WorldWideScience

Sample records for fuelled material test

  1. Performance Test of Engine Fuelled With Diesel and Ethanol Blends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K.L.Murthy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental concerns and limited amount of petroleum fuels have caused interests in the development of alternative fuels for internal combustion (ICengines. As an alternative, biodegradable and renewable fuel, ethanol is receiving increasing attention. An experimental investigation on the application of the blends of ethanol with diesel to a diesel engine was carried out. First the solubility of ethanol and diesel was conducted with and without the additive of normal butanol (n-butanol. The purpose of this project is to find the optimum percentage of ethanol that gives simultaneously better performance and lower emissions. The experiments were conducted on a water-cooled single-cylinder Direct Injection (DI diesel engine using 0% (neat diesel fuel, 10% (E10-D, 15%(E15–D, 20% (E20–D, and 25%(E25–D ethanol–diesel blended fuels. Experimental tests were carried out to study the performance of the engine fuelled with the blends compared with those fuelled by diesel. The test results show that it is feasible and applicable for the blends with n-butanol to replace pure diesel as the fuel for diesel engine.

  2. Development and test of a new catalytic converter for natural gas fuelled engine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M A Kalam; H H Masjuki; M Redzuan; T M I Mahlia; M A Fuad; M Mohibah; K H Halim; A Ishak; M Khair; A Shahrir; A Yusoff

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents characteristics of a new catalytic converter (catco) to be used for natural gas fuelled engine. The catco were developed based on catalyst materials consisting of metal oxides such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and cobalt oxide (CoO) with wire mesh substrate. Both of the catalyst materials (such as TiO2 and CoO) are inexpensive in comparison with conventional catalysts (noble metals) such as palladium or platinum. In addition, the noble metals such as platinum group metals are now identified as human health risk due to their rapid emissions in the environment from various resources like conventional catalytic converter, jewelers and other medical usages. It can be mentioned that the TiO2/CoO based catalytic converter and a new natural gas engine such as compressed natural gas (CNG) direct injection (DI) engine were developed under a research collaboration program. The original engine manufacture catalytic conveter (OEM catco) was tested for comparison purposes. The OEM catco was based on noble metal catalyst with honeycomb ceramic substrate. It is experimentally found that the conversion efficiencies of TiO2/CoO based catalytic converter are 93%, 89% and 82% for NOx, CO and HC emissions respectively. It is calculated that the TiO2/CoO based catalytic converter reduces 24%, 41% and 40% higher NOx, CO and HC emissions in comparison to OEM catco respectively. The objective of this paper is to develop a low-cost three way catalytic converter to be used with the newly developed CNG-DI engine. Detailed review on catalytic converter, low-cost catalytic converter development characteristics and CNGDI engine test results have been presented with discussions.

  3. Hydrogen Fuelling Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard

    This thesis concerns hydrogen fuelling stations from an overall system perspective. The study investigates thermodynamics and energy consumption of hydrogen fuelling stations for fuelling vehicles for personal transportation. For the study a library concerning the components in a hydrogen fuelling...... station has been developed in Dymola. The models include the fuelling protocol (J2601) for hydrogen vehicles made by Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the thermodynamic property library CoolProp is used for retrieving state point. The components in the hydrogen fuelling library are building up....... A system consisting of one high pressure storage tank is used to investigate the thermodynamics of fuelling a hydrogen vehicle. The results show that the decisive parameter for how the fuelling proceeds is the pressure loss in the vehicle. The single tank fuelling system is compared to a cascade fuelling...

  4. Safer Aviation Materials Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of thermally stable polymer samples were tested. These materials are called low heat release materials and are designed for aircraft interior decorative materials. The materials are designed to give off a minimum amount of noxious gases when heated, which increases the possibility that people can escape from a burning aircraft. New cabin materials have suitably low heat release so that fire does not spread, toxic chemicals are not given off, and the fire-emergency escape time for crew and passengers is lengthened. These low heat-release materials have a variety of advantages and applications: interiors for ground-based facilities, interiors of space vehicles, and many commercial fire-protection environments. A microscale combustion calorimeter at the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Technical Center tested NASA Langley Research Center materials samples. The calorimeter is shown. A sharp, quantitative, and reproducible heat-release-rate peak is obtained in the microscale heat-release-rate test. The newly tested NASA materials significantly reduced the heat release capacity and total heat release. The thermal stability and flammability behavior of the samples was very good. The new materials demonstrated a factor of 4 reduction in total heat release over ULTEM (a currently used material). This information is provided in the following barchart. In other tests, the materials showed greater than a factor 9 reduction in heat-release capacity over ULTEM. The newly tested materials were developed for low dielectric constant, low color, and good solubility. A scale up of the material samples is needed to determine the repeatability of the performance in larger samples. Larger panels composed of the best candidate materials will be tested in a larger scale FAA Technical Center fire facility. The NASA Glenn Research Center, Langley (Jeff Hinkley), and the FAA Technical Center (Richard Lyon) cooperatively tested these materials for the Accident Mitigation

  5. Materials Testing and Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Wayne D.; Zweigoron, Ronald B.

    1980-07-01

    The advent of automation in materials testing has been in large part responsible for recent radical changes in the materials testing field: Tests virtually impossible to perform without a computer have become more straightforward to conduct. In addition, standardized tests may be performed with enhanced efficiency and repeatability. A typical automated system is described in terms of its primary subsystems — an analog station, a digital computer, and a processor interface. The processor interface links the analog functions with the digital computer; it includes data acquisition, command function generation, and test control functions. Features of automated testing are described with emphasis on calculated variable control, control of a variable that is computed by the processor and cannot be read directly from a transducer. Three calculated variable tests are described: a yield surface probe test, a thermomechanical fatigue test, and a constant-stress-intensity range crack-growth test. Future developments are discussed.

  6. Materials Test Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — When completed, the Materials Test Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will meet mission need. MTS will provide the only fast-reactor-like irradiation...

  7. Direct-fuelled fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waidhas, M.; Drenckhahn, W.; Preidel, W.; Landes, H.

    Fuel supply is one important problem to be solved for commercial application of fuel cell technology. Conventional fuel-cell types require hydrogen as the fuel, which has to be free from impurities when operated at temperatures below 100 °C. The storage and distribution of this explosive and extremely fugitive gas is one of the open questions in the context of a customer-oriented broad commercial market. The direct-fuelled fuel cells (DMFCs) overcome the hydrogen specific restrictions. They are capable of directly using natural gas or fuels which are liquid under ambient conditions. In this paper the different options from direct-fuelled systems are described and their general aspects discussed. The state-of-the-art at Siemens in this field, and also the remaining technical questions are outlined as a basis for assessing future applications.

  8. Considerations on the DEMO pellet fuelling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, P.T., E-mail: peter.lang@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Day, Ch. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fable, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Igitkhanov, Y. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Köchl, F. [Association EURATOM-Ö AW/ATI, Atominstitut, TU Wien, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Mooney, R. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Pegourie, B. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ploeckl, B. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Wenninger, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); EFDA, Garching (Germany); Zohm, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Considerations are made for a core particle fuelling system covering all DEMO requirements. • Particle deposition beyond the pedestal top is needed to achieve efficient fuelling. • Conventional pellet technology enabling launching from the torus inboard side can be used. • Efforts have been taken for integrating a suitable pellet guiding system into the EU DEMO model. • In addition, further techniques bearing potential for advanced fuelling performance are considered. - Abstract: The Demonstration Fusion Power Reactor DEMO is the step foreseen to bridge the gap between ITER and the first commercial fusion power plant. One key element in the European work plan for DEMO is the elaboration of a conceptual design for a suitable core particle fuelling system. First considerations for such a system are presented in this contribution. Following the well-considered ITER solution, most analysis performed in this study assumes conventional pellet technology will be used for the fuelling system. However, taking advantage of the less compressed time frame for the DEMO project, several other techniques thought to bear potential for advanced fuelling performance are considered as well. In a first, basic analysis all actuation parameters at hand and their implications on the fuelling performance were considered. Tentative transport modeling of a reference scenario strongly indicates only particles deposited inside the plasma pedestal allow for efficient fuelling. Shallow edge fuelling results in an unbearable burden on the fuel cycle. Sufficiently deep particle deposition seems technically achievable, provided pellets are launched from the torus inboard at sufficient speed. All components required for a DEMO pellet system capable for high speed inboard pellet launch are already available or can be developed in due time with reasonable efforts. Furthermore, steps to integrate this solution into the EU DEMO model are taken.

  9. Distributed power generation using biogas fuelled microturbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pointon, K.; Langan, M.

    2002-07-01

    This research sought to analyse the market for small scale biogas fuelled distributed power generation, to demonstrate the concept of a biogas fuelled microturbine using the Capstone microturbine in conjunction with an anaerobic digester, and undertake a technico-economic evaluation of the biogas fuelled microturbine concept. Details are given of the experimental trials using continuous and batch digesters, and feedstocks ranging from cow and pig slurries to vegetable wastes and municipal solid waste. The yields of methane are discussed along with the successful operation of the microturbine with biogas fuels, and anaerobic digestion projects.

  10. Materials Testing - Digital Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Wiley

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Access to credible building product performance information throughout the design and construction process is critical to enable project development, vet product selections, ensure as-built quality, and successfully complete construction. This is common knowledge and part of common practice for nearly all parties involved in design and construction. The sources of such information can range from vernacular to formal – from common practice to special reference. The focus of this paper is one of the more formal or specialized information sources, performance testing, as well as how such performance testing information can be better used. This paper’s goals are to familiarize the reader with performance testing and to depict a new kind of valuable informational tool (digital ecology. Reference to pertinent nomenclature, description of a real world example, and detailed description of such an informational tool’s values will be provided.The major content of this paper was developed during project-based work and firm-funded internal research at point b design, ltd. over approximately the previous 4 years. The phrase ‘digital ecology’ as herein used is a new concept proposed by the author. The analysis contained in this paper could be applied to the field of operations and maintenance as it is herein applied to design and construction; however, operations and maintenance is beyond the scope of this paper and may be addressed in future papers. It is my hope that this paper will contribute to tangible and real improvements of the built environment via continued, positive development within academic and professional practice.

  11. Developing test materials for dyscalculia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindenskov, Lena; Bent, Lindhardt,

    Aims, requirements and context for the development of test materials for dyscalculia are analyzed. The test materials are to be used for Grade 4 pupils in Danish primary schools. Preliminary results are presented from focus group interview with adolescents and adults, who see themselves as being...

  12. Fuelling innovation in building design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2012-08-01

    Established in 2005 on a 78-acre site near Watford by a research-based consultancy, testing, and training organisation with a reputation for independence and impartiality, the BRE's Watford Innovation Park is today home to a broad range of research, consultancy, and testing activities, for the built environment. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, met with BRE director of Strategic Research, Peter Ball, to learn about the organisation's history and current-day activities, and tour of some of the key facilities where staff undertake cutting-edge research, consultancy, and testing, to improve the performance, efficiency, and sustainability, of a wide range of buildings.

  13. LNG fuelling for mine trucks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melanson, B.E.; Hodgins, K.B. [Westport Innovations Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Diesel-powered mine haul trucks consume large amounts of fuel. The diesel engines provide the trucks with the flexibility to readily move material while optimizing speed and efficiency. However, the high cost for diesel fuel has prompted the need for lower-cost solutions. Since many mining regions have access to low-cost liquefied natural gas (LNG) feedstock through indigenous natural gas resources and coal mine methane, the use of LNG for mine haul trucks offers a solution to lower operating costs. In addition to reducing the reliance on petroleum resources, the use of LNG would also contribute to a reduction in noise, air pollutants, and greenhouse gas emissions. This presentation demonstrated that significant fuel cost savings can be realized in regions where LNG has cost advantage to diesel fuel. High pressure direct injection (HPDI) of natural gas in a compression ignition engine offers the high performance and efficiency characteristics of diesel engines while reducing particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides and greenhouse gases. HPDI has been demonstrated in on-road Class 8 trucks since 2001 and mine haul trucks are now considered a prime target for implementing change to lower-carbon gaseous fuels. The supply of LNG fuel will be a necessary aspect of the introduction of HPDI to mining. LNG can be transported to mine sites or it can be produced on or near mining operations that have access to methane sources or pipelines. It was concluded that HPDI powered mine trucks offer a safe, economic and environmentally progressive solution for mine operators. 2 figs.

  14. Exhaust gas catalysts for heavy-duty vehicles fuelled by alcohol or biogas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, L.J.; Wahlberg, A.M.; Jaeraas, S.G. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    1997-06-01

    The long-term objective for the project is to develop tailor-made exhaust gas catalysts for heavy-duty ethanol fuelled diesel vehicles operating in urban traffic. Due to special problems, related to emissions of unregulated compounds emanating from ethanol fuelled buses in Swedish fleet tests, a catalyst research programme has been initiated. The engineering target was to achieve a light-off temperature (T{sub 50}) for ethanol conversion below 110 deg C and a selectivity for total oxidation over 90 %. In this report results from laboratory-reactor tests are described. The results indicate that by combining two different precious metals both activity and selectivity can be positively affected compared to the properties of the corresponding mono metallic catalysts. The best results show a light-off temperature for ethanol conversion below 100 deg C. The base metal oxides were more selective for total oxidation than the corresponding precious metal catalysts. The results also indicate a considerable interaction between support and active material which affects the product distribution in catalytic oxidation of ethanol. At temperatures below 250 deg C the by-product formation can be quite high and the major by-product is acetaldehyde. The metal support interaction also has a certain influence on the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. The results show that the NO{sub 2} formation can be suppressed without considerably affecting the activity of the catalyst. This report also includes a preliminary life cycle analysis (LCA) and life cycle cost (LCC) estimate for exhaust gas catalysts intended for heavy-duty ethanol vehicles in urban traffic. 22 refs, numerous figs and tabs

  15. A comparison of exhaust emissions from vehicles fuelled with petrol, LPG and CNG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielaczyc, P.; Szczotka, A.; Woodburn, J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an analysis of THC, NMHC, CO, NOx and CO2 emissions during testing of two bi-fuel vehicles, fuelled with petrol and gaseous fuels, on a chassis dynamometer in the context of the Euro 6 emissions requirements. The analyses were performed on one Euro 5 bi-fuel vehicle (petrol/LPG) and one Euro 5 bi-fuel vehicle (petrol/CNG), both with SI engines equipped with MPI feeding systems operating in closed-loop control, typical three-way-catalysts and heated oxygen sensors. The vehicles had been adapted by their manufacturers for fuelling with LPG or CNG by using additional special equipment mounted onto the existing petrol fuelling system. The vehicles tested featured multipoint gas injection systems. The aim of this paper was an analysis of the impact of the gaseous fuels on the exhaust emission in comparison to the emission of the vehicles fuelled with petrol. The tests subject to the analyses presented here were performed in the Engine Research Department of BOSMAL Automotive Research and Development Institute Ltd in Bielsko-Biala, Poland, within a research programme investigating the influence of alternative fuels on exhaust emissions from light duty vehicle vehicles with spark-ignition and compression-ignition engines.

  16. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  17. A preliminary evaluation of post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture performance in a pilot plant test using mono-ethanolamine at a lignite-fuelled power station in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Artanto; M.I. Attalla; A. Cottrell; J. Jansen; J.M. McGregor; E.E.B. Meuleman; S. Morgan; M. Osborn; P. Pearson; L. Wardhaugh; P.H.M. Feron [CSIRO, Clayton, Vic. (Australia). Division of Energy Technology

    2009-07-01

    CSIRO has developed three PCC pilot plants to be connected to the flue gas of coal-fuelled power stations in Australia. Currently, two pilot plants are in operation. This paper presents results achieved with CSIRO's mobile plant which is fed with real flue gas from a lignite-fuelled power station at Loy Yang, Victoria, Australia. The findings of preliminary pilot plant trials are evaluated through comparison with results derived from WinSim Design II process simulation. The pilot plant operates with a 30% mono-ethanolamine (MEA) solution to capture CO{sub 2} under nominal conditions defined as a flue gas rate of 150 m{sup 3}/h and a solvent rate of 0.34 m{sup 3}/h. These conditions are set as the base-line for further experiments with different conditions. Different flue gas and solvent flow rates (three selected cases) were examined in the pilot plant in order to study the effects on CO{sub 2} recovery, heat reboiler duty, lean solvent loading and temperature profiles in the absorber columns. Gas and liquid sample analyses were used to determine the amount of CO{sub 2} recovered. The CO{sub 2} balance was also calculated in this study. The CO{sub 2} recovered (15-20 kg/h), based on liquid analysis, are below values from simulation modeling. The CO{sub 2} recovery is approximately 95% in simulation, while experiments indicate CO{sub 2} recovery of 60-83%. Preliminary results on comparing temperature profiles in the absorber columns show similar trends. 7 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Unmanned Vehicle Material Flammability Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T’ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam; Rouvreau, Sebastian; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Jomaas, Grande

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity combustion phenomena have been an active area of research for the past 3 decades however, there have been very few experiments directly studying spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample and environment sizes typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. All previous experiments have been limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. Terrestrial fire safety standards for all other habitable volumes on earth, e.g. mines, buildings, airplanes, ships, etc., are based upon testing conducted with full-scale fires. Given the large differences between fire behavior in normal and reduced gravity, this lack of an experimental data base at relevant length scales forces spacecraft designers to base their designs using 1-g understanding. To address this question a large scale spacecraft fire experiment has been proposed by an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status and concept of this collaborative international project to examine spacecraft material flammability at realistic scales. The concept behind this project is to utilize an unmanned spacecraft such as Orbital Cygnus vehicle after it has completed its delivery of cargo to the ISS and it has begun its return journey to earth. This experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. A computer modeling effort will complement the experimental effort. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the examination of fire behavior on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model validation. This will be

  19. Thermal Systems and Materials Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    During my internship, I was involved in Boeing Thermal System/M&P, which handles maintenance and repairs of shuttle tiles, blankets, gap fillers, etc. One project I took part in was the revision of TPS-227, a repair process to tiles that entailed drilling out tile damage and using a cylindrical insert to fill the hole. The previous specification used minimal adhesive for application and when the adhesive cured, there would be several voids in the adhered material, causing an unsatisfactory bond. The testing compared several new methods and I analyzed the number of voids produced by each method to determine which one was most effective at eliminating void space. We revised the original process to apply a light adhesive coat to the top 25% of the borehole and a heavy coat to 100% of the insert. I was also responsible for maintaining the subnominal bond database, which records all unsatisfactory SIP (Strain Isolator Pad) bonds. I then archived each SIP physically for future referral data and statistics. In addition, I performed post-flight tile inspections for damages and wrote dispositions to have these tiles repaired. This also included writing a post-flight damage report for a section of Atlantis and creating summarized repair process guidelines for orbiter technicians.

  20. 46 CFR 154.430 - Material test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Material test. 154.430 Section 154.430 Shipping COAST... § 154.430 Material test. (a) The membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be made of materials that withstand the combined strains calculated under § 154.429(c). (b) Analyzed data of a material...

  1. Inflow of atomic gas fuelling star formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Gentile, G.; Hjorth, Jeppe;

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst host galaxies are deficient in molecular gas, and show anomalous metal-poor regions close to GRB positions. Using recent Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) Hi observations we show that they have substantial atomic gas reservoirs. This suggests that star formation in these ga......Gamma-ray burst host galaxies are deficient in molecular gas, and show anomalous metal-poor regions close to GRB positions. Using recent Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) Hi observations we show that they have substantial atomic gas reservoirs. This suggests that star formation...... in these galaxies may be fuelled by recent inflow of metal-poor atomic gas. While this process is debated, it can happen in low-metallicity gas near the onset of star formation because gas cooling (necessary for star formation) is faster than the Hi-to-H2 conversion....

  2. Reference materials and representative test materials: the nanotechnology case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roebben, G., E-mail: gert.roebben@ec.europa.eu [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (Belgium); Rasmussen, K. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (Italy); Kestens, V.; Linsinger, T. P. J. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (Belgium); Rauscher, H. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (Italy); Emons, H. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (Belgium); Stamm, H. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    An increasing number of chemical, physical and biological tests are performed on manufactured nanomaterials for scientific and regulatory purposes. Existing test guidelines and measurement methods are not always directly applicable to or relevant for nanomaterials. Therefore, it is necessary to verify the use of the existing methods with nanomaterials, thereby identifying where modifications are needed, and where new methods need to be developed and validated. Efforts for verification, development and validation of methods as well as quality assurance of (routine) test results significantly benefit from the availability of suitable test and reference materials. This paper provides an overview of the existing types of reference materials and introduces a new class of test materials for which the term 'representative test material' is proposed. The three generic concepts of certified reference material, reference material(non-certified) and representative test material constitute a comprehensive system of benchmarks that can be used by all measurement and testing communities, regardless of their specific discipline. This paper illustrates this system with examples from the field of nanomaterials, including reference materials and representative test materials developed at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre, in particular at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), and at the Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP).

  3. Environmental testing techniques for electronics and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Dummer, Geoffrey W A; Fry, D W; Higinbotham, W

    2013-01-01

    Environmental Testing Techniques for Electronics and Materials reviews environmental testing techniques for evaluating the performance of electronic equipment, components, and materials. Environmental test planning, test methods, and instrumentation are described, along with the general environmental conditions under which equipment must operate. This book is comprised of 15 chapters and begins by explaining why environmental testing is necessary and describing the environment in which electronics must operate. The next chapter considers how an environmental test plan is designed; the methods

  4. Nondestructive ultrasonic testing of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, B.P.

    1994-08-02

    Reflection wave forms obtained from aged and unaged material samples can be compared in order to indicate trends toward age-related flaws. Statistical comparison of a large number of data points from such wave forms can indicate changes in the microstructure of the material due to aging. The process is useful for predicting when flaws may occur in structural elements of high risk structures such as nuclear power plants, airplanes, and bridges. 4 figs.

  5. Electrical Arc Ignition Testing of Spacesuit Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah; Gallus, Tim; Tapia, Susana; Ball, Elizabeth; Beeson, Harold

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on electrical arc ignition testing of spacesuit materials is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Test Objectives; 3) Test Sample Materials; 4) Test Methods; 5) Scratch Test Objectives; 6) Cotton Scratch Test Video; 7) Scratch Test Results; 8) Entire Date Plot; 9) Closeup Data Plot; 10) Scratch Test Problems; 11) Poke Test Objectives; 12) Poke Test Results; 13) Poke Test Problems; 14) Wire-break Test Objectives; 15) Cotton Wire-Break Test Video; 16) High Speed Cotton Wire-break Test Video; 17) Typical Data Plot; 18) Closeup Data Plot; 19) Wire-break Test Results; 20) Wire-break Tests vs. Scratch Tests; 21) Urethane-coated Nylon; and 22) Moleskin.

  6. Thermophysical tests of buffer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, H. [ITC, Tokyo (Japan); Taniguchi, Wataru

    1999-03-01

    Thermodynamic properties of buffer materials were measured for putting in order thermodynamic constants to be used in the near-field thermal analysis. The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were measured as functions of the water content and temperature to deduce the specific heat. The thermal conductivity and specific heat varied significantly as the water content changed. Obtained values of the specific heat agreed well the expected values calculated based on the constituents of the buffer material. Temperature dependence of the thermodynamic constants was found small below 90degC. From the findings, the thermal conductivity and specific heat of the buffer material were formulated as functions of the water content. Thermodynamic study of powdery bentonite was carried out as well with a purpose of use for filling apertures in the artificial barrier. (H. Baba)

  7. Compatibility testing of energetic materials, which technique?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, W.P.C. de; Schrader, M.A.; Steen, A.C. van der

    1999-01-01

    Compatibility is an important safety aspect related to the production and storage of energetic materials. To test different combinations of materials a simple test method with clear criteria is advisable. At the last ESTAC the use of microcalorimetry and the vacuum stability test for the

  8. New Challenge to the Existing Fuelling Technique for ITER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENGBaiquan; PENGLilin

    2003-01-01

    A new challenge to the existing pellet fuelling technique for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has been discussed by computing ablation rate using Kuteev lentil model with considering the kinetic effects. Numerical integral results show the existing pellet injection technique will be difficult to meet the deep fuelling requirement for the reactor relevant plasma of ITER. As high as a pressure of 254 MPa should be applied to the pellet accelerator of 2-meters long single stage pneumatic gun,

  9. Compatibility testing of vacuum seal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, P. A.; Rodin, W. A.

    1993-05-01

    Small scale materials compatibility testing was conducted for three elastomers considered for use as vacuum seal materials: Adiprene MOCA-cured; Adiprene Cyanacured; and Sylgard silastic rubber. The tests were conducted using orthogonal array designed experiments for each of the elastomers placed in contact with three materials commonly used during weapon disassembly operations: Duxseal, Sylgard 186 grease, and 2-propyl alcohol. The test results indicated that only the 2-propyl alcohol had a significant effect on the elastomer hardness and physical properties. The alcohol had the largest effect on the two Adiprene materials, and the silastic rubber was the least affected.

  10. Ceramic materials testing and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilfinger, K. R., LLNL

    1998-04-30

    corrosion by limiting the transport of water and oxygen to the ceramic-metal interface. Thermal spray techniques for ceramic coating metallic structures are currently being explored. The mechanics of thermal spray resembles spray painting in many respects, allowing large surfaces and contours to be covered smoothly. All of the relevant thermal spray processes use a high energy input to melt or partially melt a powdered oxide material, along with a high velocity gas to impinge the molten droplets onto a substrate where they conform, quench, solidify and adhere mechanically. The energy input can be an arc generated plasma, an oxy-fuel flame or an explosion. The appropriate feed material and the resulting coating morphologies vary with technique as well as with application parameters. To date on this project, several versions of arc plasma systems, a detonation coating system and two variations of high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) fired processes have been investigated, operating on several different ceramic materials.

  11. Quarantine testing and biocharacterization of lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. R.; Mieszkuc, B. J.; Simmonds, R. C.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    Quarantine testing was conducted to ensure the safety of all life on earth. The plants and animals which were exposed to lunar material were carefully observed for prolonged periods to determine if any mutation or changes in growing characteristics and behavior occurred. The quarantine testing was terminated after the Apollo 14 flight when it became apparent that previously returned lunar material contained no potentially harmful agents. Further biological experimentation with the lunar material was conducted to determine its chemical, physical, and nutritional qualities.

  12. Development of a Wood Powder Fuelled 35 kW Stirling CHP Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pålsson, M.; Carlsen, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    For biomass fuelled CHP in sizes below 100 kW, Stirling engines are the only feasible alternative today. Using wood powder as fuel, the Stirling engine can be heated directly by the flame like when using a gaseous or liquid fuel burner. However, the combustion chamber will have to be much larger...... recirculation (CGR) a smaller air preheater can be used, while system efficiency will increase compared with using excess air for flame cooling. In a three-year project, a wood powder fuelled Stirling engine CHP unit will be developed and run in field test. The project will use the double-acting four......, using wood powder as fuel will be developed at Lund University, Sweden, in cooperation with the Technical University of Denmark and with the wood powder boiler manufacturer VTS AB. The unit is to be run in CHP operation by Vattenfall - the largest electric power company in Sweden - in a one-year field...

  13. Compression Testing of Textile Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, John E.

    1996-01-01

    The applicability of existing test methods, which were developed primarily for laminates made of unidirectional prepreg tape, to textile composites is an area of concern. The issue is whether the values measured for the 2-D and 3-D braided, woven, stitched, and knit materials are accurate representations of the true material response. This report provides a review of efforts to establish a compression test method for textile reinforced composite materials. Experimental data have been gathered from several sources and evaluated to assess the effectiveness of a variety of test methods. The effectiveness of the individual test methods to measure the material's modulus and strength is determined. Data are presented for 2-D triaxial braided, 3-D woven, and stitched graphite/epoxy material. However, the determination of a recommended test method and specimen dimensions is based, primarily, on experimental results obtained by the Boeing Defense and Space Group for 2-D triaxially braided materials. They evaluated seven test methods: NASA Short Block, Modified IITRI, Boeing Open Hole Compression, Zabora Compression, Boeing Compression after Impact, NASA ST-4, and a Sandwich Column Test.

  14. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  15. Advanced Mechanical Testing of Sandwich Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayman, Brian; Berggreen, Christian; Jenstrup, Claus

    2008-01-01

    An advanced digital optical system has been used to measure surface strains on sandwich face and core specimens tested in a project concerned with improved criteria for designing sandwich X-joints. The face sheet specimens were of glass reinforced polyester and were tested in tension. The core...... specimens were of PVC foam and were tested in compression. The tests were performed in order to validate the use of the measurement system on these materials and to obtain material data for use in numerical simulations. While some limitations were identified, the optical system performed well and appears...

  16. Advanced Materials Laboratory User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orndoff, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Advanced Materials Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  17. Microstability analysis of pellet fuelled discharges in MAST

    CERN Document Server

    Garzotti, L; Roach, C M; Valovic, M; Dickinson, D; Naylor, G; Romanelli, M; Scannell, R; Szepesi, G

    2014-01-01

    Reactor grade plasmas are likely to be fuelled by pellet injection. This technique transiently perturbs the profiles, driving the density profile hollow and flattening the edge temperature profile. After the pellet perturbation, the density and temperature profiles relax towards their quasi-steady-state shape. Microinstabilities influence plasma confinement and will play a role in determining the evolution of the profiles in pellet fuelled plasmas. In this paper we present the microstability analysis of pellet fuelled H-mode MAST plasmas. Taking advantage of the unique capabilities of the MAST Thomson scattering system and the possibility of synchronizing the eight lasers with the pellet injection, we were able to measure the evolution of the post-pellet electron density and temperature profiles with high temporal and spatial resolution. These profiles, together with ion temperature profiles measured using a charge exchange diagnostic, were used to produce equilibria suitable for microstability analysis of th...

  18. Symmetry Parameters of CSS Sources: Evidence of Fuelling?

    CERN Document Server

    Saikia, D J; Mantovani, F; Salter, C J; Spencer, R E; Thomasson, P; Wiita, P J

    2003-01-01

    The compact steep spectrum (CSS) and gigahertz peaked spectrum (GPS) sources are widely believed to be young radiosources, with ages <10^6 yr. If the activity in the nucleus is fuelled by the supply of gas, one might find evidence of this gas by studying the structural and polarisation characteristics of CSS sources and their evolution through this gas. In this paper we discuss some of the possible `smoking-gun' evidence of this gas which may have triggered and fuelled the radio source.

  19. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C

  20. The "edge effect" with patch test materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyad, A; Masmoudi, M L; Lachapelle, J M

    1987-03-01

    A positive "edge effect", i.e., the accumulation on the skin of a chemical solution (such as fluorescein 0.01% in a 50/50 water-ethanol solution) at the periphery of the patch test sites has been demonstrated. It occurs with different test materials (Finn Chamber; Silver Patch Test; Patch Test Chamber). Practical implications are discussed: this observation could be important when discussing results of laboratory investigations. In clinical practice, it could explain the occurrence of "ring-shaped" positive allergic patch test reactions to chemicals used in solution, i.e., Kathon CG or hydrocortisone.

  1. Europa Propulsion Valve Seat Material Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addona, Brad M.

    2017-01-01

    The Europa mission and spacecraft design presented unique challenges for selection of valve seat materials that met the fluid compatibility requirements, and combined fluid compatibility and high radiation exposure level requirements. The Europa spacecraft pressurization system valves will be exposed to fully saturated propellant vapor for the duration of the mission. The effects of Nitrogen Tetroxide (NTO) and Monomethylhydrazine (MMH) propellant vapors on heritage valve seat materials, such as Vespel SP-1 and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE), were evaluated to determine if an alternate material is required. In liquid system applications, Teflon is the only available compatible valve seat material. Radiation exposure data for Teflon in an air or vacuum environment has been previously documented. Radiation exposure data for Teflon in an oxidizer environment such as NTO, was not available, and it was unknown whether the effects would be similar to those on air-exposed samples. Material testing was conducted by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to determine the effects of propellant vapor on heritage seat materials for pressurization valve applications, and the effects of combined radiation and NTO propellant exposure on Teflon. The results indicated that changes in heritage pressurization valve seat materials' properties rendered them unsuitable for the Europa application. The combined radiation and NTO exposure testing of Teflon produced results equivalent to combined radiation and air exposure results.

  2. SCREENING TESTS FOR IMPROVED METHANE CRACKING MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2007-07-16

    Bench scale (1 to 6 gram) methane cracking tests have been performed on a variety of pure elements, some alloys, and SAES{reg_sign} commercial getters St 101, St 198, St 707, St 737, and St 909 to determine methane cracking performance (MCP) of 5% methane in a helium carrier at 700 C, 101.3 kPa (760 torr) with a 10 sccm feed. The MCP was almost absent from some materials tested while others showed varying degrees of MCP. Re, Cr, V, Gd, and Mo powders had good MCP, but limited capacities. Nickel supported on kieselguhr (Ni/k), a Zr-Ni alloy, and the SAES{reg_sign} getters had good MCP in a helium carrier. The MCP of these same materials was suppressed in a hydrogen carrier stream and the MCP of the Zr-based materials was reduced by nitride formation when tested with a nitrogen carrier gas.

  3. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-02-23

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented.

  4. Standard test method for instrumented impact testing of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This standard establishes the requirements for performing instrumented Charpy V-Notch (CVN) and instrumented Miniaturized Charpy V-Notch (MCVN) impact tests on metallic materials. This method, which is based on experience developed testing steels, provides further information (in addition to the total absorbed energy) on the fracture behavior of the tested materials. Minimum requirements are given for measurement and recording equipment such that similar sensitivity and comparable total absorbed energy measurements to those obtained in Test Methods E 23 and E 2248 are achieved. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  5. Test System for Thermoelectric Modules and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejtmánek, J.; Knížek, K.; Švejda, V.; Horna, P.; Sikora, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a design for a complex measuring device that enables its user to assess the parameters of power-generating thermoelectric modules (TEMs) (or bulk thermoelectric materials) under a wide range of temperatures ( T cold = 25°C to 90°C, T hot i) a measuring chamber where the TEM/material is compressed between thermally shielded heating blocks equipped with a mechanical loading system and water-cooled copper-based cooler, (ii) an electrical load system, (iii) a type K thermocouple array connected to a data acquisition computer, and (iv) a thermostatic water-based cooling system with electronically controlled flow rate and temperature of cooling water. Our testing setup represents a useful tool able to assess, e.g., the thermoelectric parameters of newly developed TEMs and materials or to evaluate the thermoelectric parameters of commercially available modules and materials for comparison with values declared by the manufacturer.

  6. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilat Amos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available New techniques for dynamic characterization of materials that have been developed in the last three years (since the last DYMAT conference in 2012, and results from recent dynamic testing of Inconel 718 are presented. The first development is a dynamic punch test in which three dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC is used to measure the deformation of the rear surface of a specimen as it being penetrated. The second experimental technique that is under development is a dynamic tension experiment in which full-field strain measurement with DIC and full-field temperature measurement are done simultaneously during the test.

  7. FAST BUS Test Box (LAIKA) (Engineering Materials)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    The assembly drawing AD 135-518-00-RO, and the drawings referenced thereon, provide the data and specifications for constructing the LAIKA Test Box. Some drawings are not available, although they are listed on the material lists included. The assembly is a manual tester for FAST BUS modules, both masters and slaves. FAST BUS signals are generated by means of switches or push buttons and provide the state of the bus lines by lighting LED's. The box acts as either a master or slave - depending upon the module under test. It also acts as an ATC to test the arbitration logic of a master or ATC device.

  8. Determination of operating parameters of industrial engine fuelled with post processing gases with high hydrogen content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeżański, M.; Mareczek, M.; Marek, W.; Papuga, T.

    2016-09-01

    The results of investigations of SI engine fuelled with hydrogen and mixed n-butanol with isobutanol have been presented in article. The idea of flexible feeding system and the aim and methodology of carried out measurement have been also described. Obtained results have been compared to the results of tests carried out during flexible feeding of the same engine. The proposed control system enables not only application of different liquid and gaseous fuels but also application of the fuels which chemical composition vary within the relatively short time intervals.

  9. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  10. Standard test methods for bend testing of material for ductility

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover bend testing for ductility of materials. Included in the procedures are four conditions of constraint on the bent portion of the specimen; a guided-bend test using a mandrel or plunger of defined dimensions to force the mid-length of the specimen between two supports separated by a defined space; a semi-guided bend test in which the specimen is bent, while in contact with a mandrel, through a specified angle or to a specified inside radius (r) of curvature, measured while under the bending force; a free-bend test in which the ends of the specimen are brought toward each other, but in which no transverse force is applied to the bend itself and there is no contact of the concave inside surface of the bend with other material; a bend and flatten test, in which a transverse force is applied to the bend such that the legs make contact with each other over the length of the specimen. 1.2 After bending, the convex surface of the bend is examined for evidence of a crack or surface irregu...

  11. Standard test method for dynamic tear testing of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1983-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the dynamic tear (DT) test using specimens that are 3/16 in. to 5/8 in. (5 mm to 16 mm) inclusive in thickness. 1.2 This test method is applicable to materials with a minimum thickness of 3/16 in. (5 mm). 1.3 The pressed-knife procedure described for sharpening the notch tip generally limits this test method to materials with a hardness level less than 36 HRC. Note 1—The designation 36 HRC is a Rockwell hardness number of 36 on Rockwell C scale as defined in Test Methods E 18. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. China's First Orimulsion-fuelled Power Project Kicks off

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ China's first Orimulsion-fuelled power project was recently kicked off in Zhanjiang, a coastal city in Southeastern China's Guangdong Province. This project, which draws an investment of about 4.1 billion yuan, is a joint venture among CNPC Fuel Oil Co Ltd with a 51 percent stake, Guangdong Electric Power Development Co Ltd with a 39 percent stake and Zhanjiang Harbor Group Co Ltd with a 10 percent.

  13. Avalanche Phenomenon of Runaway Electrons During Additional Fuelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨进蔚; 曹建勇; 曾庆希; 张炜; 唐年益; 董贾福; 邓中朝; 肖正贵; 姚良骅

    2002-01-01

    During pellet injection and supersonic molecular beam injection, we have observed the increase of electron density and the enhancement of hard x-ray radiation, but the runaway electrons normally decrease without additional fuelling when the density of plasma increases. This phenomenon may come from the synergetic effects of Dreicer and avalanche runaway electrons. The experimental results are consistent with the calculation based on the theory of avalanche runaway in the HL-1M tokamak.

  14. The interim test effect: testing prior material can facilitate the learning of new material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissman, Kathryn T; Rawson, Katherine A; Pyc, Mary A

    2011-12-01

    A wealth of prior research has shown that testing can improve subsequent learning of the initially tested material. In contrast, only one recent study has shown that an interim test over prior material can improve learning of subsequent new material (i.e., an interim-test effect). Five experiments replicated and extended this initial work by exploring the extent to which interim test effects generalize to complex text material. Participants were prompted to recall each section of an expository text before moving on to study the next section, or were only prompted to recall after the final section. In all experiments, recall of the final, target section was greater when prior sections had received interim tests versus no interim tests. Experiment 3 established that the effect was due to interim testing in particular rather than to intervening activity in general. Experiment 4 established that the effect was not due to test expectancy differences. In contrast to prior research, Experiment 4 also provided evidence that the effect is not due to release from proactive interference. We discuss other possible mechanisms underlying interim-test effects with text, including shifting to more effective encoding strategies.

  15. Utilization of waste glycerin to fuelling of spark ignition engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmasiak, Z.; Pietras, D.

    2016-09-01

    The paper discusses a possibilities of usage a simple alcohols to fuelling of spark ignition engines. Methanol and blends of methanol with glycerin, being a waste product from production of bio-components to fuels based on rapeseed oil, have been used in course of the investigations. The main objective of the research was to determine possibilities of utilization of glycerin to blending of engine fuels. The investigations have been performed using the Fiat 1100 MPI engine. Parameters obtained with the engine powered by pure methanol and by methanol- glycerin mixtures with 10÷30%vol content of glycerin were compared to parameters of the engine fuelled conventionally with the E95 gasoline. The investigations have shown increase of overall efficiency of the engine run on pure methanol with 2.5÷5.0%, and run on the mixture having 10% addition of glycerin with 2.0÷7.8%. Simultaneously, fuelling of the engine with the investigated alcohols results in reduced concentration of toxic components in exhaust gases like: CO, THC and NOx, as well as the greenhouse gas CO2.

  16. METEV: Measurement Technologies for Emissions from Ethanol Fuelled Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandtroem-Dahl, Charlotte

    2009-11-15

    The interest of using alcohols, and especially ethanol, as vehicle fuel is high in Sweden. The advantages are many, such as; being renewable, the ethanol can be produced locally and it is easily mixed with gasoline. Alcohol fuels are considered to be a substantial part of the alternative fuel market, especially in Brazil, USA and Sweden. With this growing interest it is of most importance to investigate the emission performance of vehicles fuelled with alcohols. The focus in this study is on measurement and calculation of hydrocarbon emissions. The emission regulations in different countries have different ways to treat alcohol fuelled vehicles. When alcohols are used as blending components in gasoline, uncombusted alcohols from the fuel are emitted in the exhaust in various amounts. If a Flame Ionization Detector (FID) is used to measure hydrocarbons, the uncombusted alcohol will be included in the measurement. The alcohol is, per definition, however not a hydrocarbon (hydrocarbons contains only hydrogen and carbon). In the US regulations, the alcohol content is measured separately, and the FID measurement is adjusted for the alcohol part. This is not performed in the European regulations. The aim of this project is to highlight the need for a discussion regarding the methodology for measuring hydrocarbon and alcohol emissions from flexible fuelled vehicles operating on alcohol fuel blends.

  17. Fuelling a National Innovation System in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio-Arias, Diana

    2006-01-01

    This presentation of the innovation-driven environment in Colombia derives from important national efforts to gather and store pertinent information. Two large surveys have tested the "innovative behaviour" of Colombian manufacturing firms--the more recent of these was in 2005. Another information source is the Scienti platform, an online effort…

  18. Nondestructive Testing of Materials and Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Akkaya, Yılmaz

    2013-01-01

    Condition assessment and characterization of materials and structures by means of nondestructive testing (NDT) methods is a priority need around the world to meet the challenges associated with the durability, maintenance, rehabilitation, retrofitting, renewal and health monitoring of new and existing infrastructures including historic monuments. Numerous NDT methods that make use of certain components of the electromagnetic and acoustic spectra are currently in use to this effect with various levels of success and there is an intensive worldwide research effort aimed at improving the existing methods and developing new ones. The knowledge and information compiled in this book captures the current state-of-the-art in NDT methods and their application to civil and other engineering materials and structures. Critical reviews and advanced interdisciplinary discussions by world-renowned researchers point to the capabilities and limitations of the currently used NDT methods and shed light on current and future res...

  19. Integrated Performance Testing Workshop - Supplemental Materials (Scripts and Procedures)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Gregory A.

    2014-02-01

    A variety of performance tests are described relating to: Material Transfers; Emergency Evacuation; Alarm Response Assessment; and an Enhanced Limited Scope Performance Test (ELSPT). Procedures are given for: nuclear material physical inventory and discrepancy; material transfers; and emergency evacuation.

  20. Evaluation of the use of bioethanol fuelled buses based on ambient air pollution screening and on-road measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Aparicio, S; Hak, C

    2013-05-01

    Mitigation measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions may have adverse effects on urban air quality and human exposure to harmful pollutants. The use of bioethanol fuelled vehicles is increasing worldwide and may create new undesired pollution effects. Different measurement campaigns were performed in a pilot study to contribute to the understanding of the consequences associated with the use of bioethanol blended fuel (E95) on a series of pollutants. Ambient screening measurements of NO2, O3, acetic acid, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were performed at different urban locations, exposed and not exposed to the circulation of bioethanol buses. In addition, volatile organic compounds were measured at the exhaust pipe of a bioethanol fuelled bus, both under idling conditions (carbonyls; DNPH cartridge) and under on-road driving conditions applying online monitoring (PTR-TOF). Higher ambient acetaldehyde values were measured at locations exposed to bioethanol fuelled buses than at locations not exposed, and very high acetaldehyde and acetic acid values were measured from the exhaust pipe during driving conditions (acetaldehyde>150 ppm; acetic acid ≈ 20-30 ppm) and modelled at close distance to the bioethanol bus. Human exposure to high concentration of acetaldehyde is expected, and it may involve a significantly increased chance in developing cancer. The high concentration of acetic acid will involve odour annoyance and significant material degradation or corrosion.

  1. A centre-triggered magnesium fuelled cathodic arc thruster uses sublimation to deliver a record high specific impulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Patrick R. C.; Bilek, Marcela; McKenzie, David R.

    2016-08-01

    The cathodic arc is a high current, low voltage discharge that operates in vacuum and provides a stream of highly ionised plasma from a solid conducting cathode. The high ion velocities, together with the high ionisation fraction and the quasineutrality of the exhaust stream, make the cathodic arc an attractive plasma source for spacecraft propulsion applications. The specific impulse of the cathodic arc thruster is substantially increased when the emission of neutral species is reduced. Here, we demonstrate a reduction of neutral emission by exploiting sublimation in cathode spots and enhanced ionisation of the plasma in short, high-current pulses. This, combined with the enhanced directionality due to the efficient erosion profiles created by centre-triggering, substantially increases the specific impulse. We present experimentally measured specific impulses and jet power efficiencies for titanium and magnesium fuels. Our Mg fuelled source provides the highest reported specific impulse for a gridless ion thruster and is competitive with all flight rated ion thrusters. We present a model based on cathode sublimation and melting at the cathodic arc spot explaining the outstanding performance of the Mg fuelled source. A further significant advantage of an Mg-fuelled thruster is the abundance of Mg in asteroidal material and in space junk, providing an opportunity for utilising these resources in space.

  2. Irradiation rigs in material testing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozenblum, F.; Gonnier, C.; Bignan, G. [CEA, Research Centers of Saclay and Cadarache (France)

    2011-07-01

    Osiris is a research reactor with a thermal power of 70 MW. It is a light-water reactor, open-core pool type, the principal aim of which is to carry out tests and irradiate structural materials and fuel elements of nuclear power plants under a high flux of neutrons, and to produce radioisotopes. Osiris operates around 200 days a year, in cycles of varying lengths from 3 to 4 weeks. A shutdown of about 10 days between two cycles allows reloading the core with fuel. Mainly 2 types of irradiation device are present: capsules for materials irradiation (CHOUCA and IRMA devices) and fuels irradiation loops (GRIFFONOS and ISABELLE). Although Osiris is still providing experiments of very good quality, it is facing obsolescence due to its ageing. Osiris is planned to be shut down during next decade. Consequently, it has been decided to launch the construction of the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) in Cadarache. JHR is a water cooled reactor which provides the necessary flexibility and accessibility to manage several highly instrumented experiments, reproducing different reactor environments (water, gas or liquid metal loops), generating transient regimes (key for safety). The JHR facility includes the reactor building, including core, cooling system and the experimental bunkers connected to the core through pool wall penetrations and the auxiliary building, including pools and hot cells necessary for the experimental irradiation process. JHR core is optimised to produce high fast neutron flux to study structural material ageing and high thermal neutrons flux for fuel experiments. The conception of this first fleet of devices integrates the operational experience accumulated by the existing MTR and specifically the Osiris one

  3. Analysis of carbon dioxide emission of gas fuelled cogeneration plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Adzuieen; Amin, M.; Majid, A.

    2013-12-01

    Gas turbines are widely used for power generation. In cogeneration system, the gas turbine generates electricity and the exhaust heat from the gas turbine is used to generate steam or chilled water. Besides enhancing the efficiency of the system, the process assists in reducing the emission of CO2 to the environment. This study analyzes the amount of CO2 emission by Universiti Teknologi Petronas gas fuelled cogeneration system using energy balance equations. The results indicate that the cogeneration system reduces the CO2 emission to the environment by 60%. This finding could encourage the power plant owners to install heat recovery systems to their respective plants.

  4. Forecasting method of fatigue life test data for metal materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张怀亮; 邱显焱; 谭冠军

    2001-01-01

    GM(1, 1) model of grey system theory is used to forecast fatigue life test data for metal materials. The method can reduce test time and save test cost, and reliability indexes of metal materials can be obtained quickly. The results of an example show that grey system theory has a high precision for forecasting fatigue life test data for metal materials. A valuable method is put forward, which can effectively reduce the fatigue life test time for metal materials.

  5. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  6. Hardness testing of some fissure-sealing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvestad, H

    1977-11-01

    The mechanical properties of fissure-sealing materials are of significant importance for their durability, i.e. their wear resistance. One of the methods of evaluating a material's resistance to attrition is to apply a hardness test. In the present investigation, the surface hardness of some fissure-sealing materials was tested. Sealants made from diluted composite materials and with inclusion of inorganic filler particles appeared to have a considerable higher surface hardness than the other sealing materials tested.

  7. Material characterization models and test methods for historic building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tessa Kvist; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele; Møller, Eva B.

    2017-01-01

    Predictions of long term hygrothermal performance can be assessed by dynamic hygrothermal simulations, in which material parameters are crucial input. Material parameters for especially historic materials are often unknown; therefore, there is a need to determine important parameters, and simple...... ways for estimation of these. A case study of a brick wall was used to create and validate a hygrothermal simulation model; a parameter study with five different parameters was performed on this model to determine decisive parameters. Furthermore, a clustering technique has been proposed to estimate...

  8. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  9. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  10. Evaporative emissions of 1,3-butadiene from petrol-fuelled motor vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y.; Galbally, I. E.; Weeks, I. A.; Duffy, B. L.; Nelson, P. F.

    This study reports the identification and quantification of 1,3-butadiene in petrol and in the evaporative emissions from Australian light-duty passenger vehicles. The mass fraction of 1,3-butadiene in each of the different grades of any brand of Australian petrol was found to be relatively constant for a given marketing area. However, the mass fractions vary significantly between the different brands (or refineries) from 0.004±0.001% to 0.047±0.008%. The measurements of the evaporative emissions of 1,3-butadiene from in-service motor vehicles were performed using standard Australian Design Rule 37/00 (ADR 37/00) Sealed Housing Evaporative Determination (SHED) tests. For post-1985 catalyst equipped vehicles fuelled with unleaded petrol, average evaporative emissions of 1,3-butadiene were 9.4 (0.7-22) and 5.0 (0.1-23) mg per test for diurnal and hot soak SHED tests, respectively. The corresponding average evaporative emissions for the older, pre-1986 non-catalyst equipped vehicles fuelled with leaded petrol were 26.5 (11.7-45.4) and 9.2 (4.3-13.1) mg per test, respectively, about double the observed emissions from newer vehicles. For the complete vehicle set (all ages), the average mass fraction of 1,3-butadiene in the total hydrocarbon (sum of C 1-C 10 hydrocarbons) emission was 0.21±0.14% from the diurnal phase and was 0.11±0.06% from the hot-soak phase. Evaporative emissions were estimated to contribute about 4% (ranging from 1-15%) of the total (exhaust and evaporative) emissions of 1,3-butadiene from Australian motor vehicles.

  11. Exergoeconomic optimization of coaxial tube evaporators for cooling of high pressure gaseous hydrogen during vehicle fuelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas Kjær; Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Markussen, Wiebke Brix

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous hydrogen as an automotive fuel is reaching the point of commercial introduction. Development of hydrogen fuelling stations considering an acceptable fuelling time by cooling the hydrogen to -40 C has started. This paper presents a design study of coaxial tube ammonia evaporators for three...

  12. The Feasibility of Pellet Re-Fuelling of a Fusion Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Tinghong; Jørgensen, L. W.; Nielsen, P.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of re-fuelling a fusion reactor by injecting pellets of frozen hydrogen isotopes is reviewed. First a general look is taken of the dominant energy fluxes received by the pellet, the re-fuelling rate required and the relation between pellet size, injection speed and frequency...

  13. Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1991-02-01

    The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  14. Plasma fuelling with cryogenic pellets in the stellarator TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, K. J. [Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Panadero, N. [Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Velasco, J. L. [Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Combs, S. K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Caughman, J. B. O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fontdecaba, J. M. [Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Foust, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); García, R. [Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Hernández Sánchez, J. [Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Navarro, M. [Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Pastor, I. [Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Soleto, A. [Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain)

    2017-04-04

    Cryogenic pellet injection is a widely used technique for delivering fuel to the core of magnetically confined plasmas. Indeed, such systems are currently functioning on many tokamak, reversed field pinch and stellarator devices. A pipe-gun-type pellet injector is now operated on the TJ-II, a low-magnetic shear stellarator of the heliac type. Cryogenic hydrogen pellets, containing between 3×1018 and 4×1019 atoms, are injected at velocities between 800 and 1200 m s-1 from its low-field side into plasmas created and/or maintained in this device by electron cyclotron resonance and/or neutral beam injection heating. In this paper, the first systematic study of pellet ablation, particle deposition and fuelling efficiency is presented for TJ-II. From this, light-emission profiles from ablating pellets are found to be in reasonable agreement with simulated pellet ablation profiles (created using a neutral gas shielding-based code) for both heating scenarios. In addition, radial offsets between recorded light-emission profiles and particle deposition profiles provide evidence for rapid outward drifting of ablated material that leads to pellet particle loss from the plasma. Finally, fuelling efficiencies are documented for a range of target plasma densities (~4×1018– ~2×1019 m-3). These range from ~20%– ~85% and are determined to be sensitive to pellet penetration depth. Additional observations, such as enhanced core ablation, are discussed and planned future work is outlined.

  15. Plasma fuelling with cryogenic pellets in the stellarator TJ-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Panadero, N.; Velasco, J. L.; Combs, S. K.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Foust, C.; García, R.; Hernández Sánchez, J.; Navarro, M.; Pastor, I.; Soleto, A.; the TJ-II Team

    2017-05-01

    Cryogenic pellet injection is a widely used technique for delivering fuel to the core of magnetically confined plasmas. Indeed, such systems are currently functioning on many tokamak, reversed field pinch and stellarator devices. A pipe-gun-type pellet injector is now operated on the TJ-II, a low-magnetic shear stellarator of the heliac type. Cryogenic hydrogen pellets, containing between 3  ×  1018 and 4  ×  1019 atoms, are injected at velocities between 800 and 1200 m s-1 from its low-field side into plasmas created and/or maintained in this device by electron cyclotron resonance and/or neutral beam injection heating. In this paper, the first systematic study of pellet ablation, particle deposition and fuelling efficiency is presented for TJ-II. From this, light-emission profiles from ablating pellets are found to be in reasonable agreement with simulated pellet ablation profiles (created using a neutral gas shielding-based code) for both heating scenarios. In addition, radial offsets between recorded light-emission profiles and particle deposition profiles provide evidence for rapid outward drifting of ablated material that leads to pellet particle loss from the plasma. Finally, fuelling efficiencies are documented for a range of target plasma densities (~4  ×  1018-  ~2  ×  1019 m-3). These range from ~20%-  ~85% and are determined to be sensitive to pellet penetration depth. Additional observations, such as enhanced core ablation, are discussed and planned future work is outlined.

  16. Tiny pollutant emissions of a dimethyl ether fuelled engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LANG Jing; ZHANG Yu-sheng; ZHOU Xiao-song; WU Hong-wei

    2008-01-01

    Emissions of dimethyl ether (DME) fuelled engines were investigated by orthogonal experiments on a ZS195 diesel engine. The study mainly focused on the tiny pollutant emissions of formaldehyde (CH2O), methyl formate (CH3OCHO) and formic acid (HCOOH). The presence of CH2O, CH3OCHO and HCOOH are proved in the exhaust by gas chromatograph and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The analysis of variance results indicate that the fuel delivery advance angle is the most important factor for CH2O emission. The fuel delivery advance angle and the interaction of injection pressure and nozzle diameter are considerable factors for unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emission. The mechanism forming tiny pollutants, primarily through CH2O formation, is suggested to be similar to the mechanism forming UHC by DME partial oxidation existing in crevices and boundary zones, and is verified via DME combustion simulation of a multizone chemical kinetic model.

  17. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wiffen, F.W. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Fusion Energy

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  18. Test Methods for Measuring Material Properties of Composite Materials in all Three Material Axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    conducted using ASTM D 6641/D 6641M “Standard Test Method for Determining the Compressive Properties of Polymer Matrix Composite Laminates Using a Combined...D 7291/D 7291M “Standard Test Method for Through-Thickness “Flatwise” Tensile Strength and Elastic Modulus of a Fiber- Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Material...34Flatwise" Tensile Strength and Elastic Modulus of a Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Material”. West Conshohocken, PA, 2005, DOI: 10.1520/D7291

  19. Material test data of SUS304 welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asayama, Tai [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Kawakami, Tomohiro [Nuclear Energy System Incorporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    This report summarizes the material test data of SUS304 welded joints. Numbers of the data are as follows: Tensile tests 71 (Post-irradiation: 39, Others: 32), Creep tests 77 (Post-irradiation: 20, Others: 57), Fatigue tests 50 (Post-irradiation: 0), Creep-fatigue tests 14 (Post-irradiation: 0). This report consists of the printouts from 'the structural material data processing system'. (author)

  20. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidt J.D.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Three new testing configurations that have been developed since the last DYMAT conference in 2009 are presented. The first is high strain rate testing of Kevlar cloth and Kevlar yarn in a tensile Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB apparatus. The Kevlar cloth/yarn is attached to the bars by specially designed adaptors that keep the impedance constant. In addition to determining the specimen’s stress and strain from the recorded waves in the bars the deformations are also measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC. The second testing configuration is a high strain rate shear test for sheet metal. The experiment is done by using a flat notched specimen in a tensile SHB apparatus. The shear strain is measured using DIC within the notch and on the boundary. The third development is a compression apparatus for testing at intermediate strain rates ranging from 20 s−1 to 200 s−1. The apparatus is a combination of a hydraulic actuator and a compression SHB. The stress in the specimen is determined from the stress wave in a very long transmitter bar and the strain and strain rate is determined by using DIC. The results show clean stress strain curves (no ringing.

  1. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled).

  2. Contrasting H-mode behaviour with deuterium fuelling and nitrogen seeding in the all-carbon and metallic versions of JET

    CERN Document Server

    Maddison, G P; Alper, B; Arnoux, G; Balboa, I; Beurskens, M N A; Boboc, A; Brezinsek, S; Brix, M; Clever, M; Coelho, R; Coenen, J W; Coffey, I; Belo, P C da Silva Aresta; Devaux, S; Devynck, P; Eich, T; Felton, R C; Flanagan, J; Frassinetti, L; Garzotti, L; Groth, M; Jachmich, S; Järvinen, A; Joffrin, E; Kempenaars, M A H; Kruezi, U; Lawson, K D; Lehnen, M; Leyland, M J; Liu, Y; Lomas, P J; Lowry, C G; Marsen, S; Matthews, G F; McCormick, G K; Meigs, A G; Morris, A W; Neu, R; Nunes, I M; Oberkofler, M; Rimini, F G; Saarelma, S; Sieglin, B; Sips, A C C; Sirinelli, A; Stamp, M F; van Rooij, G J; Ward, D J; Wischmeier, M; contributors, JET EFDA

    2014-01-01

    The former all-carbon wall on JET has been replaced with beryllium in the main torus and tungsten in the divertor to mimic the surface materials envisaged for ITER. Comparisons are presented between Type I H-mode characteristics in each design by examining respective scans over deuterium fuelling and impurity seeding, required to ameliorate exhaust loads both in JET at full capability and in ITER.

  3. Hypersonic Weapons Technology Shear Testing of Hypersonic Heatshield Materials at the NASA Hot Gas Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    tested in two stages. The first, identified as the thermal test , consisted of testing the material at the prescribed conditions for an extended... thermal test , resulting pocket prevented obtaining accurate surface shear measurements of material therefore surface shear test was omitted

  4. Partial Testing Can Potentiate Learning of Tested and Untested Material from Multimedia Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Carole L.; Soderstrom, Nicholas C.; Bjork, Elizabeth Ligon

    2015-01-01

    Test-potentiated learning occurs when testing renders a subsequent study period more effective than it would have been without an intervening test. We examined whether testing only a subset of material from a multimedia lesson would potentiate the restudy of both tested and untested material. In Experiments 1a and 1b, participants studied a…

  5. Partial Testing Can Potentiate Learning of Tested and Untested Material from Multimedia Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Carole L.; Soderstrom, Nicholas C.; Bjork, Elizabeth Ligon

    2015-01-01

    Test-potentiated learning occurs when testing renders a subsequent study period more effective than it would have been without an intervening test. We examined whether testing only a subset of material from a multimedia lesson would potentiate the restudy of both tested and untested material. In Experiments 1a and 1b, participants studied a…

  6. Fatigue testing of materials under extremal conditions by acoustic method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baranov, VM; Bibilashvili, YK; Karasevich, VA; Sarychev, GA

    2004-01-01

    Increasing fuel cycle time requires fatigue testing of the fuel clad materials for nuclear reactors. The standard high-temperature fatigue tests are complicated and tedious. Solving this task is facilitated by the proposed acoustic method, which ensures observation of the material damage dynamics, m

  7. Microwave sensors for nondestructive testing of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasri, Tuami; Glay, David; Mamouni, Ahmed; Leroy, Yves

    1999-10-01

    Much of today's applications in nondestructive testing by microwaves use an automatic network analyzer. As a result, there is a need for systems to reduce the cost of this kind of techniques. Fortunately, now we can benefit from the cost reduction of the microwave components, induced by the considerable development of the communication market, around 2 and 10 GHz. So, it seems reasonable to think that microwaves will take advantage of this new situation to assert themselves in this application field. In this context we conceive and develop original equipment competitive in term of price and reliability.

  8. Technical and Feasibility Analysis of Gasoline and Natural Gas Fuelled Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Charalambos Chasos; George Karagiorgis; Chris Christodoulou

    2014-01-01

    There is recent interest for the utilisation of natural gas for empowering the internal combustion engines (ICE) of vehicles. The production of novel natural gas ICE for vehicles, as well as the conversion of existing gasoline fuelled ICE of vehicles to natural gas fuelled ICE are new technologies which require to be analysed and assessed. The objective of the present study is to examine the adaptation of natural gas as vehicle fuel and carry out a technical analysis and an economical feasibi...

  9. Particulate Matter Emission from Dual Fuel Diesel Engine Fuelled with Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelmasiak Zdzisław

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of examination of particulate matter emission from the Diesel engine FPT 1.3 MJT simultaneously fuelled with diesel oil and natural gas CNG. The basic premise for engine adaptation was the addition of a small amount of CNG to reduce exhaust gas opacity and particulate matter emission. At this assumption, diesel oil remained the basic fuel, with contribution amounting to 0,70-0,85 of total energy delivered to the engine. The dual fuel engine was examined using an original controller installed in the Diesel engine FPT 1.3 MJT which controlled the diesel fuel dose. The dose of the injected natural gas was controlled by changing the opening time of gas injectors at constant pressure in the gas collector. The examined issues included the exhaust gas opacity, and the total number and fractional distribution of the emitted particles. The measurements were performed at twenty selected measuring points corresponding to the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC test. The performed tests have demonstrated a positive effect of gas addition on exhaust gas opacity and particulate matter emission. Depending on test conditions, the exhaust gas opacity was reduced by 10÷92%, and the total number of particles by 30÷40%. The performed tests have revealed that a small addition of gas can reduce the load of the DPF filter, extend its lifetime, and increase engine reliability. Longer time intervals between successive DPF filter regenerations improve ecological properties of the engine.

  10. Analysis of fuelling requirements in ITER H-modes with SOLPS-EPED1 derived scalings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polevoi, A. R.; Loarte, A.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Pacher, H. D.; Pacher, G. W.; Köchl, F.

    2017-02-01

    Fuelling requirements for ITER are analysed in relation to pellet fuelling and ELM pacing, and a divertor power load control consistent with the ITER pumping and fuel throughput capabilities. The plasma parameters at the separatrix and the particle sources are derived from scalings based on SOLPS simulations. Effective transport coefficients in the H-mode pedestal are derived from EPED1 + SOLPS scalings for the pedestal height and width. 1.5D transport is simulated in the ASTRA framework. The operating window for ITER DT plasmas with the required fusion performance and level of ELM, and divertor power load control compatible with ITER fuelling and pumping capabilities, is determined. It is shown that the flexibility of the ITER fuelling systems, comprising pellet and gas injection systems, enables operation with Q  =  10, which was found to be marginal in previous studies following a similar approach but with different assumptions. The present assessment shows that a reduction of by a factor ~2 (from 9 to 5  ×  1019 m-3) in 15 MA H-mode plasmas leads to a reduction in the required pellet fuelling rate by a factor of four. Results of the analysis of the fuelling requirements for a range of ITER scenarios are found to be similar to those obtained with the JINTRAC code that included 2D modelling of the edge plasma.

  11. Tests of composite materials at cryogenic temperatures facilities and results

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K

    1980-01-01

    The design and installation of test facilities for the determination of macromechanical and thermal properties of fiber-reinforced polymer materials at temperatures down to 4.2K are presented. Construction and performance details are given for the following test equipment: quasi- static-tensile and compression-test facilities equipped with an automatic data acquisition system for calculation of material properties, deformation characteristics and various statistics; a thermal contraction-expansion measuring system; a thermal conductivity measurement cell. (1 refs).

  12. Standard Guide for Testing Polymer Matrix Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide summarizes the application of ASTM standard test methods (and other supporting standards) to continuous-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite materials. The most commonly used or most applicable ASTM standards are included, emphasizing use of standards of Committee D30 on Composite Materials. 1.2 This guide does not cover all possible standards that could apply to polymer matrix composites and restricts discussion to the documented scope. Commonly used but non-standard industry extensions of test method scopes, such as application of static test methods to fatigue testing, are not discussed. A more complete summary of general composite testing standards, including non-ASTM test methods, is included in the Composite Materials Handbook (MIL-HDBK-17). Additional specific recommendations for testing textile (fabric, braided) composites are contained in Guide D6856. 1.3 This guide does not specify a system of measurement; the systems specified within each of the referenced standards shall appl...

  13. Material characterization at high strain by adapted tensile tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmens, W.C.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2012-01-01

    The strength of materials at high strain levels has been determined using the so-called Continuous-Bendingunder- Tension (CBT) test. This is a modified tensile test where the specimen is subjected to repetitive bending at the same time. This test enables to create high levels of uniform strain. A

  14. Arc Jet Testing of Thermal Protection Materials: 3 Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Conley, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Arc jet testing is used to simulate entry to test thermal protection materials. This paper discusses the usefulness of arc jet testing for 3 cases. Case 1 is MSL and PICA, Case 2 is Advanced TUFROC, and Case 3 is conformable ablators.

  15. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-05-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford tank farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  16. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Gelbard, Fred; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford Tank Farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  17. Testing techniques for mechanical characterization of rapidly solidified materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Mechanical property testing techniques are reviewed for rapidly solidified materials. Mechanical testing of rapidly solidified materials is complicated by the fact that in most cases at least one dimension of the material is very small (less than 100 microns). For some geometries, i.e., powder or thin surface layers, microhardness is the only feasible mechanical test. The ribbon geometry which is obtained by the melt-spinning method, however, has been used for a variety of mechanical property measurements including elastic properties, tensile properties, fracture toughness, creep, and fatigue. These techniques are described with emphasis placed on the precautions required by the restricted geometry of rapidly solidified specimens.

  18. Erosion/corrosion testing of materials for oil sands applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, G.; Wolodko, J.; Alemaskin, K.; Been, J.; Danysh, M. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Erosion and corrosion are common wear mechanisms for components used in oil sands processing facilities. This paper described a slurry jet test apparatus designed to evaluate and assess materials for oil sands service conditions. The jet testing apparatus was designed to mimic the wet erosion phenomena typically found in oil sands applications. Wear- and corrosion-resistant materials tested by the apparatus included carbon steel, tungsten carbide metal matrix composite (WC-MMC) overlays, and a range of polymer and rubber liner materials. Polymeric materials included hydrogenated nitrile rubber (HNBR); polyurethane elastomer; and high density polyethylene (HDPE). Material losses were determined by measuring the mass of the samples before and after testing. Normalized rates of abrasion were calculated by dividing total mass lost in the specimens by the total mass of sand impinged on the sample surface. Samples were also visually assessed and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to determine failure modes. Tests were conducted for a 2-hour period at an impingement angle of 90 degrees. Results of the study showed that the average abrasion rates of the polymeric samples are lower than rates seen with the carbon steel and overlay materials. Future work on the apparatus will include testing the materials under varying slurry jet parameters. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  19. Electrofracturing test system and method of determining material characteristics of electrofractured material samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Glover, Steven F.; Pfeifle, Tom; Su, Jiann-Cherng; Williamson, Kenneth Martin; Broome, Scott Thomas; Gardner, William Payton

    2017-08-01

    A device for electrofracturing a material sample and analyzing the material sample is disclosed. The device simulates an in situ electrofracturing environment so as to obtain electrofractured material characteristics representative of field applications while allowing permeability testing of the fractured sample under in situ conditions.

  20. An autonomous chemically fuelled small-molecule motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Miriam R.; Solà, Jordi; Carlone, Armando; Goldup, Stephen M.; Lebrasseur, Nathalie; Leigh, David A.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular machines are among the most complex of all functional molecules and lie at the heart of nearly every biological process. A number of synthetic small-molecule machines have been developed, including molecular muscles, synthesizers, pumps, walkers, transporters and light-driven and electrically driven rotary motors. However, although biological molecular motors are powered by chemical gradients or the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), so far there are no synthetic small-molecule motors that can operate autonomously using chemical energy (that is, the components move with net directionality as long as a chemical fuel is present). Here we describe a system in which a small molecular ring (macrocycle) is continuously transported directionally around a cyclic molecular track when powered by irreversible reactions of a chemical fuel, 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl chloride. Key to the design is that the rate of reaction of this fuel with reactive sites on the cyclic track is faster when the macrocycle is far from the reactive site than when it is near to it. We find that a bulky pyridine-based catalyst promotes carbonate-forming reactions that ratchet the displacement of the macrocycle away from the reactive sites on the track. Under reaction conditions where both attachment and cleavage of the 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl groups occur through different processes, and the cleavage reaction occurs at a rate independent of macrocycle location, net directional rotation of the molecular motor continues for as long as unreacted fuel remains. We anticipate that autonomous chemically fuelled molecular motors will find application as engines in molecular nanotechnology.

  1. Physical and chemical test results of electrostatic safe flooring materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompf, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This test program was initiated because a need existed at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to have this information readily available to the engineer who must make the choice of which electrostatic safe floor to use in a specific application. The information, however, should be of value throughout both the government and private industry in the selection of a floor covering material. Included are the test results of 18 floor covering materials which by test evaluation at KSC are considered electrostatically safe. Tests were done and/or the data compiled in the following areas: electrostatics, flammability, hypergolic compatibility, outgassing, floor type, material thickness, and available colors. Each section contains the test method used to gather the data and the test results.

  2. Round-Robin Test of Paraffin Phase-Change Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidi, S.; Mehling, H.; Hemberger, F.; Haussmann, Th.; Laube, A.

    2015-11-01

    A round-robin test between three institutes was performed on a paraffin phase-change material (PCM) in the context of the German quality association for phase-change materials. The aim of the quality association is to define quality and test specifications for PCMs and to award certificates for successfully tested materials. To ensure the reproducibility and comparability of the measurements performed at different institutes using different measuring methods, a round-robin test was performed. The sample was unknown. The four methods used by the three participating institutes in the round-robin test were differential scanning calorimetry, Calvet calorimetry and three-layer calorimetry. Additionally, T-history measurements were made. The aim of the measurements was the determination of the enthalpy as a function of temperature. The results achieved following defined test specifications are in excellent agreement.

  3. Status of coal ash corrosion resistant materials test program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, D.K.; Meisenhelter, D.K.; Sikka, V.K.

    1999-07-01

    In November of 1998, Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) began development of a system to permit testing of several advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam conditions of 1100 F and higher in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B and W, and First Energy's Ohio Edison jointly fund the project. CONSOL Energy Company is also participating as an advisor. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. The coal-ash corrosion resistant materials test program will provide full scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater and reheater tube materials. These newer materials may be capable of operating at higher steam temperatures while resisting external/fire-side corrosion. For high sulfur coal applications, this is a key issue for advanced cycle pulverized coal-fired plants. Fireside corrosion is also a critical issue for many existing plants. Previous testing of high temperature materials in the United States has been based primarily on using laboratory test coupons. The test coupons did not operate at conditions representative of a high sulfur coal-fired boiler. Testing outside of the United States has been with low sulfur coal or natural gas firing and has not addressed corrosion issues. This test program takes place in an actual operating boiler and is expected to confirm the performance of these materials with high sulfur coal. The system consists of three identical sections, each containing multiple pieces of twelve different materials. They are cooled by reheater steam, and are located just above the furnace exit in Ohio Edison's Niles Unit No.1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. After one year of operation, the first section will be removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation. The second and third sections will operate for

  4. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAnn Long; Michael Murphy

    2008-07-01

    Prior to April 2007, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation department. Calibration and performance testing on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor was performed, but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no performance test program. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability Manager volunteered to take over performance testing of all SNM portal monitors at NTS in order to strengthen the program and meet U.S. Department of Energy Order requirements. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with developing a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, developing and implementing procedures, troubleshooting and repair, validating the process, physical control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and implementing the performance test program.

  5. Bioethanol/gasoline blends for fuelling conventional and hybrid scooter. Regulated and unregulated exhaust emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costagliola, Maria Antonietta; Prati, Maria Vittoria; Murena, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this experimental activity was to evaluate the influence of ethanol fuel on the pollutant emissions measured at the exhaust of a conventional and a hybrid scooter. Both scooters are 4-stroke, 125 cm3 of engine capacity and Euro 3 compliant. They were tested on chassis dynamometer for measuring gaseous emissions of CO, HC, NOx, CO2 and some toxic micro organic pollutants, such as benzene, 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. The fuel consumption was estimated throughout a carbon balance on the exhaust species. Moreover, total particles number with diameter between 20 nm up to 1 μm was measured. Worldwide and European test cycles were carried out with both scooters fuelled with gasoline and ethanol/gasoline blends (10/90, 20/80 and 30/70% vol). According to the experimental results relative to both scooter technologies, the addiction of ethanol in gasoline reduces CO and particles number emissions. The combustion of conventional scooter becomes unstable when a percentage of 30%v of bioethanol is fed; as consequence a strong increasing of hydrocarbon is monitored, including carcinogenic species. The negative effects of ethanol fuel are related to the increasing of fuel consumption due to the less carbon content for volume unit and to the increasing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde due to the higher oxygen availability. Almost 70% of Ozone Formation Potential is covered by alkenes and aromatics.

  6. PM, carbon, and PAH emissions from a diesel generator fuelled with soy-biodiesel blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jen-Hsiung; Chen, Shui-Jen; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Lin, Chih-Chung; Lin, Wen-Yinn

    2010-07-15

    Biodiesels have received increasing attention as alternative fuels for diesel engines and generators. This study investigates the emissions of particulate matter (PM), total carbon (TC), e.g., organic/elemental carbons, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a diesel generator fuelled with soy-biodiesel blends. Among the tested diesel blends (B0, B10 (10 vol% soy-biodiesel), B20, and B50), B20 exhibited the lowest PM emission concentration despite the loads (except the 5 kW case), whereas B10 displayed lower PM emission factors when operating at 0 and 10 kW than the other fuel blends. The emission concentrations or factors of EC, OC, and TC were the lowest when B10 or B20 was used regardless of the loading. Under all tested loads, the average concentrations of total-PAHs emitted from the generator using the B10 and B20 were lower (by 38% and 28%, respectively) than those using pure petroleum diesel fuel (B0), while the emission factors of total-PAHs decreased with an increasing ratio of biodiesel to premium diesel. With an increasing loading, although the brake specific fuel consumption decreased, the energy efficiency increased despite the bio/petroleum diesel ratio. Therefore, soy-biodiesel is promising for use as an alternative fuel for diesel generators to increase energy efficiency and reduce the PM, carbon, and PAH emissions.

  7. A supersonic gas injection system for fuelling and probing fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, Scott [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Howard, John [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Blackwell, Boyd [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Carlsson, Peter [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteburg (Sweden); Abelsson, Mattias [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteburg (Sweden); Powell, Ben [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2006-11-01

    The large gas reservoir surrounding the H-1NF plasma leads to difficulties in achieving the density control required to maximize the plasma temperature. We have designed and tested an alternative fuelling system which uses a double conical nozzle to generate a directed flow of particles into the plasma without adding to the gas inventory in the rest of the vacuum vessel. By using a closed plenum at a programmable pressure and a piezo-electric valve, the particle flux can be dynamically changed in a controlled and quantitative manner. Measurements of the gas jet using constant temperature hot wire anemometry show that, for plenum pressures between 500 and 1000 Torr, the particle injection rate (helium) ranges between 2 x 10{sup 20} and 4 x 10{sup 20} s{sup -1} with half-cone angles between 5 deg. and 20 deg. The system has been installed on the H-1NF device and first plasma results indicate localized gas injection consistent with test tank anemometry measurements.

  8. Salt materials testing for a spacecraft adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. L.; Kittel, P.; Roellig, T.

    As part of a technology development effort to qualify adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for use in a NASA spacecraft, such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, a study of low temperature characteristics, heat capacity and resistance to dehydration was conducted for different salt materials. This report includes results of testing with cerrous metaphosphate, several synthetic rubies, and chromic potassium alum (CPA). Preliminary results show that CPA may be suitable for long-term spacecraft use, provided that the salt is property encapsulated. Methods of salt pill construction and testing for all materials are discussed, as well as reliability tests. Also, the temperature regulation scheme and the test cryostat design are briefly discussed.

  9. Progress and Strategies for Testing of Materials for Solar Panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Sarah

    2017-04-25

    Accelerated testing is key to confident launch of a new product. However, for new products like solar panels, the best approach is not always clear. The challenge for materials manufacturers is that test times can be long. Also, small-coupon testing may not predict the behavior in the full-size module, but testing of the full-size module is too expensive. As a result, solar panel test standards like IEC 61215 are useful, but are not sufficient. Material manufacturers have needed to define their own test protocols. This presentation will review some historical data (e.g., data show that manufacturers are making great progress toward reducing encapsulant discoloration) and describe advances in material testing (for example, new techniques are being demonstrated on how to more quantitatively assess adhesion, detect tendency for delamination, and understand how encapsulant properties affect other properties like cracking of cells). The International PV Quality Assurance Task Force has been researching climate-specific weathering tests toward the goal of defining international standards that would simplify qualification and quality assurance testing for materials. The status of these tests and the strategies for how to organize these standards to best meet the needs of the industry will be discussed.

  10. Using Virtual Testing for Characterization of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph

    Composite materials are finally providing uses hitherto reserved for metals in structural systems applications -- airframes and engine containment systems, wraps for repair and rehabilitation, and ballistic/blast mitigation systems. They have high strength-to-weight ratios, are durable and resistant to environmental effects, have high impact strength, and can be manufactured in a variety of shapes. Generalized constitutive models are being developed to accurately model composite systems so they can be used in implicit and explicit finite element analysis. These models require extensive characterization of the composite material as input. The particular constitutive model of interest for this research is a three-dimensional orthotropic elasto-plastic composite material model that requires a total of 12 experimental stress-strain curves, yield stresses, and Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio in the material directions as input. Sometimes it is not possible to carry out reliable experimental tests needed to characterize the composite material. One solution is using virtual testing to fill the gaps in available experimental data. A Virtual Testing Software System (VTSS) has been developed to address the need for a less restrictive method to characterize a three-dimensional orthotropic composite material. The system takes in the material properties of the constituents and completes all 12 of the necessary characterization tests using finite element (FE) models. Verification and validation test cases demonstrate the capabilities of the VTSS.

  11. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules.

  12. Arcjet Testing of Micro-Meteoroid Impacted Thermal Protection Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Munk, Michelle M.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    There are several harsh space environments that could affect thermal protection systems and in turn pose risks to the atmospheric entry vehicles. These environments include micrometeoroid impact, extreme cold temperatures, and ionizing radiation during deep space cruise, all followed by atmospheric entry heating. To mitigate these risks, different thermal protection material samples were subjected to multiple tests, including hyper velocity impact, cold soak, irradiation, and arcjet testing, at various NASA facilities that simulated these environments. The materials included a variety of honeycomb packed ablative materials as well as carbon-based non-ablative thermal protection systems. The present paper describes the results of the multiple test campaign with a focus on arcjet testing of thermal protection materials. The tests showed promising results for ablative materials. However, the carbon-based non-ablative system presented some concerns regarding the potential risks to an entry vehicle. This study provides valuable information regarding the capability of various thermal protection materials to withstand harsh space environments, which is critical to sample return and planetary entry missions.

  13. High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers : Material Selection and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bruno, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The task of my two-months internship was to test different materials to be used to build an high temperature transducer, to develop some prototypes and to test their performance, to assess the reliability of commercial product rated for such a temperature, as well as to collaborate in developing the signal processing code to measure the condensed water levels.

  14. Investigation of contact allergy to dental materials by patch testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Rai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental products are widely used by patients and dental personnel alike and may cause problems for both. Dental materials could cause contact allergy with varying manifestations such as burning, pain, stomatitis, cheilitis, ulcers, lichenoid reactions localized to the oral mucosa in patients, and hand dermatitis in dental personnel. Patch testing with the dental series comprising commonly used materials can be used to detect contact allergies to dental materials. Aim: This study aimed to identify contact allergy among patients who have oral mucosal lesions after dental treatment and among dental personnel who came in contact with these materials. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who had undergone dental procedures with symptoms of oral lichen planus, oral stomatitis, burning mouth, and recurrent aphthosis, were included in the study. Dental personnel with history of hand dermatitis were also included in the study. Patch testing was performed using Chemotechnique Dental Series and results interpreted as recommended by the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG. Results: Out of 13 patients who had undergone dental treatment/with oral symptoms, six patients with stomatitis, lichenoid lesions, and oral ulcers showed positive patch tests to a variety of dental materials, seven patients with ulcers had negative patch tests, seven dental personnel with hand dermatitis showed multiple allergies to various dental materials, and most had multiple positivities. Conclusion: The patch test is a useful, simple, noninvasive method to detect contact allergies among patients and among dental personnel dealing with these products. Long term studies are necessary to establish the relevance of these positive patch tests by eliminating the allergic substances, identifying clinical improvement, and substituting with nonallergenic materials.

  15. Nuclear waste package materials testing report: basaltic and tuffaceous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.J.; Coles, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Westerman, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in underground repositories in the continental United States requires the development of a waste package that will contain radionuclides for a time period commensurate with performance criteria, which may be up to 1000 years. This report addresses materials testing in support of a waste package for a basalt (Hanford, Washington) or a tuff (Nevada Test Site) repository. The materials investigated in this testing effort were: sodium and calcium bentonites and mixtures with sand or basalt as a backfill; iron and titanium-based alloys as structural barriers; and borosilicate waste glass PNL 76-68 as a waste form. The testing also incorporated site-specific rock media and ground waters: Reference Umtanum Entablature-1 basalt and reference basalt ground water, Bullfrog tuff and NTS J-13 well water. The results of the testing are discussed in four major categories: Backfill Materials: emphasizing water migration, radionuclide migration, physical property and long-term stability studies. Structural Barriers: emphasizing uniform corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical testing. Waste Form Release Characteristics: emphasizing ground water, sample surface area/solution volume ratio, and gamma radiolysis effects. Component Compatibility: emphasizing solution/rock, glass/rock, glass/structural barrier, and glass/backfill interaction tests. This area also includes sensitivity testing to determine primary parameters to be studied, and the results of systems tests where more than two waste package components were combined during a single test.

  16. Effect of Fuelling Depth on the Fusion Performance and Particle Confinement of a Fusion Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijia; Wang, Shaojie

    2016-12-01

    The fusion performance and particle confinement of an international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER)-like fusion device have been modeled by numerically solving the energy transport equation and the particle transport equation. The effect of fuelling depth has been investigated. The plasma is primarily heated by the fusion produced alpha particles and the loss process of particles and energy in the scrape-off layer has been taken into account. To study the effect of fuelling depth on fusion performance, the ITERH-98P(y,2) scaling law has been used to evaluate the transport coefficients. It is shown that the particle confinement and fusion performance are significantly dependent on the fuelling depth. Deviation of 10% of the minor radius on fuelling depth can make the particle confinement change by ∼ 61% and the fusion performance change by ∼ 108%. The enhancement of fusion performance is due to the better particle confinement induced by deeper particle fuelling. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11175178 and 11375196) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2014GB113000)

  17. Emissions from Road Vehicles Fuelled by Fischer Tropsch Based Diesel and Gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, U.; Lundorf, P.; Ivarsson, A.; Schramm, J. [Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Rehnlund, B. [Atrax Energi AB (Sweden); Blinge, M. [The Swedish Transport Institute (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    The described results were carried out under the umbrella of IEA Advanced Motor Fuels Agreement. The purpose was to evaluate the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from vehicles fuelled by Fischer Tropsch (FT) based diesel and gasoline fuel, compared to the emissions from ordinary diesel and gasoline. The comparison for diesel fuels was based on a literature review, whereas the gasoline comparison had to be based on our own experiments, since almost no references were found in this field. In this context measurement according to the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) were carried out on a chassis dynamometer with a directly injected gasoline vehicle. Experiments were carried out with a reference fuel, a fuel based 70% on FT and an alkylate fuel (Aspen), which was supposed to be very similar, in many ways, to FT fuel. FT based diesel generally showed good emission performance, whereas the FT based gasoline not necessary lead to lower emissions. On the other hand, the Aspen fuel did show many advantages for the emissions from the gasoline vehicle.

  18. Emissions from Road Vehicles Fuelled by Fischer Tropsch Based Diesel and Gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, U.; Lundorf, P.; Ivarsson, A.; Schramm, J. [Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Rehnlund, B. [Atrax Energi AB (Sweden); Blinge, M. [The Swedish Transport Institute (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    The described results were carried out under the umbrella of IEA Advanced Motor Fuels Agreement. The purpose was to evaluate the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from vehicles fuelled by Fischer Tropsch (FT) based diesel and gasoline fuel, compared to the emissions from ordinary diesel and gasoline. The comparison for diesel fuels was based on a literature review, whereas the gasoline comparison had to be based on our own experiments, since almost no references were found in this field. In this context measurement according to the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) were carried out on a chassis dynamometer with a directly injected gasoline vehicle. Experiments were carried out with a reference fuel, a fuel based 70% on FT and an alkylate fuel (Aspen), which was supposed to be very similar, in many ways, to FT fuel. FT based diesel generally showed good emission performance, whereas the FT based gasoline not necessary lead to lower emissions. On the other hand, the Aspen fuel did show many advantages for the emissions from the gasoline vehicle.

  19. ANALYSIS OF OPERATING PARAMETERS AND INDICATORS OF A COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE FUELLED WITH LPG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof GARBALA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the possibilities for using alternative fuels to power vehicles equipped with compression ignition (CI engines (diesel. Systems for using such fuels have been discussed. Detailed analysis and research covered the LPG STAG autogas system, which is used to power dual-fuel engine units (LPG+diesel. A description of the operation of the autogas system and installation in a vehicle has been presented. The basic algorithms of the controller, which is an actuating element of the whole system, have been discussed. Protection systems of a serial production engine unit to guarantee its factorycontrolled durability standards have been presented. A long-distance test drive and examinations of the engine over 150,000 km in a Toyota Hilux have been performed. Operating parameters and performance indicators of the engine with STAG LPG+diesel fuelling have been verified. Directions and perspectives for the further development of such a system in diesel-powered cars have been also indicated.

  20. Emission of a compression ignition engine fuelled by diesel and imitated syngas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, Bahaaddein Kamal M.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Karim, Zainal Ambri B. A.

    2012-06-01

    Biomass can be converted into a useful source of energy through gasification. The gasification product, known as synthesis gas or syngas, composition of syngas may fluctuate due to many factors such as operational errors of the gasifier as well as the type of feedstock used or may be due to the feeding rate fluctuation. Therefore it would be difficult to assess the effect of syngas composition and diesel replacement ratio to the emission when combusted in dual fuel syngas - diesel compression ignition engine. In order to overcome this problem controllable composition and conditions of imitated syngas was used in this study by selective three compositions of syngas close to the real conditions. The objective of this study is to determine the exhaust emissions of a compression ignition engine fuelled with diesel and imitated syngas at different compositions and diesel replacement ratios to determine the most appropriate composition of syngas and diesel replacement ratio which will give less emission. The test results on syngas emission are compared with the results of diesel. CO2 and NOX emission level was reduced on syngas dual fuel mode, but there were increases in CO and THC emissions throughout all syngas compositions examined due to poor combustion efficiency of dual fuel operation.

  1. Ozone depletion in the plume of a solid-fuelled rocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Krüger

    Full Text Available The local effects of the emission of a solid-fuelled rocket on the stratospheric ozone concentration have been investigated by photochemical model calculations. A one-dimensional horizontal model has been applied which calculates the trace gas composition at a single atmospheric altitude spatially resolved around the exhaust plume. Different cases were tested for the emissions of the Space Shuttle concerning the composition of the exhaust and the effects of heterogeneous reactions on atmospheric background aerosol.

    The strongest depletion of ozone is achieved when a high amount of the emitted chlorine is Cl2. If it is purely HCl, the effect is smallest, though in this case the heterogeneous reactions show their largest influence. From the results it may be estimated whether ozone depletion caused by rocket launches can be detected by satellite instruments. It appears that the chance of coincidental detection of such an event is rather small.

  2. A Cryogenic RF Material Testing Facility at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan; Martin, David; Tantawi, Sami; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    The authors have developed an X-band SRF testing system using a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom for the testing of different materials. By measuring the Q of the cavity, the system is capable to characterize the quenching magnetic field of the superconducting samples at different power level and temperature, as well as the surface resistivity. This paper presents the most recent development of the system and testing results.

  3. Test results of chemical reactivity test (CRT) analysis of structural materials and explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, P.S.; Barnhart, B.V.; Walters, R.R.; Haws, L.D.; Collins, L.W.

    1980-03-21

    The chemical reactivity test, CRT, is a procedure used to screen the compatibility of component structure materials with explosives. This report contains the results of CRT materials evaluations conducted at Mound Facility. Data about materials combinations are catalogued both under the name of the explosive and the nonexplosive.

  4. Standard Test Method for Contamination Outgassing Characteristics of Spacecraft Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a technique for generating data to characterize the kinetics of the release of outgassing products from materials. This technique will determine both the total mass flux evolved by a material when exposed to a vacuum environment and the deposition of this flux on surfaces held at various specified temperatures. 1.2 This test method describes the test apparatus and related operating procedures for evaluating the total mass flux that is evolved from a material being subjected to temperatures that are between 298 and 398 K. Pressures external to the sample effusion cell are less than 7 × 10−3 Pa (5 × 10−5 torr). Deposition rates are measured during material outgassing tests. A test procedure for collecting data and a test method for processing and presenting the collected data are included. 1.3 This test method can be used to produce the data necessary to support mathematical models used for the prediction of molecular contaminant generation, migration, and deposition. 1.4 Al...

  5. Ultraviolet Testing of Space Suit Materials for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kristine; Fries, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Human missions to Mars may require radical changes in the approach to extra-vehicular (EVA) suit design. A major challenge is the balance of building a suit robust enough to complete multiple EVAs under intense ultraviolet (UV) light exposure without losing mechanical strength or compromising the suit's mobility. To study how the materials degrade on Mars in-situ, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) invited the Advanced Space Suit team at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) to place space suit materials on the Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals (SHERLOC) instrument's calibration target of the Mars 2020 rover. In order to select materials for the rover and understand the effects from Mars equivalent UV exposure, JSC conducted ground testing on both current and new space suit materials when exposed to 2500 hours of Mars mission equivalent UV. To complete this testing, JSC partnered with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to utilize their UV vacuum chambers. Materials tested were Orthofabric, polycarbonate, Teflon, Dacron, Vectran, spectra, bladder, nGimat coated Teflon, and nGimat coated Orthofabric. All samples were measured for mass, tensile strength, and chemical composition before and after radiation. Mass loss was insignificant (less than 0.5%) among the materials. Most materials loss tensile strength after radiation and became more brittle with a loss of elongation. Changes in chemical composition were seen in all radiated materials through Spectral Analysis. Results from this testing helped select the materials that will fly on the Mars 2020 rover. In addition, JSC can use this data to create a correlation to the chemical changes after radiation-which is what the rover will send back while on Mars-to the mechanical changes, such as tensile strength.

  6. Standard test method for knoop and vickers hardness of materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers determination of the Knoop and Vickers hardness of materials, the verification of Knoop and Vickers hardness testing machines, and the calibration of standardized Knoop and Vickers test blocks. 1.2 This test method covers Knoop and Vickers hardness tests made utilizing test forces in micro (9.807 × 10-3 to 9.807 N ) ( 1 to 1000 gf ) and macro (>9.807 to 1176.68 N) ( >1 to 120 kgf ) ranges. Note 1—Previous versions of this standard limited test forces to 9.807 N (1 kgf). 1.3 This test method includes all of the requirements to perform macro Vickers hardness tests as previously defined in Test Method E92, Standard Test Method for Vickers Hardness Testing. 1.4 This test method includes an analysis of the possible sources of errors that can occur during Knoop and Vickers testing and how these factors affect the accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility of test results. Note 2—While Committee E04 is primarily concerned with metals, the test procedures described are applicab...

  7. Pellet fuelling of plasmas with ELM mitigation by resonant magnetic perturbations in MAST

    CERN Document Server

    Valovic, M; Garzotti, L; Gurl, C; Kirk, A; Naylor, G; Patel, A; Scannell, R; Thornton, A J

    2013-01-01

    Shallow fuelling pellets are injected from the high field side into plasmas in which ELMs have been mitigated using external magnetic perturbation coils. The data are compared with ideal assumptions in the ITER fuelling model, namely that mitigated ELMs are not affected by fuelling pellets. Firstly it is shown that during the pellet evaporation an ELM is triggered, during which the amount particle loss could be larger (factor ~1.5) than the particle loss during an ELM which was not induced by pellet. Secondly, a favourable example is shown in which post-pellet particle losses due to mitigated ELMs are similar to the non-pellet case, however unfavourable counter-examples also exist.

  8. Moderation of target loads using fuelling and impurity seeding on JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddison, G., E-mail: geoff.maddison@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Giroud, C. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); McCormick, K. [Max-Planck IPP, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Alonso, A. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion (Spain); Alper, B.; Andrew, Y.; Arnoux, G. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Belo, P. [IPFN, EURATOM-IST Associacao, 1096 Lisbon (Portugal); Beurskens, M.; Boboc, A.; Brett, A. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S. [IEF-Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Juelich (Germany); Brix, M. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Coffey, I. [Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Luna, E. de la [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion (Spain); Devaux, S. [Max-Planck IPP, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Vries, P. de [FOM IPP Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, 3430 BE NIEUWEGEIN (Netherlands); Devynck, P. [Association EURATOM-CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Eich, T. [Max-Planck IPP, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Felton, R. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-01

    Operation with an all metal, ITER-like wall on JET is scheduled from 2011. Adaptation particularly of baseline ELMy H-mode (q{sub 95} {approx} 3.5) to the new exhaust constraints involved has been explored by systematic scans of deuterium fuelling and seeding with extrinsic impurities neon or nitrogen. Peak heat load between ELMs on the outboard target can be strongly reduced by fuelling (recycling), and approach detachment with either seed species, for only {approx}10% loss of normalised energy confinement. Simultaneously, normalised plasma density and total radiation averaged between ELMs are not simply increased, but at stronger fuelling can actually fall with increasing seeding, indicating some redistribution of efflux power temporally and spatially. At highest nitrogen seeding, ELMs can also be mitigated, even while the electron pedestal and confinement are largely preserved. Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy indicates a substitution of intrinsic carbon with extrinsic species.

  9. Determination of Material Strengths by Hydraulic Bulge Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hankui Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic bulge test (HBT method is proposed to determine material tensile strengths. The basic idea of HBT is similar to the small punch test (SPT, but inspired by the manufacturing process of rupture discs—high-pressure hydraulic oil is used instead of punch to cause specimen deformation. Compared with SPT method, the HBT method can avoid some of influence factors, such as punch dimension, punch material, and the friction between punch and specimen. A calculation procedure that is entirely based on theoretical derivation is proposed for estimate yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. Both conventional tensile tests and hydraulic bulge tests were carried out for several ferrous alloys, and the results showed that hydraulic bulge test results are reliable and accurate.

  10. Determination of Material Strengths by Hydraulic Bulge Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hankui; Xu, Tong; Shou, Binan

    2016-12-30

    The hydraulic bulge test (HBT) method is proposed to determine material tensile strengths. The basic idea of HBT is similar to the small punch test (SPT), but inspired by the manufacturing process of rupture discs-high-pressure hydraulic oil is used instead of punch to cause specimen deformation. Compared with SPT method, the HBT method can avoid some of influence factors, such as punch dimension, punch material, and the friction between punch and specimen. A calculation procedure that is entirely based on theoretical derivation is proposed for estimate yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. Both conventional tensile tests and hydraulic bulge tests were carried out for several ferrous alloys, and the results showed that hydraulic bulge test results are reliable and accurate.

  11. Test and Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2017-01-01

    Asbestos free solid motor internal insulation samples were tested at the MSFC Hyperthermal Facility. Objectives of the test were to gather data for analog characterization of ablative and in-depth thermal performance of rubber materials subject to high enthalpy/pressure flow conditions. Tests were conducted over a range of convective heat fluxes for both inert and chemically reactive sub-sonic free stream gas flow. Instrumentation included use of total calorimeters, thermocouples, and a surface pyrometer for surface temperature measurement. Post-test sample forensics involved measurement of eroded depth, charred depth, total sample weight loss, and documentation of the general condition of the eroded profile. A complete Charring Material Ablator (CMA) style aero-thermal analysis was conducted for the test matrix and results compared to the measured data. In general, comparisons were possible for a number of the cases and the results show a limited predictive ability to model accurately both the ablative response and the in-depth temperature profiles. Lessons learned and modeling recommendations are made regarding future testing and modeling improvements that will increase understanding of the basic chemistry/physics associated with the complicated material ablation process of rubber materials.

  12. Test or toy? Materiality and the measurement of infant intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacy L

    2015-05-01

    Adopting a material culture perspective, this article interrogates the composition of the copy of the Cattell Infant Intelligence Scale housed at the University of Toronto Scientific Instruments Collection. As a deliberately assembled collection of toys, the Cattell Scale makes clear the indefinite boundary between test and toy in 20th-century American psychology. Consideration of the current condition of some of the material constituents of this particular Cattell Scale provides valuable insight into some of the elusive practices of intelligence testers in situ and highlights the dynamic nature of the testing process. At the same time, attending to the materiality of this intelligence test reveals some of the more general assumptions about the nature of intelligence inherent in tests for young children. The scale and others like it, I argue, exposes psychologists' often-uncritical equation of childhood intelligence with appropriate play undertaken with an appropriate toy, an approach complicit in, and fostered by, midcentury efforts to cultivate particular forms of selfhood. This analysis serves as an example of the kind of work that may be done on the history of intelligence testing when the material objects that were (and are) inherently a part of the testing process are included in historical scholarship.

  13. Accelerated indoor durability testing of polymeric photovoltaic encapsulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreski, Gernot

    2010-08-01

    The aim of these investigations was to determine the influence of the relevant load parameters temperature and humidity on the degradation behavior of selected polymeric PV encapsulation materials. A test program concerning three accelerated artificial ageing tests was set up and a comprehensive study of the selected candidate materials and its degradation behavior was done. To assess the long term performance and durability of materials, it was necessary not only to measure the deterioration of macroscopic physical properties, but also to gain information about degradation processes taking place at a molecular level. Therefore, the material properties and the aging behaviour were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, by UV/VIS spectroscopy, by differential scanning calorimetry, by dynamical mechanical analysis and by tensile tests. By IR spectroscopy no significant thermal oxidation was detected for all investigated materials. But UV/VIS spectroscopy showed a significant drop in solar transmittance and reflectance values. Yellowing was observed due to the formation of chromophoric degradation products. For all materials a significant decrease in ultimate mechanical properties due to chemical aging was measured. For both backsheet materials the changes in ultimate mechanical properties can be attributed nearly exclusiveley to the polyester layer. On the other hand, a stiffening of all materials due to physical aging was observed within the first 1000h of damp heat testing. For the backsheet laminates, delamination at the edges was observed. Generally, higher temperature levels during exposure induced faster rate of chemical and physical aging. High humidity levels showed to be less influential on polymer degradation than temperature.

  14. Reliability of wind turbine blades: An overview of materials testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, John W.; Sørensen, Bent F.; Brøndsted, Povl

    2007-01-01

    an understanding of how damage develops in composite structures, composite materials and adhesives. Designing reliable wind turbine blades also requires the further development of laboratory scale and full scale test methods to evaluate the structural response and durability of new materials under various loading...... and environmental conditions. This paper highlights recent advances in methods used to characterize adhesive joints in wind turbine blades and the manner in which laboratory data is used to predict the structural response of wind turbine blades....

  15. Static Corrosion Test of Porous Iron Material with Polymer Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markušová-Bučková, Lucia; Oriňaková, Renáta; Oriňak, Andrej; Gorejová, Radka; Kupková, Miriam; Hrubovčáková, Monika; Baláž, Matej; Kováľ, Karol

    2016-12-01

    At present biodegradable implants received increased attention due to their use in various fields of medicine. This work is dedicated to testing of biodegradable materials which could be used as bone implants. The samples were prepared from the carbonyl iron powder by replication method and surface polymer film was produced through sol-gel process. Corrosion testing was carried out under static conditions during 12 weeks in Hank's solution. The quantity of corrosion products increased with prolonging time of static test as it can be concluded from the results of EDX analysis. The degradation of open cell materials with polyethylene glycol coating layer was faster compared to uncoated Fe sample. Also the mass losses were higher for samples with PEG coating. The polymer coating brought about the desired increase in degradation rate of porous iron material.

  16. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Kang, Y. H.; Cho, M. S. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The essential technology for an irradiation test of materials and nuclear fuel has been successively developed and utilized to meet the user's requirements in Phase I(July 21, 1997 to March 31, 2000). It enables irradiation tests to be performed for a non-fissile material under a temperature control(300{+-}10 .deg. C) in a He gas environment, and most of the irradiation tests for the internal and external users are able to be conducted effectively. The basic technology was established to irradiate a nuclear fuel, and a creep capsule was also developed to measure the creep property of a material during an irradiation test in HANARO in Phase II(April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2003). The development of a specific purpose capsule, essential technology for a re-irradiation of a nuclear fuel, advanced technology for an irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel were performed in Phase III(April 1, 2003 to February 28, 2007). Therefore, the technology for an irradiation test was established to support the irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel which is required for the National Nuclear R and D Programs. In addition, an improvement of the existing capsule design and fabrication technology, and the development of an instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel and a specific purpose will be able to satisfy the user's requirements. In order to support the irradiation test of materials and a nuclear fuel for developing the next generation nuclear system, it is also necessary to continuously improve the design and fabrication technology of the existing capsule and the irradiation technology.

  17. Compilation of radiation damage test data cable insulating materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on commercially available organic cable insulation and jacket materials: ethylene- propylene rubber, Hypalon, neoprene rubber, polyethylene, polyurethane, polyvinylchloride, silicone rubber, etc. The materials have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to integrated absorbed doses from 5*10/sup 5/ to 5*10/sup 6/ Gy. Mechanical properties, e.g. tensile strength, elongation at break, and hardness, have been tested on irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs, to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (13 refs).

  18. DOE/MSU composite material fatigue database: Test methods, materials, and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandell, J.F.; Samborsky, D.D. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-12-01

    This report presents a detailed analysis of the results from fatigue studies of wind turbine blade composite materials carried out at Montana State University (MSU) over the last seven years. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the DOE/MSU composite Materials Fatigue Database. The fatigue testing of composite materials requires the adaptation of standard test methods to the particular composite structure of concern. The stranded fabric E-glass reinforcement used by many blade manufacturers has required the development of several test modifications to obtain valid test data for materials with particular reinforcement details, over the required range of tensile and compressive loadings. Additionally, a novel testing approach to high frequency (100 Hz) testing for high cycle fatigue using minicoupons has been developed and validated. The database for standard coupon tests now includes over 4,100 data points for over 110 materials systems. The report analyzes the database for trends and transitions in static and fatigue behavior with various materials parameters. Parameters explored are reinforcement fabric architecture, fiber content, content of fibers oriented in the load direction, matrix material, and loading parameters (tension, compression, and reversed loading). Significant transitions from good fatigue resistance to poor fatigue resistance are evident in the range of materials currently used in many blades. A preliminary evaluation of knockdowns for selected structural details is also presented. The high frequency database provides a significant set of data for various loading conditions in the longitudinal and transverse directions of unidirectional composites out to 10{sup 8} cycles. The results are expressed in stress and strain based Goodman Diagrams suitable for design. A discussion is provided to guide the user of the database in its application to blade design.

  19. Standard test methods for rockwell hardness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of the Rockwell hardness and the Rockwell superficial hardness of metallic materials by the Rockwell indentation hardness principle. This standard provides the requirements for Rockwell hardness machines and the procedures for performing Rockwell hardness tests. 1.2 This standard includes additional requirements in annexes: Verification of Rockwell Hardness Testing Machines Annex A1 Rockwell Hardness Standardizing Machines Annex A2 Standardization of Rockwell Indenters Annex A3 Standardization of Rockwell Hardness Test Blocks Annex A4 Guidelines for Determining the Minimum Thickness of a Test Piece Annex A5 Hardness Value Corrections When Testing on Convex Cylindrical Surfaces Annex A6 1.3 This standard includes nonmandatory information in appendixes which relates to the Rockwell hardness test. List of ASTM Standards Giving Hardness Values Corresponding to Tensile Strength Appendix X1 Examples of Procedures for Determining Rockwell Hardness Uncertainty Appendix X...

  20. Standard test methods for rockwell hardness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of the Rockwell hardness and the Rockwell superficial hardness of metallic materials by the Rockwell indentation hardness principle. This standard provides the requirements for Rockwell hardness machines and the procedures for performing Rockwell hardness tests. 1.2 This standard includes additional requirements in annexes: Verification of Rockwell Hardness Testing Machines Annex A1 Rockwell Hardness Standardizing Machines Annex A2 Standardization of Rockwell Indenters Annex A3 Standardization of Rockwell Hardness Test Blocks Annex A4 Guidelines for Determining the Minimum Thickness of a Test Piece Annex A5 Hardness Value Corrections When Testing on Convex Cylindrical Surfaces Annex A6 1.3 This standard includes nonmandatory information in appendixes which relates to the Rockwell hardness test. List of ASTM Standards Giving Hardness Values Corresponding to Tensile Strength Appendix X1 Examples of Procedures for Determining Rockwell Hardness Uncertainty Appendix X...

  1. Scoping Future Policy Dynamics in Raw Materials Through Scenarios Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Vitor; Keane, Christopher; Sturm, Flavius; Schimpf, Sven; Bodo, Balazs

    2017-04-01

    The International Raw Materials Observatory (INTRAW) project is working towards a sustainable future for the European Union in access to raw materials, from an availability, economical, and environmental framework. One of the major exercises for the INTRAW project is the evaluation of potential future scenarios for 2050 to frame economic, research, and environmental policy towards a sustainable raw materials supply. The INTRAW consortium developed three possible future scenarios that encompass defined regimes of political, economic, and technological norms. The first scenario, "Unlimited Trade," reflects a world in which free trade continues to dominate the global political and economic environment, with expectations of a growing demand for raw materials from widely distributed global growth. The "National Walls" scenario reflects a world where nationalism and economic protectionism begins to dominate, leading to stagnating economic growth and uneven dynamics in raw materials supply and demand. The final scenario, "Sustainability Alliance," examines the dynamics of a global political and economic climate that is focused on environmental and economic sustainability, leading towards increasingly towards a circular raw materials economy. These scenarios were reviewed, tested, and provided simulations of impacts with members of the Consortium and a panel of global experts on international raw materials issues which led to expected end conditions for 2050. Given the current uncertainty in global politics, these scenarios are informative to identifying likely opportunities and crises. The details of these simulations and expected responses to the research demand, technology investments, and economic components of raw materials system will be discussed.

  2. Titanium doped LSCM anode for hydrocarbon fuelled SOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azad, Abul K.; Hakem, Afizul; Petra, Pg. M. Iskandar [Faculty of Integrated Technologies, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Gadong BE 1410 (Brunei Darussalam)

    2015-05-15

    La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25}Cr{sub 0.5-x}Mn{sub 0.5}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3} (x = 0.1, 0.2) has been synthesized in solid state reaction method and tested as a potential anode material for solid oxide fuel cells. Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data using Fullprof software shows that the materials crystallize in the rhombohedral symmetry in the R-3C space group. The cell parameters are: a = b = 5.5286 (4) Å, c = 13.408(1) Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. Particle size distribution measurements show that the average particle size for x = 0.1 and 0.2 was 232.66 nm and 176.63 nm, respectively. The potential on particles were found to be −22.86 mV and −27.73 mV, for x = 0.1 and x = 0.2, respectively. Thermal expansion measurement using thermo-mechanical analyzer shows that the thermal expansion coefficient is 13.96 × 10{sup −6}/°C which is close to the thermal expansion of the state-of–the art YSZ electrolyte. Microstructure has been observed from scanning electron microscopy which shows a porous structure. Energy dispersive X-ray shows that the percentage of the different cations and anions in the structure are close to the chemical occupancies.

  3. Static slot testing of conventional lost circulation materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Behr, V.L.; Wilde, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the utility of conventional lost circulation materials and testing methods was performed using a modified API slot tester. Five lost circulation materials were evaluated in 266 tests at both room temperature and temperature-aged conditions simulating expected geothermal environments. A large variation in the maximum pressure (or sealing pressure) the plug could withstand was attributed to nonrepeatability in plug strengths. Plugs were composed to multiple or single particle bridges, with the latter providing stronger, better sealing plugs. Seals occurred on the upstream surface of the slots in all cases. Sealing pressures generally decreased with increasing slot widths and decreasing solids concentration. When the slot width was less than the size of the largest rigid particle in the lost circulation slurry, sealing pressure was maximized. When the slot width was greater than three times the maximum rigid particle size, no significant sealing ability was observed with the conventional materials tested. Additionally, cellulosic lost circulation materials are severely degraded by temperature aging. Mud gellation provided no significant improvement in lost circulation material sealing ability.

  4. Standard Test Methods for Constituent Content of Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 These test methods determine the constituent content of composite materials by one of two approaches. Method I physically removes the matrix by digestion or ignition by one of seven procedures, leaving the reinforcement essentially unaffected and thus allowing calculation of reinforcement or matrix content (by weight or volume) as well as percent void volume. Method II, applicable only to laminate materials of known fiber areal weight, calculates reinforcement or matrix content (by weight or volume), and the cured ply thickness, based on the measured thickness of the laminate. Method II is not applicable to the measurement of void volume. 1.1.1 These test methods are primarily intended for two-part composite material systems. However, special provisions can be made to extend these test methods to filled material systems with more than two constituents, though not all test results can be determined in every case. 1.1.2 The procedures contained within have been designed to be particularly effective for ce...

  5. Testing the effectiveness of existing psycho-educational material ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of the existing ... material given to people suffering from schizophrenia and their caregivers has to be adapted to their ..... themselves and to take home for self-study and to do ...

  6. Design of a Compact Fatigue Tester for Testing Irradiated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartsell, Brian [Fermilab; Campbell, Michael [Fermilab; Fitton, Michael [RAL, Didcot; Hurh, Patrick [Fermilab; Ishida, Taku [KEK, Tsukuba; Nakadaira, Takeshi [KEK, Tsukuba

    2015-06-01

    A compact fatigue testing machine that can be easily inserted into a hot cell for characterization of irradiated materials is beneficial to help determine relative fatigue performance differences between new and irradiated material. Hot cell use has been carefully considered by limiting the size and weight of the machine, simplifying sample loading and test setup for operation via master-slave manipulator, and utilizing an efficient design to minimize maintenance. Funded from a US-Japan collaborative effort, the machine has been specifically designed to help characterize titanium material specimens. These specimens are flat cantilevered beams for initial studies, possibly utilizing samples irradiated at other sources of beam. The option to test spherically shaped samples cut from the T2K vacuum window is also available. The machine is able to test a sample to $10^7$ cycles in under a week, with options to count cycles and sense material failure. The design of this machine will be presented along with current status.

  7. Numerical test on polystyrene tunnel seismic-isolation material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress-strain mechanical properties of polystyrene foam plastic material were tested under different loading conditions. An empirical constitutive model for describing metal materials was proposed for the polystyrene plastic foam. The static and dynamic tests results show that the ductility and watertightness of the polystyrene plastic foam are significantly improved. At the same time, in order to check its seismic-isolation property, the high-performance foam concrete as filling materials of Galongla tunnel in Tibet was simulated by FEM. The simulated results show that the polystyrene plastic foam can remarkably decrease the stress and the plastic zone in final lining, so it can effectively reduce the seismic damage of the tunnel. Considering the seismic-isolation property and low price of polystyrene plastic foam, it is a good reference for the anti-seismic design of tunnels in high intensity zones.

  8. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis. Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Joseph W.; Popelar, Carl F.; Page, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA a comprehensive suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for aging multilayer pressure vessels, Southwest Research Institute (R) (SwRI) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. This report describes Phase 1 of this effort which includes a preliminary material property assessment as well as a fractographic, fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analyses of an induced flaw in the outer shell of a representative multilayer vessel that was subjected to cyclic pressure test. SwRI performed this Phase 1 effort under contract to the Digital Wave Corporation in support of their contract to Jacobs ATOM for the NASA Ames Research Center.

  9. Testing theOdour Quality of Non-Metallic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AVIJIT SINGH GANGWAR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This report has been compiled on the completion of 3 week summer training at ICAT. It discusses about a very necessary and least popular part of the Automotive Industry i.e. Testing and Certification. It discusses about one of the government notified Testing body ICAT which is one of just 6 such organisations in India.This report deals with the odour quality testing of non-metallic materials that are used for automobile compartment and parts associated with the compartment.

  10. Type of speech material affects Acceptable Noise Level test outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xaver eKoch

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Acceptable Noise Level (ANL test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual's inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measure may predict aspects of hearing aid success. Crucially, however, recent studies have questioned its repeatability (test-retest reliability. The first question for this study was whether the inconsistent results regarding the repeatability of the ANL test may be due to differences in speech material types used in previous studies. Second, it is unclear whether meaningfulness and semantic coherence of the speech modify ANL outcome. To investigate these questions, we compared ANLs obtained with three types of materials: the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS, which is non-meaningful and semantically non-coherent by definition, passages consisting of concatenated meaningful standard audiology sentences, and longer fragments taken from conversational speech. We included conversational speech as this type of speech material is most representative of everyday listening. Additionally, we investigated whether ANL outcomes, obtained with these three different speech materials, were associated with self-reported limitations due to hearing problems and listening effort in everyday life, as assessed by a questionnaire. ANL data were collected for 57 relatively good-hearing adult participants with an age range representative for hearing aid users. Results showed that meaningfulness, but not semantic coherence of the speech material affected ANL. Less noise was accepted for the non-meaningful ISTS signal than for the meaningful speech materials. ANL repeatability was

  11. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Davis

    2006-09-30

    Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

  12. Acoustic Emission During Tensile Testing of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Začal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with possibilities of acoustic emission method utilization as an online surveillance tool for improvement of identification of structural damage onset in composite materials. With employment of AE method we are able to localize the degraded areas in stressed components and subsequently estimate the extent of degradation. In experimental part the piezoelectric sensor was employed for continuous record of emission signals, continuous processing and analysis of measured data and monitoring of stressed material feedback on applied mechanical load in real time. Partial results from distinctive areas of conducted research were implemented in this method, especially detection of emission signals and analysis of recorded signals in both frequency and temporal zones. Samples were reinforcement of 6 layers aramide-carbon weave 0/90° of specific mass 180 g/m2. In total 7 samples were tested in monoaxial tension on universal testing apparatus ZDM 5/51 with acoustic emission measurement recording in course of testing.

  13. Material model calibration through indentation test and stochastic inverse analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Buljak, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Indentation test is used with growing popularity for the characterization of various materials on different scales. Developed methods are combining the test with computer simulation and inverse analyses to assess material parameters entering into constitutive models. The outputs of such procedures are expressed as evaluation of sought parameters in deterministic sense, while for engineering practice it is desirable to assess also the uncertainty which affects the final estimates resulting from various sources of errors within the identification procedure. In this paper an experimental-numerical method is presented centered on inverse analysis build upon data collected from the indentation test in the form of force-penetration relationship (so-called indentation curve). Recursive simulations are made computationally economical by an a priori model reduction procedure. Resulting inverse problem is solved in a stochastic context using Monte Carlo simulations and non-sequential Extended Kalman filter. Obtained re...

  14. Chairside CAD/CAM materials. Part 2: Flexural strength testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, Michael; Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Mevec, Daniel; Harrer, Walter; Lube, Tanja; Danzer, Robert; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Strength is one of the preferred parameters used in dentistry for determining clinical indication of dental restoratives. However, small dimensions of CAD/CAM blocks limit reliable measurements with standardized uniaxial bending tests. The objective of this study was to introduce the ball-on-three-ball (B3B) biaxial strength test for dental for small CAD/CAM block in the context of the size effect on strength predicted by the Weibull theory. Eight representative chairside CAD/CAM materials ranging from polycrystalline zirconia (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent), reinforced glasses (Vitablocs Mark II, VITA; Empress CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) and glass-ceramics (e.max CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent; Suprinity, VITA; Celtra Duo, Dentsply) to hybrid materials (Enamic, VITA; Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) have been selected. Specimens were prepared with highly polished surfaces in rectangular plate (12×12×1.2mm(3)) or round disc (Ø=12mm, thickness=1.2mm) geometries. Specimens were tested using the B3B assembly and the biaxial strength was determined using calculations derived from finite element analyses of the respective stress fields. Size effects on strength were determined based on results from 4-point-bending specimens. A good agreement was found between the biaxial strength results for the different geometries (plates vs. discs) using the B3B test. Strength values ranged from 110.9MPa (Vitablocs Mark II) to 1303.21MPa (e.max ZirCAD). The strength dependency on specimen size was demonstrated through the calculated effective volume/surface. The B3B test has shown to be a reliable and simple method for determining the biaxial strength restorative materials supplied as small CAD/CAM blocks. A flexible solution was made available for the B3B test in the rectangular plate geometry. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Corrosion testing of urea-formaldehyde foam insulating material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, R.; Graviano, A.; Sheppard, K.

    1980-09-01

    Two tests of the corrosiveness of urea-formaldehyde (UF) foam insulating materials were compared. One test, the Timm test, had test coupons foamed in place. In the second, the Canadian test, blocks of foam already set were placed in contact with test coupons. The Timm test uses 10 gage thick coupons, while the Canadian test specifies 3 mil thick ones. Two samples of UF foam were tested by the Timm and the Canadian tests. The electrical-resistance probes showed that the corrosion rate against steel was initially quite high, of the order of 12 to 20 mpy (mils per year). After about 20 days, the rate was almost zero. In the Timm test, the corrosion rates of steel coupons were of the order to 0.5 to 2 mpy when averaged over the 28 or 56 day test period. The greater corrosion rate of the thick coupons in the Canadian test as well as poor reproducibility of the corrosion rates was attributed primarily to variations in the contact areas between the sample and the UF foam. The corrosion rates of galvanized steel coupons in the Canadian test in several cases exceeded the failure value. In the Timm test, the corrosion rates averaged over the whole test period were quite low. The corrosion rates of copper and aluminum in both tests were quite low. On the basis of the results of this study the following recommendations for a corrosion-test procedure for UF foam were made: two corrosion tests should be conducted, one for foam while curing and one after it has stabilized; the Timm test for corrosiveness while curing should be used, but for only 1 to 2 days; the test for corrosiveness after stabilizing should be of the accelerated type such as the Canadian one. To insure a constant-contact area, thicker coupons should be used; and the coupons for both tests should have a controlled part of the area not in contact with the foam to simulate field conditions.

  16. Migrating Broad-billed Sandpipers achieve high fuelling rates by taking a multi-course meal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuil, Y.I.; Dekinga, A; Koolhaas, A; van der Winden, J; van der Have, T M; Chernichko, I I

    2006-01-01

    In spring, large numbers of migrating Broad-billed Sandpipers make a stop-over in the Sivash, a shallow lagoon system in the Crimea, Ukraine, between the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. Observed fuelling rates are high and, in just a few weeks, the birds can build up sufficient departure mass to reac

  17. FARE device operational characteristics of remote controlled fuelling machine at Wolsong NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namgung, I. [Korea Power Engineering Co., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. B.; Lee, S. K. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    There are 4 CANDU6 type reactors operating at Wolsong site. For fuelling operation of certain fuel channels (with flow less than 21.5 kg/s) a FARE (flow Assist Ram Extension) device is used. During the refuelling operation, two remote controlled F/Ms (Fuelling Machines) are attached to a designated fuel channel and carry out refuelling job. The upstream F/M inserts new fuel bundles into the fuel channel while the downstream F/M discharges spent fuel bundles. In order to assist fuelling operation of channels that has lower coolant flow rate, the FARE device is used instead of F/M C-ram to push the fuel bundle string. The FARE device is essentially a flow restricting element that produces enough drag force to push the fuel bundle string toward downstream F/M. Channels that require the use of FARE device for refuelling are located along the outside perimeter of reactor. This paper presents the FARE device design feature, steady state hydraulic and operational characteristics and behavior of the device when coupled with fuel bundle string during fuelling operation. The study showed that the steady state performance of Fare device meets the design objective that was confirmed by downstream F/M C-ram force to be positive.

  18. Avian pectoral muscle size rapidly tracks body mass changes during flight, fasting and fuelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindstrom, A; Kvist, A; Piersma, T; Dekinga, A; Dietz, MW; Lindström, Åke

    2000-01-01

    We used ultrasonic imaging to monitor short-term changes in the pectoral muscle size of captive red knots Calidris canutus. Pectoral muscle thickness changed rapidly and consistently in parallel with body mass changes caused by flight, fasting;and fuelling. Four knots hew repeatedly for 10h periods

  19. Mechanical Testing of Carbon Based Woven Thermal Protection Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, John; Agrawal, Parul; Arnold, James O.; Peterson, Keith; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Three Dimensional Woven thermal protection system (TPS) materials are one of the enabling technologies for mechanically deployable hypersonic decelerator systems. These materials have been shown capable of serving a dual purpose as TPS and as structural load bearing members during entry and descent operations. In order to ensure successful structural performance, it is important to characterize the mechanical properties of these materials prior to and post exposure to entry-like heating conditions. This research focuses on the changes in load bearing capacity of woven TPS materials after being subjected to arcjet simulations of entry heating. Preliminary testing of arcjet tested materials [1] has shown a mechanical degradation. However, their residual strength is significantly more than the requirements for a mission to Venus [2]. A systematic investigation at the macro and microstructural scales is reported here to explore the potential causes of this degradation. The effects of heating on the sizing (an epoxy resin coating used to reduce friction and wear during fiber handling) are discussed as one of the possible causes for the decrease in mechanical properties. This investigation also provides valuable guidelines for margin policies for future mechanically deployable entry systems.

  20. Material testing facilities and programs for plasma-facing component testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Doerner, R. P.; Greuner, H.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.

    2017-09-01

    Component development for operation in a large-scale fusion device requires thorough testing and qualification for the intended operational conditions. In particular environments are necessary which are comparable to the real operation conditions, allowing at the same time for in situ/in vacuo diagnostics and flexible operation, even beyond design limits during the testing. Various electron and neutral particle devices provide the capabilities for high heat load tests, suited for material samples and components from lab-scale dimensions up to full-size parts, containing toxic materials like beryllium, and being activated by neutron irradiation. To simulate the conditions specific to a fusion plasma both at the first wall and in the divertor of fusion devices, linear plasma devices allow for a test of erosion and hydrogen isotope recycling behavior under well-defined and controlled conditions. Finally, the complex conditions in a fusion device (including the effects caused by magnetic fields) are exploited for component and material tests by exposing test mock-ups or material samples to a fusion plasma by manipulator systems. They allow for easy exchange of test pieces in a tokamak or stellarator device, without opening the vessel. Such a chain of test devices and qualification procedures is required for the development of plasma-facing components which then can be successfully operated in future fusion power devices. The various available as well as newly planned devices and test stands, together with their specific capabilities, are presented in this manuscript. Results from experimental programs on test facilities illustrate their significance for the qualification of plasma-facing materials and components. An extended set of references provides access to the current status of material and component testing capabilities in the international fusion programs.

  1. High temperature indentation tests on fusion reactor candidate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma-Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: roberto.montanari@uniroma2.it; Filacchioni, G. [ENEA CR Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, I-00060 S.M. di Galeria, Rome (Italy); Iacovone, B. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma-Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Plini, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma-Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Riccardi, B. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, P.O. Box 65, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2007-08-01

    Flat-top cylinder indenter for mechanical characterization (FIMEC) is an indentation technique employing cylindrical punches with diameters ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm. The test gives pressure-penetration curves from which the yield stress can be determined. The FIMEC apparatus was developed to test materials in the temperature range from -180 to +200 {sup o}C. Recently, the heating system of FIMEC apparatus has been modified to operate up to 500 {sup o}C. So, in addition to providing yield stress over a more extended temperature range, it is possible to perform stress-relaxation tests at temperatures of great interest for several nuclear fusion reactor (NFR) alloys. Data on MANET-II, F82H mod., Eurofer-97, EM-10, AISI 316 L, Ti6Al4V and CuCrZr are presented and compared with those obtained by mechanical tests with standard methods.

  2. Abrasion test of flexible protective materials on hydraulic structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin WANG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, several kinds of flexible protective materials sprayed with polyurea elastomers (hereinafter referred to as polyurea elastomer protective material were adopted to meet the abrasion resistance requirement of hydraulic structures, and their abrasion resistances against the water flow with suspended load or bed load were studied systematically through tests. Natural basalt stones were adopted as the abrasive for simulation of the abrasion effect of the water flow with bed load, and test results indicate that the basalt stone is suitable for use in the abrasion resistance test of the flexible protective material. The wear process of the polyurea elastomer protective material is stable, and the wear loss is linear with the time of abrasion. If the wear thickness is regarded as the abrasion resistance evaluation factor, the abrasion resistance of the 351 pure polyurea is about twice those of pure polyurea with a high level of hardness and aliphatic polyurea, and over five times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with suspended load. It is also about 50 times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with bed load. Overall, the abrasion resistance of pure polyurea presented a decreasing trend with increasing hardness. Pure polyurea with a Shore hardness of D30 has the best abrasion resistance, which is 60 to 70 times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with bed load, and has been recommended, among the five kinds of pure polyurea materials with different hardness, in anti-abrasion protection of hydraulic structures.

  3. Material control system design: Test Bed Nitrate Storage Area (TBNSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G.A.; Da Roza, R.A.; Dunn, D.R.; Sacks, I.J.; Harrison, W.; Huebel, J.G.; Ross, W.N.; Salisbury, J.D.; Sanborn, R.H.; Weissenberger, S.

    1978-05-01

    This report provides an example of a hypothetical Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Safeguard Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) System which will be used as a subject for the demonstration of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory MC and A System Evaluation Methodology in January 1978. This methodology is to become a tool in the NRC evaluation of license applicant submittals for Nuclear Fuel Cycle facilities. The starting point for this test bed design was the Allied-General Nuclear Services--Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant Reprocessing plant as described in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), of August 1975. The test bed design effort was limited to providing an SNM safeguard system for the plutonium nitrate storage area of this facility. (DLC)

  4. A 360-deg Digital Image Correlation system for materials testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, K.; Cortese, L.; Rossi, M.; Amodio, D.

    2016-07-01

    The increasing research interest toward natural and advanced engineered materials demands new experimental protocols capable of retrieving highly dense sets of experimental data on the full-surface of samples under multiple loading conditions. Such information, in fact, would allow to capture the possible heterogeneity and anisotropy of the material by using up-to-date inverse characterization methods. Although the development of object-specific test protocols could represent the optimal choice to address this need, it is unquestionable that universal testing machines (UTM) remain the most widespread and versatile option to test materials and components in both academic and industrial contexts. A major limitation of performing standard material tests with UTM, however, consists in the scarce information obtainable with the commonly associated sensors since they provide only global (LVDTs, extensometers, 2D-video analyzers) or local (strain gages) measures of displacement and strain. This paper presents a 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system developed to perform highly accurate full-surface 360-deg measurements on either standard or custom-shaped samples under complex loading within universal testing machines. To this aim, a low cost and easy to setup video rig was specifically designed to overcome the practical limitations entailed with the integration of a multi-camera system within an already existing loading frame. In particular, the proposed system features a single SLR digital camera moved through multiple positions around the specimen by means of a large rotation stage. A proper calibration and data-processing procedure allows to automatically merge the experimental data obtained from the multiple views with an accuracy of 10-2 m m . The results of a full benchmarking of the metrological performances of the system are here reported and discussed together with illustrative examples of full-360-deg shape and deformation measurements on a Grade X65 steel

  5. Temperature control of a solar furnace for material testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, B. Andrade; Lemos, J. M.; Rosa, L. G.

    2011-08-01

    A solar furnace is a thermodynamic device that concentrates sun radiation in order to achieve high-temperatures at a focus, where a sample of the material to be tested is located. This article address the problem of designing a control architecture for solar furnaces. It is motivated by the use of a solar furnace as an instrument in material science research to perform two types of experimental tests. In the first type, samples are tested in high-temperature stress cycles. In these experiments it is important to control the temperature profile. The second test type is characterised by imposing a solar radiation flux profile. On both experiment types there are strong nonlinear effects, a significant degree of parametric uncertainty and disturbances, such as solar radiation fluctuation due to clouds and to sun's apparent movement. Although the actuator (shutter) is much faster than the thermic system, it may destabilise the overall controlled system. The contribution of this article consists in the design of a control architecture for solar furnaces and the application of singular perturbation methods in order to derive conditions in the form of bounds for the speed of actuator dynamics so that the closed-loop system is stable.

  6. Examination of an optical transmittance test for photovoltaic encapsulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C.; Bengoechea, Jaione; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Köhl, Michael; Powell, Nick E.; Smith, Michael E.; White, Michael D.; Wilson, Helen Rose; Wohlgemuth, John H.

    2013-09-01

    The optical transmittance of encapsulation materials is a key characteristic for their use in photovoltaic (PV) modules. Changes in transmittance with time in the field affect module performance, which may impact product warranties. Transmittance is important in product development, module manufacturing, and field power production (both immediate and long-term). Therefore, an international standard (IEC 62788-1-4) has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the optical performance of PV encapsulation materials. Existing standards, such as ASTM E903, are general and more appropriately applied to concentrated solar power than to PV. Starting from the optical transmittance measurement, the solar-weighted transmittance of photon irradiance, yellowness index (which may be used in aging studies to assess durability), and ultraviolet (UV) cut-off wavelength may all be determined using the proposed standard. The details of the proposed test are described. The results of a round-robin experiment (for five materials) conducted at seven laboratories to validate the test procedure using representative materials are also presented. For example, the Encapsulation Group actively explored the measurement requirements (wavelength range and resolution), the requirements for the spectrophotometer (including the integrating sphere and instrument accessories, such as a depolarizer), specimen requirements (choice of glass-superstrate and -substrate), and data analysis (relative to the light that may be used in the PV application). The round-robin experiment identified both intra- and inter-laboratory instrument precision and bias for five encapsulation materials (encompassing a range of transmittance and haze-formation characteristics).

  7. Examination of an optical transmittance test for photovoltaic encapsulation materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C.; Bengoechea, Jaione; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Köhl, Michael; Powell, Nick E.; Smith, Michael E.; White, Michael D.; Wilson, Helen Rose; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Lynn, Kevin W.

    2013-09-24

    The optical transmittance of encapsulation materials is a key characteristic for their use in photovoltaic (PV) modules. Changes in transmittance with time in the field affect module performance, which may impact product warranties. Transmittance is important in product development, module manufacturing, and field power production (both immediate and long-term). Therefore, an international standard (IEC 62788-1-4) has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the optical performance of PV encapsulation materials. Existing standards, such as ASTM E903, are general and more appropriately applied to concentrated solar power than to PV. Starting from the optical transmittance measurement, the solar-weighted transmittance of photon irradiance, yellowness index (which may be used in aging studies to assess durability), and ultraviolet (UV) cut-off wavelength may all be determined using the proposed standard. The details of the proposed test are described. The results of a round-robin experiment (for five materials) conducted at seven laboratories to validate the test procedure using representative materials are also presented. For example, the Encapsulation Group actively explored the measurement requirements (wavelength range and resolution), the requirements for the spectrophotometer (including the integrating sphere and instrument accessories, such as a depolarizer), specimen requirements (choice of glass-superstrate and -substrate), and data analysis (relative to the light that may be used in the PV application). The round-robin experiment identified both intra- and inter-laboratory instrument precision and bias for five encapsulation materials (encompassing a range of transmittance and haze-formation characteristics).

  8. Energetic and environmental balance of a natural gas fuelled low-capacity cogeneration system; Energetische und umwelttechnische Bilanz eines erdgasbetriebenen Klein-BHKW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentschel, D. [Hochschule fuer Technik, Wirtschaft und Kultur (F.H.), Leipzig (Germany). Lehrgebiet Produktionsplanung und -steuerung; Werner, C. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie, Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Waermetechnik und Thermodynamik

    2002-03-01

    FH Leipzig University has been operating a natural gas fuelled cogeneration system since 1998. The performance of the system was tested in field experiments. The contribution presents the energy- and environment-related results. [German] Seit 1998 betreibt die Hochschule fuer Technik, Wirtschaft und Kultur Leipzig (FH) am Fachbereich Maschinen- und Energietechnik zu Lehr- und Forschungszwecken ein erdgasbetriebenes Blockheizkraftwerk (BHKW). Unter Beachtung wesentlicher energetischer und umwelttechnischer Aspekte ist das Betriebsverhalten des Gas-Otto-Motoren-BHKW anhand von Feldversuchen ermittelt worden. Im Folgenden erfolgt eine Verknuepfung der energetischen und umwelttechnischen Anlageneigenschaften. (orig.)

  9. Thermal Testing of Woven TPS Materials in Extreme Entry Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, G.; Stackpoole, M.

    2014-01-01

    NASAs future robotic missions to Venus and outer planets, namely, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, result in extremely high entry conditions that exceed the capabilities of current mid density ablators (PICA or Avcoat). Therefore mission planners assume the use of a fully dense carbon phenolic heatshield similar to what was flown on Pioneer Venus and Galileo. Carbon phenolic (CP) is a robust TPS however its high density and thermal conductivity constrain mission planners to steep entries, high heat fluxes, high pressures and short entry durations, in order for CP to be feasible from a mass perspective. In 2012 the Game Changing Development Program in NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate funded NASA ARC to investigate the feasibility of a Woven Thermal Protection System to meet the needs of NASAs most challenging entry missions. The high entry conditions pose certification challenges in existing ground based test facilities. Recent updates to NASAs IHF and AEDCs H3 high temperature arcjet test facilities enable higher heatflux (2000 Wcm2) and high pressure (5 atm) testing of TPS. Some recent thermal tests of woven TPS will be discussed in this paper. These upgrades have provided a way to test higher entry conditions of potential outer planet and Venus missions and provided a baseline against carbon phenolic material. The results of these tests have given preliminary insight to sample configuration and physical recession profile characteristics.

  10. Testing of ceramic filter materials at the PCFB test facility; Keraamisten suodinmateriaalien testaus PCFB-koelaitoksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuivalainen, R.; Eriksson, T.; Lehtonen, P.; Tiensuu, J. [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) combustion technology has been developed in Karhula, Finland since 1986. In 1989, a 10 MW PCFB test facility was constructed. The test facility has been used for performance testing with different coal types through the years 1990-1994 for obtaining data for design and commercialization of the high-efficiency low-emission PCFB combustion technology. The main objective of the project Y53 was to evaluate advanced candle filter materials for the Hot Gas Clean-up Unit (HGCU) to be used in a commercial PCFB Demonstration Project. To achieve this goal, the selected candle materials were exposed to actual high temperature, high pressure coal combustion flue gases for a period of 1000-1500 h during the PCFB test runs. The test runs were carried out in three test segments in Foster Wheeler`s PCFB test facility at the Karhula R and D Center. An extensive inspection and sampling program was carried out after the second test segment. Selected sample candles were analyzed by the filter supplier and the preliminary results were encouraging. The material strength had decreased only within expected range. Slight elongation of the silicon carbide candles was observed, but at this phase the elongation can not be addressed to creep, unlike in the candles tested in 1993-94. The third and last test segment was completed successfully in October 1996. The filter system was inspected and several sample candles were selected for material characterization. The results will be available in February - March 1997. (orig.)

  11. Kazakhstan tokamak for material testing conceptual design and basic parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korotkov, V.A. E-mail: korotkov@sintez.niiefa.spb.su; Azizov, E.A.; Cherepnin, Yu.S.; Dokouka, V.N.; Ya.Dvorkin, N.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Krylov, V.A.; Kuzmin, E.G.; Leykin, I.N.; Mineev, A.B.; Shkolnik, V.S.; Shestakov, V.P.; Shapovalov, G.V.; Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Tikhomirov, L.N.; Yagnov, V.A

    2001-10-01

    The construction of a special machine for plasma facing material testing under powerful and particle and heat flux deposition is necessary for progress of researches in the field of controlled fusion to industrial application. Kazakhstan tokamak for material testing (KTM) is planned as spherical tokamak with moderate-to-low aspect ratio (A=2) and high plasma and vacuum vessel elongation, that allows to reach high plasma parameters, large power-intensity at a compact arrangement of design elements and low requirements to a toroidal magnetic field. KTM tokamak is planned in order to investigate the following issues: (1) Plasma confinement in tokamak with A=2, plasma parameters and configurations working window; (2) Differed kinds of divertor plates under power flux of plasma to divertor volume; (3) Plasma-wall interaction (different materials and coating) and plasma-limiter configurations. In the paper the basic parameters of the machine are given. The design of magnet system with poloidal field coils, vacuum vessel and divertor are submitted.

  12. THERMAL PREDICTIONS OF NEW COMPOSITE MATERIAL DURING INPILE TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; W. David Swank; Heng Ban; Kurt Harris; Adam Zabriskie

    2011-09-01

    An inpile experiment is currently underway wherein specimens comprised of a newly developed material are being irradiated at Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in conjunction with Utah State University under the auspices of the ATR National Scientific User Facility. This paper provides the thermophysical properties of this new material measured prior to irradiation. After the irradiation campaign is complete, the thermophysical properties of the specimens will be measured and compared to the preirradiation values. A finite-element model was constructed to predict bounding specimen temperatures during irradiation. Results from the thermal hydraulic modeling, including the steady-state temperatures of the specimens within sealed capsules, are presented. After the irradiation campaign is completed, best-estimate thermal predictions will be performed for the individual specimens using the actual as-run irradiation power levels.

  13. Natural radioactive materials at the Arco Reactor Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singlevich, W; Healy, J W; Paas, H J; Carey, Z E

    1951-05-28

    At the request of the Division of Biology and Medicine of the AEC, the Biophysics Section of the Radiological Sciences Department at Hanford undertook the task of conducting a background survey for naturally occurring radioactive materials in the environs of the Arco Reactor Test Site in Central Idaho. This survey was part of an overall study which included meteorological measurements by the the Air Weather Service, Geological Studies by the USGS, and an ecological survey of plants and animals by members of the Idaho State College at Pocatello. In general, the measurements at Arco followed the pattern established for environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site with some additional measurements made for natural isotopes not normally of concern at Hanford. A number of analysis included materials such as plutonium and I-131 which were carried out for the purpose of establishing analytical backgrounds for the procedures used. 20 refs., 13 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Multidimensional Testing of Thermal Protection Materials in the Arcjet Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Ellerby, Donald T.; Switzer, Matt R.; Squire, Thomas Howard

    2010-01-01

    Many thermal protection system materials used for spacecraft heatshields have anisotropic thermal properties, causing them to display significantly different thermal characteristics in different directions, when subjected to a heating environment during flight or arcjet tests. The anisotropic effects are enhanced in the presence of sidewall heating. This paper investigates the effects of anisotropic thermal properties of thermal protection materials coupled with sidewall heating in the arcjet environment. Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) and LI-2200 materials (the insulation material of Shuttle tiles) were used for this study. First, conduction-based thermal response simulations were carried out, using the Marc.Mentat finite element solver, to study the effects of sidewall heating on PICA arcjet coupons. The simulation showed that sidewall heating plays a significant role in thermal response of these models. Arcjet tests at the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) at NASA Ames Research Center were performed later on instrumented coupons to obtain temperature history at sidewall and various radial locations. The details of instrumentation and experimental technique are the prime focus of this paper. The results obtained from testing confirmed that sidewall heating plays a significant role in thermal response of these models. The test results were later used to validate the two-dimensional ablation, thermal response, and sizing program, TITAN. The test data and model predictions were found to be in excellent agreement

  15. Multidimensional Tests of Thermal Protection Materials in the Arcjet Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Ellerby, Donald T.; Switzer, Mathew R.; Squire, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Many thermal protection system materials used for spacecraft heatshields have anisotropic thermal properties, causing them to display significantly different thermal characteristics in different directions, when subjected to a heating environment during flight or arcjet tests. This paper investigates the effects of sidewall heating coupled with anisotropic thermal properties of thermal protection materials in the arcjet environment. Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) and LI-2200 materials (the insulation material of Shuttle tiles) were used for this study. First, conduction-based thermal response simulations were carried out, using the Marc.Mentat finite element solver, to study the effects of sidewall heating on PICA arcjet coupons. The simulation showed that sidewall heating plays a significant role in thermal response of these models. Arcjet tests at the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) at NASA Ames Research Center were performed later on instrumented coupons to obtain temperature history at sidewall and various radial locations. The details of instrumentation and experimental technique are the prime focus of this paper. The results obtained from testing confirmed that sidewall heating plays a significant role in thermal response of these models. The test results were later used to verify the two-dimensional ablation, thermal response, and sizing program, TITAN. The test data and model predictions were found to be in excellent agreement

  16. Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

    2013-04-30

    studied the effect of x-rays and γ-rays, on thin film chalcogenide glasses and applied them in conjunction with film incorporating a silver source in a new type of radiation sensor for which we have an US patent application [3]. In this report, we give data about our studies regarding our designed radiation sensor along with the testing and performance at various radiation doses. These studies have been preceded by materials characterization research related to the compositional and structural characteristics of the active materials used in the radiation sensor design. During the work on the project, we collected a large volume of material since every experiment was repeated many times to verify the results. We conducted a comprehensive material research, analysis and discussion with the aim to understand the nature of the occurring effects, design different structures to harness these effects, generated models to aid in the understanding the effects, built different device structures and collected data to quantify device performance. These various aspects of our investigation have been detailed in previous quarterly reports. In this report, we present our main results and emphasize on the results pertaining to the core project goals materials development, sensor design and testing and with an emphasis on classifying the appropriate material and design for the optimal application. The report has three main parts: (i) Presentation of the main data; (ii) Bulleted summary of the most important results; (iii) List of the patent, journal publications, conference proceedings and conferences participation, occurring as a result of working on the project.

  17. Materials challenges and testing for supply of energy and resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boellinghaus, Thomas; Lexow, Juergen (eds.) [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Kishi, Teruo [National Inst. for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kitagawa, Masaki [Isobe Mihamaku, Chiba (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    One major goal of the World Materials Research Institute Forum - WMRIF is to promote young scientists in the field of materials science and engineering. To enhance the international knowledge exchange between young postdoctoral scientists all over the world, WMRIF meanwhile regularly organizes joint workshops among the member institutes. These workshops also represent an increasingly appreciated platform to get known to each other and to build co-operations. For such workshops, various topics are selected, pointing to future perspectives and challenges in the field of materials science and engineering. This book contains the following contributions: I. Materials challenges for nuclear fission and fusion - Examination of Dust Particles from Present-Day Controlled Fusion Devices (Elzbieta Fortuna-Zalesna); Quantitative microstructural investigation of neutron-irradiated RAFM steel for nuclear fusion applications (Oliver J. Weiss), Controlling Welding Residual Stresses by means of Alloy Design (Arne Kromm); Degradation Mechanism of Creep Strength Enhanced Ferritic Steels for Power Plants (Kota Sawada); Electrochemical studies on pitting corrosion on Cr13 steel exposed to CO{sub 2} and artificial brine with high chloride concentration (Oleksandra Yevtushenko); Development of {sup 10}B{sub 2}O{sub 3} processing for use as a neutron conversion materials (Lars F. Voss). II. Materials challenges for water supply Water overlayers on Cu(110) studied by van der Waals density Functional (Sheng Meng). III. Challenges in conclusive, realistic and system oriented materials testing - Employment of high Resolution RBS to characterize ultrathin transparent electrode in high efficiency GaN based Light Emitting Diode (Grace Huiqi Wang); A possible route to the quantification of piezoresponse force microscopy through correlation with electron backscatter diffraction (Tim L. Burnett); High Resolution Analysis of Tungsten Doped Amorphous Carbon thin Films (Marcin Rasinski); Electron

  18. Lap-joint testing of precoated steel materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chico, B.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In industry, particularly in the building construction, lap-joint technology for precoated steel sheet materials has undergone rapid development. However, standars for lap-joint testing are lacking. This work analyses the behaviour of four precoated steel materials commonly used in the building industry: 55 % Al-Zn and hot dip galvanized, painted and unpainted. Two-year atmospheric exposure tests have been carried out in Madrid and Avilés (Spain, complemented by accelerated weathering tests in climatic cabinets. The latter have consisted of two salt fog/humidity/drying cycles: VDA cycle 621-415 and the "CENIM cycle", which has been designed to adequately simulate the behaviour of materials in this type of joints.

    En la industria en general y, particularmente, en la industria de la construcción, las tecnologías sobre uniones solapadas han experimentado un rápido desarrollo. Sin embargo, no son abundantes los ensayos para este tipo de uniones. Este trabajo analiza el comportamiento de cuatro materiales de acero pre-recubierto comúnmente usados en la industria de la construcción: 55 % Al-Zn y galvanizado por inmersión en caliente, con recubrimiento orgánico y sin él. Se han realizado ensayos de exposición natural durante dos años en las atmósferas de Madrid y Avilés (España, complementados con ensayos de envejecimiento acelerado en cámaras climáticas. En estos últimos se han ensayado dos ciclos de proyección niebla salina/humedad/secado: ciclo VDA 621-415 y un ciclo desarrollado en el CENIM diseñado.

  19. Laboratory Testing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Surrogate Waste Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, S.; Bronowski, D.; Pfeifle, T.; Herrick, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below the ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. WIPP Performance Assessment modeling of the underground material response requires a full and accurate understanding of coupled mechanical, hydrological, and geochemical processes and how they evolve with time. This study was part of a broader test program focused on room closure, specifically the compaction behavior of waste and the constitutive relations to model this behavior. The goal of this study was to develop an improved waste constitutive model. The model parameters are developed based on a well designed set of test data. The constitutive model will then be used to realistically model evolution of the underground and to better understand the impacts on repository performance. The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of the degraded containers and TRU waste materials after the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial and lateral stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk

  20. Utility of transient testing to characterize thermal interface materials

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, B; Michel, B

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes a transient method for the characterization of low-resistance thermal interfaces of microelectronic packages. The transient method can yield additional information about the package not available with traditional static methods at the cost of greater numerical complexity, hardware requirements, and sensitivity to noise. While the method is established for package-level thermal analysis of mounted and assembled parts, its ability to measure the relatively minor thermal impedance of thin thermal interface material (TIM) layers has not yet been fully studied. We combine the transient thermal test with displacement measurements of the bond line thickness to fully characterize the interface.

  1. Standard Test Method for Shear Fatigue of Sandwich Core Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers determination of the effect of repeated shear loads on sandwich core materials. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound units given may be approximate. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. Testing and modeling of rockfill materials:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xiao; Hong Liu; Wengang Zhang; Hanlong Liu; Feng Yin; Youyu Wang

    2016-01-01

    The research development of rockfill materials (RFM) was investigated by a series of large-scale triaxial tests. It is observed that confining pressure and particle breakage play important roles in the mechanical property, dilatancy relation and constitutive model of RFM. In addition, it is observed that the conven-tional dilatancy relation and constitutive model are not suitable for RFM due to the complex mechanical behavior. Hence, it needs to propose a unified constitutive model of RFM, considering the state-dependent and particle breakage behavior.

  3. Materials Science Research Rack-1 Fire Suppressant Distribution Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, P. O.

    2002-01-01

    Fire suppressant distribution testing was performed on the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1), a furnace facility payload that will be installed in the U.S. Lab module of the International Space Station. Unlike racks that were tested previously, the MSRR-1 uses the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) to reduce vibration on experiments, so the effects of ARIS on fire suppressant distribution were unknown. Two tests were performed to map the distribution of CO2 fire suppressant throughout a mockup of the MSRR-1 designed to have the same component volumes and flowpath restrictions as the flight rack. For the first test, the average maximum CO2 concentration for the rack was 60 percent, achieved within 45 s of discharge initiation, meeting the requirement to reach 50 percent throughout the rack within 1 min. For the second test, one of the experiment mockups was removed to provide a worst-case configuration, and the average maximum CO2 concentration for the rack was 58 percent. Comparing the results of this testing with results from previous testing leads to several general conclusions that can be used to evaluate future racks. The MSRR-1 will meet the requirements for fire suppressant distribution. Primary factors that affect the ability to meet the CO2 distribution requirements are the free air volume in the rack and the total area and distribution of openings in the rack shell. The length of the suppressant flowpath and degree of tortuousness has little correlation with CO2 concentration. The total area of holes in the rack shell could be significantly increased. The free air volume could be significantly increased. To ensure the highest maximum CO2 concentration, the PFE nozzle should be inserted to the stop on the nozzle.

  4. Ion temperature anisotropy in high power helium neutral beam fuelling experiments in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, A.C.; Core, W.G.F.; Gerstel, U.C.; Von Hellermann, M.G.; Koenig, R.W.T.; Marcus, F.B. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    During helium beam fuelling experiments in JET, distinctive anisotropic features have been observed in the velocity distribution function describing both fast and thermal alpha particle populations. During the initial fuelling phase the central helium ion temperature observed perpendicular to the magnetic field is higher than the central electron temperature, while the central helium ion temperature observed parallel to the magnetic field is lower than or equal to the central electron temperature. In order to verify temperature measurements of both perpendicular and parallel lines of sight, other independent methods of deducing the ion temperature are investigated: deuterium ion temperature, deuterium density, comparison with neutron rates and profiles (influence of a possible metastable population of helium). 6 refs., 7 figs.

  5. The control of convection by fuelling and pumping in the JET pumped divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, P.J.; Andrew, P.; Campbell, D.; Clement, S.; Davies, S.; Ehrenberg, J.; Erents, S.K.; Gondhalekar, A.; Gadeberg, M.; Gottardi, N.; Von Hellermann, M.; Horton, L.; Loarte, A.; Lowry, C.; Maggi, C.; McCormick, K.; O`Brien, D.; Reichle, R.; Saibene, G.; Simonini, R.; Spence, J.; Stamp, M.; Stork, D.; Taroni, A.; Vlases, G. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    Convection from the scrape-off layer (SOL) to the divertor will control core impurities, if it retains them in a cold, dense, divertor plasma. This implies a high impurity concentration in the divertor, low at its entrance. Particle flux into the divertor entrance can be varied systematically in JET, using the new fuelling and pumping systems. The convection ratio has been estimated for various conditions of operation. Particle convection into the divertor should increase thermal convection, decreasing thermal conduction, and temperature and density gradients along the magnetic field, hence increasing the frictional force and decreasing the thermal force on impurities. Changes in convection in the SOL, caused by gaseous fuelling, have been studied, both experimentally in the JET Mk I divertor and with EDGE2/NIMBUS. 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Impact of fuelling and impurity on pedestal dynamics and instabilities in the HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, W. L.; Zou, X. L.; Gao, J. M.; Shi, Z. B.; Feng, B. B.; Cui, Z. Y.; Xu, M.; Shen, Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Ding, X. T.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong; HL-2A Team

    2017-01-01

    In recent experiments of the HL-2A tokamak, the effect on the pedestal dynamics by the plasma fuelling with supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) has been intensively investigated. Experimental results in several tokamaks suggested that SMBI is a promising technique for ELM mitigation. In addition to the fuelling, the impact of impurities on the pedestal dynamics and instabilities has been investigated in HL-2A. Experimental results have shown that during the H-mode phase, a broadband electromagnetic (EM) turbulence was driven by peaked impurity density profile at the edge plasma region, and governed by double critical gradients of the impurity density. The absolute value of the threshold in positive gradient region is much lower than that in the negative region. This strong asymmetry in the critical gradients has been predicted by theoretical simulation. The results reveal that pedestal dynamics and heat loads can be actively controlled by exciting or changing pedestal instabilities.

  7. Test of a new tip material for Langmuir probe diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, M. Y.; Shukrullah, S.; Ghaffar, A.; Rehman, N. U.; Khan, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the work is to test a nickel-chrome alloy as a probe tip material for characterization of discharge plasmas. In order to meet the objective, a symmetric triple Langmuir probe diagnostic system and an associated driving circuit are designed and tested in an inductively coupled plasma generated by a 13.56-MHz radio frequency source coupled with an automated impedance match network. This probe is used to measure the electron temperature, electron number density, and ion saturation current as functions of the input power of the radio frequency source and the filling gas pressure. An increasing trend is noticed in the electron temperature and electron number density with an increase in the input power, whilst a decreasing trend is evident in these parameters with an increase in the nitrogen gas pressure. The overall inaccuracies in electron temperature and electron number density measurements are 5-12% and 3-13%, respectively.

  8. Standard Guide for Testing Materials for Aerospace Plastic Transparent Enclosures

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide is intended to summarize the standard test methods available on individual and composite materials utilized in fabrication of aerospace plastic transparent enclosures. As such, it is intended to specifically include transparent thermoplastics, transparent elastomers, and reinforced plastics, whether thermoplastic or thermosetting. 1.2 This guide is intended as an aid in the search for test methods pertinent to Aerospace Plastic Transparent Enclosures. It should be understood that all methods listed may not apply to all enclosures. 1.3 The standards included refer to the properties or aspects listed in Table 1. The properties or aspects are listed in alphabetical order and the descriptions used are intended to facilitate the search. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limi...

  9. Materials property testing using a stress-strain microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panayotou, N.F.; Baldrey, D.G. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States); Haggag, F.M. [Advanced Technology Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The Stress-Strain Microprobe (SSM) uses an automated ball indentation technique to obtain flow data from a localized region of a test specimen or component. This technique is used to rapidly determine the yield strength and microstructural condition of a variety of materials including pressure vessel steels, stainless steels, and nickel-base alloys. The SSM provides an essentially non-destructive technique for the measurement of yield strength data. This technique is especially suitable for the study of complex or highly variable microstructures such as weldments and weld heat affected zones. In this study 119 distinct SSM determinations of the yield strength of eight engineering alloys are discussed and compared to data obtained by conventional tensile tests. The sensitivity of the SSM to the presence of residual stresses is also discussed.

  10. Mobile NMR for geophysical analysis and materials testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BLUMICH Bernhard; MAULER Jǒrg; HABER Agnes; PERLO Juan; DANIELI Ernesto; CASANOVA Federico

    2009-01-01

    Initiated by well logging NMR, portable NMR instruments are being developed for a variety of novel applications in materials testing, process analysis and control, which provides new opportunities for geophysical investigations. Small-diameter cylindrical sensors can probe short distances into the walls of slim-line logging holes, and single-sided sensors enable non-destructive testing of large objects. Both sensors are characterized by small sensitive volumes. Barrel-shaped magnets that accommodate the sample in their center have higher sensitivity due to a larger sensitive volume but can accommodate only samples like drill cores, which fit in size to the diameter of the magnet bore. Both types of magnets can be scaled down to the size of a coffee mug to arrive at sub-compact NMR equipment. Portable NMR magnets are reviewed in the context of applications related to geophysics.

  11. Production integrated nondestructive testing of composite materials and material compounds – an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straß, B.; Conrad, C.; Wolter, B.

    2017-03-01

    Composite materials and material compounds are of increasing importance, because of the steadily rising relevance of resource saving lightweight constructions. Quality assurance with appropriate Nondestructive Testing (NDT) methods is a key aspect for reliable and efficient production. Quality changes have to be detected already in the manufacturing flow in order to take adequate corrective actions. For materials and compounds the classical NDT methods for defectoscopy, like X-ray and Ultrasound (US) are still predominant. Nevertheless, meanwhile fast, contactless NDT methods, like air-borne ultrasound, dynamic thermography and special Eddy-Current techniques are available in order to detect cracks, voids, pores and delaminations but also for characterizing fiber content, distribution and alignment. In Metal-Matrix Composites US back-scattering can be used for this purpose. US run-time measurements allow the detection of thermal stresses at the metal-matrix interface. Another important area is the necessity for NDT in joining. To achieve an optimum material utilization and product safety as well as the best possible production efficiency, there is a need for NDT methods for in-line inspection of the joint quality while joining or immediately afterwards. For this purpose EMAT (Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer) technique or Acoustic Emission testing can be used.

  12. Application of exhaust gas fuel reforming in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines fuelled with biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsolakis, A. [School of Engineering, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Megaritis, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering and Design, Brunel University, West London, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Yap, D. [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore)

    2008-03-15

    This paper documents the application of exhaust gas fuel reforming of two alternative fuels, biodiesel and bioethanol, in internal combustion engines. The exhaust gas fuel reforming process is a method of on-board production of hydrogen-rich gas by catalytic reaction of fuel and engine exhaust gas. The benefits of exhaust gas fuel reforming have been demonstrated by adding simulated reformed gas to a diesel engine fuelled by a mixture of 50% ultra low sulphur diesel (ULSD) and 50% rapeseed methyl ester (RME) as well as to a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine fuelled by bioethanol. In the case of the biodiesel fuelled engine, a reduction of NO{sub x} emissions was achieved without considerable smoke increase. In the case of the bioethanol fuelled HCCI engine, the engine tolerance to exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) was extended and hence the typically high pressure rise rates of HCCI engines, associated with intense combustion noise, were reduced. (author)

  13. Results of the mole penetration tests in different materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzaszek, Roman; Seweryn, Karol; Grygorczuk, Jerzy; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Rybus, Tomasz; Wisniewski, Lukasz; Neal, Clive R.; Huang, Shaopeng

    2010-05-01

    Mole devices are low velocity, medium to high energy, self-driven penetrators, designed as a carrier of different sensors for in situ investigations of subsurface layers of planetary bodies. The maximum insertion depth of such devices is limited by energy of single mole's stroke and soil resistance for the dynamic penetration. A mole penetrator ‘KRET' has been designed, developed, and successfully tested at Space Research Centre PAS in Poland. The principle of operation of the mole bases on the interaction between three masses: the cylindrical casing, the hammer, and the rest of the mass, acting as a support mass. This approach takes advantage of the MUPUS penetrator (a payload of Philae lander on Rosetta mission) insertion tests knowledge. Main parameters of the mole KRET are listed below: - outer diameter: 20.4mm, - length: 330mm, - total mass: 488g, - energy of the driving spring: 2.2J, - average power consumption: 0.28W, - average insertion progress/stroke: 8.5mm, The present works of Space Research Center PAS team are focused on three different activities. First one includes investigations of the mole penetration effectiveness in the lunar analogues (supported by ESA PECS project). Second activity, supported by Polish national fund, is connected with numerical calculation of the heat flow investigations and designing and developing the Heat Flow Probe Hardware Component (HPHC) for L-GIP NASA project. It's worth noting that L-GIP project refers to ILN activity. Last activity focuses on preparing the second version of the mole ready to work in low thermal and pressure conditions. Progress of a mole penetrator in granular medium depends on the mechanical properties of this medium. The mole penetrator ‘KRET' was tested in different materials: dry quartz sand (0.3 - 0.8 grain size), wet quartz sand, wheat flour and lunar regolith mechanical simulant - Chemically Enhanced OB-1 (CHENOBI). Wheat flour was selected due to its high cohesion rate and small grain size

  14. Development of Power Electronics Based Test Platform for Characterization and Testing of Magnetocaloric Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Elamalayil Soman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetocaloric effects of various materials are getting more and more interesting for the future, as they can significantly contribute towards improving the efficiency of many energy intensive applications such as refrigeration, heating, and air conditioning. Accurate characterization of magnetocaloric effects, exhibited by various materials, is an important process for further studies and development of the suitable magnetocaloric heating and cooling solutions. The conventional test facilities have plenty of limitations, as they focus only on the thermodynamic side and use magnetic machines with moving bed of magnetocaloric material or magnet. In this work an entirely new approach for characterization of the magnetocaloric materials is presented, with the main focus on a flexible and efficient power electronic based excitation and a completely static test platform. It can generate a periodically varying magnetic field using superposition of an ac and a dc magnetic field. The scale down prototype uses a customized single phase H-bridge inverter with essential protections and an electromagnet load as actuator. The preliminary simulation and experimental results show good agreement and support the usage of the power electronic test platform for characterizing magnetocaloric materials.

  15. Sustainability Indicators for Open-Cycle Thorium-Fuelled Nuclear Energy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The potential for countries which currently have a nominal nuclear energy infrastructure to adopt thorium-uranium-fuelled nuclear energy systems, using a once-through “open” nuclear fuel cycle, has been presented by the International Atomic Energy Agency. This paper highlights Generation III and III+ nuclear energy technologies that could potentially adopt an open thorium-uranium fuel cycle and qualitatively highlights the main differences between the open thorium-uranium and open uranium fue...

  16. Disaggregate demand for conventional and alternative fuelled vehicles in the Census Metropolitan Area of Hamilton, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potoglou, Dimitrios

    The focus of this thesis is twofold. First, it offers insight on how households' car-ownership behaviour is affected by urban form and availability of local-transit at the place of residence, after controlling for socio-economic and demographic characteristics. Second, it addresses the importance of vehicle attributes, household and individual characteristics as well as economic incentives and urban form to potential demand for alternative fuelled vehicles. Data for the empirical analyses of the aforementioned research activities were obtained through an innovative Internet survey, which is also documented in this thesis, conducted in the Census Metropolitan Area of Hamilton. The survey included a retrospective questionnaire of households' number and type of vehicles and a stated choices experiment for assessing the potential demand for alternative fuelled vehicles. Established approaches and emerging trends in automobile demand modelling identified early on in this thesis suggest a disaggregate approach and specifically, the estimation of discrete choice models both for explaining car ownership and vehicle-type choice behaviour. It is shown that mixed and diverse land uses as well as short distances between home and work are likely to decrease the probability of households to own a large number of cars. Regarding the demand for alternative fuelled vehicles, while vehicle attributes are particularly important, incentives such as free parking and access to high occupancy vehicle lanes will not influence the choice of hybrids or alternative fuelled vehicles. An improved understating of households' behaviour regarding the number of cars as well as the factors and trade-offs for choosing cleaner vehicles can be used to inform policy designed to reduce car ownership levels and encourage adoption of cleaner vehicle technologies in urban areas. Finally, the Internet survey sets the ground for further research on implementation and evaluation of this data collection method.

  17. A modelling evaluation of an ammonia-fuelled microchannel reformer for hydrogen generation

    OpenAIRE

    Chiuta, Steven; Everson, Raymond C.; Neomagus, Hein W.J.P.; Le Grange, Louis A.; Bessarabov, Dmitri G.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen production from an ammonia-fuelled microchannel reactor is simulated in a three-dimensional (3D) model implemented via Comsol Multiphysics™. The work described in this paper endeavours to obtain a mathematical framework that provides an understanding of reaction-coupled transport phenomena within the microchannel reactor. The transport processes and reactor performance are elucidated in terms of velocity, temperature, and species concentration distributions, as well as local reaction...

  18. Tracing the origin of the AGN fuelling reservoir in MCG-6-30-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimundo, S. I.; Davies, R. I.; Canning, R. E. A.; Celotti, A.; Fabian, A. C.; Gandhi, P.

    2017-02-01

    The active galaxy MCG-6-30-15 has a 400 pc diameter stellar kinematically distinct core, counter-rotating with respect to the main body of the galaxy. Our previous high spatial resolution (0.1 arcsec) H-band observations of this galaxy mapped the stellar kinematics and [Fe II] 1.64 μm gas dynamics though mainly restricted to the spatial region of the counter-rotating core. In this work, we probe the stellar kinematics on a larger field of view and determine the ionized and molecular gas dynamics to study the formation of the counter-rotating core and the implications for active galactic nucleus (AGN) fuelling. We present integral field spectroscopy observations with SINFONI in the H and K bands in the central 1.2 kpc and with VIMOS HR-blue in the central 4 kpc of the galaxy. Ionized gas outflows of vout ˜ 100 km s-1 are traced by the [Ca VIII] 2.32 μm coronal line and extend out to at least a radius of r ˜ 140 pc. The molecular gas, traced by the H2 2.12 μm emission, is also counter-rotating with respect to the main body of the galaxy, indicating that the formation of the distinct core was associated with inflow of external gas into the centre of MCG-6-30-15. The molecular gas traces the available gas reservoir for AGN fuelling and is detected as close as r ˜ 50-100 pc. External gas accretion is able to significantly replenish the fuelling reservoir suggesting that the event which formed the counter-rotating core was also the main mechanism providing gas for AGN fuelling.

  19. Effects of gas types and models on optimized gas fuelling station reservoir's pressure

    OpenAIRE

    M. Farzaneh-Gord; M. Deymi-Dashtebayaz; Rahbari,H. R.

    2013-01-01

    There are similar algorithms and infrastructure for storing gas fuels at CNG (Compressed Natural Gas) and CHG (Compressed Hydrogen Gas) fuelling stations. In these stations, the fuels are usually stored in the cascade storage system to utilize the stations more efficiently. The cascade storage system generally divides into three reservoirs, commonly termed low, medium and high-pressure reservoirs. The pressures within these reservoirs have huge effects on performance of the stations. In the c...

  20. Technical and Feasibility Analysis of Gasoline and Natural Gas Fuelled Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambos Chasos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There is recent interest for the utilisation of natural gas for empowering the internal combustion engines (ICE of vehicles. The production of novel natural gas ICE for vehicles, as well as the conversion of existing gasoline fuelled ICE of vehicles to natural gas fuelled ICE are new technologies which require to be analysed and assessed. The objective of the present study is to examine the adaptation of natural gas as vehicle fuel and carry out a technical analysis and an economical feasibility analysis of the two types of ICE vehicles, namely gasoline and natural gas fuelled vehicles. The technical model uses the physical properties of the two fuels and the performance factors of internal combustion engines including brake thermal efficiency. The resulting exhaust gas emissions are also estimated by the technical model using combustion calculations which provide the expected levels of exhaust gas emissions. Based on the analysis with the technical model, comparisons of the two types of engines are performed. Furthermore, the estimated performance characteristics of the two types of engines, along with local statistical data on annual fuel imports and annual fuel consumption for transportation and data on the vehicles fleet for the case study of Cyprus are used as input in the economical model. For the base year 2013, data of natural gas price is also used in the economical model. The economical model estimates the capital cost, the carbon dioxide emissions avoidance of fines, the net present value and the internal rate of return of the investment of large scale adaptation of natural gas fuelled vehicles for the case study. From the results and comparisons, conclusions are drawn and recommendations are provided for the adaptation of natural gas vehicles which can provide improved performance with reduced pollutant emissions.

  1. Mechanical test results from the EU testing program for potential ITER insulation material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, A.J.; Butt, S.; Smith, K.D. [Oxford Instruments, Witney (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    Insulation systems will be a key element in the future construction and impregnation of the coils for the ITER device. Candidate materials must survive prolonged irradiation (2.5 x 10{sup 21} - 2.5 x 10{sup 22} neutrons/m{sup 2} - September 1994) simultaneous high compressive and shear stresses (up to 300 MPa and 50 MPa respectively), and have high electrical reliability (30 year service life). The materials chosen are intended to meet the demands of full scale coil manufacture. Mechanical properties, including shear / compression and compression at cryogenic temperatures of several different insulation systems are reported. The mechanically acceptable systems will be irradiation tested at a future date, although only materials believed to withstand high irradiation doses have been selected. The final results of this program are presented and compared with a pass / fail criterion based on results from a benchmark testing program (insulation system based on anhydride cured DGEBA resin and S2 glass).

  2. Fabricated and friction test anisotropy material of ultrasonic motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Yan-yan; QU Jian-jun; KUANG Nai-hang

    2010-01-01

    The twisters for composed of anisotropic material were designed and manufactured.And two kinds of directional-composites were made:one was fiber direction vertical with frictional interface and another was parallel with frictional interface and moving direction.By varying the proportions of epoxy resin and fiber and arranging the orientations of fiber,the composites anisotropy along longitudinal and circumferential were got.Using density measurement,the mass fraction of resin and fiber were calculated.According to composite mesoscopic mechanics,the elasticity constants of composite were analyzed and calculated.The composite different thicknesses were sliced,and attach to the rotor,then the load characteristics,no-load speed,stop load of ultrasonic motor(USM) were test.The output properties of USM with 0.6 mm thickness composite were superior.The effect of friction material on ultrasonic motor was analyzed.Elastic modulus,thickness and micro-morphology of material are main factors which affect characteristics of ultrasonic motor.

  3. Materials development for ITER shielding and test blanket in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.M., E-mail: Chenjm@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wu, J.H.; Liu, X.; Wang, P.H. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Z.H.; Li, Z.N. [Ningxia Orient Non-ferrous Metals Group Co. Ltd., P.O. Box 105, Shizuishan (China); Wang, X.S.; Zhang, P.C. [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhang, N.M.; Fu, H.Y.; Liu, D.H. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2011-10-01

    China is a member of the ITER program and is developing her own materials for its shielding and test blanket modules. The materials include vacuum-hot-pressing (VHP) Be, CuCrZr alloy, 316L(N) and China low activation ferritic/martensitic (CLF-1) steels. Joining technologies including Be/Cu hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and electron beam (EB) weldability of 316L(N) were investigated. Chinese VHP-Be showed good properties, with BeO content and ductility that satisfy the ITER requirements. Be/Cu mock-ups were fabricated for Be qualification tests at simulated ITER vertical displacement event (VDE) and heat flux cycling conditions. Fine microstructure and good mechanical strength of the CuCrZr alloy were achieved by a pre-forging treatment, while the weldability of 316L(N) by EB was demonstrated for welding depths varying from 5 to 80 mm. Fine microstructure, high strength, and good ductility were achieved in CLF-1 steel by an optimized normalizing, tempering and aging procedure.

  4. Materials Testing and Performance Optimization for the SAMURAI-TPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, K. D.; Lynch, W. G.; Barney, J.; Chajecki, Z.; Estee, J.; Shane, R.; Tangwanchareon, S.; Tsang, M. B.; Yurkon, J.

    2012-10-01

    The SAMURAI time-projection chamber (TPC) will be used to make measurements of pion spectra from heavy ion collisions at RIBF in Japan. Such research provides an opportunity to study supra-saturation density neutron-rich matter in the laboratory, and is critical to understanding the structure of neutron stars. It will provide a complete, 3D picture of the ionization deposited in a gas volume, from which particle types and momenta can be determined. The gas-containment volume is composed of surfaces of aluminum and plastic, as well as halogen-free printed circuit board. During multiplication of the ionized electrons at the anode wire plane of the TPC, UV photons are produced. These cause unwanted discharges when they interact with oxidized aluminum surfaces, which have low work functions. This problem can be addressed by application of a suitable conductive paint or epoxy. Paints were investigated to insure they did not contain any materials capable of inhibiting the performance of the detector gas. These investigations were cross-checked by tests carried out using an existing BRAHMS-TPC. Details on these tests and the materials chosen will be shown. The design and optimization of the gating grid, used to limit data collection to triggered events, will also be discussed.

  5. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material--ATM-104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization data obtained to date are described for Approved Testing Material 104 (ATM-104), which is spent fuel from Assembly DO47 of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Unit 1), a pressurized-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-104 consists of 128 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 42 MWd/kgM and expected fission gas release of about 1%. A variety of analyses were performed to investigate cladding characteristics, radionuclide inventory, and redistribution of fission products. Characterization data include (1) fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling history; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) and electron probe microanalyses (EPMA); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding.

  6. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material---ATM-105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization data obtained to data are described for Approved Testing Material 105 (ATM-105), which is spent fuel from Bundles CZ346 and CZ348 of the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant, a boiling-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-105 consists of 88 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 2400 GJ/kgM (28 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of about 1%. Characterization data include (1) descriptions of as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report.

  7. Bio-oil fuelled diesel power plant; Biooeljyllae toimiva dieselvoimala

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuorinen, A. [Modigen Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The project mission is to develop a diesel power plant which is capable of using liquid bio-oils as the main fuel of the power plant. The applicable bio-oils are rape seed oils and pyrolysis oils. The project was started in 1994 by installing a 1.5 MW Vasa 4L32 engine in VTT Energy laboratory in Otaniemi. During 1995 the first tests with the rape seed oils were made. The tests show that the rape seed oil can be used in Vasa 32 engines without difficulties. In the second phase of the project during 1996 pyrolysis oil made of wood was tested. Finally a diesel power plant concept with integrated pyrolysis oil, electricity and heat production will be developed

  8. Radiochemical analyses of several spent fuel Approved Testing Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Wildung, N.J.

    1994-09-01

    Radiochemical characterization data are described for UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} plus 3 wt% Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} commercial spent nuclear fuel taken from a series of Approved Testing Materials (ATMs). These full-length nuclear fuel rods include MLA091 of ATM-103, MKP070 of ATM-104, NBD095 and NBD131 of ATM-106, and ADN0206 of ATM-108. ATMs 103, 104, and 106 were all irradiated in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Reactor No.1), a pressurized-water reactor that used fuel fabricated by Combustion Engineering. ATM-108 was part of the same fuel bundle designed as ATM-105 and came from boiling-water reactor fuel fabricated by General Electric and irradiated in the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant. Rod average burnups and expected fission gas releases ranged from 2,400 to 3,700 GJ/kgM. (25 to 40 Mwd/kgM) and from less than 1% to greater than 10%, respectively, depending on the specific ATM. The radiochemical analyses included uranium and plutonium isotopes in the fuel, selected fission products in the fuel, fuel burnup, cesium and iodine on the inner surfaces of the cladding, {sup 14}C in the fuel and cladding, and analyses of the gases released to the rod plenum. Supporting examinations such as fuel rod design and material descriptions, power histories, and gamma scans used for sectioning diagrams are also included. These ATMs were examined as part of the Materials Characterization Center Program conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program.

  9. Detailed experimental characterization of a reformate fuelled PEM stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Anders; Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2006-01-01

    Increasing attention is given to fuel cells for micro combined heat and power systems for local households. Currently, mainly three different types of fuel cells are commercially competitive: SOFC, low- and high-temperature PEM fuel cells. In the present paper the Low Temperature PEM technology...... performance and process input variations need to be carefully accounted for. Such data will additionally provide valuable input for system modeling and optimization. The paper presents an advanced experimental test facility capable of performing static as well as dynamic tests on fuel cell stacks...

  10. Standard test method for rapid indentation hardness testing of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1984-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the procedure for rapid indentation hardness testing of metallic materials as an alternative to Test Method E 10 on standard Brinell hardness. It includes methods for the verification of rapid indentation hardness testing machines, Part B, and the calibration of reference hardness test blocks, Part C. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. Effect of High-Humidity Testing on Material Parameters of Flexible Printed Circuit Board Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahokallio, Sanna; Saarinen, Kirsi; Frisk, Laura

    2013-09-01

    The tendency of polymers to absorb moisture impairs especially their electrical and mechanical properties. These are important characteristics for printed circuit board (PCB) materials, which should provide mechanical support as well as electrical insulation in many different environments in order to guarantee safe operation for electrical devices. Moreover, the effects of moisture are accelerated at increased temperatures. In this study, three flexible PCB dielectric materials, namely polyimide (PI), fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), were aged over different periods of time in a high-humidity test, in which the temperature was 85°C and relative humidity 85%. After aging, the changes in the structure of the polymers were studied by determining different material parameters such as modulus of elasticity, glass-transition temperature, melting point, coefficient of thermal expansion, water absorption, and crystallinity, and changes in the chemical structure with several techniques including thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, moisture analysis, and a precision scale. The results showed that PI was extremely stable under the aging conditions and therefore an excellent choice for electrical applications under harsh conditions. Similarly, FEP proved to be relatively stable under the applied aging conditions. However, its crystallinity increased markedly during aging, and after 6000 h of aging the results indicated oxidation. PET suffered from hydrolysis during the test, leading to its embrittlement after 2000 h of aging.

  12. Alternative buffer material. Status of the ongoing laboratory investigation of reference materials and test package 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Daniel [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Lydmark, Sara; Jaegerwall, Sara; Pedersen, Karsten [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden); Hansen, Staffan [LTH Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    Bentonite clay is part of the Swedish KBS-3 design of final repositories for high level radioactive waste. Wyoming bentonite with the commercial name MX-80 (American Colloid Co) has long been the reference for buffer material in the KBS-3 concept. Extending the knowledge base of alternative buffer materials will make it possible to optimize regarding safety, availability and cost. For this reason the field experiment Alternative Buffer Material (ABM) was started at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2006. The experiment includes three medium-scale test packages, each consisting of a central steel tube with heaters, and a buffer of compacted clay. Eleven different clays were chosen for the buffers to examine effects of smectite content, interlayer cations and overall iron content. Also bentonite pellets with and without additional quartz are being tested. The buffer in package 1 had been subjected to wetting by formation water and heating for more than two years (at 130 deg C for {approx} 1 year) when it was retrieved and analyzed. The main purposes of the project were to characterise the clays with respect to hydro-mechanical properties, mineralogy and chemical composition and to identify any differences in behaviour or long term stability. The diversity of clays and the heater of steel also make the experiment suitable for studies of iron-bentonite interactions. This report concerns the work accomplished up to now and is not to be treated as any final report of the project.

  13. Design of new frictional testing machine for shallow fault materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadai, O.; Tanikawa, W.; Hirose, T.; Sakaguchi, M.; Lin, W.

    2009-12-01

    Subduction thrust faults at shallow depth mainly consist of granular and clay-rich materials which strengths are influenced by the presence of pore water. Dilatation and pore pressure generation of fault zones by the dynamic friction will increase the volumetric water content in fault zone, which can assist the fault weakening by acoustic fluidization or hydrodynamic lubrication mechanism. Therefore the evaluation of rheology for clay minerals rich in pore water is critical for understanding of seismic behaviors at shallow depth. Here, we introduce a new testing apparatus for the purpose of accurate evaluation of friction behavior for incohesive fault rock materials. Our machine can shear granular materials up to 80 mm of outer diameter and maximum thickness of 40 mm. The capacities of axial load, torque, and motor are 100kN, 500Nm and 30kW, respectively, and pore pressure is increased up to 50 MPa. Maximum rotation speed is 660 rpm, which is equivalent to 1 m/s of the average slip velocity when sample diameter is 60 mm. We can monitor the dynamic changes of pore pressure and temperature at sliding surface during the friction tests. We can also control the pore pressure, axial load, pore pressure and temperature independently. All parameters can be held at targeted values and be generated at constant incremental velocity. We can control the rotation more sensitively to program the complicated rotation history that slip velocity and acceleration change during the rotation. We used powdered smectite and illite in our friction tests. We measured normal stress dependence on shear stress at normal stress up to 25 MPa with a constant rotation speed from 0.01 to 1 rpm. Normal stress is proportional to shear stress for dry clay minerals, and the friction coefficients are from 0.3 to 0.5. On the other hand, very low friction is observed in clay minerals saturated by water, and shear strength is nearly constant at various normal stresses. Our results suggest that clay

  14. Methodology comparison for gamma-heating calculations in material-testing reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, M.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Lyoussi, A. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache F-13108 Saint Paul les Durance (France); Reynard-Carette, C. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, Universite de Toulon, IM2NP UMR 7334, 13397, Marseille (France)

    2015-07-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is a Material-Testing Reactor (MTR) under construction in the south of France at CEA Cadarache (French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission). It will typically host about 20 simultaneous irradiation experiments in the core and in the beryllium reflector. These experiments will help us better understand the complex phenomena occurring during the accelerated ageing of materials and the irradiation of nuclear fuels. Gamma heating, i.e. photon energy deposition, is mainly responsible for temperature rise in non-fuelled zones of nuclear reactors, including JHR internal structures and irradiation devices. As temperature is a key parameter for physical models describing the behavior of material, accurate control of temperature, and hence gamma heating, is required in irradiation devices and samples in order to perform an advanced suitable analysis of future experimental results. From a broader point of view, JHR global attractiveness as a MTR depends on its ability to monitor experimental parameters with high accuracy, including gamma heating. Strict control of temperature levels is also necessary in terms of safety. As JHR structures are warmed up by gamma heating, they must be appropriately cooled down to prevent creep deformation or melting. Cooling-power sizing is based on calculated levels of gamma heating in the JHR. Due to these safety concerns, accurate calculation of gamma heating with well-controlled bias and associated uncertainty as low as possible is all the more important. There are two main kinds of calculation bias: bias coming from nuclear data on the one hand and bias coming from physical approximations assumed by computer codes and by general calculation route on the other hand. The former must be determined by comparison between calculation and experimental data; the latter by calculation comparisons between codes and between methodologies. In this presentation, we focus on this latter kind of bias. Nuclear

  15. Synthesis of functional materials by radiation and qualification testing of organic materials in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nho, Young Chang; Kim, Ki Yup; Kang, Phil Hyun and others [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Hong Jae [Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Dong Hak; Lee, Young Moo [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byung Kak [Chungju National Univ., Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Bae, You Han [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-05-01

    The radiation crosslinking and grafting can be easily adjusted and is easily reproducible by controlling the radiation dose. These studies aim to develop new biomaterials such as covering for burns and wound, and controlled release of drug. A radiation technology was used to develop PTC materials useful in devices that limit electric fault currents. Radiation-curing of fiber-matrix composites is a promising application. There are a number of advantages to radiation curing of composites, compared with conventional thermal processing. Radiation curing at ambient temperature allows tighter control of part dimensions, and elimination of internal stresses which otherwise occur on cooling and which reduce material strength. These studies involved radiation curing of epoxy resins with various fibers and filler for structural application for aerospace and sport goods. The chain scission is the basis of other radiation treatments aimed at enhancing processing characteristics of polymers. These studies aim to make PTFE powder from PTFE scrap using the radiation degradation which allows incorporation of the material into coatings, inks etc. Low density polyethylene, crosslinked polyethylene, ethylene propylene rubber, and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber as cable insulating, seathing and sealing materials were irradiated for the accelerated ageing tests. Degradation was investigated by measuring dielectric analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and dynamic mechanical analysis. Dielectric tan{delta}, storage modulus and loss modulus were increased with irradiation doses. However, decomposition temperature decreased with irradiation doses.

  16. Standard Test Method for Oxyacetylene Ablation Testing of Thermal Insulation Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the screening of ablative materials to determine the relative thermal insulation effectiveness when tested as a flat panel in an environment of a steady flow of hot gas provided by an oxyacetylene burner. 1.2 This test method should be used to measure and describe the properties of materials, products, or assemblies in response to heat and flame under controlled laboratory conditions and should not be used to describe or appraise the fire hazard of materials, products, or assemblies under actual fire conditions. However, results of this test method may be used as elements of a fire risk assessment which takes into account all of the factors which are pertinent to an assessment of the fire hazard of a particular end use. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limi...

  17. Aerogel Hybrid Composite Materials: Designs and Testing for Multifunctional Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha K.; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    This webinar will introduce the broad spectrum of aerogel composites and their diverse performance properties such as reduced heat transfer to energy storage, and expands specifically on the aerogel/fiber laminate systems and testing methodologies. The multi-functional laminate composite system, AeroFiber, and its construction is designed by varying the type of fiber (e.g. polyester, carbon, Kevlar®, Spectra® or Innegral(TradeMark) and combinations thereof), the aerogel panel type and thickness, and overall layup configuration. The combination and design of materials may be customized and tailored to achieve a range of desired properties in the resulting laminate system. Multi-functional properties include structural strength, impact resistance, reduction in heat transfer, increased fire resistance, mechanical energy absorption, and acoustic energy dampening. Applications include aerospace, aircraft, automotive, boating, building and construction, lightweight portable structures, liquefied natural gas, cryogenics, transportation and energy, sporting equipment, and military protective gear industries.

  18. Vertical Flume Testing of WIPP Surrogate Waste Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, C. G.; Schuhen, M.; Kicker, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. The DOE demonstrates compliance with 40 CFR 194 by means of performance assessment (PA) calculations conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. WIPP PA calculations estimate the probability and consequences of radionuclide releases for a 10,000 year regulatory period. Human intrusion scenarios include cases in which a future borehole is drilled through the repository. Drilling mud flowing up the borehole will apply a hydrodynamic shear stress to the borehole wall which could result in erosion of the waste and radionuclides being carried up the borehole. WIPP PA uses the parameter TAUFAIL to represent the shear strength of the degraded waste. The hydrodynamic shear strength can only be measured experimentally by flume testing. Flume testing is typically performed horizontally, mimicking stream or ocean currents. However, in a WIPP intrusion event, the drill bit would penetrate the degraded waste and drilling mud would flow up the borehole in a predominantly vertical direction. In order to simulate this, a flume was designed and built so that the eroding fluid enters an enclosed vertical channel from the bottom and flows up past a specimen of surrogate waste material. The sample is pushed into the current by a piston attached to a step motor. A qualified data acquisition system controls and monitors the fluid's flow rate, temperature, pressure, and conductivity and the step motor's operation. The surrogate materials used correspond to a conservative estimate of degraded TRU waste at the end of the regulatory period. The recipes were previously developed by SNL based on anticipated future states of the waste

  19. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, L. M.; Zenobia, S. J.; Egle, B. J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.

    2016-08-01

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA-500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 1014 ions/(cm2 s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  20. The technology development for surveillance test of reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Sun Phil; Park, Day Young; Choi, Kwen Jai

    1997-12-01

    Benchmark test was performed in accordance with the requirement of US NRC Reg. Guide DG-1053 for Kori unit-1 in order to determine best-estimated fast neutron fluence irradiated into reactor vessel. Since the uncertainty of radiation analysis comes from the calculation error due to neutron cross-section data, reactor core geometrical dimension, core source, mesh density, angular expansion and convergence criteria, evaluation of calculational uncertainty due to analytical method was performed in accordance with the regulatory guide and the proof was performed for entire analysis by comparing the measurement value obtained by neutron dosimetry located in surveillance capsule. Best-estimated neutron fluence in reactor vessel was calculated by bias factor, neutron flux measurement value/calculational value, from reanalysis result from previous 1st through 4th surveillance testing and finally fluence prediction was performed for the end of reactor life and the entire period of plant life extension. Pressurized thermal shock analysis was performed in accordance with 10 CFR 50.61 using the result of neutron fluence analysis in order to predict the life of reactor vessel material and the criteria of safe operation for Kori unit 1 was reestablished. (author). 55 refs., 55 figs.

  1. On exhaust emissions from petrol-fuelled passenger cars at low ambient temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurikko, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Use

    1998-11-01

    The study at hand deals with regulated and unregulated exhaust emissions from petrol-fuelled cars at low ambient temperatures with present-day or near-future exhaust after treatment systems. The subject has been investigated at VTT over a decade and this report compiles data from various sub-studies carried out between the years 1993 - 1997. Each one of them viewed different aspects of the phenomenon, like determining the low-temperature response of today`s new cars employing three-way catalytic converters or assessing the long-term durability and the influence of vehicle mileage upon the low-temperature emissions performance. Within these studies, together more than 120 cars of model years from 1990 to 1997 have been tested. Most of them were normal, in-service vehicles with total mileages differing between only a few thousand kilometres for new cars up to 80,000 km or even more for the in-use vehicles. Both the US FTP75 and the European test cycle have been employed, and the ambient temperatures ranged from the baseline (+22 deg C) down to +- O deg C, -7 deg C and in some cases even to -20 deg C. The studies attested that new cars having today`s advanced emissions control systems produced fairly low levels of emissions when tested in conditions designated in the regulations that are the basis of the current new-vehicle certification. However, this performance was not necessarily attained at ambient temperatures that were below the normative range. Fairly widespread response was recorded, and cars having almost equal emissions output at baseline could produce largely deviating outcomes in low-temperature conditions. On average, CO and HC emissions increased by a factor of five to 10, depending on the ambient temperature and vehicle type. However, emissions of NO{sub x} were largely unaffected. Apart from these regulated emissions, many unregulated species were also determined, either by using traditional sampling and chromatography methods or on-line, employing

  2. Efficiency evaluation of gas fuelled and electric driven buses in the public transport sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, Tobias Alexander

    2013-07-01

    The following report evaluates the efficiency of gas fuelled and electric driven buses in the public transport sector on a theoretical basis. The results indicate that the combination of CHP power plants and electric driven buses reach an overall efficiency of about 51% throughout the production chain (Well-to-Wheel), including heat distribution losses. The overall Well-to-Wheel efficiency for conventional gas turbines without heat recovery decreases to around 28%. For gas fuelled buses the Well-to-Wheel efficiency is about 30%. The Co2-emissions are evaluated based on the example of a #Left Double Quotation Mark#Volvo B10L CNG#Right Double Quotation Mark# gas bus and the electric driven #Left Double Quotation Mark#Eurabus 600#Right Double Quotation Mark#. The low energy consumption of the electric driven bus results in Co2-emissions of only 181.4 g Co2/km (Grid-to-Wheel). Depending on the utilised power plant technology the overall Co2-emissions (Well-to-Wheel) amount to 307.5 g Co2/km for a CHP power plant and 553.5 g Co2/km for a conventional gas turbine. On the other hand, gas fuelled buses emit about 1.25 kg Co2/km (Tank-to-Wheel), which is eightfold the emissions of an electrical bus. The Well-to-Tank emissions further increase to about 1.32 kg Co2/km. The emission calculation is based on real gas consumption data from a Norwegian public transport utility. The results indicate that the combination of CHP plants and electrical buses provide a much higher efficiency while reducing Co2-emissions. (author)

  3. Novel organosilicon phantoms as testing material for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avigo, Cinzia; Armanetti, Paolo; Masciullo, Cecilia; Di Lascio, Nicole; Cavigli, Lucia; Ratto, Fulvio; Pini, Roberto; Cecchini, Marco; Kusmic, Claudia; Faita, Francesco; Menichetti, Luca

    2016-03-01

    The contrast in photoacoustic (PA) imaging depends on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, as well as on his optical absorption and scatter properties. Thanks to these futures, this novel modality could offer additional specificity compared to conventional ultrasound techniques, being able to reveal the signal of absorbing materials and chomophores, e.g. endogenous molecules like haemoglobin or specific near infrared dyes or plasmonic contrast agents. The development of semi-quantitative protocols for the assessment of the contrast enhancement, is one of the key aspect of the ongoing research, that could open new routes to the use of PA imaging for a variety of applications in preclinical research of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In this work, we designed and tested a tissue mimicking polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantom for photoacoustic applications, with tailored biomechanical/optical and geometrical properties. In order to modulate the light fluence and penetration, that remains one of the major challenge for this technique, we added titanium dioxide and black ink, rendering the optical absorption and scattering coefficients similar to those of biological tissues. The PDMS phantom can become a particularly promising tool in the field of photoacoustics for the evaluation of the performance of a PA system and as a model of the structure of vascularized soft tissues.

  4. Occupational exposure to asbestos during renovation of oil-shale fuelled power plants in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangur, Maie

    2007-01-01

    Many thousands of tonnes of asbestos were used in buildings in the past, especially for thermal insulation of pipes and boilers in power plants. Occupational exposure to asbestos dust now mainly occurs during demolition, renovation and routine maintenance activities. The objective of this study was to evaluate occupational exposure to airborne asbestos during renovation of solid oil-shale fuelled power plants carried out in 2001-2003. Air monitoring inside and outside of the renovation area was performed. The concentration of airborne fibres in the working environment increased during renovation but the valid limit value (0.1 fibres/cm(3)) was not exceeded.

  5. Performance analysis of different organic Rankine cycle configurations on board liquefied natural gas-fuelled vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldasso, Enrico; Andreasen, Jesper Graa; Meroni, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Gas-fuelled shipping is expected to increase significantly in the coming years. Similarly, much effort is devoted to the study of waste heat recovery systems to be implemented on board ships. In this context, the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) technology is considered one of the most promising...... solutions. The ORC favorably compares to the steam Rankine cycle because of its simple layout and high efficiency, achievable by selecting a working fluid with desirable properties. This paper aims at assessing the fuel savings attainable by implementing ORC units on board vessels powered by liquefied...

  6. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jiyeon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jeters, Robert T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, Gary A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonheyo, George T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  7. What is materialism? Testing two dominant perspectives on materialism in the marketing literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchiraju Srikant

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Materialism is defined as the importance an individual attaches to worldly possessions, which has been considered as an important construct in consumer behavior and marketing literature. There are two dominant perspectives on individual materialism in the marketing literature that focus on (1 personality traits or (2 individual personal values. However, several scholars have questioned the aforementioned materialism conceptualizations. Therefore, the present study directly compares the constructs of personality materialism and value materialism. Structural equation modeling was employed to address the following issues: (1 what are the key conceptual dimensions of materialism, (2 how much do they overlap, and (3 what is their discriminant validity in predicting outcomes linked to materialism. We suggest these two dominant perspectives on individual materialism are two distinct constructs, as they shared only 21 percent of common variance. Furthermore, we stress the multi-faceted nature of materialism, with an emphasis on future research directions related to materialism in marketing.

  8. Reference materials and representative test materials to develop nanoparticle characterization methods: the NanoChOp project case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebben, Gert; Kestens, Vikram; Varga, Zoltan; Charoud-Got, Jean; Ramaye, Yannic; Gollwitzer, Christian; Bartczak, Dorota; Geißler, Daniel; Noble, James; Mazoua, Stéphane; Meeus, Nele; Corbisier, Philippe; Palmai, Marcell; Mihály, Judith; Krumrey, Michael; Davies, Julie; Resch-Genger, Ute; Kumarswami, Neelam; Minelli, Caterina; Sikora, Aneta; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the production and characteristics of the nanoparticle test materials prepared for common use in the collaborative research project NanoChOp (Chemical and optical characterisation of nanomaterials in biological systems), in casu suspensions of silica nanoparticles and CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots. This paper is the first to illustrate how to assess whether nanoparticle test materials meet the requirements of a 'reference material' (ISO Guide 30:2015) or rather those of the recently defined category of 'representative test material' (ISO TS 16195:2013). The NanoChOp test materials were investigated with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and centrifugal liquid sedimentation (CLS) to establish whether they complied with the required monomodal particle size distribution. The presence of impurities, aggregates, agglomerates and viable microorganisms in the suspensions was investigated with DLS, CLS, optical and electron microscopy and via plating on nutrient agar. Suitability of surface functionalization was investigated with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (ATR-FTIR) and via the capacity of the nanoparticles to be fluorescently labeled or to bind antibodies. Between-unit homogeneity and stability were investigated in terms of particle size and zeta potential. This paper shows that only based on the outcome of a detailed characterization process one can raise the status of a test material to representative test material or reference material, and how this status depends on its intended use.

  9. An Ecosystem-Based Job-Creation Engine Fuelled by Technology Entrepreneurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia D. Bot

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Job creation is at the centre of the rationale provided by governments and publicly funded organizations for investing in services purported to support entrepreneurs to launch and grow technology startups. However, little is known about how to design and build the engines that convert these publicly funded services into jobs in a region. In this article, we argue that the architecture of a job-creation engine fuelled by technology entrepreneurs is important and that it should be made visible to the stakeholders of a regional venture system. The manner in which the components of a job-creation engine are organized and integrated determines the effectiveness and efficiency of the conversion of public funds into jobs. Making visible the architecture of a job-creation engine enables individuals and organizations to: i better understand the link between the investment made to service technology entrepreneurs and systematic job creation; ii utilize the regional venture system more effectively; and iii set the performance benchmark for capability improvement and rapid adjustment to environmental changes. The experience gained from operating Lead To Win since 2009 is used to describe the architecture of a job-creation engine fuelled by technology entrepreneurs that operate in Canada’s Capital Region. Lead To Win is an ecosystem designed to help a technology venture generate sufficient revenue to create six or more knowledge jobs in the region within three years of inception.

  10. Optimization of biomass fuelled systems for distributed power generation using Particle Swarm Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, P. Reche; Reyes, N. Ruiz [Department of Telecommunication Engineering, University of Jaen, 23700 EPS Linares, Jaen (Spain); Gonzalez, M. Gomez [Junta of Andalusia, 23470 Maestro Francisco Yuste 2, Cazorla, Jaen (Spain); Jurado, F. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Jaen, 23700 EPS Linares, Jaen (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    With sufficient territory and abundant biomass resources Spain appears to have suitable conditions to develop biomass utilization technologies. As an important decentralized power technology, biomass gasification and power generation has a potential market in making use of biomass wastes. This paper addresses biomass fuelled generation of electricity in the specific aspect of finding the best location and the supply area of the electric generation plant for three alternative technologies (gas motor, gas turbine and fuel cell-microturbine hybrid power cycle), taking into account the variables involved in the problem, such as the local distribution of biomass resources, transportation costs, distance to existing electric lines, etc. For each technology, not only optimal location and supply area of the biomass plant, but also net present value and generated electric power are determined by an own binary variant of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). According to the values derived from the optimization algorithm, the most profitable technology can be chosen. Computer simulations show the good performance of the proposed binary PSO algorithm to optimize biomass fuelled systems for distributed power generation. (author)

  11. Avian pectoral muscle size rapidly tracks body mass changes during flight, fasting and fuelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, A; Kvist, A; Piersma, T; Dekinga, A; Dietz, M W

    2000-03-01

    We used ultrasonic imaging to monitor short-term changes in the pectoral muscle size of captive red knots Calidris canutus. Pectoral muscle thickness changed rapidly and consistently in parallel with body mass changes caused by flight, fasting and fuelling. Four knots flew repeatedly for 10 h periods in a wind tunnel. Over this period, pectoral muscle thickness decreased in parallel with the decrease in body mass. The change in pectoral muscle thickness during flight was indistinguishable from that during periods of natural and experimental fasting and fuelling. The body-mass-related variation in pectoral muscle thickness between and within individuals was not related to the amount of flight, indicating that changes in avian muscle do not require power-training as in mammals. Our study suggests that it is possible for birds to consume and replace their flight muscles on a time scale short enough to allow these muscles to be used as part of the energy supply for migratory flight. The adaptive significance of the changes in pectoral muscle mass cannot be explained by reproductive needs since our knots were in the early winter phase of their annual cycle. Instead, pectoral muscle mass changes may reflect (i) the breakdown of protein during heavy exercise and its subsequent restoration, (ii) the regulation of flight capacity to maintain optimal flight performance when body mass varies, or (iii) the need for a particular protein:fat ratio in winter survival stores.

  12. Density and impurity profile behaviours in HL-2A tokamak with different gas fuelling methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Zheng-Ying; Zhou Yan; Li Wei; Feng Bei-Bin; Sun Ping; Dong Chun-Feng; Liu Yi; Hong Wen-Yu; Yang Qing-Wei; Ding Xuan-Tong; Duan Xu-Ru

    2009-01-01

    The electron density profile peaking and the impurity accumulation in the HL-2A tokamak plasma are observed when three kinds of fuelling methods are separately used at different fuelling particle locations.The density profile becomes more peaked when the line-averaged electron density approaches the Greenwald density limit nG and,consequently,impurity accumulation is often observed.A linear increase regime in the density range ne<0.6nG and a saturation regime in ne>0.6nG are obtained.There is no significant difference in achieved density peaking factor fne between the supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) and gas puffing into the plasma main chamber.However,the achieved fne is relatively low,in particular,in the case of density below 0.7nG,when the working gas is puffed into the divertor chamber.A discharge with a density as high as 1.2nG,i.e.ne=1.2nG,can be achieved by SMBI just after siliconization as a wall conditioning.The metallic impurities,such as iron and chromium,also increase remarkably when the impurity accumulation happens.The mechanism behind the density peaking and impurity accumulation is studied by investigating both the density peaking factor versus the effective collisionality and the radiation peaking versus density peaking.

  13. The Effect of Testing on the Retention of Coherent and Incoherent Text Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Mario; Tabbers, Huib K.; Rikers, Remy M. J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that testing during learning can enhance the long-term retention of text material. In two experiments, we investigated the testing effect with a fill-in-the-blank test on the retention of text material. In Experiment 1, using a coherent text, we found no retention benefit of testing compared to a restudy (control) condition. In…

  14. Defect detection in conducting materials using eddy current testing techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brauer Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lorentz force eddy current testing (LET is a novel nondestructive testing technique which can be applied preferably to the identification of internal defects in nonmagnetic moving conductors. The LET is compared (similar testing conditions with the classical eddy current testing (ECT. Numerical FEM simulations have been performed to analyze the measurements as well as the identification of internal defects in nonmagnetic conductors. The results are compared with measurements to test the feasibility of defect identification. Finally, the use of LET measurements to estimate of the electrical conductors under test are described as well.

  15. Overpressure wave generated by the pneumatic explosion of a solid propellant-fuelled propeller; Onde de surpression generee par l`explosion pneumatique d`un propulseur a propergol solide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolland, C.; Roussille, A. [DGA, Direction des Missiles et de l`Espace, Centre d`Achevement et d`Essais des Propulseurs et Engins, 33 - Saint Medard en Jalles (France)

    1996-12-31

    The CAEPE, the French Centre of Propellers and Engines Completion and Testing is in charge of the static tests of solid propellant fuelled propellers. In order to evaluate the risks linked with the explosion of such propellers, an analytical method is proposed which allows to determine the energy, impulses and overpressure due to an explosion occurring at any time of the firing process. This method is based on the exploitation of the shock tube equations. Concerning the overpressure wave propagation, several laws are compared to full scale tests performed at the CAEPE. (J.S.) 14 refs.

  16. Materials Challenges and Testing for Supply of Energy and Resources

    CERN Document Server

    Bollinghaus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    One major goal of the World Materials Research Institute Forum - WMRIF is to promote young scientists in the field of materials science and engineering. To enhance the international knowledge exchange between young postdoctoral scientists all over the world, WMRIF meanwhile regularly organizes joint workshops among the member institutes. These workshops also represent an increasingly appreciated platform to get known to each other and to build co-operations. For such workshops, various topics are selected, pointing to future perspectives and challenges in the field of Materials Science and Eng

  17. [Animal experimental tests of a new filling material (Isocap)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethe, P; Rotgans, J; Schmalz, G

    1978-09-01

    An experimental investigation with animals (Rhesus monkeys) concerning pulp tolerance to two premeasured dosages of calcium hydroxide cement (Reocap and Reocap-E) as well as a pre-measured dosage of filling material (Isocap) in an injection capsule was carried out (78 class V cavities). As with the negative controls, a very slight reaction, or none at all, developed in response to the two calcium hydroxide cements and the new filling material, with and without application of capping material. When five other accidentally exposed pulpae were dissected, direct capping under the corresponding preconditions (punctate exposed pulpa, longer storage period for calcium hydroxide cement) showed the characteristic formation of reparative dentin.

  18. Advanced testing methods for studying the mechanical behavior of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipilov, Sergei A.

    2005-03-01

    This article considers some problems associated with the selection of metallic materials used in engineering structures and environments. A common dilemma in engineering is the proliferation of newly designed (mostly high-strength and/or corrosion-resistant) steels and alloys that are unusable in industry as they are highly susceptible to failure under operating conditions including environmentally assisted cracking. The problem of materials failure has several sources, the most significant of which is how engineers select which material to use in which industry.

  19. Full scale tests of moisture buffer capacity of wall materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2005-01-01

    Moisture buffer capacity of hygroscopic materials can be used to moderate peaks in the relative humidity (RH) of indoor air as well as moisture content variations in building materials and furnishing. This can help to ensure healthier indoor environments by preventing many processes......, the buffer performance is investigated first for the untreated material, then after adding rendering on the surfaces, and finally with latex paint. Similarly for the walls of plasterboard construction, the buffer effects are investigated first for the insulation (cellulose or mineral wool), then after adding...... reduced even with the supposedly highly vapour permeable rendering finish, not to mention the case when the latex paint was used. In the same way, the experiments for the plaster board construction demonstrated how cellulose insulation, as a very hygroscopic material, is a good buffer compared...

  20. Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratoriers: User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaschl, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users. The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware developers. It is intended to assist their project engineering personnel in materials analysis planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the analysis process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, products, and inputs necessary to define scope of analysis, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  1. A materials test system for static compression at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korellis, J.S.; Steinhaus, C.A.; Totten, J.J.

    1992-06-01

    This report documents modifications to our existing computer-controlled compression testing system to allow elevated temperature testing in an evacuated environment. We have adopted an ``inverse`` design configuration where the evacuated test volume is located within the induction heating coil, eliminating the expense and minimizing the evacuation time of a much larger traditional vacuum chamber. 2 refs.

  2. A materials test system for static compression at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korellis, J.S.; Steinhaus, C.A.; Totten, J.J.

    1992-06-01

    This report documents modifications to our existing computer-controlled compression testing system to allow elevated temperature testing in an evacuated environment. We have adopted an inverse'' design configuration where the evacuated test volume is located within the induction heating coil, eliminating the expense and minimizing the evacuation time of a much larger traditional vacuum chamber. 2 refs.

  3. 21 CFR 660.33 - Testing of source material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... incorporated into the Reagent Red Blood Cell product shall be individually tested, with no fewer than two donor sources of each antibody specificity employed, to confirm the identification of all blood group antigens... tests for each factor. The Reagent Red Blood Cell product may be tested with a single donor source...

  4. Historical Evolution of NASA Standard Materials Testing with Hypergolic Propellants and Ammonia (NASA Standard 6001 Test 15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Benjamin; McClure, Mark B.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has performed testing of hazardous and reactive aerospace fluids, including hypergolic propellants, with materials since the 1960s with the Apollo program. Amongst other test activities, Test 15 is a NASA standard test for evaluating the reactivity of materials with selected aerospace fluids, in particular hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, uns-dimethylhydrazine, Aerozine 50, dinitrogen tetroxide oxidizers, and ammonia. This manuscript provides an overview of the history of Test 15 over a timeline ranging from prior to its development and first implementation as a NASA standard test in 1974 to its current refinement. Precursor documents to NASA standard tests, as they are currently known, are reviewed. A related supplementary test, international standardization, and enhancements to Test 15 are also discussed. Because WSTF was instrumental in the development and implementation of Test 15, WSTF experience and practices are referred to in this manuscript.

  5. 77 FR 14445 - Leakage Tests on Packages for Shipment of Radioactive Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... COMMISSION Leakage Tests on Packages for Shipment of Radioactive Material AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Standard N14.5-1997, ``Radioactive Materials--Leakage Tests on Packages for Shipment'' approved February... receiving radioactive material. II. Further Information Revision 1 of Regulatory Guide 7.4 was issued with...

  6. Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal. Testing Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Accumulation and elimination of six chlorobenzenes by guppies . Chemosphere 9:3-19. Lake, J.L, N. Rubinstein, and S. Pavignano. 1987. Predicting...organisms be fish, crustaceans, and zooplankton. The test species may be from healthy laboratory cultures or may be collected from the vicinity of the...laboratory cultures can be held indefinitely but may also need to be gradually acclimated to the test temperature and salinity if test conditions differ from

  7. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF REAL TIME SECONDARY CO-INJECTION OF WATER – DIETHYL ETHER SOLUTION IN DI-DIESEL ENGINE FUELLED WITH PALM KERNEL METHYL ESTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. V. SATYANARAYANAMURTHY

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation tests were conducted on single cylinder diesel engine fuelled with neat diesel and biodiesel palm kernel methyl ester as a base line fuel with secondary injection of Water-DEE solution through the inlet manifold. A real time control systems consists of electronic unit pump that delivers 5% to 25% vol. Water-DEE solution through injector tip mounted nearer to the inlet manifold under a pressure of 3 kgf/cm2. NOx emissions reduced to a level of 500 ppm with simultaneous reduction of soot especially for PKME. However for 15% vol. of Water-DEE injection the HC emissions are closely tallying with that of neat diesel. A global overview of the results has shown that the 15% Water-DEE solution is the optimal blend based on performance and emission characteristics.

  8. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the core material influences armour stability, wave run-up and wave overtopping. The main problem related to the scaling of core materials in models is that the hydraulic gradient and the pore velocity are varying in space and time. This makes it impossible to arrive at a fully...... correct scaling. The paper presents an empirical formula for the estimation of the wave induced pressure gradient in the core, based on measurements in models and a prototype. The formula, together with the Forchheimer equation can be used for the estimation of pore velocities in cores. The paper proposes...... that the diameter of the core material in models is chosen in such a way that the Froude scale law holds for a characteristic pore velocity. The characteristic pore velocity is chosen as the average velocity of a most critical area in the core with respect to porous flow. Finally the method is demonstrated...

  9. LOCA simulation in the NRU reactor: materials test-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russcher, G.E.; Marshall, R.K.; Hesson, G.M.; Wildung, N.J.; Rausch, W.N.

    1981-10-01

    A simulated loss-of-coolant accident was performed with a full-length test bundle of pressurized water reactor fuel rods. This second experiment of the program produced peak fuel cladding temperatures of 1148K (1607/sup 0/F) and resulted in six ruptured fuel rods. Test data and initial results from the experiment are presented here in the form of photographs and graphical summaries. These results are also compared with the preceding prototypic thermal-hydraulic test results and with computer model test predictions.

  10. Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Contamination Survivability: Material Effects Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    International, Association of Official Analytical Chemists ( AOAC ) International, or American Society of Metals (ASM) International standard methods...properties shall be tested using a specified test method established by ASTM International, AOAC International, ASM International, or another...Evaluation Center AFB Air Force Base AMCR U.S. Army Materiel Command Regulation AOAC Association of Official Analytical Chemists AR Army Regulation

  11. Material Compressing Test of the High Polymer Part Used in Draft Gear of Heavy Load Locomotive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yangang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the actual load cases of heavy load locomotive, the material compressing tests of the high polymer parts used in the locomotive are researched. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing are acquired by means of comparing the many results of the material compressing tests under different test condition. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing is nonlinear in large range of strain, but the relationship is approximately linear in small range of strain. The material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are compared through the tests. The results show that the compressing property of the material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are almost same. The research offers the foundation to study the structure elasticity of the draft gear.

  12. Impact Testing for Materials Science at NASA - MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikapizye, Mitch

    2010-01-01

    The Impact Testing Facility (ITF) at NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center is host to different types of guns used to study the effects of high velocity impacts. The testing facility has been and continues to be utilized for all NASA missions where impact testing is essential. The Facility has also performed tests for the Department of Defense, other corporations, as well as universities across the nation. Current capabilities provided by Marshall include ballistic guns, light gas guns, exploding wire gun, and the Hydrometeor Impact Gun. A new plasma gun has also been developed which would be able to propel particles at velocities of 20km/s. This report includes some of the guns used for impact testing at NASA Marshall and their capabilities.

  13. Nondestructive testing of advanced materials using sensors with metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozina, Steigmann; Narcis Andrei, Danila; Nicoleta, Iftimie; Catalin-Andrei, Tugui; Frantisek, Novy; Stanislava, Fintova; Petrica, Vizureanu; Adriana, Savin

    2016-11-01

    This work presents a method for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of advanced materials that makes use of the images in near field and the concentration of flux using the phenomenon of spatial resolution. The method allows the detection of flaws as crack, nonadhesion of coating, degradation or presence delamination stresses correlated with the response of electromagnetic sensor.

  14. Hot hydrogen testing of metallic turbo pump materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Ralph; Chin, Bryan; Inamdar, Rohit

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation are to expose heat resistant alloys to hydrogen at elevated temperatures and to use various microstructural and analytical techniques to determine the chemical and rate process involved in degradation of these materials due to hydrogen environment. Inconel 718 and NASA-23 (wrought and cast) are candidate materials. The degradation of these materials in the presence of 1 to 5 atmospheric pressure of hydrogen from 450 C to 1100 C was examined. The hydrogen facility at Auburn University was used for this purpose. Control experiments were also conducted wherein the samples were exposed to vacuum so that a direct comparison of the results would separate the thermal contribution from the hydrogen effects. The samples were analyzed prior to and after exposure. A residual gas collection system was used to determine the gaseous species produced by any chemical reaction that may have occurred during the exposure. Analysis of this gas sample shows only the presence of H2 as expected. Analyses of the samples were conducted using optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and weight change. There appears to be no change in weight of the samples as a result of hydrogen exposure. In addition no visible change on the surface structure was detected. This indicates that the materials of interest do not have strong interaction with hot hydrogen. This is consistent with the microstructure results.

  15. The influence of engine operating parameters on aldehyde emissions from an ethanol-fuelled vehicle; Influencia de parametros de operacao do motor nas emissoes de aldeidos por um veiculo a etanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Rinaldo Antunes [FIAT Automoveis S.A., Betim, MG (Brazil). Engenharia de Motores]. E-mail: expmotor@fiat.com.br; Sodre, Jose Ricardo [Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: ricardo@pucminas.br

    2000-07-01

    This work presents results and analysis of experiments on aldehyde emissions and on the regulated pollutants (CO, HC and NO{sub X}) emissions, with varying engine operational parameters in an ethanol-fuelled vehicle during a standard urban test cycle. The test cycle was carried out with the vehicle in a chassis dynamometer, and simulates an average urban trip of approximately 5,8 km, under steady state conditions. The varied parameters were fuel/air equivalence ratio, dash pot function, cut off function and gear change speed. The results found showed lower aldehyde emissions for gear change at lower speeds and for richer mixtures. (author)

  16. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Y. (John) F [UTRC

    2015-01-05

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  17. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Y. F. [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2012-04-30

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  18. Emissions from Diesel and Gasoline Vehicles Fuelled by Fischer-Tropsch Fuels and Similar Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Lundorff, Peter; Ivarsson, Anders

    2007-01-01

    vehicles fuelled by Fischer Tropsch (FT) based diesel and gasoline fuel, compared to the emissions from ordinary diesel and gasoline. The comparison for diesel fuels was based on a literature review, whereas the gasoline comparison had to be based on our own experiments, since almost no references were...... and an alkylate fuel (Aspen), which was taken to be the ultimate formula of FT gasoline. FT based diesel generally showed good emission performance, whereas the FT based gasoline not necessary lead to lower emissions. On the other hand, the Aspen fuel did show many advantages for the emissions from the gasoline......The described investigation was carried out under the umbrella of IEA Advanced Motor Fuels Agreement. The purpose was to evaluate the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from...

  19. Auxiliary power unit based on a solid oxide fuel cell and fuelled with diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jeremy; Boltze, Matthias

    An auxiliary power unit (APU) is presented that is fuelled with diesel, thermally self-sustaining, and based on a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The APU is rated at 1 kW electrical, and can generate electrical power after a 3 h warm-up phase. System features include a "dry" catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) diesel reformer, a 30 cell SOFC stack with an open cathode, and a porous-media afterburner. The APU does not require a supply of external water. The SOFC stack is an outcome of a development partnership with H.C. Starck GmbH and Fraunhofer IKTS, and is discussed in detail in an accompanying paper.

  20. Epidermal cells help coordinate leukocyte migration during inflammation through fatty acid-fuelled matrix metalloproteinase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christopher J; Boyle, Rachel H; Sun, Xueying; Wicker, Sophie M; Misa, June P; Krissansen, Geoffrey W; Print, Cristin G; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S

    2014-05-23

    In addition to satisfying the metabolic demands of cells, mitochondrial metabolism helps regulate immune cell function. To date, such cell-intrinsic metabolic-immunologic cross-talk has only been described operating in cells of the immune system. Here we show that epidermal cells utilize fatty acid β-oxidation to fuel their contribution to the immune response during cutaneous inflammation. By live imaging metabolic and immunological processes within intact zebrafish embryos during cutaneous inflammation, we uncover a mechanism where elevated β-oxidation-fuelled mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species within epidermal cells helps guide matrix metalloproteinase-driven leukocyte recruitment. This mechanism requires the activity of a zebrafish homologue of the mammalian mitochondrial enzyme, Immunoresponsive gene 1. This study describes the first example of metabolic reprogramming operating within a non-immune cell type to help control its contribution to the immune response. Targeting of this metabolic-immunologic interface within keratinocytes may prove useful in treating inflammatory dermatoses.

  1. Performance and Emissions of Internal Combustion Engine Fuelled With CNG - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Darade

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of alternative fuels such as natural gases has become very essential because of the continuously decrease in the petroleum reserves and also their contribution for pollutants. In this paper, a survey of research papers on the utilization of Compressed Natural Gas in the Internal Combustion engines along with its effects on the performance and emissions is done. It is revealed that the performance characteristics except thermal efficiency and exhaust temperature, various other performance parameters like brake mean effective pressure, power, torque and brake specific fuel consumption are decreased for CNG fuelled engine while the emission characteristics of unburnt hydrocarbon, Carbon monoxide and Carbon-di-oxide except nitrogen oxides are better for CNG compared to petrol and diesel engines. The improvement in performance is observed with the addition of hydrogen.

  2. Performance of Membrane-Assisted Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System Fuelled by Bioethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amornchai Arpornwichanop

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The membrane separation units for bioethanol purification including pervaporation and vapor permeation are integrated with the bioethanol-fuelled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC system. The preliminary calculations indicate that Hydrophilic type is a suitable membrane for vapor permeation to be installed after a hydrophobic pervaporation. Based on energy self-sufficient condition and data of available pervaporation membranes, the simulation results show that the use of vapor permeation unit after the pervaporation can significantly improve the overall electrical efficiency from 10.96% for the system with pervaporation alone to 26.56%. Regarding the effect of ethanol recovery, the ethanol recovery at 75% can offer the optimal overall efficiency from the proposed purification system compared to the ethanol recovery at 31.16% for the case with the single pervaporation.

  3. Energy and Exergy Analysis of a Diesel Engine Fuelled with Diesel and Simarouba Biodiesel Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Nabnit; Mohanty, Mahendra Kumar; Mishra, Sruti Ranjan; Mohanty, Ramesh Chandra

    2016-08-01

    This article intends to determine the available work and various losses of a diesel engine fuelled with diesel and SB20 (20 % Simarouba biodiesel by volume blended with 80 % diesel by volume). The energy and exergy analysis were carried out by using first law and second law of thermodynamics respectively. The experiments were carried out on a 3.5 kW compression ignition engine. The analysis was conducted on per mole of fuel basis. The energy analysis indicates that about 37.23 and 37.79 % of input energy is converted into the capacity to do work for diesel and SB20 respectively. The exergetic efficiency was 34.8 and 35 % for diesel and Simarouba respectively. Comparative study indicates that the energetic and exergetic performance of SB20 resembles with that of diesel fuel.

  4. Lock-in infrared thermography as non-destructive test for material characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Carolus, Jorne; Bussé, Len

    2015-01-01

    The Research Institute for Materials, located at the university campus in Diepenbeek, comprises a research group, imo-imomec, committed to the development and characterization of new material systems. Material characterization can be done by means of destructive or non-destructive testing methods. However, the destructive testing methods are time consuming and economically inefficient since the test specimens are damaged during the process. The main objective of this master's thesis is to rea...

  5. Modeling Spin Testing Using Location Specific Material Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Three stages of creep. 37 2.4.1 Creep Testing A virtual creep test begins with an elastoplastic coupon, and an initial prescribed...and maximum single crystal Schmid factor. This then models the worst case of a potent damaged inclusion cluster located in a group of grains of high...is the maximum plastic shear strain amplitude, while the coefficient K’ takes into account the damaging effect of the local maximum normal stress

  6. An Internet based stated choices household survey for alternative fuelled vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potoglou, D.; Kanaroglou, P.S. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Centre for Spatial Analysis

    2006-01-15

    Vehicles fuelled by alternative energy sources have the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other negative externalities associated with the transportation sector. However, the demand for alternative fuelled vehicles (AFV) and the effectiveness of incentives, marketing promotions, new vehicle designs, and fuel subsystems should be evaluated before devising policy measures that promote the use of new vehicle technologies. This paper discussed the design and application of a stated choices experiment for the demand for AFVs that is administered uniquely through the Internet. The use of the Internet is a new method of survey data collection which provides many advantages over tradition methods of computer-aided telephone interviews (CATI) and mail interviews. The main advantages of Internet surveys are the savings in cost and time. The authors designed a Choice Internet Based Experiment for Research on Cars (CIBER-CARS). It is a self-administered online questionnaire that was used in the Census Metropolitan Area of Hamilton, Ontario. This paper described the survey design in detail and reviewed the implementation and data collection procedures. Measures for evaluating the efficiency of the Internet survey were also highlighted and the characteristics of the collected information were summarized with emphasis on the profiles of respondents and households. The characteristics of this survey were also compared with those of a similar study conducted in the State of California. Out of the 902 respondents in Hamilton, 602 stated that they would buy a vehicle in the next 5 years and 496 provided valid observations for each of the 8 stated choice exercises that included 3 fuel-type options (gasoline, hybrid, and alternative fuel) and 8 vehicle type/size-classes. The objective was to determine the impact of vehicle attributes and household characteristics to the actual choice of certain vehicles. It was expected that people with access to information via the

  7. Impact test on natural fiber reinforced polymer composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chandramohan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, natural fibers like Sisal (Agave sisalana, Banana (Musa sepientum & Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa , Sisal and banana (hybrid , Roselle and banana (hybrid and Roselle and sisal (hybrid are fabricated with bio epoxy resin using molding method. In this work, impact strength of Sisal and banana (hybrid, Roselle and banana (hybridand Roselle and sisal (hybrid composite at dry and wet conditions were studied. Impact test were conducted izod impact testing machine. In this work micro structure of the specimens are scanned by the Scanning Electron Microscope.

  8. Non Destructive Testing - Identification of Defects in Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Bachorec

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In electrical impedance tomography (EIT currents are applied through the electrodes attached on the surface of the object, and the resulting voltages are measured using the same or additional electrodes. Internal conductivity distribution is recalculated from the measured voltages and currents. The problem is very ill posed, and therefore, regularization has to be used. The aim is to reconstruct, as accurately as possible, the conductivity distribution s in phantom using finite element method (FEM. In this paper are proposed variations of the regularization term, which are applied to non-destructiveidentification of defects (voids or cracks in conductive material.

  9. Consensus stability testing protocols for organic photovoltaic materials and devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reese, Matthew O.; Gevorgyan, Suren; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    Procedures for testing organic solar cell devices and modules with respect to stability and operational lifetime are described. The descriptions represent a consensus of the discussion and conclusions reached during the first 3 years of the international summit on OPV stability (ISOS). The proced...

  10. Application of Denisyuk pulsed holography to material testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renesse, R.L. van; Burgmeijer, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    When holography is applied outside the laboratory, some well known problems are experienced: vibrations, rigid body motion, stray daylight. Pulse holography can overcome the difficulties with vibrations, but the other problems are less easily solved. When the object area to be holographically tested

  11. Materials Test-2 LOCA Simulation in the NRU Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barner, J. O.; Hesson, G. M.; King, I. L.; Marshall, R. K.; Parchen, L. J.; Pilger, J. P.; Rausch, W. N.; Russcher, G. E.; Webb, B. J.; Wildung, N. J.; Wilson, C. L.; Wismer, M. D.; Mohr, C. L.

    1982-03-01

    A simulated loss-of-coolant accident was performed with a full-length test bundle of pressurized water reactor fuel rods. This third experiment of the program produced fuel cladding temperatures exceeding 1033 K (1400°F) for 155 s and resulted in eight ruptured fuel rods. Experiment data and initial results are presented in the form of photographs and graphical summaries.

  12. Consensus stability testing protocols for organic photovoltaic materials and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reese, M.O.; Gevorgyan, S.A.; Jørgensen, M.; Bundgaard, E.; Kurtz, S.R.; Ginley, D.S.; Olson, D.C.; Lloyd, M.T.; Morvillo, P.; Katz, E.A.; Elschner, A.; Haillant, O.; Currier, T.R.; Shrotriya, V.; Hermenau, M.; Riede, M.; Kirov, K.R.; Trimmel, G.; Rath, T.; Inganäs, O.; Zhang, F.; Andersson, M.; Tvingstedt, K.; Lira-Cantu, M.; Laird, D.; McGuiness, C.; Gowrisanker, S.; Pannone, M.; Xiao, M.; Hauch, J.; Steim, R.; Delongchamp, D.M.; Rösch, R.; Hoppe, H.; Espinosa, N.; Urbina, A.; Yaman-Uzunoglu, G.; Bonekamp, J.-B.; Breemen, A.J.J.M. van; Girotto, C.; Voroshazi, E.; Krebs, F.C.

    2011-01-01

    Procedures for testing organic solar cell devices and modules with respect to stability and operational lifetime are described. The descriptions represent a consensus of the discussion and conclusions reached during the first 3 years of the international summit on OPV stability (ISOS). The procedure

  13. Standard test method for ranking resistance of materials to sliding wear using block-on-ring wear test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers laboratory procedures for determining the resistance of materials to sliding wear. The test utilizes a block-on-ring friction and wear testing machine to rank pairs of materials according to their sliding wear characteristics under various conditions. 1.2 An important attribute of this test is that it is very flexible. Any material that can be fabricated into, or applied to, blocks and rings can be tested. Thus, the potential materials combinations are endless. However, the interlaboratory testing has been limited to metals. In addition, the test can be run with various lubricants, liquids, or gaseous atmospheres, as desired, to simulate service conditions. Rotational speed and load can also be varied to better correspond to service requirements. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. Wear test results are reported as the volume loss in cubic millimetres for both the block and ring. Materials...

  14. Application of ISO system to safety test for radioactive material transport package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, K. S.; Lee, J. C.; Bang, K. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    Safety tests for radioactive material transportation package are described in MOST notice 2001-23, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1 and US 10 CFR Part 71. Safety test facilities and equipments were provided to be capable of performing various tests prescribed in those regulations. Test methods and procedures appropriate in International Standard ISO were established and this laboratory of radioactive material transportation package is accredited by Korea Laboratory Accreditation Scheme(KOLAS)

  15. Anode Material Testing for Marine Sediment Microbial Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    the plumping centered over billet, and the electrical feed through fitting with connecting wire. The solid graphite plate will be tested by...state conditions, using a liquid bath of glucose as the substrate (17). Chaudhuri and Lovley 2005, showed that the graphite foam increased production...Microbial fuel cells: performances and perspectives. Biofuels for fuel cells: biomass fermentation towards usage in fuel cells. IWA Publishing, London

  16. Hybrid microcircuit technology handbook materials, processes, design, testing and production

    CERN Document Server

    Licari, James J

    1998-01-01

    The Hybrid Microcircuit Technology Handbook integrates the many diverse technologies used in the design, fabrication, assembly, and testing of hybrid segments crucial to the success of producing reliable circuits in high yields. Among these are: resistor trimming, wire bonding, die attachment, cleaning, hermetic sealing, and moisture analysis. In addition to thin films, thick films, and assembly processes, important chapters on substrate selections, handling (including electrostatic discharge), failure analysis, and documentation are included. A comprehensive chapter of design guidelines will

  17. Design of water shock tube for testing shell materials

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Hongjuan; Mustafa, Mohamad; Khawaja, Hassan Abbas; Ewan, Bruce C.; Moatamedi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents design considerations for a shock tube experimental rig used to investigate the dynamic failure mechanisms of shell geometries subjected to water shock impact loading. In such setup, it is desirable that the drive pressure used within the tube can provide a wide range of impulsive loads on the test structures and some flexibility can be achieved on the applied pulse durations. With this aim a review of various existing shock tube experimental setup is presented and choi...

  18. Validation Testing and Numerical Modeling of Advanced Armor Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    during the time of this investigation, we chose 6061-T6 to represent the matrix because it is representative of a non- ferrous light aluminum alloy metal...and consist of a strengthening component embedded in an aluminum alloy matrix. For this study, we perform Taylor impact tests on a unique...aluminum alloy only. We perform a detailed analysis of the deformed specimen shapes to determine the dynamic yield strength. Additionally, hydrocode

  19. Subsize specimen testing of nuclear reactor pressure vessel material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.S. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Materials Research Center; Rosinski, S.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cannon, N.S. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Hamilton, M.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A new methodology is proposed to correlate the upper shelf energy (USE) of full size and subsize Charpy specimens of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel plate material, A533B. The methodology appears to be more satisfactory than the methodologies proposed earlier. USE of a notched-only specimen is partitioned into macro-crack initiation and crack propagation energies. USE of a notched and precracked specimen provides the crack propagation energy. {Delta}USE, the difference between the USE`s of notched-only and precracked specimens, is an estimate of the crack initiation energy. {Delta}USE was normalized by a factor involving the dimensions of the Charpy specimen and the stress concentration factor at the notch root. The normalized values of the {Delta}USE were found to be invariant with specimen size.

  20. Subsize specimen testing of nuclear reactor pressure vessel material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.S. (Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Materials Research Center); Rosinski, S.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Cannon, N.S. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Hamilton, M.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    A new methodology is proposed to correlate the upper shelf energy (USE) of full size and subsize Charpy specimens of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel plate material, A533B. The methodology appears to be more satisfactory than the methodologies proposed earlier. USE of a notched-only specimen is partitioned into macro-crack initiation and crack propagation energies. USE of a notched and precracked specimen provides the crack propagation energy. [Delta]USE, the difference between the USE's of notched-only and precracked specimens, is an estimate of the crack initiation energy. [Delta]USE was normalized by a factor involving the dimensions of the Charpy specimen and the stress concentration factor at the notch root. The normalized values of the [Delta]USE were found to be invariant with specimen size.

  1. Cryogenic piping material selection for the Component Test Facility (CTF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Cyr, William W.

    1991-01-01

    The anticipated high cost of the 8500 psi cryogenic and 15,000 psi gas piping systems used in the CTF at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center led to the consideration of high-strength materials for these piping systems. Based on years of satisfactory service using austenitic stainless steels in cryogenic applications, particularly for hydrogen service, consideration was limited to the austenitic stainless steels. Attention was focused on alternatives to the 304/304L grades of stainless steel traditionally used in these applications. This paper discusses the various considerations that resulted in the decision to continue using 304/304L for the cryogenic piping and the selection of the nitrogen-strengthened 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn alloy (UNS S21903) for the high-pressure gas systems at the CTF.

  2. Fatigue Crack Growth Threshold Testing of Metallic Rotorcraft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; James, Mark A.; Johnson, William M.; Le, Dy D.

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented for a program to determine the near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior appropriate for metallic rotorcraft alloys. Four alloys, all commonly used in the manufacture of rotorcraft, were selected for study: Aluminum alloy 7050, 4340 steel, AZ91E Magnesium, and Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V (beta-STOA). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sponsored this research to advance efforts to incorporate damage tolerance design and analysis as requirements for rotorcraft certification. Rotorcraft components are subjected to high cycle fatigue and are typically subjected to higher stresses and more stress cycles per flight hour than fixed-wing aircraft components. Fatigue lives of rotorcraft components are generally spent initiating small fatigue cracks that propagate slowly under near-threshold cracktip loading conditions. For these components, the fatigue life is very sensitive to the near-threshold characteristics of the material.

  3. Mechanical property tests on structural materials for ITER magnet system at low temperatures in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuanjun; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Laifeng

    2014-01-01

    High field superconducting magnets need strong non-superconducting components for structural reinforcement. For instance, the ITER magnet system (MS) consists of cable-in-conduit conductor, coil case, magnet support, and insulating materials. Investigation of mechanical properties at magnet operation temperature with specimens machined at the final manufacturing stages of the conductor jacket materials, magnet support material, and insulating materials, even the component of the full-size conductor jacket is necessary to establish sound databases for the products. In China, almost all mechanical property tests of structural materials for the ITER MS, including conductor jacket materials of TF coils, PF coils, CCs, case material of CCs, conductor jacket materials of Main Busbars (MB) and Corrector Busbars (CB), material of magnet supports, and insulating materials of CCs have been carried out at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry (TIPC), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). In this paper, the mechanical property test facilities are briefly demonstrated and the mechanical tests on the structural materials for the ITER MS, highlighting test rigs as well as test methods, are presented.

  4. Thermal Analysis and Testing of Candidate Materials for PAIDAE Inflatable Aeroshell

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelCorso, Joseph A.; Bruce, Walter E., III; Liles, Kaitlin A.; Hughes, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    The Program to Advance Inflatable-Decelerators for Atmospheric Entry (PAIDAE) is a NASA project tasked with developing and evaluating viable inflatable-decelerator aeroshell geometries and materials. Thermal analysis of material layups supporting an inflatable aeroshell was completed in order to identify expected material response, failure times, and to establish an experimental test matrix to keep barrier layer materials from reaching critical temperature limits during thermal soak. Material layups were then tested in the 8- foot High Temperature Tunnel (8'HTT), where they were subjected to hypersonic aerothermal heating conditions, similar to those expected for a Mars entry. This paper presents a broad overview of the thermal analysis supporting multiple materials, and layup configurations tested in the 8'HTT at flight conditions similar to those that would be experienced during Mars entry trajectories. Direct comparison of TPS samples tested in the 8'HTT verify that the thermal model accurately predicted temperature profiles when there are up to four materials in the test layup. As the number of material layers in each test layup increase (greater than 4), the accuracy of the prediction decreases significantly. The inaccuracy of the model predictions for layups with more than four material layers is believed to be a result of the contact resistance values used throughout the model being inaccurate. In addition, the harsh environment of the 8'HTT, including hot gas penetrating through the material layers, could also be a contributing factor.

  5. Test Methodology to Evaluate the Safety of Materials Using Spark Incendivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Charles; Calle, Carlos; Clements, Sid; Ritz, Mindy; Starnes, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    For many years scientists and engineers have been searching for the proper test method to evaluate an electrostatic risk for materials used in hazardous environments. A new test standard created by the International Electrotechnical Commission is a promising addition to conventional test methods used throughout industry. The purpose of this paper is to incorporate this test into a proposed new methodology for the evaluation of materials exposed to flammable environments. However, initial testing using this new standard has uncovered some unconventional behavior in materials that conventional test methods were thought to have reconciled. For example some materials tested at higher humidities were more susceptible to incendive discharges than at lower humidity even though the surface resistivity was lower.

  6. Development of eddy current testing system using magnetic saturation in ferromagnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Je Joong; Ahn, Hyung Keun; Shin, Yong Hoon [Sae An Engineering Corperation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Dong Man [Kunjang College, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-11-15

    Ferromagnetic materials have difficulties of eddy current test using traditional eddy current equipment due to their electric character of high permeability and anomalous magnetic flux. Development of on-line eddy current test equipment for ferromagnetic materials is a goal of this research. as the first step for it, in this paper, a prove for ferromagnetic materials was developed and practical test was performed with it at a manufactory. For magnetic saturation of inside of ferromagnetic material, DC power supply was used. As increasement of applied voltage, signals of defects were distinguished.

  7. Establishment of Testing Device for Shielding Performance of X and Gamma Ray Radiation Protection Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Ming-zhe; WEI; Ke-xin; HOU; Jin-bing; WANG; Hong-yu; GAO; Fei; NI; Ning

    2015-01-01

    X and gamma ray radiation protective material shielding performance testing device was built based on the international standard IEC61331.1-2014.The device can be used to test attenuation ratio,attenuation equivalent and lead equivalent of radiation protective material in"narrow beam condition","broad beam condition"and"inverse

  8. Test methodology for elemental sulfur resistant advanced materials for oil and gas field equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, G. [Verein Deutscher Eisenhuettenleute, Duesseldorf (Germany); Bruckhoff, W. [BEB Erdgas und Erdoel GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Koehler, M. [Krupp-VDM AG, Werdohl (Germany); Schlerkmann, H. [Mannesmann Forschungsinstitut, Duisburg (Germany); Schmitt, G. [Iserlohn Polytechnic (Germany). Lab. for Corrosion Protection

    1995-10-01

    The great variety of methodologies for testing the performance of advanced materials for resistance to elemental sulfur in oil and gas industry prompted the Technical Committee for Corrosion of the German Iron and Steel Institute (VDEh) to define recommended test procedures. These procedures have already found wide acceptance in the German materials and oil and gas industry.

  9. A combined analytical-experimental tensile test technique for brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    A semiconventional tensile test technique is developed for impact ices and other brittle materials. Accurate results have been obtained on ultimate strength and modulus of elasticity in a refrigerated ice test. It is noted that the technique can be used to determine the physical properties of impact ices accreted inside icing wind tunnels or other brittle materials.

  10. 21 CFR 211.110 - Sampling and testing of in-process materials and drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... PHARMACEUTICALS Production and Process Controls § 211.110 Sampling and testing of in-process materials and drug... production process, e.g., at commencement or completion of significant phases or after storage for long... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sampling and testing of in-process materials...

  11. Standard Test Method for Dimensional Stability of Sandwich Core Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the sandwich core dimensional stability in the two plan dimensions. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound units given may be approximate. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. [Concept formation in children with schizophrenia (from Piaget test material)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedinskiĭ, V V; Novikova, E Iu

    1975-01-01

    The authors studied reasons of a domineering perceptive generalizations in the Piaget test by children with schizophrenia. In teaching the children to distinguish and measure different properties of objects, the most typical appeared to be the following actions: a complete or partial refusal to accomplish them, a substitution of measurements by a perceptive comparison, difficulties in the narration of personal activity in well developed speech. Better results were attained in those who were emotionally positive. On these grounds the authors presumed an autistical genesis of these disturbances.

  13. Development of IASCC Test Facility for Neutron-irradiated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. W.; Kim, D. J.; Hwang, S. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    From literature review and benchmark studies on recent technologies for IASCC evaluation of highly irradiated stainless steels, the requirements to establish IASCC test facility were drawn. According to the requirements, IASCC test facility for assessment of life time and integrity of RVIs in Korean PWRs will be designed in detail and constructed in hot cells of KAERI. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) has been regarded as the main cause for intergranular cracking incidents in reactor vessel internals (RVIs) in light water reactors (LWRs). IASCC was reported in a fuel rod in the 1960s, a control rod in the 1970s, and a baffle former bolt in recent years. For a proactive management of IASCC of these components, a lot of work has been performed in boiling water reactors (BWRs). From these works, IASCC mechanism and its relation to radiation-induced segregation (RIS), neutron fluence, and applied stress were proposed to describe IASCC behavior of RVIs in BWRs. However, the IASCC mechanism of RVIs in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is not fully understood yet as compared with that in BWRs owing to a lack of reliable data. Recently, worldwide efforts have been made to investigate the IASCC susceptibility of RVIs in PWRs.

  14. Laser photoacoustics for gas analysis and materials testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Markus W.

    1995-07-01

    The application of laser photoacoustics to two different areas is discussed. First, laser-induced spallation and interferometric detection of transient surface displacements is proposed as a powerful noncontact tool for the investigation of adhesion properties of solid surface coatings. Results for nickel and plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings are presented. Delamination processes at the interface between substrate and coating could be detected with excellent spatial and temporal resolution and adhesion strengths in the 0.2 to 2 GPa range be determined. Second, laser photoacoustic spectroscopy is applied to trace gas monitoring. An automated mobile CO2$ laser photoacoustic system is employed for in situ air monitoring with parts per billion sensitivity in industrial, urban, and rural environments. An improvement in detection selectivity for multicomponent gas mixtures is achieved with a continuously tunable high- pressure CO2 laser with a narrow linewidth of 0.017 cm-1. A CO laser photoacoustic system previously used for the analysis of motor vehicle exhausts is now employed for studying dimerization phenomena in fatty acid vapors. Finally, emphasis is put on the development of widely tunable, narrow-band, mid-IR laser sources based on optical parametric oscillation or difference frequency generation employing tunable diode lasers and AgGaSe2 as nonlinear material.

  15. Metallic and Ceramic Materials Research. Task Order 0005: Metallic, Materials, Methods, Characterization and Testing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    more efficient jet engines. The focus areas covered a broad range of technologies comprising thermal protection materials, fiber lasers for...in Mar-M247 region ~6 mm apart from the weld interface. (b-c) Higher magnification images illustrating (b) a blocky, faceted appearance of fracture... thermal stability, distortion tolerance, expected design life, and environmental resistance requirements vary significantly between these initiatives

  16. Assessment of The Compatibility of Composite Materials With High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy; Griffin, Dennis E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The compatibility of composite materials with high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) was assessed using various chemical and mechanical techniques. Methods included classical schemes combining concentration assay with accelerated aging by means of a heated water bath. Exothermic reactivity was observed using Isothermal Microcalorimetry. Mechanical Properties testing determined degradation of the composite material. Photoacoustic Infrared Spectroscopy was used to monitor chemical alteration of the resin matrix. Other materials were examined including some polymers and metals.

  17. Evaluating Material Flammability in Microgravity and Martian Gravity Compared to the NASA Standard Normal Gravity Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslon, Sandra. L.; Ferkul, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Drop tower tests are conducted at Martian gravity to determine the flammability of three materials compared to previous tests in other normal gravity and reduced gravity environments. The comparison is made with consideration of a modified NASA standard test protocol. Material flammability limits in the different gravity and flow environments are tabulated to determine the factor of safety associated with normal gravity flammability screening. Previous testing at microgravity and Lunar gravity indicated that some materials burned to lower oxygen concentrations in low gravity than in normal gravity, although the low g extinction limit criteria are not the same as 1g due to time constraints in drop testing. Similarly, the data presented in this paper for Martian gravity suggest that there is a gravity level below Earth s at which materials burn more readily than on Earth. If proven for more materials, this may indicate the need to include a factor of safety on 1g flammability limits.

  18. Exposure assessment of particulates originating from diesel and CNG fuelled engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravisjaervi, K.; Pietikaeinen, M.; Keiski, R. L. (Univ. of Oulu, Dept. of Process and Environmental Engineering (Finland)). email: kati.oravisjarvi@oulu.fi; Voutilainen, A. (Univ. of Kuopio, Dept. of Physics (Finland)); Haataja, M. (Oulu Univ. of Applied Sciences (Finland); Univ. of Oulu, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering (Finland)); Ruuskanen, J. (Univ. of Kuopio, Dept. of Environmental Sciences (Finland)); Rautio, A. (Univ. of Oulu, Thule Inst. (Finland))

    2009-07-01

    Particulates emitted from combustion engines have been a great concern in past years due to their adverse health effects, such as pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases, morbidity and mortality. The source of particulates can be stationary and transient, such as gas and oil fuelled engines, turbines and boilers. Particulate matter (PM) dispersed into ambient air can be classified in many ways: the mechanism of the formation, the size and the composition. Fine particles (PM2.5) are particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 mum and particles, greater than 2.5 mum in diameter are generally referred to as coarse particles (PM10). PM2.5 is also called the respirable fraction, because they can penetrate to the unciliated regions of the lung. Fine particles consist of so called ultrafine particles (an aerodynamic diameter less than 0.1 mum). The sizes of particulates emitted from combustion processes range between 10 nm and 100 mum, and are usually a mixture of unburned and partially burned hydrocarbons. Diesel exhaust particles have a mass median diameter of 0.05-1.0 mum. They are a complex mixture of elemental carbon, a variety of hydrocarbons, sulphur compounds, and other species. They consist of a numerous spherical primary particles, which are agglomerated into aggregates. Particles from natural gas engine emissions range from 0.01-0.7 mum. Increase in PM10 pollution has been found to be associated with a range of adverse health effects, such as increased use of medication for asthma, attacks of asthma in patients with pre-existing asthma, attacks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), deaths from respiratory causes, admission to hospital for cardiovascular causes, deaths from heart attacks and deaths from strokes. While it is unknown, which particulate matter component is the most hazardous for humans, a number of factors suggest that ultrafine particles may be more toxic than larger particles. Ultrafine particles have a large surface area per

  19. Development and Execution of a Large-scale DDT Tube Test for IHE Material Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Gary Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Broilo, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lopez-Pulliam, Ian Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vaughan, Larry Dean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Insensitive High Explosive (IHE) Materials are defined in Chapter IX of the DOE Explosive Safety Standard (DOE-STD-1212-2012) as being materials that are massdetonable explosives that are so insensitive that the probability of accidental initiation or transition from burning to detonation is negligible1. There are currently a number of tests included in the standard that are required to qualify a material as IHE, however, none of the tests directly evaluate for the transition from burning to detonation (aka deflagration-to-detonation transition, DDT). Currently, there is a DOE complex-wide effort to revisit the IHE definition in DOE-STD-1212-2012 and change the qualification requirements. The proposal lays out a new approach, requiring fewer, but more appropriate tests, for IHE Material qualification. One of these new tests is the Deflagration-to-Detonation Test. According to the redefinition proposal, the purpose of the new deflagration-todetonation test is “to demonstrate that an IHE material will not undergo deflagration-to-detonation under stockpile relevant conditions of scale, confinement, and material condition. Inherent in this test design is the assumption that ignition does occur, with onset of deflagration. The test design will incorporate large margins and replicates to account for the stochastic nature of DDT events.” In short, the philosophy behind this approach is that if a material fails to undergo DDT in a significant over-test, then it is extremely unlikely to do so in realistic conditions. This effort will be valuable for the B61 LEP to satisfy their need qualify the new production lots of PBX 9502. The work described in this report is intended as a preliminary investigation to support the proposed design of an overly conservative, easily fielded DDT test for updated IHE Material Qualification standard. Specifically, we evaluated the aspects of confinement, geometry, material morphology and temperature. We also developed and tested a

  20. State of the art report on the materials testing capabilities for IASCC susceptibility testing at SCK-CEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, R.-W.; Boydens, P.; Vankeerbergen, R.; Van Nieuwenhove, R.; Van Dyck, S

    1999-08-01

    An overview of the current IASCC testing facilities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN is given. The testing techniques are reviewed, and their capabilities as well as their limitations are discussed. Possible future developments in testing techniques are discussed. IASCC is caused by a complex interaction between materials, its environment and mechanical stresses. Characterisation techniques assessing mechanical stresses as well as electrochemical and microstructural characteristics are reported on.

  1. Influence of heat treatment and indenter tip material on depth sensing hardness tests at high temperatures of fusion relevant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredl, Julian, E-mail: julian.bredl@kit.edu; Dany, Manuel; Albinski, Bartlomiej; Schneider, Hans-Christian; Kraft, Oliver

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Operation of a custom-made indentation device designed for test temperatures up to 650 °C and a remote handled operation in a Hot Cell. • Instrumented indentation and conventional hardness testing of unirradiated MANET II and EUROFER. • Comparison of diamond and sapphire as indenter tip materials. - Abstract: The instrumented indentation is a suitable method for testing of even small neutron-irradiated specimens. From the continuously recorded indentation depth and the indentation force, it is possible to deduce mechanical parameters of the tested material. In this paper, a brief description of the high temperature device is given and representative results are presented. In the study, unirradiated steels are investigated by instrumented indentation at temperatures up to 500 °C. It is shown that the hardness is highly depending on the testing-temperature and can be correlated to the results of conventional tensile testing experiments. A not negligible influence of the indenter tip material is observed. The results show the functionality of the high-temperature indentation device.

  2. Pump and probe damage testing for investigation of transient material modifications associated with laser damage in optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negres, R A; Feit, M D; DeMange, P; Bude, J D; Demos, S G

    2007-10-18

    Laser-induced breakdown in the bulk of transparent dielectric materials is associated with the generation of extreme localized conditions of temperatures and pressures. In this work, we perform pump and probe damage testing experiments to investigate the evolution of transient absorption by the host material arising from modifications following confined laser energy deposition in fused silica and DKDP materials. Specifically, we measure the size of the damage sites observed in the region of spatial overlap between the pump and probe pulses versus probe time delay and energy. Results of this proof-of-principle experimental work confirm that material modifications under extreme conditions created during a damage event include transient optical absorption. In addition, we found that the relaxation times of the induced absorption are very distinct for DKDP and SiO{sub 2} even under identical excitation conditions, on the order of 100 ns and 100 {micro}s, respectively.

  3. Validation of the material point method and plasticity with Taylor impact tests

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Biswajit

    2012-01-01

    Taylor impacts tests were originally devised to determine the dynamic yield strength of materials at moderate strain rates. More recently, such tests have been used extensively to validate numerical codes for the simulation of plastic deformation. In this work, we use the material point method to simulate a number of Taylor impact tests to compare different Johnson-Cook, Mechanical Threshold Stress, and Steinberg-Guinan-Cochran plasticity models and the vob Mises and Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman yield conditions. In addition to room temperature Taylor tests, high temperature tests have been performed and compared with experimental data.

  4. Development and Testing the Technology of Complex Transformation of Carbohydrates from Vegetable Raw Materials into Bioethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P. Tsygankov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of development and testing the tentative technology of sweet sorghum and finger millet processing into bioethanol are described. The carbohydrates content and range of the studied vegetable biomass as the raw material is defined. Bioethanol potential output from sugar sorghum and finger millet carbohydrates and key technological parameters of preparation of both types of vegetable raw material for alcohol fermentation are defined. The concept of the tentative technology of bioethanol production from carbohydrate raw material of the first and second generations is offered. Testing of complex transformation of carbohydrates from vegetable raw materials into bioethanol is performed.

  5. Impact of hydrogen onboard storage technologies on the performance of hydrogen fuelled vehicles: A techno-economic well-to-wheel assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, M.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/310873754; Faaij, A.P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10685903X

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen onboard storage technologies form an important factor in the overall performance of hydrogen fuelled transportation, both energetically and economically. Particularly, advanced storage options such as metal hydrides and carbon nanotubes are often hinted favourable to conventional, liquid

  6. Impact of hydrogen onboard storage technologies on the performance of hydrogen fuelled vehicles: A techno-economic well-to-wheel assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, M.P.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen onboard storage technologies form an important factor in the overall performance of hydrogen fuelled transportation, both energetically and economically. Particularly, advanced storage options such as metal hydrides and carbon nanotubes are often hinted favourable to conventional, liquid an

  7. High heat flux testing of divertor plasma facing materials and components using the HHF test facility at IPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Yashashri; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Belsare, Sunil; Swamy, Rajamannar; Tripathi, Sudhir; Bhope, Kedar; Kanpara, Shailesh

    2016-02-01

    The High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) was designed and established recently at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) in India for testing heat removal capability and operational life time of plasma facing materials and components of the ITER-like tokamak. The HHFTF is equipped with various diagnostics such as IR cameras and IR-pyrometers for surface temperature measurements, coolant water calorimetry for absorbed power measurements and thermocouples for bulk temperature measurements. The HHFTF is capable of simulating steady state heat load of several MW m-2 as well as short transient heat loads of MJ m-2. This paper presents the current status of the HHFTF at IPR and high heat flux tests performed on the curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups as well as transient heat flux tests carried out on pure tungsten materials using the HHFTF. Curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups were fabricated using hot radial pressing (HRP) technique. Two curved tungsten monoblock type test mock-ups successfully sustained absorbed heat flux up to 14 MW m-2 with thermal cycles of 30 s ON and 30 s OFF duration. Transient high heat flux tests or thermal shock tests were carried out on pure tungsten hot-rolled plate material (Make:PLANSEE) with incident power density of 0.49 GW m-2 for 20 milliseconds ON and 1000 milliseconds OFF time. A total of 6000 thermal shock cycles were completed on pure tungsten material. Experimental results were compared with mathematical simulations carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics for transient high heat flux tests.

  8. THE HYDROGEN-FUELLED INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES FOR MARINE APPLICATIONS WITH A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim S. Seddiek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern marine power plants have been designed to improve the overall ship’s efficiency. This pushed the designers of marine machinery to search for unconventional fuels for these plants. During the previous years, diesel oil has been extensively used on-board ships. Due to the high price of light diesel oil and the environmental problems resulting from the use of heavy fuel oil, it has become necessary to search for an alternative to traditional fuels. As a result, natural gas fuel has been used on-board some types of ships, especially short-voyage cruise ships. Unfortunately, there are still some technical and logistic problems related to the use of natural gas as a fuel, especially as it is considered a non-renewable energy source. The use of hydrogen fuel on-board ships, particularly in modern power plants may contribute to overcoming the above problems. The present paper considers the possibility of the use of hydrogen fuel for marine applications and discusses different stages of hydrogen gas cycle beginning with hydrogen generation process from clean energy until using it as fuel for internal combustion engines on-board one RO/RO ship, named Taba, operating in the Mediterranean Sea. Compared to the diesel engine, the hydrogen fuelled engine is found to be lower in thermal efficiency and fuel consumption, however, some adjustments are needed.

  9. Effects of gas types and models on optimized gas fuelling station reservoir's pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farzaneh-Gord

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There are similar algorithms and infrastructure for storing gas fuels at CNG (Compressed Natural Gas and CHG (Compressed Hydrogen Gas fuelling stations. In these stations, the fuels are usually stored in the cascade storage system to utilize the stations more efficiently. The cascade storage system generally divides into three reservoirs, commonly termed low, medium and high-pressure reservoirs. The pressures within these reservoirs have huge effects on performance of the stations. In the current study, based on the laws of thermodynamics, conservation of mass and real/ideal gas assumptions, a theoretical analysis has been constructed to study the effects of gas types and models on performance of the stations. It is intended to determine the optimized reservoir pressures for these stations. The results reveal that the optimized pressure differs between the gas types. For ideal and real gas models in both stations (CNG and CHG, the optimized non-dimensional low pressure-reservoir pressure is found to be 0.22. The optimized non-dimensional medium-pressure reservoir pressure is the same for the stations, and equal to 0.58.

  10. Performance evaluation of common rail direct injection (CRDI engine fuelled with Uppage Oil Methyl Ester (UOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Basavarajappa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available For economic and social development of any country energy is one of the most essential requirements. Continuously increasing price of crude petroleum fuels in the present days coupled with alarming emissions and stringent emission regulations has led to growing attention towards use of alternative fuels like vegetable oils, alcoholic and gaseous fuels for diesel engine applications. Use of such fuels can ease the burden on the economy by curtailing the fuel imports. Diesel engines are highly efficient and the main problems associated with them is their high smoke and NOx emissions. Hence there is an urgent need to promote the use of alternative fuels in place of high speed diesel (HSD as substitute. India has a large agriculture base that can be used as a feed stock to obtain newer fuel which is renewable and sustainable. Accordingly Uppage oil methyl ester (UOME biodiesel was selected as an alternative fuel. Use of biodiesels in diesel engines fitted with mechanical fuel injection systems has limitation on the injector opening pressure (300 bar. CRDI system can overcome this drawback by injecting fuel at very high pressures (1500-2500 bar and is most suitable for biodiesel fuels which are high viscous. This paper presents the performance and emission characteristics of a CRDI diesel engine fuelled with UOME biodiesel at different injection timings and injection pressures. From the experimental evidence it was revealed that UOME biodiesel yielded overall better performance with reduced emissions at retarded injection timing of -10° BTDC in CRDI mode of engine operation.

  11. Tracing the origin of the AGN fuelling reservoir in MCG--6-30-15

    CERN Document Server

    Raimundo, S I; Canning, R E A; Celotti, A; Fabian, A C; Gandhi, P

    2016-01-01

    The active galaxy MCG--6-30-15 has a 400 pc diameter stellar kinematically distinct core, counter-rotating with respect to the main body of the galaxy. Our previous high spatial resolution (0".1) H-band observations of this galaxy mapped the stellar kinematics and [Fe II] 1.64 {\\mu}m gas dynamics though mainly restricted to the spatial region of the counter-rotating core. In this work we probe the stellar kinematics on a larger field-of-view and determine the ionised and molecular gas dynamics to study the formation of the counter-rotating core and the implications for AGN fuelling. We present integral field spectroscopy observations with SINFONI in the H and K-bands in the central 1.2 kpc and with VIMOS HR-blue in the central 4 kpc of the galaxy. Ionised gas outflows of v ~ 100 km/s are traced by the [Ca VIII] 2.32 {\\mu}m coronal line and extend out to at least a radius of r ~ 140 pc. The molecular gas, traced by the H2 2.12 {\\mu}m emission is also counter rotating with respect to the main body of the galaxy...

  12. PERFORMANCE AND EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF CI ENGINE FUELLED WITH NON EDIBLE VEGETABLE OIL AND DIESEL BLENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. ELANGO

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates performance and emission characteristics of a diesel engine which is fuelled with different blends of jatropha oil and diesel (10–50%. A single cylinder four stroke diesel engine was used for the experiments at various loads and speed of 1500 rpm. An AVL 5 gas analyzer and a smoke meter were used for the measurements of exhaust gas emissions. Engine performance (specific fuel consumption SFC, brake thermal efficiency, and exhaust gas temperature and emissions (HC, CO, CO2, NOx and Smoke Opacity were measured to evaluate and compute the behaviour of the diesel engine running on biodiesel. The results showed that the brake thermal efficiency of diesel is higher at all loads. Among the blends maximum brake thermal efficiency and minimum specific fuel consumption were found for blends upto 20% Jatropha oil. The specific fuel consumption of the blend having 20% Jatropha oil and 80% diesel (B20 was found to be comparable with the conventional diesel. The optimum blend is found to be B20 as the CO2 emissions were lesser than diesel while decrease in brake thermal efficiency is marginal.

  13. Thermal instabilities in cooling galactic coronae: fuelling star formation in galactic discs

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, Alexander; Power, Chris; Cole, David

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the means by which cold gas can accrete onto Milky Way mass galaxies from a hot corona of gas, using a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, 'SPHS'. We find that the 'cold clumps' seen in many classic SPH simulations in the literature are not present in our SPHS simulations. Instead, cold gas condenses from the halo along filaments that form at the intersection of supernovae-driven bubbles from previous phases of star formation. This positive feedback feeds cold gas to the galactic disc directly, fuelling further star formation. The resulting galaxies in the SPH and SPHS simulations differ greatly in their morphology, gas phase diagrams, and stellar content. We show that the classic SPH cold clumps owe to a numerical thermal instability caused by an inability for cold gas to mix in the hot halo. The improved treatment of mixing in SPHS suppresses this instability leading to a dramatically different physical outcome. In our highest resolution SPHS simulation, we find that the cold filaments ...

  14. Developing a Knock Predictive Criterion in Spark Ignition Engines Fuelled with Gaseous Fuels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.A.Karim

    1993-01-01

    Consideration of the chemical reaction activity of the end gas in a spark ignition and operating conditions are combined to predict the onset of knock and associated performance in an engine fuelled with methane.A two-zone predictive combustion model was developed based on an estimate of the effective duration of the combustion period and the mass burning rate for any set of operating conditions.The unburned end gas preignition chemical reaction activity is described by a detailed chemical reaction kinetic scheme for methane and air,The variation with time of the value of a formulated dimensionless knock parameter(k)is calcuated.It is shown that whenever knocking is encounteren.the value of “k” builds up to a sufficiently high value that exceeds a critical value.Under normal operating conditions,the value of “k” remains throughout the whole combustion period at comparatively very low levels.It is shown that the model and the use of this knock criterion“k” produce results that are in good agreement with experiment.

  15. Particle emission from heavy-duty engine fuelled with blended diesel and biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Leila Droprinchinski; da Silva Júnior, Carlos Roberto; Solci, Maria Cristina; Pinto, Jurandir Pereira; Souza, Davi Zacarias; Vasconcellos, Pérola; Guarieiro, Aline Lefol Nani; Guarieiro, Lílian Lefol Nani; Sousa, Eliane Teixeira; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2012-05-01

    In this study, particulate matter (PM) were characterized from a place impacted by heavy-duty vehicles (Bus Station) fuelled with diesel/biodiesel fuel blend (B3) in the city of Londrina, Brazil. Sixteen priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) concentrations were analyzed in the samples by their association with atmospheric PM, mass size distributions and major ions (fluorite, chloride, bromide, nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, nitrite, oxalate; fumarate, formate, succinate and acetate; lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium and ammonium). Results indicate that major ions represented 21.2% particulate matter mass. Nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium, respectively, presented the highest concentration levels, indicating that biodiesel may also be a significant source for these ions, especially nitrate. Dibenzo[a,h]anthracene and indeno[1,2,3,-cd]pyrene were the main PAH found, and a higher fraction of PAH particles was found in diameters lower than 0.25 μm in Londrina bus station. The fine and ultrafine particles were dominant among the PM evaluated, suggesting that biodiesel decreases the total PAH emission. However, it does also increase the fraction of fine and ultrafine particles when compared to diesel.

  16. The Stability of Lubricant Oil Acidity of Biogas Fuelled Engine due to Biogas Desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gde Tirta Nindhia, Tjokorda; Wayan Surata, I.; Wardana, Ari

    2017-05-01

    This research is established for the purpose of the understanding the stability of the acidity of lubricant oil in biogas fuelled engine due to the absence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As was recognized that other than Methane (CH4), there are also other gas impurities in the biogas such as carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), moisture (H2O) and ammonia (NH3). Due to H2S contents in the biogas fuel, the engine was found failure. This is caused by corrosion in the combustion chamber due to increase of lubricant acidity. To overcome this problem in practical, the lubricant is increased the pH to basic level with the hope will be decrease to normal value after several time use. Other method is by installing pH measurement sensor in the engine lubricant so that when lubricant is known turn to be acid, then lubricant replacement should be done. In this research, the effect of biogas desulfurization down to zero level to the acidity of lubricant oil in the four stroke engine was carried out with the hope that neutral lubrication oil to be available during running the engine. The result indicates that by eliminating H2S due desulfurization process, effect on stability and neutrality of pH lubricant. By this method the engine safety can be obtained without often replacement the lubricant oil.

  17. Ground-Based Tests of Spacecraft Polymeric Materials under OXY-GEN Plasma-Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernik, Vladimir; Novikov, Lev; Gaidar, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft LEO mission is accompanied by destruction of polymeric material surface under influence of atomic oxygen flow. Sources of molecular, plasma and ion beams are used for the accelerated ground-based tests of spacecraft materials. In the work application of oxygen plasma accelerator of a duoplasmatron type is described. Plasma particles have been accelerated up to average speed of 13-16 km/s. Influence of such beam on materials leads to more intensive destruction of polymers than in LEO. This fact allows to execute tests in the accelerated time scale by a method of an effective fluence. Special measures were given to decrease a concentration of both gaseous and electrode material impurities in the oxygen beam. In the work the results of simulative tests of spacecraft materials and experiments on LEO are considered. Comparison of plasma beam simulation with LEO data has shown conformity for structures of a number of polymeric materials. The relative erosion yields (normalized with respect to polyimide) of the tested materials are shown practically equal to those in LEO. The obtained results give grounds for using the plasma-generation mode with ion energies of 20-30 eV to accelerated testing of spacecraft materials for long -term LEO missions.

  18. Galaxy pairs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - XII: The fuelling mechanism of low excitation radio-loud AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, Sara L; Hickox, Ryan C

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether the fuelling of low excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) is linked to major galaxy interactions. Our study utilizes a sample of 10,800 spectroscopic galaxy pairs and 97 post-mergers selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with matches to multi-wavelength datasets. The LERG fraction amongst interacting galaxies is a factor of 3.5 higher than that of a control sample matched in local galaxy density, redshift and stellar mass. However, the LERG excess in pairs does not depend on projected separation and remains elevated out to at least 500 kpc, suggesting that major mergers are not their main fuelling channel. In order to identify the primary fuelling mechanism of LERGs, we compile samples of control galaxies that are matched in various host galaxy and environmental properties. The LERG excess is reduced, but not completely removed, when halo mass or D4000 are included in the matching parameters. However, when BOTH M_halo and D4000 are matched, there is no LERG excess and the 1.4 GHz lumin...

  19. Evaluation of in-plane shear test methods for composite material laminates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-lei; HAO Qing-duo; OU Jin-ping

    2007-01-01

    In-plane shear properties of composite material laminates are very important in structural design of composite material. Four commonly used in-plane shear test methods were introduced in this paper. In order to study the differences of various shear test methods, two ASTM standard in-plane shear test methods for composite material laminates were experimentally investigated. They are ±45℃ tensile shear test (ASTM D3518) and V-notched rail shear test (ASTM D7078). Five types of composite material laminates composed of E-glass fiber fabric and vinyl ester resin were utilized, whose stacking sequences are [0]3s, [0/90]3s, [CSM/0/90]2s, [±45]3s and [(0/90)2/(±45)2/(0/90)2]s, respectively. The test results indicate that the±45℃ tensile shear test can predict shear moduli of composite material laminates accurately. However, the predictions of shear strength using±45℃ tensile shear test are significantly lower than those of V-notched rail shear test.

  20. Materials research in the solar furnace. Materials testing in extreme conditions; Materialforschung im Sonnenofen. Werkstoffpruefung unter extremen Bedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmuecker, M. [DLR-Institut fuer Werkstoff-Forschung, Koeln-Porz (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Extreme temperatures can be achieved with concentrated solar radiation. High heating and cooling rates are possible, and furnace walls are not required. This makes the solar furnace a unique tool for testing of high-temperature materials as cooperations with the DLR Institute of Materials Research have shown. (orig.) [German] Mit konzentrierter Sonnenstrahlung koennen extreme Temperaturen erreicht werden. Hohe Aufheiz- und Abkuehlraten sind moeglich; im Allgemeinen kann auf begrenzende Ofenwandungen verzichtet werden. Damit stellt der Sonnenofen, in Verbindung mit einer geeigneten Mess- und Regeltechnik, ein einzigartiges Pruefwerkzeug fuer Hochtemperaturwerkstoffe dar, wie Kooperationen mit dem DLR-Institut fuer Werkstoff-Forschung gezeigt haben. (orig.)

  1. Standard test method for linear-elastic plane-strain fracture toughness KIc of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2013-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fracture toughness (KIc) of metallic materials under predominantly linear-elastic, plane-strain conditions using fatigue precracked specimens having a thickness of 1.6 mm (0.063 in.) or greater subjected to slowly, or in special (elective) cases rapidly, increasing crack-displacement force. Details of test apparatus, specimen configuration, and experimental procedure are given in the Annexes. Note 1—Plane-strain fracture toughness tests of thinner materials that are sufficiently brittle (see 7.1) can be made using other types of specimens (1). There is no standard test method for such thin materials. 1.2 This test method is divided into two parts. The first part gives general recommendations and requirements for KIc testing. The second part consists of Annexes that give specific information on displacement gage and loading fixture design, special requirements for individual specimen configurations, and detailed procedures for fatigue precracking. Additional a...

  2. Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ARMSEF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  3. Standard Guide for Recording Mechanical Test Data of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials in Databases

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides a common format for mechanical test data for composite materials for two purposes: (1) to establish data reporting requirements for test methods and ( 2) to provide information for the design of material property databases. This guide should be used in combination with Guide E 1309 which provides similar information to identify the composite material tested. 1.2 These guidelines are specific to mechanical tests of high-modulus fiber-reinforced composite materials. Types of tests considered in this guide include tension, compression, shear, flexure, open/filled hole, bearing, fracture toughness, and fatigue. The ASTM standards for which this guide was developed are listed in . The guidelines may also be useful for additional tests or materials. 1.3 This guide is the second part of a modular approach for which the first part is Guide E 1309. Guide E 1309 serves to identify the material, and this guide serves to describe mechanical testing procedures and variables and to record results....

  4. Inverse Approach to Evaluate the Tubular Material Parameters Using the Bulging Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Ge

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tubular material parameters are required for both part manufactory process planning and finite element simulations. The bulging test is one of the most credible ways to detect the property parameters for tubular material. The inverse approach provides more effective access to the accurate material evaluation than with direct identifications. In this paper, a newly designed set of bulging test tools is introduced. An inverse procedure is adopted to determine the tubular material properties in Krupkowski-Swift constitutive model of material deformation using a hybrid algorithm that combines the differential evolution and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithms. The constitutive model’s parameters obtained from the conventional and inverse methods are compared, and this comparison shows that the inverse approach is able to offer more information with higher reliability and can simplify the test equipment.

  5. Experimental study on CO2/CO of typical lining materials in full-scale fire test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; ZHANG HePing; WAN YuTian

    2007-01-01

    Lining materials are widely used in buildings to cover walls and ceilings. Combustible linings may produce a potential high fire hazard in buildings. Once ignited, it propagates fire and accelerates the enclosure fire growth. Two types of lining materials were studied during the tests: blook board and plywood. The test was conducted in an ISO 9705 room, where linings were mounted on walls without the ceiling. By changing the heat output of the burner, the ventilation, etc., the concentrations of CO2/CO of different lining materials were researched. The effect of test conditions on the production of CO2/CO of different lining materials was investigated, and useful experimental data were provided for the further development of numerical modeling to simulate enclosure fire growth lined with combustible materials.

  6. Performance improvement of direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell fuelled by H2S-contaminated biogas with paper-structured catalyst technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratori, Y.; Sakamoto, M.

    2016-11-01

    Direct internal reforming (DIR) operation of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a very attractive concept for downsizing and cost reduction of SOFC systems. This study aimed to develop stable operation of a DIR-SOFC fuelled by biogas. The current-voltage (I-V) curves of 2 × 2 cm2 planar SOFCs (anode- and electrolyte-supported cells, ASC and ESC, respectively.) were measured at 800 °C in the direct feed of a simulated biogas mixture (CH4/CO2 = 1), and the flexible structured catalyst material (paper-structured catalyst (PSC)) was applied on the anode material for performance enhancement. By applying a hydrotalcite (HT)-dispersed PSC (HT-PSC), the sulfur tolerance of the SOFC in the DIR operation was remarkably improved. By the effect of the HT-PSC, for both ASC and ESC, a stable cell voltage higher than 800 mV was obtained over 200 h at 0.2 A cm-2 in the direct feed of simulated biogas under 5 ppm H2S poisoning.

  7. Further Studies of Materials Compatibility in High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, R.; Owens, T.

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of the compatibility of high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials, in particular new materials such as composites, is critical to the development of new propulsion systems meeting requirements of reduced cost and environmental impact. While compatibility with HTP has been addressed previously, newer materials were not considered. The focus of this project was to develop a scheme for evaluation of HTP with all materials. In the previous summer, methods were developed for production of HTP on site, and preliminary steps were taken to evaluate materials. Methods investigated this summer have included accelerated aging by heating, coupled with assay of concentration and stabilization loss, observation of reactivity by means of Isothermal Microcalorimetry, and evaluation of changes to the materials by Short Beam Shear testing and by Photoacoustic-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Various metals, polymers, and composites were examined in this study.

  8. Characterization of Material Response During Arc-Jet Testing with Optical Methods Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of ablation and recession of heat shield materials during arc jet testing is an important step towards understanding the governing processes during these tests and therefore for a successful extrapolation of ground test data to flight. The behavior of ablative heat shield materials in a ground-based arc jet facility is usually monitored through measurement of temperature distributions (across the surface and in-depth), and through measurement of the final surface recession. These measurements are then used to calibrate/validate materials thermal response codes, which have mathematical models with reasonably good fidelity to the physics and chemistry of ablation, and codes thus calibrated are used for predicting material behavior in flight environments. However, these thermal measurements only indirectly characterize the pyrolysis processes within an ablative material pyrolysis is the main effect during ablation. Quantification of pyrolysis chemistry would therefore provide more definitive and useful data for validation of the material response codes. Information of the chemical products of ablation, to various levels of detail, can be obtained using optical methods. Suitable optical methods to measure the shape and composition of these layers (with emphasis on the blowing layer) during arc jet testing are: 1) optical emission spectroscopy (OES) 2) filtered imaging 3) laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and 4) absorption spectroscopy. Several attempts have been made to optically measure the material response of ablative materials during arc-jet testing. Most recently, NH and OH have been identified in the boundary layer of a PICA ablator. These species are suitable candidates for a detection through PLIF which would enable a spatially-resolved characterization of the blowing layer in terms of both its shape and composition. The recent emission spectroscopy data will be presented and future experiments for a qualitative and quantitative

  9. On the selection of materials for cryogenic seals and the testing of their performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Three questions are addressed: what mission must a cryogenic seal perform; what are the contrasts between desirable and available seal materials; and how realistic must test conditions be. The question of how to quantify the response of a material subject to large strains and which is susceptible to memory effects leads to a discussion of theoretical issues. Accordingly, the report summarizes some ideas from the rational mechanics of materials. The report ends with a list of recommendations and a conclusion.

  10. Finite Element Verification of Non-Homogeneous Strain and Stress Fields during Composite Material Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2015-01-01

    strength and fatigue performance is essential. Nevertheless, testing composites includes some challenges regarding stiffness determination using conventional strain gauges and achieving correct material failure unaffected by the gripping region during fatigue testing. Challenges, which in the present study......, has been addressed using the finite element method. During this, a verification of experimental observations, a deeper understanding on the test coupon loading and thereby improved test methods has been achieved....

  11. Design and building of a new experimental setup for testing hydrogen storage materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.

    2005-01-01

    For hydrogen to become the future energy carrier a suitable way of storing hydrogen is needed, especially if hydrogen is to be used in mobile applications such as cars. To test potential hydrogen storage materials with respect to capacity, kinetics andthermodynamics the Materials Research...

  12. Compilation of radiation damage test data part III: materials used around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Beynel, P; Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1982-01-01

    For pt.II see CERN report 79-08 (1979). This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins.

  13. Dynamic material characterization by combining ballistic testing and an engineering model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.; Wal, R. van der

    2013-01-01

    At TNO several energy-based engineering models have been created for various failure mechanism occurring in ballistic testing of materials, like ductile hole growth, denting, plugging, etc. Such models are also under development for ceramic and fiberbased materials (fabrics). As the models are

  14. Performance testing of elastomeric seal materials under low and high temperature conditions: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRONOWSKI,DAVID R.

    2000-06-01

    The US Department of Energy Offices of Defense Programs and Civilian Radioactive Waste Management jointly sponsored a program to evaluate elastomeric O-ring seal materials for radioactive material shipping containers. The report presents the results of low- and high-temperature tests conducted on 27 common elastomeric compounds.

  15. Using Isothermal Microcalorimetry to Determine Compatibility of Structural Materials with High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy; Villegas, Yvonne; Nwosisi, Genne

    2003-01-01

    High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) propellant (greater than or equal to 70%) offers many advantages in space launch applications; however, materials used in construction of propulsion systems must be shown to be compatible with HTP. Isothermal Microcalorimetry (IMC) was used to determine the compatibility of several metallic and non-metallic materials with 90% HTP. The results of these experiments agreed with those from immersion bath tests when the values were converted to %Active Oxygen Loss per week (%AOL/wk).

  16. International Test Program for Synergistic Atomic Oxygen and Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure of Spacecraft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sharon K.

    2001-01-01

    The components and materials of spacecraft in low Earth orbit can degrade in thermal and optical performance through interaction with atomic oxygen and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, which are predominant in low Earth orbit. Because of the importance of low Earth orbit durability and performance to manufacturers and users, an international test program for assessing the durability of spacecraft materials and components was initiated. Initial tests at the NASA Glenn Research Center consisted of exposure of samples representing a variety of thermal control paints, multilayer insulation materials, and Sun sensors that have been used in space. Materials donated from various international sources were tested alongside materials whose performance is well known, such as Teflon FEP, Kapton H, or Z-93-P white paint. The optical, thermal, or mass loss data generated during the tests were then provided to the participating material suppliers. Data were not published unless the participant donating the material consented to publication. The test program is intended to give spacecraft builders and users a better understanding of degradation processes and effects so that they can improve their predictions of spacecraft performance.

  17. Investigation of the ElectroPuls E3000 Test Machine for Fatigue Testing of Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    R- ratio of 0.5, the threshold stress intensity factor range is approximately 3.2 MPa·m½. Limitations of the test apparatus were identified under ...Through the course of investigating the behaviour of the test apparatus, limitations were identified under certain conditions, for example...University in 2008. Since 2009 she has worked as an engineer/scientist in the Armour Mechanics and Vehicle Survivability Group and the Structural

  18. IN VITRO TESTING – AN ESENTIAL METHOD FOR EVALUATING THE PERFORMANCE OF DENTAL MATERIALS AND DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca VIŢALARIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dentistry is unique among biomaterials specialties as to the large variety of materials used, and nature of the challenges they must resist. Intra-oral service demands materials adapted to a warm and moist environment, resisting the attack of digestive acids and enzymes. The materials subjected to mechanical forces should preserve their strength, fatigue and wear characteristics, for accomplishing their function. The wide range of materials available for restorative dentistry demands knowledge of their relative strengths and trade-offs, and offers the opportunity for many interesting lines of research. The spectrum extensively ranges from elastic impression materials to extremely stiff metal and ceramic appliances, so that familiarity with a variety of mechanical testing situations is required from a well-rounded dental materials laboratory. Evaluating the mechanical and wear characteristics of dental restorative materials and analyzing the durability of adhesives is critical to the development of improved dental devices

  19. The Virtual Employment Test Bed: An Immersive Synthetic Environment Allows Engineers to Test and Evaluate Material Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-03

    synthetic environment allows engineers to test and evaluate material solutions Robert DeMarco, MSBME; Gordon Cooke, MEME ; John Riedener, MSSE...ROBERT DEMARCO, MSBME, is a Project Lead Engineer and Certified LabVIEW Associate Developer. GORDON COOKE, MEME , is a Principal Investigator at the

  20. Mechanical and Vibration Testing of Carbon Fiber Composite Material with Embedded Piezoelectric Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Kray, Nicholas; Gemeinhardt, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials have been proposed as a means of decreasing turbomachinery blade vibration either through a passive damping scheme, or as part of an active vibration control system. For polymer matrix fiber composite (PMFC) blades, the piezoelectric elements could be embedded within the blade material, protecting the brittle piezoceramic material from the airflow and from debris. Before implementation of a piezoelectric element within a PMFC blade, the effect on PMFC mechanical properties needs to be understood. This study attempts to determine how the inclusion of a packaged piezoelectric patch affects the material properties of the PMFC. Composite specimens with embedded piezoelectric patches were tested in four-point bending, short beam shear, and flatwise tension configurations. Results show that the embedded piezoelectric material does decrease the strength of the composite material, especially in flatwise tension, attributable to failure at the interface or within the piezoelectric element itself. In addition, the sensing properties of the post-cured embedded piezoelectric materials were tested, and performed as expected. The piezoelectric materials include a non-flexible patch incorporating solid piezoceramic material, and two flexible patch types incorporating piezoelectric fibers. The piezoceramic material used in these patches was Navy Type-II PZT.

  1. In-plant material test experience under hydrogen water chemistry at a Japanese BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Masami; Koshiishi, Masato; Kato, Takahiko [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Works; Abe, Ayumi; Sekiguchi, Masahiko; Takiguchi, Hideki

    1999-07-01

    Hydrogen injection technology has been applied to Japanese domestic aged BWR plants since 1994 to mitigate corrosive environment regarding Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) of Reactor Internals (RINs). The Tsuruga Unit-1 plant has also been operated with this technology since 1997, considering suppression of radiation increase in the main steam piping system besides mitigation of corrosive environment in the reactor; the hydrogen injection rate in the feed water was about 0.5 ppm. In order to confirm the effects of the hydrogen injection on suppression of SCC susceptibility of the RIN materials, several in-plant material tests have been conducted using the reactor water clean up system (RWCU). Cyclic-Slow Strain Rate Tensile (C-SSRT) test, Slow Strain Rate Tensile (SSRT) test and Compact Tension (CT) test were performed in the test facilities which were installed at the sampling line from the RWCU. Evaluation of SCC life by means of the C-SSRT test was the first application as an accelerated SCC test for in-plant material tests. It was confirmed that the hydrogen injection in the feed water has a good mitigation effects on IGSCC performance of the RIN materials. Results will be discussed from a viewpoint of the test condition such as total oxidant, ECP, conductivity and loading/unloading. (author)

  2. Butyl rubber O-ring seals: Revision of test procedures for stockpile materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domeier, L.A.; Wagter, K.R.

    1996-12-01

    Extensive testing showed little correlation between test slab and O-ring performance. New procedures, comparable to those used with the traditional test slabs, were defined for hardness, compression set, and tensile property testing on sacrificial O-ring specimens. Changes in target performance values were made as needed and were, in one case, tightened to reflect the O-ring performance data. An additional study was carried out on O-ring and slab performance vs cure cycle and showed little sensitivity of material performance to large changes in curing time. Aging and spectra of certain materials indicated that two sets of test slabs from current vendor were accidently made from EPDM rather than butyl rubber. Random testing found no O-rings made from EPDM. As a result, and additional spectroscope test will be added to the product acceptance procedures to verify the type of rubber compound used.

  3. Results of ASTM round robin testing for mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    The results are summarized of several interlaboratory 'round robin' test programs for measuring the mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of advanced fiber reinforced composite materials. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests were conducted by participants in ASTM committee D30 on High Modulus Fibers and their Composites and by representatives of the European Group on Fracture (EGF) and the Japanese Industrial Standards Group (JIS). DCB tests were performed on three AS4 carbon fiber reinforced composite materials: AS4/3501-6 with a brittle epoxy matrix; AS4/BP907 with a tough epoxy matrix; and AS4/PEEK with a tough thermoplastic matrix. Difficulties encountered in manufacturing panels, as well as conducting the tests are discussed. Critical issues that developed during the course of the testing are highlighted. Results of the round robin testing used to determine the precision of the ASTM DCB test standard are summarized.

  4. Accelerated 54{degree}C irradiated test of Shippingport neutron shield tank and HFIR vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, J.R. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States); Rosinski, S.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Charpy V-notch specimens (ASTM Type A) and 5.74-mm diameter tension test specimens of the Shippingport Reactor Neutron Shield Tank (NST) (outer wall material) were irradiated together with Charpy V-notch specimens of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNI), High,, Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) vessel (shell material), to 5.07 {times} 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV. The irradiation was performed in the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR), a test reactor, at a controlled temperature of 54{degrees}C (130{degrees}F) selected to approximate the prior service temperatures of the cited reactor structures. Radiation-induced elevations in the Charpy 41-J transition temperature and the ambient temperature yield strength were small and independent of specimen test orientation (ASTM LT vs. TL). The observations are consistent with prior findings for the two materials (A 212-B plate) and other like materials irradiated at low temperature (< 200{degrees}C) to low fluence. The high radiation embrittlement sensitivity observed in HFIR vessel surveillance program tests was not found in the present accelerated irradiation test. Response to 288{degrees}C-168 h postirradiation annealing was explored for the NST material. Notch ductility recovery was found independent of specimen test orientation but dependent on the temperature within the transition region at which the specimens were tested.

  5. Accelerated 54[degree]C irradiated test of Shippingport neutron shield tank and HFIR vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, J.R. (Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)); Rosinski, S.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Charpy V-notch specimens (ASTM Type A) and 5.74-mm diameter tension test specimens of the Shippingport Reactor Neutron Shield Tank (NST) (outer wall material) were irradiated together with Charpy V-notch specimens of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNI), High,, Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) vessel (shell material), to 5.07 [times] 10[sup 17] n/cm[sup 2], E > 1 MeV. The irradiation was performed in the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR), a test reactor, at a controlled temperature of 54[degrees]C (130[degrees]F) selected to approximate the prior service temperatures of the cited reactor structures. Radiation-induced elevations in the Charpy 41-J transition temperature and the ambient temperature yield strength were small and independent of specimen test orientation (ASTM LT vs. TL). The observations are consistent with prior findings for the two materials (A 212-B plate) and other like materials irradiated at low temperature (< 200[degrees]C) to low fluence. The high radiation embrittlement sensitivity observed in HFIR vessel surveillance program tests was not found in the present accelerated irradiation test. Response to 288[degrees]C-168 h postirradiation annealing was explored for the NST material. Notch ductility recovery was found independent of specimen test orientation but dependent on the temperature within the transition region at which the specimens were tested.

  6. Diffusion-controlled toluene reference material for VOC emissions testing: international interlaboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Reed, Cynthia; Liu, Zhe; Cox, Steven; Leber, Dennis; Samarov, Dan; Little, John C

    2014-04-01

    The measurement of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from building products and materials by manufacturers and testing laboratories, and the use of the test results for labeling programs, continue to expand. One issue that hinders wide acceptance for chamber product testing is the lack of a reference material to validate test chamber performance. To meet this need, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Virginia Tech (VT) have developed a prototype reference material that emits a single VOC similar to the emissions of a diffusion-controlled building product source with a dynamic emissions profile. The prototype material has undergone extensive testing at NIST and a pilot interlaboratory study (ILS) with four laboratories. The next development step is an evaluation of the prototype source in multiple-sized chambers of 14 laboratories in seven countries. Each laboratory was provided duplicate specimens and a test protocol. Study results identified significant issues related to the need to store the source at a subzero Celsius temperature until tested and possible inconsistencies in large chambers. For laboratories using a small chamber and meeting all the test method criteria, the results were very encouraging with relative standard deviations ranging from 5% to 10% across the laboratories. Currently, the chamber performance of laboratories conducting product VOC emissions testing is assessed through interlaboratory studies (ILS) using a source with an unknown emission rate. As a result, laboratory proficiency can only be based on the mean and standard deviation of emission rates measured by the participating ILS laboratories. A reference material with a known emission rate has the potential to provide an independent assessment of laboratory performance as well as improve the quality of interlaboratory studies. Several international laboratories with different chamber testing systems demonstrated the ability to measure the emission rate

  7. Composite materials. Volume 1: Properties, non-destructive testing, and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, M.M. [United Technologies Corp., East Hartford, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This book provides a practical overview of the different types, properties, applications and design implementations of the latest composite materials. It describes important composite families, including metals, ceramics, polymers and other engineered materials; shows how each type of composite may be designed, manufactured, strengthened, and repaired; introduces composite modeling techniques; and explains the major industrial applications for composites. Primary markets for this book include materials engineers and designers in aerospace, automotive and transportation industries; works managers, facilities engineers, test engineers, plant engineers, manufacturing and industrial engineers, and production managers; students in material science, mechanical engineering and metallurgy.

  8. Ceramic materials in hydroelectric power plants - testing and working out method descriptions. Prestudy; Keramiska material i vattenkraftanlaeggningar - test och utarbetande av metodbeskrivning. Foerstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forssander, Maerit (TerraCorrosion AB (SE)); Persson, Charlotte (EnergoRetea, Stockholm (SE)); Carlsson, Roger (Vattenfall Power Consultant, Stockholm (SE)); Edwardson, Wille (Jaemtkontroll, Hammerdal (SE)); Johansson, Martin (Skellefteaa Kraft (SE)); Westerlund, Erik (Fortum Power and Heat OY (FI))

    2008-01-15

    Using ceramic materials for anti-corrosion painting in Swedish hydro power plants has been done with different results. In some cases it has performed well but in other it has failed. In only some cases the tests has been followed up rigorously to learn more about the process. The result from the interviews with the user and manufacturers is that there are cases where the use of ceramics in the hydro power plants will be economically favourable. The materials are there but they have to be tested in every single application before general recommendations can be done. A literature survey has been performed. Experiences from tests with ceramics in hydro power plants in Sweden have been summarised. Manufacturers on the Swedish market have been interviewed. The results from the literature survey showed that no published result was to be found of using ceramics in hydro electric power plants in the world. It is mentioned somewhere that Three Gorges in China have been using ceramics but no results was found. The conclusion is that even though the use of ceramics in hydro power plants can be economically favourable more tests has to be done. Those tests can be done together with the manufacturers in Sweden

  9. Design and production of a novel sand materials strength testing machine for foundry applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Hansen, K. S.; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2012-01-01

    In the foundry, existing strength testing machines are used to measure only the maximum fracture strength of mould and core materials. With traditionally used methods, the loading history to ascertain deformation of the material is not available. In this paper, a novel moulding material strength...... testing machine was designed and built for both green sand and chemically-bonded sand materials. This machine measures and presents the loading response as a force-displacement profile from which the mechanical properties of the moulding materials can be deduced. The system was interfaced to a computer....... The force was calibrated using an Amsler Hydraulic Press while the displacements were calibrated with and without loading using a displacement calibrator (Heidenhain Digitaler). The calibration results showed that the data obtained are stable and reliable and the machine can be used for the measurement...

  10. A systemic approach to testing the tribological properties of selected materials of agricultural machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Kučera

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The contribution brings the evaluation of selected materials regarding wear resistance under conditions of two experiments. The following materials had been chosen for these experiments: steel E295, steel C 45 after heat treatment, steel C 45 after quenching and steel 16MnCr5 after carburizing and quenching. The experiment was performed on a test device belonging to the category of “pin – disk“ test devices. The resistance of selected materials was evaluated regarding energy consumption, and it was compared to sizes of weight loss. It was observed that the material C 45 after heat treatment reached the highest values of wear resistance in conditions of adhesive wear without lubrication. The material 16MnCr5 indicated the best results in conditions of abrasive wear.

  11. Compendium of information on identification and testing of materials for plastic solar thermal collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinniss, V.D.; Sliemers, F.A.; Landstrom, D.K.; Talbert, S.G.

    1980-07-31

    This report is intended to organize and summarize prior and current literature concerning the weathering, aging, durability, degradation, and testing methodologies as applied to materials for plastic solar thermal collectors. Topics covered include (1) rate of aging of polymeric materials; (2) environmental factors affecting performance; (3) evaluation and prediction of service life; (4) measurement of physical and chemical properties; (5) discussion of evaluation techniques and specific instrumentation; (6) degradation reactions and mechanisms; (7) weathering of specific polymeric materials; and (8) exposure testing methodology. Major emphasis has been placed on defining the current state of the art in plastics degradation and on identifying information that can be utilized in applying appropriate and effective aging tests for use in projecting service life of plastic solar thermal collectors. This information will also be of value where polymeric components are utilized in the construction of conventional solar collectors or any application where plastic degradation and weathering are prime factors in material selection.

  12. COMBUSTION AND PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF A SMALL SPARK IGNITION ENGINE FUELLED WITH HCNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. SONTHALIA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to environmental concerns and fossil fuel depletion, large scale researches were carried out involving the use of natural gas in internal combustion engines. Natural gas is a clean burning fuel that is available from large domestic natural reserve. When it is used as a fuel in SI engines, it reduces emissions to meet EURO-III norms with carburettors and EURO-IV norms with manifold injection. Countries like India with fewer natural fossil fuel reserves depend heavily on oil imported from Middle East Asian countries and on the other hand combustion of fossil fuel has negative impact on air quality in urban areas. Use of CNG as a fuel in internal combustion engines can reduce the intensiveness of these pervasive problems. The performance of CNG can further be improved by addition of small percentages of hydrogen to it to overcome the drawbacks like lower energy density of the fuel, drop in engine power and engine out exhaust emissions. When hydrogen is added to CNG it is called as Hythane or Hydrogen enriched Compressed Natural Gas (HCNG. This can be considered as a first step towards promotion of hydrogen in automobiles. In this study, the effects of mixing hydrogen with CNG on a small air cooled four stroke SI engine’s performance, emissions and heat release rate was analyzed. A comparison of performance and emission by running engine separately on gasoline, hydrogen, CNG and HCNG was done. The results show a significant decrease in HC, CO and NOx emissions and marginal increase in specific energy consumption when fuelled with HCNG.

  13. Performance evaluation of common rail direct injection (CRDI engine fuelled with Uppage Oil Methyl Ester (UOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Basavarajappa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available For economic and social development of any country energy is one of the most essential requirements. Continuously increasing price of crude petroleum fuels in the present days coupled with alarming emissions and stringent emission regulations has led to growing attention towards use of alternative fuels like vegetable oils, alcoholic and gaseous fuels for diesel engine applications. Use of such fuels can ease the burden on the economy by curtailing the fuel imports. Diesel engines are highly efficient and the main problems associated with them is their high smoke and NOx emissions.  Hence there is an urgent need to promote the use of alternative fuels in place of high speed diesel (HSD as substitute. India has a large agriculture base that can be used as a feed stock to obtain newer fuel which is renewable and sustainable. Accordingly Uppage oil methyl ester (UOME biodiesel was selected as an alternative fuel. Use of biodiesels in diesel engines fitted with mechanical fuel injection systems has limitation on the injector opening pressure (300 bar. CRDI system can overcome this drawback by injecting fuel at very high pressures (1500-2500 bar and is most suitable for biodiesel fuels which are high viscous. This paper presents the performance and emission characteristics of a CRDI diesel engine fuelled with UOME biodiesel at different injection timings and injection pressures. From the experimental evidence it was revealed that UOME biodiesel yielded overall better performance with reduced emissions at retarded injection timing of -10° BTDC in CRDI mode of engine operation.

  14. Keying Results on the CELT-Structure Test to U.S. Grade Level Instructional Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Ross T.

    1978-01-01

    It would be beneficial for ESL instructors to know the U.S. grade equivalent English ability of their students for placement purposes, especially if their instructional materials are keyed for U.S. classrooms. For this purpose, the Stanford Intermediate Level I Reading Comprehension Test was compared with the CELT-Structure Test. (Author/RM)

  15. Test method for the microbiological barrier properties of wrapping materials ; new approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn ACP; Wagner P

    1993-01-01

    The study shows that the new approach, as proposed by CEN TC102 wg4, for the development of a test method for the determination the microbial barrier properties of packaging materials for medical devices does not give the expected advances over the in 1990 presented LGM test method (RIVM-report 9190

  16. In-core materials testing under LWR conditions in the Halden reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, P.J.; Hauso, E.; Hoegberg, N.W.; Karlsen, T.M.; McGrath, M.A. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)

    2002-07-01

    The Halden boiling water reactor (HBWR) has been in operation since 1958. It is a test reactor with a maximum power of 18 MW and is cooled and moderated by boiling heavy water, with a normal operating temperature of 230 C and a pressure of 34 bar. In the past 15 years increasing emphasis has been placed on materials testing, both of in-core structural materials and fuel claddings. These tests require representative light water reactor (LWR) conditions, which are achieved by housing the test rigs in pressure flasks that are positioned in fuel channels in the reactor and connected to dedicated water loops, in which boiling water reactor (BWR) or pressurised water reactor (PWR) conditions are simulated. Understanding of the in-core behaviour of fuel or reactor materials can be greatly improved by on-line measurements during power operation. The Halden Project has performed in-pile measurements for a period of over 35 years, beginning with fuel temperature measurements using thermocouples and use of differential transformers for measurement of fuel pellet or cladding dimensional changes and internal rod pressure. Experience gained over this period has been applied to on-line instrumentation for use in materials tests. This paper gives details of the systems used at Halden for materials testing under LWR conditions. The techniques used to provide on-line data are described and illustrative results are presented. (authors)

  17. Screening tests for hazard classification of complex waste materials - Selection of methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weltens, R., E-mail: reinhilde.weltens@vito.be [VITO Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B 2400 Mol (Belgium); Vanermen, G.; Tirez, K. [VITO Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B 2400 Mol (Belgium); Robbens, J. [University of Antwerp - Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Deprez, K.; Michiels, L. [University of Hasselt - Biomedical Research Institute, University Hasselt, Campus Diepenbeek, Agoralaan A, B3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2012-12-15

    In this study we describe the development of an alternative methodology for hazard characterization of waste materials. Such an alternative methodology for hazard assessment of complex waste materials is urgently needed, because the lack of a validated instrument leads to arbitrary hazard classification of such complex waste materials. False classification can lead to human and environmental health risks and also has important financial consequences for the waste owner. The Hazardous Waste Directive (HWD) describes the methodology for hazard classification of waste materials. For mirror entries the HWD classification is based upon the hazardous properties (H1-15) of the waste which can be assessed from the hazardous properties of individual identified waste compounds or - if not all compounds are identified - from test results of hazard assessment tests performed on the waste material itself. For the latter the HWD recommends toxicity tests that were initially designed for risk assessment of chemicals in consumer products (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, biocides, food, etc.). These tests (often using mammals) are not designed nor suitable for the hazard characterization of waste materials. With the present study we want to contribute to the development of an alternative and transparent test strategy for hazard assessment of complex wastes that is in line with the HWD principles for waste classification. It is necessary to cope with this important shortcoming in hazardous waste classification and to demonstrate that alternative methods are available that can be used for hazard assessment of waste materials. Next, by describing the pros and cons of the available methods, and by identifying the needs for additional or further development of test methods, we hope to stimulate research efforts and development in this direction. In this paper we describe promising techniques and argument on the test selection for the pilot study that we have performed on different types of

  18. Lubrication and wear in diesel engine injection equipment fuelled by dimethyl ether (DME)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2003-01-01

    that jeopardise the high efficiency of the engine and increase the manufacturing costs. DME has a low toxicity and can be made from anything containing carbon including biomass. If DME is produced from cheap natural gas from remote locations, the price of this new fuel could even become lower than that of diesel...... oil. Fueling diesel engines with DME presents two significant problems: The injection equipment can break down due to extensive wear and DME attacks nearly all known elastomers. The latter problem renders dynamic sealing diƣult whereas the first one involves the poor lubrication qualities of DME which...... are the main concerns of the present study. The volatile fuel tribotester (VFTT) was developed, capable of testing material compatibility with DME. This apparatus has the potential of selecting new materials for future DME pumps. Two properties are important for describing these lubrication qualities...

  19. Determination of radon exhalation from construction materials using VOC emission test chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M; Jann, O; Kemski, J; Schneider, U; Krocker, C; Hoffmann, B

    2013-10-01

    The inhalation of (222) Rn (radon) decay products is one of the most important reasons for lung cancer after smoking. Stony building materials are an important source of indoor radon. This article describes the determination of the exhalation rate of stony construction materials by the use of commercially available measuring devices in combination with VOC emission test chambers. Five materials - two types of clay brick, clinker brick, light-weight concrete brick, and honeycomb brick - generally used for wall constructions were used for the experiments. Their contribution to real room concentrations was estimated by applying room model parameters given in ISO 16000-9, RP 112, and AgBB. This knowledge can be relevant, if for instance indoor radon concentration is limited by law. The test set-up used here is well suited for application in test laboratories dealing with VOC emission testing.

  20. Compositions, Functions, and Testing of Friction Brake Materials and Their Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, PJ

    2001-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to present a survey of commercial brake materials and additives, and to indicate their typical properties and functions, especially as regards their use in heavy trucks. Most truck pad and shoe materials described here were designed to wear against cast iron. Brake material test methods are also briefly described. This report does not address issues associated with the fabrication and manufacturing of brake materials. Since there are literally thousands of brake material additives, and their combinations are nearly limitless, it is impractical to list them all here. Rather, an attempt has been made to capture the primary constituents and their functions. An Appendix contains thermo-physical properties of some current and potential brake materials.

  1. Field Testing of Low-Cost Bio-Based Phase Change Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2013-03-01

    A test wall built with phase change material (PCM)-enhanced loose-fill cavity insulation was monitored for a period of about a year in the warm-humid climate of Charleston, South Carolina. The test wall was divided into various sections, one of which contained only loose-fill insulation and served as a control for comparing and evaluating the wall sections with the PCM-enhanced insulation. This report summarizes the findings of the field test.

  2. An investigation of neutron irradiation test on superplastic zirconia-ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Taiju; Ishihara, Masahiro; Baba, Shinichi; Hayashi, Kimio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Motohashi, Yoshinobu [Ibaraki Univ., Mito (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    A neutron irradiation test on superplastic ceramic materials at high temperature has been proposed as an innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). For the effective execution of the test, we reviewed the superplastic deformation mechanism of ceramic materials and discussed neutron irradiation effects on the superplastic deformation process of stabilized Tetragonal Zirconia Polycrystal (TZP), which is a representative superplastic ceramic material. As a result, we pointed out that the decrease in the activation energy for superplastic deformation is expected by the radiation-enhanced diffusion. We selected a fast neutron fluence of 5x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} and an irradiation temperature of about 600degC as test conditions for the first irradiation test on TZP and decided to perform a preliminary irradiation test by the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). Moreover, we estimated the radioactivity of irradiated TZP and indicated that it is in the order of 10{sup 10} Bq/g (about 0.3 Ci/g) immediately after irradiation to a thermal neutron fluence of 3x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} and that it decays to about 1/100 in a year. (author)

  3. Testing for characterization of the materials from radiological point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercea, Sorin; Iliescu, Elena; Dudu, Dorin; Iancso, Georgeta

    2013-12-01

    The nuclear techniques and materials are now used in a large number of applications, both in medicine and industry. Due to this fact, new materials are needed in order to assure the radiological protection of the personnel involved in these activities. But, finally, all these materials have to be tested for some specific parameters, in order to prove that they are adequate for the purposed for which they were created. One of the important parameters of the materials used for the radiological protection is the attenuation coefficient. The attenuation coefficient of the ionizing radiation composed by particles without electrical charge (X,γ-ray and neutron) is the most important parameter for the materials used for the shielding of these ionizing radiation. This paper deals with the experimental methods developed for the determination of the attenuation of fast and thermal neutrons. These experimental methods, involved the use of Am-Be source and U-120 Cyclotron of IFIN-HH. For the tests which were done at the U-120 Cyclotron, a number of experiments had to be performed, in order to establish the irradiation geometry and the dose equivalent rates in front of and behind the material samples. The experimental results obtained for samples of several materials, confirmed the methods as adequate for the aim of the test.

  4. Quantification of uncertainty of experimental measurement in leaching test on cement-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutand, M; Cyr, M; Clastres, P

    2011-10-01

    When mineral wastes are reused in construction materials, a current practice is to evaluate their environmental impact using standard leaching test. However, due to the uncertainty of the measurement, it is usually quite difficult to estimate the pollutant potential compared to other materials or threshold limits. The aim of this paper is to give a quantitative evaluation of the uncertainty of leachate concentrations of cement-based materials, as a function of the number of test performed. The relative standard deviations and relative confidence intervals are determined using experimental data in order to give a global evaluation of the uncertainty of leachate concentrations (determination of total relative standard deviation). Various combinations were realized in order to point out the origin of large dispersion of the results (determination of relative standard deviation linked to analytical measured and to leaching procedure), generalisation was suggested and the results were compared to literature. An actual example was given about the introduction of residue (meat and bone meal bottom ash--MBM-BA) in mortar, leaching tests were carried out on various samples with and without residue MBM-BA. In conclusion large dispersion were observed and mainly due to heterogeneity of materials. So heightened attention needed to analyse leaching result on cement-based materials and further more other tests (e.g. ecotoxicology) should be performed to evaluate the environmental effect of these materials.

  5. Permeation Testing of Materials With Chemical Agents or Simulants (Swatch Testing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    g Cystine 0.065 g Glutamine 0.16 g Glycine 0.11 g Histidine 0.82 g Citric acid 0.55 g Phenol 0.16 g Sodium chloride 7.62 g Potassium sulfate...aerosol particles should be generated from a nontoxic, low-volatility liquid (e.g., oleic acid ). Aerosol particle sizes and numbers are measured with an...in the theater of operations. Swatch testing may be required periodically throughout the equipment life cycle if normal wear or storage is shown to

  6. Testing Penetration of Epoxy Resin and Diamine Hardeners through Protective Glove and Clothing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Mäkelä, Erja A; Suuronen, Katri

    2015-10-01

    Efficient, comfortable, yet affordable personal protective equipment (PPE) is needed to decrease the high incidence of allergic contact dermatitis arising from epoxy resin systems (ERSs) in industrial countries. The aim of this study was to find affordable, user-friendly glove and clothing materials that provide adequate skin protection against splashes and during the short contact with ERS that often occurs before full cure. We studied the penetration of epoxy resin and diamine hardeners through 12 glove or clothing materials using a newly developed test method. The tests were carried out with two ERS test mixtures that had a high content of epoxy resin and frequently used diamine hardeners of different molar masses. A drop (50 µl) of test mixture was placed on the outer surface of the glove/clothing material, which had a piece of Fixomull tape or Harmony protection sheet attached to the inner surface as the collection medium. The test times were 10 and 30 min. The collecting material was removed after the test was finished and immersed into acetone. The amounts of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), isophorone diamine (IPDA), and m-xylylenediamine (XDA) in the acetone solution were determined by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The limit for acceptable penetration of XDA, IPDA, and DGEBA through glove materials was set at 2 µg cm(-2). Penetration through the glove materials was 1.4 µg cm(-2) or less. The three tested chemical protective gloves showed no detectable penetration (<0.5 µg cm(-2)). Several affordable glove and clothing materials were found to provide adequate protection during short contact with ERS, in the form of, for example, disposable gloves or clothing materials suitable for aprons and as additional protective layers on the most exposed parts of clothing, such as the front of the legs and thighs and under the forearms. Every ERS combination in use should be tested separately to find the best skin protection material

  7. Molding of strength testing samples using modern PDCPD material for purpose of automotive industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, L.; Baier, A.; Sobek, M.

    2017-08-01

    The casting of metal materials is widely known but the molding of composite polymer materials is not well-known method still. The initial choice of method for producing composite bodies was the method of casting of PDCPD material. For purpose of performing casting of polymer composite material, a special mold was made. Firstly, the 3D printed, using PLA material, mold was used. After several attempts of casting PDCPD many problems were encountered. The second step was to use mold milled from a firm and dense isocyanate foam. After several attempts research shown that this solution is more resistant to high-temperature peak, but this material is too fragile to use it several times. This solution also prevents mold from using external heating, which can be necessary for performing correct molding process. The last process was to use the aluminum mold, which is dedicated to PDCPD polymer composite, because of low adhesiveness. This solution leads to perform correct PDCPD polymer composite material injection. After performing casting operation every PDCPD testing samples were tested. These results were compared together. The result of performed work was to archive correct properties of injection of composite material. Research and results were described in detail in this paper.

  8. A Micro-Test Structure for the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Metal Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingying Ren

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An innovative micro-test structure for detecting the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC of metal materials is presented in this work. Throughout this method, a whole temperature sensing moveable structures are supported by four groups of cascaded chevrons beams and packed together. Thermal expansion of the metal material causes the deflection of the cascaded chevrons, which leads to the capacitance variation. By detecting the capacitance value at different temperatures, the TEC value of the metal materials can be calculated. A finite element model has been established to verify the relationship between the TEC of the material and the displacement of the structure on horizontal and vertical directions, thus a function of temperature for different values of TEC can be deduced. In order to verify the analytical model, a suspended-capacitive micro-test structure has been fabricated by MetalMUMPs process and tested in a climate chamber. Test results show that in the temperature range from 30 °C to 80 °C, the TEC of the test material is 13.4 × 10−6 °C−1 with a maximum relative error of 0.8% compared with the given curve of relationship between displacement and temperature.

  9. Standard Test Method for Testing Polymeric Seal Materials for Geothermal and/or High Temperature Service Under Sealing Stress

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the initial evaluation of (screening) polymeric materials for seals under static sealing stress and at elevated temperatures. 1.2 This test method applies to geothermal service only if used in conjunction with Test Method E 1068. 1.3 The test fluid is distilled water. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  10. A new penetration test method: protection efficiency of glove and clothing materials against diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Mäkelä, Erja

    2015-03-01

    Reported cases of allergic contact dermatitis caused by methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) have increased and thereby increased the need for adequate skin protection. Current standardized permeation and penetration test methods give information about efficacy of protective materials against individual components of the polyurethane systems. They do not give information of what kind of clothing materials workers should wear against splashes when handling mixed MDI-polyurethane formulations, which contain MDI, its oligomers, and polyols. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a sensitive penetration test method that can be used to select clothing that is protective enough against uncured splashes of MDI-polyurethane, still easy to use, and also, to find affordable glove materials that provide adequate protection during a short contact. The penetration of MDI through eight representative glove or clothing materials was studied with the developed test procedure. One MDI hardener and two polymeric MDI (PMDI)-polyol formulations representing different curing times were used as test substances. The materials tested included work clothing (woven) fabric, arm shields (nonwoven fabric), old T-shirt, winter gloves, and gloves of nitrile rubber, leather, vinyl (PVC), and natural rubber. A drop (50 µl) of test substance was added to the outer surface of the glove/clothing material, which had Tape Fixomull attached to the inner surface as a collection medium. After penetration times of 5 or 20min, the collecting material was removed and immediately immersed into acetonitrile containing 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazine for derivatization. The formed urea derivatives of 2,4'-MDI and 4,4'-MDI were analysed using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric and UV detection. The precision of the test method was good for the material with high penetration (work clothing fabric) of MDI, as the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 14 and 20%. For the arm shield with a low

  11. Material inertia and size effects in the Charpy V-notch test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desandre, D. A.; Benzerga, A. A.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2004-01-01

    The effect of material inertia on the size dependence of the absorbed energy in the Charpy V-notch test is investigated. The material response is characterized by an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a porous plastic solid, with adiabatic heating due to plastic dissipation and the re......The effect of material inertia on the size dependence of the absorbed energy in the Charpy V-notch test is investigated. The material response is characterized by an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a porous plastic solid, with adiabatic heating due to plastic dissipation...... and the resulting thermal softening accounted for. The onset of cleavage is taken to occur when a critical value of the maximum principal stress is attained over a critical volume. Plane strain dynamic analyses are carried out for geometrically similar specimens of various sizes with all parameters adjusted so...

  12. Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-10-01

    Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

  13. Testing of high temperature materials within HTR program in Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berka Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research institutes and also industrial companies in Czech Republic are involved in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR program and activities related to the study of advanced materials and HTGR technologies. These activities are supported by EC (within international projects, e.g. FP7-ARCHER, ALLIANCE, GoFastR can be mentioned and also by Technology Agency of Czech Republic. Within these activities, degradation of metallic and ceramic materials in the high temperature helium atmosphere is investigated, and also new experimental facilities for material testing are built. As examples of tested materials, Alloy 800 H, ferritic steel P91, austenitic steel 316, Inconel 713 and 738 and corundum ceramics could be named. The selected results of exposure experiments in the high temperature helium environment are presented in this paper.

  14. Remarks on Some Mechanical Small-Scale Tests Applied to Properties of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardu, Marilena; Seccatore, Jacopo

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the results of test campaigns on small-scale strength properties (particularly, micro-hardness) performed on two homogeneous materials: calcite, a very common and widespread mineral that is characterized by its relatively low Mohs hardness and its high reactivity with even weak acids; and glass, an amorphous solid characterized by the absence of the long-range order which defines crystalline materials. After a synthetic description of the principles underlying two of the three classical comminution laws, known as Kick's law and Rittinger's law, experimental results are discussed. The results of the tests performed show that both scale effect and size effect contribute to the non-constancy of mechanical properties at small scale for crystalline materials. On the other hand, for amorphous materials, a theoretical law considering size effects gives considerably different results from empirical measurements. Considerations and an extended discussion address these findings.

  15. Immortalized gingival fibroblasts as a cytotoxicity test model for dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illeperuma, Rasika P; Park, Young J; Kim, Jin M; Bae, Jung Y; Che, Zhong M; Son, Hwa K; Han, Mi R; Kim, Kwang M; Kim, Jin

    2012-03-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity test is an initial step to identify the harmful effects of new dental materials. Aim of this study was to develop a stable human cell line derived from normal gingival fibroblasts (hNOF) and to assess its feasibility in in vitro cytotoxicity testing. Immortalized human gingival fibroblasts (hTERT-hNOF) were successfully established with human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene transfection, preserving its phenotypical characteristics, replicative potential and biological properties. Utilizing standard cytotoxicity test modeling and dental materials, hTERT-hNOF were evaluated for their feasibility in cytotoxicity testing, compared with hNOF and L929 cells. Similar pattern of cytotoxic response was observed among hNOF, hTERT-hNOF and L929 cells. Cytotoxicity response of hTERT-hNOF was significantly similar to hNOF, moreover hTERT-hNOF and hNOF were found to be more sensitive towards the tested dental materials compared to L929 cells. This study suggested that hTERT-hNOF is an effective cytotoxic test model for dental materials.

  16. Arc Jet Test and Analysis of Asbestos Free Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Dome Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2017-01-01

    Asbestos free solid motor internal insulation samples were recently tested at the MSFC Hyperthermal Arc Jet Facility. Objectives of the test were to gather data for solid rocket motor analog characterization of ablative and in-depth thermal performance of rubber materials subject to high enthalpy/pressure flow conditions. Tests were conducted over a range of convective heat fluxes for both inert and chemically reactive sub-sonic free stream gas flow. Active instrumentation included use of total calorimeters, in-depth thermocouples, and a surface pyrometer for in-situ surface temperature measurement. Post-test sample forensics involved determination of eroded depth, charred depth, total sample weight loss, and documentation of the general condition of the eroded profile. A complete Charring Material Ablator (CMA) style aero thermal analysis was conducted for the test matrix and results compared to the measured data. In general, comparisons were possible for a number of the cases and the results show a limited predictive ability to model accurately both the ablative response and the in-depth temperature profiles. Lessons learned and modeling recommendations are made regarding future testing and modeling improvements that will increase understanding of the basic chemistry/physics associated with the complicated material ablation process of rubber materials.

  17. Characterization of a backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF Baclo Project - Phase 3 Laboratory tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Sanden, Torbjoern; Dueck, Ann; Ohlsson, Lars (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    A backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF, which origin from Milos, Greece, has been investigated. The material was delivered both as granules and as pellets. The investigation described in this report aimed to characterize the material and evaluate if it can be used in a future repository. The following investigations have been done and are presented in this report: 1. Standard laboratory tests. Water content, liquid limit and swelling potential are examples on standard tests that have been performed. 2. Block manufacturing. The block compaction properties of the material have been determined. A first test was performed in laboratory but also tests in large scale have been performed. After finishing the test phase, 60 tons of blocks were manufactured at Hoeganaes Bjuf AB. The blocks will be used in large scale laboratory tests at Aespoe HRL. 3. Mechanical parameters. The compressibility of the material was investigated with oedometer tests (four tests) where the load was applied in steps after saturation. The evaluated oedometer modulus varied between 34.50 MPa. Tests were made to evaluate the elastic parameters of the material (E, nu). Altogether three tests were made on specimens with dry densities of about 1,710 kg/m3. The evaluated E-modulus and Poisson's ratio varied between 231-263 MPa and 0.16-0.19 respectively. The strength of the material, both the compressive strength and the tensile strength were measured on specimens compacted to different dry densities. The test results yielded a relation between density and the two types of strength. Furthermore, tests have been made in order to determine the compressibility of the unsaturated filling of pellets. Two tests were made where the pellets were loosely filled in a Proctor cylinder and then compressed at a constant rate of strain during continuously measurement of the applied load. 4. Swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity. There is, as expected, a very clear influence of the dry density on the

  18. Standard test method for conducting friction tests of piston ring and cylinder liner materials under lubricated conditions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for conducting laboratory bench-scale friction tests of materials, coatings, and surface treatments intended for use in piston rings and cylinder liners in diesel or spark-ignition engines. The goal of this procedure is to provide a means for preliminary, cost-effective screening or evaluation of candidate ring and liner materials. A reciprocating sliding arrangement is used to simulate the contact that occurs between a piston ring and its mating liner near the top-dead-center position in the cylinder where liquid lubrication is least effective, and most wear is known to occur. Special attention is paid to specimen alignment, running-in, and lubricant condition. 1.2 This test method does not purport to simulate all aspects of a fired engine’s operating environment, but is intended to serve as a means for preliminary screening for assessing the frictional characteristics of candidate piston ring and liner material combinations in the presence of fluids that behave as u...

  19. Alkali metal compatibility testing of candidate heater head materials for a Stirling engine heat transport system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Jack E.; Hickman, Gary L.; Grobstein, Toni

    The authors describe work performed as part of the 25-kWe advanced Stirling conversion system project. Liquid alkali metal compatibility is being assessed in an ongoing test program to evaluate candidate heater head materials and fabrication processes at the temperatures and operating conditions required for Stirling engines. Specific materials under evaluation are alloy 713LC, alloy 713LC coated with nickel aluminide, and Udimet 720, each in combination with Waspaloy. The tests were run at a constant 700 C. A eutectic alloy of sodium and potassium (NaK) was the working fluid. Titanium sheet in the system was shown to be an effective oxygen getter. Metallographic and microchemical examination of material surfaces, joints, and their interfaces revealed little or no corrosion after 1000 h. Tests are in progress, with up to 10,000 h exposure.

  20. Railgun Application for High Energy Impact Testing of Nano-Reinforced Kevlar-Based Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, D.; Vricella, A.; Pastore, R.; Morles, R. B.; Marchetti, M.

    2013-08-01

    An advanced electromagnetic accelerator, called railgun, has been assembled and tuned in order to perform high energy impact test on layered structures. Different types of layered composite materials have been manufactured and characterized in terms of energy absorbing capability upon impact of metallic bullets fired at high velocity. The composite materials under testing are manufactured by integrating several layers of Kevlar fabric and carbon fiber ply within a polymeric matrix reinforced by carbon nanotubes at 1% of weight percentage. The experimental results show that the railgun-device is a good candidate to perform impact testing of materials in the space debris energy range, and that carbon nanotubes may enhance, when suitably coupled to the composite's matrix, the excellent antiballistic properties of the Kevlar fabrics.

  1. Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1984-05-01

    Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

  2. Significance of tests and properties of concrete and concrete-making materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pielert, James H

    2006-01-01

    Reflects a decade of technological changes in concrete industry! The newest edition of this popular ASTM publication reflects the latest technology in concrete and concrete-making materials. Six sections cover: (1) General information on the nature of concrete, sampling, variability, and testing laboratories. A new chapter deals with modeling cement and concrete properties. (2) Properties of freshly mixed concrete. (3) Properties of hardened concrete. (4) Concrete aggregates—this section has been revised and the chapters are presented in the order that most concerns concrete users: grading, density, soundness, degradation resistance, petrographic examination, reactivity, and thermal properties. (5) Materials other than aggregates—the chapter on curing materials now reflects the current technology of materials applied to new concrete surfaces. The chapter on mineral admixtures has been separated into two chapters: supplementary cementitious materials and ground slag. (6) Specialized concretes—contains a ...

  3. Energy-optimisation of biogas-fuelled CHP units; Energetische Optimierung von Biogas-BHKW's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltic, P.; Edenhauser, D.; Winkler, A.

    2008-07-15

    This illustrated final report for the Swiss Federal office of Energy (SFOE) reports on the energy-related optimisation of combined heat and power (CHP) units that are fuelled with non-processed biogas. Ways of increasing the efficiency of these units as far as the production of electricity is concerned are examined and commented on. Also, ways of using the heat generated by the CHP units to produce electricity using other, exergetic means are also described. Systems such as Stirling engines and existing and new thermo-electrical elements are discussed. The economic viability of the systems is also discussed.

  4. Determination of Constant Parameters of Copper as Power-Law Hardening Material at Different Test Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowser Md. A.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a technique has been developed to determine constant parameters of copper as a power-law hardening material by tensile test approach. A work-hardening process is used to describe the increase of the stress level necessary to continue plastic deformation. A computer program is used to show the variation of the stress-strain relation for different values of stress hardening exponent, n and power-law hardening constant, α . Due to its close tolerances, excellent corrosion resistance and high material strength, in this analysis copper (Cu has been selected as the material. As a power-law hardening material, Cu has been used to compute stress hardening exponent, n and power-law hardening constant, α from tensile test experiment without heat treatment and after heat treatment. A wealth of information about mechanical behavior of a material can be determined by conducting a simple tensile test in which a cylindrical specimen of a uniform cross-section is pulled until it ruptures or fractures into separate pieces. The original cross sectional area and gauge length are measured prior to conducting the test and the applied load and gauge deformation are continuously measured throughout the test. Based on the initial geometry of the sample, the engineering stress-strain behavior (stress-strain curve can be easily generated from which numerous mechanical properties, such as the yield strength and elastic modulus, can be determined. A universal testing machine is utilized to apply the load in a continuously increasing (ramp manner according to ASTM specifications. Finally, theoretical results are compared with these obtained from experiments where the nature of curves is found similar to each other. It is observed that there is a significant change of the value of n obtained with and without heat treatment it means the value of n should be determined for the heat treated condition of copper material for their applications in engineering

  5. Comparison of irradiated 15Kh2MFA material mechanical properties using conventional testing methods and innovative approach of small punch testing (SPT) and automated ball indentation (ABIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopriva, R.; Petelova, P.; Eliasova, I.; Kytka, M.; Culek, M.

    2017-02-01

    Article describes two innovative testing methods – Small Punch Testing (SPT) and Automated Ball Indentation Test (ABIT) – which are based on the determination and evaluation of material properties from miniaturized testing specimens. These methods are very promising due to minimum material needed for testing and also in case of testing highly irradiated materials of components that are not included in standard surveillance programs. The test results were obtained for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) base material 15Ch2MFA in both states - initial unirradiated and irradiated. Subsequently results were compared with standard tensile tests to prove applicability of these testing methods for the evaluation of degradation of irradiated structural materials of nuclear power plants.

  6. EFFECT OF IGNITION TIMING ON THE PERFORMANCE OF LPG FUELLED SI ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M.Dabhadkar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fast depletion of fossil fuels and their detrimental effect on the environment is demanding an urgent need of alternative fuels for meeting sustainable energy demand with minimum environmental impact.A lot of research is being carried out throughout the world to evaluate the performance, exhaust emission and combustion characteristics of the existing engines using several alternative fuels such as hydrogen, compressed natural gas, alcohols, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG, biogas, producer gas, bio-diesels developed from vegetable oils, and others (Roy et. al, 2010. LPG and CNG are the alternative fuels to be widely adopted for use in the world. Gaseous fuel mix uniformly with air which burns precisely during combustion than liquid fuels. It has minimum carbon deposition & negligible physical delay. Internal combustion engines running on liquid petroleum gas (LPG are well-proven technologies and work much likegasoline-powered spark-ignition engines. They are normally used as spark-ignition engines for bi-fuelled (gasoline/CH4 cars, but have also been used, for example, in compression-ignition engines for heavy-duty vehicles. Both LPG and NG are not used alone, but always in bi-fuel vehicles, in combination with gasoline. In bi-fuel vehicles two fuels are stored in separate tanks and the engine runs on one fuel at a time. Bi-fuel vehicles have the capability to switch back and forth from gasoline to the other fuel, manually or automatically. As a fuel for spark-ignition engines LPG have some advantages over gasoline, such as a better anti-knock characteristic and reduced CO and unburned HC emissions (Hsieh et al., 2002. Environmental point of view is that there is an increasing interest among the suppliers to investigate LPG as a transportation fuel.It was found that the liquid petroleum gas, roughly a mixture of propane and butane, which gives a benefit in terms of toxic hydrocarbons emissions and ozone formation due to its composition and CO2

  7. Breakdown Tests of Composite Materials, and the Importance of the Volume Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Find; Holbøll, Joachim; Henriksen, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    High voltage testing of inhomogeneous composite materials often shows that the stressed volume has a great influence on the result. This paper tries to develop methods of estimating the stressed volume by calculating the theoretical extent of streamer propagation along insulating surfaces....... A dynamical numerical model of a certain test setup is used to predict the actual volume tested depending on electrode geometry and peak impulse voltage. The geometry of the test setup as well as the thickness of the Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) has been varied....

  8. Performance tests on column materials for {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sombrito, E.Z.; Bulos, A.D.; Tangonan, M.C. [Chemistry Research Section, Atomic Research Div., Philippine Nuclear Research Inst., Quezon (Philippines)

    1998-10-01

    To meet the need of producing a {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc generator, based on low specific activity reactor-produced {sup 99}Mo, different procedures for preparing zirconium molybdate gels were tested. Performance tests were done on molybdate gel columns prepared using the procedures developed by Vietnam and China, and recently, on a polyzirconium compound (PZC) prepared in Japan. The conditions for the batch drying of a large volume of the gel material were studied as well as the conditions in preparing a column to concentrate technetium-99m. The performance of PZC sample as column material for the generator was also evaluated. (author)

  9. Design and production of a novel sand materials strength testing machine for foundry applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Hansen, K. S.; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2012-01-01

    testing machine was designed and built for both green sand and chemically-bonded sand materials. This machine measures and presents the loading response as a force-displacement profile from which the mechanical properties of the moulding materials can be deduced. The system was interfaced to a computer...... with a commercial PC based-control and data acquisition software. The testing conditions and operations are specified in the user interface and the data acquisition is made according to specifications. The force and displacements were calibrated to ensure consistency and reliability of the measurement data...

  10. Standard test method for plane-strain (Chevron-Notch) fracture toughness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of plane-strain (chevron-notch) fracture toughnesses, KIv or KIvM, of metallic materials. Fracture toughness by this method is relative to a slowly advancing steady state crack initiated at a chevron-shaped notch, and propagating in a chevron-shaped ligament (Fig. 1). Some metallic materials, when tested by this method, exhibit a sporadic crack growth in which the crack front remains nearly stationary until a critical load is reached. The crack then becomes unstable and suddenly advances at high speed to the next arrest point. For these materials, this test method covers the determination of the plane-strain fracture toughness, KIvj or KIvM, relative to the crack at the points of instability. Note 1—One difference between this test method and Test Method E 399 (which measures KIc) is that Test Method E 399 centers attention on the start of crack extension from a fatigue precrack. This test method makes use of either a steady state slowly propagating crack, or a...

  11. Standard test method for determining the superplastic properties of metallic sheet materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the procedure for determining the superplastic forming properties (SPF) of a metallic sheet material. It includes tests both for the basic SPF properties and also for derived SPF properties. The test for basic properties encompasses effects due to strain hardening or softening. 1.2 This test method covers sheet materials with thicknesses of at least 0.5 mm but not greater than 6 mm. It characterizes the material under a uni-axial tensile stress condition. Note 1—Most industrial applications of superplastic forming involve a multi-axial stress condition in a sheet; however it is more convenient to characterize a material under a uni-axial tensile stress condition. Tests should be performed in different orientations to the rolling direction of the sheet to ascertain initial anisotropy. 1.3 This method has been used successfully between strain rates of 10-5 to 10-1 per second. 1.4 This method has been used successfully on Aluminum and Titanium alloys. The use of the method wi...

  12. Special Form Testing of Sealed Source Encapsulation for High-Alpha-Activity Actinide Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Oscar A [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    In the United States all transportation of radioactive material is regulated by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Beginning in 2008 a new type of sealed-source encapsulation package was developed and tested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These packages contain high-alpha-activity actinides and are regulated and transported in accordance with the requirements for DOT Class 7 hazardous material. The DOT provides specific regulations pertaining to special form encapsulation designs. The special form designation indicates that the encapsulated radioactive contents have a very low probability of dispersion even when subjected to significant structural events. The special form designs have been shown to simplify the delivery, transport, acceptance, and receipt processes. It is intended for these sealed-source encapsulations to be shipped to various facilities making it very advantageous for them to be certified as special form. To this end, DOT Certificates of Competent Authority (CoCAs) have been sought for the design suitable for containing high-alpha-activity actinide materials. This design consists of the high-alpha-activity material encapsulated within a triangular zirconia canister, referred to as a ZipCan, tile that is then enclosed by a spherical shell. The spherical shell design, with ZipCan tile inside, was tested for compliance with the special form regulations found in 49 CFR 173.469. The spherical enclosure was subjected to 9-m impact, 1 m percussion, and 10-minute thermal tests at the Packaging Evaluation Facility located at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, TN USA and operated by ORNL. Before and after each test, the test units were subjected to a helium leak check and a bubble test. The ZipCan tiles and core were also subjected to the tests required for ISO 2919:2012(E), including a Class IV impact test and heat test and subsequently subjected to helium leakage rate tests [49 CFR 173.469(a)(4)(i)]. The impact

  13. Long term test of buffer material at the Aespoe HRL, LOT project. Final report on the A0 test parcel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern; Faelth, Billy (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Jansson, Mats; Eriksen, Trygve E.; Svaerdstroem, Kjell (KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)); Rosborg, Bo (Studsvik AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Muurinen, Arto (VTT, Espoo (Finland))

    2011-02-15

    In the Swedish repository concept for nuclear waste (KBS-3 concept), the spent nuclear fuel will be stored in copper canisters surrounded by compacted bentonite. The decaying power of the fuel will increase the temperature in the repository which, in combination with the uptake of ground-water, could be expected to produce minor mineralogical changes in the bentonite. The ongoing LOT test series at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory are focused on identifying and quantifying any mineralogical alterations in the bentonite exposed to typical repository-like conditions. Further, buffer-related processes concerning copper corrosion, cation transport, and bacterial survival/activity are studied. In total, the LOT project includes seven test parcels, which contain a central Cu-tube surrounded by cylindrical bentonite blocks to a total diameter of 30 cm as well as temperature, total pressure, water pressure and humidity sensors. In each test parcel, an electrical heater placed inside the copper tube is used to simulate the heat generation from the decaying spent fuel. Three test parcels (S1 to S3) have been exposed to standard KBS-3 conditions (maximum temperature below 100 deg C) and three parcels (A1 to A3) to adverse conditions (maximum temperature below approx140 deg C). Both the standard and the adverse test series include short term tests (1 to 2 years), medium term tests (> 5 years) and long term tests (> 10 years). The present report concerns an additional short term test, thereby the designation A0, which was exposed to adverse conditions for approximately 1.5 years. Cu-coupons, 134Cs and 57Co tracers and specific chemical agents were placed in the bentonite at defined positions. After field exposure, the entire test parcel was released from the rock by overlapping percussion drilling and wire sawing. The parcel was lifted and divided at the test site and the bentonite material was sampled for specified analyses. The main aspects of the various tests and analyses

  14. [Evaluation and characterization of the certified reference materials for coagulation factor Ⅷ and Ⅸ activity testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H P; Zhou, W B; Li, C B; Du, Z L; Peng, M T

    2016-05-31

    To evaluate and characterize the certified reference materials for coagulation factor Ⅷ (FⅧ) and factor Ⅸ (FⅨ) activity testing. The homogeneity and stability of three lots of certified reference materials (F01-F03) with different factor concentrations were evaluated according to guidelines"Reference materials-general and statistical principles for certification","Guidance on evaluating the homogeneity and stability of samples used for proficiency testing"and"Technical Norm of Primary Reference Material". The certified reference materials were characterized by eight laboratories using one-stage method, which were calibrated by the coagulation standard provided by the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC) in UK. The Coefficient of Variation (CV) of homogeneity test of FⅧ activity of three lots of certified reference materials were 3.9%, 3.3% and 3.4%, respectively. While that of FⅨ activity were 3.7%, 3.0% and 1.8%, respectively. The results of one-way ANOVA showed that all certified reference materials had good homogeneity (P>0.05), and the between-bottle homogeneity uncertainties (ubb) of FⅧ and FⅨ activity were 0.5%-2.9% and 0.1%-3.9%, respectively. All certified reference materials stored in -80 ℃ remained stable in 9 months by trend analysis, and the long-term stability uncertainties(ults) of FⅧ and FⅨ activity were 0.5%-5.1% and 1.3%-4.4%, respectively. The characterization uncertainties (uchar) of FⅧ and FⅨ activity testing were 0.9%-2.4% and 1.1%-2.4%, respectively. The combined uncertainties and extended uncertainties (coverage factor k=2) were calculated. The assigned values of each lot of certified reference materials for FⅧ activity were (85±13)%, (36.0±3.4)% and (20.5±2.3)%, and that were (102±13)%, (47.8±6.9)% and (29.3±3.8)% for FⅨ activity, respectively. The certified reference materials for FⅧ and FⅨ activity testing have good homogeneity and stability. The results of the

  15. Standard test method for translaminar fracture toughness of laminated and pultruded polymer matrix composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of translaminar fracture toughness, KTL, for laminated and pultruded polymer matrix composite materials of various ply orientations using test results from monotonically loaded notched specimens. 1.2 This test method is applicable to room temperature laboratory air environments. 1.3 Composite materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by type of polymer matrix or fiber, provided that the specimen sizes and the test results meet the requirements of this test method. This test method was developed primarily from test results of various carbon fiber – epoxy matrix laminates and from additional results of glass fiber – epoxy matrix, glass fiber-polyester matrix pultrusions and carbon fiber – bismaleimide matrix laminates (1-4, 6, 7). 1.4 A range of eccentrically loaded, single-edge-notch tension, ESE(T), specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but planar size may be variable and adjusted, with asso...

  16. State of art report for high temperature wear test of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Hu; Lee, Jae Seon; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Ji Ho; Kim, Jong In

    2000-03-01

    Wear resistance properties of machine elements has been more critical in view of its significant effect on life extension, economics and material saving because it has been recognized that nearly 80 percent of damages of mechanical elements in the friction pairs are due to the material loss by wear. And wear properties have direct influence on the life of a machine in a great extend under extremely severe operating condition. Therefore highly improved wear properties of machine elements operating in such circumstances is heavily required. The purpose of this report is to survey current technology for high temperature wear test in order to establish the test plan for the life evaluation of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing materials. Friction and wear test will be done under high pressure (170 MPa) and high temperature (350 degree C) with water as lubricant to simulate the operating condition of the nuclear power reactor. Because pump type for MCP is selected as the caned motor pump which needs no mechanical sealing, the rotating shaft on which bearing is fully submerged by main coolant with high temperature. So MCP bearing operates without additional lubricant. CEDM is adopted as the ball-screw type with fine controllability. So the driving part is designed as the immersed-in type by main coolant. Therefore the anti-wear and reliability of driving parts are much consequent to guarantee the lifetime and the safety of the whole system. Tribometer adapted to high temperature and pressure circumstance is needed to execute bearing material testing. Test parameters are material, sliding speed, sliding distance and applied load. In order to identify the wear mechanism, optical microscope and surface roughness testers are required. The result of this report will provide an elementary data to develop bearing materials and to estimate bearing lifetime for the bearings of MCP and CEDM in SMART. (author)

  17. State of art report for high temperature wear test of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Hu; Lee, Jae Seon; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Ji Ho; Kim, Jong In

    2000-03-01

    Wear resistance properties of machine elements has been more critical in view of its significant effect on life extension, economics and material saving because it has been recognized that nearly 80 percent of damages of mechanical elements in the friction pairs are due to the material loss by wear. And wear properties have direct influence on the life of a machine in a great extend under extremely severe operating condition. Therefore highly improved wear properties of machine elements operating in such circumstances is heavily required. The purpose of this report is to survey current technology for high temperature wear test in order to establish the test plan for the life evaluation of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing materials. Friction and wear test will be done under high pressure (170 MPa) and high temperature (350 degree C) with water as lubricant to simulate the operating condition of the nuclear power reactor. Because pump type for MCP is selected as the caned motor pump which needs no mechanical sealing, the rotating shaft on which bearing is fully submerged by main coolant with high temperature. So MCP bearing operates without additional lubricant. CEDM is adopted as the ball-screw type with fine controllability. So the driving part is designed as the immersed-in type by main coolant. Therefore the anti-wear and reliability of driving parts are much consequent to guarantee the lifetime and the safety of the whole system. Tribometer adapted to high temperature and pressure circumstance is needed to execute bearing material testing. Test parameters are material, sliding speed, sliding distance and applied load. In order to identify the wear mechanism, optical microscope and surface roughness testers are required. The result of this report will provide an elementary data to develop bearing materials and to estimate bearing lifetime for the bearings of MCP and CEDM in SMART. (author)

  18. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Test Methods on the Flexural Strength Results of Monolithic Zirconia Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Schatz; Monika Strickstrock; Malgorzata Roos; Daniel Edelhoff; Marlis Eichberger; Isabella-Maria Zylla; Bogna Stawarczyk

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of specimen preparation and test method on the flexural strength results of monolithic zirconia. Different monolithic zirconia materials (Ceramill Zolid (Amann Girrbach, Koblach, Austria), Zenostar ZrTranslucent (Wieland Dental, Pforzheim, Germany), and DD Bio zx2 (Dental Direkt, Spenge, Germany)) were tested with three different methods: 3-point, 4-point, and biaxial flexural strength. Additionally, different specimen preparation methods wer...

  19. Influence of specimen preparation and test methods on the flexural strength results of monolithic zirconia materials

    OpenAIRE

    Schatz, Christine; Strickstrock, Monika; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Zylla, Isabella-Maria; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of specimen preparation and test method on the flexural strength results of monolithic zirconia. Different monolithic zirconia materials (Ceramill Zolid (Amann Girrbach, Koblach, Austria), Zenostar ZrTranslucent (Wieland Dental, Pforzheim, Germany), and DD Bio zx2 (Dental Direkt, Spenge, Germany)) were tested with three different methods: 3-point, 4-point, and biaxial flexural strength. Additionally, different specimen preparation methods wer...

  20. Mechanical tests, static and modal finite element analysis for MWCNT composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela BARAN

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to develop some numerical experiences based on mechanical tests performed on MWCNT (Multi-wall carbon nanotubes composites created in our Material compartment using finite element commercial codes (here NASTRAN. The results of numerical simulations are consistent with the laboratory tests and encourage us to continue to improve the models using NASTRAN capabilities in order to obtain a realistic simulation of aeronautical structures made of such composites, considering their special properties.

  1. Adaptation of Crack Growth Detection Techniques to US Material Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Joseph Palmer; Sebastien P. Teysseyre; Kurt L. Davis; Joy L. Rempe; Gordon Kohse; Yakov Ostrovsky; David M. Carpenter

    2014-04-01

    A key component in evaluating the ability of Light Water Reactors to operate beyond 60 years is characterizing the degradation of materials exposed to radiation and various water chemistries. Of particular concern is the response of reactor materials to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Some materials testing reactors (MTRs) outside the U.S., such as the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), have deployed a technique to measure crack growth propagation during irradiation. This technique incorporates a compact loading mechanism to stress the specimen during irradiation. A crack in the specimen is monitored using the Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method. A project is underway to develop and demonstrate the performance of a similar type of test rig for use in U.S. MTRs. The first year of this three year project was devoted to designing, analyzing, fabricating, and bench top testing a mechanism capable of applying a controlled stress to specimens while they are irradiated in a pressurized water loop (simulating PWR reactor conditions). During the second year, the mechanism will be tested in autoclaves containing high pressure, high temperature water with representative water chemistries. In addition, necessary documentation and safety reviews for testing in a reactor environment will be completed. In the third year, the assembly will be tested in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR) and Post Irradiation Examinations (PIE) will be performed.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material - ATM-8 glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wald, J.W.

    1985-10-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) Approved Testing Material ATM-8 is a borosilicate glass that incorporates elements typical of high-level waste (HLW) resulting from the reprocessing of commercial nuclear reactor fuel. Its composition is based upon the simulated HLW glass type 76-68 (Mendel, J.E. et al., 1977, Annual Report of the Characteristics of High-Level Waste Glasses, BNWL-2252, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington), to which depleted uranium, technetium-99, neptunium-237 and plutonium-239 have been added at moderate to low levels. The glass was requested by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. It was produced by the MCC at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute. ATM-8 glass was produced in April of 1984, and is the second in a series of testing materials for NNWSI. This report discusses its fabrication (starting materials, batch and glass preparation, measurement and testing equipment, other equipment, procedures, identification system and materials availability and storage, and characterization (bulk density) measurements, chemical analysis, microscopic examination, and x-ray diffraction analysis. 4 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. Standard Guide for Selection of Test Methods for Interlayer Materials for Aerospace Transparent Enclosures

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This guide summarizes the standard test methods available for determining physical and mechanical characteristics of interlayer materials used in multi-ply aerospace transparent enclosures. 1.2 Interlayer materials are used to laminate glass-to-glass, glass-to-plastic, and plastic-to-plastic. Interlayer materials are basically transparent adhesives with high-quality optical properties. They can also serve as an energy absorbing medium, a fail-safe membrane to contain cockpit pressure and to prevent entry of impact debris; a strain insulator to accommodate different thermal expansion rates of members being laminated and as an adherent to prevent spalling of inner surface ply material fragments. The relative importance of an interlayer characteristic will be a function of the prime use it serves in its particular application. 1.3 This guide, as a summary of various methods in Section 2, is intended to facilitate the selection of tests that can be applied to interlayer materials. 1.4 The test methods list...

  4. Design and Testing of Braided Composite Fan Case Materials and Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Pereira, J. Michael; Braley, Michael S.; Arnold, William a.; Dorer, James D.; Watson, William R/.

    2009-01-01

    Triaxial braid composite materials are beginning to be used in fan cases for commercial gas turbine engines. The primary benefit for the use of composite materials is reduced weight and the associated reduction in fuel consumption. However, there are also cost benefits in some applications. This paper presents a description of the braided composite materials and discusses aspects of the braiding process that can be utilized for efficient fabrication of composite cases. The paper also presents an approach that was developed for evaluating the braided composite materials and composite fan cases in a ballistic impact laboratory. Impact of composite panels with a soft projectile is used for materials evaluation. Impact of composite fan cases with fan blades or blade-like projectiles is used to evaluate containment capability. A post-impact structural load test is used to evaluate the capability of the impacted fan case to survive dynamic loads during engine spool down. Validation of these new test methods is demonstrated by comparison with results of engine blade-out tests.

  5. Developing an Innovative Field Expedient Fracture Toughness Testing Protocol for Concrete Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Liu, Ken C [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2008-09-01

    The Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test (SNTT) was developed recently to determine the intrinsic fracture toughness (KIC) of structural materials. The SNTT system operates by applying pure torsion to uniform cylindrical specimens with a notch line that spirals around the specimen at a 45 pitch. KIC values are obtained with the aid of a three-dimensional finite-element computer code, TOR3D-KIC. The SNTT method is uniquely suitable for testing a wide variety of materials used extensively in pressure vessel and piping structural components and weldments. Application of the method to metallic, ceramic, and graphite materials has been demonstrated. One important characteristic of SNTT is that neither a fatigue precrack or a deep notch are required for the evaluation of brittle materials, which significantly reduces the sample size requirement. In this paper we report results for a Portland cement-based mortar to demonstrate applicability of the SNTT method to cementitious materials. The estimated KIC of the tested mortar samples with compressive strength of 34.45 MPa was found to be 0.19 MPa m.

  6. 8th RILEM International Symposium on Testing and Characterization of Sustainable and Innovative Bituminous Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Partl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the results of RILEM TC 237-SIB (Testing and characterization of sustainable innovative bituminous materials and systems). The papers have been selected for publication after a rigorous peer review process and will be an invaluable source to outline and clarify the main directions of present and future research and standardization for bituminous materials and pavements. The following topics are covered: - Characterization of binder-aggregate interaction - Innovative testing of bituminous binders, additives and modifiers - Durability and aging of asphalt pavements - Mixture design and compaction analysis - Environmentally sustainable materials and technologies - Advances in laboratory characterization of bituminous materials - Modeling of road materials and pavement performance prediction - Field measurement and in-situ characterization - Innovative materials for reinforcement and interlayer systems - Cracking and damage characterization of asphalt pavements - Rec...

  7. ADAPTATION OF CRACK GROWTH DETECTION TECHNIQUES TO US MATERIAL TEST REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Joseph Palmer; Sebastien P. Teysseyre; Kurt L. Davis; Gordon Kohse; Yakov Ostrovsky; David M. Carpenter; Joy L. Rempe

    2015-04-01

    A key component in evaluating the ability of Light Water Reactors to operate beyond 60 years is characterizing the degradation of materials exposed to radiation and various water chemistries. Of particular concern is the response of reactor materials to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Some test reactors outside the United States, such as the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), have developed techniques to measure crack growth propagation during irradiation. The basic approach is to use a custom-designed compact loading mechanism to stress the specimen during irradiation, while the crack in the specimen is monitored in-situ using the Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method. In 2012 the US Department of Energy commissioned the Idaho National Laboratory and the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (MIT NRL) to take the basic concepts developed at the HBWR and adapt them to a test rig capable of conducting in-pile IASCC tests in US Material Test Reactors. The first two and half years of the project consisted of designing and testing the loader mechanism, testing individual components of the in-pile rig and electronic support equipment, and autoclave testing of the rig design prior to insertion in the MIT Reactor. The load was applied to the specimen by means of a scissor like mechanism, actuated by a miniature metal bellows driven by pneumatic pressure and sized to fit within the small in-core irradiation volume. In addition to the loader design, technical challenges included developing robust connections to the specimen for the applied current and voltage measurements, appropriate ceramic insulating materials that can endure the LWR environment, dealing with the high electromagnetic noise environment of a reactor core at full power, and accommodating material property changes in the specimen, due primarily to fast neutron damage, which change the specimen resistance without additional crack growth. The project culminated with an in

  8. Material Ignition and Suppression Test (MIST) in Space Exploration Atmospheres, Summary of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Pello, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The Material Ignition and Suppression Test (MIST) project has had the objective of evaluating the ease of ignition and the fire suppression of materials used in spacecraft under environmental condition expected in a spacecraft. For this purpose, an experimental and theoretical research program is being conducted on the effect of space exploration atmospheres (SEA) on the piloted ignition of representative combustible materials, and on their fire suppression characteristics. The experimental apparatus and test methodology is derived from the Forced Ignition and Flame Spread Test (FIST), a well-developed bench scale test designed to extract material properties relevant to prediction of material flammability. In the FIST test, materials are exposed to an external radiant flux and the ignition delay and critical mass flux at ignition are determined as a function of the type of material and environmental conditions. In the original MIST design, a small-scale cylindrical flow duct with fuel samples attached to its inside wall was heated by a cylindrical heater located at the central axis of the cylinder. However, as the project evolved it was decided by NASA that it would be better to produce an experimental design that could accommodate other experiments with different experimental concepts. Based on those instructions and input from the requirements of other researchers that may share the hardware in an ISS/CIR experiment, a cylindrical design based on placing the sample at the center of an optically transparent tube with heaters equally spaced along the exterior of the cylinder was developed. Piloted ignition is attained by a hot wire igniter downstream of the fuel sample. Environment variables that can be studied via this experimental apparatus include: external radiant flux, oxidizer oxygen concentration, flow velocity, ambient pressure, and gravity level (if flown in the ISS/CIR). This constitutes the current experimental design, which maintains fairly good

  9. Physicists purchase materials testing machine in support of pioneering particle physics experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    Sharpe, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    "The particle physics group at Liverpool University has purchased an LRXPlus singlecolumn materials testing machine from Lloyd Instruments, which will be used to help characterise the carbon-fibre support frames for detectors used for state-of-the-art particle physics experiments." (1 page)

  10. Bulk Density Adjustment of Resin-Based Equivalent Material for Geomechanical Model Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengxian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An equivalent material is of significance to the simulation of prototype rock in geomechanical model test. Researchers attempt to ensure that the bulk density of equivalent material is equal to that of prototype rock. In this work, barite sand was used to increase the bulk density of a resin-based equivalent material. The variation law of the bulk density was revealed in the simulation of a prototype rock of a different bulk density. Over 300 specimens were made for uniaxial compression test. Test results indicated that the substitution of quartz sand by barite sand had no apparent influence on the uniaxial compressive strength and elastic modulus of the specimens but can increase the bulk density, according to the proportional coarse aggregate content. An ideal linearity was found in the relationship between the barite sand substitution ratio and the bulk density. The relationship between the bulk density and the usage of coarse aggregate and barite sand was also presented. The test results provided an insight into the bulk density adjustment of resin-based equivalent materials.

  11. Using Soxhlet Ethanol Extraction to Produce and Test Plant Material (Essential Oils for Their Antimicrobial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Redfern

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available As the issue of antimicrobial resistance continues to grow, there is a renewed interest in deriving antimicrobial products from natural compounds, particularly extracts from plant materials. This paper describes how essential oil can be extracted from the common herb, thyme (Thymus vulgaris in the classroom. Subsequently, the extract can be tested for its antimicrobial activity. A number of variables are suggested.

  12. Mechanical properties test data for structural materials. Quarterly progress report for period ending October 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, M R [comp.

    1976-12-01

    Test data on heat resisting reactor materials are presented. These data were obtained in research at EG and G Idaho, Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division, General Electric Company, University of Cincinnati, and University of California at Los Angeles. (JRD)

  13. A review on the utilization of the Japan materials testing reactor (JMTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Kang, Y. H.; Kim, B. G.; Choo, K. N.; Oh, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Shin, Y. T

    1999-04-01

    The HANARO has possessed the potential capability for the testing of materials and fuels since the beginning of its operation in 1995. Recently, this reactor has contributed to various activities in nuclear power research in Korea. We need the recent technical data of developed countries to support these activities in nuclear power. Most of the developed countries in nuclear power have more than thirty years' experience in the irradiation test of nuclear fuel and material for performing their complicated in-core measurements of the change of material properties. They also have developed various types of sensors, equipment and techniques. This report describes the status of utilization of the irradiation facilities of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor(JMTR). It also describes the recent efforts of the JMTR in order to develop new irradiation test techniques. It will be our great pleasure for this report to help a broad range of people understand the generic contents (JMTR utilization, new techniques) of the JMTR. (author)

  14. Component design and testing for a miniaturised autonomous sensor based on a nanowire materials platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fagas, Giorgos; Nolan, Michael; Georgiev, Yordan M.; Yu, Ran; Lotty, Olan; Petkov, Nikolay; Holmes, Justin D.; Jia, Guobin; Eisenhawer, Björn; Gawlik, Annett; Falk, Fritz; Khosropour, Naser; Buitrago, Elizabeth; Fernández-Bolaños Badia, Montserrat; Krummenacher, Francois; Ionescu, Adrian M.; Kayal, Maher; Nightingale, Adrian M.; De Mello, John C; Puik, Erik; Bent, Frank van der; Lafeber, Rik; Ramaneti, Rajesh; Tong, Hien Duy; Rijn, Cees van

    2014-01-01

    From Springer description: "We present the design considerations of an autonomous wireless sensor and discuss the fabrication and testing of the various components including the energy harvester, the active sensing devices and the power management and sensor interface circuits. A common materials pl

  15. Standardization Efforts for Mechanical Testing and Design of Advanced Ceramic Materials and Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Jenkins, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced aerospace systems occasionally require the use of very brittle materials such as sapphire and ultra-high temperature ceramics. Although great progress has been made in the development of methods and standards for machining, testing and design of component from these materials, additional development and dissemination of standard practices is needed. ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics and ISO TC 206 have taken a lead role in the standardization of testing for ceramics, and recent efforts and needs in standards development by Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics will be summarized. In some cases, the engineers, etc. involved are unaware of the latest developments, and traditional approaches applicable to other material systems are applied. Two examples of flight hardware failures that might have been prevented via education and standardization will be presented.

  16. Developing standard performance testing procedures for material control and accounting components at a site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Carolynn P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bushlya, Anatoly V [ROSATOM, RUSSIA; Efimenko, Vladimir F [IPPE, RUSSIA; Ilyanstev, Anatoly [IPPE, RUSSIA; Regoushevsky, Victor I [IPPE, RUSSIA

    2010-01-01

    The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC&A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements and documentation, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC&A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following subsystems, MC&A and Detecting Material Losses, and their respective elements for the material control and accountability system: (a) Elements of the MC&A Subsystem - Information subsystem (Accountancy/Inventory), Measurement subsystem, Nuclear Material Access subsystem, including tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated Information-gathering subsystem; (b) Elements for Detecting Nuclear Material Loses Subsystem - Inventory Differences, Shipper/receiver Differences, Confirmatory Measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or Seal Violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems from the list above. Additionally this work includes a review of regulatory requirements for the MC&A system component characteristics and criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC&A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a Guide for MC&A Performance Testing at the material balance areas (MBAs) of State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (SSC RF-IPPE).

  17. Compatibility tests between Jarytherm DBT synthetic oil and solid materials from wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasquelle, Thomas; Falcoz, Quentin; Neveu, Pierre; Flamant, Gilles; Walker, Jérémie

    2016-05-01

    Direct thermocline thermal energy storage is the cheapest sensible thermal energy storage configuration. Indeed, a thermocline tank consists in one tank instead of two and reduces costs. Thermocline thermal energy storages are often filled with cheap solid materials which could react with the heat transfer fluid in the case of incompatibility. PROMES laboratory is building a pilot-scale parabolic trough solar loop including a direct thermocline thermal energy storage system. The working fluid will be a synthetic oil, the Jarytherm® DBT, and the thermal energy storage tank will be filled with stabilized solid materials elaborated from vitrified wastes. Compatibility tests have been conducted in order to check on one hand if the thermo-mechanical properties and life time of the energy storage medium are not affected by the contact with oil and, on the other hand, if the thermal oil performances are not degraded by the solid filler. These experiments consisted in putting in contact the oil and the solid materials in small tanks. In order to discriminate the solid materials tested in the shortest time, accelerating aging conditions at 330 °C for 500 hours were used. The measurements consisted in X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy for the solids, and thermo-physical and chemical properties measurements for the oil. Regarding the solid samples, their crystalline structure did not change during the test, but it is difficult to conclude about their elementary composition and they seem to absorb oil. While thermal properties still makes Jarytherm® DBT a good heat transfer fluid after the accelerated aging tests, this study results in differentiating most compatible materials. Thus according to our study, Jarytherm® DBT can be used in direct thermocline thermal energy storage applications when compatibility of the solid material has been demonstrated.

  18. Tensile tests of specimens made of selected group of the filament materials manufactured with FDM method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabowik Cezary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of tensile tests carried out for specimens made of the selected group of the filament materials. As a manufacturing technology FDM 3D printing method was chosen. The selected group of the filament materials involved the group of wood, PLA, ABS, PET, PMMA and ASA. Herein, it should be noticed, that technical data sheets that are delivered by filament materials producers include data that are valid for only one specific printing direction. This printing direction is deliberately selected, in such way that ensures the best material characteristics. Therefore, received during the research results allow to make comparison between a catalogue data and data obtained in the printing process. It aids both mechanical designer and product manufacturer at the stage of the printed product mechanical properties shaping.

  19. Evaluation of Kerosene Fuelled Scramjet Combustor using a Combination of Cooled and Uncooled Struts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chandrasekhar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The scramjet combustor a vital component of scramjet engine has been designed by employing fuel injection struts. Several experimental studies have been carried out to evaluate the propulsive performance and structural integrity of the in-stream fuel injection struts in the connect-pipe test facility. As the mission objective of hypersonic demonstrator is to flight test the scramjet engine for 20 s duration, in-stream fuel injection struts which are designed as heat sink devices encounter hostile flow field conditions especially in terms of high thermal and high convective loads in the scramjet combustor. To circumvent these adverse conditions, materials like Niobium C-103 and W-Ni-Fe alloys have been used for the construction of struts and a number of tests have been carried out to evaluate the survivability of the in-stream fuel injection struts in the scramjet combustor. The results thus obtained show that the erosion of leading edges of the Stage-II fuel injection struts in the initial phase and subsequently puncturing of the fuel injection manifold after 10-12 s of the test are noticed, while the other stages of the struts are found to be intact. This deteriorating leading edges of Stage-II struts with respect to time, affect the overall propulsive performance of the combustor. To mitigate this situation, Stage-II struts have been designed as cooled structure and other Stages of struts are designed as un-cooled structure. Material of construction of struts used is Nimonic C-263 alloy. This paper highlights the results of the static test of the scramjet combustor, which has been carried out at a combustor entry Mach number of 2.0, total temperature of 2000 K, with an overall kerosene fuel equivalence ratio of 1.0 and for the supersonic combustion duration of 20 s. Low back pressure has been created at the exit of the scramjet combustor using ejector system to avoid flow separation.Visual inspection of the fuel injection struts after the test

  20. An assessment of wind tunnel test data on flexible thermal protection materials and results of new fatigue tests of threads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Charles F.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI) was developed as a replacement for the low-temperature (white) tiles on the Space Shuttle. The first use of the AFRSI for an Orbiter flight was on the OMS POD of Orbiter (OV-099) for STS-6. Post flight examination after STS-6 showed that damage had occurred to the AFRSI during flight. The failure anomaly between previous wind-tunnel tests and STS-6 prompted a series of additional wind tunnel tests to gain an insight as to the cause of the failure. An assessment of all the past STS-6 wind tunnel tests pointed out the sensitivity of the test results to scaling of dynamic loads due to the difference of boundary layer thickness, and the material properties as a result of exposure to heating. The thread component of the AFRSI was exposed to fatigue testing using an apparatus that applied pulsating aerodynamic loads on the threads similar to the loads caused by an oscillating shock. Comparison of the mean values of the number-of-cycles to failure showed that the history of the thread was the major factor in its performance. The thread and the wind tunnel data suggests a mechanism of failure for the AFRSI.

  1. Pulsed Excitation in Eddy Current Non-Destructive Testing of Conductive Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Janousek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with eddy current non-destructive testing of conductive materials. Basic principle of the method is explained. Two types of eddy current excitation, the harmonic one and the pulsed one, are discussed. The characteristics, advantages as well as disadvantages of the two excitation methods are compared. It is explained that the pulsed excitation gives more complex information about a tested object. Experimental results of the pulsed eddy current testing of a defect in an Aluminium plate are presented

  2. APPLICATION OF INDEX TESTING METHODS IN DETERMINING MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF INTACT ROCK MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Dobrilović

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The review of index testing methods with detailed observations on the application of Schmidt rebound hardness and point load strength index in mechanical properties estimations of intact rock material is given in this paper. The results of conducted testing in determining applicability of the above-mentioned testing methods for the estimations of uniaxial compressive strength, elasticity modulus, tensile strength and flexural strength for three characteristic types of limestone from the roof layers of „Korenići“ deposit are also presented (the paper is published in Croatian.

  3. Fatigue testing of a carbon fibre composite wind turbine blade with associated material characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, G.A.; Richardson, D.J. [Univ. of the West of England, Faculty of Engineering, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    Within the EC project JOULE 2, the University of the West of England (UWE) tested a carbon fibre reinforced epoxy (CFRE) full scale wind turbine blade together with an associated material test coupon programme. All the work was closely linked with the manufacturer Polymarine BV of the Netherlands, who designed and manufactured the blade and provided test specimens, the UWE carried out the research into the validation of the design calculations together with a check of the strength and fatigue life of the blade. (au)

  4. Combination of Universal Mechanical Testing Machine with Atomic Force Microscope for Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian; He, Dannong

    2015-08-01

    Surface deformation and fracture processes of materials under external force are important for understanding and developing materials. Here, a combined horizontal universal mechanical testing machine (HUMTM)-atomic force microscope (AFM) system is developed by modifying UMTM to combine with AFM and designing a height-adjustable stabilizing apparatus. Then the combined HUMTM-AFM system is evaluated. Finally, as initial demonstrations, it is applied to analyze the relationship among macroscopic mechanical properties, surface nanomorphological changes under external force, and fracture processes of two kinds of representative large scale thin film materials: polymer material with high strain rate (Parafilm) and metal material with low strain rate (aluminum foil). All the results demonstrate the combined HUMTM-AFM system overcomes several disadvantages of current AFM-combined tensile/compression devices including small load force, incapability for large scale specimens, disability for materials with high strain rate, and etc. Therefore, the combined HUMTM-AFM system is a promising tool for materials research in the future.

  5. Examination of a Size-Change Test for Photovoltaic Encapsulation Materials (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D. C.; Ji, L.; Kelly, G.; Gu, X.; Nickel, N.; Norum, P.; Shioda, T.; Tamizhmani, G.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    We examine a proposed test standard that can be used to evaluate the maximum representative change in linear dimensions of sheet encapsulation products for photovoltaic modules (resulting from their thermal processing). The proposed protocol is part of a series of material-level tests being developed within Working Group 2 of the Technical Committee 82 of the International Electrotechnical Commission. The characterization tests are being developed to aid module design (by identifying the essential characteristics that should be communicated on a datasheet), quality control (via internal material acceptance and process control), and failure analysis. Discovery and interlaboratory experiments were used to select particular parameters for the size-change test. The choice of a sand substrate and aluminum carrier is explored relative to other options. The temperature uniformity of +/- 5C for the substrate was confirmed using thermography. Considerations related to the heating device (hot-plate or oven) are explored. The time duration of 5 minutes was identified from the time-series photographic characterization of material specimens (EVA, ionomer, PVB, TPO, and TPU). The test procedure was revised to account for observed effects of size and edges. The interlaboratory study identified typical size-change characteristics, and also verified the absolute reproducibility of +/- 5% between laboratories.

  6. Examination of a Size-Change Test for Photovoltaic Encapsulation Materials: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Gu, X.; Ji, L.; Kelly, G.; Gu, X.; Nickel, N.; Norum, P.; Shioda, T.; Tamizhmani, G.

    2012-08-01

    We examine a proposed test standard that can be used to evaluate the maximum representative change in linear dimensions of sheet encapsulation products for photovoltaic modules (resulting from their thermal processing). The proposed protocol is part of a series of material-level tests being developed within Working Group 2 of the Technical Committee 82 of the International Electrotechnical Commission. The characterization tests are being developed to aid module design (by identifying the essential characteristics that should be communicated on a datasheet), quality control (via internal material acceptance and process control), and failure analysis. Discovery and interlaboratory experiments were used to select particular parameters for the size-change test. The choice of a sand substrate and aluminum carrier is explored relative to other options. The temperature uniformity of +/- 5C for the substrate was confirmed using thermography. Considerations related to the heating device (hot-plate or oven) are explored. The time duration of 5 minutes was identified from the time-series photographic characterization of material specimens (EVA, ionomer, PVB, TPO, and TPU). The test procedure was revised to account for observed effects of size and edges. The interlaboratory study identified typical size-change characteristics, and also verified the absolute reproducibility of +/- 5% between laboratories.

  7. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: generation and characterization of test materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Michael; Letinski, Daniel J; Carr, John; Caro, Mario L; Daughtrey, Wayne; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    In compliance with the Clean Air Act regulations for fuel and fuel additive registration, the petroleum industry, additive manufacturers, and oxygenate manufacturers have conducted comparative toxicology testing on evaporative emissions of gasoline alone and gasoline containing fuel oxygenates. To mimic real world exposures, a generation method was developed that produced test material similar in composition to the re-fueling vapor from an automotive fuel tank at near maximum in-use temperatures. Gasoline vapor was generated by a single-step distillation from a 1000-gallon glass-lined kettle wherein approximately 15-23% of the starting material was slowly vaporized, separated, condensed and recovered as test article. This fraction was termed vapor condensate (VC) and was prepared for each of the seven test materials, namely: baseline gasoline alone (BGVC), or gasoline plus an ether (G/MTBE, G/ETBE, G/TAME, or G/DIPE), or gasoline plus an alcohol (G/EtOH or G/TBA). The VC test articles were used for the inhalation toxicology studies described in the accompanying series of papers in this journal. These studies included evaluations of subchronic toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Results of these studies will be used for comparative risk assessments of gasoline and gasoline/oxygenate blends by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

  8. Performance evaluation of DAAF as a booster material using the onionskin test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Francois, Elizabeth G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hooks, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harry, Herbert H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-02

    Initiation of insensitive high explosive (IHE) formulations requires the use of a booster explosive in the initiation train. Booster material selection is crucial, as the initiation must reliably function across some spectrum of physical parameters. The interest in Diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) for this application stems from the fact that it possesses many traits of an IHE but is shock sensitive enough to serve as an explosive booster. A hemispherical wave breakout test, termed the onionskin test, is one of the methods used to evaluate the performance of a booster material. The wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemispherical IHE charge is recorded and the relative uniformity of the breakout can be quantitatively compared between booster materials. A series of onionskin tests were performed to investigate breakout and propagation diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) at low temperatures to evaluate ignition and detonation spreading in comparison to other explosives commonly used in booster applications. Some wave perturbation was observed with the DAAF booster in the onionskin tests presented. The results of these tests will be presented and discussed.

  9. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60 Food... of components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products must have and follow written... identified to show the specific component, in-process material, or drug product for each lot tested. (4) A...

  10. Standard Test Method for Solar Transmittance (Terrestrial) of Sheet Materials Using Sunlight

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1986-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of solar transmittance (terrestrial) of materials in sheet form by using a pyranometer, an enclosure, and the sun as the energy source. 1.2 This test method also allows measurement of solar transmittance at angles other than normal incidence. 1.3 This test method is applicable to sheet materials that are transparent, translucent, textured, or patterned. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. Standard Test Method for Stress-Corrosion of Titanium Alloys by Aircraft Engine Cleaning Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method establishes a test procedure for determining the propensity of aircraft turbine engine cleaning and maintenance materials for causing stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloy parts. 1.2 The evaluation is conducted on representative titanium alloys by determining the effect of contact with cleaning and maintenance materials on tendency of prestressed titanium alloys to crack when subsequently heated to elevated temperatures. 1.3 Test conditions are based upon manufacturer's maximum recommended operating solution concentration. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see and .

  12. Mechanical and oxidation testing of advanced materials for steam power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bontempi, P.; Guardamagna, C.; Ricci, N.; Torri, L. [CESI, Segrate (Milano) (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    In the frame of the COST522 programme, Steam Power Plant Working Group, CESI is carrying out an experimental programme in order to evaluate boiler and turbine innovative materials suitable for applications up to 650 C. In this paper results from Low Cycle Fatigue, creep and oxidation-corrosion testing are presented. LCF tests at T=600 C have been performed on a new cast steel (CB6), evaluating also the effect of hold time period. The preliminary creep results at T=625 C on four new 11%Cr ferritic steels for piping are presented: the experimentation is still in progress. The steamside corrosion - oxidation test results at T=600 C and T=650 till now obtained on both boiler and turbine innovative materials are shown. (orig.)

  13. Characterization of a backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF Baclo Project - Phase 3 Laboratory tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Sanden, Torbjoern; Dueck, Ann; Ohlsson, Lars (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    A backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF, which origin from Milos, Greece, has been investigated. The material was delivered both as granules and as pellets. The investigation described in this report aimed to characterize the material and evaluate if it can be used in a future repository. The following investigations have been done and are presented in this report: 1. Standard laboratory tests. Water content, liquid limit and swelling potential are examples on standard tests that have been performed. 2. Block manufacturing. The block compaction properties of the material have been determined. A first test was performed in laboratory but also tests in large scale have been performed. After finishing the test phase, 60 tons of blocks were manufactured at Hoeganaes Bjuf AB. The blocks will be used in large scale laboratory tests at Aespoe HRL. 3. Mechanical parameters. The compressibility of the material was investigated with oedometer tests (four tests) where the load was applied in steps after saturation. The evaluated oedometer modulus varied between 34.50 MPa. Tests were made to evaluate the elastic parameters of the material (E, nu). Altogether three tests were made on specimens with dry densities of about 1,710 kg/m3. The evaluated E-modulus and Poisson's ratio varied between 231-263 MPa and 0.16-0.19 respectively. The strength of the material, both the compressive strength and the tensile strength were measured on specimens compacted to different dry densities. The test results yielded a relation between density and the two types of strength. Furthermore, tests have been made in order to determine the compressibility of the unsaturated filling of pellets. Two tests were made where the pellets were loosely filled in a Proctor cylinder and then compressed at a constant rate of strain during continuously measurement of the applied load. 4. Swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity. There is, as expected, a very clear influence of the dry density on the

  14. Tolerance of freshwater test organisms to formulated sediments for use as control materials in whole-sediment toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemble, N.E.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G. [Geological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States). Environmental and Contaminants Research Center; Dawson, T.D. [Integrated Laboratory Systems, Duluth, MN (United States); Norberg-King, T.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Mid-Continent Ecological Div.

    1999-02-01

    A method is described for preparing formulated sediments for use in toxicity testing. Ingredients used to prepare formulated sediments included commercially available silt, clay, sand, humic acid, dolomite, and {alpha}-cellulose (as a source of organic carbon). {alpha}-Cellulose was selected as the source of organic carbon because it is commercially available, consistent from batch to batch, and low in contaminant concentrations. The tolerance of freshwater test organisms to formulated sediments for use as control materials in whole-sediment toxicity testing was evaluated. Sediment exposures were conducted for 10 d with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midges Chironomus riparius and C. tentans, and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and for 28 d with H. azteca. Responses of organisms in formulated sediments was compared with a field-collected control sediment that has routinely been used to determine test acceptability. Tolerance of organisms to formulated sediments was evaluated by determining responses to varying levels of {alpha}-cellulose, to varying levels of grain size, to evaluation of different food types, or to evaluation of different sources of overlying water. In the 10-d exposures, survival of organisms exposed to the formulated sediments routinely met or exceeded the responses of test organisms exposed to the control sediment and routinely met test acceptability criteria required in standard methods. Growth of amphipods and oligochaetes in 10-d exposures with formulated sediment was often less than growth of organisms in the field-collected control sediment. Additional research is needed, using the method employed to prepare formulated sediment, to determine if conditioning formulated sediments before starting 10-d tests would improve the growth of amphipods. In the 28-d exposures, survival of H. azteca was low when reconstituted water was used as the source of overlying water. However, when well water was used as the source of overlying water in

  15. AGN fuelling: Bridging Large and Small Scales - Overlapping Inflows as Catalysts of Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel Carmona Loaiza, Juan Manuel

    2015-05-01

    One of the biggest challenges in understanding the fuelling of supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is not on accounting for the source of fuel, as a galaxy can comfortably supply the required mass budget, but on its actual delivery. While a clear picture has been developed for the large scale (~ kpc) down to the intermediate one (~ 100 pc), and for the smallest scales (~ 0.1 pc) where an accretion disc likely forms, a bridge that has proven difficult to build is that between ~ 100 pc and ~ 0.1 pc. It is feared that gas at these scales might still retain enough angular momentum and settle into a larger scale disc with very low or no inflow to form or replenish the inner accretion disc (on ~ 0.01 pc scales). In this Thesis, I present numerical simulations in which a rotating gaseous shell flows towards a SMBH because of its lack of rotational support. As inflow proceeds, gas from the shell impacts an already present nuclear (~ 10pc) disc. The cancellation of angular momentum and redistribution of gas, due to the misalignment between the angular momentum of the shell and that of the disc, is studied in this scenario. The underlying hypothesis is that even if transport of angular momentum at these scales may be inefficient, the interaction of an inflow with a nuclear disc would still provide a mechanism to bring mass inwards because of the cancellation of angular momentum. I quantify the amount of gas such a cancellation would bring to the central parsec under different circumstances: Co- and counter-rotation between the disc and the shell and the presence or absence of an initial turbulent kick; I also discuss the impact of self gravity in our simulations. The scenario we study is highly idealized and designed to capture the specific outcomes produced by the mechanism proposed. I find that angular momentum cancellation and redistribution via hydrodynamical shocks leads to sub-pc inflows enhanced by more than 2-3 orders of magnitude. In all of our

  16. Guidelines for conducting impact tests on shipping packages for radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, G.C.; Carlson, R.W.; Lu, S.C.; Fischer, L.E.

    1995-09-01

    Federal regulation (10 CFR Part 71) specifies a number of impact conditions (free-drop, penetration, and puncture), under which a package for the transport of radioactive materials must be tested or evaluated to demonstrate compliance with the regulation. This report is a comprehensive guide to the planning and execution of these impact tests. The report identifies the required considerations for both the design, pre-, and post-test inspections of the test model and the measurement, recording, analysis, and reporting of the test data. The report also presents reasons for the requirements, identifies the major difficulties in meeting these requirements, and suggests possible methods to overcome the difficulties. Discussed in substantial detail is the use of scale models and instrumented measurements.

  17. Algal growth inhibition test in filled, closed bottles for volatile and sorptive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Nyholm, Niels; Verbruggen, Eric M. J.;

    2000-01-01

    Exposure concentrations of many hydrophobic substances are difficult to maintain in algal growth inhibition tests performed in open agitated flasks. This is partly because such compounds tend to volatilize from aqueous solution and partly because of sorption to the algal biomass as well as to the......Exposure concentrations of many hydrophobic substances are difficult to maintain in algal growth inhibition tests performed in open agitated flasks. This is partly because such compounds tend to volatilize from aqueous solution and partly because of sorption to the algal biomass as well...... as to the test container. A simple filled closed bottle test with low algal densities and bicarbonate enrichment is described here as an approach to minimize the loss of test material from solution. The algal medium was enriched with 300 mg NaHCO3/L, the pH was adjusted to 7.0 by addition of HCl...

  18. Testing of bearing materials for large two-stroke marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vølund, Anders; Klit, Peder; Persson, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    In large two-stroke marine diesel engines, bearings are designed to last the lifetime of the engine. The design has shown very good service experiences. The design parameters of the main bearings are, among others, based on the average maximum specific load which the bearing should operate under...... gradient are not established. Large two-stroke journal bearings are not suitable for fatigue test due to the size, the low rotational speed and the complexity of such a test-rig. The disc fatigue test rig was designed with the purpose to test white metal coatings under realistic bearing conditions......, in a confined time-frame. The test-rig simulates a scale model of a thrust bearing, in contrary to standard design, the bearing lining material is applied to the rotating collar. Parameters, such as bearing load, rotational speed, oil temperature, oil contamination is controlled/monitored in order to achieve...

  19. European cryogenic material testing program for ITER coils and intercoil structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyilas, A.; Portone, A.; Kiesel, H.

    2002-05-01

    The following materials were characterized for the use in the magnet structures of ITER: 1) Type 316LN cast materials having a modified chemistry used for a Model of the TF (Toroidal Field) outer intercoil structure were investigated with respect to tensile, fracture, fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR), and fatigue life behavior between 7 and 4 K. 2) For Type 316LN 80 mm thick plate used for the TFMC (T_oroidal F_ield M_odel C_oil) structure a complete cryogenic mechanical materials characterization was established. 3) For full size coil case mockups, repair weld properties of 240 mm thick narrow-gap welds were investigated to determine their tensile and fracture behavior. 4) For CSMC (C_enter S_olenoid M_odel C_oil) superconductor jackets, the fatigue lives of orbital butt welds made of Incoloy 908 and Type 316LN (aged and unaged) materials were determined up to one million cycles at 7 K. The results reveal to date that the FCGR of aged Type 316LN is inferior to Incoloy 908 material, whilst the fatigue life properties are comparable. However, for Type 316LN jacket structure considerable improvement of FCGR could be achieved by a solution heat treatment process. In addition, tensile and fatigue life tests performed with a new cryogenic mechanical test facility (630 kN capacity) are presented.

  20. X-ray based methods for non-destructive testing and material characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Randolf; Fuchs, Theobald; Uhlmann, Norman

    2008-06-01

    The increasing complexity and miniaturization in the field of new materials as well as in micro-production requires in the same way improvements and technical advances in the field of micro-NDT to provide better quality data and more detailed knowledge about the internal structures of micro-components. Therefore, non-destructive methods like radioscopy, ultrasound, optical or thermal imaging increasingly gain in importance with respect to ongoing product and material development in the different phases like material characterization, production control or module reliability testing. Because of the manifold different application fields, i.e., certain physical NDT methods applied to material inspection, characterization or reliability testing, this contribution will focus on the radioscopic-based methods related to their most important applications. Today, in modern industrial quality control, X-ray transmission is used in two different ways: Two-dimensional radioscopic transmission imaging (projection technique), usually applied to inline inspection tasks in application fields like lightweight material production, electronic component soldering or food production. Computed tomography (CT) for generation of three-dimensional data, representing spatial information and density distribution of objects. CT application fields are on the one hand the understanding of production process failure or component and module inspection (completeness) and on the other hand the dimensional measuring of hidden geometrical outlines (metrology). This paper demonstrates the methods including technical set-ups (X-ray source and detector), imaging and reconstruction results and the methods for high speed and high-resolution volume data generation and evaluation.

  1. Biological induced corrosion of materials II: New test methods and experiences from mir station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintworth, R.; Reher, H. J.; Viktorov, A. N.; Bohle, D.

    1999-09-01

    During previous long-term manned missions, more than 100 species of microorganisms have been identified on surfaces of materials (bacteria and fungi). Among them were potentially pathogenic ones (saprophytes) which are capable of active growth on artificial substrates, as well as technophilic bacteria and fungi causing damages (destruction and degradation) to various materials (metals and polymers), resulting in failures and disruptions in the functioning of equipment and hardware. Aboard a space vehicle some microclimatic parameters are optimal for microorganism growth: the atmospheric fluid condensate with its specific composition, chemical and/or antropogenic contaminants (human metobolic products, etc.) all are stimulating factors for the development of bacteria and mould fungi on materials of the interior and equipment of an orbital station during its operational phase(s). Especially Russian long-term missions (SALJUT, MIR) have demonstrated that uncontrolled interactions of microorganisms with materials will ultimately lead to the appearence of technological and medical risks, significantly influencing safety and reliability characteristics of individual as well as whole systems and/ or subsystems. For a first conclusion, it could be summarized, that countermeasures and anti-strategies focussing on Microbial Contamination Management (MCM) for the International Space Station (ISS, next long-term manned mission) at least require a new materials test approach. Our respective concept includes a combined age-ing/biocorrosion test sequence. It is represented here, as well as current status of MCM program, e.g. continuous monitoring (microbiological analyses), long-term disinfection, frequent cleaning methods, mathematical modeling of ISS, etc.

  2. Developing a reference material for diffusion-controlled formaldehyde emissions testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Xiaomin; Cox, Steven S; Little, John C

    2013-11-19

    Formaldehyde, a known human carcinogen and mucous membrane irritant, is emitted from a variety of building materials and indoor furnishings. The drive to improve building energy efficiency by decreasing ventilation rates increases the need to better understand emissions from indoor products and to identify and develop lower emitting materials. To help meet this need, formaldehyde emissions from indoor materials are typically measured using environmental chambers. However, chamber testing results are frequently inconsistent and provide little insight into the mechanisms governing emissions. This research addresses these problems by (1) developing a reference formaldehyde emissions source that can be used to validate chamber testing methods for characterization of dynamic sources of formaldehyde emissions and (2) demonstrating that emissions from finite formaldehyde sources can be predicted using a fundamental mass-transfer model. Formaldehyde mass-transfer mechanisms are elucidated, providing practical approaches for developing diffusion-controlled reference materials that mimic actual sources. The fundamental understanding of emissions mechanisms can be used to improve emissions testing and guide future risk reduction actions.

  3. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H. [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Akiba, M. [Naka Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop of plasma facing components which can resist these. Then, we have established electron beam heat facility ({open_quotes}OHBIS{close_quotes}, Oarai Hot-cell electron Beam Irradiating System) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30kV (constant) and 1.7A, respectively. The loading time of electron beam is more than 0.1ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the mainly dimensions are 500mm in inner diameter, 1000mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10{sup -4}Pa. At present, the facility for thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. And performance estimation on the electron beam is being conducted. Presently, the devices for heat loading tests under steady state will be added to this facility.

  4. Project of electro-cyclotron resonance ion source test-bench for material investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulevoy, T V; Chalykh, B B; Kuibeda, R P; Kropachev, G N; Ziiatdinova, A V

    2014-02-01

    Development of new materials for future energy facilities with higher operating efficiency is a challenging and crucial task. However, full-scale testing of radiation hardness for reactor materials is quite sophisticated and difficult as it requires long session of reactor irradiation; moreover, induced radioactivity considerably complicates further investigation. Ion beam irradiation does not have such a drawback; on the contrary, it has certain advantages. One of them is high speed of defect formation. Therefore, it provides a useful tool for modeling of different radiation damages. Improved understanding of material behavior under high dose irradiation will probably allow to simulate reactor irradiation close to real conditions and to make an adequate estimation of material radiation hardness. Since 2008 in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, the ion beam irradiation experiments are under development at the heavy ion radio frequency quadrupole linac and very important results are obtained already [T. V. Kulevoy et al., in Proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Research Applications and Utilization of Accelerators, IAEA Vienna, Austria, 2009, http://www.pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/P1433_CD/darasets/papers/ap_p5_07.pdf]. Nevertheless, the new test bench based on electro-cyclotron resonance ion source and high voltage platform is developed. The project of the test bench is presented and discussed.

  5. Protocol for production of a chewable material for masticatory function tests (Optocal - Brazilian version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Liz Pocztaruk

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article aimed to present a standardized protocol for the production of a chewable test material that has been used in masticatory efficiency and performance studies. This chewable material has advantages in respect to its physical properties when compared to other artificial and natural test foods. It is constituted by mixing condensation silicon (58.3% by weight, common plaster (10.2% by weight, alginate (12.5% by weight, solid vaseline (11.5% by weight, tooth paste (7.5% by weight, and catalyst paste (20.8 mg/g, adding also three drops of mint essence. The mixed material is then inserted into an acrylic mould with perforations of 12 mm in diameter and 5 mm in height to produce rounded tablets with those measures after polymerization. It was named "Optocal - Brazilian version". A volume of 3 cm³ is indicated for a chewing test, which corresponds to 12 tablets using the present methodology. The present protocol can make the production of this chewable material easier, helping in its standardization for studies on masticatory function.

  6. Toxicity Testing of Restorative Dental Materials Using Brine Shrimp Larvae (Artemia salina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manar M. Milhem

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of extracts of different composites, glass ionomer cement (GICs and compomers on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. Ethanolic extracts of four dental composites (Z-100; Solitaire 2; Filtek P60 and Synergy, a conventional GIC (Ketac-Fil, a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, two compomers (F2000; Dyract AP, and a flowable compomer (Dyract Flow were prepared from each material. Following evaporation of the ethanol, the extracts were resuspended in distilled water, which was then used to test the effects on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. For the composites, the extract of Synergy was the least toxic (88% viability followed by the extracts of Solitaire 2, Z100 and P60 (75%, 67.5% and 50% viability, respectively. One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the resin composite materials (p<0.001. Follow-up comparison between the composite groups by Tukey's pairwise multiple-comparison test (α =0.05 showed that the extract of Synergy was significantly less toxic than the extracts of all the other materials except that of Solitaire 2. The compomers showed 100% lethality, while the percentage of viable larvae for the extracts of Ketac-Fil, and Vitremer were 32.3%, and 37.0%, respectively. One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the groups of materials (p<0.001. Follow-up comparison between the groups by Tukey's test (α = 0.05 showed that the toxic effect of the extracts of the compomers were significantly greater than that of Ketac-Fil, and Vitremer. The differences in the toxic effects of Vitremer and Ketac-Fil were not statistically significant. In conclusion, the toxicity of composite materials varied according to their chemical composition. Compomers were the most lethal materials to brine shrimp larvae followed by GICs and then composites.

  7. Volume magnetization for system-level testing of magnetic materials within small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, David T.; Palo, Scott E.

    2016-10-01

    Passive Magnetic Attitude Control (PMAC) is a popular among small satellites due to its low resource cost and simplicity of installation. However, predicting the performance of these systems can be a challenge, chiefly due to the difficulty of measurement and simulation of hysteresis materials. We present a low-cost method of magnetic measurement allowing for characterization of both hard and soft magnetic materials. A Helmholtz cage uniformly magnetizes a 30 cm×30 cm×30 cm test volume. The addition of a thin sense coil allows this system to characterize individual hysteresis rod performance when in close proximity to other hard and/or soft magnetic materials. This test setup is applied to hard and soft magnetic materials used aboard the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE), a 3U CubeSat for space weather investigation which used a PMAC system. The measured hard magnet dipole of 0.80±0.017 A m2 is in good agreement with the dynamics-based satellite dipole moment fits. Five hysteresis rods from the same set as the CSSWE flight rods are tested; significant differences in dampening abilities are found. In addition, a limitation of the widely-used Flatley model is described. The interaction of two hysteresis rods in a variety of relative geometries are tested; perpendicular rods are found to have no significant interaction while parallel rods could have their dampening ability reduced by half, depending on the rod separation distance. Finally, the performance of the hysteresis rods are measured in their flight configuration, with hard and soft magnetic material dispersed as it is on CSSWE itself. For the CSSWE PMAC system design, interactions between rods have a greater affect than the magnetic flux density offset due to the onboard bar magnet.

  8. A space simulation test chamber development for the investigation of radiometric properties of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enlow, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and preliminary utilization of a thermal vacuum space simulation facility are discussed. The facility was required to perform studies on the thermal radiation properties of materials. A test chamber was designed to provide high pumping speed, low pressure, a low photon level radiation background (via high emissivity, coated, finned cryopanels), internal heat sources for rapid warmup, and rotary and linear motion of the irradiated materials specimen. The radiation detection system consists of two wideband infrared photoconductive detectors, their cryogenic coolers, a cryogenic-cooled blackbody source, and a cryogenic-cooled optical radiation modulator.

  9. Design and building of a new experimental setup for testing hydrogen storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasen, Anders

    2005-09-01

    For hydrogen to become the future energy carrier a suitable way of storing hydrogen is needed, especially if hydrogen is to be used in mobile applications such as cars. To test potential hydrogen storage materials with respect to capacity, kinetics and thermodynamics the Materials Research Department has a high pressure balance. However, the drawback of this equipment is, that in order to load samples, exposure towards air is inevitable. This has prompted the design and building of a new experimental setup with a detachable reactor allowing samples to be loaded under protective atmosphere. The purpose of this report is to serve as documentation of the new setup. (au)

  10. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  11. Wet voice as a sign of penetration/aspiration in Parkinson's disease: does testing material matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Marília; Argolo, Natalie; Melo, Ailton; Nóbrega, Ana Caline

    2014-10-01

    Wet voice is a perceptual vocal quality that is commonly used as an indicator of penetration and/or aspiration in clinical swallowing assessments and bedside screening tests. Our aim was to describe the clinimetric characteristics of this clinical sign using various fluid materials and one solid food in the Parkinson's disease (PD) population. Consecutive PD individuals were submitted for simultaneous fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and voice recording. Speech therapists rated the presence or absence of wetness and other voice abnormalities. Two binary endpoints of FEES were selected for comparison with an index test: low penetration (LP) and low penetration and/or aspiration (LP/ASP). The accuracy of wet voice changed according to the testing material in PD patients. Overall, the specificity of this indicator was better than its sensitivity, and the wafer cookie and yogurt drink yielded the best indices. Our data show that wet voice is clearly indicative of LP or LP/ASP in PD patients in case of positive test. However, in the case of a negative result, the wet voice test should be repeated or combined with other clinical tests to include or exclude the risk of LP or LP/ASP.

  12. Nanorobotic System iTRo for Controllable 1D Micro/nano Material Twisting Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haojian; Shang, Wanfeng; Wei, Xueyong; Yang, Zhan; Fukuda, Toshio; Shen, Yajing

    2017-06-08

    In-situ micro/nano characterization is an indispensable methodology for material research. However, the precise in-situ SEM twisting of 1D material with large range is still challenge for current techniques, mainly due to the testing device's large size and the misalignment between specimen and the rotation axis. Herein, we propose an in-situ twist test robot (iTRo) to address the above challenges and realize the precise in-situ SEM twisting test for the first time. Firstly, we developed the iTRo and designed a series of control strategies, including assembly error initialization, triple-image alignment (TIA) method for rotation axis alignment, deformation-based contact detection (DCD) method for sample assembly, and switch control for robots cooperation. After that, we chose three typical 1D material, i.e., magnetic microwire Fe74B13Si11C2, glass fiber, and human hair, for twisting test and characterized their properties. The results showed that our approach is able to align the sample to the twisting axis accurately, and it can provide large twisting range, heavy load and high controllability. This work fills the blank of current in-situ mechanical characterization methodologies, which is expected to give significant impact in the fundamental nanomaterial research and practical micro/nano characterization.

  13. In situ thermomechanical testing methods for micro/nano-scale materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wonmo; Merrill, Marriner; Wheeler, Jeffrey M

    2017-02-23

    The advance of micro/nanotechnology in energy-harvesting, micropower, electronic devices, and transducers for automobile and aerospace applications has led to the need for accurate thermomechanical characterization of micro/nano-scale materials to ensure their reliability and performance. This persistent need has driven various efforts to develop innovative experimental techniques that overcome the critical challenges associated with precise mechanical and thermal control of micro/nano-scale specimens during material characterization. Here we review recent progress in the development of thermomechanical testing methods from miniaturized versions of conventional macroscopic test systems to the current state of the art of in situ uniaxial testing capabilities in electron microscopes utilizing either indentation-based microcompression or integrated microsystems. We discuss the major advantages/disadvantages of these methods with respect to specimen size, range of temperature control, ease of experimentation and resolution of the measurements. We also identify key challenges in each method. Finally, we summarize some of the important discoveries that have been made using in situ thermomechanical testing and the exciting research opportunities still to come in micro/nano-scale materials.

  14. Innovative viscoelastic material selection strategy based on dma and mini-shaker tests for spacecraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawak, B. J.; Cabon, B. H.; Aglietti, G. S.

    2017-02-01

    With the increase of payload sensitivity (such as high precision optics for sub-metric imager), micro-vibration disturbances generated by spinning actuators, if not controlled, may affect on-board instruments and may worsen the quality of pictures taken by an Earth observation imager. For the last two decades, viscoelastic materials have been gradually used in isolators designed for space applications. Their attractiveness comes from their ability to act as a second order low pass filter to minimise micro-vibration forces. In this study, an innovative viscoelastic material pre-selection process has been developed to assess the mechanical and thermal properties of viscoelastic isolators during early design stages. In order to characterise the viscoelastic isolators, tests have been performed at viscoelastic material level (material characterisation) and at viscoelastic isolator level (isolator characterisation). A qualitative correlation has been established between the master curves (material characterisation) and the transmissibility curves (isolator characterisation) which leads to a possible prediction of expected isolation performances of a viscoelastic material during early design stages.

  15. Use of diagnostic self-tests on body materials among Internet users in the Netherlands : prevalence and correlates of use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronda, G.; Portegijs, P.; Dinant, G.J.; Buntinx, F.; Norg, R.; Weijden, T.T. van der

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A range of self-tests on body materials has become available to the general public, but the extent of their use has hardly been studied. This study examined how many people use diagnostic self-tests on body materials such as blood or urine, as well as the type of tests that are used, and

  16. Benefits of testing for nontested information: retrieval-induced facilitation of episodically bound material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Christopher A; DeLosh, Edward L

    2014-12-01

    Testing is a powerful means to boost the retention of information. The extent to which the benefits of testing generalize to nontested information, however, is not clear. In three experiments, we found that completing cued-recall tests for a subset of studied materials enhanced retention for the specific information tested, as well as for associated, nontested information during later free-recall testing. In Experiment 1, this generalized benefit was revealed for lists of category-exemplar pairs. Experiment 2 extended the effect to unrelated words, suggesting that retrieval can enhance later free recall of nontested information that is bound solely through episodic context. In Experiment 3, we manipulated the format of the final test and found facilitation in free-recall, but not in cued-recall, testing. The results suggest that testing may facilitate later free recall in part by enhancing access to information that is present during a prior temporal or list context. More generally, these findings suggest that retrieval-induced facilitation extends to a broader range of conditions than has previously been suggested, and they further motivate the adoption of testing as a practical and effective learning tool.

  17. Additive value of patch testing custom epoxy materials from the workplace at the occupational disease specialty clinic in Toronto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Marie-Claude; Holness, D Linn; Dekoven, Joel; Skotnicki, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to epoxy resins is one of the major causes of occupationally induced ACD. Testing of custom epoxy materials from the workplace is often performed to diagnose ACD. The objective of this study was to investigate the additive value of patch testing custom-made epoxy materials. We retrospectively analyzed outcomes of 24 patients who were tested to custom epoxy resin materials between January 2002 and July 2011. For 11 patients (46%), the testing of their materials from work had no additional value (negative results). For 13 patients (54%), there was an additional value of testing custom allergens. Of those, 7 patients (54%) had positive reactions to custom epoxy materials that reinforced the test results found with the commercially available allergens, and 6 (46%) patients had positive reactions only to custom epoxy materials. Therefore, for 6 patients (25%), there was a definite additive value of testing custom epoxy materials because the allergy was discovered with custom testing and not with the commercially available allergens. Because of the high percentage (54%) of patients with additive value of patch testing custom epoxy materials, we think that the inclusion of actual workplace epoxy materials should be strongly considered when patch testing patients with occupational epoxy exposure.

  18. Use of cortical neuronal networks for in vitro material biocompatibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkhkar, Hamid; Frewin, Christopher; Nezafati, Maysam; Knaack, Gretchen L; Peixoto, Nathalia; Saddow, Stephen E; Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2014-03-15

    Neural interfaces aim to restore neurological function lost during disease or injury. Novel implantable neural interfaces increasingly capitalize on novel materials to achieve microscale coupling with the nervous system. Like any biomedical device, neural interfaces should consist of materials that exhibit biocompatibility in accordance with the international standard ISO10993-5, which describes in vitro testing involving fibroblasts where cytotoxicity serves as the main endpoint. In the present study, we examine the utility of living neuronal networks as functional assays for in vitro material biocompatibility, particularly for materials that comprise implantable neural interfaces. Embryonic mouse cortical tissue was cultured to form functional networks where spontaneous action potentials, or spikes, can be monitored non-invasively using a substrate-integrated microelectrode array. Taking advantage of such a platform, we exposed established positive and negative control materials to the neuronal networks in a consistent method with ISO 10993-5 guidance. Exposure to the negative controls, gold and polyethylene, did not significantly change the neuronal activity whereas the positive controls, copper and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), resulted in reduction of network spike rate. We also compared the functional assay with an established cytotoxicity measure using L929 fibroblast cells. Our findings indicate that neuronal networks exhibit enhanced sensitivity to positive control materials. In addition, we assessed functional neurotoxicity of tungsten, a common microelectrode material, and two conducting polymer formulations that have been used to modify microelectrode properties for in vivo recording and stimulation. These data suggest that cultured neuronal networks are a useful platform for evaluating the functional toxicity of materials intended for implantation in the nervous system.

  19. HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process materials: chemical analysis and biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and biological testing of coal liquefaction materials obtained from the Hydrocarbon Research, Incorporated (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. Materials from both an experimental run and a 25-day demonstration run were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsorption column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biological activity was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay and an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity. Where applicable, the results obtained from the analyses of the CTSL materials have been compared to those obtained from the integrated and nonintegrated two-stage coal liquefaction processes. 18 refs., 26 figs., 22 tabs.

  20. Testing a model for the critical degree of saturation at freezing of porous building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1996-01-01

    Frost resistance of porous materials can be characterized by the critical degree of saturation, SCR. An experimental determination of SCR is very laborious and therefore only seldom used when testing frost resistance. A theoretical model for prediction of SCR based on fracture mechanics and phase...... geometry of two-phase materials has been developed. The degradation is modelled as being caused by different eigenstrains of the pore phase and the solid phase when freezing, leading to stress concentrations and crack propagation. Calculations are based on porosity, pore size distribution, modulus...... of elasticity, tensile strength, amount of freezable water, thermal expansion coefficients and parameters characterizing the pore structure and its effect on strength, modulus of elasticity and volumetric expansion. For the present, the model assumes non air-entrained homogeneous materials subjected to freeze...

  1. Real time outdoor exposure testing of solar cell modules and component materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, E.; Forestieri, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Plastic samples, solar cell modules, and sub-modules were exposed at test sites in Florida, Arizona, Puerto Rico, and Cleveland, Ohio, in order to determine materials suitable for use in solar cell modules with a proposed 20-year lifetime. Various environments were encountered including subtropical, subtropical with a sea air atmosphere, desert, rain forest, normal urban, and urban-polluted. The samples were exposed for periods up to six months. Materials found not suitable were polyurethane, polyester, Kapton, Mylar, and UV-stabilized Lexan. Suitable materials were acrylic, FEP-A, and glass. The results of exposure of polyvinylidene fluoride were dependent on the specific formulation, but several types appear suitable. RTV silicone rubber (clear) appears to pick up and hold dirt both as a free film and as a potting medium for modules. The results indicate that dirt accumulation and cleanability are important factors in the selection of solar cell module covers and encapsulants.

  2. Testing a model for the critical degree of saturation at freezing of porous building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1996-01-01

    during freezing. The reliability and usefulness of the model are discussed, e.g. in relation to air-entrained materials and in relation to the description of the pore structure.Keywords: Brick tile, concrete, critical degree of saturation, eigenstrain, fracture mechanics, frost resistance, pore structure......Frost resistance of porous materials can be characterized by the critical degree of saturation, SCR. An experimental determination of SCR is very laborious and therefore only seldom used when testing frost resistance. A theoretical model for prediction of SCR based on fracture mechanics and phase...... of elasticity, tensile strength, amount of freezable water, thermal expansion coefficients and parameters characterizing the pore structure and its effect on strength, modulus of elasticity and volumetric expansion. For the present, the model assumes non air-entrained homogeneous materials subjected to freeze...

  3. HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process materials: chemical analysis and biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and biological testing of coal liquefaction materials obtained from the Hydrocarbon Research, Incorporated (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. Materials from both an experimental run and a 25-day demonstration run were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsorption column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biological activity was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay and an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity. Where applicable, the results obtained from the analyses of the CTSL materials have been compared to those obtained from the integrated and nonintegrated two-stage coal liquefaction processes. 18 refs., 26 figs., 22 tabs.

  4. Materials Combustion Testing and Combustion Product Sensor Evaluations in FY12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marit Elisabeth; Mudgett, Paul D.; Hornung, Steven D.; McClure, Mark B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bryg, Victoria; Makel, Darby; Ruff, Gary A.; Hunter, Gary

    2013-01-01

    NASA Centers continue to collaborate to characterize the chemical species and smoke particles generated by the combustion of current space-rated non-metallic materials including fluoropolymers. This paper describes the results of tests conducted February through September 2012 to identify optimal chemical markers both for augmenting particle-based fire detection methods and for monitoring the post-fire cleanup phase in human spacecraft. These studies follow up on testing conducted in August 2010 and reported at ICES 2011. The tests were conducted at the NASA White Sands Test Facility in a custom glove box designed for burning fractional gram quantities of materials under varying heating profiles. The 623 L chamber was heavily instrumented to quantify organics (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), inorganics by water extraction followed by ion chromatography, and select species by various individual commercially-available sensors. Evaluating new technologies for measuring carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride and other species of interest was a key objective of the test. Some of these sensors were located inside the glovebox near the fire source to avoid losses through the sampling lines; the rest were located just outside the glovebox. Instruments for smoke particle characterization included a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance Personal Dust Monitor (TEOM PDM) and a TSI Dust Trak DRX to measure particle mass concentration, a TSI PTrak for number concentration and a thermal precipitator for collection of particles for microscopic analysis. Materials studied included Nomex®, M22759 wire insulation, granulated circuit board, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), Kapton®, and mixtures of PTFE and Kapton®. Furnace temperatures ranged from 340o to 640o C, focusing on the smoldering regime. Of particular interest in these tests was confirming burn repeatability and production of acid gases with different

  5. Materials Combustion Testing and Combustion Product Sensor Evaluations in FY12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marit E.; Hunter, Gary; Ruff, Gary; Mudgett, Paul D.; Hornung, Steven D.; McClure, Mark B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bryg, Victoria; Makel, Darby

    2013-01-01

    NASA Centers continue to collaborate to characterize the chemical species and smoke particles generated by the combustion of current space-rated non-metallic materials including fluoropolymers. This paper describes the results of tests conducted February through September 2012 to identify optimal chemical markers both for augmenting particle-based fire detection methods and for monitoring the post-fire cleanup phase in human spacecraft. These studies follow up on testing conducted in August 2010 and reported at ICES 2011. The tests were conducted at the NASA White Sands Test Facility in a custom glove box designed for burning fractional gram quantities of materials under varying heating profiles. The 623 L chamber was heavily instrumented to quantify organics (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), inorganics by water extraction followed by ion chromatography, and select species by various individual commercially-available sensors. Evaluating new technologies for measuring carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride and other species of interest was a key objective of the test. Some of these sensors were located inside the glovebox near the fire source to avoid losses through the sampling lines; the rest were located just outside the glovebox. Instruments for smoke particle characterization included a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance Personal Dust Monitor (TEOM PDM) and a TSI Dust Trak DRX to measure particle mass concentration, a TSI PTrak for number concentration and a thermal precipitator for collection of particles for microscopic analysis. Materials studied included Nomex(R), M22759 wire insulation, granulated circuit board, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), Kapton(R), and mixtures of PTFE and Kapton(R). Furnace temperatures ranged from 340 to 640 C, focusing on the smoldering regime. Of particular interest in these tests was confirming burn repeatability and production of acid gases with different

  6. Test system for defect detection in cementitious material with artificial neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saowanee Saechai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a newly developed test system for defect detection, classification of number of defects andidentification of defect materials in cement-based products. With the system, the pattern of ultrasonic waves for each case ofspecimen can be obtained from direct and indirect measurements. The machine learning algorithm called artificial neuralnetwork classifier with back-propagation model is employed for classification and verification of the wave patterns obtainedfrom different specimens. By applying the system, the presence or absence of a defect in mortar can be identified. Moreover,the system is applied to identify the number and materials of defects inside the mortar. The methodology is explained and theclassification results are discussed. The effectiveness of the developed test system is evaluated. Comparison of the classification results between different input features with different number of training sets is demonstrated. The results show that thistechnique based on pattern recognition has a potential for practical inspection of concrete structures.

  7. Validating material modelling for OFHC copper using dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) test at different velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, N.; Testa, G.; Ruggiero, A.; Iannitti, G.; Colliander, M. Hörnquist; Mortazavi, N.

    2017-01-01

    In the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test, the material is subjected to very large strain, high strain rate and elevated temperature. Numerical simulation, validated comparing with measurements obtained on soft-recovered extruded fragments, can be used to probe material response under such extreme conditions and to assess constitutive models. In this work, the results of a parametric investigation on the simulation of DTE test of annealed OFHC copper - at impact velocity ranging from 350 up to 420 m/s - using the modified Rusinek-Klepaczko model, are presented. Simulation of microstructure evolution was performed using the visco-plastic self consistent model (VPSC), providing, as input, the velocity gradient history obtained with FEM at selected locations along the axis of the fragment trapped in the extrusion die. Finally, results are compared with EBSD analysis.

  8. A Cognitive Approach to the Compilation of Test Materials for the Evaluation of Translator's Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Berg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A Cognitive Approach to the Compilation of Test Materials for the Evaluation of Translator's Skills This paper discusses the importance of a cognitive approach to the evaluation of translator’s skills. The authors set forth their recommendations for the compilation of test materials for the evaluation of translators’ cognitive ability.   Kognitywne podejście do kompilowania tekstów służących ocenie umiejętności tłumacza Artykuł porusza wagę kognitywnego podejścia do ewaluacji umiejętności tłumacza. Autorzy przedstawiają swoje zalecenia co do kompilowania materiałów testowych do ewaluacji kognitywnych zdolności tłumacza.

  9. Materials of large wind turbine blades: Recent results in testing and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl; Nijssen, Rogier

    2012-01-01

    for the experimental determination of reliable material properties used in the design of wind turbine blades and experimental validation of design models, (ii) development of predictive models for the life prediction, prediction of residual strength and failure probability of the blades and (iii) analysis......The reliability of rotor blades is the pre-condition for the development and wide use of large wind turbines. In order to accurately predict and improve the wind turbine blade behavior, three main aspects of the reliability and strength of rotor blades were considered: (i) development of methods...... of the effect of the microstructure of wind turbine blade composites on their strength and ways of microstructural optimization of the materials. By testing reference coupons, the effect of testing parameters (temperature and frequency) on the lifetime of blade composites was investigated, and the input data...

  10. Standard Test Method for Water Absorption of Core Materials for Structural Sandwich Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the relative amount of water absorption by various types of structural core materials when immersed or in a high relative humidity environment. This test method is intended to apply to only structural core materials; honeycomb, foam, and balsa wood. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound units given may be approximate. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. Low Temperature Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Biss, Emily J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of cryogenic fuels (liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen) in current space transportation vehicles, in combination with the proposed use of composite materials in such applications, requires an understanding of how such materials behave at cryogenic temperatures. In this investigation, tensile intralaminar shear tests were performed at room, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen temperatures to evaluate the effect of temperature on the mechanical response of the IM7/8551-7 carbon-fiber/epoxy-resin system. Quasi-isotropic lay-ups were also tested to represent a more realistic lay-up. It was found that the matrix became both increasingly resistant to microcracking and stiffer with decreasing temperature. A marginal increase in matrix shear strength with decreasing temperature was also observed. Temperature did not appear to affect the integrity of the fiber-matrix bond.

  12. Testing of organic waste surrogate materials in support of the Hanford organic tank program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Miron, Y. [Bureau of Mines (United States)

    1994-01-01

    To address safety issues regarding effective waste management efforts of underground organic waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Bureau of Mines conducted a series of tests, at the request of the Westinghouse Hanford company. In this battery of tests, the thermal and explosive characteristics of surrogate materials, chosen by Hanford, were determined. The surrogate materials were mixtures of inorganic and organic sodium salts, representing fuels and oxidants. The oxidants were sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. The fuels were sodium salts of oxalate, citrate and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Polyethylene powder was also used as a fuel with the oxidant(s). Sodium aluminate was used as a diluent. In addition, a sample of FeCN, supplied by Hanford was also investigated.

  13. Laboratory and field testing for utilization of an excavated soil as landfill liner material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozbey, Ilknur; Guler, Erol

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using a silty soil excavated in highway construction as landfill liner material. The tests were conducted both at laboratory and in situ scales, and the soil was tested in pure and lime treated forms. Different levels of compaction energy were used. For the field study, a test pad was constructed and in situ hydraulic conductivity experiments were conducted by sealed double ring infiltrometers (SDRI). Laboratory testing revealed that while lime treatment improved the shear strength, it resulted in higher hydraulic conductivity values compared to pure soil. It was observed that leachate permeation did not change the hydraulic conductivity of the pure and lime treated samples. Laboratory hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 10(-9) m/s and met the 1.0E-08 m/s criterion in the Turkish regulations, which is one order of magnitude higher than the value allowed in most developed countries. SDRI testing, which lasted for 6 mo, indicated that lime treatment increased the hydraulic conductivity of pure soil significantly in the field scale tests. In situ hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 1E-08 and 1E-07 m/s, and exceeded the allowable value in the Turkish regulations. Undisturbed samples collected from the test pad were not representative of field hydraulic conductivities. Contrary to laboratory findings, higher compaction efforts did not result in lower hydraulic conductivities in field scales. The study verified the importance of in situ hydraulic conductivity testing in compacted liners.

  14. Miniaturized platform with on-chip strain sensors for compression testing of arrayed materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacQueen, Luke; Chebotarev, Oleg; Simmons, Craig A; Sun, Yu

    2012-10-21

    We report a microfabricated mechanical testing platform with on-chip strain sensors for in situ mechanical characterization of arrayed materials. The device is based on deformable elastomeric membranes that are actuated by pressure that is delivered through an underlying channel network. The bulging membranes compress material samples that are confined between the membranes and a rigid top-plate. Carbon nanotube-based strain sensors that exhibit strain-dependent electrical resistivity were integrated within the membranes to provide continuous read-out of membrane deflection amplitude. We used this platform to study the cyclic compression of several different silicone samples and thereby measured their elastic moduli. The results obtained using our miniaturized platform were in excellent agreement with those obtained using a commercially available mechanical testing platform and clearly demonstrated the utility of our platform for the mechanical testing of small samples in parallel. The miniaturized platform can significantly increase mechanical testing efficiency, particularly when testing of iterative sample formulations is required.

  15. A binary engine fuelling HD87643' s complex circumstellar environment, using AMBER/VLTI

    CERN Document Server

    Millour, Florentin; Borges-Fernandes, Marcelo; Meilland, Anthony; Mars, Gilbert; Benoist, C; Thiébaut, E; Stee, Philippe; Hofmann, K -H; Baron, Fabien; Young, John R; Bendjoya, Philippe; Carciofi, A C; De Souza, Armando Domiciano; Driebe, Thomas; Jankov, Slobodan; Kervella, Pierre; Petrov, R G; Robbe-Dubois, Sylvie; Vakili, Farrokh; Waters, L B F M; Weigelt, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Context. The star HD 87643, exhibiting the ?B[e] phenomenon?, has one of the most extreme infrared excesses for this object class. It harbours a large amount of both hot and cold dust, and is surrounded by an extended re?ection nebula. Aims. One of our major goals was to investigate the presence of a companion in HD87643. In addition, the presence of close dusty material was tested through a combination of multi-wavelength high spatial resolution observations. Methods. We observed HD 87643 with high spatial resolution techniques, using the near-IR AMBER/VLTI interferometer with baselines ranging from 60 m to 130 m and the mid-IR MIDI/VLTI interferometer with baselines ranging from 25 m to 65 m. These observations are complemented by NACO/VLT adaptive-optics-corrected images in the K and L-bands, ESO-2.2m optical Wide-Field Imager large-scale images in the B, V and R-bands, Results. We report the direct detection of a companion to HD 87643 by means of image synthesis using the AMBER/VLTI instrument. The presen...

  16. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    Potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials are evaluated. The goal of the program is to identify, evaluate, test, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations have concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. Experiments are underway to assess the durability and cost effectiveness of coatings for protection of steel. Investigations are continuing with commercial maintenance coatings based on fluorocarbon and silicone-alkyd chemistries. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings for wood products such as hard-board. An experimental program continued to determine the usefulness of soil resistant coatings. Primers were evaluated for effectiveness in bonding candidate pottants to outer covers, glass and substate materials. A program of accelerated aging and life predictive strategies is being conducted and data are reported for sunlamp exposure and thermal aging. Supporting activities are also discussed briefly. (LEW)

  17. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    Potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials are evaluated. The goal of the program is to identify, evaluate, test, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations have concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. Experiments are underway to assess the durability and cost effectiveness of coatings for protection of steel. Investigations are continuing with commercial maintenance coatings based on fluorocarbon and silicone-alkyd chemistries. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings for wood products such as hard-board. An experimental program continued to determine the usefulness of soil resistant coatings. Primers were evaluated for effectiveness in bonding candidate pottants to outer covers, glass and substate materials. A program of accelerated aging and life predictive strategies is being conducted and data are reported for sunlamp exposure and thermal aging. Supporting activities are also discussed briefly. (LEW)

  18. Cytotoxicity of orthodontic materials assessed by survival tests in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberger, Karen M; Westphalen, Graziela H; Menezes, Luciane M; Medina-Silva, Renata

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cytotoxicity of orthodontic materials (brackets, wires, resin, elastomers and silver solder) using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. The induction of cytotoxicity was assessed by two different tests using the wild-type S. cerevisiae strain FF18733: (1) direct exposure to orthodontic materials in YPD broth, and (2) exposure to artificial commercial saliva pre-treated with orthodontic materials. Only the silver solder was tested in mutant S. cerevisiae strains to investigate the origin of the observed cytotoxicity. Colony forming units per mL counts were carried out in all experiments and compared to controls to detect significant survival differences. The results showed that only the silver solder induced significant cytotoxicity, which might have occurred via oxidative stress, although this mechanism is not completely understood. Moreover, S. cerevisiae proved to be a reliable and useful model microorganism for evaluating the cytotoxicity of clinical materials. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pathology of Building Materials in Historic Buildings. Relationship Between Laboratory Testing and Infrared Thermography

    OpenAIRE

    Lerma, C.; Mas, Á.; Gil,E.; Vercher, J.; Peñalver, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Study of historic buildings requires a pathology analysis of the construction materials used in order to define their conservation state. Usually we can find capillary moisture, salt crystalli-zation or density differences by deterioration. Sometimes this issue is carried out by destructive testing which determine materials’ physical and chemical characteristics. However, they are unfavorable regarding the building’s integrity, and they are sometimes difficult to implement. This paper present...

  20. Operation of a 5-MJ Capacitor Bank for EML Materials Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    electromagnetic railgun for long-range fire support [1]. The deployed system has requirements for sustained rep-rated fire at 6-12 rounds per minute...OPERATION OF A 5-MJ CAPACITOR BANK FOR EML MATERIALS TESTING*∗ Jesse M. Neriξ, Brett M. Human Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory...Naval Research ξ email: Jesse.Neri@nrl.navy.mil Abstract The U.S. Navy is considering the development of an electromagnetic launcher (EML) for

  1. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Seventh annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the program is to identify and evaluate encapsulation materials and processes for the protection of silicon solar cells for service in a terrestrial environment. Aging and degradation studies were performed including: thermal aging, sunlamp exposures, aging in controlled environment reactors and outdoor photothermal aging devices, and metal catalyzed degradation. Other tests addressed water absorption, primers and adhesives, soiling experiments, and corrosion protection. (LEW)

  2. IMPACT TESTING OF MATERIALS USING AN EIGHT-INCH AIR GUN AND COMPUTER REDUCTION OF DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorne, L. F.

    1973-10-01

    A mechanical shock actuator has been converted into an air gun capable of firing 8-inch-·diameter (20.32 cm) projectiles to velocities exceeding 1000 fps (304.8 m/ s). This new capability has been used to study the effect of impact velocity upon the energy.absorbed by crushable materials. Shockpulse data is reduced by computer techniques and test results are displayed in either tabular or graphic format by use of the C DC 6600 Calcomp plotter.

  3. Solar tests of aperture plate materials for solar thermal dish collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1984-11-01

    If a malfunction occurs in a solar thermal point-focus distributed receiver power plant while a concentrator is pointed at the sun, motion of the concentrator may stop. As the sun moves relative to the earth, the spot of concentrated sunlight then slowly walks off the receiver aperture, across the receiver face plate, and perhaps across adjacent portions of the concentrator. Intense local heating by the concentrated sunlight may damage or destroy these parts. The behavior of various materials under conditions simulating walk-off of a parabolic dish solar collector were evaluated. Each test consisted of exposure to concentrated sunlight at a peak flux density of about 7000 kW/square meter for 15 minutes. Types of materials tested included graphite, silicon carbide, silica, various silicates, alumina, zirconia, aluminum, copper, steel, and polytetrafluroethylene. The only material that neither cracked nor melted was grade G-90 graphite. Grade CS graphite, a lower cost commercial grade, cracked half-way across, but did not fail apart. Both of these grades are medium-grain extruded graphites. A graphite cloth (graphitized polyacrylonitrile) showed fair performance when tested as a single thin ply; it might be useful as a multi-ply assembly. High purity slipcast silica showed some promise also.

  4. Materials testing facilities and programmes for fission and ion implantation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    González de Vicente, S. M.; Boutard, J.-L.; Zinkle, S. J.; Tanigawa, H.

    2017-09-01

    Currently there is no fusion neutron dedicated source with a high enough flux to mimic irradiation conditions relevant to those to be experienced by the First Wall in a fusion reactor. Nevertheless, very valuable information can be obtained from existing irradiation sources, in particular Materials Test Reactors, Fast neutron reactors and Ion accelerators. Partial information is provided by these irradiation facilities that can be used to down select main materials candidates for DEMO fusion reactors and evaluate their performance under limited conditions. Modelling is an indispensable tool to interpret all the available information and build a test matrix of experiments to be carried out in a dedicated fusion neutron source. Available tools for testing materials exposed to ion or neutron irradiation, including their advantages and limitations when mimicking fusion conditions, are discussed in this paper. Next generation of fusion devices, such as DEMO, will need the input provided by a dedicated fusion neutron source to enable them to proceed in an efficient and safe manner to reach their full mission and performance.

  5. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Fabich, Adrian; Meddahi, Malika; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/201...

  6. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos [CERN; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias [CERN; Fabich, Adrian [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/2016.

  7. Solar tests of aperture plate materials for solar thermal dish collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    If a malfunction occurs in a solar thermal point-focus distributed receiver power plant while a concentrator is pointed at the sun, motion of the concentrator may stop. As the sun moves relative to the earth, the spot of concentrated sunlight then slowly walks off the receiver aperture, across the receiver face plate, and perhaps across adjacent portions of the concentrator. Intense local heating by the concentrated sunlight may damage or destroy these parts. The behavior of various materials under conditions simulating walk-off of a parabolic dish solar collector were evaluated. Each test consisted of exposure to concentrated sunlight at a peak flux density of about 7000 kW/square meter for 15 minutes. Types of materials tested included graphite, silicon carbide, silica, various silicates, alumina, zirconia, aluminum, copper, steel, and polytetrafluroethylene. The only material that neither cracked nor melted was grade G-90 graphite. Grade CS graphite, a lower cost commercial grade, cracked half-way across, but did not fail apart. Both of these grades are medium-grain extruded graphites. A graphite cloth (graphitized polyacrylonitrile) showed fair performance when tested as a single thin ply; it might be useful as a multi-ply assembly. High purity slipcast silica showed some promise also.

  8. Development of reference material for proficiency tests: arsenic in fish tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Luciana Vieira de; Sarkis, Jorge E.S.; Ulrich, Joao C.; Hortellani, Marcos Antonio, E-mail: santana-luciana@ig.com.br, E-mail: jesarkis@ipen.br, E-mail: jculrich@ipen.br, E-mail: mahortel@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Proficiency tests (PT) are extensively used to evaluate the analytical competence of laboratories, and are also used as a part of accreditation processes. For this reason are important tool for quality control of laboratories including laboratories that act directly with food exporting companies. In Brazil there are no providers of proficiency testing for toxic metals, such as arsenic in fish tissue. This study presents a protocol to produce reference material to be used in proficiency test for arsenic in fish tissue following the recommendations of the ISO Guide 35. The preparation scheme consisted of: selecting of individuals, cleaning of scale and skin, trituration, homogenization, and spiking with arsenic at two levels of concentration. The mixture was then irradiated in a cyclotron Cyclone 30 Applications ion beam with cobalt 60 at 10.00 ± 1.05 KGy, before being packed into sachets. To verify the efficacy of the irradiation procedure, 26 (randomly selected) irradiated sachets and 26 non-irradiated sachets were assessed for homogeneity and stability. The results indicate that irradiation with cobalt 60 is crucial for ensuring the preservation of the integrity of the material, providing stable material at room temperature for 2 months. The samples can therefore be transported at room temperature. (author)

  9. Monte Carlo Simulation Study of a Differential Calorimeter Measuring the Nuclear Heating in Material Testing Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amharrak, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Carette, M.; Brun, J.; De Vita, C.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.-F.; Guimbal, P.

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs) are crucial for the study of nuclear materials and fuels under irradiation. The reference measurements of this nuclear heating are especially performed by a differential calorimeter including a graphite sample material. Then these measurements are used for other materials, other geometries, or other experimental conditions in order to predict the nuclear heating and thermal conditions induced in the irradiation devices. This paper will present new simulations with MCNP Monte-Carlo transport code to determine the gamma heating profile inside the calorimeter. The whole complex geometry of the sensor has been considered. We use as an input source in the model, the photon spectra calculated in various positions of CARMEN-1 irradiation program in OSIRIS reactor. After a description of the differential calorimeter device, the MCNP modeling used for the calculations of radial profile of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements will be introduced. The obtained results of different simulations will be detailed and discussed in this paper. The charged particle equilibrium inside the calorimeter elements will be studied. Then we will focus on parametric studies of the various components of the calorimeter. The influence of source type will be also took into account. Moreover the influence of the material used for the sample will be described.

  10. Monte Carlo Simulation Study of a Differential Calorimeter Measuring the Nuclear Heating in Material Testing Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amharrak H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs are crucial for the study of nuclear materials and fuels under irradiation. The reference measurements of this nuclear heating are especially performed by a differential calorimeter including a graphite sample material. Then these measurements are used for other materials, other geometries, or other experimental conditions in order to predict the nuclear heating and thermal conditions induced in the irradiation devices. This paper will present new simulations with MCNP Monte-Carlo transport code to determine the gamma heating profile inside the calorimeter. The whole complex geometry of the sensor has been considered. We use as an input source in the model, the photon spectra calculated in various positions of CARMEN-1 irradiation program in OSIRIS reactor. After a description of the differential calorimeter device, the MCNP modeling used for the calculations of radial profile of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements will be introduced. The obtained results of different simulations will be detailed and discussed in this paper. The charged particle equilibrium inside the calorimeter elements will be studied. Then we will focus on parametric studies of the various components of the calorimeter. The influence of source type will be also took into account. Moreover the influence of the material used for the sample will be described.

  11. Review of Mechanical Testing and Modelling of Thrombus Material for Vascular Implant and Device Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S; Duffy, S; Gunning, G; Gilvarry, M; McGarry, J P; McHugh, P E

    2017-08-28

    A thrombus or blood clot is a solid mass, made up of a network of fibrin, platelets and other blood components. Blood clots can form through various pathways, for example as a result of exposed tissue factor from vascular injury, as a result of low flow/stasis, or in very high shear flow conditions. Embolization of cardiac or vascular originating blood clots, causing an occlusion of the neurovasculature, is the major cause of stroke and accounts for 85% of all stroke. With mechanical thrombectomy emerging as the new standard of care in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS), the need to generate a better understanding of the biomechanical properties and material behaviour of thrombus material has never been greater, as it could have many potential benefits for the analysis and performance of these treatment devices. Defining the material properties of a thrombus has obvious implications for the development of these treatment devices. However, to-date this definition has not been adequately established. While some experimentation has been performed, model development has been extremely limited. This paper reviews the previous literature on mechanical testing of thrombus material. It also explores the use of various constitutive and computational models to model thrombus formation and material behaviour.

  12. Long term test of buffer material. Final Report on the pilot parcels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Sanden, Torbjoern; Johannesson, Lars-Erik [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Eriksen, Trygve E; Jansson, Mats; Wold, Susanna [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Pedersen, Karsten; Motamedi, Mehrdad [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden); Rosborg, Bo [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    The 'Long Term Test of Buffer Material' (LOT) series at the Aespoe HRL aims at checking models and hypotheses for a bentonite buffer material under conditions similar to those in a KBS3 repository. The test series comprises seven test parcels, which are exposed to repository conditions for 1, 5 and 20 years. This report concerns the two completed pilot tests (1-year tests) with respect to construction, field data and laboratory results. Four research groups were engaged in this part of the project working on physical properties - mineralogy, cation diffusion, bacteria and copper corrosion, respectively. The experimental layout was to place parcels containing heater, central copper tube, pre-compacted bentonite blocks and instruments in vertical boreholes in crystalline rock. The heaters were used for simulating the decay power from spent nuclear fuel at standard KBS3 conditions (S1 parcel, 90 deg C) and to give adverse conditions (A1 parcel, 130 deg C). The latter was used in order to accelerate possible processes. Temperature, total pressure, water pressure and water content were measured during the heating period. The two pilot tests were terminated after approximately 12 months of heating, and the parcels were extracted by overlapping core drilling outside the original borehole. The entire 4.5 m long S1-parcel with approximately 20 cm rock cover was successfully lifted in one piece from the rock, whereas the central part of the A1 parcel was lost during drilling. The upper and lower parts were however retrieved. Reference and exposed bentonite material were analysed with respect to physical properties (triaxial, beam and oedometer tests), and to mineralogical properties (XRD, CEC, ICP-AES and SEM analyses) according to a defined test program. Some precipitation, mainly gypsum, was found in the warmest part of the parcels, and the only unpredicted change was minor uptake of Cu into the clay matrix. An overarching conclusion is that no degrading

  13. Standard Test Method for Determining Solar or Photopic Reflectance, Transmittance, and Absorptance of Materials Using a Large Diameter Integrating Sphere

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1987-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of the absolute total solar or photopic reflectance, transmittance, or absorptance of materials and surfaces. Although there are several applicable test methods employed for determining the optical properties of materials, they are generally useful only for flat, homogeneous, isotropic specimens. Materials that are patterned, textured, corrugated, or are of unusual size cannot be measured accurately using conventional spectrophotometric techniques, or require numerous measurements to obtain a relevant optical value. The purpose of this test method is to provide a means for making accurate optical property measurements of spatially nonuniform materials. 1.2 This test method is applicable to large specimens of materials having both specular and diffuse optical properties. It is particularly suited to the measurement of the reflectance of opaque materials and the reflectance and transmittance of semitransparent materials including corrugated fiber-reinforced plastic, ...

  14. Comparative study of cogasification and co-combustion of communal sewage sludge in brown coal fuelled plants; Vergleich der Mitvergasung und Mitverbrennung kommunaler Klaerschlaemme in braunkohlegefeuerten Anlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, H.P.; Bierbaum, K.; Adlhoch, W.; Thomas, G. [Rheinbraun AG, Koeln (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Co-combustion and cogasification of sewage sludge in brown coal fuelled plants are compared, and an economic assessment is made. (ABI) [Deutsch] Die Mitverbrennung und Mitvergasung von Klaerschlamm in braunkohlegefeuerten Anlagen werden verglichen und auf ihre Wirtschaftlichkeit hin untersucht. (ABI)

  15. Abrasion and erosion testing of materials used in power production from coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tylczak, Joseph H.; Adler, Thomas A.; Rawers, James C.

    2003-09-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) has a long history of studying abrasive wear, related to mineral testing, handling, and processing. The center has also been instrumental in the design and development of wear test procedures and equipment. Research capabilities at ARC include Pin-on-Drum, Pin-on-Disk, and Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel abrasion tests, Jaw Crusher gouging test, Ball-on-Ball Impact test, and Jet erosion tests. Abrasive and erosive wear studies have been used to develop both new alloys and improved heat treatments of commercial alloys. As part of ARC’s newest iteration on wear testing to evaluate materials for use in new and existing pulverized coal combustion and gasifier power systems, the ARC has designed and constructed a new High Temperature Hostile Atmosphere Erosion Wear Test (HAET). This new piece of test apparatus is designed for erosive particle velocities of 10-40 m/sec and temperatures from room temperature (23°C) to 800+°C, with special control over the gas atmosphere. A variable speed whirling arm design is used to vary the impact energy of the gravity fed erosive particles. The specimens are mounted at the edge of a disk and allow a full range of impingement angles to be selected. An electric furnace heats the specimens in an enclosed retort to the selected temperature. Tests include both oxidizing conditions and reducing conditions. A range of gases, including CO, CO2, CH4, H2, H2S, HCl, N2, O2, and SO2 can be mixed and delivered to the retort. During the erosion testing a stream of abrasive powder is delivered in front of the specimens. This apparatus is designed to use low abrasive fluxes, which simulate real operating conditions in commercial power plants. Currently ~270 μm SiO2 particles are being used to simulate the abrasive impurities typically found in coal. Since operators are always striving for longer lifetimes and higher operating temperatures, this apparatus can help elucidate mechanisms of wastage and identify superior

  16. Comparing in Cylinder Pressure Modelling of a DI Diesel Engine Fuelled on Alternative Fuel Using Two Tabulated Chemistry Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngayihi Abbe, Claude Valery; Nzengwa, Robert; Danwe, Raidandi

    2014-01-01

    The present work presents the comparative simulation of a diesel engine fuelled on diesel fuel and biodiesel fuel. Two models, based on tabulated chemistry, were implemented for the simulation purpose and results were compared with experimental data obtained from a single cylinder diesel engine. The first model is a single zone model based on the Krieger and Bormann combustion model while the second model is a two-zone model based on Olikara and Bormann combustion model. It was shown that both models can predict well the engine's in-cylinder pressure as well as its overall performances. The second model showed a better accuracy than the first, while the first model was easier to implement and faster to compute. It was found that the first method was better suited for real time engine control and monitoring while the second one was better suited for engine design and emission prediction.

  17. A cycle simulation model for predicting the performance of a diesel engine fuelled by diesel and biodiesel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogoi, T.K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Tezpur University, Napaam, Tezpur, Assam 784028 (India); Baruah, D.C. [Energy Department, Tezpur University, Napaam, Tezpur, Assam 784028 (India)

    2010-03-15

    Among the alternative fuels, biodiesel and its blends are considered suitable and the most promising fuel for diesel engine. The properties of biodiesel are found similar to that of diesel. Many researchers have experimentally evaluated the performance characteristics of conventional diesel engines fuelled by biodiesel and its blends. However, experiments require enormous effort, money and time. Hence, a cycle simulation model incorporating a thermodynamic based single zone combustion model is developed to predict the performance of diesel engine. The effect of engine speed and compression ratio on brake power and brake thermal efficiency is analysed through the model. The fuel considered for the analysis are diesel, 20%, 40%, 60% blending of diesel and biodiesel derived from Karanja oil (Pongamia Glabra). The model predicts similar performance with diesel, 20% and 40% blending. However, with 60% blending, it reveals better performance in terms of brake power and brake thermal efficiency. (author)

  18. Solar Photovoltaic Project: materials, processes, and testing activities. Quarterly report, 1 January-31 March 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forman, S. E.; Themelis, M. P.

    1979-06-30

    The Department of Energy has set a 20-year-lifetime goal for terrestrial photovoltaic modules. Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratory, in its capacity as a Photovoltaic Field Tests and Applications Center, has established throughout the United States various experimental test sites which range in size from 0.1 to 25 kW of peak power. These sites include modules from several manufacturers and serve as test beds for photovoltaic system components. The activities of the Materials, Processes, and Testing Laboratory of the Solar Photovoltaic Project during a three-month (1/1/79-3/31/79) period are summarized. During this period, an inspection trip was made to the Mead, Nebraska, test site. The modules were tested in the field to determine the extent of physical and electrical degradation which had taken place since previous inspections. In addition, several modules were removed from the site for more detailed laboratory examination. The results of both the field testing and laboratory analyses are reported.

  19. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Saario, T. [Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  20. The effect of EGR rates on NOX and smoke emissions of an IDI diesel engine fuelled with Jatropha biodiesel blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gomaa, A.J. Alimin, K.A. Kamarudin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The depletion of fossil fuels and the worst impact on environmental pollution caused of their burning have led to the search for renewable clean energies. Nowadays, there are many sources of renewable energy. Biodiesel is just one source, but a very important one. Biodiesel has been known as an attractive alternative fuel although biodiesel produced from edible oil is very expensive than conventional diesel. Therefore, the uses of biodiesel produced from non-edible oils are much better option. Currently Jatropha biodiesel (JBD is receiving attention as an alternative fuel for diesel engine. However, previous studies have reported that combustion of JBD emitted higher nitrogen oxides (NOX, while hydrocarbon (HC and smoke emissions were lower than conventional diesel fuel. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR is one of the techniques being used to reduce NOX emission from diesel engines; because it decreases both flame temperature and oxygen concentration in the combustion chamber. Some studies succeeded to reduce NOX emission from biodiesel fuelled engines using EGR; but they observed increase in smoke emission with increasing engine load and EGR rate. The aim of the present work is to investigate the effect of EGR on an indirect injection (IDI diesel engine fuelled with JBD blends in order to reduce NOX and smoke emissions. A 4-cylinder, water-cooled, turbocharged, IDI diesel engine was used for investigation. Smoke, NOX, carbon monoxide (CO and carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions were recorded and various engine performance parameters were also evaluated. The results showed that, at 5% EGR with JB5, both NOX and smoke opacity were reduced by 27% and 17% respectively. Furthermore, JB20 along with 10% EGR was also able to reduce both NOX and smoke emission by 36% and 31%, respectively compared to diesel fuel without EGR.