances...

  12. Tar water digestion in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skibsted Mogensen, A.; Angelidaki, I.; Schmidt, J.E.; Ahring, B.K. [Technical Univ., Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1998-08-01

    The water from the gasification and wet oxidised tar water has been digested anaerobically in UASB reactors and were digested in respectively 10 and 50% in batches. Though the tar water show inhibition at very low concentrations to aerobic microorganisms, the granular sludge used in UASB reactors degrades tar water in concentrations that reveal total inhibition of e.g. bacteria conducting the nitrification process. The value of waste waters are determined, showing that the tar water produces more biogas in the anaerobic digestion. A wide range of xenobiotics, especially phenolic compounds can be transformed in the anaerobic digestion process. Seven phenolic are followed in batch experiments and UASB reactor experiments, and their particular fate in the anaerobic systems embody large differences in the transformation pattern. (au) 24 refs.

  13. Biomass Gasification — Primary Methods for Eliminating Tar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lisý

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This present paper deals with primary methods for reducing tar in biomass gasification, namely by feeding a natural catalyst into a fluidized bed. This method is verified using an experimental pilot plant.

  14. UTILIZATION OF AQUEOUS-TAR CONDENSATES FORMED DURING GASIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kwiecińska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gasification of solid fuels is an alternative process for energy production using conventional and renewable fuels. Apart from desired compounds, i.e. carbon oxide, hydrogen and methane, the produced gas contains complex organic (tars and inorganic (carbonizate, ammonia contaminants. Those substances, together with water vapor, condensate during cooling of the process gas, what results in the formation of aqueous-tar condensate, which requires proper methods of utilization. The management of this stream is crucial for commercialization and application of the gasification technology. In the paper the treatment of aqueous-tar condensates formed during biomass gasification process is discussed. The removal of tars from the stream was based on their spontaneous separation. The aqueous stream was subjected to ultrafiltration operated at different pressures. Such a treatment configuration enabled to obtain highly concentrated retentate, which could be recycled to the gasifier, and filtrate, which could be subjected to further treatment.

  15. Structural and enzymatic analysis of TarM glycosyltransferase from Staphylococcus aureus reveals an oligomeric protein specific for the glycosylation of wall teichoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Cengiz; Gerlach, David; Beck, Sebastian; Peschel, Andreas; Xia, Guoqing; Stehle, Thilo

    2015-04-10

    Anionic glycopolymers known as wall teichoic acids (WTAs) functionalize the peptidoglycan layers of many Gram-positive bacteria. WTAs play central roles in many fundamental aspects of bacterial physiology, and they are important determinants of pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance. A number of enzymes that glycosylate WTA in Staphylococcus aureus have recently been identified. Among these is the glycosyltransferase TarM, a component of the WTA de novo biosynthesis pathway. TarM performs the synthesis of α-O-N-acetylglycosylated poly-5'-phosphoribitol in the WTA structure. We have solved the crystal structure of TarM at 2.4 Å resolution, and we have also determined a structure of the enzyme in complex with its substrate UDP-GlcNAc at 2.8 Å resolution. The protein assembles into a propeller-like homotrimer in which each blade contains a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase domain with a typical Rossmann fold. The enzymatic reaction retains the stereochemistry of the anomeric center of the transferred GlcNAc-moiety on the polyribitol backbone. TarM assembles into a trimer using a novel trimerization domain, here termed the HUB domain. Structure-guided mutagenesis experiments of TarM identify residues critical for enzyme activity, assign a putative role for the HUB in TarM function, and allow us to propose a likely reaction mechanism.

  16. Environmentally Friendly Cleaners for Removing Tar from Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    800.544.0133 Phone: 269.382.0133 Fax: 269.382.0214 email: sales@beaverresearch.com 57A Degreaser Diethanolamine, Aliphatic (D-60) Solvent Naphtha , Medium...Fax: (718) 748-3425 General Information Email: info@kleenallplus.com #408 Tar & Asphalt Remover #141 Vehicle wash Petroleum naphtha , Ethylene...Xylene-ortho Solvent, Light aromatic, Naphtha (petroleum) Removes tar from metal surfaces. 19 Sentinel Products, Inc. 51 NE 77th Ave Minneapolis

  17. Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-03-16

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

  18. Reduction of Ammonia and Tar in Pressurized Biomass Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Olofsson, G.

    2002-09-19

    The present paper intended to present the results of parametric study of the formation of ammonia and tar under pressurized gasification conditions. By the use of multivariate data analysis, the effects of operating parameters were determined and their influences could be quantified. In order to deal with cases in which high levels of ammonia and tar were produced, study of catalytic hot gas cleaning was performed, aiming to discuss the removal efficiency and test catalysts.

  19. Chemical structure of asphaltenes from tar produced in semicoking of lignite from the Kansk-Achinsk fields (Berezovka deposit)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Ryltsova, S.V.; Klyavina, O.A. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1998-10-01

    The chemical composition of asphaltenes from semicoking tar recovered at 450-600{degree}C from Kansk-Achinsk lignite was studied by a set of physicochemical methods. A liquid adsorption chromatographic scheme was developed for separation of asphaltenes into a large number of subfractions significantly differing in the structural parameters and in the nature and content of functional groups.

  20. Destabilization of the TAR hairpin leads to extension of the polyA hairpin and inhibition of HIV-1 polyadenylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrolijk, M.M.; Harwig, A.; Berkhout, B.; Das, A.T.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Two hairpin structures that are present at both the 5' and 3' end of the HIV-1 RNA genome have important functions in the viral life cycle. The TAR hairpin binds the viral Tat protein and is essential for Tat-mediated activation of transcription. The adjacent polyA hairpin

  1. Biogeochemical gradients above a coal tar DNAPL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherr, Kerstin E., E-mail: kerstin.brandstaetter-scherr@boku.ac.at [University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU), Department IFA-Tulln, Institute for Environmental Biotechnology, Konrad Lorenz Strasse 20, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Backes, Diana [University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU), Department IFA-Tulln, Institute for Environmental Biotechnology, Konrad Lorenz Strasse 20, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Scarlett, Alan G. [University of Plymouth, Petroleum and Environmental Geochemistry Group, Biogeochemistry Research Centre, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Lantschbauer, Wolfgang [Government of Upper Austria, Directorate for Environment and Water Management, Division for Environmental Protection, Kärntner Strasse 10-12, 4021 Linz (Austria); Nahold, Manfred [GUT Gruppe Umwelt und Technik GmbH, Ingenieurbüro für Technischen Umweltschutz, Plesching 15, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2016-09-01

    Naturally occurring distribution and attenuation processes can keep hydrocarbon emissions from dense non aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) into the adjacent groundwater at a minimum. In a historically coal tar DNAPL-impacted site, the de facto absence of a plume sparked investigations regarding the character of natural attenuation and DNAPL resolubilization processes at the site. Steep vertical gradients of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, microbial community composition, secondary water quality and redox-parameters were found to occur between the DNAPL-proximal and shallow waters. While methanogenic and mixed-electron acceptor conditions prevailed close to the DNAPL, aerobic conditions and very low dissolved contaminant concentrations were identified in three meters vertical distance from the phase. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC × GC–MS) proved to be an efficient tool to characterize the behavior of the present complex contaminant mixture. Medium to low bioavailability of ferric iron and manganese oxides of aquifer samples was detected via incubation with Shewanella alga and evidence for iron and manganese reduction was collected. In contrast, 16S rDNA phylogenetic analysis revealed the absence of common iron reducing bacteria. Aerobic hydrocarbon degraders were abundant in shallow horizons, while nitrate reducers were dominating in deeper aquifer regions, in addition to a low relative abundance of methanogenic archaea. Partial Least Squares – Canonical Correspondence Analysis (PLS-CCA) suggested that nitrate and oxygen concentrations had the greatest impact on aquifer community structure in on- and offsite wells, which had a similarly high biodiversity (H’ and Chao1). Overall, slow hydrocarbon dissolution from the DNAPL appears to dominate natural attenuation processes. This site may serve as a model for developing legal and technical strategies for the treatment of DNAPL-impacted sites where contaminant plumes are

  2. Nuclear factor-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides attenuates ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat liver graft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Qing Xu; Xiu-Rong Shuai; Mao-Lin Yan; Ming-Man Zhang; Lu-Nan Yan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the protective effect of NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat liver graft.METHODS: Orthotopic syngeneic rat liver transplantation was performed with 3 h of cold preservation of liver graft in University of Wisconsin solution containing phosphorothioated double-stranded NF-κB decoy ODNs or scrambled ODNs. NF-κB decoy ODNs or scrambled ODNs were injected intravenously into donor and recipient rats 6 and 1 h before operation,respectively. Recipients were killed 0 to 16 h after liver graft reperfusion. NF-κB activity in the liver graft was analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Hepatic mRNA expression of TNF-α, IFN-γand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were determined by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Serum levels of TNF-α and IFN-γ were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Serum level of alanine transaminase (ALT) was measured using a diagnostic kit. Liver graft myeloperoxidase (MPO) content was assessed.RESULTS: NF-κB activation in liver graft was induced in a time-dependent manner, and NF-κB remained activated for 16 h after graft reperfusion. NF-κB activation in liver graft was significant at 2 to 8 h and slightly decreased at 16 h after graft reperfusion. Administration of NF-κB decoy ODNs significantly suppressed NF-κB activation as well as mRNA expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and ICAM-1 in the liver graft. The hepatic NF-κB DNA binding activity [presented as integral optical density (IOD) value] in the NF-κB decoy ODNs treatment group rat was significantly lower than that of the I/R group rat (2.16±0.78 vs 36.78±6.35 and 3.06±0.84 vs 47.62± 8.71 for IOD value after 4 and 8 h of reperfusion, respectively, P<0.001).The hepatic mRNA expression level of TNF-α, IFN-y and ICAM-1 [presented as percent of β-actin mRNA(%)] in the NF-κBdecoy ODNs treatment group rat was significantly lower than that of the I/R group rat (8.31 ±3.48 vs 46.37±10

  3. Atmospheric Tar Balls: Particles from Biomass and Biofuel Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posfai, Mihaly; Gelencser, Andras; Simonics, Renata; Arato, Krisztina; Li, Jia; Hobbs, Peter V.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    Tar balls are amorphous, carbonaceous spherules that occur in the tropospheric aerosol as a result of biomass and biofuel burning. They form a distinct group of particles with diameters typically between 30 and 500 nm and readily identifiable with electron microscopy. Their lack of a turbostratic microstructure distinguishes them from soot, and their morphology and composition (approximately 90 mol% carbon) renders them distinct from other carbonaceous particles. Tar balls are particularly abundant in slightly aged (minutes to hours old) biomass smoke, indicating that they likely form by gas-to-particle conversion within smoke plumes. The material of tar balls is initially hygroscopic; however, the particles become largely insoluble as a result of free radical polymerization of their organic molecules. Consequently, tar balls are primarily externally mixed with other particle types, and they do not appreciably increase in size during aging. When tar balls coagulate with water-bearing particles, their material may partly dissolve and no longer be recognizable as distinct particles. Tar balls may contain organic compounds that absorb sunlight. They are an important, previously unrecognized type of carbonaceous (organic) atmospheric particle.

  4. Atmospheric tar balls: Particles from biomass and biofuel burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pósfai, MiháLy; GelencséR, AndráS.; Simonics, RenáTa; Arató, Krisztina; Li, Jia; Hobbs, Peter V.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-03-01

    "Tar balls" are amorphous, carbonaceous spherules that occur in the tropospheric aerosol as a result of biomass and biofuel burning. They form a distinct group of particles with diameters typically between 30 and 500 nm and readily identifiable with electron microscopy. Their lack of a turbostratic microstructure distinguishes them from soot, and their morphology and composition (˜90 mol % carbon) renders them distinct from other carbonaceous particles. Tar balls are particularly abundant in slightly aged (minutes to hours old) biomass smoke, indicating that they likely form by gas-to-particle conversion within smoke plumes. The material of tar balls is initially hygroscopic; however, the particles become largely insoluble as a result of free radical polymerization of their organic molecules. Consequently, tar balls are primarily externally mixed with other particle types, and they do not appreciably increase in size during aging. When tar balls coagulate with water-bearing particles, their material may partly dissolve and no longer be recognizable as distinct particles. Tar balls may contain organic compounds that absorb sunlight. They are an important, previously unrecognized type of carbonaceous (organic) atmospheric particle.

  5. Estimating thermodynamic properties of coal, char, tar and ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisermann, W.; Johnson, P.; Conger, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    Methods for predicting the specific heat, enthalpy, and entropy of coal, char, tar and ash as a function of temperature and material composition are presented. The standard entropy of coal is approximated by comparing the behavior of the standard entropies of a number of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons as a function of the variables H/(C + N), O/(C + N), N/(C + N), and S/(C + N), where the variables are the atomic fractions of the respective elements. The standard entropy of a bituminous coal was found to be about 20 kJ/kmol carbon K and of the char to be about 10 kJ/kmol carbon K. Estimates of the enthalpy difference between 273 K and temperatures above 273 K deviated from published data by about 8.49% for chars and 8.55% for coals on the average. Maximum deviations of 18.3% and 17.6% respectively were found. 10 figures, 4 tables.

  6. Learning from decoys to improve the sensitivity and specificity of proteomics database search results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Yadav

    Full Text Available The statistical validation of database search results is a complex issue in bottom-up proteomics. The correct and incorrect peptide spectrum match (PSM scores overlap significantly, making an accurate assessment of true peptide matches challenging. Since the complete separation between the true and false hits is practically never achieved, there is need for better methods and rescoring algorithms to improve upon the primary database search results. Here we describe the calibration and False Discovery Rate (FDR estimation of database search scores through a dynamic FDR calculation method, FlexiFDR, which increases both the sensitivity and specificity of search results. Modelling a simple linear regression on the decoy hits for different charge states, the method maximized the number of true positives and reduced the number of false negatives in several standard datasets of varying complexity (18-mix, 49-mix, 200-mix and few complex datasets (E. coli and Yeast obtained from a wide variety of MS platforms. The net positive gain for correct spectral and peptide identifications was up to 14.81% and 6.2% respectively. The approach is applicable to different search methodologies--separate as well as concatenated database search, high mass accuracy, and semi-tryptic and modification searches. FlexiFDR was also applied to Mascot results and showed better performance than before. We have shown that appropriate threshold learnt from decoys, can be very effective in improving the database search results. FlexiFDR adapts itself to different instruments, data types and MS platforms. It learns from the decoy hits and sets a flexible threshold that automatically aligns itself to the underlying variables of data quality and size.

  7. Structure and Mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus TarS, the Wall Teichoic Acid β-glycosyltransferase Involved in Methicillin Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Sobhanifar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a growing interest in teichoic acids as targets for antibiotic drug design against major clinical pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, reflecting the disquieting increase in antibiotic resistance and the historical success of bacterial cell wall components as drug targets. It is now becoming clear that β-O-GlcNAcylation of S. aureus wall teichoic acids plays a major role in both pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance. Here we present the first structure of S. aureus TarS, the enzyme responsible for polyribitol phosphate β-O-GlcNAcylation. Using a divide and conquer strategy, we obtained crystal structures of various TarS constructs, mapping high resolution overlapping N-terminal and C-terminal structures onto a lower resolution full-length structure that resulted in a high resolution view of the entire enzyme. Using the N-terminal structure that encapsulates the catalytic domain, we furthermore captured several snapshots of TarS, including the native structure, the UDP-GlcNAc donor complex, and the UDP product complex. These structures along with structure-guided mutants allowed us to elucidate various catalytic features and identify key active site residues and catalytic loop rearrangements that provide a valuable platform for anti-MRSA drug design. We furthermore observed for the first time the presence of a trimerization domain composed of stacked carbohydrate binding modules, commonly observed in starch active enzymes, but adapted here for a poly sugar-phosphate glycosyltransferase.

  8. Target-Decoy Approach and False Discovery Rate: When Things May Go Wrong

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Nitin; Bandeira, Nuno; Keich, Uri; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2011-01-01

    The target-decoy approach (TDA) has done the field of proteomics a great service by filling in the need to estimate the false discovery rates (FDR) of peptide identifications. While TDA is often viewed as a universal solution to the problem of FDR evaluation, we argue that the time has come to critically re-examine TDA and to acknowledge not only its merits but also its demerits. We demonstrate that some popular MS/MS search tools are not TDA-compliant and that it is easy to develop a non-TDA...

  9. Field test of a practical secure communication network with decoy-state quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Teng-Yun; Liang, Hao; Liu, Yang; Cai, Wen-Qi; Ju, Lei; Liu, Wei-Yue; Wang, Jian; Yin, Hao; Chen, Kai; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2009-04-13

    We present a secure network communication system that operated with decoy-state quantum cryptography in a real-world application scenario. The full key exchange and application protocols were performed in real time among three nodes, in which two adjacent nodes were connected by approximate 20 km of commercial telecom optical fiber. The generated quantum keys were immediately employed and demonstrated for communication applications, including unbreakable real-time voice telephone between any two of the three communication nodes, or a broadcast from one node to the other two nodes by using one-time pad encryption.

  10. Finite-key analysis of a practical decoy-state high-dimensional quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Haize; Bao, Wansu; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Chun; Chen, Ruike

    2016-05-01

    Compared with two-level quantum key distribution (QKD), high-dimensional QKD enables two distant parties to share a secret key at a higher rate. We provide a finite-key security analysis for the recently proposed practical high-dimensional decoy-state QKD protocol based on time-energy entanglement. We employ two methods to estimate the statistical fluctuation of the postselection probability and give a tighter bound on the secure-key capacity. By numerical evaluation, we show the finite-key effect on the secure-key capacity in different conditions. Moreover, our approach could be used to optimize parameters in practical implementations of high-dimensional QKD.

  11. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Decoy, TOY, Attenuates Gram-Negative Bacterial Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Keehoon Jung; Jung-Eun Lee; Hak-Zoo Kim; Ho Min Kim; Beom Seok Park; Seong-Ik Hwang; Jie-Oh Lee; Sun Chang Kim; Gou Young Koh

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane glycolipid, induces sepsis through its interaction with myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). To block interaction between LPS/MD-2 complex and TLR4, we designed and generated soluble fusion proteins capable of binding MD-2, dubbed TLR4 decoy receptor (TOY) using 'the Hybrid leucine-rich repeats (LRR) technique'. TOY contains the MD-2 binding ectodomain of TLR4, the LRR motif of hagfish va...

  12. Asymptotic key generation rates with phase-randomized coherent light by decoy method

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, M

    2007-01-01

    The asymptotic key generation (AKG) rates of quantum key distribution (QKD) with the decoy method are discussed in both the forward error correction and the reverse error correction cases when the QKD system is equipped with phase-randomized coherent light with arbitrary number of intensities. For this purpose, we derive a useful convex expansion of the phase-randomized coherent state. We also derive upper bounds of AKG rates on a natural and concrete channel model. Using these upper bounds, we numerically check that the AKG rates are almost saturated when the number of intensities is three.

  13. Aptamer-Mediated Codelivery of Doxorubicin and NF-κB Decoy Enhances Chemosensitivity of Pancreatic Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Porciani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers able to bind efficiently cell-surface receptors differentially expressed in tumor and in healthy cells are emerging as powerful tools to perform targeted anticancer therapy. Here, we present a novel oligonucleotide chimera, composed by an RNA aptamer and a DNA decoy. Our assembly is able to (i target tumor cells via an antitransferrin receptor RNA aptamer and (ii perform selective codelivery of a chemotherapeutic drug (Doxorubicin and of an inhibitor of a cell-survival factor, the nuclear factor κB decoy oligonucleotide. Both payloads are released under conditions found in endolysosomal compartments (low pH and reductive environment. Targeting and cytotoxicity of the oligonucleotidic chimera were assessed by confocal microscopy, cell viability, and Western blot analysis. These data indicated that the nuclear factor κB decoy does inhibit nuclear factor κB activity and ultimately leads to an increased therapeutic efficacy of Doxorubicin selectively in tumor cells.

  14. Comprehensive database of Manufactured Gas Plant tars. Part A. Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallacher, Christopher; Thomas, Russell; Lord, Richard; Kalin, Robert M; Taylor, Chris

    2017-08-15

    Coal tars are a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds that were by-products from the manufactured gas and coke making industries. Different manufacturing processes have resulted in the production of distinctly different tar compositions. This study presents a comprehensive database of compounds produced using two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC/TOFMS), analysing 16 tar samples produced by five distinct production processes. Samples of coal tar were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and derivatised post-extraction using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) with 1% trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS). The derivatised samples were analysed using two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC/TOFMS). A total of 16 tar samples originating from five different production processes: Low Temperature Horizontal Retorts, Horizontal Retorts, Vertical Retorts, Carbureted Water Gas and Coke Ovens, were analysed. A total of 2369 unique compounds were detected with 948 aromatic compounds, 196 aliphatic compounds, 380 sulfur-containing compounds, 209 oxygen-containing compounds, 262 nitrogen-containing compounds and 15 mixed heterocycles. Derivatisation allowed the detection of 359 unique compounds, the majority in the form of hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, many of which would not have been detected without derivatisation. Of the 2369 unique compounds detected, 173 were found to be present within all samples. A unique comprehensive database of compounds detected within 16 tar samples from five different production processes was produced. The 173 compounds identified within every sample may be of particular importance from a regulatory standpoint. This initial study indicates that different production processes produce tars with different chemical signatures and it can be further expanded upon by in-depth analysis of the different compound

  15. Minimal region necessary for autonomous replication of pTAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallie, D R; Kado, C I

    1988-07-01

    The native 44-kilobase-pair plasmid pTAR, discovered in a grapevine strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, contains a single origin of DNA replication confined to a 1.0-kilobase-pair region of the macromolecule. This region (ori) confers functions sufficient for replication in Agrobacterium and Rhizobium species but not in Pseudomonas solanacearum, Pseudomonas glumae, Pseudomonas syringae pv. savastanoi, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and Escherichia coli. ori contains a repA gene that encodes a 28,000-dalton protein required for replication. Nucleotide sequencing of repA and its promoter region revealed four 8-base-pair palindromic repeats upstream of the repA coding region. Deletion of these repeats alters repA expression and plasmid copy number. Downstream of repA are three additional repeats in a region essential for replication. A locus responsible for plasmid partitioning (parA) and a putative second locus regulating plasmid copy number are part of the origin region and are required for stable plasmid maintenance.

  16. First experimental results on the IShTAR testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Inca, R.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Morgal, I.; Fünfgelder, H.; Faugel, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Crombe, K.; Louche, F.; Van Eester, D. [LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Heuraux, S.; Devaux, S.; Moritz, J.; Faudot, E. [Institut Jean Lamour UMR 7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium)

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetized plasma test facility dedicated to the investigation of RF wave/plasma interaction [1] in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF). It provides a better accessibility for the instrumentation than tokamaks while being representative of the neighboring region of the wave emitter. It is equipped with a magnetized plasma source (1 m long, 0.4 m diameter) powered by a helical antenna up to 3 kW at 11 MHz. We present the results of the first analysis of the plasma characteristics (plasma density, electron temperature) in function of the operating parameters (injected power, neutral pressure and magnetic field) as measured with fixed and movable Langmuir probes, spectrometer and cameras. The plasma is presently produced only by the helical antenna (no ICRF). We show that the plasma exists in three regime depending on the power level: the first two ones are stable and separated by a jump in density; a first spatial profile of the plasma density has been established for these modes; The third mode is unstable, characterized by strong oscillations of the plasma tube position.

  17. Thermocatalytic treatment of biomass tar model compounds via radio frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Samsudin; Zainal, Z A; Bakar, M Z A

    2013-05-01

    A new effective RF tar thermocatalytic treatment process with low energy intensive has been proposed to remove tar from biomass gasification. Toluene and naphthalene as biomass tar model compounds were removed via both thermal and catalytic treatment over a wide temperature range from 850 °C to 1200 °C and 450 °C to 900 °C, respectively at residence time of 0-0.7 s. Thermal characteristics of the new technique are also described in this paper. This study clearly clarified that toluene was much easier to be removed than naphthalene. Soot was found as the final product of thermal treatment of the tar model and completely removed during catalytic treatment. Radical reactions generated by RF non-thermal effect improve the tar removal. The study showed that Y-zeolite has better catalytic activity compared to dolomite on toluene and naphthalene removal due to its acidic nature and large surface area, even at lower reaction temperature of about 550 °C.

  18. Biodegradation of naphthalene from coal tar. Research progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshal, S.; Ramaswami, A.; Luthy, R.G.

    1994-02-07

    Biodegradation experiments were conducted to evaluate the mineralization of naphthalene released from coal tar entrapped in microporous silica media. Tests were performed with two coal tars recovered from former manufactured gas plant sites. Results from these tests showed that the degradation end point for naphthalene was significantly lower than the total amount of naphthalene present in coal tar. The role of physico-chemical and biological processes on the rate of biotransformation of naphthalene was evaluated. Mass transfer rates for dissolution of naphthalene from entrapped coal tar were measured in batch, flow-through systems. The rate of naphthalene mass transfer from the coal tar was found to be significantly greater than the rate of naphthalene biomineralization in batch slurry reactors. This implied that the rate acting factor for the biodegradation process was related to biokinetic phenomena rather than mass transfer processes. Further tests indicated that conditions inhibitory to bacteria limited the biodegradation of naphthalene, and in some cases the inhibition was reversible upon dilution of the reactor contents.

  19. HuMiTar: A sequence-based method for prediction of human microRNA targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ke

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRs are small noncoding RNAs that bind to complementary/partially complementary sites in the 3' untranslated regions of target genes to regulate protein production of the target transcript and to induce mRNA degradation or mRNA cleavage. The ability to perform accurate, high-throughput identification of physiologically active miR targets would enable functional characterization of individual miRs. Current target prediction methods include traditional approaches that are based on specific base-pairing rules in the miR's seed region and implementation of cross-species conservation of the target site, and machine learning (ML methods that explore patterns that contrast true and false miR-mRNA duplexes. However, in the case of the traditional methods research shows that some seed region matches that are conserved are false positives and that some of the experimentally validated target sites are not conserved. Results We present HuMiTar, a computational method for identifying common targets of miRs, which is based on a scoring function that considers base-pairing for both seed and non-seed positions for human miR-mRNA duplexes. Our design shows that certain non-seed miR nucleotides, such as 14, 18, 13, 11, and 17, are characterized by a strong bias towards formation of Watson-Crick pairing. We contrasted HuMiTar with several representative competing methods on two sets of human miR targets and a set of ten glioblastoma oncogenes. Comparison with the two best performing traditional methods, PicTar and TargetScanS, and a representative ML method that considers the non-seed positions, NBmiRTar, shows that HuMiTar predictions include majority of the predictions of the other three methods. At the same time, the proposed method is also capable of finding more true positive targets as a trade-off for an increased number of predictions. Genome-wide predictions show that the proposed method is characterized by 1.99 signal

  20. Groundwater and contaminant transport modelling at the Sydney Tar Ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M. [Groundwater Insight Inc., Halifax, NS (Canada); Check, G. [Jacques Whitford Environment Ltd., Halifax, NS (Canada); Carey, G. [Environmental Inst. for Continuing Education, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Abbey, D. [Waterloo Hydrogeologic, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Baechler, F. [ADI Ltd., Sydney, NS (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    The Muggah Creek Watershed, a tidal estuary located in Sydney, Nova Scotia, is known locally as the Tar Ponds. Over the past century, the Tar Ponds have accumulated contaminants in the contributing watershed from the iron, steel and coke manufacturing. There are sediments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). A groundwater modelling program was developed to estimate current contaminant fluxes to the estuary and site streams, through groundwater. Attempts were made to incorporate a complex stratigraphic profile, where groundwater flow and contaminant transport is strongly controlled by shallow fractured bedrock, into the conceptual model developed for the site. This conceptual model for groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the Sydney Tar Ponds site was presented. The complex flow patterns between bedrock and overburden, and between the bedrock units and surface water bodies were illustrated with model simulations. It was found that groundwater flow was dominated by discharge to the streams and the estuary. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs.

  1. Remediation of Former Manufactured Gas Plant Tars Using Alkaline Flushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, S.; Rylander, S.; Birak, P. S.; Miller, C. T.

    2010-12-01

    The remediation of former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) tars in the subsurface is particularly difficult due to the wetting behavior and high viscosities of these dense non-aqueous liquids (DNAPLs). Alkaline flooding is a technique which has proven effective in improving the recovery of crude oils, which share some characteristics with FMGP tars. For this study, we measured the effect of NaOH solutions on interfacial tension and conducted column experiments to investigate the feasibility of applying this technique to FMGP tars. The pendant drop technique was used to measure interfacial tensions for solutions ranging from 0-1% NaOH. Column experiments were conducted by contaminating sands with tars recovered from a FMGP then flushing the columns with NaOH solutions. A final, 70% v/v ethanol cosolvent flush was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of a two-stage remediation approach. The mass removal of tar, as well as 26 individual PAHs, was measured, along with the aqueous phase mass flux of PAHs after each flushing stage. The interfacial tension was reduced from about 20 mN/m with pure water to a minimum of 0.05 mN/m at a concentration of 0.1% NaOH. In the column experiments, alkaline flushing resulted in a 50% reduction of the residual saturation. Aqueous phase PAH concentrations, however, were similar before and after the alkaline flushing stage. The combination of alkaline and cosolvent flushing resulted in an overall reduction of 95% of the total mass of the 16 EPA PAHs. Final aqueous phase concentrations were reduced significantly for lower molecular weight PAHs, but increased slightly for the higher molecular weight compounds, likely due to their increased mole fraction within the remaining tar. Additional work is being conducted to improve the effectiveness of the alkaline flushing through the use of surfactants and polymers.

  2. Use of a molecular decoy to segregate transport from antigenicity in the FrpB iron transporter from Neisseria meningitidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Saleem

    Full Text Available FrpB is an outer membrane transporter from Neisseria meningitidis, the causative agent of meningococcal meningitis. It is a member of the TonB-dependent transporter (TBDT family and is responsible for iron uptake into the periplasm. FrpB is subject to a high degree of antigenic variation, principally through a region of hypervariable sequence exposed at the cell surface. From the crystal structures of two FrpB antigenic variants, we identify a bound ferric ion within the structure which induces structural changes on binding which are consistent with it being the transported substrate. Binding experiments, followed by elemental analysis, verified that FrpB binds Fe(3+ with high affinity. EPR spectra of the bound Fe(3+ ion confirmed that its chemical environment was consistent with that observed in the crystal structure. Fe(3+ binding was reduced or abolished on mutation of the Fe(3+-chelating residues. FrpB orthologs were identified in other Gram-negative bacteria which showed absolute conservation of the coordinating residues, suggesting the existence of a specific TBDT sub-family dedicated to the transport of Fe(3+. The region of antigenic hypervariability lies in a separate, external sub-domain, whose structure is conserved in both the F3-3 and F5-1 variants, despite their sequence divergence. We conclude that the antigenic sub-domain has arisen separately as a result of immune selection pressure to distract the immune response from the primary transport function. This would enable FrpB to function as a transporter independently of antibody binding, by using the antigenic sub-domain as a 'molecular decoy' to distract immune surveillance.

  3. Is dermatologic usage of coal tar carcinogenic? A review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pion, I.A.; Koenig, K.L.; Lim, H.W. [New York VA Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Coal tar ointments have been used for decades in the treatment of various dermatoses, most notably eczema and psoriasis. Occupational exposure to coal tar poses an increased risk of developing cutaneous malignancies. The evidence of an increased risk of skin cancer in humans, as a result of dermatologic usage of tar, however, is conflicting. A consensus on the carcinogenicity of tar was sought. The existing literature (in vitro, animal and human studies) on this subject was reviewed. The carcinogenicity of coal tar was clearly demonstrated by in vitro and animal studies, and appears to be potentiated by concomitant use of ultraviolet radiation. Systemic absorption of mutagens from topically applied tar has been demonstrated in humans. Epidemiologic studies in humans, however, have not definitively shown an increase in skin cancer with therapeutic use of tar. Conclusive evidence for the carcinogenicity of tar used in dermatologic practice is lacking. Further controlled studies are necessary. 49 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Beach tar accumulation, transport mechanisms, and sources of variability at Coal Oil Point, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sontro, Tonya S; Leifer, Ira; Luyendyk, Bruce P; Broitman, Bernardo R

    2007-09-01

    A new field method for tar quantification was used at Coal Oil Point (COP), California to study the mechanisms transporting oil/tar from the nearby COP natural marine hydrocarbon seep field. This method segregates tar pieces into six size classes and assigns them an average mass based on laboratory or direct field measurements. Tar accumulation on the 19,927m(2) survey area was well resolved spatially by recording tar mass along twelve transects segmented into 4-m(2) blocks and then integrating over the survey area. A seasonal trend was apparent in total tar in which summer accumulations were an order of magnitude higher than winter accumulations. Based on multiple regression analyses between environmental data and tar accumulation, 34% of tar variability is explained by a combination of onshore advection via wind and low swell height inhibiting slick dispersion.

  5. Luminescence monitoring of oil or tar contamination for industrial hygiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammage, Richard B.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1980-09-01

    Synfuel plants produce potentially carcinogenic oils and tars. Exposure of workers to these tars and oils is difficult to avoid completely and occurs via direct contact with dirty surfaces or condensation of escaped fumes onto or within the body. Surface skin measurements are made directly with a near-ultraviolet luminoscope employing a fiber optics lightguide and a stethoscopic cap pressed against the skin. This instrument is especially suitable for measuring ng to μg/cm 2 amounts of residual contamination remaining on the surface of the skin after washing. To minimize the potential for carcinogenicity, the excitating ultraviolet light intensity is only 1/100 th that of sunlight.

  6. Optimal visual simulation of the self-tracking combustion of the infrared decoy based on the particle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qi; Duan, Jin; Wang, LiNing; Zhai, Di

    2016-09-01

    The high-efficiency simulation test of military weapons has a very important effect on the high cost of the actual combat test and the very demanding operational efficiency. Especially among the simulative emulation methods of the explosive smoke, the simulation method based on the particle system has generated much attention. In order to further improve the traditional simulative emulation degree of the movement process of the infrared decoy during the real combustion cycle, this paper, adopting the virtual simulation platform of OpenGL and Vega Prime and according to their own radiation characteristics and the aerodynamic characteristics of the infrared decoy, has simulated the dynamic fuzzy characteristics of the infrared decoy during the real combustion cycle by using particle system based on the double depth peeling algorithm and has solved key issues such as the interface, coordinate conversion and the retention and recovery of the Vega Prime's status. The simulation experiment has basically reached the expected improvement purpose, effectively improved the simulation fidelity and provided theoretical support for improving the performance of the infrared decoy.

  7. Ebullition-facilitated transport of manufactured gas plant tar from contaminated sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinn, Eugene L; Stolzenburg, Thomas R

    2009-11-01

    Manufactured gas plant (MGP) tar and wastewater solids historically were discharged into the Penobscot River, Maine,USA, via a sewer at the Bangor Landing site. The tar and wastewater solids accumulated in riverbed sediment over a 5-hectare area downstream from the sewer outfall. Much of the tarry sediment is a hardened mass at the bottom of the river, but in part of the tar deposit (the active zone), the tar remains unhardened. In the active zone, anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter generates methane and carbon dioxide; as gas accumulates and migrates upward, it entrains tar, eventually dragging the tar from the sediment to surface water. Understanding the migration mechanisms in different portions of the tar deposit is critical for modeling the risk posed by the tar at the Bangor Landing site, because during gas-facilitated tar migration, the tar is brought to the water surface, instead of remaining in the sediment. Tar migration from sediment poses a potential human health risk because of the high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the tar. Migration from sediment to the water surface greatly increases the potential exposure of human and ecological receptors to tar that reaches the water surface. In order for tar to migrate from sediment to surface water, three conditions are necessary: the sediment must contain liquid tar, the sediment must produce gas bubbles, and the gas must come into contact with the tarry sediment. Failure to consider facilitated transport of MGP tar from sediment can cause underestimation of site risk and can lead to failure of remedial measures.

  8. 29 CFR 1910.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1910.1002... Hazardous Substances § 1910.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. As used in § 1910.1000 (Table Z-1), coal tar pitch volatiles include the fused polycyclic hydrocarbons which volatilize from...

  9. Experimental comparison of biomass chars with other catalysts for tar reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu El-Rub, Z.; Bramer, E.A.; Brem, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the potential of using biomass char as a catalyst for tar reduction is discussed. Biomass char is compared with other known catalysts used for tar conversion. Model tar compounds, phenol and naphthalene, were used to test char and other catalysts. Tests were carried out in a fixed bed

  10. Uptake of pyrene in a breast-fed child of a mother treated with coal tar.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Houtum, J.L.M. van; Anzion, R.B.M.; Harder, R.; Bos, R.P.; Valk, P.G.M. van der

    2009-01-01

    A woman was treated for atopic dermatitis with coal tar containing ointments. Coal tar containing ointments contain genotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Over a period of 50 days the accumulated dose of different coal tar containing ointments treatments corresponded to 993 mg of pyrene and 464

  11. Elevated Serum Levels of the Antiapoptotic Protein Decoy-Receptor 3 Are Associated with Advanced Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgos Bamias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Decoy-receptor 3 (DcR3 exerts antiapoptotic and immunomodulatory function and is overexpressed in neoplastic and inflammatory conditions. Serum DcR3 (sDcR3 levels during the chronic hepatitis/cirrhosis/hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC sequence have not been explored. Objective. To assess the levels and significance of sDcR3 protein in various stages of chronic liver disease. Methods. We compared sDcR3 levels between healthy controls and patients with chronic viral hepatitis (CVH, decompensated cirrhosis (DC, and HCC. Correlations between sDcR3 levels and various patient- and disease-related factors were analyzed. Results. sDcR3 levels were significantly higher in patients with CVH than in controls (P<0.01. sDcR3 levels were elevated in DC and HCC, being significantly higher compared not only to controls (P<0.001 for both but to CVH patients as well (P<0.001 for both. In addition, DcR3 protein was detected in large quantities in the ascitic fluid of cirrhotics. In patients with CVH, sDcR3 significantly correlated to fibrosis severity, as estimated by Ishak score (P=0.019 or by liver stiffness measured with elastography (Spearman r=0.698, P<0.001. In cirrhotic patients, significant positive correlations were observed between sDcR3 levels and markers of severity of hepatic impairment, including MELD score (r=0.653, P<0.001. Conclusions. Circulating levels of DcR3 are elevated during chronic liver disease and correlate with severity of liver damage. sDcR3 may serve as marker for liver fibrosis severity and progression to end-stage liver disease.

  12. A decoy-state protocol for quantum cryptography with 4 intensities of coherent states

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X B

    2004-01-01

    In order to beat any type of photon-number-splitting attack, we In order to beat any type of photon-number-splitting attack, we propose a protocol for quantum key distributoin (QKD) using 4 different intensities of pulses. They are vacuum and coherent states with mean photon number $\\mu,\\mu'$ and $\\mu_s$. $\\mu_s$ is around 0.55 and this class of pulses are used as the main signal states. The other two classes of coherent states are used for both decoy and signal. We have shown that, given the typical set-up in practice, the key rate from the main signal pulses is more than 77% to 88% of the theoretically allowed maximal rate in the case of overall transmittance of $10^{-4}$ and $10^{-3}$.

  13. Expression and regulation of the decoy bone morphogenetic protein receptor BAMBI in the developing avian face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashihori, Norihisa; Song, Yiping; Richman, Joy M

    2008-05-01

    Here, we examine the expression and regulation of the gene BAMBI, a kinase-deficient decoy receptor capable of interacting with type I bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors in avian embryos. Initially, expression was limited to the endoderm during neurula and pharyngula stages. From embryonic day 3.5 (stage 20) and onward, BAMBI expression almost perfectly overlapped with known expression patterns for BMP4, particularly in the face and limbs. We performed bead implant experiments in the face to see which signals could be repressing or promoting expression of BAMBI. Our data point to retinoids and BMPs as being major positive regulators of BAMBI expression; however, fibroblast growth factor 2 acts to repress BAMBI. Furthermore, retinoic acid is likely to act directly on BAMBI as induction occurs in the presence of cycloheximide. The data suggested that BAMBI could be used to regulate Bmp signaling during tissue interactions that are an integral part of facial morphogenesis.

  14. Experimental Long-Distance Decoy-State Quantum Key Distribution Based On Polarization Encoding

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, C Z; Ma, H X; Pan, J W; Wang, X B; Yang, D; Yang, T; Yin, H; Zeng, H P; Zhang, J; Gao, Wei-Bo; Ma, Huai-Xin; Pan, Jian-Wei; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Yang, Dong; Yang, Tao; Yin, Hao; Zeng, He-Ping; Zhang, Jun

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the decoy-state quantum key distribution (QKD) with one-way quantum communication in polarization space over 75 km. So far, our experimental implementation is the only one that really offers the unconditionally secure final keys among all the implementations of long-distance QKD with weak coherent states. We use 3 different intensities of 0, 0.2 and 0.6 for the pulses of source in our experiment. In order to eliminate the influences of polarization mode dispersion in the long-distance single-mode optical fiber, an automatic polarization compensation system is utilized to implement the active compensation. Only one detector is used in our experiment. The secure distance can be raised to 120 km given 4 detectors.

  15. Hacking on decoy-state quantum key distribution system with partial phase randomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Ma, Xiang-Chun; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2014-04-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) provides means for unconditional secure key transmission between two distant parties. However, in practical implementations, it suffers from quantum hacking due to device imperfections. Here we propose a hybrid measurement attack, with only linear optics, homodyne detection, and single photon detection, to the widely used vacuum + weak decoy state QKD system when the phase of source is partially randomized. Our analysis shows that, in some parameter regimes, the proposed attack would result in an entanglement breaking channel but still be able to trick the legitimate users to believe they have transmitted secure keys. That is, the eavesdropper is able to steal all the key information without discovered by the users. Thus, our proposal reveals that partial phase randomization is not sufficient to guarantee the security of phase-encoding QKD systems with weak coherent states.

  16. The enhanced measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with two-intensity decoy states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Feng; Zhou, Xing-Yu; Wang, Qin

    2016-09-01

    We put forward a new scheme for implementing the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD) with weak coherent source, while using only two different intensities. In the new scheme, we insert a beam splitter and a local detector at both Alice's and Bob's side, and then all the triggering and non-triggering signals could be employed to process parameter estimations, resulting in very precise estimations for the two-single-photon contributions. Besides, we compare its behavior with two other often used methods, i.e., the conventional standard three-intensity decoy-state measurement-device-independent QKD and the passive measurement-device-independent QKD. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrate that our new approach can exhibit outstanding characteristics not only in the secure transmission distance, but also in the final key generation rate.

  17. Three-intensity decoy-state method for measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zong-Wen; Zhou, Yi-Heng; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2013-12-01

    We study the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) in practice with limited resources, when there are only three different states in implementing the decoy-state method. We present a tighter explicit formula to estimate the lower bound of the yield of two-single-photon pulses sent by Alice and Bob. Moreover, we show that the bounding of this yield and phase flip error of single-photon pulse pairs can be further improved by using other constraints which can be solved by a simple and explicit program. Our methods here can significantly improve the key rate and the secure distance of MDI-QKD with only three intensities.

  18. Sharks shape the geometry of a selfish seal herd: experimental evidence from seal decoys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Alta; O'Riain, M Justin

    2010-02-23

    Many animals respond to predation risk by forming groups. Evolutionary explanations for group formation in previously ungrouped, but loosely associated prey have typically evoked the selfish herd hypothesis. However, despite over 600 studies across a diverse array of taxa, the critical assumptions of this hypothesis have remained collectively untested, owing to several confounding problems in real predator-prey systems. To solve this, we manipulated the domains of danger of Cape fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) decoys to provide evidence that a selfish reduction in a seals' domain of danger results in a proportional reduction in its predation risk from ambush shark attacks. This behaviour confers a survival advantage to individual seals within a group and explains the evolution of selfish herds in a prey species. These findings empirically elevate Hamilton's selfish herd hypothesis to more than a 'theoretical curiosity'.

  19. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crombé, K., E-mail: Kristel.Crombe@UGent.be [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); LPP-ERM/KMS, Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium); Devaux, S.; Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Moritz, J. [YIJL, UMR7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); D’Inca, R.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Louche, F.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  20. Perversities of Extreme Dependence and Unequal Growth in the TAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Fischer (Andrew Martín)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe official Chinese press recently came out with a series of articles reporting the latest statistics on the phenomenally rapid economic growth that has been taking place in the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) since the mid-1990s through sheer force of Central Government subsidies. Given

  1. Kinetic features of pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Rozental, D.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    The kinetic features of accumulation of the main gaseous and some liquid products in pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar at 750-900{degree}C (contact time 0.5-6.0 s) were studied. The overall reaction order of accumulation of certain compounds was determined, and possible pathways for their formation were suggested.

  2. Phytotoxicity and Plant Productivity Analysis of Tar-Enriched Biochars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, M. L.; Masiello, C. A.; Dugan, B.; Rudgers, J. A.; Capareda, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    Biochar is one of the three by-products obtained by the pyrolysis of organic material, the other two being syngas and bio-oil. The pyrolysis of biomass has generated a great amount of interest in recent years as all three by-products can be put toward beneficial uses. As part of a larger project designed to evaluate the hydrologic impact of biochar soil amendment, we generated a biochar through fast pyrolysis (less than 2 minutes) of sorghum stock at 600°C. In the initial biochar production run, the char bin was not purged with nitrogen. This inadvertent change in pyrolysis conditions produced a fast-pyrolysis biochar enriched with tars. We chose not to discard this batch, however, and instead used it to test the impact of tar-enriched biochars on plants. A suite of phytotoxicity tests were run to assess the effects of tar-rich biochar on plant germination and plant productivity. We designed the experiment to test for negative effects, using an organic carbon and nutrient-rich, greenhouse- optimized potting medium instead of soil. We used Black Seeded Simpson lettuce (Lactuca sativa) as the test organism. We found that even when tars are present within biochar, biochar amendment up to 10% by weight caused increased lettuce germination rates and increased biomass productivity. In this presentation, we will report the statistical significance of our germination and biomass data, as well as present preliminary data on how biochar amendment affects soil hydrologic properties.

  3. Brown carbon in tar balls from smoldering biomass combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. K. Chakrabarty; H. Moosmuller; L.-W. A. Chen; K. Lewis; W. P. Arnott; C. Mazzoleni; M. K. Dubey; C. E. Wold; W. M. Hao; S. M. Kreidenweis

    2010-01-01

    We report the direct observation of laboratory production of spherical, carbonaceous particles - "tar balls" - from smoldering combustion of two commonly occurring dry mid-latitude fuels. Real-time measurements of spectrally varying absorption Angstrom coefficients (AAC) indicate that a class of light absorbing organic carbon (OC) with wavelength dependent...

  4. Literature Review on Possible Alternatives to Tar for Antiskid Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Y.

    2010-01-01

    In airports, there are different areas such as runways, taxiways, aprons and parking areas. For runways, good skid resistance and water drainage of the surface layer is necessary. Tar, because of its good adhesion properties and other advantages as mentioned above, is widely used in thin, high skid

  5. Pyrolysis kinetics of phenols from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Polovetskaya, O.S.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Shavyrina, O.A. [Leo Tolstoy Tula State Pedag University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2002-11-01

    The features of pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar were studied. The activation energy and order of the reactions of accumulation of methane, hydrogen, carbon monoxide and dioxide, naphthalene and its methyl homologs, phenols, and isomeric cresols and dimethylphenols were determined.

  6. Wet scrubbing of biomass producer gas tars using vegetable oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoi, Prakashbhai Ramabhai

    The overall aims of this research study were to generate novel design data and to develop an equilibrium stage-based thermodynamic model of a vegetable oil based wet scrubbing system for the removal of model tar compounds (benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene) found in biomass producer gas. The specific objectives were to design, fabricate and evaluate a vegetable oil based wet scrubbing system and to optimize the design and operating variables; i.e., packed bed height, vegetable oil type, solvent temperature, and solvent flow rate. The experimental wet packed bed scrubbing system includes a liquid distributor specifically designed to distribute a high viscous vegetable oil uniformly and a mixing section, which was designed to generate a desired concentration of tar compounds in a simulated air stream. A method and calibration protocol of gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy was developed to quantify tar compounds. Experimental data were analyzed statistically using analysis of variance (ANOVA) procedure. Statistical analysis showed that both soybean and canola oils are potential solvents, providing comparable removal efficiency of tar compounds. The experimental height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) was determined as 0.11 m for vegetable oil based scrubbing system. Packed bed height and solvent temperature had highly significant effect (p0.05) effect on the removal of model tar compounds. The packing specific constants, Ch and CP,0, for the Billet and Schultes pressure drop correlation were determined as 2.52 and 2.93, respectively. The equilibrium stage based thermodynamic model predicted the removal efficiency of model tar compounds in the range of 1-6%, 1-4% and 1-2% of experimental data for benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene, respectively, for the solvent temperature of 30° C. The NRTL-PR property model and UNIFAC for estimating binary interaction parameters are recommended for modeling absorption of tar compounds in vegetable oils. Bench scale

  7. Analysis of the environmental control technology for tar sand development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Nevers, N.; Glenne, B.; Bryner, C.

    1979-06-01

    The environmental technology for control of air pollution, water pollution, and for the disposal, stabilization, and vegetation of the waste tar sand were thoroughly investigated. Although some difficulties may be encountered in any of these undertakings, it seems clear that the air and water pollution problems can be solved to meet any applicable standard. Currently there are two large-scale plants producing liquid fuels from tar sands in Alberta, Canada which use similar technology involving surface mining, hot water extraction, and surface disposal of waste sand. These projects all meet the Canadian environmental control regulations in force at the time they began. The largest US deposits of tar sands are much smaller than the Canadian; 95 percent are located in the state of Utah. Their economics do not appear as attractive as the Canadian deposits. The environmental control costs are not large enough to make an otherwise economic project uneconomic. The most serious environmental conflict likely to occur over the recovery of liquid fuels from the US deposits of tar sands is that caused by the proximity of the deposits to national parks, national monuments, and a national recreation area in Utah. These areas have very stringent air pollution requirements; and even if the air pollution control requirements can be met, there may still be adequate opposition to large-scale mining ventures in these areas to prevent their commercial exploitation. Another environmental constraint may be water rights availability.Essentially all of the water running in the Colorado river basin is now legally allocated. Barring new interpretations of the legality of water rights purchase, Utah tar sands developments should be able to obtain water by purchasing existing irrigation water rights.

  8. Ensamblajes urbanos: la TAR y el examen de la ciudad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Farías

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta nuevas perspectivas de investigación y desafíos analíticos que la teoría del actor-red (TAR abre para los estudios urbanos. En primer lugar, se revisan cómo los principios de relacionalidad híbrida y asociatividad plana de la TAR están siendo adoptados en los estudios urbanos para ampliar simétricamente la ecología urbana a no-humanos e impugnar concepciones escalares del espacio y economías urbanas. A continuación, se propone que la TAR trae consigo un desafío más fundamental relativo a la concepción de la ciudad como objeto de estudio. Mientras su comprensión habitual como objeto espacial, entidad político-económica y/o forma sociocultural subraya su carácter singular, estable y delimitado, la TAR permite pensar la ciudad como un objeto múltiple y decentrado. La noción de ensamblajes urbanos se introduce entonces para dar cuenta de la circulación y devenir de la ciudad en múltiples redes híbridas y translocales. El artículo concluye sopesando algunas de las consecuencias de este exámen de la ciudad, especialmente el reposicionamiento del problema de la complejidad, urbana en este caso, como punto, si no de partida, entonces al menos de llegada para la TAR.

  9. Monitoring of tar contents in gases. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Finn [ChimneyLab Europe ApS, Hadsten (Denmark); Houmann Jakobsen, H. [BioSynergi Proces ApS, Hoersholm (Denmark)

    2012-08-15

    The purpose of this project is to develop and test a relative cheap and simple online tar measuring method, which can monitor the tar content in product gas from thermal gasification. The measuring principle is absorption of tar from sample gas in Isopropanol (IPA), and measuring on this solution by UV-spectrophotometer. Continuous sampling of tar containing producer gas turned out to be a larger problem than earlier foreseen. The best solution was decided to be sampling with higher flows, and afterwards cleaning the IPA in activated carbon. The ambitions for continuous sampling had to be decreased to 1 week, where the IPA and the activated carbon is contaminated by tar and has to be replaced. However this requires larger amounts of IPA and activated carbon. For IPA the weekly consumption was 12-15 Litres and for activated carbon 10 Litres. The whole analyzer unit turned out to be more complex than first projected, mainly because of the increased amounts of IPA. The best mist filter, with respect to pressure drop, efficiency and retention time is a combination of glass wool and quarts wool. The unit has been tested on gas; 20 kW pellets burner for 116 hours. Harbooere updraft gasifier for 519 hours. Skive fluid bed gasifier for 879 hours. There have during the project period been several simple practical problems such as bubbles in the IPA, increasing pressure drop over the activated carbon bed, dropout of UV data acquisition program and increasing baseline. The principle showed from the beginning some good results, with the limitation of 1 week continuous operation, but at the 5. period in Skive the baseline was increasing all the time, and it was not possible to solve this problem. (LN)

  10. Oxygenated interface on biomass burn tar balls determined by single particle scanning transmission X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivanski, Alexei V; Hopkins, Rebecca J; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Gilles, Mary K

    2007-06-28

    Carbonaceous particles originating from biomass burning can account for a large fraction of organic aerosols in a local environment. Presently, their composition, physical and chemical properties, as well as their environmental effects are largely unknown. Tar balls, a distinct type of highly spherical carbonaceous biomass burn particles, have been observed in a number of field campaigns. The Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study that took place in summer 2002 occurred during an active fire season in the western United States; tar balls collected during this field campaign are described in this article. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy are used to determine the shape, structure, and size-dependent chemical composition of approximately 150 individual spherical particles ranging in size from 0.15 to 1.2 mum. The elemental composition of tar balls is approximately 55% atomic carbon and approximately 45% atomic oxygen. Oxygen is present primarily as carboxylic carbonyls and oxygen-substituted alkyl (O-alkyl-C) functional groups, followed by moderate amounts of ketonic carbonyls. The observed chemical composition, density, and carbon functional groups are distinctly different from soot or black carbon and more closely resemble high molecular weight polymeric humic-like substances, which could account for their reported optical properties. A detailed examination of the carboxylic carbonyl and O-alkyl-C functional groups as a function of particle size reveals a thin oxygenated interface layer. The high oxygen content, as well as the presence of water-soluble carboxylic carbonyl groups, could account for the reported hygroscopic properties of tar balls. The presence of the oxygenated layer is attributed to atmospheric processing of biomass burn particles.

  11. Characteristics of Surface Functional Groups From Coal Tar Asphaltene and Its Influence on the Selection of Assistants in Slurry-Bed Hydrocracking%煤焦油沥青质的表面官能团特性及对悬浮床加氢裂化助剂选择的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓文安; 吴乐乐; 王晓杰; 芦静; 李传

    2015-01-01

    以煤焦油常压渣油(T‐AR)为原料,分离出了正庚烷沥青质(T‐AR‐HI),通过元素分析、XPS、FT‐IR手段对该沥青质的表面官能团进行了表征,同时考察了不同助剂作用下T‐AR悬浮床加氢裂化反应过程中的生焦行为,进而分析了不同助剂对T‐AR沥青质的稳定作用机理。结果表明, T‐AR‐HI表面官能团以C—C、C— H、C—O为主;杂原子中O含量最高,杂原子官能团以含O官能团为主,其中醚类结构(C—O—C )占大多数;含N官能团主要为吡啶、吡咯和胺类,此外含有少量亚砜等含S官能团。表面官能团中,中性官能团总相对浓度为7.9%,酸性官能团为0.01%,碱性官能团为1.47%,沥青质表面呈弱碱性。SDBS、OA、CTAB 3种助剂对T‐AR沥青质的稳定作用依次降低,稳定作用主要取决于沥青质表面官能团与助剂之间的酸碱作用和氢键作用,其中酸碱作用影响较大。宜选取具有酸性基团的阴离子型双亲分子作为T‐AR悬浮床加氢裂化的助剂。%n‐Heptane asphaltene(HI) was isolated from coal tar atmospheric residue (T‐AR) .Its surface functional groups characteristics were studied by Element analysis ,XPS and FT‐IR .The coke formation in slurry bed hydrocracking of T‐AR in the presence of assistant and the mechanism of the stabilization of T‐AR asphaltene by different assistants were investigated simultaneously . The results indicated that the main surface functional groups of T‐AR‐HI were C—C ,C— H and C—O ,and the O content was highest in heteroatom contents .In addition ,O‐containing groups were the main part of heteroatom functional groups and appeared mainly as ethers structure (C—O—C) .N‐containing groups were mainly pyridine ,pyrrole and amine .Sulfoxides was detected as the main S‐containing functional group with the smallest content in the total heteroatom functional group contents .In the

  12. The temporal relationship between advertising and sales of low-tar cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Mark B; Anderson, Christy M; Burns, David M

    2006-12-01

    To determine whether a temporal relationship exists between the advertising and sales of low-tar cigarettes. It was hypothesised that increases in the advertising of low-tar cigarettes would precede increases in sales for these cigarettes. The themes of cigarette advertisements were reviewed and coded for 20 low-tar cigarette brands advertised in 13 widely read magazines in the US between 1960 and 1996. These 20 brands represented most of the low-tar cigarette advertisements and cigarette sales from 1967 to 1996. Cigarette sales data were obtained from the 1994 Maxwell report that summarises all cigarette sales from 1925 to 1990. If the advertisement referred to the low-tar attributes of the cigarette advertised, the advertisement was coded as having a low-tar theme and was included in the analysis. Five different graphical presentations of the relationship between the advertising and sales of the 20 low-tar cigarette brands showed a temporal relationship between low-tar advertising and sales for these brands. This relationship was observed for brands that introduced a low-tar alternative into an existing brand family (eg, Marlboro Light) and for new exclusively low-tar brands (eg, Carlton). Despite large increases in the advertising for the exclusively low-tar brands, sales of these brands remained low relative to sales of the low-tar alternative brands. Increases in print advertising of 20 of the most popular low-tar cigarette brands were followed by increases in sales for these cigarettes. Despite increases in the advertising of exclusively low-tar brands in the mid-1970s and early 1980s, the sales of these brands never matched the sales of the low-tar alternative brands. This suggests that it may have been easier to get smokers to switch to low-tar brands within a brand family compared with entirely new low-tar brands. Over the past 30 years, the marketing of low-tar cigarettes as a healthier alternative to higher-tar cigarettes has resulted in these brands

  13. The temporal relationship between advertising and sales of low‐tar cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Mark B; Anderson, Christy M; Burns, David M

    2006-01-01

    Objective and hypothesis To determine whether a temporal relationship exists between the advertising and sales of low‐tar cigarettes. It was hypothesised that increases in the advertising of low‐tar cigarettes would precede increases in sales for these cigarettes. Methods The themes of cigarette advertisements were reviewed and coded for 20 low‐tar cigarette brands advertised in 13 widely read magazines in the US between 1960 and 1996. These 20 brands represented most of the low‐tar cigarette advertisements and cigarette sales from 1967 to 1996. Cigarette sales data were obtained from the 1994 Maxwell report that summarises all cigarette sales from 1925 to 1990. If the advertisement referred to the low‐tar attributes of the cigarette advertised, the advertisement was coded as having a low‐tar theme and was included in the analysis. Results Five different graphical presentations of the relationship between the advertising and sales of the 20 low‐tar cigarette brands showed a temporal relationship between low‐tar advertising and sales for these brands. This relationship was observed for brands that introduced a low‐tar alternative into an existing brand family (eg, Marlboro Light) and for new exclusively low‐tar brands (eg, Carlton). Despite large increases in the advertising for the exclusively low‐tar brands, sales of these brands remained low relative to sales of the low‐tar alternative brands. Conclusions Increases in print advertising of 20 of the most popular low‐tar cigarette brands were followed by increases in sales for these cigarettes. Despite increases in the advertising of exclusively low‐tar brands in the mid‐1970s and early 1980s, the sales of these brands never matched the sales of the low‐tar alternative brands. This suggests that it may have been easier to get smokers to switch to low‐tar brands within a brand family compared with entirely new low‐tar brands. Over the past 30 years, the marketing of low‐tar

  14. Nuclear factor-kappa B decoy suppresses nerve injury and improves mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a rat lumbar disc herniation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Munetaka; Inoue, Gen; Gemba, Takefumi; Watanabe, Tomoko; Ito, Toshinori; Koshi, Takana; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Yamashita, Masaomi; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Takaso, Masashi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is a gene transcriptional regulator of inflammatory cytokines. We investigated the transduction efficiency of NF-kappaB decoy to dorsal root ganglion (DRG), as well as the decrease in nerve injury, mechanical allodynia, and thermal hyperalgesia in a rat lumbar disc herniation model. Forty rats were used in this study. NF-kappaB decoy-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was injected intrathecally at the L5 level in five rats, and its transduction efficiency into DRG measured. In another 30 rats, mechanical pressure was placed on the DRG at the L5 level and nucleus pulposus harvested from the rat coccygeal disc was transplanted on the DRG. Rats were classified into three groups of ten animals each: a herniation + decoy group, a herniation + oligo group, and a herniation only group. For behavioral testing, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated. In 15 of the herniation rats, their left L5 DRGs were resected, and the expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF-3) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was evaluated immunohistochemically compared to five controls. The total transduction efficiency of NF-kappaB decoy-FITC in DRG neurons was 10.8% in vivo. The expression of CGRP and ATF-3 was significantly lower in the herniation + decoy group than in the other herniation groups. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were significantly suppressed in the herniation + decoy group. NF-kappaB decoy was transduced into DRGs in vivo. NF-kappaB decoy may be useful as a target for clarifying the mechanism of sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation.

  15. Up-regulation of NKX3.1 Expression and Inhibition of LNCaP Cell Proliferation Induced by an Inhibitory Element Decoy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An-Li JIANG; Xiao-Yan HU; Peng-Ju ZHANG; Mei-Lan HE; Feng KONG; Zhi-Fang LIU; Hui-Qing YUAN; Jian-Ye ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    NKX3.1 is an androgen-regulated prostate-specific homeobox gene that is thought to play an important role in prostate development and cancerogenesis. NKX3.1 acts as a tumor suppressor gene specifically in the prostate. Up-regulation of NKX3.1 gene offers a promising gene therapy for prostate cancer. The decoy strategy has been developed and is considered a useful tool for regulating gene expression and gene therapy. In our previous studies, we identified a 20 bp inhibitory element upstream of the NKX3.1 promoter.In this study, we focused on using the 20 bp inhibitory element decoy to block negative regulation of the NKX3.1 gene and to up-regulate NKX3.1 expression using synthetic double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides of the 20 bp inhibitory element. We found in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiment that the 20 bp inhibitory decoy presented competitive binding to a specific binding protein of the 20 bp inhibitory element in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. In luciferase reporter gene assays, we found that the 20 bp inhibitory decoy could enhance NKX3.1 promoter activity, and RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that NKX3.1expression was up-regulated effectively by the transfection with the 20 bp inhibitory decoy. Furthermore,cell proliferation was inhibited by up-regulated NKX3.1 expression induced by the 20 bp inhibitory decoy.

  16. The effects of higher cigarette prices on tar and nicotine consumption in a cohort of adult smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, M C; Nimsch, C T; Hyland, A; Cummings, M

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to estimate the demand for tar and nicotine in cigarettes as a function of cigarette prices in a cohort of cigarette 11,966 smokers followed for 5 years. Data for the analysis come from a longitudinal telephone survey of 11,966 smokers who were interviewed in 1988 and 1993 as part of the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT). Separate models are estimated for three age groups to account for differences in levels of addiction and brand loyalty across age. We found that smokers respond to higher cigarette prices by reducing the number of cigarettes smoked per day but also by switching to cigarettes that are higher in tar and nicotine per cigarette.

  17. Annual fuel reviews 1987. Aromatic and tar industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yoshinori

    1988-07-20

    Production of benzene, toluene, and xylene - major aromatic products - was 227,000 tons in total in 1987, which exceeded the 1986 production by 12%, renewing the past highest production record. The reason was the favorable supply and demand situation of petroleum chemicals with ethylene as the main products. Total production of pitch, creosote and naphthalene which are the typical tar products was less than that of 1986 by 5%. It was caused by the delayed recovery of the raw material industry with iron as the main product. The demand for aromatic products largely increased in 1987. Demands for toluene and xylene were at high levels. Demand for tar products was roughly the same as 1986 except for continued poor pitch demand. Demand for creosote was approximately of the smae level as 1986. The demand for 95% naphthalene was 2% less as a whole in comparison with 1986. (11 tabs)

  18. Quantitative analysis of phenol and alkylphenols in Brazilian coal tar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Bastos Caramão

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work is the identification and quantification of phenolic compounds in coal tar samples from a ceramics factory in Cocal (SC, Brazil. The samples were subjected to preparative scale liquid chromatography, using Amberlyst A-27TM ion-exchange resin as stationary phase. The fractions obtained were classified as "acids" and "BN" (bases and neutrals. The identification and quantification of phenols, in the acid fraction, was made by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Nearly twenty-five phenols were identified in the samples and nine of them were also quantified. The results showed that coal tar has large quantities of phenolic compounds of industrial interest.

  19. Tar Creek study, Sargent oil field, Santa Clara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, David L.; Fedasko, Bill; Carnahan, J.R.; Brunetti, Ross; Magoon, Leslie B.; Lillis, Paul G.; Lorenson, T.D.; Stanley, Richard G.

    2002-01-01

    Field work in the Tar Creek area of Sargent oil field was performed June 26 to 28, 2000. The Santa Clara County study area is located in Sections, 30, 31, and 32, Township 11 South, Range 4 East, M.D.B&M; and in Sections 25 and 36, Township 11 South, Range 3 East, M.D.B.&M., north and south of Tar Creek, west of Highway 101. The work was a cooperative effort of the California Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR), California Geological Survey (CGS), and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The purpose of the project was to map the stratigraphy and geologic structure (David Wagner, CGS); sample oil for age dating (Les Magoon, USGS); and search for undocumented wells plus conduct a GPS survey of the area (Bill Fedasko, J.P. Carnahan, and Ross Brunetti, DOGGR)

  20. Preparation of liquid fuels from chark chemical tar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaksyntay Kairbekov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the course of study the optimal conditions of conduction of the process hydrogenization are found. Optimal temperature for preparation of motor oils from chark chemical tar is 4000С. On the increase of temperature from 3500С to 4000С the yield of liquid products on Mo-containing catalyst increases from 47.1 mass. % to 65.2 mass. % compared to the yield of liquid products obtained without the catalyst. The yield of gasoil fraction constitutes 15 mass. %. Optimal quantity of catalyst for preparation of liquid products from the tar is 0.05 mass. %. According to the results of study the catalytic effect of synthesized from emulsion catalyst appears at low concentration of molybdenum (0.05 mass.%. But the double increase of concentration of molybdenum weakly effects the improvement of indicators of the process.

  1. Cold Preparation of Heroin in a Black Tar Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Alexis M; Armenta, Richard F; Wagner, Karla D; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Goldshear, Jesse L; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Garfein, Richard S

    2017-07-29

    Black tar heroin is typically prepared for injection with heat which decreases the risk of HIV transmission by inactivating the virus. We received reports that persons who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico, a black tar heroin market, were using only water to dissolve heroin. Because Tijuana abuts San Diego County, CA, United States, we undertook the present analyses to determine the prevalence of this practice among PWID in San Diego, California. PWID completed quarterly behavioral assessments and serological testing for blood-borne viruses. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to assess for individual, social, and structural correlates of preparing heroin without heat within the preceding 6 months. Nearly half of black tar heroin users (149/305) reported they had prepared heroin without heat within 6 months. In multivariable analysis, cold preparation was independently associated with younger age (10 year decrease; AOR = 1.25; 95% CI 1.03, 1.53), more drug injecting acquaintances (per 5 acquaintance increase; AOR = 1.05; 95% CI 1.01, 1.09) and prefilled syringe use (injecting drugs from syringes that are already filled with drugs before purchase; AOR = 1.86; 95% CI 1.14, 3.02). Conclusions/Importance: To our knowledge, this is the first paper to report that PWID living in a black tar heroin market are preparing heroin without heat. Additional research is needed to determine whether this is an endemic practice or PWID are engaging in new forms of drug preparation in response to changes in the environment.

  2. Short contact therapy in psoriasis Tar vs Anthralin

    OpenAIRE

    Kar P

    1994-01-01

    Thirty cases (group I) having psoriasis were studied with a view to assess the efficacy of combination of short contact coal tar therapy, sunrays exposure and short contact anthralin therapy. Results were compared with thirty patients (group II) with psoriasis using anthralin paste as per Ingram technique as control. The combined short contact therapy in group I patients with intensive 90 to 120 minutes treatment sessions done once in every alternate day resulted in complete clearing in 19 (6...

  3. Contemporary Weaving Traditions in Shora Village, Dranang County, TAR

    OpenAIRE

    Yixilamu, Yeshe Xxx

    2013-01-01

    This thesis documents the traditional craft of weaving with a particular focus on the production of nampu (snam bu), a woolen fabric made from sheep wool, which is an important and popular textile among Tibetans. Nampu are mainly used for the making of traditional Tibetan costumes, garments and boots. The most famous area for nampu textiles in Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) is Dranang (Grwa nang) County in Lhoka (Lho kha) Prefecture. I have chosen to focus on the production of nampu in Shora (...

  4. G4-DNA formation in the HRAS promoter and rational design of decoy oligonucleotides for cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Membrino

    Full Text Available HRAS is a proto-oncogene involved in the tumorigenesis of urinary bladder cancer. In the HRAS promoter we identified two G-rich elements, hras-1 and hras-2, that fold, respectively, into an antiparallel and a parallel quadruplex (qhras-1, qhras-2. When we introduced in sequence hras-1 or hras-2 two point mutations that block quadruplex formation, transcription increased 5-fold, but when we stabilized the G-quadruplexes by guanidinium phthalocyanines, transcription decreased to 20% of control. By ChIP we found that sequence hras-1 is bound only by MAZ, while hras-2 is bound by MAZ and Sp1: two transcription factors recognizing guanine boxes. We also discovered by EMSA that recombinant MAZ-GST binds to both HRAS quadruplexes, while Sp1-GST only binds to qhras-1. The over-expression of MAZ and Sp1 synergistically activates HRAS transcription, while silencing each gene by RNAi results in a strong down-regulation of transcription. All these data indicate that the HRAS G-quadruplexes behave as transcription repressors. Finally, we designed decoy oligonucleotides mimicking the HRAS quadruplexes, bearing (R-1-O-[4-(1-Pyrenylethynyl phenylmethyl] glycerol and LNA modifications to increase their stability and nuclease resistance (G4-decoys. The G4-decoys repressed HRAS transcription and caused a strong antiproliferative effect, mediated by apoptosis, in T24 bladder cancer cells where HRAS is mutated.

  5. Brown carbon in tar balls from smoldering biomass combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Chakrabarty

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the direct observation of large-scale production of spherical, carbonaceous particles – "tar balls" – from smoldering combustion of two commonly occurring dry mid-latitude fuels. Real-time measurements indicate that brown carbon is an important component of tar balls. The spectrum of the imaginary parts of their complex refractive indices can be described with a Lorentzian-like model with an effective resonance wavelength in the ultraviolet (UV spectral region. Sensitivity calculations for aerosols containing traditional organic carbon (no absorption at visible and UV wavelengths and brown carbon suggest that accounting for UV absorption by brown carbon leads to a significant increase in aerosol radiative forcing efficiency and increased atmospheric warming. Since particles from smoldering combustion account for nearly three-fourths of the total carbonaceous aerosol mass emitted globally, inclusion of the optical properties of tar balls into radiative forcing models has significance for the Earth's radiation budget, optical remote sensing, and understanding of anomalous UV absorption in the troposphere.

  6. Brown carbon in tar balls from smoldering biomass combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Chakrabarty

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the direct observation of laboratory production of spherical, carbonaceous particles – "tar balls" – from smoldering combustion of two commonly occurring dry mid-latitude fuels. Real-time measurements of spectrally varying absorption Ångström coefficients (AAC indicate that a class of light absorbing organic carbon (OC with wavelength dependent imaginary part of its refractive index – optically defined as "brown carbon" – is an important component of tar balls. The spectrum of the imaginary parts of their complex refractive indices can be described with a Lorentzian-like model with an effective resonance wavelength in the ultraviolet (UV spectral region. Sensitivity calculations for aerosols containing traditional OC (no absorption at visible and UV wavelengths and brown carbon suggest that accounting for near-UV absorption by brown carbon leads to an increase in aerosol radiative forcing efficiency and increased light absorption. Since particles from smoldering combustion account for nearly three-fourths of the total carbonaceous aerosol mass emitted globally, inclusion of the optical properties of tar balls into radiative forcing models has significance for the Earth's radiation budget, optical remote sensing, and understanding of anomalous UV absorption in the troposphere.

  7. Brown carbon in tar balls from smoldering biomass combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, R. K.; Moosmüller, H.; Chen, L.-W. A.; Lewis, K.; Arnott, W. P.; Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M. K.; Wold, C. E.; Hao, W. M.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2010-07-01

    We report the direct observation of laboratory production of spherical, carbonaceous particles - "tar balls" - from smoldering combustion of two commonly occurring dry mid-latitude fuels. Real-time measurements of spectrally varying absorption Ångström coefficients (AAC) indicate that a class of light absorbing organic carbon (OC) with wavelength dependent imaginary part of its refractive index - optically defined as "brown carbon" - is an important component of tar balls. The spectrum of the imaginary parts of their complex refractive indices can be described with a Lorentzian-like model with an effective resonance wavelength in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region. Sensitivity calculations for aerosols containing traditional OC (no absorption at visible and UV wavelengths) and brown carbon suggest that accounting for near-UV absorption by brown carbon leads to an increase in aerosol radiative forcing efficiency and increased light absorption. Since particles from smoldering combustion account for nearly three-fourths of the total carbonaceous aerosol mass emitted globally, inclusion of the optical properties of tar balls into radiative forcing models has significance for the Earth's radiation budget, optical remote sensing, and understanding of anomalous UV absorption in the troposphere.

  8. Target-Decoy Approach and False Discovery Rate: When Things May Go Wrong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nitin; Bandeira, Nuno; Keich, Uri; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2011-07-01

    The target-decoy approach (TDA) has done the field of proteomics a great service by filling in the need to estimate the false discovery rates (FDR) of peptide identifications. While TDA is often viewed as a universal solution to the problem of FDR evaluation, we argue that the time has come to critically re-examine TDA and to acknowledge not only its merits but also its demerits. We demonstrate that some popular MS/MS search tools are not TDA-compliant and that it is easy to develop a non-TDA compliant tool that outperforms all TDA-compliant tools. Since the distinction between TDA-compliant and non-TDA compliant tools remains elusive, we are concerned about a possible proliferation of non-TDA-compliant tools in the future (developed with the best intentions). We are also concerned that estimation of the FDR by TDA awkwardly depends on a virtual coin toss and argue that it is important to take the coin toss factor out of our estimation of the FDR. Since computing FDR via TDA suffers from various restrictions, we argue that TDA is not needed when accurate p-values of individual Peptide-Spectrum Matches are available.

  9. The murine gammaherpesvirus-68 gp150 acts as an immunogenic decoy to limit virion neutralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Gillet

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses maintain long-term infectivity without marked antigenic variation. They must therefore evade neutralization by other means. Immune sera block murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68 infection of fibroblasts, but fail to block and even enhance its infection of IgG Fc receptor-bearing cells, suggesting that the antibody response to infection is actually poor at ablating virion infectivity completely. Here we analyzed this effect further by quantitating the glycoprotein-specific antibody response of MHV-68 carrier mice. Gp150 was much the commonest glycoprotein target and played a predominant role in driving Fc receptor-dependent infection: when gp150-specific antibodies were boosted, Fc receptor-dependent infection increased; and when gp150-specific antibodies were removed, Fc receptor-dependent infection was largely lost. Neither gp150-specific monoclonal antibodies nor gp150-specific polyclonal sera gave significant virion neutralization. Gp150 therefore acts as an immunogenic decoy, distorting the MHV-68-specific antibody response to promote Fc receptor-dependent infection and so compromise virion neutralization. This immune evasion mechanism may be common to many non-essential herpesvirus glycoproteins.

  10. High-dimensional decoy-state quantum key distribution over multicore telecommunication fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, G.; Vera, N.; Cariñe, J.; González, P.; Cardenas, J.; Connolly, P. W. R.; Przysiezna, A.; Gómez, E. S.; Figueroa, M.; Vallone, G.; Villoresi, P.; da Silva, T. Ferreira; Xavier, G. B.; Lima, G.

    2017-08-01

    Multiplexing is a strategy to augment the transmission capacity of a communication system. It consists of combining multiple signals over the same data channel and it has been very successful in classical communications. However, the use of enhanced channels has only reached limited practicality in quantum communications (QC) as it requires the manipulation of quantum systems of higher dimensions. Considerable effort is being made towards QC using high-dimensional quantum systems encoded into the transverse momentum of single photons, but so far no approach has been proven to be fully compatible with the existing telecommunication fibers. Here we overcome such a challenge and demonstrate a secure high-dimensional decoy-state quantum key distribution session over a 300-m-long multicore optical fiber. The high-dimensional quantum states are defined in terms of the transverse core modes available for the photon transmission over the fiber, and theoretical analyses show that positive secret key rates can be achieved through metropolitan distances.

  11. Predictive value of decoy receptor 3 in postoperative nosocomial bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Juan; Shao, Li-Hua; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Jian; Ma, Rui-Ping; Liu, Hai-Hong; Dong, Xiao-Meng; Ma, Li-Xian

    2014-11-03

    Nosocomial bacterial meningitis requires timely treatment, but what is difficult is the prompt and accurate diagnosis of this disease. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) levels in the differentiation of bacterial meningitis from non-bacterial meningitis. A total of 123 patients were recruited in this study, among them 80 patients being with bacterial meningitis and 43 patients with non-bacterial meningitis. Bacterial meningitis was confirmed by bacterial culture of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect the level of DcR3 in CSF. CSF levels of DcR3 were statistically significant between patients with bacterial meningitis and those with non-bacterial meningitis (pbacterial meningitis received antibiotic>24 h before CSF sampling, which was much higher than that of non-bacterial meningitis. CSF leucocyte count yielded the highest diagnostic value, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) of 0.928, followed by DcR3. At a critical value of 0.201 ng/mL for DcR3, the sensitivity and specificity were 78.75% and 81.40% respectively. DcR3 in CSF may be a valuable predictor for differentiating patients with bacterial meningitis from those with non-bacterial meningitis. Further studies are needed for the validation of this study.

  12. Phenol-formaldehyde resin substitutes from biomass tars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmelblau, D.A. [Biocarbons Corporation, Woburn, MA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Approximately 320,000 tonnes of phenol and formaldehyde are currently used annually in North America to make adhesive resins that are used to make exterior-grade structural panels. The demand for phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resins is growing faster than the demand for panels, because more adhesive is required to join/coat the surface of wood flakes (for oriented strand board - OSB) than is required to join veneer; OSB is replacing plywood as logs large enough for veneer become scarcer. Also, competitive uses for phenol and methanol (for making formaldehyde) have increased raw materials cost and threatened availability. Production of adhesive resins from biomass to reduce reliance on raw materials derived from commodity petrochemicals and to lower resin cost looks attractive. A simple fluidized-bed reactor system can be used to produce tars that can substitute for a major portion of the phenol and formaldehyde in PF resin adhesives. This can be done in an air-fluidized, single-bed reactor; no inert gas or dual-bed system is required. The key is recognizing that optimum phenolic character in the tar is not produced at the maximum tar yield, but at reactor temperatures around 600{degrees}C and short gas-phase residence times that produce a yield of about 25 to 30 weight percent. A wide range of phenols, aldehydes and other compounds capable of polymerization are produced. Feedstock can be any wood waste larger than sander dust; low cost agricultural wastes such as bagasse are also suitable. Adhesive resin is produced from the entire tar product by shifting the pH from acidic to basic with NaOH, and combining and heating the resulting resole with phenol and formaldehyde, similarly to conventional resins. Approximately half of the phenol and formaldehyde by weight can be replaced with tar. A plant producing 13,865,000 kg (30,566,000 lb) annually from 308 tonnes (340 tons) per day of green wood chips would cost approximately $8,400,000.

  13. Metal catalysts for steam reforming of tar derived from the gasification of lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dalin; Tamura, Masazumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2015-02-01

    Biomass gasification is one of the most important technologies for the conversion of biomass to electricity, fuels, and chemicals. The main obstacle preventing the commercial application of this technology is the presence of tar in the product gas. Catalytic reforming of tar appears a promising approach to remove tar and supported metal catalysts are among the most effective catalysts. Nevertheless, improvement of catalytic performances including activity, stability, resistance to coke deposition and aggregation of metal particles, as well as catalyst regenerability is greatly needed. This review focuses on the design and catalysis of supported metal catalysts for the removal of tar in the gasification of biomass. The recent development of metal catalysts including Rh, Ni, Co, and their alloys for steam reforming of biomass tar and tar model compounds is introduced. The role of metal species, support materials, promoters, and their interfaces is described.

  14. Thermal Cracking of Tars in a Continuously Fed Reactor with Steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    coal and biomass ) Oxygenated compounds (phenols and acids) TAR , oil, Naptha Pyrolysis gases (CO, H2, CH4, H2O, etc.) CHAR (carbon and inorganics...Fluidized Bed using biomass 8 Tars  Mixture of organic components present in gasification product gas with high molecular weight hydrocarbons [MW...Disable sulfur removal systems FoulingPlugging [Ref. 3: Biomass Gasification – Tar and Particles in Product Gases Sampling and Analysis”, European

  15. Comprehensive database of Manufactured Gas Plant tars. Part B. Aliphatic and aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallacher, Christopher; Thomas, Russell; Lord, Richard; Kalin, Robert M; Taylor, Chris

    2017-08-15

    Coal tars are a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds that were produced as a by-product from the manufactured gas and coke making industries. The composition of the tar produced varies depending on many factors; these include the temperature of production and the type of retort used. As different production processes produce different tars, a comprehensive database of the compounds present within coal tars from different production processes is a valuable resource. Such a database would help to understand how their chemical properties differ and what hazards the compounds present within these tars might pose. This study focuses on the aliphatic and aromatic compounds present in a database of 16 different tars from five different production processes. Samples of coal tar were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and derivatised post-extraction using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) with 1% trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS). The derivatised samples were analysed using two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC/TOFMS). A total of 198 individual aliphatic and 951 individual aromatic compounds were detected within 16 tar samples produced by five different production processes. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content of coal tars varies greatly depending on the production process used to obtain the tars and this is clearly demonstrated within the results. The aliphatic composition of the tars provided an important piece of analytical information that would have otherwise been missed with the detection of petrogenic compounds such as alkyl cyclohexanes. The aromatic compositions of the tar samples varied greatly between the different production processes investigated and useful analytical information was obtained about the individual production process groups. Alkyl cyclohexanes were detected in all samples from sites known to operate Carbureted Water Gas plants and not detected in

  16. Contact sensitivity to newsprint: a rare manifestation of coal tar allergy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illchyshyn, A.; Cartwright, P.H.; Smith, A.G.

    1987-07-01

    Contact dermatitis due to coal tar is infrequently reported in spite of the fact that it consists of a mixture of 10,000 constituents, and is still often used to treat both eczema and psoriasis. Discusses patient with coal tar sensitivity in whom the source of exacerbation of her dermatitis is shown to be newsprint, a common product containing coal tar-derived material. 6 refs.

  17. Pelagic tar off Georgia and Florida in relation to physical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, C.; Atkinson, L.; Lee, R.; Blanton, J.

    1980-11-01

    It was hypothesized, following the Ixtoc oil rig blowout in Campeche Bay in August 1979, that resultant tarballs should eventually appear in the Gulf stream off Georgia and that little would reach nearshore areas. Surface tows to collect floating tar were conducted off the coasts of Georgia and Florida to test this hypothesis. No tar was found within 40 km of shore. All samples more than 40 km from shore contained some tar.

  18. Early growth response gene-1 decoy oligonucleotides inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia of autogenous vein graft in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xisheng; Mei, Yunqing; Ji, Qiang; Feng, Jing; Cai, Jianzhi; Xie, Shiliang

    2015-07-01

    The excess proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the development of intimal hyperplasia is a hallmark of vein graft failure. This study aimed to verify that a single intraoperative transfection of early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) decoy oligonucleotide (ODN) can suppress vein graft proliferation of VSMCs and intimal hyperplasia. In a rabbit model, jugular veins were treated with Egr-1 decoy ODN, scrambled decoy ODN, Fugene6, or were left untreated, then grafted to the carotid artery. The vein graft samples were obtained 48 h, 1, 2 or 3 weeks after surgery. The thickness of the intima and intima/media ratio in the grafts was analysed by haematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. The expression of the Egr-1 decoy ODN transfected in the vein was analysed using fluorescent microscopy. Egr-1 mRNA was measured using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The expression of Egr-1 protein was analysed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Transfection efficiency of the ODN was confirmed by 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining. In the grafts treated with Egr-1 decoy ODN, our study achieved statistically significant inhibition of intimal hyperplasia by ∼58% at 3 weeks. Transfection of Egr-1 decoy ODNs decreased the protein expression of Egr-1 and Egr-1 mRNA. We confirmed that gene therapy using in vivo transfection of an Egr-1 decoy ODN significantly inhibits proliferation of VSMC and intimal hyperplasia of vein grafts in a rabbit model. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  19. Decoy Receptor DcR1 Is Induced in a p50/Bcl3-Dependent Manner and Attenuates the Efficacy of Temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Nassir M; Bernal, Giovanna M; Wu, Longtao; Crawley, Clayton D; Cahill, Kirk E; Voce, David J; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Zhang, Wei; Spretz, Ruben; Nunez, Luis; Larsen, Gustavo F; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Yamini, Bakhtiar

    2015-05-15

    Temozolomide is used widely to treat malignant glioma, but the overall response to this agent is generally poor. Resistance to DNA-damaging drugs such as temozolomide has been related to the induction of antiapoptotic proteins. Specifically, the transcription factor NF-κB has been suggested to participate in promoting the survival of cells exposed to chemotherapy. To identify factors that modulate cytotoxicity in the setting of DNA damage, we used an unbiased strategy to examine the NF-κB-dependent expression profile induced by temozolomide. By this route, we defined the decoy receptor DcR1 as a temozolomide response gene induced by a mechanism relying upon p50/NF-κB1. A conserved NF-κB-binding sequence (κB-site) was identified in the proximal promoter and was demonstrated to be required for DcR1 induction by temozolomide. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies reveal that the atypical IκB protein, Bcl3, is also required for induction of DcR1 by temozolomide. Mechanistically, DcR1 attenuates temozolomide efficacy by blunting activation of the Fas receptor pathway in p53(+/+) glioma cells. Intracranial xenograft studies show that DcR1 depletion in glioma cells enhances the efficacy of temozolomide. Taken together, our results show how DcR1 upregulation mediates temozolomide resistance and provide a rationale for DcR1 targeting as a strategy to sensitize gliomas to this widely used chemotherapy.

  20. Study on Tar Generated from Downdraft Gasification of Oil Palm Fronds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atnaw, Samson Mekbib; Kueh, Soo Chuan; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar

    2014-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues concerning the gasification of oil palm fronds (OPF) is the presence of tar and particulates formed during the process considering its high volatile matter content. In this study, a tar sampling train custom built based on standard tar sampling protocols was used to quantify the gravimetric concentration of tar (g/Nm3) in syngas produced from downdraft gasification of OPF. The amount of char, ash, and solid tar produced from the gasification process was measured in order to account for the mass and carbon conversion efficiency. Elemental analysis of the char and solid tar samples was done using ultimate analysis machine, while the relative concentration of the different compounds in the liquid tar was determined making use of a liquid gas chromatography (GC) unit. Average tar concentration of 4.928 g/Nm3 and 1.923 g/Nm3 was obtained for raw gas and cleaned gas samples, respectively. Tar concentration in the raw gas sample was found to be higher compared to results for other biomass materials, which could be attributed to the higher volatile matter percentage of OPF. Average cleaning efficiency of 61% which is comparable to that of sand bed filter and venturi scrubber cleaning systems reported in the literature was obtained for the cleaning system proposed in the current study. PMID:24526899

  1. The Legend of Hot Tar or Pitch as a Defensive Weapon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    In popular culture and even in academic discourse surrounding castles, hot tar pitch has been depicted as a widespread defensive weapon. The identification of "machicoulis" (machicolations) as an architectural provision for pouring down liquid tar pitch goes back to the early days of castle...... production and use during the Middle Ages will be discussed with special focus on the application of tar pitch as an ingredient in medieval and post-medieval thermal weapons (especially Greek Fire, the firebomb and the fire arrow). The punishment of tarring and feathering will also be considered...

  2. Assessment of ground-water contamination by coal-tar derivatives, St. Louis Park area, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Operation of a coal-tar distillation and wood-preserving facility in St. Louis Park, Minnesota, during 1918-72 contaminated ground water with coal-tar derivatives and inorganic chemicals. Coal-tar derivatives entered the groundwater system through three major paths: (1) Spills and drippings that percolated to the water table, (2) surface runoff and plant process water that was discharged to wetlands south of the former plant site, and (3) movement of coal tar directly into bedrock aquifers through a multiaquifer well on the site.

  3. Dermal uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons after hairwash with coal-tar shampoo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schooten, F.-J. van; Moonen, E.J.C.; Rhijnsburger, E.; Agen, B. van; Thijssen, H.H.W.; Kleinjans, J.C.S. [University of Limburg, Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology

    1994-11-26

    Describes an experiment to assess the dermal uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) after hairwashing with coal tar antidandruff shampoo. The urinary excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OH-P), a PAH metabolile was used to assess internal dose of PAH. A single use of coal tar shampoo resulted in increased 1-OH-P excretion in all members of the experimental group compared with the control group using a non-coal tar antidandruff shampoo. It is suggested that repeated use of coal tar shampoo would result in a high internal dose of carcinogenic PAH. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Study on Tar Generated from Downdraft Gasification of Oil Palm Fronds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson Mekbib Atnaw

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging issues concerning the gasification of oil palm fronds (OPF is the presence of tar and particulates formed during the process considering its high volatile matter content. In this study, a tar sampling train custom built based on standard tar sampling protocols was used to quantify the gravimetric concentration of tar (g/Nm3 in syngas produced from downdraft gasification of OPF. The amount of char, ash, and solid tar produced from the gasification process was measured in order to account for the mass and carbon conversion efficiency. Elemental analysis of the char and solid tar samples was done using ultimate analysis machine, while the relative concentration of the different compounds in the liquid tar was determined making use of a liquid gas chromatography (GC unit. Average tar concentration of 4.928 g/Nm3 and 1.923 g/Nm3 was obtained for raw gas and cleaned gas samples, respectively. Tar concentration in the raw gas sample was found to be higher compared to results for other biomass materials, which could be attributed to the higher volatile matter percentage of OPF. Average cleaning efficiency of 61% which is comparable to that of sand bed filter and venturi scrubber cleaning systems reported in the literature was obtained for the cleaning system proposed in the current study.

  5. Study on tar generated from downdraft gasification of oil palm fronds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atnaw, Samson Mekbib; Kueh, Soo Chuan; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar

    2014-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues concerning the gasification of oil palm fronds (OPF) is the presence of tar and particulates formed during the process considering its high volatile matter content. In this study, a tar sampling train custom built based on standard tar sampling protocols was used to quantify the gravimetric concentration of tar (g/Nm3) in syngas produced from downdraft gasification of OPF. The amount of char, ash, and solid tar produced from the gasification process was measured in order to account for the mass and carbon conversion efficiency. Elemental analysis of the char and solid tar samples was done using ultimate analysis machine, while the relative concentration of the different compounds in the liquid tar was determined making use of a liquid gas chromatography (GC) unit. Average tar concentration of 4.928 g/Nm3 and 1.923 g/Nm3 was obtained for raw gas and cleaned gas samples, respectively. Tar concentration in the raw gas sample was found to be higher compared to results for other biomass materials, which could be attributed to the higher volatile matter percentage of OPF. Average cleaning efficiency of 61% which is comparable to that of sand bed filter and venturi scrubber cleaning systems reported in the literature was obtained for the cleaning system proposed in the current study.

  6. The Legend of Hot Tar or Pitch as a Defensive Weapon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atzbach, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    In popular culture and even in academic discourse surrounding castles, hot tar pitch has been depicted as a widespread defensive weapon. The identification of "machicoulis" (machicolations) as an architectural provision for pouring down liquid tar pitch goes back to the early days of castle...... production and use during the Middle Ages will be discussed with special focus on the application of tar pitch as an ingredient in medieval and post-medieval thermal weapons (especially Greek Fire, the firebomb and the fire arrow). The punishment of tarring and feathering will also be considered...

  7. Modelling the low-tar BIG process; Modellering af low-tar BIG processen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Lars Henrik

    2002-09-15

    This report describes the possibilities of integrating a biomass gasifier in a combined heat and power plant. The purpose of the study is, among others, to see if the gasification technology can challenge existing heat and power production methods. A research programme dealing with the construction of a low far gasifier (LT-BIG), which easily can be scaled to large gasification plants, is in progress. This report also contains a model formulation and implementation for this suggested low tar gasifier. All the models are created by the use of the energy simulation tool DNA. For some cases it has been necessary to develop new components or to alter existing components in DNA. Three different systems are considered; Gas Engine, Simple Cycle Gas Turbine and Combined Cycle. When biomass with and lower heating value of 19 MJ/kg and a moisture content of 50% is employed the subsequent results and designs are achieved: 1) The Engine plant utilizes the hot flue-gas to dry the biomass, but has difficulties taking advantage of the potential energy from the cooling of the syngas. An engine with a net electric efficiency of 40% at full load is computed to convert 38,5% of the energy content in the biomass to electricity. 2) The Simple Cycle Gas Turbine plant has good potential for integration with a gasifier. It dries the biomass by means of the flue-gas and recuperates the energy from the hot syngas to preheat the pressurised gas before it enters the combustion chamber. With an isentropic efficiency of 89% and a pressure ratio of 20, an electric efficiency of 38% is computed. 3) The Combined Cycle plant almost reach a computed efficiency of 45%. It utilises the cooling of the hot syngas to produce extra steam for the cycle, which results in a very steady efficiency, even when the moisture content of the fuel is changed. A grand parametric and sensitivity study of the LT-BIG model is carried out. The study includes estimates of the air demand for the gasifier and the partial

  8. Expression, Purification, and Biophysical Characterization of a Secreted Anthrax Decoy Fusion Protein in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Duhra-Gill, Sifti; Kailemia, Muchena J.; Phu, My L.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; Nandi, Somen; McDonald, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptor-mediated drug development for blocking anthrax toxin action has received much attention in recent decades. In this study, we produced a secreted anthrax decoy fusion protein comprised of a portion of the human capillary morphogenesis gene-2 (CMG2) protein fused via a linker to the fragment crystallizable (Fc) domain of human immunoglobulin G1 in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a transient expression system. Using the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and co-expression with the p19 gene silencing suppressor, we were able to achieve a high level of recombinant CMG2-Fc-Apo (rCMG2-Fc-Apo) protein accumulation. Production kinetics were observed up to eight days post-infiltration, and maximum production of 826 mg/kg fresh leaf weight was observed on day six. Protein A affinity chromatography purification of the rCMG2-Fc-Apo protein from whole leaf extract and apoplast wash fluid showed the homodimeric form under non-reducing gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the molecular integrity of the secreted protein. The N-glycosylation pattern of purified rCMG2-Fc-Apo protein was analysed; the major portion of N-glycans consists of complex type structures in both protein samples. The most abundant (>50%) N-glycan structure was GlcNAc2(Xyl)Man3(Fuc)GlcNAc2 in rCMG2-Fc-Apo recovered from whole leaf extract and apoplast wash fluid. High mannose N-glycan structures were not detected in the apoplast wash fluid preparation, which confirmed the protein secretion. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that high-level production of rCMG2-Fc-Apo can be achieved by transient production in Nicotiana benthamiana plants with apoplast targeting. PMID:28054967

  9. Expression, Purification, and Biophysical Characterization of a Secreted Anthrax Decoy Fusion Protein in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Duhra-Gill, Sifti; Kailemia, Muchena J; Phu, My L; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Rodriguez, Raymond L; Nandi, Somen; McDonald, Karen A

    2017-01-04

    Anthrax toxin receptor-mediated drug development for blocking anthrax toxin action has received much attention in recent decades. In this study, we produced a secreted anthrax decoy fusion protein comprised of a portion of the human capillary morphogenesis gene-2 (CMG2) protein fused via a linker to the fragment crystallizable (Fc) domain of human immunoglobulin G1 in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a transient expression system. Using the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and co-expression with the p19 gene silencing suppressor, we were able to achieve a high level of recombinant CMG2-Fc-Apo (rCMG2-Fc-Apo) protein accumulation. Production kinetics were observed up to eight days post-infiltration, and maximum production of 826 mg/kg fresh leaf weight was observed on day six. Protein A affinity chromatography purification of the rCMG2-Fc-Apo protein from whole leaf extract and apoplast wash fluid showed the homodimeric form under non-reducing gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the molecular integrity of the secreted protein. The N-glycosylation pattern of purified rCMG2-Fc-Apo protein was analysed; the major portion of N-glycans consists of complex type structures in both protein samples. The most abundant (>50%) N-glycan structure was GlcNAc₂(Xyl)Man₃(Fuc)GlcNAc₂ in rCMG2-Fc-Apo recovered from whole leaf extract and apoplast wash fluid. High mannose N-glycan structures were not detected in the apoplast wash fluid preparation, which confirmed the protein secretion. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that high-level production of rCMG2-Fc-Apo can be achieved by transient production in Nicotiana benthamiana plants with apoplast targeting.

  10. Predictive Value of Decoy Receptor 3 in Postoperative Nosocomial Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Juan Liu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial bacterial meningitis requires timely treatment, but what is difficult is the prompt and accurate diagnosis of this disease. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of decoy receptor 3 (DcR3 levels in the differentiation of bacterial meningitis from non-bacterial meningitis. A total of 123 patients were recruited in this study, among them 80 patients being with bacterial meningitis and 43 patients with non-bacterial meningitis. Bacterial meningitis was confirmed by bacterial culture of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF culture and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to detect the level of DcR3 in CSF. CSF levels of DcR3 were statistically significant between patients with bacterial meningitis and those with non-bacterial meningitis (p < 0.001. A total of 48.75% of patients with bacterial meningitis received antibiotic >24 h before CSF sampling, which was much higher than that of non-bacterial meningitis. CSF leucocyte count yielded the highest diagnostic value, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC of 0.928, followed by DcR3. At a critical value of 0.201 ng/mL for DcR3, the sensitivity and specificity were 78.75% and 81.40% respectively. DcR3 in CSF may be a valuable predictor for differentiating patients with bacterial meningitis from those with non-bacterial meningitis. Further studies are needed for the validation of this study.

  11. Structure-based rational design of a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 decoy receptor with high binding affinity for a target protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Han

    Full Text Available Repeat proteins are increasingly attracting much attention as alternative scaffolds to immunoglobulin antibodies due to their unique structural features. Nonetheless, engineering interaction interface and understanding molecular basis for affinity maturation of repeat proteins still remain a challenge. Here, we present a structure-based rational design of a repeat protein with high binding affinity for a target protein. As a model repeat protein, a Toll-like receptor4 (TLR4 decoy receptor composed of leucine-rich repeat (LRR modules was used, and its interaction interface was rationally engineered to increase the binding affinity for myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD2. Based on the complex crystal structure of the decoy receptor with MD2, we first designed single amino acid substitutions in the decoy receptor, and obtained three variants showing a binding affinity (K(D one-order of magnitude higher than the wild-type decoy receptor. The interacting modes and contributions of individual residues were elucidated by analyzing the crystal structures of the single variants. To further increase the binding affinity, single positive mutations were combined, and two double mutants were shown to have about 3000- and 565-fold higher binding affinities than the wild-type decoy receptor. Molecular dynamics simulations and energetic analysis indicate that an additive effect by two mutations occurring at nearby modules was the major contributor to the remarkable increase in the binding affinities.

  12. Environmental assessment: tar sand in situ steam injection experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    A field experiment is planned for the in situ recovery of bitumen from tar sand. The site is located on a ten acre site 6.5 miles West of Vernal, Utah, and the experiment will last about six months. The experiment will utilize steam to lower the viscosity of the bitumen and drive it into production wells where it is recovered. Due to the small scale of this experiment, the impact of the proposed action will be minimal. Impact on local biological life will be minimal. The experiment will have no effect on aquatic habitats. No rare or endangered biological species will be affected by the experiment.

  13. pTAR-Encoded Proteins in Plasmid Partitioning

    OpenAIRE

    Kalnin, Kirill; Stegalkina, Svetlana; Yarmolinsky, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Partition cassettes, essential for the segregational stability of low-copy-number bacterial plasmids, typically encode two autoregulated proteins and an adjacent cis-acting centromere analog to which one or perhaps both proteins bind. The diminutive partition region of pTAR of Agrobacterium spp. was reported to be exceptional, encoding only a single protein, ParA (D. R. Gallie and C. I. Kado, J. Mol. Biol. 193:465–478, 1987). However, resequencing of the region revealed two small downstream g...

  14. Deodarone Isomers in Cedrus atlantica Essential Oils and Tar Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nama, Anne Marie; Bighelli, Ange; Ghanmi, Mohamed; Satrani, Badr; Casanova, Joseph; Tomi, Félix

    2015-11-01

    Deodarone [2,2,6-trimethyl-6-(4-methylcyclohex-3-enyl)-tetrahydro-4-pyrone] is a sesquiterpene tetrahydro-γ-pyrone related to bisabolene and atlantone, first isolated from Cedrus deodora essential oil. With respect to the stereochemistry of the asymmetric carbons C4 and C8, two diastereoisomers may be distinguished. Identification and quantification of both diastereoisomers in wood and tar oils from C. atlantica has been achieved using 13C NMR spectroscopy, in combination with GC (polar column). The contents of (4R,8R)- and (4R,8S)-deodarone varied between 1.1-2.8% and 1.0-3.0%, respectively.

  15. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  16. Isolation and structural determination of mutagenic substances in coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosuge, T.; Zenda, H.; Nukaya, H.; Terada, A.; Okamoto, T.; Shudo, K.; Yamaguchi, K.; Iitaka, Y.; Sugimura, T.

    1982-04-01

    Eleven compounds that were mutagenic to Salmonella typhimurim TA98 were isolated from a basic fraction of coal tar. These were six aminopolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (1-aminofluoranthene, 1- and 3-aminophenanthrene, 1- and 2-aminopyrene and 5-aminobenz(hALPHA)anthracene) and five aza-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenaleno(1,9-gh)quinoline, pyrido(3,2-c)carbazole, quino(3,2-c)carbazole, benzo(h)naphtho(2,1,8-delfquinoline and benzo(de)naphthol(1,8-gh)quinoline).

  17. Thermodynamic studies of a series of homologous HIV-1 TAR RNA ligands reveal that loose binders are stronger Tat competitors than tight ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Lise; Azoulay, Stéphane; Di Giorgio, Audrey; Zenacker, Laura; Gaysinski, Marc; Clayette, Pascal; Patino, Nadia

    2013-06-01

    RNA is a major drug target, but the design of small molecules that modulate RNA function remains a great challenge. In this context, a series of structurally homologous 'polyamide amino acids' (PAA) was studied as HIV-1 trans-activating response (TAR) RNA ligands. An extensive thermodynamic study revealed the occurence of an enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon resulting in very close TAR affinities for all PAA. However, their binding modes and their ability to compete with the Tat fragment strongly differ according to their structure. Surprisingly, PAA that form loose complexes with TAR were shown to be stronger Tat competitors than those forming tight ones, and thermal denaturation studies demonstrated that loose complexes are more stable than tight ones. This could be correlated to the fact that loose and tight ligands induce distinct RNA conformational changes as revealed by circular dichroism experiments, although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments showed that the TAR binding site is the same in all cases. Finally, some loose PAA also display promising inhibitory activities on HIV-infected cells. Altogether, these results lead to a better understanding of RNA interaction modes that could be very useful for devising new ligands of relevant RNA targets.

  18. DIANA-TarBase v7.0: indexing more than half a million experimentally supported miRNA:mRNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachos, Ioannis S; Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Georgakilas, Georgios; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Kanellos, Ilias; Anastasopoulos, Ioannis-Laertis; Maniou, Sofia; Karathanou, Konstantina; Kalfakakou, Despina; Fevgas, Athanasios; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA species, which act as potent gene expression regulators. Accurate identification of miRNA targets is crucial to understanding their function. Currently, hundreds of thousands of miRNA:gene interactions have been experimentally identified. However, this wealth of information is fragmented and hidden in thousands of manuscripts and raw next-generation sequencing data sets. DIANA-TarBase was initially released in 2006 and it was the first database aiming to catalog published experimentally validated miRNA:gene interactions. DIANA-TarBase v7.0 (http://www.microrna.gr/tarbase) aims to provide for the first time hundreds of thousands of high-quality manually curated experimentally validated miRNA:gene interactions, enhanced with detailed meta-data. DIANA-TarBase v7.0 enables users to easily identify positive or negative experimental results, the utilized experimental methodology, experimental conditions including cell/tissue type and treatment. The new interface provides also advanced information ranging from the binding site location, as identified experimentally as well as in silico, to the primer sequences used for cloning experiments. More than half a million miRNA:gene interactions have been curated from published experiments on 356 different cell types from 24 species, corresponding to 9- to 250-fold more entries than any other relevant database. DIANA-TarBase v7.0 is freely available.

  19. Mechanism of co-pyrolysis of coal-tar pitch with polyvinylpyridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzyb, B.; Machnikowski, J. [Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Petroleum and Coal, Wroclaw University of Technology, Gdanska 7/9, 50-344 Wroclaw (Poland); Weber, J.V. [Laboratoire de Chimie et Applications, Universite de Metz-IUT, /Rue V. Demange, 57-500 Saint Avold (France)

    2004-08-01

    Co-pyrolysis of coal-tar pitch and poly(4-vinylpyridine) cross-linked with 25wt.% of divinylbenzene (PVP) or the oxidized form of the co-polymer (PVPox) was studied as a possible way of manufacturing of carbonaceous materials enriched in nitrogen. Interactions of pitch with polymers were evaluated using thermogravimetry, elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy in the DRIFT mode, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The tendency to depolymerization of PVP on heat treatment results in a little effect of the polymer on the thermal behaviour of the blend. PVPox is a stronger modifier of pitch carbonization behaviour and much more efficient source of nitrogen in the co-pyrolysis. The principal chemical interaction between pitch and PVPox is the dehydrogenative polymerization of pitch constituents induced by polymer oxygen groups. The oxidation of PVP does not affect the nitrogen functionalities transformation on pyrolysis.

  20. A baseline assessment of beach debris and tar contamination in Bonaire, Southeastern Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Rijn, van J.; Bron, P.S.; Leon, R.

    2013-01-01

    Data on beach debris and tar contamination is provided for 21 natural beach sites in Bonaire, Southeastern Caribbean. Transects amounting to a combined length of 991 m were sampled March–May 2011 and a total of 8960 debris items were collected. Highest debris and tar contamination were found on the

  1. Dissolution and transport of coal tar compounds in fractured clay-rich residuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vulava, Vijay M.; McKay, Larry D.; Broholm, Mette Martina

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the dissolution and transport of organic contaminants from a crude coal tar mixture in a monolith of fractured clay-rich residuum. An electrolyte solution was eluted through the residuum monolith containing a small emplaced source of coal tar under biologically inhibited and mildl...

  2. The influence of partial oxidation mechanisms on tar destruction in TwoStage biomass gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Egsgaard, Helge; Stelte, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    TwoStage gasification of biomass results in almost tar free producer gas suitable for multiple end-use purposes. In the present study, it is investigated to what extent the partial oxidation process of the pyrolysis gas from the first stage is involved in direct and in-direct tar destruction and ...... tar destruction and a high moisture content of the biomass enhances the decomposition of phenol and inhibits the formation of naphthalene. This enhances tar conversion and gasification in the char-bed, and thus contributes in-directly to the tar destruction.......TwoStage gasification of biomass results in almost tar free producer gas suitable for multiple end-use purposes. In the present study, it is investigated to what extent the partial oxidation process of the pyrolysis gas from the first stage is involved in direct and in-direct tar destruction...... and conversion. The study identifies the following major impact factors regarding tar content in the producer gas: oxidation temperature, excess air ratio and biomass moisture content. In a experimental setup, wood pellets were pyrolyzed and the resulting pyrolysis gas was transferred in a heated partial...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.1102 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1926.1102 Section 1926.1102 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Hazardous Substances § 1926.1102 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. Note: The...

  4. 29 CFR 1915.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1915.1002 Section 1915.1002 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. Note:...

  5. Gc/ms analysis of coal tar composition produced from coal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    foundation for the further processing and utilization of coal tar. ... After dust removal and tar separation, the coal gas entered into the next waste ... multiplier tube voltage at 500 V, scan range form m/z 40 to 650 at 3 scan/s was used, solvent.

  6. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of tar compounds formed during pyrolysis of rice husks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Stevens, T.W.; Hovestad, A.; Skolnik, V.; Visser, R.

    1991-01-01

    Pyrolysis of agricultural waste to produce fuel gas involves formation of tars as noxious by-products. In this paper the qualitative analysis of tars formed during pyrolysis of rice husks is presented, based on identification by gas chromatography—mass spectrometry and interpolation of retention tim

  7. No Increased Risk of Cancer after Coal Tar Treatment in Patients with Psoriasis or Eczema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofzen, Judith H. J.; Aben, Katja K. H.; Oldenhof, Ursula T. H.; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan; Alkemade, Hans A.; van de Kerkhof, Peter C. M.; van der Valk, Pieter G. M.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.

    Coal tar is an effective treatment for psoriasis and eczema, but it contains several carcinogenic compounds. Occupational and animal studies have shown an increased risk of cancer after exposure to coal tar. Many dermatologists have abandoned this treatment for safety reasons, although the risk of

  8. Decomposition of tar in gas from updraft gasifier by thermal cracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Peder; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2000-01-01

    Continuing earlier work with tar reduction by partial oxidation of pyrolysis gas [1] thermal cracking has been evaluated as a gas cleaning process. The work has been focusing on cleaning gas from updraft gasifiers, and the long term purpose is to develop a tar cleaning unit based on thermal...

  9. Phillips solves Venezuelan tar-belt producing problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finken, R.E.; Meldau, R.F.

    1972-07-17

    Phillips Petroleum Co. and partners have just completed an expansion to produce, treat, and ship 88,000 bpd of heavy oil from the tar-belt region of E. Venezuela. The first phase of the expansion was a $4.5-million diluent project to produce 80 API oil from the largest reservoir in the Morichal field, Monagas State. The second phase was to drill 41 wells in Amoco's Jobo field under an operating contract. The final phase was a $3.5-million expansion of treating, pipeline, and terminal facilities to handle the increased throughput. The crude produced is naphthenic and after treating is ready for road-building use, and as residual fuel at its usual viscosity of 520 to 550 sfs at 122/sup 0/F. As an asphalt stock, it has a yield of 60 to 70% and is readily processed into quality-paving asphalts which meet standard specifications. Production of the viscous 80 API crude oil, even though the major oil reservoir in Morichal, was very limited until installation of the diluent facilities last year. The same problem exists all over the famous tar-belt region of E. Venezuela. Vast oil reserves exist almost continuously in the area shown by the base map, but the oil cannot be dehydrated, desalted or transported when produced by itself. Thus, the 80 API oil is a known reserve, but without an external supply of diluent it cannot be commercially recovered.

  10. [Compositions and structure characterizations of coal tar refined soft pitch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li-Juan; Zhao, Xue-Fei; Lai, Shi-Quan; Cheng, Jun-Xia; Lu, Yi-Qiang

    2009-08-01

    High temperature coal tar was used as raw materials, and was distilled to 280 degrees C for getting coal tar soft pitch. Then refined soft pitch was obtained by solvent extracting and subsequent settlement method. Its soft point was 32 degrees C; the group compositions consisted of 53.67% heptane soluble, 39.47% heptane insoluble but toluene soluble, 6.86% toluene insoluble and 0.06% quinoline insoluble. The relative average molecular weight was about 292. Its average molecular formula was C22.22 H16.32 N0.12 S0.06 O0.33; the total content of heteroatom was less than 1. IR analytic results showed that its heteroatom O existed in the R-O-R and Ar-O-R structure; its heteroatom N existed in the R-NH-R and -N=, with the latter being primary. Its average structure was obtained by improved Brown-Lander model: five-membered condensed rings. UV analysis indicated that the majority was linear arrangement, and the minority was surface arrangement; namely, the chemical structure of the samples was mainly the cata-condensed structure, while the minority was peri-condensation.

  11. Final report on the safety assessment of Juniperus communis Extract, Juniperus oxycedrus Extract, Juniperus oxycedrus Tar, Juniperus phoenicea extract, and Juniperus virginiana Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The common juniper is a tree that grows in Europe, Asia, and North America. The ripe fruit of Juniperus communis and Juniperus oxycedrus is alcohol extracted to produce Juniperus Communis Extract and Juniperus Oxycedrus Extract, respectively. Juniperus Oxycedrus Tar is the volatile oil from the wood of J. oxycedrus. Juniperus Phoenicea Extract comes from the gum of Juniperus phoenicea, and Juniperus Virginiana Extract is extracted from the wood of Juniperus virginiana. Although Juniperus Oxycedrus Tar is produced as a by-product of distillation, no information was available on the manufacturing process for any of the Extracts. Oils derived from these varieties of juniper are used solely as fragrance ingredients; they are commonly produced using steam distillation of the source material, but it is not known if that procedure is used to produce extracts. One report does state that the chemical composition of Juniper Communis Oil and Juniperus Communis Extract is similar, each containing a wide variety of terpenoids and aromatic compounds, with the occasional aliphatic alcohols and aldehydes, and, more rarely, alkanes. The principle component of Juniperus Oxycedrus Tar is cadinene, a sesquiterpene, but cresol and guaiacol are also found. No data were available, however, indicating the extent to which there would be variations in composition that may occur as a result of extraction differences or any other factor such as plant growth conditions. Information on the composition of the other ingredients was not available. All of the Extracts function as biological additives in cosmetic formulations, and Juniperus Oxycedrus Tar is used as a hair-conditioning agent and a fragrance component. Most of the available safety test data are from studies using oils derived from the various varieties of juniper. Because of the expected similarity in composition to the extract, these data were considered. Acute studies using animals show little toxicity of the oil or tar. The oils

  12. Joint Parameter Estimation of the Target and Decoy within the Radar Beam Based on Improved MCMC%基于改进MCMC的波束内目标与诱饵联合参数估计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋志勇; 肖怀铁; 祝依龙; 卢再奇

    2012-01-01

    波束内目标与诱饵的参数估计是导引头正确实现目标分选、完成波束指向调整与精确跟踪的必要条件.目标与诱饵的“紧密接近”导致接收回波混叠,使得常规参数测量与估计方法失效.基于实际采样处理中目标回波能量会“溢出”到相邻匹配滤波采样点这一信号模型,通过贝叶斯原理从观测的条件似然以及未知参数的先验分布获取待估计参数的后验概率分布,采用Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC)方法中的Metropolis-Hastings (M-H)抽样算法联合估计目标与诱饵的相关参数,并根据拖曳式诱饵干扰对抗的特点对M-H抽样进行了改进.各种典型干扰条件及动态攻击场景下的仿真试验表明了本文方法的有效性.%The parameter estimation of the target and towed radar active decoy (TRAD) within the radar beam is the necessary condition for radar seeker to realize target selection and achieve the boresight steering adjust and accurate tracking. The "closely spaced" target and decoy make radar echoes abased and the traditional method for parameter measurement and estimation fail. Based on the signal model, that the energy of single target will spill over to adjacent matched filter sampling points when the output of matched filter of radar seeker is sampled actually. Bayesian theory is adopted to obtain the posterior probability density function of estimated parameters from the conditional likelihood function of the observation and the prior distribution of unknown parameters in this paper. Then the Metropolis-Hastings (M-H) sampling algorithm belonged to Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) is utilized to estimate parameters of target and decoy jointly. At the same time, based on the jamming model and characteristics of TRAD, the M-H sampling is improved. The simulation results under different jamming conditions and dynamic attack scenarios illustrate the performance of proposed method.

  13. Microwave-induced cracking of pyrolytic tars coupled to microwave pyrolysis for syngas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneroso, D; Bermúdez, J M; Montes-Morán, M A; Arenillas, A; Menéndez, J A

    2016-10-01

    Herein a new process is proposed to produce a syngas-rich gas fraction (>80vol% H2+CO) from biowaste based on microwave heating within two differentiated steps in order to avoid tars production. The first step consists of the microwave pyrolysis of biowaste induced by a char-based susceptor at 400-800°C; tars, char and syngas-rich gas fractions being produced. The tars are then fed into the second step where a portion of the char from the first step is used as a bed material in a 0.3:1wt% ratio. This bed is heated up by microwaves up to 800°C, allowing thermal cracking of tars and additional syngas (>90vol% H2+CO) being then produced. This new concept arises as an alternative technology to the gasification of biowastes for producing syngas with no need for catalysts or gasifying reagents to minimise tars production.

  14. Influence of diffusion resistance in oxidative heat-hardening of char/tar briquetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, K.B.S.; Venkatesham, M.

    1983-11-01

    Char/tar briquetes can be made sufficiently strong and completely smokeless by heating in the presence of oxygen. It is recognized that tar is converted into a resinous matter during this process and the rate at which this happens seems to be controlled by oxygen diffusion into the briquete. A model has been developed, considering the tar to envelop the char particles as a thin stationary layer. Computer simulation of briquetes having a binder percentage varying linearly in a direction parallel to the cylindrical axis has shown that briquetes with the smaller amount of tar near the end of the cylinder give the better average conversion, implying that such briquetes are the strongest. This has been verified experimentally using briquetes having a linearly varying tar content. The model however is a highly simplified representation of a complicated phenomenon and may need substantial modification before firmer conclusions are drawn.

  15. Characterization of the replication and stability regions of Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallie, D R; Zaitlin, D; Perry, K L; Kado, C I

    1984-03-01

    A 5.4-kilobase region containing the origin of replication and stability maintenance of the 44-kilobase Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR has been mapped and characterized. Within this region is a 1.3-kilobase segment that is capable of directing autonomous replication. The remaining segment contains the stability locus for maintenance of pTAR during nonselective growth. Approximately 35% of pTAR shares sequence homology with pAg119, a 44-kilobase cryptic plasmid in grapevine strain 1D1119. However, no homology was detected between pTAR DNA and several Ti plasmids or several other small cryptic plasmids in many A. tumefaciens strains. A recombinant plasmid containing the origin of replication and stability maintenance region of pTAR was compatible with pTiC58, pTi15955, and pTi119 and incompatible with pAg119. A new compatibility group, Inc Ag-1, is discussed.

  16. Influence of Pyrolysis Temperature on Rice Husk Char Characteristics and Its Tar Adsorption Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anchan Paethanom

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A biomass waste, rice husk, was inspected by thermoanalytical investigation to evaluate its capability as an adsorbent medium for tar removal. The pyrolysis process has been applied to the rice husk material at different temperatures 600, 800 and 1000 °C with 20 °C/min heating rate, to investigate two topics: (1 influence of temperature on characterization of rice husk char and; (2 adsorption capability of rice husk char for tar removal. The results showed that subsequent to high temperature pyrolysis, rice husk char became a highly porous material, which was suitable as tar removal adsorbent with the ability to remove tar effectively. In addition, char characteristics and tar removal ability were significantly influenced by the pyrolysis temperature.

  17. PAHs and organic matter partitioning and mass transfer from coal tar particles to water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhabib, Karim; Simonnot, Marie-Odile; Sardin, Michel

    2006-10-01

    The coal tar found in contaminated soils of former manufactured gas plants and coking plants acts as a long-term source of PAHs. Organic carbon and PAH transfer from coal tar particles to water was investigated with closed-looped laboratory column experiments run at various particle sizes and temperatures. Two models were derived. The first one represented the extraction process at equilibrium and was based on a linear partitioning of TOC and PAHs between coal tar and water. The partition coefficient was derived as well as the mass of extractable organic matter in the particles. The second model dealt with mass transfer. Particle diffusion was the limiting step; organic matter diffusivity in the coal tar was then computed in the different conditions. A good consistency was obtained between experimental and computed results. Hence, the modeling of PAH migration in contaminated soils at the field scale requires taking into account coal tar as the source-term for PAH release.

  18. Monitoring of West Nile virus, Usutu virus and Meaban virus in waterfowl used as decoys and wild raptors in southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado-Tarifa, E; Napp, S; Lecollinet, S; Arenas, A; Beck, C; Cerdà-Cuéllar, M; Fernández-Morente, M; García-Bocanegra, I

    2016-12-01

    In the last decade, the number of emerging flaviviruses described worldwide has increased considerably, with wild birds acting as the main reservoir hosts of these viruses. We carried out an epidemiological survey to determine the seroprevalence of antigenically related flaviviruses, particularly West Nile virus (WNV), Usutu virus (USUV) and Meaban virus (MBV), in waterfowl used as decoys and wild raptors in Andalusia (southern Spain), the region considered to have the highest risk of flaviviruses circulation in Spain. The overall flaviviruses seroprevalence according to bELISA was 13.0% in both in decoys (n=1052) and wild raptors (n=123). Specific antibodies against WNV, USUV and MBV were confirmed by micro virus neutralization tests in 12, 38 and 4 of the seropositive decoys, respectively. This is the first study on WNV and USUV infections in decoys and the first report of MBV infections in waterfowl and raptors. Moreover we report the first description of WNV infections in short-toed snake eagle (Circaetus gallicus) and Montagu's harrier (Circus pygargus). The seropositivity obtained indicates widespread but not homogeneous distribution of WNV and USUV in Andalusia. The results also confirm endemic circulation of WNV, USUV and MBV in both decoys and wild raptors in southern Spain. Our results highlight the need to implement surveillance and control programs not only for WNV but also for other related flaviviruses. Further research is needed to determine the eco-epidemiological role that waterfowl and wild raptors play in the transmission of emerging flaviviruses, especially in decoys, given their close interactions with humans.

  19. Origin of beach-stranded tars from source rocks indigeneous to Seychelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, P.S. [Seychelles National Oil Co., Mahe (South Africa)

    1996-03-01

    Tarballs have been found stranded as traction deposits on a beach on northwest Mahe Island, Seychelles, with every ebbing tide. Weekly collections from mid-1993 to mid-1994 gathered nearly 4750 samples of two types of tar: a dominant black malleable tar and a less common brownish-black hard tar. Both tars represent moderately degraded extracts of crude oils seemingly derived from mature source rocks dominated by a combination of oil-prone phytoplanktonic and algal organic matter over gas-prone land-plant organic matter. Source rock deposition occurred principally in paralic to open-marine environments. The presence of minor oleanane and bicadinane, and a general preponderance of diasteranes and tricyclic terpanes in the hard tar suggest derivation from a Late Cretaceous clastic source rock with possible carbonate interbeds. By contrast, no samples of the malleable tar contain oleanane or bicadinane, but all contain significant norhopane and tetracyclic terpanes, which, along with significant sulfur and low diasterane contents, indicate derivation from a carbonate source rock of perhaps pre-Late Cretaceous age. Additionally, maturity and limited geochemical data from proven and potential source rocks present in the offshore wells enable the malleable and hard tars to be equated with specific units in the Seychelles stratigraphy; the malleable tar is seemingly derived from a Middle Jurassic carbonate of Tethyan affinity and the hard tar possibly originated from either Campanian or Maastrichtian-Paleocene shales. These tars are thus concluded to be natural seepage products derived from source rocks indigenous to Seychelles, and their persistent beach stranding significantly reduces the risk of hydrocarbon exploration in this frontier province.

  20. Comparison and analysis on test methods of infrared radiant intensity of infrared decoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunsheng; Dai, Mengyan; Liu, Haifeng; Fang, Guofeng; Xie, Changyou; Zhang, Tong

    2014-11-01

    The research on infrared radiant characteristics of typical target is important for the detection and recognition of target, infrared simulation calculation and design of electro-optical countermeasures. Thus it is essential to select appropriate test method and optimal calculation method to improve the test accuracy and reliability of infrared radiant intensity. In this paper, three instruments including SR5000 spectroradiometer (CI, MigdalHaEmek, Israel), remote sensing interferometer spectrometer Tensor37 (Bruker, Germany) and Image IR8325 (InfraTec Ltd, Germany) mid-infrared thermal imager were applied to test the infrared radiant (1μm-3μm - 3μm-5μm) intensity of decoy samples. Three methods were designed based on two operational principles including direct test and indirect test. The SR5000 spectroradiometer which is able to obtain the value of radian intensity immediately is regard as direct test. The other two instruments which deduce and calculate infrared radiant intensity according to Planck's law and Lambert's cosine law with some preliminary tested parameters such as the response voltage - the distribution of infrared radiant temperature of flaming samples and calibrated data by blackbody, however, are regard as indirect test. Reasons for the diversity of experiment results were provided through analysis on the concrete measurement theory and detailed calculation methods. Moreover, some rules and suggestions were put forward to improve the test accuracy and reliability of infrared radiant intensity when different methods were adopted. It is shown from experiment results that the average mid-infrared radiant intensity obtained from SR5000 was about 903W/Sr in near-infrared band - whereas Tensor 37 and Image IR8325 was about 834W/Sr and 547 W/Sr respectively. It was proved that maximum relative of calculated results from remote sensing interferometer spectrometer Tensor37 and results measured with SR5000 spectroradiometer is below 13%, which meet the

  1. TRAM-Derived Decoy Peptides inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mastitis model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Qu, Shihui; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2015-10-05

    It has been proved that TRAM-Derived Decoy peptides have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we synthesized a TRAM-Derived decoy peptide (TM6), belongs to TRAM TIR domain, of which sequence is "N"-RQIKIWFQNRRMKWK, KENFLRDTWCNFQFY-"C" and evaluated the effects of TM6 on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice. In vivo, LPS-induced mice mastitis model was established by injection of LPS through the duct of mammary gland. TM6 was injected 1h before or after LPS treatment. In vitro, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells were used to investigate the effects of TM6 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. The results showed that TM6 inhibited LPS-induced mammary gland histopathologic changes, MPO activity, and TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production in mice. In vitro, TM6 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production, as well as NF-κB and MAPKs activation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that TM6 had protective effects on LPS-mastitis and may be a promising therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinetics of mesophase transformation of coal tar pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, H.; Feng, Y.; Shen, B.; Gao, J. [East China Institute of Metallurgy, Maanshan (China)

    1998-05-01

    A study on the kinetics of mesophase transformation of two coal tar pitches (CTP) with different primary quinoline-insoluble (QI) content is reported. It showed that the meosphase transformation of CTP studied was an autocatalytic type reaction. The rate law and rate constants for the mesophase transformation at holding temperature of 390{degree}C, 410{degree}C and 450{degree}C were determined and the rate constants of mesophase transformation follow the Arrhenius equation. Primary QI of CTP decreases the activation energy from 210.1 kJ/mol to 175.8 kJ/mol, and the pre-exponential factor from 2.12 x 10{sup 13} 1/h to 6.29 x 10{sup 10} 1/h; its influence on the rate constants is irregular. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Evaluation of different oxygen carriers for biomass tar reforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendiara, Teresa; Johansen, Joakim Myung; Utrilla, Rubén

    2011-01-01

    , in a concentration of 600–2000ppmv, was chosen as a tar model compound. Experiments were performed in a TGA apparatus and a fixed bed reactor. Four oxygen carriers (60% NiO/MgAl2O4 (Ni60), 40% NiO/NiAl2O4 (Ni40), 40% Mn3O4/Mg–ZrO2 (Mn40) and FeTiO3 (Fe)) were tested under alternating reducing/oxidizing cycles...... deposition compared to Mn40, specially at high temperatures. Carbon deposition could be controlled by decreasing the temperature and the time for the reduction step. The addition of water also reduced the amount of carbon deposited, which was completely avoided working with a H2O/C7H8 molar ratio of 26.4....

  4. Short contact therapy in psoriasis Tar vs Anthralin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar P

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty cases (group I having psoriasis were studied with a view to assess the efficacy of combination of short contact coal tar therapy, sunrays exposure and short contact anthralin therapy. Results were compared with thirty patients (group II with psoriasis using anthralin paste as per Ingram technique as control. The combined short contact therapy in group I patients with intensive 90 to 120 minutes treatment sessions done once in every alternate day resulted in complete clearing in 19 (63.3% patients, 3 (10% showed more than 50% clearing of lesions, 6 (20% had 21-50% improvement of lesions, one (3.3% had 5-20% improvement and disease got worse in one (3.3% case. The average rate of clearance of lesions started to appear between 10-22 days with a mean of 16 days. In group II out of 30 patients using anthralin paste every day, 16 (53.3% showed complete clearing of lesions, 5 (16.6% showed more than 50% clearing of lesions, 4 (13.3% had 21-50% improvement of lesions, two (6.6% patients had 5-20% improvement of lesions and the disease got worse in 3 (10% cases. The average rate of clearance of lesions started to appear between 18-28 days with a mean of 23 days. The combined short contact therapy schedule allows minimal time away from work, decreased hours per week in contact with coal tar and anthralin, decreased cost and a low risk of side effects.

  5. Opening of the TAR hairpin in the HIV-1 genome causes aberrant RNA dimerization and packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Atze T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TAR hairpin is present at both the 5′ and 3′ end of the HIV-1 RNA genome. The 5′ element binds the viral Tat protein and is essential for Tat-mediated activation of transcription. We recently observed that complete TAR deletion is allowed in the context of an HIV-1 variant that does not depend on this Tat-TAR axis for transcription. Mutations that open the 5′ stem-loop structure did however affect the leader RNA conformation and resulted in a severe replication defect. In this study, we set out to analyze which step of the HIV-1 replication cycle is affected by this conformational change of the leader RNA. Results We demonstrate that opening the 5′ TAR structure through a deletion in either side of the stem region caused aberrant dimerization and reduced packaging of the unspliced viral RNA genome. In contrast, truncation of the TAR hairpin through deletions in both sides of the stem did not affect RNA dimer formation and packaging. Conclusions These results demonstrate that, although the TAR hairpin is not essential for RNA dimerization and packaging, mutations in TAR can significantly affect these processes through misfolding of the relevant RNA signals.

  6. Geochemical Characteristics and Origin of Tar Mats from the Yaha Field in Tarim Basin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敏; 张俊; 等

    1999-01-01

    Tar mats were firstly discovered and determined accurately in terrestrial oil and gas reservoirs associated with Lower Tertiary sandstone reservoirs in the Yaha field of the Tarim Basin,China,by thin-layer chromatography-flame ionization detector(TLC-FID)and Rock-Eval analysis.The relative content of asphaltene in gross composition of tar mat extracts accounts for more than 30%,that in the corresponding oil leg less than 20%.In the geochemical description profile of oil gas reservoirs,drastic changes in asphaltene contents between tar mats and oil legs could be discovered.This in an important marker to determine tar mats.Distribution characteristics of saturated and aromaic hydrocarbons from reservoir core extracts and crude oils in the Yaha oil and gas reservoirs in the Tarim Basin are described systematically in this paper,and the results show there are similarities among n-alkane distribution characteristics,biomarker distribution characteristics and their combined characteristics of saturated hydrocarbons,and the geochemical characteristics of aromatic hydrocarbons for tar mats.oil leg,asphaltic sand and crude oil.These characteristics suggest the hydrocarbons in these samples were originated from the common source rocks.However,the geochemical characteristics of tar mats reveales that the mechanism of formation of tar mats is the precipitation of asphaltene from crude oils in petroleum reservoirs caused by increased dissolved gas in oil legs(gas injection).

  7. DETERMINATION OF WATER CONTENT IN PYROLYTIC TARS USING COULOMETRIC KARL-FISHER TITRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Jílková

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The liquid organic fraction of pyrolytic tar has a high energy value which makes possible its utilization as an energy source. However, before utilization, it is crucial to remove water from the liquid fraction. The presence of water reduces the energy value of pyrolytic tars. Water separation from the organic tar fraction is a complex process, since an emulsion can be readily formed. Therefore, after phase separation, it is important to know the residual water content in the organic phase and whether it is necessary to further dry it. The results presented in this manuscript focus on a water determination in liquid products from coal and biomass pyrolysis by a coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration. The Coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration is often used for a water content determination in gaseous, liquid and solid samples. However, to date, this titration method has not been used for a water determination in tars. A new water determination method, which has been tested on different types of tar, has been developed. The Coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration is suitable for tar samples with a water content not greater than 5 wt. %. The obtained experimental results indicate that the new introduced method can be used with a very good repeatability for a water content determination in tars.

  8. Understanding the stability of pyrolysis tars from biomass in a view point of free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenjing; Liu, Qingya; Shi, Lei; Liu, Zhenyu; Ci, Donghui; Lievens, Caroline; Guo, Xiaofen; Liu, Muxin

    2014-03-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass has attracted increasing attention worldwide to produce bio-tars that can be upgraded into liquid fuels and chemicals. However, the bio-tars are usually poor in quality and stability and are difficult to be upgraded. To better understand the nature of the bio-tars, this work reveals radical concentration of tars derived from pyrolysis of two kinds of biomass. The tars were obtained by condensing the pyrolysis volatiles in 3s. It shows that the tars contain large amounts of radicals, at a level of 10(16)spins/g, and are able to generate more radicals at temperatures of 573K or higher, reaching a level of 10(19)spins/g at 673K in less than 30min. The radical generation in the tar samples is attributed to the formation of THF insoluble matters (coke), which also contain radicals. The radical concentrations of the aqueous liquids obtained in pyrolysis are also studied.

  9. Sampling of benzene in tar matrices from biomass gasification using two different solid-phase sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipovs, Sergejs

    2008-06-01

    Biomass tar mainly consists of stable aromatic compounds such as benzene and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, benzene being the biggest tar component in real biomass gasification gas. For the analysis of individual tar compounds, the solid-phase adsorption method was chosen. According to this method, tar samples are collected on a column with an amino-phase sorbent. With a high benzene concentration in biomass tar, some of the benzene will not be collected on the amino-phase sorbent. To get over this situation, we have installed another column with activated charcoal which is intended for collection of volatile organic compounds, including benzene, after the column with the amino-phase sorbent. The study of maximal adsorption amounts of various compounds on both adsorbents while testing different sampling volumes led to the conclusion that benzene is a limiting compound. The research proved that the use of two sorbents (500 mg + 100 mg) connected in series allows for assessment of tar in synthesis gas with a tar concentration up to 30-40 g m(-3), which corresponds to the requirements of most gasifiers.

  10. Catalytic Tar Reduction for Assistance in Thermal Conversion of Space Waste for Energy Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraccio, Anne Joan; Devor, Robert William; Hintze, Paul E.; Muscatello, Anthony C.; Nur, Mononita

    2014-01-01

    The Trash to Gas (TtG) project investigates technologies for converting waste generated during spaceflight into various resources. One of these technologies was gasification, which employed a downdraft reactor designed and manufactured at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for the conversion of simulated space trash to carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide would then be converted to methane for propulsion and water for life support systems. A minor byproduct of gasification includes large hydrocarbons, also known as tars. Tars are unwanted byproducts that add contamination to the product stream, clog the reactor and cause complications in analysis instrumentation. The objective of this research was to perform reduction studies of a mock tar using select catalysts and choose the most effective for primary treatment within the KSC downdraft gasification reactor. Because the KSC reactor is operated at temperatures below typical gasification reactors, this study evaluates catalyst performance below recommended catalytic operating temperatures. The tar reduction experimentation was observed by passing a model tar vapor stream over the catalysts at similar conditions to that of the KSC reactor. Reduction in tar was determined using gas chromatography. Tar reduction efficiency and catalyst performances were evaluated at different temperatures.

  11. Carbazole is a naturally occurring inhibitor of angiogenesis and inflammation isolated from antipsoriatic coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack L. Arbiser; Baskaran Govindarajan; Traci E. Battle; Rebecca Lynch; David A. Frank; Masuko Ushio-Fukai; Betsy N. Perry; David F. Stern; G. Tim Bowden; Anquan Liu; Eva Klein; Pawel J. Kolodziejski; N. Tony Eissa; Chowdhury F. Hossain; Dale G. Nagle [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States). Department of Dermatology

    2006-06-15

    Coal tar is one of the oldest and an effective treatment for psoriasis. Coal tar has been directly applied to the skin, or used in combination with UV light as part of the Goeckerman treatment. The use of coal tar has caused long-term remissions in psoriasis, but has fallen out of favor because the treatment requires hospitalization and coal tar is poorly acceptable aesthetically to patients. Thus, determining the active antipsoriatic component of coal tar is of considerable therapeutic interest. We fractionated coal tar into its components, and tested them using the SVR angiogenesis inhibitor assay. Treatment of SVR endothelial cells with coal tar fractions resulted in the isolation of a single fraction with antiangiogenic activity. The active antiangiogenic compound in coal tar is carbazole. In addition to antiangiogenic activity, carbazole inhibited the production of inflammatory IL-15 by human mononuclear cells. IL-15 is elevated in psoriasis and is thought to contribute to psoriatic inflammation. Carbazole treatment also reduced activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is proinflammatory and elevated in psoriasis. The effect of carbazole on upstream pathways in human psoriasis was determined, and carbazole was shown to inhibit signal transducer and activator of transcription (stat)3-mediated transcription, which has been shown to be relevant in human psoriasis. IL-15, iNOS, and stat3 activation require the activation of the small GTPase rac for optimal activity. Carbazole was found to inhibit rac activation as a mechanism for its inhibition of downstream inflammatory and angiogenic pathways. Given its antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory activities, carbazole is likely a major component of the antipsoriatic activity of coal tar. Carbazole and derivatives may be useful in the therapy of human psoriasis.

  12. Comprehensive database of Manufactured Gas Plant tars. Part C. Heterocyclic and hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallacher, Christopher; Thomas, Russell; Lord, Richard; Kalin, Robert M; Taylor, Chris

    2017-08-15

    Coal tars are a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds that were by-products from the manufactured gas and coke making industries. The tar compositions varied depending on many factors such as the temperature of production and the type of retort used. For this reason a comprehensive database of the compounds found in different tar types is of value to understand both how their compositions differ and what potential chemical hazards are present. This study focuses on the heterocyclic and hydroxylated compounds present in a database produced from 16 different tars from five different production processes. Samples of coal tar were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and derivatized post-extraction using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) with 1% trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS). The derivatized samples were analysed using two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC/TOFMS). A total of 865 heterocyclic compounds and 359 hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected in 16 tar samples produced by five different processes. The contents of both heterocyclic and hydroxylated PAHs varied greatly with the production process used, with the heterocyclic compounds giving information about the feedstock used. Of the 359 hydroxylated PAHs detected the majority would not have been be detected without the use of derivatization. Coal tars produced using different production processes and feedstocks yielded tars with significantly different heterocyclic and hydroxylated contents. The concentrations of the individual heterocyclic compounds varied greatly even within the different production processes and provided information about the feedstock used to produce the tars. The hydroxylated PAH content of the samples provided important analytical information that would otherwise not have been obtained without the use of derivatization and GCxGC/TOFMS. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Characterization of Waste Tar Associated with Abandoned Wood Chemical Plant Sites in Northwest Pennsylvania, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edendorn, H.M.; Severson, D. (Allegheny Institute of Natural History, Bradford, PA)

    2007-07-01

    Over 70 wood chemical plants operated in northern Pennsylvania between ca. 1890 and 1950, all located within 72 km of the New York state border. Their original purpose was to salvage the small unwanted hardwood trees left behind by the lumber mills, and to make charcoal, calcium acetate and methanol for a number of industrial uses via destructive distillation. At many old wood chemical plant sites, unknown quantities of wood tar remain as a residual contaminant and pose a pollution threat to aquatic life in nearby streams. Research on the composition and properties of residual wood tars from five abandoned industrial sites in Pennsylvania are described. Weathered wood tars were more viscous and contained fewer volatile and semivolatile organic compounds than did soil-buried tars. Phenol, 2-methylphenol (o-cresol), 4-methylphenol (p-cresol), and 2, 4-dimethylphenol were found in all sampled tars. These water-soluble phenolic compounds were released quasi-instantaneously in aqueous solution, followed by a slower rate of release, consistent with the behavior of similar compounds in other dense non-aqueous liquids. Air-exposed wood tar deposits developed a hard crust, which contained fewer volatiles and semivolatiles and had a higher softening point than other samples. These tars eroded to form a powdered soil colonized by lichens and mosses. Residual wood tar material found at one site was shown to be thermally altered, likely during the historical destruction of the chemical plant by fire. Recovered wood tar wastes have a relatively high heating value and may have use as a potential, but limited, alternate energy source.

  14. A comparison of thermal conversion process for several coal tar pitches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Y.; Shui, H.; Yuan, X. [East China Metallurgical Institute, Ma`anshan (China)

    1995-03-01

    The property and constituents of coal tar pitch are of great importance to the production of raw material for needle coke. Structural constituents of five coal tar pitches were determined using {sup 1}H-NMR. Besides, thermal conversion process of these pitches in which primary quinoline in soluble fraction was removed by centrifugal separation method was also investigated. The experimental results show Baogang (I) and Meishan coal tar pitches meet the requirements of raw material for needle coke. The thermal conversion data was correlated with structural parameters. 6 refs.,1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Characterization of the replication and stability regions of Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR.

    OpenAIRE

    Gallie, D R; Zaitlin, D; Perry, K L; Kado, C I

    1984-01-01

    A 5.4-kilobase region containing the origin of replication and stability maintenance of the 44-kilobase Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR has been mapped and characterized. Within this region is a 1.3-kilobase segment that is capable of directing autonomous replication. The remaining segment contains the stability locus for maintenance of pTAR during nonselective growth. Approximately 35% of pTAR shares sequence homology with pAg119, a 44-kilobase cryptic plasmid in grapevine strain 1D11...

  16. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report, July 1990--July 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1992-04-01

    Contents of this report include the following: executive summary; characterization of the native bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit; influence of carboxylic acid content on bitumen viscosity; water based oil sand separation technology; extraction of bitumen from western oil sands by an energy-efficient thermal method; large- diameter fluidized bed reactor studies; rotary kiln pyrolysis of oil sand; catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; ebullieted bed hydrotreating and hydrocracking; super critical fluid extraction; bitumen upgrading; 232 references; Appendix A--Whiterocks tar sand deposit bibliography; Appendix B--Asphalt Ridge tar sand deposit bibliography; and Appendix C--University of Utah tar sands bibliography.

  17. Potential use of fucose-appended dendrimer/α-cyclodextrin conjugates as NF-κB decoy carriers for the treatment of lipopolysaccharide-induced fulminant hepatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akao, Chiho; Tanaka, Takahiro; Onodera, Risako; Ohyama, Ayumu; Sato, Nana; Motoyama, Keiichi; Higashi, Taishi; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2014-11-10

    The purpose of the present study is to treat lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fulminant hepatitis by NF-κB decoy complex with fucose-appended dendrimer (generation 2; G2) conjugate with α-cyclodextrin (Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2)). Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2, average degree of substitution of fucose (DSF2))/NF-κB decoy complex significantly suppressed nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production from LPS-stimulated NR8383 cells, a rat alveolar macrophage cell line, by adequate physicochemical properties and fucose receptor-mediated cellular uptake. Intravenous injection of Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2, DSF2)/NF-κB decoy complex extended the survival of LPS-induced fulminant hepatitis model mice. In addition, Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2, DSF2)/NF-κB decoy complex administered intravenously highly accumulated in the liver, compared to naked NF-κB decoy alone. Furthermore, the liver accumulation of Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2, DSF2)/NF-κB decoy complex was inhibited by the pretreatment with GdCl3, a specific inhibitor of Kupffer cell uptake. Also, the serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and TNF-α levels in LPS-induced fulminant hepatitis model mice were significantly attenuated by the treatment with Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2, DSF2)/NF-κB decoy complex, compared with naked NF-κB decoy alone. Taken together, these results suggest that Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2, DSF2) has the potential for a novel Kupffer cell-selective NF-κB decoy carrier for the treatment of LPS-induced fulminant hepatitis in mice.

  18. Dermatological exposure to coal tar and bladder cancer risk: a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofzen, J.H.; Aben, K.K.H.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Valk, P.G. van der; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Coal tar ointments are used as treatment of various skin diseases, especially psoriasis and eczema. These ointments contain several carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Metabolites of these polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are excreted in the urine and therefore, dermatological

  19. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Uinta-Piceance Province (020) Tar Sand Deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Tar sands represent a significant source of hydrocarbons in the United States. Also known by several other names including bitumen-bearing rocks, natural asphalt,...

  20. Secondary reactions of tar during thermochemical biomass conversion[Dissertation 14341

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morf, P.O.

    2001-07-01

    This dissertation submitted to the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich presents and discusses the results obtained during the examination of the processes involved in the formation and conversion of tar in biomass gasification plant. Details are given on the laboratory reactor system used to provide separated tar production and conversion for the purposes of the experiments carried out. The results of analyses made of the tar and the gaseous products obtained after its conversion at various temperatures are presented. The development of kinetic models using the results of the experiments that were carried out is described. The results of the experiments and modelling are compared with the corresponding results obtained using a full-scale down-draft, fixed-bed gasifier. The author is of the opinion that the reaction conditions found in full-scale gasifiers can be well simulated using heterogeneous tar conversion experiments using the lab reactor system.

  1. Thatcheri tütar avalikustas Raudse Leedi nõdrameelsuse / Sandra Maasalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Maasalu, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Postimees : na russkom jazõke 26. aug. 2008, lk. 9. Suurbritannia endise peaministri Margaret Thatcheri tütar Carol Thatcher kirjutab peatselt ilmuvas mälestusteraamatus oma ema dementsusest

  2. Upgrading producer gas quality from rubber wood gasification in a radio frequency tar thermocatalytic treatment reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Samsudin; Zainal, Z A

    2013-12-01

    This study focused on improving the producer gas quality using radio frequency (RF) tar thermocatalytic treatment reactor. The producer gas containing tar, particles and water was directly passed at a particular flow rate into the RF reactor at various temperatures for catalytic and thermal treatments. Thermal treatment generates higher heating value of 5.76 MJ Nm(-3) at 1200°C. Catalytic treatments using both dolomite and Y-zeolite provide high tar and particles conversion efficiencies of about 97% on average. The result also showed that light poly-aromatic hydrocarbons especially naphthalene and aromatic compounds particularly benzene and toluene were still found even at higher reaction temperatures. Low energy intensive RF tar thermocatalytic treatment was found to be effective for upgrading the producer gas quality to meet the end user requirements and increasing its energy content.

  3. Effects of Syngas Cooling and Biomass Filter Medium on Tar Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Thapa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomass gasification is a proven technology; however, one of the major obstacles in using product syngas for electric power generation and biofuels is the removal of tar. The purpose of this research was to develop and evaluate effectiveness of tar removal methods by cooling the syngas and using wood shavings as filtering media. The performance of the wood shavings filter equipped with an oil bubbler and heat exchanger as cooling systems was tested using tar-laden syngas generated from a 20-kW downdraft gasifier. The tar reduction efficiencies of wood shavings filter, wood shavings filter with heat exchanger, and wood shavings filter with oil bubbler were 10%, 61%, and 97%, respectively.

  4. Study of catalytic upgrading of biomass tars using Indonesian iron ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicakso, Doni Rahmat; Sutijan, Rochmadi, Budiman, Arief

    2017-03-01

    Catalytic decomposition is a promising way for chemical upgrading process of low quality oil such as biomass tars. In this experiment, catalytic decomposition of biomass tars was performed over Indonesian low grade iron ore catalyst. This process is carried out in a fixed bedreactor which is equipped with preheater to convert the tars into vapor form. The reaction was studied at the temperature range of 500 - 700°C. The kinetic study of catalytic decomposition of biomass tars is represented using first order reaction. The results show that value of constant of chemical reaction is in range 0.2514 - 0.9642 cm3.gr-1.min-1 with value of the frequency factor (A) and the activation energy (E) are 48.98 min-1 and 5724.94 cal.mol-1, respectively.

  5. Dermatological exposure to coal tar and bladder cancer risk: a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofzen, J.H.; Aben, K.K.H.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Valk, P.G. van der; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Coal tar ointments are used as treatment of various skin diseases, especially psoriasis and eczema. These ointments contain several carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Metabolites of these polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are excreted in the urine and therefore, dermatological

  6. Characterisation of dense non-aqueous phase liquids of coal tar using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauchotte-Lindsay, Caroline; McGregor, Laura; Richards, Phil; Kerr, Stephanie; Glenn, Aliyssa; Thomas, Russell; Kalin, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) is a recently developed analytical technique in which two capillary columns with different stationary phases are placed in series enabling planar resolution of the analytes. The resolution power of GCxGC is one order of magnitude higher than that of one dimension gas chromatography. Because of its high resolution capacity, the use of GCxGC for complex environmental samples such as crude oils, petroleum derivatives and polychlorinated biphenyls mixtures has rapidly grown in recent years. We developed a one-step method for the forensic analysis of coal tar dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) from former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) sites. Coal tar is the by-product of the gasification of coal for heating and lighting and it is composed of thousands of organic and inorganic compounds. Before the boom of natural gases and oils, most towns and cities had one or several manufactured gas plants that have, in many cases, left a devastating environmental print due to coal tar contamination. The fate of coal tar DNAPLs, which can persist in the environment for more than a hundred years, is therefore of crucial interest. The presented analytical method consists of a unique clean-up/ extraction stage by pressurized liquid extraction and a single analysis of its organic chemical composition using GCxGC coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). The chemical fingerprinting is further improved by derivatisation by N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) of the tar compounds containing -OH functions such as alcohols and carboxylic acids. We present here how, using the logical order of elution in GCxGC-TOFMS system, 1) the identification of never before observed -OH containing compounds is possible and 2) the isomeric selectivity of an oxidation reaction on a DNAPL sample can be revealed. Using samples collected at various FMGP sites, we demonstrate how this GCxGC method enables the simultaneous

  7. Production of Mesophase Pitch from Coal Tar and Petroleum Pitches using Supercritical Fluid Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZEL, Mustafa Z.

    2002-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is currently being investigated as a possible technique in the production of high quality mesophase pitch from coal tar and petroleum pitches. Mesophase pitch is used to make high technology products, such as carbon fibre. The conventional production of mesophase pitch initially involves the removal of low molecular weight species from coal tar and petroleum pitches. The remaining residue is then transformed into a mesophase pitch through a polym...

  8. Potential for the use of pyrolytic tar from bagasse in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, L.E.B. [Oriente Univ., Chemical Engineering Faculty, Santiago de Cuba (Cuba); Cortez, L.A.B. [State Univ. of Campinas, Agricultural Engineering Faculty, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    1997-12-01

    Tar from pyrolyzed bagasse was characterized according to its main structural features. Its solubility in NaOH solutions results in an alkaline tar solution (ATS) that exhibits surface active properties. The prepared ATS was successfully used as a foam flotation agent in copper mining, as a foaming agent in foam concrete formation, and as a fluidization agent for Portland cement manufacture. The potentialities of by-products of conventional pyrolysis and carbonization processed are stressed. (Author)

  9. Relation Between PAHs and Coal-Tar-Based Pavement Sealant in Urban Environments (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, B. J.; van Metre, P. C.

    2010-12-01

    Since 2003, coal-tar-based sealant products have come under increased scrutiny as a source of PAHs in urban environments. Sealant (or sealcoat) is the black, shiny substance often applied to asphalt pavement, in particular parking lots and driveways, for esthetic and maintenance purposes. Coal-tar-based sealant, one of the two primary pavement sealant types on the market, typically is 20-35 percent coal-tar pitch, a known carcinogen that is more than 50 percent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The PAH content of the coal-tar-based sealant product is about 1,000 times that of a similar, asphalt-based product, on average. This difference is reflected in regional differences in sealant use and PAH concentrations in pavement dust. In the central and eastern U.S., where the coal-tar-based formulation is prevalent, ΣPAH in mobile particles from sealed pavement have been shown to be about 1,000 times higher than in the western U.S., where the asphalt-based formulation is prevalent (the median ΣPAH concentrations are 2,200 mg/kg in the central and eastern U.S. and 2.1 mg/kg in the western U.S.). Source apportionment modeling indicates that, in the central and eastern U.S., particles from sealed pavement are contributing the majority of the PAHs in recently deposited (post-1990) lake sediment, with implications for ecological health, and that coal-tar-based sealant is the primary cause of upward trends in PAHs in U.S. urban lakes. From the standpoint of human health, research indicates that mobile particles from parking lots with coal-tar-based sealant are tracked indoors, resulting in elevated PAH concentrations in house dust. Coal-tar-based sealcoat being applied to an asphalt parking lot at the University of Texas Pickle Research Center.

  10. Flood-induced transport of PAHs from streambed coal tar deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulava, Vijay M; Vaughn, D Syreeta; McKay, Larry D; Driese, Steven G; Cooper, Lee W; Menn, Fu-Min; Levine, Norman S; Sayler, Gary S

    2017-01-01

    We assessed whether coal tar present in contaminated streambed sediments can be mobilized by flood events and be re-deposited in an adjacent floodplain. The study was conducted within a contaminated urban stream where coal tar wastes were released into a 4-km reach from a coke plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA. Sediments containing visible amounts of coal tar were dredged from the streambed in 1997-98 and 2007 as part of a cleanup effort. However, post-dredging sampling indicated that very high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) remained in streambed sediments. Sampling of sediments in the floodplain at two sites downstream of the coke plant indicated that high concentrations of PAHs were also present in the floodplain, even though no coal tar was observed in the samples. Age-dating of the floodplain sediments using (137)Cs indicated that peak PAH concentrations were contemporary with coke plant operations. While there was little or any direct contamination of the floodplain sediments by coal tar, sediment contamination was likely a result of deposition of suspended streambed sediments containing sorbed PAHs. A flood model developed to delineate the extent of flooding in various flood recurrence scenarios confirmed the potential for contaminated streambed sediments to be transported into the adjacent floodplain. It was hypothesized that coal tar, which was visibly "sticky" during dredging-based stream cleanup, may act as a binding agent for streambed sediments, decreasing mobility and transport in the stream. Therefore, coal tar is likely to remain a persistent contaminant source for downstream reaches of the stream and the adjacent floodplain during flood events. This study also showed that even after excavation of tar-rich streambed sediments, PAH contaminated non-tarry sediments may be a source of flood-related contamination in the adjacent flood plain. A conceptual framework was developed to delineate specific mechanisms that can

  11. Integrated Biomass Gasification with Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Selective Tar Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lingzhi; Wei, Wei; Manke, Jeff; Vazquez, Arturo; Thompson, Jeff; Thompson, Mark

    2011-05-28

    Biomass gasification is a flexible and efficient way of utilizing widely available domestic renewable resources. Syngas from biomass has the potential for biofuels production, which will enhance energy security and environmental benefits. Additionally, with the successful development of low Btu fuel engines (e.g. GE Jenbacher engines), syngas from biomass can be efficiently used for power/heat co-generation. However, biomass gasification has not been widely commercialized because of a number of technical/economic issues related to gasifier design and syngas cleanup. Biomass gasification, due to its scale limitation, cannot afford to use pure oxygen as the gasification agent that used in coal gasification. Because, it uses air instead of oxygen, the biomass gasification temperature is much lower than well-understood coal gasification. The low temperature leads to a lot of tar formation and the tar can gum up the downstream equipment. Thus, the biomass gasification tar removal is a critical technology challenge for all types of biomass gasifiers. This USDA/DOE funded program (award number: DE-FG36-O8GO18085) aims to develop an advanced catalytic tar conversion system that can economically and efficiently convert tar into useful light gases (such as syngas) for downstream fuel synthesis or power generation. This program has been executed by GE Global Research in Irvine, CA, in collaboration with Professor Lanny Schmidt's group at the University of Minnesota (UoMn). Biomass gasification produces a raw syngas stream containing H2, CO, CO2, H2O, CH4 and other hydrocarbons, tars, char, and ash. Tars are defined as organic compounds that are condensable at room temperature and are assumed to be largely aromatic. Downstream units in biomass gasification such as gas engine, turbine or fuel synthesis reactors require stringent control in syngas quality, especially tar content to avoid plugging (gum) of downstream equipment. Tar- and ash-free syngas streams are a critical

  12. Criteria for selection of dolomites and catalysts for tar elimination from biomass gasification gas. Kinetic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Narvaez, I.; Orio, A. [Madrid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chem. Eng.

    1996-12-31

    Calcined dolomites and commercial steam reforming catalysts are used downstream biomass gasifiers for hot catalytic raw gas cleaning. To further compare these solids under a rigorous basis, a reaction network and a kinetic model are presented. The apparent kinetic constant for the tar reduction is here proposed as a basis of comparison. Tar sampling and analysis, and the units used for the space-time in the catalytic reactor affect the kinetic constants observed. (author) (2 refs.)

  13. Selected constituents in the smokes of foreign commercial cigaretts: tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, R.A.; Quincy, R.B.; Guerin, M.R.

    1979-05-01

    The tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide contents of the smokes of 220 brands of foreign commercial cigarettes are reported. In some instances, filter cigarettes of certain brands were found to deliver as much or more smoke constituents than their nonfilter counterparts. Also, data indicated that there can be a great variation in the tar, nicotine, or carbon monoxide content of the smoke of samples of a given brand of cigarettes, depending on the nation in which they are purchased. 24 tables.

  14. Light absorption properties of laboratory generated tar ball particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hoffer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tar balls (TBs are a specific particle type which is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g. organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter is emitted mainly during flaming conditions from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up generating pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM and total carbon (TC analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8–3.0 m2 g−1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9 in the wavelength range 467–652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84–0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS. Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning emissions, these findings may

  15. Catalytic decomposition of tar derived from wood waste pyrolysis using Indonesian low grade iron ore as catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicakso, Doni Rahmat [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Lambung Mangkurat University, Jalan A. Yani KM. 36 Banjarbaru, 70714, South Kalimantan (Indonesia); Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Sutijan; Rochmadi [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Budiman, Arief, E-mail: abudiman@ugm.ac.id [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Center for Energy Studies, Gadjah Mada University, Sekip K1A, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia)

    2016-06-03

    Low grade iron ore can be used as an alternative catalyst for bio-tar decomposition. Compared to other catalysts, such as Ni, Rd, Ru, Pd and Pt, iron ore is cheaper. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of using low grade iron ore as catalyst for tar catalytic decomposition in fixed bed reactor. Tar used in this experiment was pyrolysis product of wood waste while the catalyst was Indonesian low grade iron ore. The variables studied were temperatures between 500 – 600 °C and catalyst weight between 0 – 40 gram. The first step, tar was evaporated at 450 °C to produce tar vapor. Then, tar vapor was flowed to fixed bed reactor filled low grade iron ore. Gas and tar vapor from reactor was cooled, then the liquid and uncondensable gas were analyzed by GC/MS. The catalyst, after experiment, was weighed to calculate total carbon deposited into catalyst pores. The results showed that the tar components that were heavy and light hydrocarbon were decomposed and cracked within the iron ore pores to from gases, light hydrocarbon (bio-oil) and carbon, thus decreasing content tar in bio-oil and increasing the total gas product. In conclusion, the more low grade iron ore used as catalyst, the tar content in the liquid decrease, the H{sup 2} productivity increased and calorimetric value of bio-oil increased.

  16. Catalytic decomposition of tar derived from wood waste pyrolysis using Indonesian low grade iron ore as catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicakso, Doni Rahmat; Sutijan, Rochmadi, Budiman, Arief

    2016-06-01

    Low grade iron ore can be used as an alternative catalyst for bio-tar decomposition. Compared to other catalysts, such as Ni, Rd, Ru, Pd and Pt, iron ore is cheaper. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of using low grade iron ore as catalyst for tar catalytic decomposition in fixed bed reactor. Tar used in this experiment was pyrolysis product of wood waste while the catalyst was Indonesian low grade iron ore. The variables studied were temperatures between 500 - 600 °C and catalyst weight between 0 - 40 gram. The first step, tar was evaporated at 450 °C to produce tar vapor. Then, tar vapor was flowed to fixed bed reactor filled low grade iron ore. Gas and tar vapor from reactor was cooled, then the liquid and uncondensable gas were analyzed by GC/MS. The catalyst, after experiment, was weighed to calculate total carbon deposited into catalyst pores. The results showed that the tar components that were heavy and light hydrocarbon were decomposed and cracked within the iron ore pores to from gases, light hydrocarbon (bio-oil) and carbon, thus decreasing content tar in bio-oil and increasing the total gas product. In conclusion, the more low grade iron ore used as catalyst, the tar content in the liquid decrease, the H2 productivity increased and calorimetric value of bio-oil increased.

  17. Molecular dynamics studies of the HIV-1 TAR and its complex with argininamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nifosì, Riccardo; Reyes, Carolina M.; Kollman, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of HIV-1 TAR and its complex with argininamide is investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations starting from NMR structures, with explicit inclusion of water and periodic boundary conditions particle mesh Ewald representation of the electrostatic energy. During simulations of free and argininamide-bound TAR, local structural patterns, as determined by NMR experiments, were reproduced. An interdomain motion was observed in the simulations of free TAR, which is absent in the case of bound TAR, leading to the conclusion that the free conformation of TAR is intrinsically more flexible than the bound conformation. In particular, in the bound conformation the TAR–argininamide interface is very well ordered, as a result of the formation of a U·A·U base triple, which imposes structural constraints on the global conformation of the molecule. Free energy analysis, which includes solvation contributions, was used to evaluate the influence of van der Waals and electrostatic terms on formation of the complex and on the conformational rearrangement from free to bound TAR. PMID:11121486

  18. HIV-1 TAR miRNA protects against apoptosis by altering cellular gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiri Eti

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference is a gene regulatory mechanism that employs small RNA molecules such as microRNA. Previous work has shown that HIV-1 produces TAR viral microRNA. Here we describe the effects of the HIV-1 TAR derived microRNA on cellular gene expression. Results Using a variation of standard techniques we have cloned and sequenced both the 5' and 3' arms of the TAR miRNA. We show that expression of the TAR microRNA protects infected cells from apoptosis and acts by down-regulating cellular genes involved in apoptosis. Specifically, the microRNA down-regulates ERCC1 and IER3, protecting the cell from apoptosis. Comparison to our cloned sequence reveals possible target sites for the TAR miRNA as well. Conclusion The TAR microRNA is expressed in all stages of the viral life cycle, can be detected in latently infected cells, and represents a mechanism wherein the virus extends the life of the infected cell for the purpose of increasing viral replication.

  19. Tar sands. Fuelling the climate crisis, undermining EU energy security and damaging development objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wykes, S.; Heywood, S.; Urbaniak, D. (ed.); De Clerck, P. (ed.)

    2010-05-15

    Tar sands - bitumen that is extracted and upgraded to produce synthetic crude - has been heavily criticised for its poor environmental and social outcomes, locally and globally. Tar sands generates on average 3 to 5 times more greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than conventional oil, representing a huge threat to climate protection. Canada is currently the only major centre of production but investment is expanding, including by European oil companies such as BP, Shell, Total and ENI. The second part of this report shows which oil companies are increasing their investments in tar sands and oil shale, and where. In Canada, tar sands development is the fastest growing source of GHG emissions and is undermining the country's Kyoto commitments. Tar sands projects are also extremely costly and capital intensive - to the point where investors and analysts have raised concerns about their longer-term financial viability in a world where the introduction of low-carbon regulation and reduced demand for expensive fossil fuels are increasingly likely. A more strategic approach to energy policy would encourage redirection of the hundreds of billions to be invested over the next decade in tar sands production in Canada alone into development of renewable fuel technologies and energy efficiency measures.

  20. Recognition of HIV-TAR RNA using neomycin-benzimidazole conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Nihar; Kumar, Sunil; Watkins, Derrick; Wang, Deyun; Appella, Daniel H; Arya, Dev P

    2013-10-15

    Synthesis of a novel class of compounds and their biophysical studies with TAR-RNA are presented. The synthesis of these compounds was achieved by conjugating neomycin, an aminoglycoside, with benzimidazoles modeled from a B-DNA minor groove binder, Hoechst 33258. The neomycin-benzimidazole conjugates have varying linkers that connect the benzimidazole and neomycin units. The linkers of varying length (5-23 atoms) in these conjugates contain one to three triazole units. The UV thermal denaturation experiments showed that the conjugates resulted in greater stabilization of the TAR-RNA than either neomycin or benzimidazole used in the synthesis of conjugates. These results were corroborated by the FID displacement and tat-TAR inhibition assays. The binding of ligands to the TAR-RNA is affected by the length and composition of the linker. Our results show that increasing the number of triazole groups and the linker length in these compounds have diminishing effect on the binding to TAR-RNA. Compounds that have shorter linker length and fewer triazole units in the linker displayed increased affinity towards the TAR RNA.

  1. Gasification of municipal solid waste in a downdraft gasifier: Analysis of tar formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabitha Geoffrey Etutu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, municipal solid waste (MSW from a dumpsite was converted into refuse derived fuel (RDF and used as feedstock for an air-blown gasification process. The gasification process was conducted in a 10 kg.hr -1 downdraft gasifier at different air flow rates of 300, 350, 400, 450 and 550 NL.min1 at atmospheric pressure in order to investigate the quantity and quality of tar formed. It was shown that the increase in the air flow rate from 300 NL.min1 to 550 NL.min1 led to an increase in the oxidation temperature from 719°C to 870°C and an increase in the reduction temperature from 585°C to 750°C, respectively. Tar was reduced from 15 g.Nm3 to 4.7 g.Nm3 respectively. Heavy tar compounds (>C17 e.g. pyrene and phenathrene, decreased with the increase in the light tar compounds (tar reduction through a tar cracking process.

  2. Manganese oxide as catalyst for tar cleaning of biomass-derived gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Fredrik; Israelsson, Mikael; Seemann, Martin; Thunman, Henrik [Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Energy Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    The possibilities to upgrade raw gas with the use of a manganese oxide have been investigated in an application for secondary tar cleaning of biomass-derived gas. Experiments were conducted in a reactor system where a novel technique that combines tar cleaning with catalyst regeneration is applied. Raw gas from the Chalmers non-catalytic steam biomass gasifier - containing roughly 32 g{sub tar}/Nm{sub gas} {sup 3} - was fed to the tar cleaning reactor. The tar reforming qualities of the manganese oxide were evaluated in the reactor system using a mixture of 23 wt.% catalysts in silica sand at the temperatures 700 and 800 C. Experiments showed that the catalyst was continuously regenerated from carbon deposits and that the total amount of tars was decreased by as much as 44.5 % at a gas residence time of 0.4 s in the bed. The catalyst showed activity in water-gas shift reaction and the H{sub 2}/CO ratio increased from 0.6 in the raw gas to a peak value of 1 in the reformed gas at 800 C. Only a slight decrease in methane and acetylene content was observed for both operating temperatures. (orig.)

  3. Deciphering structure-activity relationships in a series of Tat/TAR inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Lise; González, Alejandro López; Di Giorgio, Audrey; Gaysinski, Marc; Teixido Closa, Jordi; Tejedor, Roger Estrada; Azoulay, Stéphane; Patino, Nadia

    2016-11-01

    A series of pentameric "Polyamide Amino Acids" (PAAs) compounds derived from the same trimeric precursor have been synthesized and investigated as HIV TAR RNA ligands, in the absence and in the presence of a Tat fragment. All PAAs bind TAR with similar sub-micromolar affinities but their ability to compete efficiently with the Tat fragment strongly differs, IC50 ranging from 35 nM to >2 μM. While NMR and CD studies reveal that all PAA interact with TAR at the same site and induce globally the same RNA conformational change upon binding, a comparative thermodynamic study of PAA/TAR equilibria highlights distinct TAR binding modes for Tat competitor and non-competitor PAAs. This led us to suggest two distinct interaction modes that have been further validated by molecular modeling studies. While the binding of Tat competitor PAAs induces a contraction at the TAR bulge region, the binding of non-competitor ones widens it. This could account for the distinct PAA ability to compete with Tat fragment. Our work illustrates how comparative thermodynamic studies of a series of RNA ligands of same chemical family are of value for understanding their binding modes and for rationalizing structure-activity relationships.

  4. Integrated Biomass Gasification with Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Selective Tar Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lingzhi; Wei, Wei; Manke, Jeff; Vazquez, Arturo; Thompson, Jeff; Thompson, Mark

    2011-05-28

    Biomass gasification is a flexible and efficient way of utilizing widely available domestic renewable resources. Syngas from biomass has the potential for biofuels production, which will enhance energy security and environmental benefits. Additionally, with the successful development of low Btu fuel engines (e.g. GE Jenbacher engines), syngas from biomass can be efficiently used for power/heat co-generation. However, biomass gasification has not been widely commercialized because of a number of technical/economic issues related to gasifier design and syngas cleanup. Biomass gasification, due to its scale limitation, cannot afford to use pure oxygen as the gasification agent that used in coal gasification. Because, it uses air instead of oxygen, the biomass gasification temperature is much lower than well-understood coal gasification. The low temperature leads to a lot of tar formation and the tar can gum up the downstream equipment. Thus, the biomass gasification tar removal is a critical technology challenge for all types of biomass gasifiers. This USDA/DOE funded program (award number: DE-FG36-O8GO18085) aims to develop an advanced catalytic tar conversion system that can economically and efficiently convert tar into useful light gases (such as syngas) for downstream fuel synthesis or power generation. This program has been executed by GE Global Research in Irvine, CA, in collaboration with Professor Lanny Schmidt's group at the University of Minnesota (UoMn). Biomass gasification produces a raw syngas stream containing H2, CO, CO2, H2O, CH4 and other hydrocarbons, tars, char, and ash. Tars are defined as organic compounds that are condensable at room temperature and are assumed to be largely aromatic. Downstream units in biomass gasification such as gas engine, turbine or fuel synthesis reactors require stringent control in syngas quality, especially tar content to avoid plugging (gum) of downstream equipment. Tar- and ash-free syngas streams are a critical

  5. Response of microbial activities and diversity to PAHs contamination at coal tar contaminated land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Sun, Yujiao; Ding, Aizhong; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Dayi

    2015-04-01

    Coal tar is one of the most hazardous and concerned organic pollutants and the main hazards are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The indigenous microorganisms in soils are capable to degrade PAHs, with essential roles in biochemical process for PAHs natural attenuation. This study investigated 48 soil samples (from 8 depths of 6 boreholes) in Beijing coking and chemistry plant (China) and revealed the correlation between PAHs contamination, soil enzyme activities and microbial community structure, by 16S rRNA denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). At the site, the key contaminants were identified as naphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene and anthracene, and the total PAHs concentration ranged from 0.1 to 923.9 mg/kg dry soil. The total PAHs contamination level was positively correlated (psoil), showing the significant response of microbial population and degrading functions to the organic contamination in soils. The PAHs contamination stimulated the PAHs degrading microbes and promoted their biochemical roles in situ. The positive relationship between bacteria count and dehydrogenase activities (psoil microbial functions at the PAHs heavily contaminated sites, offering deeper understanding on the roles of indigenous microbial community in natural attenuation process.

  6. Producing 88,000 bd. in the tar belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finken, R.E.; Meldau, R.F.

    1972-08-01

    The Phillips Petroleum Co. and its associates have completed the necessary work for producing, treating and transporting 88,000 bopd of crude oil from the Oil Belt of the Orinoco, in the E. part of Venezuela. The first step consisted in assembling the means for diluting the 8$ API crude, coming from the producing horizons of the Morichal field. The second step was the drilling of 41 wells in the Jobo field. The final step consisted in the upgrading of the means of treatment, the pipelining and equipment for handling the increased production. The solvent which is used to dilute the heavy crude comes to the port by tanker and is pumped through a new pipeline to the field, where distribution lines take it to the various wells. Here it is pumped down the tubing to a point above the pump (which is located above a production packer) and then out the annulus. During this cycle the heavy crude is diluted with the light solvent to a consistency where it is manageable. The producing sands of the Tar Belt have a reserve estimate of 700-billion barrels of recoverable oil. Phillips also makes extensive use of thermal recovery methods in producing these wells.

  7. Tar sands : dirty oil and the future of a continent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforuk, A.

    2008-07-01

    This book exposes the environmental, social and political costs of oil sands development in Alberta's Athabasca Deposit. It argues that the earth-destroying production methods of bitumen cost nearly 20 times more than conventional crude to produce and upgrade. Most of the tar sands lie in such deep formations that bitumen must be steamed out of the ground using an array of pumps, pipes and horizontal wells. Steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD), which is the most popular in situ technology used to recover oil sands can have detrimental effects on the boreal forests, wildlife and their habitat. The book emphasized the high greenhouse gas emissions, high energy consumption and suspected health problems associated with oil sands development. It also highlighted the industry's poor record on reclamation. Although some industry players have taken measures to reduce water consumption, more will have to be done to treat and reuse water. The author advocates that changes must be made in order to ensure sustainable development. refs., figs.

  8. Effects of birch tar oils on soil organisms and plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. HAGNER

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of birch tar oil (BTO is a new innovation in plant and animal protection working against various weeds, harmful insects and rodents. Due to its novelty as a biocide/repellent/plant protection product, no comprehensive information on the effects of BTO on non-target soil organisms is available. In this study we examined the impact of BTO on non-target soil organisms (enchytraeids, nematodes and soil microbes and plants using laboratory toxicity tests and field experiments. In addition, we determined the LC50 value of BTO to the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa and the EC50 value of BTO to the offspring production of the collembolan Folsomia candida. The effects of BTO on soil fauna were mostly insignificant. BTO seemed to be detrimental to the growth of plants directly after application, but this effect was short-term; after a period of 2.5 months, the growth of most of the plant species recovered completely from the application. The LC50 for A. caliginosa was 6560 mg BTO kg-1 dry soil and EC50 for juvenile production of F. candida was 5100 mg BTO kg-1 dry soil. The results indicate that the risk caused by BTOs (concentration 500-1360 L ha-1 to the soil environment is insignificant and short-term as compared to the many chemical products applied for similar purposes.;

  9. Topical tazarotene vs. coal tar in stable plaque psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, U.; Kaur, I.; Dogra, S.; De, D.; Kumar, B. [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh (India)

    2010-07-15

    The efficacy of topical tazarotene has not previously been compared with the conventional topical treatment of crude coal tar (CCT) in stable plaque psoriasis. In this nonblinded side-to-side comparison study, patients with chronic stable plaque psoriasis, who had bilaterally symmetrical plaques on the limbs, applied 0.1% tazarotene gel on the right side and 5% CCT ointment on the left side once daily for 12 weeks followed by an 8-week treatment-free follow up period. Severity of psoriatic lesions and response to treatment was evaluated by scoring erythema, scaling and induration (ESI). Of 30 patients recruited, 27 could be assessed. In the per-protocol analysis, the mean percentage reduction in ESI score at the end of the treatment period was 74.15% {+-} 9.43 and 77.37% {+-} 10.93 with tazarotene and CCT, respectively (P {gt} 0.05). A reduction in ESI score of {gt} 75% was seen in 11 (40.74%) and 16 (59.26%) patients with tazarotene and CCT, respectively, at the end of 12 weeks. Side-effects were seen in 48.14% of patients treated with tazarotene, but in no patient treated with CCT. Tazarotene 0.1% gel has comparable clinical efficacy to CCT 5% ointment. CCT ointment remains a cost-effective therapy for plaque psoriasis.

  10. Emissions of tar-containing binders: field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugener, Martin; Emmenegger, Lukas; Mattrel, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the measurement of emissions during field construction of asphalt pavements using tar-containing recycled asphalt pavement (RAP), which is known to release harmful substances, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). At three different test sites, the main emission sources were identified and the total emission rates of fumes and PAHs of the paving process were determined. For this purpose, the paver was temporarily enclosed. While the screed area was the main emission source, the hopper area and freshly compacted pavement were also significant. In comparison with previous laboratory tests, the binder composition and the resulting emissions were comparable, except for Naphthalene. Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) as a representative for carcinogenic PAHs was identified as a good leading compound, correlating well with the toxicity weighted sum of PAHs. In contrast, the unweighted, mass related sum of all EPA PAHs does not seem to be a good parameter to assess workplace concentrations because emissions by mass are dominated by the less hazardous 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAHs. Workplace concentrations for bitumen fumes and PAHs were below limit values in all three field studies. However, the margin was not large and the field tests were done under favourable meteorological conditions. Therefore, we suggest maintaining the current Swiss limit of 5000 mg EPA-PAH per kg binder in the RAP-containing hot mix.

  11. A one-step method for priority compounds of concern in tar from former industrial sites: trimethylsilyl derivatisation with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauchotte-Lindsay, C; Richards, P; McGregor, L A; Thomas, R; Kalin, R M

    2012-08-31

    A dense non-aqueous phase liquid sample formed by release of coal tar into the environment was derivatised by trimethylsilylation using the reagent N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and extracted in hexane using accelerated solvent extraction. This procedure enables comprehensive extraction of an extensive suite of organic compounds from tar, which has not previously been described. Comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time of flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) was used for the analysis of the sample for concurrent evaluation of -OH functional group-containing compounds along with aliphatics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other typical tar compounds normally determined via classic gas chromatography. Using statistically designed experiments, a range of conditions were tested for complete recovery of four different surrogates. The robustness and repeatability of the optimised derivatisation/extraction method was demonstrated. Finally, more than a hundred and fifty derivatised compounds were identified using mass spectra elucidation and GC×GC logical order of elution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the periplasmic domain of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor Tar and its complex with aspartate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mise, Takeshi; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.; Maruyama, Ichiro N., E-mail: ichi@oist.jp [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Kunigami, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan)

    2014-08-27

    The periplasmic domain of the E. coli aspartate receptor Tar was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized with and without bound ligand. The crystals obtained diffracted to resolutions of 1.58 and 1.95 Å, respectively. The cell-surface receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni{sup 2+}. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by its ligands, the Escherichia coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate (Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively) were each crystallized in two different forms. Using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 2.10 and 2.40 Å, respectively. Alternatively, using sodium chloride as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 1.95 and 1.58 Å, respectively. Crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 adopted space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, while those of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 adopted space groups P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and C2, respectively.

  13. A comparison of physicochemical methods for the remediation of porous medium systems contaminated with tar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, Scott C.; Miller, Cass T.

    2014-10-01

    The remediation of former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) sites contaminated with tar DNAPLs (dense non-aqueous phase liquids) presents a significant challenge. The tars are viscous mixtures of thousands of individual compounds, including known and suspected carcinogens. This work investigates the use of combinations of mobilization, solubilization, and chemical oxidation approaches to remove and degrade tars and tar components in porous medium systems. Column experiments were conducted using several flushing solutions, including an alkaline-polymer (AP) solution containing NaOH and xanthan gum (XG), a surfactant-polymer (SP) solution containing Triton X-100 surfactant (TX100) and XG, an alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) solution containing NaOH, TX100, and XG, and base-activated sodium persulfate both with and without added TX100. The effectiveness of the flushing solutions was assessed based on both removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mass and on the reduction of dissolved-phase PAH concentrations. SP flushes of 6.6 to 20.9 PV removed over 99% of residual PAH mass and reduced dissolved-phase concentrations by up to two orders of magnitude. ASP flushing efficiently removed 95-96% of residual PAH mass within about 2 PV, and significantly reduced dissolved-phase concentrations of several low molar mass compounds, including naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, and phenanthrene. AP flushing removed a large portion of the residual tar (77%), but was considerably less effective than SP and ASP in terms of the effect on dissolved PAH concentrations. Persulfate was shown to oxidize tar components, primarily those with low molar mass, however, the overall degradation was relatively low (30-50% in columns with low initial tar saturations), and the impact on dissolved-phase concentrations was minimal.

  14. Iron(II) supramolecular helicates interfere with the HIV-1 Tat–TAR RNA interaction critical for viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Jaroslav; Hannon, Michael J.; Brabec, Viktor

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between the HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat and TAR (transactivation responsive region) RNA, plays a critical role in HIV-1 transcription. Iron(II) supramolecular helicates were evaluated for their in vitro activity to inhibit Tat–TAR RNA interaction using UV melting studies, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and RNase A footprinting. The results demonstrate that iron(II) supramolecular helicates inhibit Tat-TAR interaction at nanomolar concentrations by binding to TAR RNA. These studies provide a new insight into the biological potential of metallosupramolecular helicates.

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF SOME CARCINOGENIC POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN BANGLADESHI VEHICLES EXHAUST TAR BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amzad Hossain

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A more sensitive GC-MS method has been established for the determination of some carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in vehicles exhaust tar samples. The tar samples were extracted using dichloromethane (DMC: n-hexane solvent mixture. A multi-layer clean-up (silica gel/sodium sulphate column was used, followed by glass fiber filter (GFF paper. The method was successfully applied to determine a number of PAHs present in exhaust tar sample of different vehicles of the Atomic Energy Centre, Dhaka, Bangladesh.   Keywords: Carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, vehicles tar samples, identification, GC-MS/MS

  16. Selected constituents in the smokes of U. S. commercial cigaretts: tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, R.A.; Quincy, R.B.; Guerin, M.R.

    1979-05-01

    One hundred twenty-one brands of United States commercial cigarettes were analyzed for their deliveries of tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide under standard analytical smoking conditions. The sample included both filter and nonfilter cigarettes. Comparisons of carbon monoxide deliveries over the range of observed tar deliveries indicated a very high correlation between CO and tar for filter cigarettes, but nonfilter cigarettes tended to produce much less CO than would have been predicted from their tar deliveries. Comparison of ORNL nicotine values for specific brands with those determined by the Federal Trade Commission yield no statistically significant differences between laboratories. 4 figures, 6 tables.

  17. Nuclear TAR DNA-binding protein 43 A new target for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Zheng; Yujie Shi; Dongsheng Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) inclusion bodies can be detected in the degener-ative neurons of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, we induced chronic oxidative stress in-jury by applying malonate to cultured mouse cortical motor neurons. In the later stages of the ma-lonate insult, TDP-43 expression reduced in the nuclei and transferred to the cytoplasm. This was accompanied by neuronal death, mimicking the pathological changes in TDP-43 that are seen in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Interestingly, in the early stages of the response to ma-lonate treatment, nuclear TDP-43 expression increased, and neurons remained relatively intact, without inclusion bodies or fragmentation. Therefore, we hypothesized that the increase of nuclear TDP-43 expression might be a pro-survival factor against oxidative stress injury. This hypothesis was confirmed by an in vitro transgenic experiment, in which overexpression of wild type mouse TDP-43 in cultured cortical motor neurons significantly reduced malonate-induced neuronal death. Our findings suggest that the loss of function of TDP-43 is an important cause of neuronal dege-neration, and upregulation of nuclear TDP-43 expression might be neuroprotective in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  18. Determination of coal tar and creosote constituents in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, R C; Aneiro, K M

    1997-07-11

    Creosote and its parent material, coal tar, are complex mixtures. Upon release their components fractionate into the air, water, soil/sediment and biota; as a function of their physical and chemical properties. Therefore, assessment of their fate and concentrations in the environment must consider a wide variety of both compounds and matrices. Analyses are typically complicated, consisting of sample extraction, purification and chromatography-based final characterization steps. Several new techniques have been introduced to reduce or simplify the number of steps, solvent and time required. Recently developed extraction methods include supercritical fluid, accelerated solvent, microwave and solid-phase microextraction. On-line purification and coupling of extraction and chromatography have also emerged. HPLC and GC remain the major tools for performing the final separations. Application of mass spectrometry has increased as more reliable, versatile and less expensive units have become available, such as the ion trap and mass selective detectors. Fluorescence and diode array UV, in concert with HPLC, and C-, S- and N-selective gas chromatographic detectors are also being applied.

  19. Removal of phenol by powdered activated carbon prepared from coal gasification tar residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong-Lei; Shen, Jun; Niu, Yan-Xia; Wang, Yu-Gao; Liu, Gang; Sheng, Qing-Tao

    2017-04-10

    Coal gasification tar residue (CGTR) is a kind of environmentally hazardous byproduct generated in fixed-bed coal gasification process. The CGTR extracted by ethyl acetate was used to prepare powdered activated carbon (PAC), which is applied later for adsorption of phenol. The results showed that the PAC prepared under optimum conditions had enormous mesoporous structure, and the iodine number reached 2030.11 mg/g, with a specific surface area of 1981 m(2)/g and a total pore volume of 0.92 ml/g. Especially, without loading other substances, the PAC, having a strong magnetism, can be easily separated after it adsorbs phenol. The adsorption of phenol by PAC was studied as functions of contact time, temperature, PAC dosage, solution concentration and pH. The results showed a fast adsorption speed and a high adsorption capacity of PAC. The adsorption process was exothermic and conformed to the Freundlich models. The adsorption kinetics fitted better to the pseudo-second-order model. These results show that CGTR can be used as a potential adsorbent of phenols in wastewater.

  20. Engineering New Catalysts for In-Process Elimination of Tars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Larry G. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2012-09-30

    The key objective of this project was to develop a new and more efficient methodology for engineering and economically producing optimized robust catalysts for the reduction or elimination of tars in biomass gasification. Whereas current catalyst technology typically disposes thin layers of catalytically-active material onto rigid supports via wet chemistry-based methods, this project investigated novel thermal methods for directly incorporating catalytically active materials onto robust supports as well as novel approaches for incorporating catalytically active materials on and/or within an otherwise inert refractory support material which is then subsequently formed and processed to create a catalytically-active material on all exposed surfaces. Specifically, the focus of this engineered catalyst development was on materials which were derived from, or otherwise related to, olivine-like minerals, due to the inherent attrition resistance and moderate catalytic properties exhibited by natural olivine when used in a fluidized bed biomass gasifier. Task 1 of this project successfully demonstrated the direct thermal impregnation of catalytically-active materials onto an olivine substrate, with the production of a Ni-olivine catalyst. Nickel and nickel oxide were thermally impregnated onto an olivine substrate and when reduced were shown to demonstrate improved catalytic activity over the baseline olivine material and equal the tar-decomposing performance of Ni-olivine catalysts prepared by conventional wet impregnation. Task 2 involved coordination with our subcontracted project partners to further develop and characterize catalyst formulations and to optimize activity and production methods. Within this task, several significant new materials were developed. NexTech Materials developed a sintered ceramic nickel-magnesium-silicate catalyst that demonstrated superb catalytic activity and high resistance to deactivation by H2S. Alfred University developed both supported

  1. MAZ-binding G4-decoy with locked nucleic acid and twisted intercalating nucleic acid modifications suppresses KRAS in pancreatic cancer cells and delays tumor growth in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cogoi, Susanna; Zorzet, Sonia; Rapozzi, Valentina;

    2013-01-01

    KRAS mutations are primary genetic lesions leading to pancreatic cancer. The promoter of human KRAS contains a nuclease-hypersensitive element (NHE) that can fold in G4-DNA structures binding to nuclear proteins, including MAZ (myc-associated zinc-finger). Here, we report that MAZ activates KRAS...... transcription. To knockdown oncogenic KRAS in pancreatic cancer cells, we designed oligonucleotides that mimic one of the G-quadruplexes formed by NHE (G4-decoys). To increase their nuclease resistance, two locked nucleic acid (LNA) modifications were introduced at the 3'-end, whereas to enhance the folding...... the Kaplan-Meier median survival time by 70%. Together, our data show that MAZ-specific G4-decoys mimicking a KRAS quadruplex are promising for pancreatic cancer therapy....

  2. Extraction of vanadium from athabasca tar sands fly ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Bueno, C. O.; Spink, D. R.; Rempel, G. L.

    1981-06-01

    The production of refinery grade oil from the Alberta tar sands deposits as currently practiced by Suncor (formally Great Canadian Oil Sands Ltd.—GCOS) generates a substantial amount of petroleum coke fly ash which contains appreciable amounts of valuable metals such as vanadium, nickel and titanium. Although the recovery of vanadium from petroleum ash is a well established commercial practice, it is shown in the present work that such processes are not suitable for recovery of vanadium from the GCOS fly ash. The fact that the GCOS fly ash behaves so differently when compared to other petroleum fly ash is attributed to its high silicon and aluminum contents which tie up the metal values in a silica-alumina matrix. Results of experiments carried out in this investigation indicate that such matrices can be broken down by application of a sodium chloride/water roast of the carbon-free fly ash. Based on results from a series of preliminary studies, a detailed investigation was undertaken in order to define optimum conditions for a vanadium extraction process. The process developed involves a high temperature (875 to 950 °C) roasting of the fly ash in the presence of sodium chloride and water vapor carried out in a rotary screw kiln, followed by dilute sodium hydroxide atmosphereic leaching (98 °C) to solublize about 85 pet of the vanadium originally present in the fly ash. It was found that the salt roasting operation, besides enhancing vanadium recovery, also inhibits silicon dissolution during the subsequent leaching step. The salt roasting treatment is found to improve vanadium recovery significantly when the fly ash is fully oxidized. This is easily achieved by burning off the carbon present in the “as received” fly ash under excess air. The basic leaching used in the new process selectively dissolves vanadium from the roasted ash, leaving nickel and titanium untouched.

  3. Atmospheric tar balls from biomass burning in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kouji; Buseck, Peter R.

    2011-03-01

    Atmospheric tar balls (TBs) are spherical, organic aerosol particles that occur in smoke from biomass burning (BB). They absorb sunlight and thereby cause warming of the atmosphere. This study reports a transmission electron microscope (TEM) study of TBs from BB smoke samples collected within minutes to hours from emission in a tropical area of Mexico. Their spherical shapes as seen in both scanning electron microscope images and with electron tomography indicate that they were solid when collected. They consist of C and minor O, S, K, and N. The hygroscopic growth factor for our relatively fresh TBs is 1.09 ± 0.04 at a relative humidity of 100%. In samples 1.6 km from the fire, an average of ˜1 and 14%, respectively, of particles with aerodynamic diameter from 50 to 300 nm consisted of TBs. For the latter, more aged samples, the total volume was roughly double that of soot, and their total calculated light absorption at a wavelength of 550 nm was between 74 and 96% that of soot, with the exact amount depending on the size, shape, and coating of the soot. In general, the TBs that we analyzed were similar to those from North America, southern Africa, and Europe in terms of size, external mixing, relative freedom of inclusions, and composition. This and previous studies show that TBs result from a range of biomass fuels. Their distribution from various regions across the globe, combined with their optical properties, suggests they have important effects on regional and perhaps global climate.

  4. Free-space measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol using decoy states with orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Zhao, Sheng-Mei; Gong, Long-Yan; Cheng, Wei-Wen

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol using orbital angular momentum (OAM) in free space links, named the OAM-MDI-QKD protocol. In the proposed protocol, the OAM states of photons, instead of polarization states, are used as the information carriers to avoid the reference frame alignment, the decoy-state is adopted to overcome the security loophole caused by the weak coherent pulse source, and the high efficient OAM-sorter is adopted as the measurement tool for Charlie to obtain the output OAM state. Here, Charlie may be an untrusted third party. The results show that the authorized users, Alice and Bob, could distill a secret key with Charlie’s successful measurements, and the key generation performance is slightly better than that of the polarization-based MDI-QKD protocol in the two-dimensional OAM cases. Simultaneously, Alice and Bob can reduce the number of flipping the bits in the secure key distillation. It is indicated that a higher key generation rate performance could be obtained by a high dimensional OAM-MDI-QKD protocol because of the unlimited degree of freedom on OAM states. Moreover, the results show that the key generation rate and the transmission distance will decrease as the growth of the strength of atmospheric turbulence (AT) and the link attenuation. In addition, the decoy states used in the proposed protocol can get a considerable good performance without the need for an ideal source. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271238 and 61475075), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20123223110003), the Natural Science Research Foundation for Universities of Jiangsu Province of China (Grant No. 11KJA510002), the Open Research Fund of Key Laboratory of Broadband Wireless Communication and Sensor Network Technology, Ministry of Education, China (Grant No. NYKL2015011), and the

  5. Toxicity of coal-tar and asphalt sealants to eastern newts, Notophthalmus viridescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommarito, Thomas; Sparling, Donald W; Halbrook, Richard S

    2010-09-01

    Between 1970 and 2000 the concentration of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (TPAH) in several lakes across the country increased whereas those of other persistent organic pollutants (POPs) tended to remain stable or declined. Urbanized watersheds experienced greater rises in TPAH concentration compared to non-urban lakes. Sources for urban PAHs include industrial wastes, vehicular exhausts and oil leaks and sealants from pavement surfaces. Both coal-tar and asphalt sealants are used to protect surfaces but runoff from surfaces coated with coal-tar can have mean concentrations of 3500 mg TPAHs kg(-1), much higher than runoff from asphalt-sealed or cement surfaces. Unaltered parent compounds of PAHs can have many lethal and sublethal toxic effects, but oxidation and UV radiation can alter the toxicity of these compounds, sometimes creating degradates that are many times more toxic than parent compounds. The purposes of this study were to determine if coal-tar sealants can be toxic to adult eastern newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) and to compare the toxicity of coal-tar sealant to that of asphalt sealant. Newts were exposed to sediments containing dried sealants ranging from 0 mg kg(-1) to 1500 mg kg(-1) under simultaneous exposure to UV radiation and visible light to determine concentration/response relationships. No significant mortality occurred with any treatment. Significant effects due to sealants included decreased righting ability and diminished liver enzyme activities. Coal-tar sealant was more effective in inducing these changes than was asphalt sealant.

  6. Toxicity of coal-tar and asphalt sealants to eastern newts, Notophthalmus viridescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bommarito, T.; Sparling, D.W.; Halbrook, R.S. [South Illinois University, Carbondale, IL (United States). Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory

    2010-09-15

    Between 1970 and 2000 the concentration of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (TPAH) in several lakes across the country increased whereas those of other persistent organic pollutants (POPs) tended to remain stable or declined. Urbanized watersheds experienced greater rises in TPAH concentration compared to non-urban lakes. Sources for urban PAHs include industrial wastes, vehicular exhausts and oil leaks and sealants from pavement surfaces. Both coal-tar and asphalt sealants are used to protect surfaces but runoff from surfaces coated with coal-tar can have mean concentrations of 3500 mg TPAHs kg{sup -1}, much higher than runoff from asphalt-sealed or cement surfaces. Unaltered parent compounds of PAHs can have many lethal and sublethal toxic effects, but oxidation and UV radiation can alter the toxicity of these compounds, sometimes creating degradates that are many times more toxic than parent compounds. The purposes of this study were to determine if coal-tar sealants can be toxic to adult eastern newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) and to compare the toxicity of coal-tar sealant to that of asphalt sealant. Newts were exposed to sediments containing dried sealants ranging from 0 mg kg{sup -1} to 1500 mg kg{sup -1} under simultaneous exposure to UV radiation and visible light to determine concentration/response relationships. No significant mortality occurred with any treatment. Significant effects due to sealants included decreased righting ability and diminished liver enzyme activities. Coal-tar sealant was more effective in inducing these changes than was asphalt sealant.

  7. Beneficial use of the upwelling phenomenon in coal-tar remediation efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudijk, G.; Coler, M. [Hydrotechnology Consultants, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Manufactured gas plants (MGPs) were in operation in the State of New Jersey from about 1850 until the early 1930s. Large gas holders constructed of steel, commonly emplaced deep in the subsurface, were used to produce and store the gas. One by-product of coal gasification is a dense, viscous substance known as coal-tar which is commonly the source of many environmental problems in New Jersey. Coal-tar was often disposed of haphazardly and due to its high density, migrated downward causing significant contamination of groundwater supplies. Pools of coal-tar may be encountered at the bottom of an aquifer, becoming a continuous source of groundwater contamination. The purpose of this paper is to show that the physical phenomena observed during the upwelling of saline water, such as in coastal aquifers, can be applied in coal-tar recovery operations. Field data of coal-tar upwelling from an MGP site in New Jersey are applied to the salt water upwelling methodologies used in coastal aquifers. 2 ref.

  8. UTILIZATION OF ACTIVATED ZEOLITE AS MOLECULAR SIEVE IN CHROMATOGRAPHIC COLUMN FOR SEPARATION OF COAL TAR COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Retno Nurotul Wahidiyah

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Application of activated zeolite (ZAA as molecular sieve to separate compounds of coal tar from vaccum fractional distillation, have been done. The size of zeolite was 10-20 mesh and used as solid phase in column chromatography with length of 30 cm. The first step of the research was coal pyrolisis and the product (tar was distillated by fractional column and vaccum system at reduced pressure 44 cmHg and maximum temperature at 200 oC. The distillate from this procedure was flowed to the column chromatography of zeolite (ZAA. The compound absorbed by zeolite was eluted with varying solvents, i.e: CCl4, acetone and ethanol. Each fraction was then analyzed by gas chromatography. The results showed, zeolite have a capability to separate the compounds of tar and it tends to absorb medium hydrocarbon. The nonpolar eluent [CCl4] gives the better result in eluting tar compound than polar (ethanol or medium polar eluents (acetone.   Keywords: zeolite, coal tar, column chromatography

  9. Guideline for sampling and analysis of 'tars' and particles in biomass producer gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeft, J.P.A. [ECN Biomass, Petten (Netherlands); Knoef, H.A.M. [Biomass Technology Group BTG, Enschede (Netherlands); Zielke, U. [DTI Danish Technological Institute, Aarhus (Denmark); Sjoestroem, K. [KTH Kungl Tekniska Hoegskolan, Stockholm (Sweden); Hasler, P. [Verenum, Zuerich (Switzerland); Simell, P.A.; Suomalainen, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Dorrington, M.A. [CRE Group, Cheltenham (United Kingdom); Greil, C. [Lurgi Envirotherm, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    The further development of a Guideline (formerly Protocol) for sampling and analysis of 'tars' from biomass producer gases is reported. This Guideline is being developed as a project within the European Fifth Framework Programme with additional partners from Switzerland and North-America. In this paper an outline and the principle of the Guideline are given. The Guideline is based on isokinetic sampling of particles and 'tar' from the main producer gas duct, particle filtration at high temperature, gas cooling in a liquid quench, 'tar' absorption in a solvent at low temperatures, an optional backup adsorber, and flow measurement and control. The Guideline gives a definition for 'Gravimetric tar' which is the 'tar' number to be determined by the Guideline. Also, the Guideline gives procedures for compound analysis by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or gas chromatography - Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID). Moreover, in this paper the major choices that were made to reach the first version of the Guideline are explained. Finally, at the end of the paper it is described how and on what time scale the development of the Guideline will be completed. The full text of the Guideline is available on the Internet at www.tarweb.net. 11 refs.

  10. Tar reduction in pyrolysis vapours from biomass over a hot char bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, P; Ryu, C; Sharifi, V; Swithenbank, J

    2009-12-01

    The behaviour of pyrolysis vapours over char was investigated in order to maximise tar conversion for the development of a new fixed bed gasifier. Wood samples were decomposed at a typical pyrolysis temperature (500 degrees C) and the pyrolysis vapours were then passed directly through a tar cracking zone in a tubular reactor. The product yields and properties of the condensable phases and non-condensable gases were studied for different bed lengths of char (0-450 mm), temperatures (500-800 degrees C), particle sizes (10 and 15 mm) and nitrogen purge rates (1.84-14.70 mm/s). The carbon in the condensable phases showed about 66% reduction by a 300 mm long char section at 800 degrees C, compared to that for pyrolysis at 500 degrees C. The amount of heavy condensable phase decreased with increasing temperature from about 18.4 wt% of the biomass input at 500 degrees C to 8.0 wt% at 800 degrees C, forming CO, H(2) and other light molecules. The main mode of tar conversion was found to be in the vapour phase when compared to the results without the presence of char. The composition of the heavy condensable phase was simplified into much fewer secondary and tertiary tar components at 800 degrees C. Additional measures were required to maximise the heterogeneous effect of char for tar reduction.

  11. Syngas production from tar reforming by microwave plasma jet at atmospheric pressure: power supplied influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Medeiros, Henrique; Justiniano, Lucas S.; Gomes, Marcelo P.; Soares da Silva Sobrinho, Argemiro; Petraconi Filho, Gilberto

    2013-09-01

    Now a day, scientific community is searching for new fuels able to replace fossil fuels with economic and environment gains and biofuel play a relevant rule, mainly for the transport sector. A major process to obtaining such type of renewable resource is biomass gasification. This process has as product a gas mixture containing CO, CH4, and H2 which is named synthesis gas (syngas). However, an undesirable high molecular organic species denominated tar are also produced in this process which must be removed. In this work, results of syngas production via tar reforming in the atmospheric pressure microwave discharge having as parameter the power supply. Argon, (argon + ethanol), and (argon + tar solution) plasma jet were produced by different values of power supplied (from 0.5 KW to 1.5 KW). The plasma compounds were investigated by optical spectroscopy to each power and gas composition. The main species observed in the spectrum are Ar, CN, OII, OIV, OH, H2, H(beta), CO2, CO, and SIII. This last one came from tar. The best value of the power applied to syngas production from tar reforming was verified between 1.0 KW and 1.2 KW. We thank the following institutions for financial support: CNPq, CAPES, and FAPESP.

  12. Groundwater contamination by organic bases derived from coal-tar wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, W.E.; Rostad, C.E.; Garbarino, J.R.; Hult, M.F.

    1983-01-01

    A fluid sample from a shallow aquifer contaminated by coal-tar wastes was analyzed for organic bases. The sample consisted of a mixture of aqueous and oily-tar phases. The phases were separated by centrifugation and filtration. Organic bases were isolated from each phase by pH adjustment and solvent extraction. Organic bases in the oily-tar phase were further purified by neutral-alumina, micro-column adsorption chromatography. Separation and identification of the organic bases in each phase were achieved by using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-computer (GC-MS-COM) and probe distillation-high resolution mass spectrometry (PD-HRMS) techniques. Organic bases present in the aqueous phase included primary aromatic amines (such as aniline, alkylated anilines, and naphthylamines) as well as azaarenes (such as alkylated pyridines, quinolines, acridine, and benzoquinolines). The oily-tar phase contained acridine, benzacridines, dibenzacridines, and numerous other azaarenes, the elemental compositions of which were determined by PD-HRMS. Azaarenes in the oily-tar phase, varying in size from 6 to 12 rings, are reported for the first time. The origin and environmental significance of these compounds are discussed. ?? 1983.

  13. Ground-water contamination by organic bases derived from coal-tar wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Wilfred E.; Rostad, Colleen E.; Garbarino, John R.; Hult, Marc F.

    1983-01-01

    A fluid sample from a shallow aquifer contaminated by coal-tar wastes was analyzed for organic bases. The sample consisted of a mixture of aqueous and oily-tar phases. The phases were separated by centrifugation and filtration. Organic bases were isolated from each phase by pH adjustment and solvent extraction. Organic bases in the oily-tar phase were further purified by neutral-alumina, micro-column adsorption chromatography. Separation and identification of the organic bases in each phase were achieved by using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-computer (GC-MS-COM) and probe distillation-high resolution mass spectrometry (PD-HRMS) techniques. Organic bases present in the aqueous phase included primary aromatic amines (such as aniline, alkylated anilines, and naphthylamines) as well as azaarenes (such as alkylated pyridines, quinolines, acridine, and benzoquinolines). The oily-tar phase contained acridine, benzacridines, dibenzacridines, and numerous other azaarenes, the elemental compositions of which were determined by PD-HRMS. Azaarenes in the oily-tar phase, varying in size from 6 to 12 rings, are reported for the first time. The origin and environmental significance of these compounds are discussed.

  14. Research into the group composition of tar using the gas liquid chromatography method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisin, S.N.; Stepanov, Yu.V.; Lisina, L.A.; Chistyakov, A.N.

    1986-03-01

    This paper first gives a brief review of current methods used for determining chemical composition of tars, then describes experiments using gas liquid chromatography (GLC) to determine the chemical composition of delta/sub 1/, delta/sub 2/, delta, and delta fractions of medium temperature tars obtained during normal solvent processing (isooctane, toluene, quinoline). For delta and delta fractions, a Tsvet-104 chromatograph was used with a flame-ionization detector under the following conditions: column height 3 m, diameter 3 mm, AW-HMDS filler, 0.25-0.36 mm fractions with 5% SE-30, linear column temperature increase from 50-310/sup 0/C, velocity 6 C/min, condenser temperature 350/sup 0/C, velocity of carrier gas (helium) and hydrogen 100 ml/min, air consumption 1.5 l/min. delta/sub 1/ and delta/sub 2/ fractions were determined using a GC-IC chromatograph (manufactured by Shimatsu) under conditions analogous to those given above. Conclusion is that the yield of chromatographable compounds from tar by the GLC method with temperature programming is practically constant for each tar and can be characterized by the delta fraction content and its chemical composition. A method of determining the group composition of tars and the chemical composition of the delta fraction using GLC is proposed. 13 refs.

  15. Novel VEGF decoy receptor fusion protein conbercept targeting multiple VEGF isoforms provide remarkable anti-angiogenesis effect in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Wang

    Full Text Available VEGF family factors are known to be the principal stimulators of abnormal angiogenesis, which play a fundamental role in tumor and various ocular diseases. Inhibition of VEGF is widely applied in antiangiogenic therapy. Conbercept is a novel decoy receptor protein constructed by fusing VEGF receptor 1 and VEGF receptor 2 extracellular domains with the Fc region of human immunoglobulin. In this study, we systematically evaluated the binding affinity of conbercept with VEGF isoforms and PlGF by using anti-VEGF antibody (Avastin as reference. BIACORE and ELISA assay results indicated that conbercept could bind different VEGF-A isoforms with higher affinity than reference. Furthermore, conbercept could also bind VEGF-B and PlGF, whereas Avastin showed no binding. Oxygen-induced retinopathy model showed that conbercept could inhibit the formation of neovasularizations. In tumor-bearing nude mice, conbercept could also suppress tumor growth very effectively in vivo. Overall, our study have demonstrated that conbercept could bind with high affinity to multiple VEGF isoforms and consequently provide remarkable anti-angiogenic effect, suggesting the possibility to treat angiogenesis-related diseases such as cancer and wet AMD etc.

  16. Coal tar creosote abuse by vapour inhalation presenting with renal impairment and neurotoxicity: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Thomas F; Bellamy, Christopher OC; Hughes, Jeremy H

    2007-01-01

    A 56 year old aromatherapist presented with advanced renal failure following chronic coal tar creosote vapour inhalation, and a chronic tubulo-interstitial nephritis was identified on renal biopsy. Following dialysis dependence occult inhalation continued, resulting in seizures, ataxia, cognitive impairment and marked generalised cerebral atrophy. We describe for the first time a case of creosote abuse by chronic vapour inhalation, resulting in significant morbidity. Use of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-containing wood preservative coal tar creosote is restricted by many countries due to concerns over environmental contamination and carcinogenicity. This case demonstrates additional toxicities not previously reported with coal tar creosote, and emphasizes the health risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure. PMID:17892538

  17. Numerical simulation of vortex pyrolysis reactors for condensable tar production from biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.S.; Bellan, J. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

    1998-08-01

    A numerical study is performed in order to evaluate the performance and optimal operating conditions of vortex pyrolysis reactors used for condensable tar production from biomass. A detailed mathematical model of porous biomass particle pyrolysis is coupled with a compressible Reynolds stress transport model for the turbulent reactor swirling flow. An initial evaluation of particle dimensionality effects is made through comparisons of single- (1D) and multi-dimensional particle simulations and reveals that the 1D particle model results in conservative estimates for total pyrolysis conversion times and tar collection. The observed deviations are due predominantly to geometry effects while directional effects from thermal conductivity and permeability variations are relatively small. Rapid ablative particle heating rates are attributed to a mechanical fragmentation of the biomass particles that is modeled using a critical porosity for matrix breakup. Optimal thermal conditions for tar production are observed for 900 K. Effects of biomass identity, particle size distribution, and reactor geometry and scale are discussed.

  18. Technology for the production of Zero Q.I pitch from coal tar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, K.; Kumar, K. Rajesh; Rao, C. V. Nageswara; Kumar, B. Vinod; Murty, J. V. S.

    2013-06-01

    Zero Quinoline Insolubles (Q.I) pitch is a special type of pitch obtained from pre-treatment of coal tar, which is converted into pitch. This is used for impregnation of electrodes for improving the strength, electrical properties and also used as a pre-cursor for Mesophase pitch for producing Mesophase pitch based carbon fibers, carbon foam, and Meso carbon micro beads. This paper discusses the technology of Q.I separation from Coal Tar by using decantation of Coal Tar mixed with Heavy Creosote Oil (HC Oil) at different temperatures. By this method we were able to produce the Zero Q.I pitch with a Q.I value of 0.1%.

  19. Coal tar creosote abuse by vapour inhalation presenting with renal impairment and neurotoxicity: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiemstra Thomas F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 56 year old aromatherapist presented with advanced renal failure following chronic coal tar creosote vapour inhalation, and a chronic tubulo-interstitial nephritis was identified on renal biopsy. Following dialysis dependence occult inhalation continued, resulting in seizures, ataxia, cognitive impairment and marked generalised cerebral atrophy. We describe for the first time a case of creosote abuse by chronic vapour inhalation, resulting in significant morbidity. Use of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-containing wood preservative coal tar creosote is restricted by many countries due to concerns over environmental contamination and carcinogenicity. This case demonstrates additional toxicities not previously reported with coal tar creosote, and emphasizes the health risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure.

  20. 国内煤焦油市场分析%Market analysis of domestic coal tar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婕

    2012-01-01

    分析了国内煤焦油产量、消费情况及地区的分布状况,论述了深加工和炭黑行业是煤焦油的主要消费方向。近2年来,受宏观调控、经济增长放缓等因素的影响,深加工和炭黑行业呈现弱势运行。%Analysis is done to domestic coal tar about its output, consumption and regional distribution. Further processing and carbon black industry are the main consumer of coal tar. The further processing of tar and carbon black industry have been running weakly in the recent two years due to the slowing economic growth affected by macro regulation.

  1. Pelagic tar off Georgia and Florida in relation to physical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, C.; Atkinson, L.; Lee, R.; Blanton, J.

    1980-01-01

    Following the Ixtoc I oil rig blowout in Campeche Bay we hypothesized that resulting tarballs should eventually appear in the Gulf Stream off Georgia and that because of dynamic barriers in the innershelf little would reach near-shore areas. To test these hypotheses, surface tows to collect floating tar were taken off the coasts of Georgia and Florida in October and December 1979. No tar was found within 40 km of the shore. All samples more than 40 km offshore contained some tar. The mean concentration was 0.82 mg m/sup -2/ with a range of 0.01 to 5.6 mg m/sup -2/. Closely spaced sampling showed extreme variation but trends were consistent. Perylene was the most abundant compound in the tarballs.

  2. Strengthening the face zone of a well with tar-sandstone mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazlov, M.N.; Maslov, I.I.; Shved, G.M.; Fisenko, N.T.

    1978-01-01

    Results are given for laboratory studies and the industrial introduction of a new technique of strengthening loose sands of the facing zone of wells of horizon IV of the Anastas-Troits field with tar-sand mixtures. The producing zone of the fourth horizon was subjected to significant breaks at very small depressions whose intensity fluctuated in time, depending on the fluid yield, and increased sharply as the flooding of the well increased. A description is given of the new technique, based on laboratory studies and pilot-industrial tests, that provides for the preparation of an assigned permeability on the surface of the tar-sand mixture that is determined by an applied graph. This mixture is pumped into the face zone to create a blocking debris cone of ring sand along the entire stripped layer. When the tar-sand mixture hardens in the face zone a matrix is formed that has the necessary permeability and sufficient hardness to prevent the destruction of the bed. A basic arrangement is shown for binding the aggregate with the well opening for placing the tar-sand filter and the sequence of the operations. The tar-sand filter is installed in 30 minutes. This technique was used to strengthen the face zone of 50 wells in 1977. The positive results of strengthening the loose sand of the face zone are: the prevention of the formation of sandy samples and the continuous operation of the wells; a longer inter-service operating period of the wells; an increase in the pressure on the opening of most wells as a result of the lower water content in the recovered fluid, and a reduction in the expenditure of tar.

  3. Analysis of coal tar pitch and smoke extract components and their cytotoxicity on human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhitao; Wu, Yongjun; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Lixia; Zhu, Hansong; Qin, Lijuan; Feng, Feifei; Wang, Wei; Wu, Yiming

    2011-02-28

    Coal tar pitch and its smoke are considered hazardous by-products and common pollutant generated from coal industry processing. In this study, coal tar pitch and its smoke extracts were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with dimethylsulfoxide. We identified only 0.3025% of components in the total coal tar pitch using GC/MS. Among 18 identified compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has the highest relative abundance (0.19%). The remaining components were composed of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic compounds and alkenes. In contrast, among 38 coal tar pitch smoke extract constituents that have been profiled, 87.91% were PAHs, and the remaining 12.09% were composed of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic compounds and alkenes. The cytotoxic effect of coal tar pitch and its smoke extracts on BEAS-2B cells were also evaluated by MTT assay. BEAS-2B cells exposed to coal tar pitch showed a non dose-dependent U-shaped cytotoxicity with a dosage for maximal inhibitory of 3.75 mg/L. In contrast, BEAS-2B cells exposed to coal tar pitch smoke extracts showed a dose dependent cytotoxicity with a LC(50) of 8.64 mg/L. Our study demonstrated the significant different composition and cytotoxicity of coal tar pitch and its extracts, suggesting two different underlying mechanisms that are pending future investigation.

  4. Investigating Efficient Tar Management from Biomass and Waste to Energy Gasification Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    1.0 mL/minute – Split Ratio: 20.0 • Detector 25 – Mass Spectroscopy (MS) – Ion Source Temp:300C – Interface temp = 285C – Solvent cut Time...manuals that allow 35% aromatic, and the JP-8 Spec that allows 25% aromatic hydrocarbon . The stalagmite poses another interesting source of liquid fuel...of Waste Energy into Electricity There are 3 sources of chemical energy coming from a gasifier: Syngas, light tars and heavy tars. The syngas

  5. Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-11

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future

  6. Preparation and Morphological Study of Coal-tar-based Carbon Foam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-ying; ZHU Jiang-jiang; ZHANG Chang-xing; WANG Yi-min; WANG Yan-ping; YU Ming-fang

    2006-01-01

    A novel process for fabricating coal-tar pitch derived carbon foam was introduced. The coal-tar based mesophase pitch was characterized by Infrared Spectrum and Wide Angle X-ray Diffraction. Scanning Electron Microscope was used for the morphological study of carbon foam. The results showed that the pitch foam with pores of 300 - 500 μm and low density of 0.2 - 0.5 g/cm-3 could be successfully fabricated and further carbonized and graphtized to obtain a novel carbon foam.

  7. In situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation after drive process treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Stanecki, John

    2010-09-21

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing a drive fluid to a hydrocarbon containing layer of the tar sands formation to mobilize at least some hydrocarbons in the layer. At least some first hydrocarbons from the layer are produced. Heat is provided to the layer from one or more heaters located in the formation. At least some second hydrocarbons are produced from the layer of the formation. The second hydrocarbons include at least some hydrocarbons that are upgraded compared to the first hydrocarbons produced by using the drive fluid.

  8. Radiocarbon dating of extinct fauna in the Americas recovered from tar pits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jull, A.J.T. E-mail: jull@email.arizona.edu; Iturralde-Vinent, M.; O' Malley, J.M.; MacPhee, R.D.E.; McDonald, H.G.; Martin, P.S.; Moody, J.; Rincon, A

    2004-08-01

    We have obtained radiocarbon dates by accelerator mass spectrometry on bones of extinct large mammals from tar pits. Results on some samples of Glyptodon and Holmesina (extinct large mammals similar to armadillos) yielded ages of >25 and >21 ka, respectively. We also studied the radiocarbon ages of three different samples of bones from the extinct Cuban ground sloth, Parocnus bownii, which yielded dates ranging from 4960 {+-} 280 to 11 880 {+-} 420 yr BP. In order to remove the tar component pretreat the samples sufficiently to obtain reliable dates, we cleaned the samples by Soxhlet extraction in benzene. Resulting samples of collagenous material were often small.

  9. Radiocarbon dating of extinct fauna in the Americas recovered from tar pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Iturralde-Vinent, M.; O'Malley, J. M.; MacPhee, R. D. E.; McDonald, H. G.; Martin, P. S.; Moody, J.; Rincón, A.

    2004-08-01

    We have obtained radiocarbon dates by accelerator mass spectrometry on bones of extinct large mammals from tar pits. Results on some samples of Glyptodon and Holmesina (extinct large mammals similar to armadillos) yielded ages of >25 and >21 ka, respectively. We also studied the radiocarbon ages of three different samples of bones from the extinct Cuban ground sloth, Parocnus bownii, which yielded dates ranging from 4960 ± 280 to 11 880 ± 420 yr BP. In order to remove the tar component pretreat the samples sufficiently to obtain reliable dates, we cleaned the samples by Soxhlet extraction in benzene. Resulting samples of collagenous material were often small.

  10. Development of Ni-Based Catalysts for Steam Reforming of Tar Derived from Biomass Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dalin LI; Yoshinao NAKAGAWA; Keiichi TOMISHIGE

    2012-01-01

    Nickel catalysts are effective for the steam reforming of tar derived from biomass pyrolysis,but the improvement is needed in terms of activity,stability,suppression of coke deposition and aggregation,and regeneration.Our recent development of Ni-based catalysts for the steam reforming of tar is reviewed including the modification with CeO2 (or MnO),trace Pt,and MgO.The role of additives such as CeO2,MnO,Pt,and MgO is also discussed.

  11. Splitting statistical potentials into meaningful scoring functions: Testing the prediction of near-native structures from decoy conformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliva Baldo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances on high-throughput technologies have produced a vast amount of protein sequences, while the number of high-resolution structures has seen a limited increase. This has impelled the production of many strategies to built protein structures from its sequence, generating a considerable amount of alternative models. The selection of the closest model to the native conformation has thus become crucial for structure prediction. Several methods have been developed to score protein models by energies, knowledge-based potentials and combination of both. Results Here, we present and demonstrate a theory to split the knowledge-based potentials in scoring terms biologically meaningful and to combine them in new scores to predict near-native structures. Our strategy allows circumventing the problem of defining the reference state. In this approach we give the proof for a simple and linear application that can be further improved by optimizing the combination of Zscores. Using the simplest composite score ( we obtained predictions similar to state-of-the-art methods. Besides, our approach has the advantage of identifying the most relevant terms involved in the stability of the protein structure. Finally, we also use the composite Zscores to assess the conformation of models and to detect local errors. Conclusion We have introduced a method to split knowledge-based potentials and to solve the problem of defining a reference state. The new scores have detected near-native structures as accurately as state-of-art methods and have been successful to identify wrongly modeled regions of many near-native conformations.

  12. Calculation of Tissue-Air Ratios(TAR) in Irregularly shaped Field for Co-60 Gamma Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Young Hoon [Dept. of Therapetic Radiology, Kangnam General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-05-15

    In order to calculate the dose on each interest point in five types of irregularly shaped fields used commonly in radiotherapy, the tissue-air ratios (TAR) in these fields for Go-60 gamma radiation were calculated using the newly devised SAR-chart. The TARs calculated from newly method of using the SAR-chart, computer method and approximation method at the interest point were compared to the TARs obtained from measurement. The result are as follows; In case of the interest points on central axis the calculated TARs in irregularly shaped fields by the above mentioned methods were well agreed within the error of , whereas for the interest points on off-axis the calculated TARs were resulted in the maximum errors of and respectively. From these results, the accuracy of calculation method of using the SAR-chart was confirmed.

  13. Skin cancer in patients with psoriasis treated with coal tar. A 25-year follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittelkow, M.R.; Perry, H.O.; Muller, S.A.; Maughan, W.Z.; O' Brien, P.C.

    1981-08-01

    For many years, crude coal tar has been used for the treatment of psoriasis. The possible carcinogenic effect of crude coal tar and ultraviolet (UV) radiation (Goeckerman regimen), considered individually or in combination, has been of some concern to physicians. A 25-year follow-up study was completed on 280 patients with psoriasis who were hospitalized and treated with crude coal tar and UV radiation at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn, during the years 1950 through 1954. The results of this study suggest that the incidence of skin cancer is not appreciably increased above the expected incidence for the general population when patients are treated with coal tar ointments. It seems that the Goeckerman regimen (topical crude coal tar combined with UV radiation) can be used with minimal risk for skin cancer in the treatment of psoriasis.

  14. Modeling, Simulation, and Analysis of a Decoy State Enabled Quantum Key Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    needs and required functionality early in the development cycle, documenting requirements, then proceeding with design synthesis and system validation...is an open source IDE that supports software project development in Java, C, C++, PHP , and other languages. The Eclipse IDE supports version

  15. Enhanced expression of the decoy receptor IL-13Rα2 in macrophages of Schistosoma japonicum-infected mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; SHEN Yu-xian; LI Jing; ZHANG Shi-hai; LUO Qing-li; ZHONG Zhen-rong; JIANG Zuo-jun; SHEN Ji-long

    2009-01-01

    Background Type 2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-13 and its decoy receptor, IL-13 receptor (R)α2 appear to play a major role in tissue fibrosis of schistosomiasis and asthma. IL-13 is a key regulator of the extracellular matrix (ECM). It is known to signal to cells by binding to the IL-13Ra1, which then heterodimerizes with IL-4Rα. In contrast, IL-13Rα2 binds IL-13 with high affinity but does not signal. IL-13Rα2 is known to down-regulate granulomatous inflammation and prolong host survival in Schistosoma mansoni (S. Mansoni) infection, but little is known about the location and expression level of IL-13Ra2 in the context of S. Japonicum infection. Methods We established S. Japonicum-infected mouse models. Kinetic serum levels of IL-13Rα2 were examined with ELISA. IL-13Rα2 mRNA and protein of liver tissues were determined by PCR and immunoblotting analysis, respectively. Detection of IL-13Rα2 expression and location in macrophages was performed by TaqMan PCR and fluorescent immunocytochemistry technique, respectively. Results A marked elevation of mRNA and protein expression of IL-13Rα2 was observed in mice during S. Japonicum infection. An enhanced expression of IL-13Rg2 was further demonstrated in primary macrophages of murine schistosomiasis. Conclusions IL-13Rα2 in macrophages may be a critical contributor to pathogenesis of schistosomiasis. The data highlight the potential importance of cell signaling and antifibrotic gene therapeutics in T helper 2 cell (Th2)-mediated diseases.

  16. Effect of the bioemulsifier emulsan on naphthalene mineralization from coal tar in aqueous systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skubal, K.L.; Luthy, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    Coal tar in aerobic aqueous systems was treated with purified emulsan, the anionic heteropolysaccharide bioemulsifier produced by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1; with inocula of various concentrations of stationary phase RAG-1 cells; or with cell-free broth from stationary phase RAG-1 cultures. Naphthalene mineralization by a mixed PAH-degrading population was measured by recovering {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolved during biotransformation of the [{sup 14}C]naphthalene-labeled coal tar. There was no evidence of naphthalene mineralization by RAG- 1 cells alone. The addition of emulsan, RAG-1 inocula, or cell-free broth to systems containing the PAH-degrading population did not significantly affect naphthalene mineralization in any of the systems tested. Coal tar in these experiments was present either as a free dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL), or as DNAPL imbibed into microporous silica particles. Emulsification of the tar was not observed in either case. The presence or absence of microporous silica did not affect the extent or rate of naphthalene mineralization, nor did the concentration of RAG-1 inocula or the amount of broth added. The addition of cell-free broth, emulsan, or RAG-1 cells late in the experiments did not yield significantly different results compared to initial addition of these substances. Thus, emulsan and related fractions from RAG-1 cultures were ineffective in altering naphthalene mineralization in this study.

  17. Tar sands showdown : Canada and the new politics of oil in an age of climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, T. [Polaris Institute, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This book outlined the social and environmental issues facing the oil sands industry in Canada, including economic sovereignty, energy security, water rights and free trade. The tar sands have become vital to the Canadian economy, as they have the potential to increase Canada's foreign oil output by 4 to 5 times in the next 15 years. The author discussed the ecological and social impact of the Alberta tar sands and the real cost of development to Albertans and Canadians. Tar sands oil production generates more than 3 times the amount of greenhouse gas emissions than conventional oil production. The industry is also becoming a prime example of the abuse of water sources. The author emphasized the need to build an alternative energy future in an age of global warming. The main objective of this book was to help stimulate a nation-wide public debate about the tar sands and the critical issues at stake regarding Canada's energy future and an environmental strategy for more sustainable development. refs., tabs., figs.

  18. Simulation of Trajectories of Tar Ball Transport to the Goa Coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suneel, V.; Vethamony, P.; VinodKumar, K.; Babu, M.T.; Prasad, V.S.R.

    when no oil spill was reported in the Arabian Sea (AS). The only source for the formation of tar balls could be the spill/tanker-wash from the tankers passing through the international tanker routes across the AS. Assuming this, an attempt has been made...

  19. Characteristics of PAH tar oil contaminated soils-Black particles, resins and implications for treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trellu, Clément; Miltner, Anja; Gallo, Rosita; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A; Kästner, Matthias

    2017-04-05

    Tar oil contamination is a major environmental concern due to health impacts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and the difficulty of reaching acceptable remediation end-points. Six tar oil-contaminated soils with different industrial histories were compared to investigate contamination characteristics by black particles. Here we provide a simple method tested on 6 soils to visualize and identify large amounts of black particles (BP) as either solid aggregates of resinified and weathered tar oil or various wood/coke/coal-like materials derived from the contamination history. These materials contain 2-10 times higher PAH concentrations than the average soil and were dominantly found in the sand fraction containing 42-86% of the total PAH. The PAH contamination in the different granulometric fractions was directly proportional to the respective total organic carbon content, since the PAH were associated to the carbonaceous particulate materials. Significantly lower (bio)availability of PAH associated to these carbonaceous phases is widely recognized, thus limiting the efficiency of remediation techniques. We provide a conceptual model of the limited mass transfer of PAH from resinated tar oil phases to the water phase and emphasize the options to physically separate BP based on their lower bulk density and slower settling velocity.

  20. Addressing airborne pollutant exposure at the source: an example of coal tar pitch volatiles (CTPV)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pretorius, Cecilia J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Personal exposure concentrations to coal tar pitch volatiles (CTPV) were a concern in a workplace and the cause of the exposure was thought to be a particular raw material; as per the conventional belief. All the raw materials were analysed...

  1. 179 Extraction of Coal-tar Pitch by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meyer

    Extraction of Coal-tar Pitch by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. .... methanol in vials that were cooled with a mixture of ice and sodium chloride to avoid the loss of .... The data produced by our experiments may be utilised in a kinetic study of the.

  2. Genetic relation of adamantanes from extracts and semicoking tars of lignites with the initial biological material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Shvykin, A.Y.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Podshibyakin, S.I. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1999-11-01

    A genetic relation was revealed of adamantanes from extracts and semicoking tars of lignites with the relic terpenoid and steroid compounds. Probable pathways are suggested for transformation of the initial natural structures into adamantanes. The qualitative and quantitative compositions of adamantanes from crude oil and coal are compared.

  3. Coal-tar-based pavement sealcoat, polycyclic aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), and environmental health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have identified coal-tar-based sealcoat-the black, viscous liquid sprayed or painted on asphalt pavement such as parking lots-as a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in urban areas for large parts of the Nation. Several PAHs are suspected human carcinogens and are toxic to aquatic life.

  4. PAHs underfoot: Contaminated dust from coal-tar sealcoated pavement is widespread in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, P.C.; Mahler, B.J.; Wilson, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    We reported in 2005 that runoff from parking lots treated with coal-tar-based sealcoat was a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to streams in Austin, Texas. Here we present new data from nine U. S. cities that show nationwide patterns in concentrations of PAHs associated with sealcoat Dust was swept from parking lots in six cities in the central and eastern U. S., where coal-tar-based sealcoat dominates use, and three cities in the western U. S., where asphalt-based sealcoat dominates use. For six central and eastern cities, median ?? PAH concentrations in dust from sealcoated and unsealcoated pavement are 2200 and 27 mg/kg, respectively. For three western cities, median ?? PAH concentrations in dust from sealcoated and unsealcoated pavement are similar and very low (2. 1 and 0. 8 mg/kg, respectively). Lakes in the central and eastern cities where pavement was sampled have bottom sediments with higher PAH concentrations than do those in the western cities relative to degree of urbanization. Bottom-sediment PAH assemblages are similar to those of sealcoated pavement dust regionally, implicating coal-tar-based sealcoat as a PAH source to the central and eastern lakes. Concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene in dust from coal-tar sealcoated pavement and adjacent soils greatly exceed generic soil screening levels, suggesting that research on human-health risk is warranted.

  5. Water availability for development of major tar sands areas in Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefer, T.N.; McQuivey, R.S.

    1979-05-01

    The Sutron Corporation, under contract with Colorado State University, has conducted a study for the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) to determine the availability of water for future extraction of viscous petroleum (bitumen) from the six major tar sands deposits in Utah. Specifically, the areas are: Asphalt Ridge and Whiterocks, which lie immediately west of Vernal, Utah; P.R. Spring, a large area extending from the Colorado River to the White River along Utah's eastern border; Hill Creek, adjacent to P.R. Spring to the west; Sunnyside, immediately across the Green River from Hill Creek between the Price and Green Rivers; and Tar Sand Triangle, near the confluence of the Colorado and Dirty Devil Rivers. The study, conducted between September and December of 1978, was a fact-finding effort involving the compilation of information from publications of the US Geological Survey (USGS), Utah State Engineer, Utah Department of Natural Resources, and other federal and state agencies. The information covers the general physiographic and geologic features of the total area, the estimated water requirements for tar sands development, the availability of water in each of the six areas, and the legal and sociological restraints and impacts. The conclusions regarding water availability for tar sands development in each of the six areas and specific recommendations related to the development of each area are presented also.

  6. Impact of air pollution on the occurrence of Rhytisma acerinium "tar-spot" on mapie leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kosiba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was, to find out whether the occurrence of Rhytisma acerinium and the variability of numbers of the "tar-spot" fungus on Acer platanoides leaves depend on the degree of environmental pollution. A significant variability was found between sites in relation to contents of chemical elements in soils, leaves and numbers of "tar-spots". The similarity of sites presented in dendrograms classified them as industrial, urban-agglomeration and vehicle-transport areas. The factor and PCA analyses showed that two factors differentiate the soil of the sites in respect of Fe, Cu, Co, Mo, Cr, Ni, Cd and N, S, Mn, Pb. In case of leaves of A. platanoides populations differentiate them in respect of N, S, Fe, Pb, Zn, Co, Be, Cr, Cd and Mn, Cu, Mo. The different air pollutions affect significantly the numbers of "tar-spots" on leaves. Sites with the highest contents of elements do not show "tar-spots", and the factors restricting their occurrence are the high contents, mainly of N, S (NOX, SOX and heavy metals. In sites, with the lowest contents of these elements massive infections take place. The occurrence of R. acerinium corresponding with the level of site pollution can be used as a tool for evaluation of the degree of environmental pollution.

  7. Simulation of Low-Temperature Coal Tar Hydrocracking in Supercritical Gasoline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lei; Liu Zongkuan; Gu Zhaolin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was preliminary design of the process for low-temperature coal tar hydrocracking in supercritical gasoline based on Aspen Plus with the concept of energy self-sustainability. In order to ensure the correct-ness and accuracy of the simulation, we did the following tasks: selecting reasonable model compounds for low-tem-perature coal tar; describing the nature of products gasoline and diesel accurately; and conifrming the proper property study method for each block by means of experience and trial. The purpose of energy self-sustainability could be pos-sibly achieved, on one hand, by using hot stream to preheat cold stream and achieving temperature control of streams, and on the other hand, by utilizing gas (byproduct of the coal tar hydrocracking) combustion reaction to provide energy. Results showed that the whole process could provide a positive net power of about 609 kW·h for processing the low-temperature coal tar with a lfowrate of 2 268 kg/h. The total heat recovery amounted to 2 229 kW·h, among which 845 kW·h was obtained from the gas combustion reaction, and 1 116 kW·h was provided by the reactor’s outlet stream, with the rest furnished by hot streams of the products gasoline, diesel and residue. In addition, the process lfow sheet could achieve products separation well, and speciifcally the purity of product gasoline and diesel reached 97.2% and 100%, respectively.

  8. Tar analysis from biomass gasification by means of online fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumhakl, Christoph; Karellas, Sotirios

    2011-07-01

    Optical methods in gas analysis are very valuable mainly due to their non-intrusive character. That gives the possibility to use them for in-situ or online measurements with only optical intervention in the measurement volume. In processes like the gasification of biomass, it is of high importance to monitor the gas quality in order to use the product gas in proper machines for energy production following the restrictions in the gas composition but also improving its quality, which leads to high efficient systems. One of the main problems in the biomass gasification process is the formation of tars. These higher hydrocarbons can lead to problems in the operation of the energy system. Up to date, the state of the art method used widely for the determination of tars is a standardized offline measurement system, the so-called "Tar Protocol". The aim of this work is to describe an innovative, online, optical method for determining the tar content of the product gas by means of fluorescence spectroscopy. This method uses optical sources and detectors that can be found in the market at low cost and therefore it is very attractive, especially for industrial applications where cost efficiency followed by medium to high precision are of high importance.

  9. A thermoanalytical study of the co-pyrolysis of coal-tar pitch and petroleum pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Perez; M. Granda; R. Santamaria; T. Morgan; R. Menendez [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2004-06-01

    Four pitch blends were prepared at laboratory scale by mixing a coal-tar pitch and a petroleum pitch in several proportions (CTP:PP 85:15, 70:30, 55:45 and 40:60). Single pitches and blends were characterized by standard procedures, infrared spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. Pyrolysis behaviour and interactions between the two pitches in the blends were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results show that blending does not alter the composition of pitches. However, the TG/DTG curves reveal that coal-tar pitch and petroleum pitch interact actively during pyrolysis, modifying the temperature of initial weight loss and the temperature of the maximum rate of weight loss. Primary quinoline-insoluble particles present in coal-tar pitch and transferable hydrogen seem to be the main factors responsible for these modifications. The DSC curves show that the presence of coal-tar pitch in the blends reduces the reactivity of the petroleum pitch and shifts the exothermic peaks observed at the temperature of the cracking/polymerization reactions ({gt}400{sup o}C) to lower temperatures. 18 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Quantification of Tars, Particulates, and Higher Heating Values in Gases Produced from a Biomass Gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher O. Akudo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Syngas from biomass gasifiers contains impurities such as tars and particulates, which can create difficulties for the downstream processes (e.g., internal combustion engines and the Fischer-Tropsch process. To design an efficient and effective gas cleaning system, it is important to accurately quantify the tars and particulates. The absence of an ASTM procedure for tars and particulates produced from a gasifier led to the development and testing of the protocol presented in this study. Syngas was generated from woodchips using a pilot-scale downdraft gasifier, which was designed and constructed in-house. The sampled impurities were analyzed using mass gravimetry, solvent evaporation, and weight differential methods. The higher heating value of the exiting gases was estimated from the syngas composition. The average tar and particulate concentrations of the sample runs were 1.8 to 3.1 g/m3 and 5.2 to 6.4 g/m3, respectively. The higher heating values of the syngas ranged between 4.38 and 4.55 MJ/m3.

  11. Low Temperature Particle Filtration of Wood Gas with Low Tar Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindsgaul, Claus; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Bentzen, Jens Dall

    2002-01-01

    Baghouse filters and cartridge filters were tested online with wood gas from a two stage down draft gasifier. The gas contained soot and very low levels (10-30 mg/Nm³) of tar. Particle collection efficiencies were above 95%. Continuous operation with cheap self cleaning baghouse filters were tested...

  12. Gasification and effect of gasifying temperature on syngas quality and tar generation: A short review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangul, Fiseha Mekonnen; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Raghavan, Vijay R.

    2012-06-01

    Corrosion, erosion and plugging of the downstream equipments by tar and ash particle and, low energy content of syngas are the main problems of biomass gasification process. This paper attempts to review the findings of literature on the effect of temperature on syngas quality, and in alleviating the tar and ash problems in the gasification process. The review of literature indicates that as the gasification temperature increases, concentration of the resulting H2 and carbon conversion efficiency increase, the amount of tar in the syngas decreases. For the same condition, CH4 and CO concentration do not show consistent trend when the feedstock and gasification process varies. These necessitate the need for conducting an experiment for a particular gasification process and feedstock to understand fully the benefits of controlling the gasification temperature. This paper also tries to propose a method to improve the syngas quality and to reduce the tar amount by using preheated air and superheated steam as a gasifying media for oil palm fronds (OPF) gasification.

  13. Carbon deposition in an SOFC fueled by tar-laden biomass gas: a thermodynamic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devinder; Hernández-Pacheco, Eduardo; Hutton, Phillip N.; Patel, Nikhil; Mann, Michael D.

    This work presents a thermodynamic analysis of the carbon deposition in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) fueled by a biomass gasifier. Integrated biomass-SOFC units offer considerable benefits in terms of efficiency and fewer emissions. SOFC-based power plants can achieve a system efficiency of 70-80% (including heat utilization) as compared to 30-37% for conventional systems. The fuel from the biomass gasifier can contain considerable amounts of tars depending on the type of gasifier used. These tars can lead to the deposition of carbon at the anode side of SOFCs and affect the performance of the fuel cells. This paper thermodynamically studies the risk of carbon deposition due to the tars present in the feed stream and the effect various parameters like current density, steam, and temperature have on carbon deposition. Since tar is a complex mixture of aromatics, it is represented by a mixture of toluene, naphthalene, phenol, and pyrene. A total of 32 species are considered for the thermodynamic analysis, which is done by the Gibbs energy minimization technique. The carbon deposition is shown to decrease with an increase in current density and becomes zero after a critical current density. Steam in the feed stream also decreases the amount of carbon deposition. With the increase in temperature the amount of carbon first decreases and then increases.

  14. Coal tar residues produce both DNA adducts and oxidative DNA damage in human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadon, S A; Sumerel, J; Minton, T A; Tischler, A

    1995-12-01

    In the present study we compare the metabolic activation of coal tar, as measured by the production of both DNA adducts and oxidative DNA damage, with that of a single carcinogen that is a constituent of this complex mixture in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC). We find that a significant level of DNA adducts, detected by 32P-postlabeling, are formed in HMEC following exposure to coal tar residues. This treatment also results in the generation of high levels of oxidative DNA damage, as measured by the production of one type of oxidative base modification, thymine glycols. The amounts of both DNA adducts and thymine varied considerably between the various coal tar residues and did not correlate with either the total amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) or the amount of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) present in the residue. Fractionating the residue from one of the sites by sequential extraction with organic solvents indicated that while the ability to produce both types of DNA damage was contained mostly in a hexane-soluble fraction, a benzene-soluble fraction produced high levels of reactive oxygens relative to the number of total DNA adducts. We find that the total amount of PAH or B[a]P present in the coal tars from the various sites was not a predictor of the level of total DNA damage formed.

  15. Abilitazione nazionale: sentenza TAR sulle riviste. Tutto da rifare per le aree 11 e 14?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Pievatolo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Il Tar del Lazio ha accolto un ricorso contro la classificazione Anvur a favore di una rivista di area 11,  la “Nuova Rivista Storica”,  disponendo il conseguente annullamento delle valutazioni operate dall’ANVUR – gruppi di lavoro Area CUN 11 e … 14.

  16. Application of Cigarette Smoke Characterisation Based on Optical Aerosol Spectrometry. Dynamics and Comparisons with Tar Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, W.D. van; Cremers, R.; Klerx, W.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Scheepers, P.T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Cigarette smoking causes devastating disease worldwide. Current cigarette classification is based on standardised tar mass values obtained from smoking-machines. However, their ability to predict disease is poor, and these mass values are primarily determined by larger particles. The a

  17. Black gold rush in Canada[Tar sand oil]; Svart gullrush i Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundersen, Ina

    2006-07-01

    In Alberta, Canada, oil companies are competing for licences to extract oil from the tar sand deposits. The occurrences cover an area equal to Belgium, and the total of recoverable oil is estimated to around 1700 million barrels. Descriptions of the recovery process and the competing companies are given.

  18. 21 CFR 740.18 - Coal tar hair dyes posing a risk of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coal tar hair dyes posing a risk of cancer. 740.18... posing a risk of cancer. (a) The principal display panel of the label and any labeling accompanying a... your skin and has been determined to cause cancer in laboratory animals. (b) Hair dyes containing...

  19. Implication of Coal Tar and Asphalt on Black Carbon Quantification in Urban Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Werth, C. J.; Ligouis, B.; Razzaque, M.

    2008-12-01

    Sorption to black carbon (BC) is an important process that controls the transport and fate of persistent organic pollutants in aquatic environments. Efforts have been made to measure BC in different environmental matrices including aerosols, soils, and sediments; however, few studies have attempted to evaluate BC in dust from urban streets or parking lots, which can be an important BC source in urban lake sediments. Methods to quantify BC in soils and sediments usually involve the removal of non-BC carbonaceous materials with chemical and/or thermal oxidation followed by elemental analysis. The presence of coal tar pitch and asphalt in urban pavement dust is hypothesized to potentially result in an overestimate of BC. The primary objectives of this research are to identify the distribution of BC in a small urban watershed and to investigate the potential interference from coal tar and asphalt on BC quantification by method intercomparison. Samples were collected from the Lake Como watershed in Fort Worth, Texas. They include dust from coal-tar-sealed and unsealed parking lots and residential streets, soils from residential and commercial areas, stream bed sediments, and lake sediment cores. After density separation, samples were subjected to sequential chemical treatments and thermal treatment. Commercial coal tar pitch and asphalt products were subjected to these same treatments for comparison. BC contents quantified with chemical treatment and chemo-thermal oxidation at 375°C (CTO-375) were compared with those characterized using organic petrography. The chemical treatment predicted greater BC contents than organic petrography in all samples, and the greatest difference is in the sealed parking lot dust. CTO-375 method also predicted greater BC content in this sample than organic petrography. Commercial coal tar pitch was resistant to thermal oxidation and both coal tar pitch and asphalt were resistant to the chemical treatment. These results indicate that

  20. The search for a source rock for the giant Tar Sand triangle accumulation, southeastern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntoon, J.E.; Hansley, P.L.; Naeser, N.D.

    1999-01-01

    A large proportion (about 36%) of the world's oil resource is contained in accumulations of heavy oil or tar. In these large deposits of degraded oil, the oil in place represents only a fraction of what was present at the time of accumulation. In many of these deposits, the source of the oil is unknown, and the oil is thought to have migrated over long distances to the reservoirs. The Tar Sand triangle in southeastern Utah contains the largest tar sand accumulation in the United States, with 6.3 billion bbl of heavy oil estimated to be in place. The deposit is thought to have originally contained 13-16 billion bbl prior to the biodegradation, water washing, and erosion that have taken place since the middle - late Tertiary. The source of the oil is unknown. The tar is primarily contained within the Lower Permian White Rim Sandstone, but extends into permeable parts of overlying and underlying beds. Oil is interpreted to have migrated into the White Rim sometime during the Tertiary when the formation was at a depth of approximately 3500 m. This conclusion is based on integration of fluid inclusion analysis, time-temperature reconstruction, and apatite fission-track modeling for the White Rim Sandstone. Homogenization temperatures cluster around 85-90??C for primary fluid inclusions in authigenic, nonferroan dolomite in the White Rim. The fluid inclusions are associated with fluorescent oil-bearing inclusions, indicating that dolomite precipitation was coeval with oil migration. Burial reconstruction suggests that the White Rim Sandstone reached its maximum burial depth from 60 to 24 Ma, and that maximum burial was followed by unroofing from 24 to 0 Ma. Time-temperature modeling indicates that the formation experienced temperatures of 85-90??C from about 35 to 40 Ma during maximum burial. Maximum formation temperatures of about 105-110??C were reached at about 24 Ma, just prior to unroofing. Thermal modeling is used to examine the history of potential source rocks

  1. Physicochemical Approaches for the Remediation of Former Manufactured Gas Plant Tars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, S.; Miller, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) tars are one of the most challenging non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants to remediate due to their complex chemical composition, high viscosities, and ability to alter wettability. In this work, we investigate several in situ remediation techniques for the removal of tar from porous media. Batch and column experiments were conducted to test the effectiveness of mobilization, solubilization, and chemical oxidation remediation approaches. Alkaline (NaOH), surfactant (Triton X-100), and polymer (xanthan gum) agents were used in various combinations to reduce tar-water interfacial tension, increase flushing solution viscosity, and increase the solubilities of tar components. Base-activated sodium persulfate was used alone and in combination with surfactant to chemically oxidized tar components. The effectiveness of each method was assessed in terms of both removal of PAHs from the system and reduction of dissolved-phase effluent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations. In column studies, alkaline-polymer (AP) and alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) solutions efficiently mobilized 81-93% and 95-96% of residual PAHs, respectively, within two pore volumes. The impact of AP flushing on dissolved-phase PAH concentrations was relatively low; however, the concentrations of several low molar mass PAHs were significantly reduced after ASP flushing. Surfactant-polymer (SP) solutions removed over 99% of residual PAHs through a combination of mobilization and solubilization, and reduced the post-remediation, dissolved-phase total PAH concentration by 98.4-99.1%. Degradation of residual PAHs by base-activated sodium persulfate was relatively low (30-50%), and had little impact on dissolved-phase PAH concentrations.

  2. Understanding the fate and transport of petroleum hydrocarbons from coal tar within gasholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulon, Frédéric; Orsi, Roberto; Turner, Claire; Walton, Chris; Daly, Paddy; Pollard, Simon J T

    2009-02-01

    Coal tars have been identified as posing a threat to human health due to their toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic characteristics. Workers involved in former gasholders decommissioning are potentially exposed to relevant concentrations of volatile and semi-volatile hydrocarbons upon opening up derelict tanks and during tar excavation/removal. While information on contaminated sites air-quality and its implications on medium-long term exposure is available, acute exposure issues associated with the execution of critical tasks are less understood. Calculations indicated that the concentration of a given contaminant in the gasholder vapour phase only depends on the coal tar composition, being only barely affected by the presence of water in the gasholder and the tar volume/void space ratio. Fugacity modelling suggested that risk-critical compounds such as benzene, naphthalene and other monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons may gather in the gasholder air phase at significant concentrations. Gasholder emissions were measured on-site and compared with the workplace exposure limits (WELs) currently in use in UK. While levels for most of the toxic compounds were far lower than WELs, benzene air-concentrations where found to be above the accepted threshold. In addition due to the long exposure periods involved in gasholder decommissioning and the significant contribution given by naphthalene to the total coal tar vapour concentration, the adoption of a WEL for naphthalene may need to be considered to support operators in preventing human health risk at the workplace. The Level I fugacity approach used in this study demonstrated its suitability for applications to sealed environments such as gasholders and its further refining could provide a useful tool for land remediation risk assessors.

  3. RANKL employs distinct binding modes to engage RANK and the osteoprotegerin decoy receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christopher A; Warren, Julia T; Wang, Michael W-H; Teitelbaum, Steven L; Fremont, Daved H

    2012-11-07

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) are members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily that regulate osteoclast formation and function by competing for RANK ligand (RANKL). RANKL promotes osteoclast development through RANK activation, while OPG inhibits this process by sequestering RANKL. For comparison, we solved crystal structures of RANKL with RANK and RANKL with OPG. Complementary biochemical and functional studies reveal that the monomeric cytokine-binding region of OPG binds RANKL with ∼500-fold higher affinity than RANK and inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclastogenesis ∼150 times more effectively, in part because the binding cleft of RANKL makes unique contacts with OPG. Several side chains as well as the C-D and D-E loops of RANKL occupy different orientations when bound to OPG versus RANK. High affinity OPG binding requires a 90s loop Phe residue that is mutated in juvenile Paget's disease. These results suggest cytokine plasticity may help to fine-tune specific tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-family cytokine/receptor pair selectivity.

  4. Pyrolysis of agricultural residues. Part II. Yield and chemical composition of tars and oils produced from cotton stalks, and assessment of lignin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmy, Y.; Mobarak, F.; Schweers, W.

    1982-01-01

    The pyrolysis of cotton stalks at 400-600 degrees resulted in the production of char and tar in highest yield, and the increase of temperature within this range decreased the yield of tar and phenolic compounds in the tar but increased the ratio of neutrals to acids in the tar. On decreasing the particle size of stalks, the total yield of tar remained almost constant regardless of pyrolysis temperature but that of phenols increased while that of neutrals and acids decreased. The distribution of syringol and guaiacol in phenolic products indicated that lignin in stalks belongs to the guaiacyl-syringyl type.

  5. Therapeutic effect of intra-articular injection of ribbon-type decoy oligonucleotides for hypoxia inducible factor-1 on joint contracture in an immobilized knee animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotobayashi, Daisuke; Kawahata, Hirohisa; Anada, Natsuki; Ogihara, Toshio; Morishita, Ryuichi; Aoki, Motokuni

    2016-08-01

    Limited range of motion (ROM) as a result of joint contracture in treatment associated with joint immobilization or motor paralysis is a critical issue. However, its molecular mechanism has not been fully clarified and a therapeutic approach is not yet established. In the present study, we investigated its molecular mechanism, focusing on the role of a transcription factor, hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), which regulates the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and evaluated the possibility of molecular therapy to inhibit HIF-1 activation by ribbon-type decoy oligonucleotides (ODNs) for HIF-1 using immobilized knee animal models. In a mouse model, ROM of the immobilized knee significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner, accompanied by synovial hypertrophy. Immunohistochemical studies suggested that CTGF and VEGF are implicated in synovial hypertrophy with fibrosis. CTGF and VEGF were up-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels at 1 and 2 weeks after immobilization, subsequent to up-regulation of HIF-1 mRNA and transcriptional activation of HIF-1. Of importance, intra-articular transfection of decoy ODNs for HIF-1 in a rat model successfully inhibited transcriptional activation of HIF-1, followed by suppression of expression of CTGF and VEGF, resulting in attenuation of restricted ROM, whereas transfection of scrambled decoy ODNs did not. The present study demonstrates the important role of HIF-1 in the initial progression of immobilization-induced joint contracture, and indicates the possibility of molecular treatment to prevent the progression of joint contracture prior to intervention with physical therapy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydary, J; Susa, D; Dudáš, J

    2013-05-01

    Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H2, CO, CH4, CO2 and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work.

  7. Tar pollution of beaches in the Indian Ocean, the south China Sea and the South Pacific Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostdam, B.L.

    1984-07-01

    During 1978, a comparative survey was made of the degree of pollution of 265 beaches in the Indian Ocean, the South China Sea, the South Pacific and along the Southern California Bight, the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the Dutch North Sea. Part of the results were published recently and elicited a number of requests for the full data set, which is, therefore, summarized in this note. Generalized observations on tar pollution are: (1) strandings from individual spills could rarely be correlated over distances longer than a few km; (2) tar is concentrated in distinct bands parallel to the water line; (3) there is a pronounced trend of vertical zonation of tar from smaller, well-rounded and soft particles near the water line to larger, flattened and hardened lumps landward; (4) buried tar is relatively uncommon, suggesting a residence time of around 30-90 days in the tropics; (5) tar concentrations display high variability indicating the need for large numbers of samples; (6) prevailing wind regimes are the main cause for seasonal variations in tar strandings. The highest beach tar concentrations were found in areas of oil production or near tanker routes, especially in enclosed seas; Persian Gulf, Red Sea and South China Sea.

  8. Are Toll-Like Receptors and Decoy Receptors Involved in the Immunopathogenesis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Lupus-Like Syndromes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Guggino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we focus our attention on the role of two families of receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLR and decoy receptors (DcR involved in the generation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and lupus-like syndromes in human and mouse models. To date, these molecules were described in several autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, antiphospholipids syndrome, bowel inflammation, and SLE. Here, we summarize the findings of recent investigations on TLR and DcR and their role in the immunopathogenesis of the SLE.

  9. Potential contributions of asphalt and coal tar to black carbon quantification in urban dust, soils, and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.; Ligouis, B.; Werth, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) using either chemical or thermal oxidation methods are generally thought to indicate the amount of char and/or soot present in a sample. In urban environments, however, asphalt and coal-tar particles worn from pavement are ubiquitous and, because of their pyrogenic origin, could contribute to measurements of BC. Here we explored the effect of the presence of asphalt and coal-tar particles on the quantification of BC in a range of urban environmental sample types, and evaluated biases in the different methods used for quantifying BC. Samples evaluated were pavement dust, residential and commercial area soils, lake sediments from a small urban watershed, and reference materials of asphalt and coal tar. Total BC was quantified using chemical treatment through acid dichromate (Cr2O7) oxidation and chemo-thermal oxidation at 375??C (CTO-375). BC species, including soot and char/charcoal, asphalt, and coal tar, were quantified with organic petrographic analysis. Comparison of results by the two oxidation methods and organic petrography indicates that both coal tar and asphalt contribute to BC quantified by Cr2O7 oxidation, and that coal tar contributes to BC quantified by CTO-375. These results are supported by treatment of asphalt and coal-tar reference samples with Cr2O7 oxidation and CTO-375. The reference asphalt is resistant to Cr2O7 oxidation but not to CTO-375, and the reference coal tar is resistant to both Cr2O7 oxidation and CTO-375. These results indicate that coal tar and/or asphalt can contribute to BC measurements in samples from urban areas using Cr2O7 oxidation or CTO-375, and caution is advised when interpreting BC measurements made with these methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Potential contributions of asphalt and coal tar to black carbon quantification in urban dust, soils, and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y.; Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.; Ligouis, B.; Werth, C.J. [University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) using either chemical or thermal oxidation methods are generally thought to indicate the amount of char and/or soot present in a sample. In urban environments, however, asphalt and coal-tar particles worn from pavement are ubiquitous and, because of their pyrogenic origin, could contribute to measurements of BC. Here we explored the effect of the presence of asphalt and coal-tar particles on the quantification of BC in a range of urban environmental sample types, and evaluated biases in the different methods used for quantifying BC. Samples evaluated were pavement dust, residential and commercial area soils, lake sediments from a small urban watershed, and reference materials of asphalt and coal tar. Total BC was quantified using chemical treatment through acid dichromate (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}) oxidation and chemo-thermal oxidation at 375{sup o}C (CTO-375). BC species, including soot and char/charcoal, asphalt, and coal tar, were quantified with organic petrographic analysis. Comparison of results by the two oxidation methods and organic petrography indicates that both coal tar and asphalt contribute to BC quantified by Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxidation, and that coal tar contributes to BC quantified by CTO-375. These results are supported by treatment of asphalt and coal-tar reference samples with Cr2O7 oxidation and CTO-375. The reference asphalt is resistant to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxidation but not to CTO-375, and the reference coal tar is resistant to both Cr2O7 oxidation and CTO-375. These results indicate that coal tar and/or asphalt can contribute to BC measurements in samples from urban areas using Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxidation or CTO-375, and caution is advised when interpreting BC measurements made with these methods.

  11. Potential contributions of asphalt and coal tar to black carbon quantification in urban dust, soils, and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaning; Mahler, Barbara J.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Ligouis, Bertrand; Werth, Charles J.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) using either chemical or thermal oxidation methods are generally thought to indicate the amount of char and/or soot present in a sample. In urban environments, however, asphalt and coal-tar particles worn from pavement are ubiquitous and, because of their pyrogenic origin, could contribute to measurements of BC. Here we explored the effect of the presence of asphalt and coal-tar particles on the quantification of BC in a range of urban environmental sample types, and evaluated biases in the different methods used for quantifying BC. Samples evaluated were pavement dust, residential and commercial area soils, lake sediments from a small urban watershed, and reference materials of asphalt and coal tar. Total BC was quantified using chemical treatment through acid dichromate (Cr 2O 7) oxidation and chemo-thermal oxidation at 375 °C (CTO-375). BC species, including soot and char/charcoal, asphalt, and coal tar, were quantified with organic petrographic analysis. Comparison of results by the two oxidation methods and organic petrography indicates that both coal tar and asphalt contribute to BC quantified by Cr 2O 7 oxidation, and that coal tar contributes to BC quantified by CTO-375. These results are supported by treatment of asphalt and coal-tar reference samples with Cr 2O 7 oxidation and CTO-375. The reference asphalt is resistant to Cr 2O 7 oxidation but not to CTO-375, and the reference coal tar is resistant to both Cr 2O 7 oxidation and CTO-375. These results indicate that coal tar and/or asphalt can contribute to BC measurements in samples from urban areas using Cr 2O 7 oxidation or CTO-375, and caution is advised when interpreting BC measurements made with these methods.

  12. Danger in the nursery : impact on birds of tar sands oil development in Canada's boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, J. [Boreal Songbird Initiative, Seattle, WA (United States); Casey-Lefkowitz, S.; Chavarria, G. [Natural Resources Defense Council, New York, NY (United States); Dyer, S. [Pembina Institute, Drayton Valley, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This report discussed the impacts of tar sands oil development in Canada's boreal forest. The Canadian boreal forest is one of the world's most important breeding areas for migratory birds, with 1 billion to 3 billion individual birds from at least 300 species known to regularly breed there. Approximately 30 per cent of all shorebirds and 30 per cent of all landbirds that breed in the United States and Canada do so within the boreal. The section of the boreal forest that sits over the tar sands region of Alberta is rapidly being fragmented by oil development. As much as 34 to 66 per cent of the Canadian boreal forest, up to 438 million acres, may no longer be intact. In Alberta, 86 per cent of the boreal forest is no longer considered intact, thus putting valuable bird habitat at risk. This report first provided background information on Canada's boreal forest as North America's nesting bird destination. It then reviewed the dangers created by tar sands operations for boreal birds. It noted that tar sands mining destroys boreal bird habitat; tailings ponds trap birds in oil waste; tar sands drilling fragments bird habitat; tar sands water withdrawals harm wetlands and water habitats; and tar sands toxins weaken and kill boreal birds. The impacts of tar sands pipelines and refineries were also discussed along with global warming impacts on boreal birds and the path forward for habitat protection. It was recommended that Alberta should implement a moratorium on new tar sands lease sales, and that Alberta and Canada should halt project approvals until long-term mitigation strategies and conservation measures are in place. refs., tabs., figs.

  13. Fresh tar (from biomass gasification) destruction with downstream catalysts: comparison of their intrinsic activity with a realistic kinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Narvaez, I.; Orio, A. [Complutense Univ. of Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    A model for fresh tar destruction over catalysts placed downstream a biomass gasifier is presented. It includes the stoichio-metry and the calculation of the kinetic constants for the tar destruction. Catalysts studied include commercial Ni steam reforming catalysts and calcinated dolomites. Kinetic constants for tar destruction are calculated for several particle sizes, times- on-stream and temperatures of the catalyst and equivalence ratios in the gasifier. Such intrinsic kinetic constants allow a rigorous or scientific comparison of solids and conditions to be used in an advanced gasification process. (orig.) 4 refs.

  14. Knockdown of Decoy Receptor 3 Impairs Growth and Invasiveness of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line of HepG2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Na Zhou; Guang-Ming Li; Ying-Chen Xu; Tuan-Jie Zhao; Ji-Xiang Wu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) binds to Fas ligand (FasL) and inhibits FasL-induced apoptosis.The receptor is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC),and it is associated with the growth and metastatic spread of tumors.DcR3 holds promises as a new target for the treatment of HCC,but little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the oncogenic properties of DcR3.The present work,therefore,examined the role of DcR3 in regulating the growth and invasive property of liver cancer cell HepG2.Methods:HepG2 cells were stably transfected with lentivirus-based short hairpin RNA vector targeting DcR3.After the knockdown of DcR3 was confirmed,cell proliferation,clone formation,ability of migrating across transwell membrane,and wound healing were assessed in vitro.Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP 9) and vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF)-C and D expressions of the DcR3 knockdown were also studied.Comparisons between multiple groups were done using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA),while pairwise comparisons were performed using Student's t test.P < 0.05 was regarded statistically significant.Results:DcR3 was overexpressed in HepG2 compared to other HCC cell lines and normal hepatocyte Lo-2.Stable knockdown of DcR3 slowed down the growth of HepG2 (P < 0.05) and reduced the number of clones formed by 50% compared to those without DcR3 knockdown (P < 0.05).The knockdown also reduced the migration of HepG2 across transwell matrix membrane by five folds compared to the control (P < 0.05) and suppressed the closure of scratch wound (P < 0.05).In addition,the messenger RNA levels of MMP 9,VEGF-C,and VEGF-D were significantly suppressed by DcR3 knockdown by 90% when compared with the mock control (P < 0.05).Conclusions:Loss of DcR3 impaired the growth and invasive property of HCC cell line of HepG2.Targeting DcR3 may be a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of HCC.

  15. Decoy receptor 3 suppresses FasL-induced apoptosis via ERK1/2 activation in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Xin; Song, Shiduo; Zhang, Lifeng; Zhu, Dongming [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Wang, Zhenxin [Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Chen, Xiaochen [Department of Pathology, The Obstetrics & Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200090 (China); Zhou, Jian, E-mail: zhoujian20150602@126.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2015-08-07

    Resistance to Fas Ligand (FasL) mediated apoptosis plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is reported to interact with FasL and is overexpressed in some malignant tumors. We sought to investigate the role of DcR3 in resistance to FasL in pancreatic cancer. We compared expression of apoptosis related genes between FasL-resistant SW1990 and FasL-sensitive Patu8988 pancreatic cell lines by microarray analysis. We explored the impact of siRNA knockdown of, or exogenous supplementation with, DcR3 on FasL-induced cell growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines and expression of proteins involved in apoptotic signaling. We assessed the level of DcR3 protein and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in tumor and non-tumor tissue samples of 66 patients with pancreatic carcinoma. RNAi knockdown of DcR3 expression in SW1990 cells reduced resistance to FasL-induced apoptosis, and supplementation of Patu8988 with rDcR3 had the opposite effect. RNAi knockdown of DcR3 in SW1990 cells elevated expression of caspase 3, 8 and 9, and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation (P < 0.05), but did not alter phosphorylated-Akt expression. 47 tumor tissue specimens, but only 15 matched non-tumor specimens stained for DcR3 (χ{sup 2} = 31.1447, P < 0.001). The proliferation index of DcR3 positive specimens (14.26  ±  2.67%) was significantly higher than that of DcR3 negative specimens (43.58  ±  7.88%, P < 0.01). DcR3 expression positively correlated with p-ERK1/2 expression in pancreatic cancer tissues (r = 0.607, P < 0.001). DcR3 enhances ERK1/2 phosphorylation and opposes FasL signaling in pancreatic cancer cells. - Highlights: • We investigated the role of DcR3 in FasL resistance in pancreatic cancer. • Knockdown of DcR3 in SW1990 cells reduced resistance to FasL-induced apoptosis. • DcR3 knockdown also elevated caspase expression, and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. • Tumor and non-tumor tissues were collected from 66 pancreatic carcinoma patients

  16. Formation of DNA adducts in the skin of psoriasis patients, in human skin in organ culture, and in mouse skin and lung following topical application of coal-tar and juniper tar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoket, B; Horkay, I; Kósa, A; Páldeák, L; Hewer, A; Grover, P L; Phillips, D H

    1990-02-01

    Preparations of coal-tar and juniper tar (cade oil) that are used in the treatment of psoriasis are known to contain numerous potentially carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Evidence of covalent binding to DNA by components of these mixtures was sought in a) human skin biopsy samples from 12 psoriasis patients receiving therapy with these agents, b) human skin explants maintained in organ culture and treated topically with the tars, and c) the skin and lungs of mice treated with repeated doses of the formulations following the regimen used in the clinic. DNA was isolated from the human and mouse tissues and digested enzymically to mononucleotides. 32P-Post-labeling analysis revealed the presence of aromatic DNA adducts in the biopsy samples at levels of up to 0.4 fmol total adducts/microgram DNA. Treatment of human skin in organ culture produced similar levels of adducts, while treatment with dithranol, a non-mutagenic therapeutic agent, resulted in chromatograms indistinguishable from those from untreated controls. In mouse skin, coal-tar ointment and juniper tar gave similar DNA adduct levels, with a similar time-course of removal: maximum levels (0.5 fmol/microgram DNA) at 24 h after the final treatment declined rapidly to 0.05 fmol/microgram at 7 d, thereafter declining slowly over the succeeding 25 d. However, while coal-tar ointment produced only very low levels of adducts in mouse lung (less than 0.03 fmol/microgram DNA), juniper tar produced adducts at a high level (0.7 fmol/microgram DNA) that were persistent in this tissue. These results provide direct evidence for the formation of potentially carcinogenic DNA damage in human and mouse tissue by components of these therapeutic tar preparations.

  17. HIV infection enhances TRAIL-induced cell death in macrophage by down-regulating decoy receptor expression and generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Ming Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL could induce apoptosis of HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM, but the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using an HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 PV-infected MDM cell model we demonstrate that HIV-1 PV infection down-regulates the expression of TRAIL decoy receptor 1 (DcR1 and 2 (DcR2, and cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP, but dose not affect the expression of death receptor 4 and 5 (DR4, DR5, and Bcl-2 family members in MDM cells. Furthermore, recombinant soluble TRAIL and an agonistic anti-DR5 antibody, AD5-10, treatment stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV infection facilitates TRIAL-induced cell death in MDM by down-regulating the expression of TRAIL decoy receptors and intracellular c-FLIP. Meanwhile, the agonistic anti-DR5 antibody, AD5-10, induces apoptosis synergistically with TRAIL in HIV-1-infected cells. ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation are involved in this process. These findings potentiate clinical usage of the combination of TRAIL and AD5-10 in eradication of HIV-infected macrophage and AIDS.

  18. Source investigation of the tar balls deposited along the Gujarat coast, India, using chemical fingerprinting and transport modeling techniques

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suneel, V.; Vethamony, P.; Naik, B.G.; VinodKumar, K.; Sreenu, L.; Samiksha, S.V.; Tai,Y.; Sudheesh, K.

    Deposition of tar balls (TBs) along the south Gujarat coast, situated on the west coast of India (WCI), commonly occurs during the southwest monsoon season. Several offshore oil fields off the Mumbai-Gujarat coast, and refineries along the coast...

  19. Mineralization Of PAHs In Coal-Tar Impacted Aquifer Sediments And Associated Microbial Community Structure Investigated With FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    The microbial community structure and mineralization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a coal-tar contaminated aquifer were investigated spatially using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and in laboratory-scale incubations of the aquifer sediments. DAPI-detect...

  20. Preparation of organic light-emitting diode using coal tar pitch, a low-cost material, for printable devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamaoka, Miki; Asami, Shun-Suke; Funaki, Nayuta; Kimura, Sho; Yingjie, Liao; Fukuda, Takeshi; Yamashita, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    We have identified coal tar pitch, a very cheap organic material made from coal during the iron-making process, as a source from which could be obtained emissive molecules for organic light-emitting diodes...

  1. Citizen science identifies the effects of nitrogen dioxide and other environmental drivers on tar spot of sycamore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, Laura; Ashmore, Mike; Sparks, Tim; Bell, Nigel

    2016-07-01

    Elevated sulphur dioxide (SO2) concentrations were the major cause of the absence of symptoms of tar spot (Rhytisma acerinum) of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus), in urban areas in the 1970s. The subsequent large decline in SO2 concentrations has not always been accompanied by increased tar spot symptoms, for reasons that have remained unresolved. We used a large citizen science survey, providing over 1000 records across England, to test two competing hypotheses proposed in earlier studies. We were able to demonstrate the validity of both hypotheses; tar spot symptoms were reduced where there were fewer fallen leaves as a source of inoculum, and elevated nitrogen dioxide concentrations reduced tar spot symptoms above a threshold concentration of about 20 μg m(-3). Symptom severity was also lower at sites with higher temperature and lower rainfall. Our findings demonstrate the power of citizen science to resolve competing hypotheses about the impacts of air pollution and other environmental drivers.

  2. Genetic relationship of organic bases of the quinoline and isoquinoline series from lignite semicoking tars with the initial biological material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Podshibyakin, S.I.; Domogatskii, V.V.; Shvykin, A.Y.; Shavyrina, O.A.; Chilachava, K.B. [Leo Tolstoy State Pedagog University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    The genetic relationship of quinoline and isoquinoline compounds present in semicoking tars of Kimovsk lignites (near-Moscow fields) with the initial vegetable material is discussed. Transformation pathways of the native compounds in the course of lignite formation are suggested.

  3. Simulation of the influence of tar formation in wood gasification processes on the cost of the purified process gas; Simulation des Einflusses der Teerbildung bei der Vergasung von Holz auf die Kosten des gereinigten Produktgases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saller, G.; Krumm, W. [Siegen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik

    1998-09-01

    The influence of the gasification process and the related tar formation rate on the cost of gas production is investigated with the aid of process models. The processes of gasification, gas purification and adsorptive treatment of waste water were modelled mathematically with a view to process mechanisms and cost. Simulations of the overall process helped to obtain a quantitative assessment of the cost of product gas as a function of process parameters like gasification process and tar formation. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Mit Hilfe von Prozessmodellen wird untersucht, welchen Einfluss das Vergasungsverfahren und die damit verbundene Teerbildung mit entsprechenden Reinigungsverfahren auf die Produktionskosten des gereinigten Produktgases besitzt. Hierfuer werden die Prozesse der Vergasung, Gasreinigung und adsorptiven Abwasseraufbereitung hinsichtlich verfahrenstechnischer Zusammenhaenge und Kosten mathematisch modelliert. Durch Simulation des Gesamtprozesses werden quantitativ die Kosten des Produktgases in Abhaengigkeit von Prozessparametern wie Vergasungsverfahren und Teerbildung ermittelt. (orig./SR)

  4. Structure and chemical composition of hydrocarbons from semicoking tar of lignites from the near-Moscow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Antonio, T.Z.; Ryltsova, S.V.; Platonova, M.V.; Shvykin, A.Y. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1999-02-01

    Hydrocarbons from semicoking tar of lignites from the near-Moscow fields were separated by thin-layer chromatography and the molecular and hypothetical structural formulae of the components were determined. A genetic relationship between the components and the initial biological material was revealed. A contribution of `primary` hydrocarbons to formation of the qualitative composition of tars obtained by high-temperature processing of lignites was demonstrated.

  5. Preparation of organic light-emitting diode using coal tar pitch, a low-cost material, for printable devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Yamaoka

    Full Text Available We have identified coal tar pitch, a very cheap organic material made from coal during the iron-making process, as a source from which could be obtained emissive molecules for organic light-emitting diodes. Coal tar pitch was separated by simple dissolution in organic solvent, and subsequent separation by preparative thin-layer chromatography was used to obtain emissive organic molecules. The retardation factor of preparative thin-layer chromatography played a major role in deciding the emission characteristics of the solution as photoluminescence spectra and emission-excitation matrix spectra could be controlled by modifying the solution preparation method. In addition, the device characteristics could be improved by modifying the solution preparation method. Two rounds of preparative thin-layer chromatography separation could improve the luminance of organic light-emitting diodes with coal tar pitch, indicating that less polar components are favorable for enhancing the luminance and device performance. By appropriate choice of the solvent, the photoluminescence peak wavelength of separated coal tar pitch could be shifted from 429 nm (cyclohexane to 550 nm (chloroform, and consequently, the optical properties of the coal tar pitch solution could be easily tuned. Hence, the use of such multicomponent materials is advantageous for fine-tuning the net properties at a low cost. Furthermore, an indium tin oxide/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(styrenesulfonate/coal tar pitch/LiF/Al system, in which the emissive layer was formed by spin-coating a tetrahydrofuran solution of coal tar pitch on the substrate, showed a luminance of 176 cd/m(2. In addition, the emission spectrum of coal tar pitch was narrowed after the preparative thin-layer chromatography process by removing the excess emissive molecules.

  6. Preparation of organic light-emitting diode using coal tar pitch, a low-cost material, for printable devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Miki; Asami, Shun-Suke; Funaki, Nayuta; Kimura, Sho; Yingjie, Liao; Fukuda, Takeshi; Yamashita, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    We have identified coal tar pitch, a very cheap organic material made from coal during the iron-making process, as a source from which could be obtained emissive molecules for organic light-emitting diodes. Coal tar pitch was separated by simple dissolution in organic solvent, and subsequent separation by preparative thin-layer chromatography was used to obtain emissive organic molecules. The retardation factor of preparative thin-layer chromatography played a major role in deciding the emission characteristics of the solution as photoluminescence spectra and emission-excitation matrix spectra could be controlled by modifying the solution preparation method. In addition, the device characteristics could be improved by modifying the solution preparation method. Two rounds of preparative thin-layer chromatography separation could improve the luminance of organic light-emitting diodes with coal tar pitch, indicating that less polar components are favorable for enhancing the luminance and device performance. By appropriate choice of the solvent, the photoluminescence peak wavelength of separated coal tar pitch could be shifted from 429 nm (cyclohexane) to 550 nm (chloroform), and consequently, the optical properties of the coal tar pitch solution could be easily tuned. Hence, the use of such multicomponent materials is advantageous for fine-tuning the net properties at a low cost. Furthermore, an indium tin oxide/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/coal tar pitch/LiF/Al system, in which the emissive layer was formed by spin-coating a tetrahydrofuran solution of coal tar pitch on the substrate, showed a luminance of 176 cd/m(2). In addition, the emission spectrum of coal tar pitch was narrowed after the preparative thin-layer chromatography process by removing the excess emissive molecules.

  7. Topical coal tar alone and in combination with oral methotrexate in management of psoriasis : a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad PVS

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty five patients admitted with psoriasis were analysed. 16 patients received 20% crude coal tar and 19 patients received 20% crude coal tar along with methotrexate in a weekly oral schedule (15mg/wk. After 4 weeks of therapy there was total clearence in 52.6% of the patients with combination therapy, whereas only 12.5% of the patients with conventional therapy achieved this.

  8. The migration and monitoring of viscous NAPLs (coal tar and creosote) in the subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, R. [Intera Engineering Ltd., Heidelberg, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The high viscosity of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) such as creosote and coal tar complicates efforts to monitor their mobility at contaminated sites. Viscous NAPLs can remain mobile for many decades after their application as a wood preservative, or after the closure of the facilities in which they were generated. NAPL-wet pathways in the subsurface can also lead to errors in residual saturation measurements. This abstract discussed issues related to creeping flow and the low seepage rates that are not accounted for using traditional measuring methods. Examples of creeping flow and the monitoring techniques used to assess it were presented for sites in British Columbia and Florida. The drainage of viscous NAPLs during water table declines was also considered, and a case study of a coal tar-removal procedures using polymer surfactant flooding was presented.

  9. Effect of Tar-resin Binder on Properties of MgO-C Monolithic Refractories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hady EFENDY; Wan Mohd.Farid BIN WAN MOHAMAD

    2010-01-01

    Based on the newly developed bonding system,a new generation of carbon-bonded MgO-C monolithic refractories product with low toxic potential has been developed.Results of an on-going investigation on properties of MgO-C monolithic refractories with tar-resin as binder are presented.Furthermore,the binder is an extremely strong carbon bonding.Further significant advantages of this system are high oxidation resistance of the highly-ordered carbon structure and the excellent stress-absorbing structure.To improve the strength and erosion resistance,and to decrease evaporation during heating,a preliminary treated tar-resin with higher melting temperature and lower content of volatile component was investigated.The binder specimens were treated at 800 ℃ and the mechanical properties of MgO-C refractories specimens treated at 200,400,and 1 200 ℃ were determined.

  10. Controlling and assessing pressure conditions during treatment of tar sands formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Etuan; Beer, Gary Lee

    2015-11-10

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the tar sands formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. Heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. A pressure in the portion of the formation is controlled such that the pressure remains below a fracture pressure of the formation overburden while allowing the portion of the formation to heat to a selected average temperature of at least about 280.degree. C. and at most about 300.degree. C. The pressure in the portion of the formation is reduced to a selected pressure after the portion of the formation reaches the selected average temperature.

  11. Coal-tar pavement sealants might substantially increase children's PAH exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E. Spencer; Mahler, Barbara J.; Van Metre, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Dietary ingestion has been identified repeatedly as the primary route of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), seven of which are classified as probable human carcinogens (B2 PAHs) by the U.S. EPA. Humans are exposed to PAHs through ingestion of cooked and uncooked foods, incidental ingestion of soil and dust, inhalation of ambient air, and absorption through skin. Although PAH sources are ubiquitous in the environment, one recently identified PAH source stands out: Coal-tar-based pavement sealant—a product applied to many parking lots, driveways, and even playgrounds primarily in the central, southern, and eastern U.S.—has PAH concentrations 100–1000 times greater than most other PAH sources. It was reported recently that PAH concentrations in house dust in residences adjacent to parking lots with coal-tar-based sealant were 25 times higher than in residences adjacent to unsealed asphalt parking lots.

  12. Rheological behavior of coal-tar pitch modified with p-methyl benzaldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Qi-lang; Li Tie-hu [Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China). College of Materials Science and Engineering

    2007-10-15

    The chemical structures and morphologies of the pitches, including the parent coal tar pitch and the modified pitch, were analysed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy. The rheological properties of the modified pitch were measured using a rotating coaxial-cylinder viscometer. It was found that many micro-fibers are uniformly distributed in the modified pitch due to the polymerisation between coal tar pitch and p-methyl benzaldebyde (PMB). The apparent viscosity of the modified pitch is 78-548 mPa.S over the temperature range 150-210{sup o}C when the shear rate is 100 s{sup -1}, indicating that the modified pitch has good rheological properties. The viscous activation energy E of the modified pitch becomes large with the decrease of toluene- soluble content and the apparent viscosity becomes small with the increase of shear rate. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. A pragmatic approach to standard setting--the example of coal tar products and asphalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, J P; Haines, A T; Verma, D K

    1989-01-01

    This article will outline a pragmatic approach directed to incorporating key elements of a scientific review of the literature and derive a proposal for an occupational exposure standard for coal tar, coal tar pitch, creosote, petroleum pitch, bitumen and asphalt, six substances which contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Five approaches to the standard setting process are reviewed and their strengths and weaknesses discussed. Unfortunately there does not exist an acceptable epidemiological data set, other than the coke oven emission studies, on which to base a valid and reliable risk assessment model. Based on comparative potency experiments of complex mixtures, consideration of the state-of-the-art sampling and analytical methods, prevention of acute human health effects, and current existing standards for these substances throughout the world, a set of recommended exposure standards are derived for health policy makers.

  14. Occupational exposure to coal tar pitch volatiles, benzo/a/pyrene and dust in tyre production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogaczewska, T; Ligocka, D

    1994-01-01

    Occupational exposure to coal tar pitch volatiles (CTPVs), benzo/a/pyrene (BaP) and dust was evaluated by means of individual measurements carried out in 80 workers and by stationary measurements on 16 work-posts in two divisions of the tyre producing plant. Dust and coal tar pitch volatiles concentrations in the air were determinated by the gravimetric method, measured, in the case of CPTVs, benzene-soluble fraction (BSF) with ultrasonic extraction. Benzo/a/pyrene analysis was performed using high performance liquid chromato-graphy (HPLC) with a spectrofluorimetric detector. It was found that nearly all personal sampling results for BaP were within the range 90%) which exceeded the admissible value (4 mg/m3) was found mainly only in the workers of the Semiproducts Division at some work-posts.

  15. Calcipotriol versus coal tar: a prospective randomized study in stable plaque psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, V.; Kaur, I.; Kumar, B. [Postgraduate Institute of Medicinal Education & Research, Chandigarh (India)

    2003-10-01

    Topical therapies are the first line of treatment for patients with stable plaque psoriasis (SPP) affecting a limited body surface area. Very few trials comparing newer agents, such as 0.005% topical calcipotriol, with conventional modes of therapy, such as coal tar ointment, have been reported. A prospective, right-left randomized, investigator-blinded study with a 12-week treatment period and an 8-week follow-up period was performed. It was found that 0.005% calcipotriol ointment produced a faster initial response and had better cosmetic acceptability in patients, although after a long period of treatment, i.e. 12 weeks, 5% coal tar ointment had comparable efficacy. There was no statistically significant difference in the relapse rates between the two modalities.

  16. Formulation of Pine Tar Antidandruff Shampoo Assessment and Comparison With Some Commercial Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gharavi

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study a pine tar shampoo as a new antidandruff formulation is presented. Assessment of antidandruff preparations has been hampered by the lack of standardized schedules, and reliable methods of evaluation.Some antidandruff agents such as : Zinc pyri-thione pine tar, selenium sulphide and (sulfure were used in shampoos. Samples were coded as numbers 1,2 formulated by us and 3,4 formulated commercially. The grading scheme based on 10 point scale, and corneocyte count was carried out on 50 selected volunte¬ers. Corneocyte count and fungal study proved that pine tor shampoo is effective against pityrosporum ovale. Draize lest was used for determination of the irritancy potential of the samples. Results showed that samples numbered 1,2 were relatively innocous in comparison with the others. I urthermore,s kin sensitination test on rabbit also confirmed the results obtained by Draize test. Consumer judgments proved that all formulations were acceptable.

  17. Gasification of biomass in a fixed bed downdraft gasifier--a realistic model including tar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Niladri Sekhar; Ghosh, Sudip; De, Sudipta

    2012-03-01

    This study presents a model for fixed bed downdraft biomass gasifiers considering tar also as one of the gasification products. A representative tar composition along with its mole fractions, as available in the literature was used as an input parameter within the model. The study used an equilibrium approach for the applicable gasification reactions and also considered possible deviations from equilibrium to further upgrade the equilibrium model to validate a range of reported experimental results. Heat balance was applied to predict the gasification temperature and the predicted values were compared with reported results in literature. A comparative study was made with some reference models available in the literature and also with experimental results reported in the literature. Finally a predicted variation of performance of the gasifier by this validated model for different air-fuel ratio and moisture content was also discussed.

  18. Development of Catalytic Tar Decomposition in an Internally Circulating Fluidized-Bed Gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xianbin; Le, Due Dung; Morishita, Kayoko; Li, Liuyun; Takarada, Takayuki

    Biomass gasification in an Internally Circulating Fluidized-bed Gasifier (ICFG) using Ni/Ah03 as tar cracking catalyst is studied at low temperature. Reaction conditions of the catalyst bed are discussed, including catalytic temperature and steam ratio. High energy efficiency and hydrogen-rich, low-tar product gas can be achieved in a properly designed multi-stage gasification process, together with high-performance catalyst. In addition, considering the economical feasibility, a newly-developed Ni-loaded brown coal char is developed and evaluated as catalyst in a lab-scale fluidized bed gasifier with catalyst fixed bed. The new catalyst shows a good ability and a hopeful prospect oftar decomposition, gas quality improvement and catalytic stability.

  19. Method of producing drive fluid in situ in tar sands formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mudunuri, Ramesh Raju (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-23

    Methods of treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. The heat may be allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation such that a drive fluid is produced in situ in the formation. The drive fluid may move at least some mobilized, visbroken, and/or pyrolyzed hydrocarbons from a first portion of the formation to a second portion of the formation. At least some of the mobilized, visbroken, and/or pyrolyzed hydrocarbons may be produced from the formation.

  20. Eutectic effect during mesophase formation in co-carbonization of ethylene tar pitch and polystyrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Xianglin; Song Shulei

    2012-01-01

    Ethylene tar pitch was co-carbonized with waste polystyrene to prepare mesophase pitch.The characteristics of mesophase pitches were examined using polarized light optical microscopy,apparent viscometry,Fourier transform infrared spectrometry,1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry,and X-ray diffractometry.The properties of the mesophase pitch were greatly improved because of the eutectic effect.The soluble content increased from 5% to 56%,the mesophase itself increased from 32% to 100%,and the optical texture was changed from a coarse mosaic into a flow domain after the waste polystyrene was added to the ethylene tar pitch.The apparent viscosity showed that the mesophase pitch changed from thixotropic to Newtonian suggesting improved rheological behavior during co-carbonization,The increased number of alkyl groups,which are mainly methylene groups,altered the molecular structure of the mesophase pitch in a way that resulted in the eutectic effect.

  1. Literature survey of in situ processes for application to the US tar sand resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jr., L. A.

    1989-08-01

    Tar sands in the United States and worldwide are a large potential source of hydrocarbon liquids that has yet to be sufficiently developed. The development of the US tar sand resource lags the worldwide development and poses a challenge that has not been eagerly accepted by the petroleum industry. This paper reviews the developmental status of in situ enhanced oil recovery techniques that have been proposed for the production of heavy oils or bitumen and determines which process or processes are in the forefront for application to the US resource. Also noted is what developmental work, if any, remains to be accomplished before field testing of the process(es). The review used only information available in the public domain. 196 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Genetic relationship of flavenoids from extracts and semicoking tars of lignite with the initial vegetable matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Shrykin, A.Y.; Podshibyakin, S.I.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Shavyrina, O.A. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1999-06-01

    A genetic relationship of flavonoids from extracts and semi-coking tars of lignites mined at the near-Moscow and Kansk-Achinsk fields with flavenoids of vegetable origin has been found. Paleoreconstruction of the possible species of the initial vegetable matter from which the organic matter of these lignites had originated was performed. Possible schemes of transformations of the initial natural flavonoids under conditions of lignite formation and in the course of semicoking are presented.

  3. Importance of heterocylic aromatic compounds in monitored natural attenuation for coal tar contaminated aquifers: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Philipp; Sagner, Anne; Tiehm, Andreas; Martus, Peter; Wendel, Thomas; Grathwohl, Peter

    2011-11-01

    NSO heterocycles (HET) are typical constituents of coal tars. However, HET are not yet routinely monitored, although HET are relatively toxic coal tar constituents. The main objectives of the study is therefore to review previous studies and to analyse HET at coal tar polluted sites in order to assess the relevance of HET as part of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) or any other long-term monitoring programme. Hence, natural attenuation of typical HET (indole, quinoline, carbazole, acridine, methylquinolines, thiophene, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, benzofuran, dibenzofuran, methylbenzofurans, dimethylbenzofurans and xanthene) were studied at three different field sites in Germany. Compound-specific plume lengths were determined for all main contaminant groups (BTEX, PAH and HET). The results show that the observed plume lengths are site-specific and are above 250 m, but less than 1000 m. The latter, i.e. the upper limit, however mainly depends on the level of investigation, the considered compound, the lowest measured concentration and/or the achieved compound-specific detection limit and therefore cannot be unequivocally defined. All downstream contaminant plumes exhibited HET concentrations above typical PAH concentrations indicating that some HET are generally persistent towards biodegradation compared to other coal tar constituents, which results in comparatively increased field-derived half-lives of HET. Additionally, this study provides a review on physicochemical and toxicological parameters of HET. For three well investigated sites in Germany, the biodegradation of HET is quantified using the centre line method (CLM) for the evaluation of bulk attenuation rate constants. The results of the present and previous studies suggest that implementation of a comprehensive monitoring programme for heterocyclic aromatic compounds is relevant at sites, if MNA is considered in risk assessment and for remediation.

  4. Steam reforming of tar model compound using Pd catalyst on alumina tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisamaneenate, Jurarat; Atong, Duangduen; Sricharoenchaikul, Viboon

    2012-12-01

    Gasification processing of biomass as a renewable energy source generates tar in the product gas. Tar leads to foul-up of the process equipment by corrosion and deposit formation. Catalytic elimination of tars is a crucial step to improve fuel gas quality from the process. In this study, a palladium catalyst on alumina (Pd/Al2O3) was used in steam reforming of benzene as a biomass gasification tar model compound. The reaction was carried out in a laboratory-scale tube reactor made of stainless steel to study the effect of reaction temperature, catalyst loading, quantity of palladium catalyst tubes, steam to carbon ratio (S/C), and residence time on catalytic performance and stability. Pd/Al2O3 showed high efficiency ofbenzene decomposition and enhanced the formation of fuel gas. Hydrogen and carbon conversions increased with reaction temperature. Although the benzene concentration increased from 2000 to 5000 mg/l, the catalytic performance at 600 degrees C and 800 degrees C was similar. 1.0 wt% Pd/Al2O3 showed excellent catalytic activity with the highest hydrogen and carbon conversions of 83% and 81%, respectively at 800 degrees C. This result is attributed to the smooth surface of the palladium, as noted from scanning electron microscopy imaging. An S/C of 2 provided the highest conversion. The addition of catalyst from four and seven tubes did not result in any great difference in terms of benzene cracking efficiency. The fourth cyclic usage of 1.0 wt% Pd/Al2O3 exhibited a higher conversion than that of 0.5 wt%.

  5. Volatilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal-tar-sealed pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Majewski, Michael S.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Foreman, William T.; Braun, Christopher L.; Wilson, Jennifer T.; Burbank, Teresa L.

    2012-01-01

    Coal-tar-based pavement sealants, a major source of PAHs to urban water bodies, are a potential source of volatile PAHs to the atmosphere. An initial assessment of volatilization of PAHs from coal-tar-sealed pavement is presented here in which we measured summertime gas-phase PAH concentrations 0.03 m and 1.28 m above the pavement surface of seven sealed (six with coal-tar-based sealant and one with asphalt-based sealant) and three unsealed (two asphalt and one concrete) parking lots in central Texas. PAHs also were measured in parking lot dust. The geometric mean concentration of the sum of eight frequently detected PAHs (ΣPAH8) in the 0.03-m samples above sealed lots (1320 ng m-3) during the hottest part of the day was 20 times greater than that above unsealed lots (66.5 ng m-3). The geometric mean concentration in the 1.28-m samples above sealed lots (138 ng m-3) was five times greater than above unsealed lots (26.0 ng m-3). Estimated PAH flux from the sealed lots was 60 times greater than that from unsealed lots (geometric means of 88 and 1.4 μg m-2 h-1, respectively). Although the data set presented here is small, the much higher estimated fluxes from sealed pavement than from unsealed pavement indicate that coal-tar-based sealants are emitting PAHs to urban air at high rates compared to other paved surfaces.

  6. Juniper tar (cade oil) poisoning in new born after a cutaneous application

    OpenAIRE

    Achour, Sanae; Abourazzak, Sana; Mokhtari, Abdelrhani; Soulaymani, Abdelmjid; Soulaymani, Rachida; Hida, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    Juniper tar (cade oil) is distilled from the branches and wood of Juniperus oxycedrus. It contains etheric oils, triterpene and phenols, used for many purposes in folk medicine. The authors report a case of a previously healthy new born treated with a topical application of Juniperus oxycedrus for atopic dermatosis The poisoning caused convulsions, collapsus, acute pulmonary oedema, renal failure and hepatotoxicity. The newborn survived after supportive and symptomatic treatment, and discharg...

  7. Volatilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal-tar-sealed pavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C; Majewski, Michael S; Mahler, Barbara J; Foreman, William T; Braun, Christopher L; Wilson, Jennifer T; Burbank, Teresa L

    2012-06-01

    Coal-tar-based pavement sealants, a major source of PAHs to urban water bodies, are a potential source of volatile PAHs to the atmosphere. An initial assessment of volatilization of PAHs from coal-tar-sealed pavement is presented here in which we measured summertime gas-phase PAH concentrations 0.03 m and 1.28 m above the pavement surface of seven sealed (six with coal-tar-based sealant and one with asphalt-based sealant) and three unsealed (two asphalt and one concrete) parking lots in central Texas. PAHs also were measured in parking lot dust. The geometric mean concentration of the sum of eight frequently detected PAHs (ΣPAH(8)) in the 0.03-m samples above sealed lots (1320 ng m(-3)) during the hottest part of the day was 20 times greater than that above unsealed lots (66.5 ng m(-3)). The geometric mean concentration in the 1.28-m samples above sealed lots (138 ng m(-3)) was five times greater than above unsealed lots (26.0 ng m(-3)). Estimated PAH flux from the sealed lots was 60 times greater than that from unsealed lots (geometric means of 88 and 1.4 μg m(-2) h(-1), respectively). Although the data set presented here is small, the much higher estimated fluxes from sealed pavement than from unsealed pavement indicate that coal-tar-based sealants are emitting PAHs to urban air at high rates compared to other paved surfaces. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Species assemblages and diets of Collembola in the organic matter accumulated over an old tar deposit

    OpenAIRE

    Gillet, Servane; Ponge, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    International audience; An oil refinery was abandoned in 1964 at Merkwiller-Pechelbrorm (Alsace, France). We investigated the food diets and species assemblages of collembolan communities living in a thick pasty tar deposit overlaid by an organic soil, by comparison with an adjacent unpolluted plot. At the polluted plot the species richness of the springtail community was low (nine species, versus 27 at the unpolluted. plot) but its total abundance was at the same level in both plots. Most sp...

  9. Correlating Bladder Cancer Risk Genes with Their Targeting MicroRNAs Using MMiRNA-Tar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA (http://cancergenome.nih.gov is a valuable data resource focused on an increasing number of well-characterized cancer genomes. In part, TCGA provides detailed information about cancer-dependent gene expression changes, including changes in the expression of transcription-regulating microRNAs. We developed a web interface tool MMiRNA-Tar (http://bioinf1.indstate.edu/MMiRNA-Tar that can calculate and plot the correlation of expression for mRNA−microRNA pairs across samples or over a time course for a list of pairs under different prediction confidence cutoff criteria. Prediction confidence was established by requiring that the proposed mRNA−microRNA pair appears in at least one of three target prediction databases: TargetProfiler, TargetScan, or miRanda. We have tested our MMiRNA-Tar tool through analyzing 53 tumor and 11 normal samples of bladder urothelial carcinoma (BLCA datasets obtained from TCGA and identified 204 microRNAs. These microRNAs were correlated with the mRNAs of five previously-reported bladder cancer risk genes and these selected pairs exhibited correlations in opposite direction between the tumor and normal samples based on the customized cutoff criterion of prediction. Furthermore, we have identified additional 496 genes (830 pairs potentially targeted by 79 significant microRNAs out of 204 using three cutoff criteria, i.e., false discovery rate (FDR < 0.1, opposite correlation coefficient between the tumor and normal samples, and predicted by at least one of three target prediction databases. Therefore, MMiRNA-Tar provides researchers a convenient tool to visualize the co-relationship between microRNAs and mRNAs and to predict their targeting relationship. We believe that correlating expression profiles for microRNAs and mRNAs offers a complementary approach for elucidating their interactions.

  10. Marketing 'less harmful, low-tar' cigarettes is a key strategy of the industry to counter tobacco control in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gonghuan

    2014-03-01

    While the 'low-tar' scheme has been widely recognised as a misleading tactic used by the tobacco industry to deceive the public about the true risks of cigarette smoking, a similar campaign using the slogan of 'less harmful, low tar' was launched by the Chinese tobacco industry, that is, State Tobacco Monopoly Administration/China National Tobacco Corporation and began to gain traction during the last decade. Despite the fact that no sufficient research evidence supports the claims made by the industry that these cigarettes are safer, the Chinese tobacco industry has continued to promote them using various health claims. As a result, the production and sales of 'less harmful, low-tar' cigarettes have increased dramatically since 2000. Recently, a tobacco industry senior researcher, whose main research area is 'less harmful, low-tar' cigarettes, was elected as an Academician to the prestigious Chinese Academy of Engineering for his contribution to developing 'less harmful, low-tar' cigarettes. The tobacco researcher's election caused an outcry from the tobacco control community and the general public in China. This paper discusses the Chinese tobacco industry's 'less harmful, low-tar' initiatives and calls for the Chinese government to stop the execution of this deceptive strategy for tobacco marketing.

  11. Sequence and structure requirements for specific recognition of HIV-1 TAR and DIS RNA by the HIV-1 Vif protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freisz, Séverine; Mezher, Joelle; Hafirassou, Lamine; Wolff, Philippe; Nominé, Yves; Romier, Christophe; Dumas, Philippe; Ennifar, Eric

    2012-07-01

    The HIV-1 Vif protein plays an essential role in the regulation of the infectivity of HIV-1 virion and in vivo pathogenesis. Vif neutralizes the human DNA-editing enzyme APOBEC3 protein, an antiretroviral cellular factor from the innate immune system, allowing the virus to escape the host defence system. It was shown that Vif is packaged into viral particles through specific interactions with the viral genomic RNA. Conserved and structured sequences from the 5'-noncoding region, such as the Tat-responsive element (TAR) or the genomic RNA dimerization initiation site (DIS), are primary binding sites for Vif. In the present study we used isothermal titration calorimetry to investigate sequence and structure determinants important for Vif binding to short viral RNA corresponding to TAR and DIS stem-loops. We showed that Vif specifically binds TAR and DIS in the low nanomolar range. In addition, Vif primarily binds the TAR UCU bulge, but not the apical loop. Determinants for Vif binding to the DIS loop-loop complex are likely more complex and involve the self-complementary loop together with the upper part of the stem. These results suggest that Tat-TAR inhibitors or DIS small molecule binders might be also effective to disturb Vif-TAR and Vif-DIS binding in order to reduce Vif packaging into virions.

  12. Field and Model Study to Define Baseline Conditions of Beached Oil Tar Balls along Florida’s First Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bacopoulos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Anecdotal data are currently the best data available to describe baseline conditions of beached oil tar balls on Florida’s First Coast beaches. This study combines field methods and numerical modeling to define a data-driven knowledge base of oil tar ball baseline conditions. Outcomes from the field study include an established methodology for field data collection and laboratory testing of beached oil tar balls, spatial maps of collected samples and analysis of the data as to transport/wash-up trends. Archives of the electronic data, including GPS locations and other informational tags, and collected samples are presented, as are the physical and chemical analyses of the collected samples. The thrust of the physical and chemical analyses is to differentiate the collected samples into highly suspect oil tar balls versus false/non-oil tar ball samples. The numerical modeling involves two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of astronomic tides. Results from the numerical modeling include velocity residuals that show ebb-dominated residual currents exiting the inlet via an offshore, counter-rotating dual-eddy system. The tidally derived residual currents are used as one explanation for the observed transport trends. The study concludes that the port activity in the St. Johns River is not majorly contributing to the baseline conditions of oil tar ball wash-up on Florida’s First Coast beaches.

  13. Camouflage, Concealment, and Decoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    normal unit supply channels (see appendix E). The LCSS reduces a vehicle’s visual and radar signatures. Stainless steel fibers in the LCSS material...components and the instructions for assembling LCSS structures for different sizes of equipment.) VEGETATION 3-65. Use branches and vines to temporarily...same shape and thermal signature as the target it is meant to conceal.  Ensure that the lines between support poles are gently sloped so that the

  14. The Decoy Duck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Anna

    1997-01-01

    Describes the development processes of an instructional video for use in a course offered through the Extended Learning Institute of Northern Virginia Community College entitled Women Writers II. Characterizes the process of transforming this English course from a print-based to a distance-learning course as time-consuming, creative, and…

  15. Cancer risk from incidental ingestion exposures to PAHs associated with coal-tar-sealed pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E. Spencer; Mahler, Barbara J.; Van Metre, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent (2009-10) studies documented significantly higher concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in settled house dust in living spaces and soil adjacent to parking lots sealed with coal-tar-based products. To date, no studies have examined the potential human health effects of PAHs from these products in dust and soil. Here we present the results of an analysis of potential cancer risk associated with incidental ingestion exposures to PAHs in settings near coal-tar-sealed pavement. Exposures to benzo[a]pyrene equivalents were characterized across five scenarios. The central tendency estimate of excess cancer risk resulting from lifetime exposures to soil and dust from nondietary ingestion in these settings exceeded 1 × 10–4, as determined using deterministic and probabilistic methods. Soil was the primary driver of risk, but according to probabilistic calculations, reasonable maximum exposure to affected house dust in the first 6 years of life was sufficient to generate an estimated excess lifetime cancer risk of 6 × 10–5. Our results indicate that the presence of coal-tar-based pavement sealants is associated with significant increases in estimated excess lifetime cancer risk for nearby residents. Much of this calculated excess risk arises from exposures to PAHs in early childhood (i.e., 0–6 years of age).

  16. Aggravated test of Intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells fed with tar-contaminated syngas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumiglia, Davide; Vaccaro, Simone; Masi, Andrea; McPhail, Stephen J.; Falconieri, Mauro; Gagliardi, Serena; Della Seta, Livia; Carlini, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, the effects of a tar-containing simulated syngas on an IT-SOFC (Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell) are evaluated. Performance and degradation rate of a planar anode-supported cell, operating under a simulated syngas obtained from steam-enriched air gasification of biomass, have been studied. The simulated syngas was contaminated using toluene as a model tar. Polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been carried out under different toluene concentrations. A cell was then operated under a constant current density on a long run. EIS measurements were made during the operation to analyze the degradation, and the voltage evolution of the cell was compared to that obtained from another identical cell operated in clean syngas for 1000 h under similar conditions. A deep post-mortem characterization was performed by means of XRD measurements, Raman spectroscopy and SEM/EDS analysis. Results show that the presence of tar dramatically reduces the electrochemical performances of the cell, affecting both activation and mass transport processes. Post-mortem analysis shows the formation of carbon deposits, oxidation of Ni to NiO, segregation of ZrO2 from the YSZ phase, particle coarsening and enhanced fragility of the anode structure, in good agreement with what suggested from the electrochemical results.

  17. Inhibition of HIV Replication by Cyclic and Hairpin PNAs Targeting the HIV-1 TAR RNA Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Upert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 replication and gene expression entails specific interaction of the viral protein Tat with its transactivation responsive element (TAR, to form a highly stable stem-bulge-loop structure. Previously, we described triphenylphosphonium (TPP cation-based vectors that efficiently deliver nucleotide analogs (PNAs into the cytoplasm of cells. In particular, we showed that the TPP conjugate of a linear 16-mer PNA targeting the apical stem-loop region of TAR impedes Tat-mediated transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR in vitro and also in cell culture systems. In this communication, we conjugated TPP to cyclic and hairpin PNAs targeting the loop region of HIV-1 TAR and evaluated their antiviral efficacy in a cell culture system. We found that TPP-cyclic PNAs containing only 8 residues, showed higher antiviral potency compared to hairpin PNAs of 12 or 16 residues. We further noted that the TPP-conjugates of the 8-mer cyclic PNA as well as the 16-mer linear PNA displayed similar antiviral efficacy. However, cyclic PNAs were shown to be highly specific to their target sequences. This communication emphasizes on the importance of small constrained cyclic PNAs over both linear and hairpin structures for targeting biologically relevant RNA hairpins.

  18. Degradation and detoxification of tar water from a gasification plant in a biogas reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelidaki, I.; Torry-Smith, M.; Petersen, L.; Ahring, B.K. [Denmarks Technical Univ., Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1998-08-01

    During gasification of biomass, toxic tar and tar-water (TW) are produced. The produced TW is saturated by soluble phenolic compound. In this project we have attempted detoxification of the produced TW by either wet oxidation where the TW is heated under pressure and addition of excess oxygen, and then subsequent treatment of the formed wet oxidized product in a biogas reactor. Alternatively, we treated the TW directly in a biogas reactor. Reduction in phenolic compounds, which constitute the major toxic compounds in TW, was used as a success parameter evaluating the detoxification of TW. The TW could successfully be degraded in a biogas reactor when co-digested with manure at a concentration up to 5%. Wet oxidized tar water (WOTW) could be degraded when added at a concentration of 30%. A biogas potential of approx. 0.19 L CH/g-VS was achieved for both the TW and WOTW. The biogas production per kg waste was 30 and 10 L CH/kg waste for the TW and the WOTW, respectively. The reason for the much lower methane production of the WOTW was that a large part of the organic content of the TW was converted to carbon dioxide during the wet oxidation process. The effluent concentrations of phenolic were in all cases much lower than the concentrations found in normally in undigested manure, showing that biomethanation of toxic wastes in co-digestion with manure could be an easy and cheap way to detoxify specific toxic wastes. (au)

  19. Karaman’ ın tarım turizmi yönünden potansiyeli

    OpenAIRE

    Yavuzaslanoğlu, Elif; YAVUZ, Musa

    2012-01-01

    Köy yaşamını merak eden insanların bitkisel ve hayvansal üretimi görerek ve aktivitelere katılarak eğlenceli vakit geçirmek istemesi nedeniyle dünyada ve Türkiye’ de tarım turizmine ilgi giderek artmaktadır. Yurt dışında başta Amerika olmak üzere; İtalya ve Yeni Zelanda gibi ülkelerde uygulama alanı bulan tarım turizmi üzerine yurdumuzda da Çanakkale-İzmir yolu üzerinde Küçükkuyu mevkiinde Aktepe köyünde Zeytinyağı müzesi ile ilk yatırım gerçekleştirilmiştir. Tarım turizmi; küçük kulübelerde,...

  20. Screening method for solvent selection used in tar removal by the absorption process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masurel, Eve; Authier, Olivier; Castel, Christophe; Roizard, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the study of the treatment of flue gas issued from a process of biomass gasification in fluidized bed. The flue gas contains tar which should be selectively removed from the fuel components of interest (e.g. H2, CO and light hydrocarbons) to avoid condensation and deposits in internal combustion engine. The chosen flue gas treatment is the gas-liquid absorption using solvents, which present specific physicochemical properties (e.g. solubility, viscosity, volatility and chemical and thermal stability) in order to optimize the unit on energetic, technico-economic and environmental criteria. The rational choice of the proper solvent is essential for solving the tar issue. The preselection of the solvents is made using a Hansen parameter in order to evaluate the tar solubility and the saturation vapour pressure of the solvent is obtained using Antoine law. Among the nine families of screened solvents (alcohols, amines, ketones, halogenates, ethers, esters, hydrocarbons, sulphured and chlorinates), acids methyl esters arise as solvents of interest. Methyl oleate has then been selected and studied furthermore. Experimental liquid-vapour equilibrium data using bubbling point and absorption cell measurements and theoretical results obtained by the UNIFAC-Dortmund model confirm the high potential of this solvent and the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  1. Fast microwave-assisted catalytic gasification of biomass for syngas production and tar removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qinglong; Borges, Fernanda Cabral; Cheng, Yanling; Wan, Yiqin; Li, Yun; Lin, Xiangyang; Liu, Yuhuan; Hussain, Fida; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, a microwave-assisted biomass gasification system was developed for syngas production. Three catalysts including Fe, Co and Ni with Al2O3 support were examined and compared for their effects on syngas production and tar removal. Experimental results showed that microwave is an effective heating method for biomass gasification. Ni/Al2O3 was found to be the most effective catalyst for syngas production and tar removal. The gas yield reached above 80% and the composition of tar was the simplest when Ni/Al2O3 catalyst was used. The optimal ratio of catalyst to biomass was determined to be 1:5-1:3. The addition of steam was found to be able to improve the gas production and syngas quality. Results of XRD analyses demonstrated that Ni/Al2O3 catalyst has good stability during gasification process. Finally, a new concept of microwave-assisted dual fluidized bed gasifier was put forward for the first time in this study.

  2. Preparation of bitumen from charkchemical tar by catalytic oxidation and study of its structure and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaksyntay Kairbekov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimal conditions (temperature, time are determined for processes of oxidation of chark-chemical tar in the presence of FеСl3·6H2O catalyst. In the course of oxidation during increase of quantity of catalyst from 0.4 mass. % to 1.0 mass. % in the composition of initial tar the amount of tar decreased from 42,75 mass.% to 28,56 mass.%, the amount of hydrocarbons from 30,18 mass.% to  28,92 mass.%, and the quantity of asphaltene increased from 15,84 mass.% to   38 mass.%. The  values of physical-mechanical indicators of obtained products in the presence of 0,8 mass.% to 1,0 mass.% catalyst corresponds to the requirements of the standard, hence they may be quantitatively attributed to viscous construction oil bitumen of mark BH 70/30, BN 90/10. Chemical transformation in the composition of obtained products during catalytic oxidation is proved by the results of IR-spectroscopic analysis.

  3. Properties of gasification-derived char and its utilization for catalytic tar reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kezhen

    Char is a low-value byproduct of biomass gasification and pyrolysis with many potential applications, such as soil amendment and the synthesis of activated carbon. The overall goal of the proposed research was to develop novel methods to use char derived from gasification for high-value applications in syngas conditioning. The first objective was to investigate effects of gasification condition and feedstock on properties of char derived from fluidized bed gasification. Results show that the surface areas of most of the char were 1--10 m 2/g and increased as the equivalence ratio increased. Char moisture and fixed carbon contents decreased while ash content increased as equivalence ratio increased. The next objective was to study the properties of sorghum and red cedar char derived from downdraft gasifier. Red cedar char contained more aliphatic carbon and o-alkyl carbon than sorghum char. Char derived from downdraft gasification had higher heating values and lower ash contents than char derived from fluidized bed gasification. The gasification reactivity of red cedar char was higher than that of sorghum char. Then, red cedar char based catalysts were developed with different preparation method to reform toluene and naphthalene as model tars. The catalyst prepared with nickel nitrate was found to be better than that with nickel acetate. The nickel particle size of catalyst impregnated with nickel nitrate was smaller than that of catalyst impregnated with nickel acetate. The particle size of catalyst impregnated with nickel acetate decreased by hydrazine reduction. The catalyst impregnated with nickel nitrate had the highest toluene removal efficiency, which was 70%--100% at 600--800 °C. The presence of naphthalene in tar reduced the catalyst efficiency. The toluene conversion was 36--99% and the naphthalene conversion was 37%--93% at 700--900 °C. Finally, effects of atmosphere and pressure on catalytic reforming of lignin-derived tars over the developed catalyst

  4. Study on microbial degradation of tar-wash wastewater and tar in biomass gasification by microorganisms.%微生物降解生物质气化洗焦废水和焦油的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨秀山; 赵军; 骆海鹏; 钱城; 董雪

    2001-01-01

    A strain conserved in the lab of Department of Biology, Capital Normal University was utilized to treat tar-wash wastewater and crude tar in order to solve the problem of tar pollution in the biomass gasification. When tar-wash wastewater concentrations were 6, 10 and 15ml/L, the COD removal rates reached 75.2%, 83.9%, and 63.1%, respectively. When tar concentrations were 0.56 and 1.0g/L, the COD removal rates reached 82.7% and 72.3%, respectively. Phenol microbial conversion indicated that the phenol highest degradation rate was 98.8%. This strain possessed the ability to degradade tar-wash wastewater and tar in the bomass gasification.%为解决在生物质气化中的焦油污染问题,用首都师范大学生物系微生物实验室保存的微生物菌种对生物质气化洗焦废水和焦油进行处理.当洗焦废水浓度分别为6, 10和15mL/L时,经微生物降解后,COD去除率分别达到75.2%,83.9%和63.1%.以焦油为底物,在焦油浓度为0.56和 1.0g/L时,COD去除率分别达到82.7%和72.3%.苯酚的最高降解率为98.8%.此菌种具有降解生物质气化洗焦废水和焦油的能力.

  5. Lead, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil and house dust in the communities surrounding the Sydney, Nova Scotia, tar ponds.

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Timothy W; Lane, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated lead, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in the residential communities adjacent to the Sydney, Nova Scotia, tar ponds, the area considered Canada's worst contaminated site. The tar pond remediation policy has been limited to the site and some residential properties. We compared background concentrations in 91 soil samples taken 5-20 km from the coke oven site with those in soil samples from the three communities surrounding the tar ponds: Wh...

  6. Class I cultural resource overview for oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, D.; Kullen, D.; Gierek, L.; Wescott, K.; Greby, M.; Anast, G.; Nesta, M.; Walston, L.; Tate, R.; Azzarello, A.; Vinikour, B.; Van Lonkhuyzen, B.; Quinn, J.; Yuen, R.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-01

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the 'Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005', Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is developing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to evaluate alternatives for establishing commercial oil shale and tar sands leasing programs in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah. This PEIS evaluates the potential impacts of alternatives identifying BLM-administered lands as available for application for commercial leasing of oil shale resources within the three states and of tar sands resources within Utah. The scope of the analysis of the PEIS also includes an assessment of the potential effects of future commercial leasing. This Class I cultural resources study is in support of the Draft Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and is an attempt to synthesize archaeological data covering the most geologically prospective lands for oil shale and tar sands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. This report is based solely on geographic information system (GIS) data held by the Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs). The GIS data include the information that the BLM has provided to the SHPOs. The primary purpose of the Class I cultural resources overview is to provide information on the affected environment for the PEIS. Furthermore, this report provides recommendations to support planning decisions and the management of cultural resources that could be impacted by future

  7. Investigations into the effects of volatile biomass tar on the performance of Fe-based CLC oxygen carrier materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot-Handford, Matthew E.; Florin, Nick; Fennell, Paul S.

    2016-11-01

    In this study we present findings from investigations into interactions between biomass tar and two iron based oxygen carrier materials (OCMs) designed for chemical-looping applications: a 100% Fe2O3 (100Fe) OCM and a 60 wt% Fe2O3/40 wt% Al2O3 (60Fe40Al) OCM. A novel 6 kWe two-stage, fixed-bed reactor was designed and constructed to simulate a chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process with ex situ gasification of biomass. Beech wood was pyrolysed in the first stage of the reactor at 773 K to produce a tar-containing fuel gas that was used to reduce the OCM loaded into the 2nd stage at 973 K. The presence of either OCM was found to significantly reduce the amount of biomass tars exiting the reactor by up to 71 wt% compared with analogous experiments in which the biomass tar compounds were exposed to an inert bed of sand. The tar cracking effect of the 60Fe40Al OCM was slightly greater than the 100Fe OCM although the reduction in the tar yield was roughly equivalent to the increase in carbon deposition observed for the 60Fe40Al OCM compared with the 100Fe OCM. In both cases, the tar cracking effect of the OCMs appeared to be independent of the oxidation state in which the OCM was exposed to the volatile biomass pyrolysis products (i.e. Fe2O3 or Fe3O4). Exposing the pyrolysis vapours to the OCMs in their oxidised (Fe2O3) form favoured the production of CO2. The production of CO was favoured when the OCMs were in their reduced (Fe3O4) form. Carbon deposition was removed in the subsequent oxidation phase with no obvious deleterious effects on the reactivity in subsequent CLC cycles with reduction by 3 mol% CO.

  8. Release of HCN, NH{sub 3} and HNCO from the thermal gas-phase cracking of coal pyrolysis tars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledesma, E.B.; Li, C.-Z.; Nelson, P.F.; Mackie, J.C. [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Division of Coal and Energy Technology

    1998-05-01

    The release of HCN, NH{sub 3} and HNCO from the thermal cracking of coal tars produced by rapid pyrolysis has been investigated using a quartz fluidized-bed reactor coupled to a quartz tubular-flow reactor. Primary pyrolysis at 600{degree}C in the fluidized-bed reactor generated the tars which were subsequently thermally decomposed in the tubular reactor in the temperature range of 600-1000{degree}C. HNCO was the initial gaseous N-containing species to be evolved, its formation commencing from 600{degree}C. HNCO was found to be a significant N-containing product of tar cracking and some previous measurements of NH{sub 3} yields during coal pyrolysis are probably the sum of the yields of NH{sub 3} and HNCO. Both HCN and NH{sub 3} start to appear from above 700{degree}C. While NH{sub 3} reaches a maximum at 850{degree}C, HCN continues to increase at higher temperatures. It is suggested that NH{sub 3} may be formed from the interactions of N-containing species with donatable H on the soot surface. FTIR analyses of the tars demonstrate that increases in the temperature of pyrolysis result in a decrease in aromatic substitution. Kinetic parameters for the release of tar-N species as HCN were determined by measurement of HCN yields and by assuming that the reaction was first order in tar-N. An overall global rate expression of 10{sup 6} exp(-140 {+-} 15/RT)s{sup -1} was derived from the data. The rate expression suggests that nitrogen release during tar cracking is a complex process. 31 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Phylogenetic study on structural elements of HIV-1 poly(A region. 2. USE domain and TAR hairpin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarudnaya M. I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim Phylogenetic study on structural elements in the poly(A region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, in particular the major upstream sequence element (USE, which stimulates polyadenylation of HIV-1 transcript, and the TAR (trans-activation response hairpin, which juxtaposes spatially the AAUAAA and USE signals. Methods. The secondary structure of these elements has been predicted by UNA Fold program. Results. The structure of USE domain and TAR hairpin has been analysed in 1679 HIV-1 genomes and 17 genomes of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVcpzPtt. We found 376 and 588 different sequences for these elements, respectively, and revealed the most frequent base changes and subtypeand country-specific mutations. Only 43 % of HIV-1 isolates contain variants of the USE domain which occur with a frequency 5 % (the main variants and 35 % of isolates contain main variants of the TAR hairpin. We found that the SIV USE domain and TAR hairpin most closely resemble those found in HIV-1 genomes of A/G-containing subtypes. Conclusions. The results of our large-scale phylogenetic study support a hypothesis on the interaction between tRNA3Lys and the 3' end of HIV-1 genomic RNA and a controversial supposition of HIV-1 genome dimerization by the TAR-TAR kissing mechanism. Since the TAR hairpin is a target for developing antiviral drugs based on the inhibition of signal elements, the data on specific structural features of this hairpin may be useful for new antivirals design.

  10. 红外干扰弹与舰空导弹火力冲突检测及消解%Detection and Resolution of Firepower Conflict Between Infrared Decoy and Ship-to-Air Missile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慕鸿; 周智超; 冷画屏

    2016-01-01

    When attacked by the Anti-Ship Missile ( ASM ) with infrared guidance function,the surface warship need to use Infrared Decoy( ID) and infrared guidance Ship-to-Air Missile ( SAM) cooperatively in reaction,where firepower conflict must be avoided.Analysis is made to the cooperative combat situation of ID with SAM,based on which a firepower conflict model is established.Then the simulation method is adopted to detect whether the firepower conflict between ID and SAM is existed or not during the combat,and a strategy of conflict resolution is given.The calculation results prove the validity of the model and the method,which can improve the anti-missile effectiveness of surface warship when using soft and hard weapons cooperatively.%对具有红外制导功能的来袭反舰导弹,水面舰艇需要使用红外干扰弹和舰空导弹协同抗击,但必须避免出现火力冲突。在分析红外干扰弹与红外制导舰空导弹协同抗击态势的基础上,建立了两者之间的火力冲突判断模型,采用仿真的方法在协同抗击全过程动态检测红外干扰弹与红外制导舰空导弹之间是否存在火力冲突,并给出了消除冲突的策略。实例计算结果验证了模型和方法的有效性,对提高水面舰艇软硬武器协同使用效能具有应用价值。

  11. Characterization of Coal Tar Pitch and Paving Pitch by UV, EA and NMR%Characterization of Coal Tar Pitch and Paving Pitch by UV,EA and NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yan-hua; FENG Rui-jie; CAO Su-mei; LIU Xiang-yong; GAO Ting; PAN Zhi-quan

    2011-01-01

    In order to enlarge the use of coal tar pitch(CTP) in paving road, CTP and 60th paving pitch (PP) were extracted by n-heptane, toluene and ethanol step by step in a Soxhlet apparatus. The three fractions of CTP and PP were detected using UV-absorption(UV-A) ,elemental analyses(EA) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) firstly as a whole unit after quality characterization of physical nature of CTP and PP were finished. The CTP had more saturate aliphatie and residue compounds dissolved in ethanol. On the other hand there were more continental type structures of aromatic ring than that of PP. There was almost no residue in PP after extracted by ethanol. The results explained why CTP was crisp in cold winter and was soften in summer. The following research will focus on how to change the chemical construction of CTP into the relative similar structures with those of PP through adding polymer.

  12. Tar removal from biomass gasification streams: processes and catalysts; Remocao do alcatrao de correntes de gaseificacao de biomassa: processos e catalisadores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quitete, Cristina P.B. [Centro de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento Leopoldo Americo Miguez de Mello (CENPES/PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Processos de Conversao de Biomassa; Souza, Mariana M.V.M., E-mail: mmattos@eq.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia. Escola de Quimica

    2014-07-01

    Biomass gasification is a technology that has attracted great interest in synthesis of biofuels and oxo alcohols. However, this gas contains several contaminants, including tar, which need to be removed. Removal of tar is particularly critical because it can lead to operational problems. This review discusses the major pathways to remove tar, with a particular focus on the catalytic steam reforming of tar. Few catalysts have shown promising results; however, long-term studies in the context of real biomass gasification streams are required to realize their potential. (author)

  13. Site-selective probing of cTAR destabilization highlights the necessary plasticity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein to chaperone the first strand transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, Julien; Kenfack, Cyril; Przybilla, Frédéric; Richert, Ludovic; Duportail, Guy; Mély, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) is a nucleic acid chaperone required during reverse transcription. During the first strand transfer, NCp7 is thought to destabilize cTAR, the (−)DNA copy of the TAR RNA hairpin, and subsequently direct the TAR/cTAR annealing through the zipping of their destabilized stem ends. To further characterize the destabilizing activity of NCp7, we locally probe the structure and dynamics of cTAR by steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. NC(11–55), a truncated NCp7 version corresponding to its zinc-finger domain, was found to bind all over the sequence and to preferentially destabilize the penultimate double-stranded segment in the lower part of the cTAR stem. This destabilization is achieved through zinc-finger–dependent binding of NC to the G10 and G50 residues. Sequence comparison further revealed that C•A mismatches close to the two G residues were critical for fine tuning the stability of the lower part of the cTAR stem and conferring to G10 and G50 the appropriate mobility and accessibility for specific recognition by NC. Our data also highlight the necessary plasticity of NCp7 to adapt to the sequence and structure variability of cTAR to chaperone its annealing with TAR through a specific pathway. PMID:23511968

  14. Effect of tar fractions from coal gasification on nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia and nickel-gadolinium doped ceria solid oxide fuel cell anode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, E.; Berrueco, C.; Millan, M.; Brandon, N. P.

    2013-11-01

    The allowable tar content in gasification syngas is one of the key questions for the exploitation of the full potential of fuel cell concepts with integrated gasification systems. A better understanding of the interaction between tars and the SOFC anodes which leads to carbon formation and deposition is needed in order to design systems where the extent of gas cleaning operations is minimized. Model tar compounds (toluene, benzene, naphthalene) have been used in experimental studies to represent those arising from biomass/coal gasification. However, the use of toluene as a model tar overestimates the negative impact of a real gasification tar on SOFC anode degradation associated with carbon formation. In the present work, the effect of a gasification tar and its distillation fractions on two commercially available fuel cell anodes, Ni/YSZ (yttria stabilized zirconia) and Ni/CGO (gadolinium doped ceria), is reported. A higher impact of the lighter tar fractions was observed, in terms of more carbon formation on the anodes, in comparison with the whole tar sample. The characterization of the recovered tars after contact with the anode materials revealed a shift towards a heavier molecular weight distribution, reinforcing the view that these fractions have reacted on the anode.

  15. Extraction of bitumen, crude oil and its products from tar sand and contaminated sandy soil under effect of ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, O V; Abramov, V O; Myasnikov, S K; Mullakaev, M S

    2009-03-01

    In the present paper, the kinetics of the water extraction of bitumen from tar sand and crude oil or residual fuel oil from model contaminated soils under the effect of ultrasound is studied. The influence of process temperature, ultrasound power, the nature, and properties of the components of heterogeneous mixtures being separated, and the concentration of added alkaline reagents on the rate and degree of oil recovery is investigated. A functional form of the dependencies of separation efficiency on the mean size of solid particles and the temperature of a working medium is found. Optimum concentrations of reagents in the process solution are determined. It is shown that the spent solution of sodium silicate can be multiply used for separation, its reuse even speeding up the yield of oil in the initial period. Taking into account obtained results, a multipurpose pilot plant with a flow-type reactor for ultrasonic extraction of petroleum and its products from contaminated soils was manufactured and tested. During tests, the purification of sandy soil contaminated with residual fuel oil was carried out which verified the results of laboratory studies.

  16. Integron gene cassettes and degradation of compounds associated with industrial waste: the case of the Sydney tar ponds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy E Koenig

    Full Text Available Integrons are genetic platforms that accelerate lateral gene transfer (LGT among bacteria. They were first detected on plasmids bearing single and multiple drug resistance determinants in human pathogens, and it is abundantly clear that integrons have played a major role in the evolution of this public health menace. Similar genetic elements can be found in nonpathogenic environmental bacteria and in metagenomic environmental DNA samples, and it is reasonable to suppose that integrons have facilitated microbial adaptation through LGT in niches outside infectious disease wards. Here we show that a heavily impacted estuary, exposed for almost a century to products of coal and steel industries, has developed a rich and unique cassette metagenome, containing genes likely to aid in the catabolism of compounds associated with industrial waste found there. In addition, we report that the most abundant cassette recovered in this study is one that encodes a putative LysR protein. This autoregulatory transcriptional regulator is known to activate transcription of linked target genes or unlinked regulons encoding diverse functions including chlorocatechol and dichlorophenol catabolism. Finally, only class 1 integrase genes were amplified in this study despite using different primer sets, and it may be that the cassettes present in the Tar Ponds will prove to be associated with class 1 integrase genes. Nevertheless, our cassette library provides a snapshot of a complex evolutionary process involving integron-meditated LGT likely to be important in natural bioremediation.

  17. Characterization and utilization of hydrotreated products produced from the Whiterocks (Utah) tar sand bitumen-derived liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.H.; Longstaff, D.C.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Oblad, A.G.

    1991-12-31

    The bitumen-derived liquid produced in a 4-inch diameter fluidized-bed reactor from the mined and crushed ore from the Whiterocks tar sand deposit has been hydrotreated in a fixed-bed reactor. The purpose was to determine the extent of upgrading as a function of process operating variable. A sulfided nickel-molybendum on alumina hydrodenitrogenation catalyst was used in all experiments. Moderately severe operating conditions were employed; that is, high reaction temperature (617--680 K) high reactor pressure (11.0--17.1 MPa) and low liquid feed rate (0.18--0.77 HSV); to achieve the desired reduction in heteroatom content. Detailed chemical structures of the bitumen-derived liquid feedstock and the hydrotreated total liquid products were determined by high resolution gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analyses. The compounds identified in the native bitumen included isoprenoids; bicyclic, tricycle, and tetracyclic terpenoids; steranes; hopanes; and perhydro-{beta}-carotenes. In addition, normal and branched alkanes and alkenes and partially dehydrogenated hydroaromatics were identified in the bitumen-derived liquid. The dominant pyrolysis reactions were: (1) the dealkylation of long alkyl side chains to form {alpha} - and isoolefins; and (2) the cleavage of alkyl chains linking aromatic and hydroaromatic clusters. Olefinic bonds were not observed in the hydrotreated product and monoaromatic hydrocarbons were the predominant aromatic species. The properties of the jet fuel fractions from the hydrotreated products met most of the jet fuel specifications. The cetane indices indicated these fractions would be suitable for use as diesel fuels.

  18. Characterization and utilization of hydrotreated products produced from the Whiterocks (Utah) tar sand bitumen-derived liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.H.; Longstaff, D.C.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Oblad, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    The bitumen-derived liquid produced in a 4-inch diameter fluidized-bed reactor from the mined and crushed ore from the Whiterocks tar sand deposit has been hydrotreated in a fixed-bed reactor. The purpose was to determine the extent of upgrading as a function of process operating variable. A sulfided nickel-molybendum on alumina hydrodenitrogenation catalyst was used in all experiments. Moderately severe operating conditions were employed; that is, high reaction temperature (617--680 K) high reactor pressure (11.0--17.1 MPa) and low liquid feed rate (0.18--0.77 HSV); to achieve the desired reduction in heteroatom content. Detailed chemical structures of the bitumen-derived liquid feedstock and the hydrotreated total liquid products were determined by high resolution gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analyses. The compounds identified in the native bitumen included isoprenoids; bicyclic, tricycle, and tetracyclic terpenoids; steranes; hopanes; and perhydro-{beta}-carotenes. In addition, normal and branched alkanes and alkenes and partially dehydrogenated hydroaromatics were identified in the bitumen-derived liquid. The dominant pyrolysis reactions were: (1) the dealkylation of long alkyl side chains to form {alpha} - and isoolefins; and (2) the cleavage of alkyl chains linking aromatic and hydroaromatic clusters. Olefinic bonds were not observed in the hydrotreated product and monoaromatic hydrocarbons were the predominant aromatic species. The properties of the jet fuel fractions from the hydrotreated products met most of the jet fuel specifications. The cetane indices indicated these fractions would be suitable for use as diesel fuels.

  19. HYDROGEN-ACCEPTING MODIFICATION OF COAL TAR PITCH ROAD BINDER%煤沥青筑路油受氢改质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金鸣林; 冯安祖

    2000-01-01

    The change in group component of the coal tar pitch road binder modified by tired rubber with reaction time and its modified mechanism were studied.The average structural parameters of the coal-tar-pitch ,solvent oil and modified road binder were calculated by Brown-Lander formula using NMR, ultimate analysis and average molecular weight.Results showed that the TS(toluene soluble of the binder modified with rubber)increased from 45.0% to 61.5%,HS(heptane soluble)decreased from 27.0% to 14.4%,TIS(toluene insoluble)decreased from 28.0% to 24.1% as compared with the binder without rubber.In contrast of the 1H-NMR of the group components of the rubber with those of the road binder,there were the same H pulses at δ=5.5 & 5.3.It was considered that the rubber,as a hydrogen donor,might take part in the modification of coal tar pitch and formed a new asphaltine.It was the hydrogen-accepting function of the coal tar pitch that the quality of the coal tar pitch road binder was improved.%研究了煤沥青在供氢剂(再生橡胶)的作用下,族组成随反应时间的变化规律及其受氢改质机理。利用核磁共振、元素分析、分子量测定等手段,计算得到了煤沥青、溶剂油以及改质筑路油等的平均结构参数。结果表明:与空白样对比,加入再生橡胶使得筑路油中沥青质含量由45.0%增加到61.5%,软沥青由27.0%降低到14.4%,不溶物由28.0%降低到24.1%。对比橡胶和筑路油族组成的1H-NMR谱图可发现,在化学位移δ=5.5和5.3处均有H质子峰出现,表明橡胶参与了改质反应,形成了新的沥青质。橡胶在改质过程中作为供氢媒介参与筑路油的热解反应,正是煤沥青的受氢作用改善了筑路油的质量。

  20. Impact of Genetic Variations in HIV-1 Tat on LTR-Mediated Transcription via TAR RNA Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larance Ronsard

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 evades host defense through mutations and recombination events, generating numerous variants in an infected patient. These variants with an undiminished virulence can multiply rapidly in order to progress to AIDS. One of the targets to intervene in HIV-1 replication is the trans-activator of transcription (Tat, a major regulatory protein that transactivates the long terminal repeat promoter through its interaction with trans-activation response (TAR RNA. In this study, HIV-1 infected patients (n = 120 from North India revealed Ser46Phe (20% and Ser61Arg (2% mutations in the Tat variants with a strong interaction toward TAR leading to enhanced transactivation activities. Molecular dynamics simulation data verified that the variants with this mutation had a higher binding affinity for TAR than both the wild-type Tat and other variants that lacked Ser46Phe and Ser61Arg. Other mutations in Tat conferred varying affinities for TAR interaction leading to differential transactivation abilities. This is the first report from North India with a clinical validation of CD4 counts to demonstrate the influence of Tat genetic variations affecting the stability of Tat and its interaction with TAR. This study highlights the co-evolution pattern of Tat and predominant nucleotides for Tat activity, facilitating the identification of genetic determinants for the attenuation of viral gene expression.

  1. 煤沥青应用研究综述%On the Application of Coal Tar Pitch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高天秀

    2014-01-01

    煤沥青是煤炭经高温热分解后的副产物煤焦油经进一步蒸馏加工后的产物,煤沥青组成极为复杂,具有稳定的性能,以煤沥青为原料,经过进一步加工后可获得一系列重要的高附加值衍生产品;综述了煤沥青用作煤沥青涂料、筑路沥青、炭素工业浸渍剂和粘结剂以及中间相煤沥青等方面的应用原理和进展。%Coal tar pitch is a byproduct distillation heavy residue of high temperature carbonization of coal tar after all kinds of light fraction extracted .The composition of coal tar pitch is very complex ,and it has high performance .After further processing ,a series of important high value-added products will be obtained from coal tar pitch .Coal tar pitch as coating materials ,paving materials and impregnating and binder were reviewed in this paper .

  2. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of acid tar waste from crude benzol refining: A thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihobo, Chido H; Chowdhury, Arindrajit; Kuipa, Pardon K; Simbi, David J

    2016-12-01

    Pyrolysis is an attractive thermochemical conversion technology that may be utilised as a safe disposal option for acid tar waste. The kinetics of acid tar pyrolysis were investigated using thermogravimetry coupled with mass spectrometry under a nitrogen atmosphere at different heating rates of 10, 15 and 20 K min(-1) The thermogravimetric analysis shows three major reaction peaks centred around 178 °C, 258 °C, and 336 °C corresponding to the successive degradation of water soluble lower molecular mass sulphonic acids, sulphonated high molecular mass hydrocarbons, and high molecular mass hydrocarbons. The kinetic parameters were evaluated using the iso-conversional Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose method. A variation in the activation energy with conversion revealed that the pyrolysis of the acid tar waste progresses through complex multi-step kinetics. Mass spectrometry results revealed a predominance of gases such as hydrogen, methane and carbon monoxide, implying that the pyrolysis of acid tar waste is potentially an energy source. Thus the pyrolysis of acid tar waste may present a viable option for its environmental treatment. There are however, some limitations imposed by the co-evolution of corrosive gaseous components for which appropriate considerations must be provided in both pyrolysis reactor design and selection of construction materials. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Implications of Use of Coal-Tar-Based Pavement Sealcoat on Urban Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, P. C.

    2015-12-01

    Coal-tar-based (CT) sealcoat is used to protect and improve the appearance of asphalt pavement of driveways and parking lots primarily in the central and eastern U.S. and in Canada. CT sealcoat typically is 20 to 35% crude coal tar or coal-tar pitch and contains from 50,000 to 100,000 mg/kg polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), about 1,000 times more than asphalt-based (AS) sealcoat or asphalt itself. Tires and snowplows abrade the friable sealcoat surface into fine particles—median total PAH concentrations in dust from CT-sealcoated pavement are 2,200 mg/kg compared to a median concentration of 11 mg/kg for dust from unsealed pavement. Use of CT sealcoat has several implications for urban streams and lakes. Source apportionment modeling has indicated that, in regions where CT sealcoat is prevalent, particles from sealcoated pavement are contributing the majority of the PAHs to recently deposited lake sediment, often resulting in sediment concentrations above toxicity thresholds based on effects-based sediment quality guidelines. Acute 2-day laboratory toxicity testing of simulated runoff from CT-sealcoated pavement to a cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) demonstrated that toxicity continues for samples collected for weeks or months following sealcoat application and that toxicity is enhanced by exposure to UV light. Using the fish-liver cell line RTL-W1, runoff collected as much as 36 days following CT-sealcoat application has been demonstrated to cause DNA damage and impair DNA repair capacity. These results demonstrate that CT runoff is a potential hazard to aquatic ecosystems and that exposure to sunlight can enhance toxicity and genetic damage. Recent research has provided direct evidence that restricting use of CT sealcoat in a watershed can lead to a substantial reduction in PAH concentrations in receiving water bodies.

  4. Investigation on the carcinogenic effects of coal tar pitch in rat respiratory tract by intratracheal instillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, F; Wang, L; Zhao, Q; Zhu, Q; Wu, Y; Chen, C; Syrjänen, S; Syrjänen, K

    1992-02-01

    The effects of coal tar pitch (CTP) on the tracheobronchial mucosa of Wistar rats were studied. Three groups of animals received 10 weekly intratracheal instillations of CTP at the cumulative doses of 6.48, 136.56 and 200 mg respectively. The control group of rats received 10 weekly intratracheal instillations of charcoal powder at a cumulative dose of 20 mg. The study in which the animals were killed serially revealed that CTP had conspicuous damage on the respiratory system of rats, especially on the bronchiolo-alveolar areas. The lesions induced by CTP ranged from hyperplastic, metaplastic and dysplastic changes to extensive cancers. These lesions were usually multifocal, and were more severe in the rats receiving higher dosages of CTP. The deposition of CTP particles within or adjacent to these lesions could be readily identified. Lung cancers occurred in 12.5% (4/32) and 25% (10/40) of the rats treated with 136.56 and 200 mg of CTP, whereas no tumors were found in control rats and the rats that received 6.48 mg of CTP. The overall cancer incidence significantly related to the cumulative dose of CTP. The histological types of lung cancers consisted of squamous cell carcinomas (10 out of the 14 lung cancers), adenocarcinoma (1/14), and combined squamous and adenocarcinomas (3/14). The development of CTP-induced rat lung cancers appears to derive from the hyperplasias of bronchiolo-alveolar epithelium, and processing stages of squamous metaplasias and/or dysplasias to carcinomas. The present results confirmed the carcinogenic effects of CTP on the respiratory system of rats, and provided experimental evidence for human lung carcinogenesis, particularly in those occupationally exposed to coal tars or tar products.

  5. Economic and environmental effects of the FQD on crude oil production from tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampman, B.; De Buck, A.; Afman, M. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Van den Berg, J.; Otten, G.J. [Carbon Matters, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    The production of unconventional crudes in Canada and Venezuela and exports of these crudes to the EU are investigated. In addition the potential economic and environmental impact of the proposed EU FQD measures (Fuel Quality Directive) on the production of crudes from tar sands and on new tar sand exploration projects are examined. CE Delft has analysed the impact by using a dedicated cost model. For existing projects, the model determines the effect on the basis of marginal production costs. For planned projects the model used the net present value (NPV) of proposed investments. The impacts were determined for a range of crude oil prices and FQD price effects. Combined, for existing and new projects together, the maximum effect would be at a price level at 60 USD/bbl, with savings of up to 19 Mt CO2/y at an FQD price differential of 3 euro/bbl. This overall effect would be substantial and come on top of the total emission reduction effect of the FQD of 60 Mt CO2/y, which will be achieved mostly by the blending of low-carbon fuels and reduced flaring and venting. As part of the reduction of transport greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the revised FQD obliges fuel suppliers to reduce these emissions by 6% by 2020 on a well-to-wheel basis. The EU is currently developing a methodology to differentiate fossil fuels on the basis of feedstock and GHG emissions. In the proposal, diesel produced from tar sands, has been given a default emission value of 108.5 gCO2 eq/MJ, while diesel from conventional crude was set at 89.1 gCO2 eq/MJ. The Commission's proposal is currently undergoing an impact assessment and is expected to be resubmitted to the Council later this year (2013)

  6. Nakamura Ryûtarô’s Anime, Serial Experiments, Lain (1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamae KOBAYASHI PRINDLE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces Nakamura Ryūtarō’s anime, Serial Experiments, Lain (1998 as a new type of anime, a genre nameable as an “expository anime”, for the reason that it creates a diachronic story out of a synchronic aspect of a certain field of science. The overarching topic of Experiments is electronics, focusing on the comparison between digital and analogue communication systems. Experiments unfolds the rationales, potentials, and effects of the two types of communication systems using the perceptions of the major character, a thirteen-year old girl, Rein, as well as other supporting characters.

  7. Sürdürülebilir Tarımsal Pazarlama Girişimleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Adanacıoğlu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sürdürülebilir pazarlama, pazarlama stratejileri geliştirilirken çevresel, sosyal eşitlik ve ekonomik kaygılar üzerine eşit derecede odaklanan bütünsel bir yaklaşım olarak ifade edilmektedir. Bu çalışmada esas olarak, sürdürülebilir tarımsal pazarlama alanında dünyada ve Türkiye’de uygulanan girişimlerin incelenerek tartışılması ve Türkiye’deki tarımsal pazarlama girişimlerinin performansının geliştirilmesi açısından bazı öneriler getirilmesi amaçlanmıştır. Dünyada uygulamaları görülen sürdürülebilir tarımsal pazarlama girişimlerinin bir kısmının sivil organizasyonlar aracılığıyla yapıldığı belirlenmiştir. Bunun yanında; çiftçiler, tüketiciler, gıda işleyicileri ve perakendecilerin girişimleri ile başlatılan sürdürülebilir tarımsal pazarlama girişimleri de bulunmaktadır. Türkiye’de sürdürülebilir tarımsal pazarlama girişimlerine yönelik başarılı örneklerin az olması ve pek yaygınlaştırılamaması nedeniyle, bu girişimlerin artırılmasına yönelik uzun vadeli stratejilerin belirlenmesi önemli görülmektedir. Bu kapsamda öncelikle, hükümet tarafından tarımsal pazarlamayı geliştirici yönde verilen desteklerde sunulan projelerin sürdürülebilir pazarlamanın ilkeleri olan çevresel, ekonomik ve sosyal boyutları incelenerek, gerekli koşulları sağlayıp sağlamadığına bakılmalıdır. Türkiye’de sürdürülebilir tarımsal pazarlama uygulamalarının daha hızlı yayılması ve benimsenmesi için, bu uygulamalara yönelik üreticilerin eğitilmesi ve yönlendirilmesi yanında, projelerin üretilmesi aşamalarında organizasyon desteğine ihtiyaç bulunmaktadır. Bu organizasyon, başta sivil toplum kuruluşları olmak üzere, yerel yönetimler, tarımsal üretici birlikleri ve kooperatifler aracılığı ile gerçekleştirilebilir. Türkiye’de uygulanması olası sürdürülebilir tarımsal pazarlama girişimlerinde do

  8. PAH volatilization following application of coal-tar-based pavement sealant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Majewski, Michael S.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Foreman, William T.; Braun, Christopher L.; Wilson, Jennifer T.; Burbank, Teresa L.

    2012-01-01

    Coal-tar-based pavement sealants, a major source of PAHs to urban water bodies, have recently been identified as a source of volatile PAHs to the atmosphere. We tracked the volatilization of PAHs for 1 year after application of a coal-tar-based pavement sealant by measuring gas-phase PAH concentrations above the pavement surface and solid-phase PAH concentrations in sealant scraped from the surface. Gas-phase concentrations at two heights (0.03 and 1.28 m) and wind speed were used to estimate volatilization flux. The sum of the concentrations of eight frequently detected PAHs (ΣPAH8) in the 0.03-m sample 1.6 h after application (297,000 ng m-3) was about 5000 times greater than that previously reported for the same height above unsealed parking lots (66 ng m-3). Flux at 1.6 h after application was estimated at 45,000 μg m-2 h-1 and decreased rapidly during the 45 days after application to 160 μg m-2 h-1. Loss of PAHs from the adhered sealant also was rapid, with about a 50% decrease in solid-phase ΣPAH8 concentration over the 45 days after application. There was general agreement, given the uncertainties, in the estimated mass of ΣPAH8 lost to the atmosphere on the basis of air sampling (2–3 g m-2) and adhered sealant sampling (6 g m-2) during the first 16 days after application, translating to a loss to the atmosphere of one-quarter to one-half of the PAHs in the sealcoat product. Combining the estimated mass of ΣPAH8 released to the atmosphere with a national-use estimate of coal-tar-based sealant suggests that PAH emissions from new coal-tar-based sealcoat applications each year (~1000 Mg) are larger than annual vehicle emissions of PAHs for the United States.

  9. A study on the effect of heat treatment temperature on mesophase development in coal tar pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Neha; Shah, Raviraj K.; Shrivastava, Rakesh; Datar, Manoj

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, a zero quinoline insoluble (QI) isotropic coal tar pitch was taken for the preparation of mesophase pitch. The pitch was heated in inert atmosphere at different heat treatment temperatures keeping same heating rate and soaking time to study the formation, growth and coalescence of mesophase spheres in the pitch. Such pitches were characterized for insoluble content (QI & TI), mesophase content, sulphur content, weight loss in inert atmosphere, softening point, coking value (CVC), C/H ratio etc. Results show that the insoluble content (QI & TI) and mesophase content of pitch increase with increase of heat treatment temperature.

  10. Prostaglandin precursors in plasma phospholipids of patients with psoriasis: effects of treatment with coal tar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, A M; Horrobin, D F; Manku, M S; Huang, Y S

    1984-05-01

    Plasma phospholipids of patients with psoriasis have significantly reduced levels of dihomogammalinolenic acid (20:3n-6), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) and adrenic acid (22:4n-6), the precursors of the 1, 2 and homo-2 series of prostaglandins (PGs). Concentrations of the 3 series PG precursor, eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) were normal. Hospital treatment with a coal tar regime produced a rise in 20:3n-6 to levels which were significantly above normal.

  11. The Legend of Hot Tar or Pitch as a Defensive Weapon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    research. In reality, this way of fighting can only be seen as a legend, i.e. a story with only a relative truth at its core. This paper will examine the origin of this historical tradition and its archaeological and architectural sources. The chemical and physical properties of tar pitch and its....... This practice was known in England, parts of Scandinavia and in some parts of the USA right up until the 20th century. The combination of these two completely separate lines of tradition will be considered as a possible root of this popular legend about castles at war....

  12. Analysis of Turkish lignite tar by coupled LC/GC, GC/MS, and capillary SFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, I.L.; Raynor, M.W.; Urwin, D.J.; Bartle, K.D.; Tolay, M.; Ekinci, E.; Schwartz, H.E.

    1988-11-01

    This work describes the analysis of a pyrolysis product of a lignite sample obtained from the Turkish Goynuk reserve. The aliphatic, aromatic and polar compounds present in the tar are separated and identified by various chromatographic techniques: capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), on-line high performance microbore liquid chromatography/capillary gas chromatography (LC/GC) and capillary supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The suitability of each technique for this particular application is discussed, and semi-quantitative results are presented for the major components detected. 35 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Aqueous extraction of phenol from tar resulting from pyrolysis of Kansk-Achinsk Basin brown coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motovilova, N.N.; Stolyarova, T.Y.; Itskovich, V.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.

    1988-12-10

    The degree of extraction of phenol from the tar fraction from HSP of KAC with a phenol content of 10-20 wt% is practically independent of the initial concentration of phenol in the organic raw material, increases with increase in the volume of the extractant, reaching 80% at the first stage with a phenol content of 20 wt% in the raw material and a 20:1 water:raw material volumetric ratio, and sharply increases with increase in the pH of the aqueous phase, reaching 99 wt% at pH 12. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. In situ heat treatment from multiple layers of a tar sands formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-11-30

    A method for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. The method includes providing a drive fluid to a first hydrocarbon containing layer of the formation to mobilize at least some hydrocarbons in the first layer. At least some of the mobilized hydrocarbons are allowed to flow into a second hydrocarbon containing layer of the formation. Heat is provided to the second layer from one or more heaters located in the second layer. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the second layer of the formation.

  15. Juniper tar (cade oil) poisoning in new born after a cutaneous application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Sanae; Abourazzak, Sana; Mokhtari, Abdelrhani; Soulaymani, Abdelmjid; Soulaymani, Rachida; Hida, Moustapha

    2011-10-28

    Juniper tar (cade oil) is distilled from the branches and wood of Juniperus oxycedrus. It contains etheric oils, triterpene and phenols, used for many purposes in folk medicine. The authors report a case of a previously healthy new born treated with a topical application of Juniperus oxycedrus for atopic dermatosis The poisoning caused convulsions, collapsus, acute pulmonary oedema, renal failure and hepatotoxicity. The newborn survived after supportive and symptomatic treatment, and discharged in a good condition on the eleventh day of hospitalisation in intensive care unit.

  16. Backtrack modeling to locate the origin of tar balls depositing along the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suneel, V.; Ciappa, A.; Vethamony, P.

    submerged tar residues and benthic for sunken TBs (Bernabeu et al. 2013, Iliffe and Knap, 1979, Butler et al. 1998). It may be noted that enormous quantities of TBs landed on the Alabama's shoreline after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon catastrophe. Forward...- and backward-in-time transport models can be used as constructive tools to track the drift of oil residues; the former is used to investigate the effects of oil pollution from known sources, and the latter for detecting the likely release sites or illegal...

  17. Further Processing of Coal Tar Pitch%煤焦油沥青深加工利用综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永林; 李好管

    2001-01-01

    Further Processing of coal tar pitch to raise the additionalvalue is one of key subjects in coal tar pro cessing. This paper discusses the present situation of coal tar pitch derived products such as modified pitch, paving pitch, coatings, carbon fiber, needle-coke.%概述了国外煤焦油沥青深加工利用现状,并对改质沥青(浸渍剂、粘结剂)、筑路沥青、涂料、碳纤维、针状焦等煤沥青深加工产品的技术开发、生产及应用进行了分析。

  18. The effects of topical corticosteroids and a coal tar preparation on dithranol-induced irritation in patients with psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinkels, O.Q.J.; Kucharekova, M.; Prins, M.; Gerritsen, M.J.P.; van der Valk, P.G.M.; van de Kerkhof, P.C.M. [University of Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Medical Center

    2003-02-01

    Dithranol has been a mainstay in the treatment of psoriasis for more than 80 years. Although a safe approach, the irritation of the clinically uninvolved perilesional skin remains a major limitation of this treatment. Corticosteroids and coal tar solution have an anti-inflammatory potential. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical and cell-biological effects of two topical corticosteroids and a coal tar preparation on dithranol-irritated skin. The expression of epidermal proliferation, differentiation and inflammation markers and the clinical irritation scores indicate that the application of a high potency corticosteroid is the best approach to minimise dithranol irritation.

  19. Production of aromatics through current-enhanced catalytic conversion of bio-oil tar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Peiyan; Yuan, Yanni; Fan, Minghui; Jiang, Peiwen; Zhai, Qi; Li, Quanxin

    2013-05-01

    Biomass conversion into benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) can provide basic feedstocks for the petrochemical industry, which also serve as the most important aromatic platform molecules for development of high-end chemicals. Present work explored a new route for transformation of bio-oil tar into BTX through current-enhanced catalytic conversion (CECC), involving the synergistic effect between the zeolite catalyst and current to promote the deoxygenation and cracking reactions. The proposed transformation shows an excellent BTX aromatics selectivity of 92.9 C-mol% with 25.1 wt.% yield at 400 °C over usual HZSM-5 catalyst. The study of the model compounds revealed that the groups such as methoxy, hydroxyl and methyl in aromatics can be effectively removed in the CECC process. Present transformation potentially provides an important approach for production of the key petrochemicals of BTX and the overall use of bio-oil tar derived from bio-oil or biomass. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speight, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.