WorldWideScience

Sample records for fuel recycle program

  1. Japan's fuel recycling policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) has formulated Japanese nuclear fuel recycling plan for the next 20 years, based on the idea that the supply and demand of plutonium should be balanced mainly through the utilization of plutonium for LWRs. The plan was approved by AEC, and is to be incorporated in the 'Long term program for development and utilization of nuclear energy' up for revision next year. The report on 'Nuclear fuel recycling in Japan' by the committee is characterized by Japanese nuclear fuel recycling plan and the supply-demand situation for plutonium, the principle of the possession of plutonium not more than the demand in conformity with nuclear nonproliferation attitude, and the establishment of a domestic fabrication system of uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel. The total plutonium supply up to 2010 is estimated to be about 85 t, on the other hand, the demand will be 80-90 t. The treatment of plutonium is the key to the recycling and utilization of nuclear fuel. By around 2000, the private sector will commercialize the fabrication of the MOX fuel for LWRs at the annual rate of about 100 t. Commitment to nuclear nonproliferation, future nuclear fuel recycling program in Japan, MOX fuel fabrication system in Japan and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  2. A proposal for an international program to develop dry recycle of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.

    1999-01-01

    The dry oxidation-reduction process (called OREOX for Oxidation Reduction of Oxide Fuel) being developed by Korea and Canada, in cooperation with IAEA and the US State Department, is limited to recycle of spent LWR fuel into CANDU reactors (DUPIC). When first conceived and demonstrated via irradiation of test elements by Atomics International in 1965, (the process was called AIROX at that time) a wider range of applications was intended, including recycle of spent LWR fuel into LWRs. Studies sponsored by DOE's Idaho Office in 1992 confirmed the applicability of this technology to regions containing LWR's only, and described the potential advantages of such recycle from an environmental, waste management and economic point of view, as compared to the direct disposal option. Recent analyses conducted by the author indicates that such dry recycle may be one of the few acceptable paths remaining for resolution of the US spent fuel storage dilemma that remains consistent with US non-proliferation policy. It is proposed that a new US program be established to develop AIROX dry recycle for use in the US, and this become part of an international cooperative program, including the current Canadian - Korean program, and possibly including participation of other countries wishing to pursue alternatives to the once through cycle, and wet reprocessing. With shared funding of major project elements, such international cooperation would accelerate the demonstration and commercial deployment of dry recycle technology, as compared to separate and independent programs in each country. (author)

  3. Mox fuels recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper will firstly emphasis that the first recycling of plutonium is already an industrial reality in France thanks to the high degree of performance of La Hague and MELOX COGEMA's plants. Secondly, recycling of spent Mixed OXide fuel, as a complete MOX fuel cycle, will be demonstrated through the ability of the existing plants and services which have been designed to proceed with such fuels. Each step of the MOX fuel cycle concept will be presented: transportation, reception and storage at La Hague and steps of spent MOX fuel reprocessing. (author)

  4. Nuclear fuel recycling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.R.; Koch, A.K.; Krawczyk, A.

    1981-01-01

    A process is provided for recycling sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellets rejected during fuel manufacture and the swarf from pellet grinding. The scrap material is prepared mechanically by crushing and milling as a high solids content slurry, using scrap sintered UO 2 pellets as the grinding medium under an inert atmosophere

  5. Program plan for research and development in support of LWR fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The ERDA program that is being planned to assist industry in the commercialization of the LWR fuel cycle will involve a range of activities, including joint programs with industry, R and D to provide technology, conceptual design of fuel recycle facilities, and environmental and economic assessments. A two-part program to begin in 1976 that is a portion of the overall ERDA plan is described. Responsibility for coordination and management of the tasks described in this document has been assigned to Du Pont as prime contractor to the ERDA Savannah River Operations Office. The first part of the program consists of the conceptual design of complete recycle facilities. The second part of the program, which will proceed concurrently, consists of supporting R and D activities, economic and environmental studies, and other studies to assist in the regulatory process. The R and D program will include both near-term activities in support of the conceptual design effort, and other activities aimed at general improvements in fuel cycle technology. The conceptual design will be used to develop current cost information for a complete reprocessing complex. The design will be based initially on current technology with provision for improvements as confirmatory information and advanced technology become available from the R and D program. The conceptual design and cost estimate will be developed by the Du Pont Atomic Energy Division. The R and D program and supporting studies will be directed at uncertainties in current technology as well as toward development of improved technology. It will include such R and D as might be appropriate for ERDA to undertake in support of joint programs with industry. The Savannah River Laboratory will have responsibility for coordinating the program

  6. Overview of HTGR fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of HTGR fuel recycle is presented, with emphasis placed on reprocessing and fuel kernel refabrication. Overall recycle operations include (1) shipment and storage, (2) reprocessing, (3) refabrication, (4) waste handling, and (5) accountability and safeguards

  7. Thorium utilization program progress report for January 1, 1974--June 30, 1975. [Reprocessing; refabrication; recycle fuel irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotts, A.L.; Kasten, P.R.

    1976-05-01

    Work was carried out on the following: HTGR reprocessing development and pilot plant, refabrication development and pilot plant, recycle fuel irradiations, engineering and economic studies, and conceptual design of a commercial recycle plant. (DLC)

  8. MOX fuel reprocessing and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the reprocessing of MOX fuel in UP2-800 plant at La Hague, and to the MOX successive reprocessing and recycling. 1. MOX fuel reprocessing. In a first step, the necessary modifications in UP2-800 to reprocess MOX fuel are set out. Early in the UP2-800 project, actions have been taken to reprocess MOX fuel without penalty. They consist in measures regarding: Dissolution; Radiological shieldings; Nuclear instrumentation; Criticality. 2. Mox successive reprocessing and recycling. The plutonium recycling in the LWR is now a reality and, as said before, the MOX fuel reprocessing is possible in UP2-800 plant at La Hague. The following actions in this field consist in verifying the MOX successive reprocessing and recycling possibilities. After irradiation, the fissile plutonium content of irradiated MOX fuel is decreased and, in this case, the re-use of plutonium in the LWR need an important increase of initial Pu enrichment inconsistent with the Safety reactor constraints. Cogema opted for reprocessing irradiated MOX fuel in dilution with the standard UO2 fuel in appropriate proportions (1 MOX for 4 UO2 fuel for instance) in order to save a fissile plutonium content compatible with MOX successive recycling (at least 3 recyclings) in LWR. (author). 2 figs

  9. Light water reactor fuel reprocessing and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    This document was originally intended to provide the basis for an environmental impact statement to assist ERDA in making decisions with respect to possible LWR fuel reprocessing and recycling programs. Since the Administration has recently made a decision to indefinitely defer reprocessing, this environmental impact statement is no longer needed. Nevertheless, this document is issued as a report to assist the public in its consideration of nuclear power issues. The statement compares the various alternatives for the LWR fuel cycle. Costs and environmental effects are compared. Safeguards for plutonium from sabotage and theft are analyzed

  10. Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

    2008-12-01

    This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

  11. Dresden 1 plutonium recycle program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresnick, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    This is the final report on the Dresden 1 Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program. It covers the work performed from July 1, 1978 to completion, which includes in-pool inspection of two fuel assemblies, removal of two fuel rods, and post-irradiation examination (PIE) of six fuel rods. Appendix A describes the inspection and rod removal operations, and Appendix B describes the PIE work

  12. Recycling of MOX fuel for LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Oh, Soo Youl

    1992-01-01

    The status and issues related to the thermal recycling of reprocessed nuclear fuels have been reviewed. It is focused on the use of reprecessed plutonium in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) for a light water reactor and the review on reprocessing and fabrication processes is beyond the scope. In spite of the difference in the nuclear characteristics between plutonium and uranium isotopes, the neutronics behavior in a core with MOX fuels is similar to that with normal uranium fuels. However, since the neutron spectrum is hardened in a core with MOX, the Doppler, viod, and moderator temperature coefficients become more negative and the control rod and boron worths are slightly reduced. Therefore, the safety will be evaluated carefully in addition to the core neutronics analysis. The MOX fuel rod behavior related to the rod performance such as the pellet to clad interaction and fission gas release is also similar to that of uranium rods, and no specific problem arises. Substituting MOX fuels for a portion of uranium fuels, it is estimated that the savings be about 25% in uranium ore and 10% in uranium enrichment service requirements. The use of MOX fuel in LWRs has been commercialized in European countries including Germany, France, Belgium, etc., and a demonstration program has been pursued in Japan for the commercial utilization in the late 1990s. Such a worldwide trend indicates that the utilization of MOX fuel in LWRs is a proven technology and meets economics criteria. (Author)

  13. Irradiation performance of HTGR recycle fissile fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.

    1976-08-01

    The irradiation performance of candidate HTGR recycle fissile fuel under accelerated testing conditions is reviewed. Failure modes for coated-particle fuels are described, and the performance of candidate recycle fissile fuels is discussed in terms of these failure modes. The bases on which UO 2 and (Th,U)O 2 were rejected as candidate recycle fissile fuels are outlined, along with the bases on which the weak-acid resin (WAR)-derived fissile fuel was selected as the reference recycle kernel. Comparisons are made relative to the irradiation behavior of WAR-derived fuels of varying stoichiometry and conclusions are drawn about the optimum stoichiometry and the range of acceptable values. Plans for future testing in support of specification development, confirmation of the results of accelerated testing by real-time experiments, and improvement in fuel performance and reliability are described

  14. Fuel recycling and 4. generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devezeaux de Lavergne, J.G.; Gauche, F.; Mathonniere, G.

    2012-01-01

    The 4. generation reactors meet the demand for sustainability of nuclear power through the saving of the natural resources, the minimization of the volume of wastes, a high safety standard and a high reliability. In the framework of the GIF (Generation 4. International Forum) France has decided to study the sodium-cooled fast reactor. Fast reactors have the capacity to recycle plutonium efficiently and to burn actinides. The long history of reprocessing-recycling of spent fuels in France is an asset. A prototype reactor named ASTRID could be entered into operation in 2020. This article presents the research program on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, gives the status of the ASTRID project and present the scenario of the progressive implementation of 4. generation reactors in the French reactor fleet. (A.C.)

  15. Plutonium recycle. In-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, F.; Berthet, A.; Le Bars, M.

    1985-01-01

    Plutonium recycle in France will concern a dozen of PWR 900 MWe controlled in gray mode till 1995. This paper presents the main characteristics of fuel management with plutonium recycle. The organization of management studies will be copied from this developed for classical management studies. Up these studies, a ''feasibility report'' aims at establishing at each stage of the fuel cycle, the impact of the utilization of fuel containing plutonium [fr

  16. Energy Return on Investment - Fuel Recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsey, W.; Simon, A.J.; Fratoni, M.; Smith, C.; Schwab, P.; Murray, P.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a methodology and requisite data to assess the potential Energy Return On Investment (EROI) for nuclear fuel cycle alternatives, and applies that methodology to a limited set of used fuel recycle scenarios. This paper is based on a study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a parallel evaluation by AREVA Federal Services LLC, both of which were sponsored by the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program. The focus of the LLNL effort was to develop a methodology that can be used by the FCT program for such analysis that is consistent with the broader energy modeling community, and the focus of the AREVA effort was to bring industrial experience and operational data into the analysis. This cooperative effort successfully combined expertise from the energy modeling community with expertise from the nuclear industry. Energy Return on Investment is one of many figures of merit on which investment in a new energy facility or process may be judged. EROI is the ratio of the energy delivered by a facility divided by the energy used to construct, operate and decommission that facility. While EROI is not the only criterion used to make an investment decision, it has been shown that, in technologically advanced societies, energy supplies must exceed a minimum EROI. Furthermore, technological history shows a trend towards higher EROI energy supplies. EROI calculations have been performed for many components of energy technology: oil wells, wind turbines, photovoltaic modules, biofuels, and nuclear reactors. This report represents the first standalone EROI analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing (or recycling) facilities.

  17. Cost benefit analysis of recycling nuclear fuel cycle in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jewhan; Chang, Soonheung

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has become an essential part of electricity generation to meet the continuous growth of electricity demand. The importance if nuclear waste management has been the main issue since the beginning of nuclear history. The recycling nuclear fuel cycle includes the fast reactor, which can burn the nuclear wastes, and the pyro-processing technology, which can reprocess the spent nuclear fuel. In this study, a methodology using Linear Programming (LP) is employed to evaluate the cost and benefits of introducing the recycling strategy and thus, to see the competitiveness of recycling fuel cycle. The LP optimization involves tradeoffs between the fast reactor capital cost with pyro-processing cost premiums and the total system uranium price with spent nuclear fuel management cost premiums. With the help of LP and sensitivity analysis, the effect of important parameters is presented as well as the target values for each cost and price of key factors

  18. On recycling of nuclear fuel in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In Japan, atomic energy has become to accomplish the important role in energy supply. Recently the interest in the protection of global environment heightened, and the anxiety on oil supply has been felt due to the circumstances in Mideast. Therefore, the importance of atomic energy as an energy source for hereafter increased, and the future plan of nuclear fuel recycling in Japan must be promoted on such viewpoint. At present in Japan, the construction of nuclear fuel cycle facilities is in progress in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture. The prototype FBR 'Monju' started the general functional test in May, this year. The transport of the plutonium reprocessed in U.K. and France to Japan will be carried out in near future. This report presents the concrete measures of nuclear fuel recycling in Japan from the long term viewpoint up to 2010. The necessity and meaning of nuclear fuel recycling in Japan, the effort related to nuclear nonproliferation, the plan of nuclear fuel recycling for hereafter in Japan, the organization of MOX fuel fabrication in Japan and abroad, the method of utilizing recovered uranium and the reprocessing of spent MOX fuel are described. (K.I.)

  19. Recycling and surplus chemical programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, T.J.

    1993-05-01

    In 1988, 45 years of defense production came to a close at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The mission of the Hanford Site was formally changed to environmental restoration and remediation. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is the management and operations (M ampersand O) contractor leading the cleanup. Within the framework of future Site cleanup, Hanford recycling and surplus chemical programs are making a viable contribution today to waste minimization, diversion of materials from the waste stream, and setting a standard for future operations. This paper focuses on two successful efforts: paper recycling and surplus chemical sales

  20. Auditing an intensive care unit recycling program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, Mark A; McGain, Forbes; O'Shea, Catherine J; Bates, Samantha

    2015-06-01

    The provision of health care has significant direct environmental effects such as energy and water use and waste production, and indirect effects, including manufacturing and transport of drugs and equipment. Recycling of hospital waste is one strategy to reduce waste disposed of as landfill, preserve resources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and potentially remain fiscally responsible. We began an intensive care unit recycling program, because a significant proportion of ICU waste was known to be recyclable. To determine the weight and proportion of ICU waste recycled, the proportion of incorrect waste disposal (including infectious waste contamination), the opportunity for further recycling and the financial effects of the recycling program. We weighed all waste and recyclables from an 11-bed ICU in an Australian metropolitan hospital for 7 non-consecutive days. As part of routine care, ICU waste was separated into general, infectious and recycling streams. Recycling streams were paper and cardboard, three plastics streams (polypropylene, mixed plastics and polyvinylchloride [PVC]) and commingled waste (steel, aluminium and some plastics). ICU waste from the waste and recycling bins was sorted into those five recycling streams, general waste and infectious waste. After sorting, the waste was weighed and examined. Recycling was classified as achieved (actual), potential and total. Potential recycling was defined as being acceptable to hospital protocol and local recycling programs. Direct and indirect financial costs, excluding labour, were examined. During the 7-day period, the total ICU waste was 505 kg: general waste, 222 kg (44%); infectious waste, 138 kg (27%); potentially recyclable waste, 145 kg (28%). Of the potentially recyclable waste, 70 kg (49%) was actually recycled (14% of the total ICU waste). In the infectious waste bins, 82% was truly infectious. There was no infectious contamination of the recycling streams. The PVC waste was 37% contaminated

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    for Solar Power Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries for Solar Power to someone by E -mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries for Solar Power on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehicles in Vermont Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Vermont to someone by E -mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Vermont on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in

  3. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: (1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs; (2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs; (3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs; and (4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs

  4. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  5. School Recycling Programs: A Handbook for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This brochure describes some of the many recycling program options that schools can implement in their communities. It focuses on implementing actual recycling projects as a way of teaching the importance and benefits of recycling. The text examines the solid waste crisis and why Americans cannot continue to possess a disposable mentality. It…

  6. Safeguards and nonproliferation aspects of a dry fuel recycling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory undertook an independent assessment of the proliferation potentials and safeguardability of a dry fuel recycling technology, whereby spent pressurized-water reactor (PWR) fuels are used to fuel canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors. Objectives of this study included (1) the evaluation of presently available technologies that may be useful to safeguard technology options for dry fuel recycling (2) and identification of near-term and long-term research needs to develop process-specific safeguards requirements. The primary conclusion of this assessment is that like all other fuel cycle alternatives proposed in the past, the dry fuel recycle entails prolfferation risks and that there are no absolute technical fixes to eliminate such risks. This study further concludes that the proliferation risks of dry fuel recycling options are relatively minimal and presently known safeguards systems and technologies can be modified and/or adapted to meet the requirements of safeguarding such fuel recycle facilities

  7. Benefit analysis of reprocessing and recycling light water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The macro-economic impact of reprocessing and recycling fuel for nuclear power reactors is examined, and the impact of reprocessing on the conservation of natural uranium resources is assessed. The LWR fuel recycle is compared with a throwaway cycle, and it is concluded that fuel recycle is favorable on the basis of economics, as well as being highly desirable from the standpoint of utilization of uranium resources

  8. The Fernald Waste Recycling Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motl, G.P.

    1993-01-01

    Recycling is considered a critical component of the waste disposition strategy at the Fernald Plant. It is estimated that 33 million cubic feet of waste will be generated during the Fernald cleanup. Recycling some portion of this waste will not only conserve natural resources and disposal volume but will, even more significantly, support the preservation of existing disposition options such as off-site disposal or on-site storage. Recognizing the strategic implications of recycling, this paper outlines the criteria used at Fernald to make recycle decisions and highlights several of Fernald's current recycling initiatives

  9. Multiple recycling of fuel in prototype fast breeder reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the FBR closed fuel cycle, possibility of multi-recycle has been recognized. In the present study, Pu-239 equivalence approach is used to demonstrate the feasibility of achieving near constant input inventory of Pu and near stable Pu isotopic composition after a few recycles of the same fuel of the prototype fast breeder ...

  10. Implementing a campus wide recycling program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, L.

    2002-01-01

    'Full text:' The University of Windsor is currently expanding its recycling program to include all buildings on campus, but faces two challenges: 1) uncertainty about the current waste composition and distribution on campus; and 2) uncertainty about the effectiveness of increased recycling. This project assesses the current waste composition and the attitudes of the students towards recycling, and evaluates the effectiveness of proposed recycling activities. At present, paper is the only material that is collected throughout the entire campus. Except for two buildings, all other potentially recyclable materials within buildings, such as metal, glass, and plastic beverage containers, are discarded. The main focus of this research is on beverage containers as they represent clearly identifiable materials, but other materials were examined as well. To quantify the waste, different buildings on campus were classified according to their function: academic,operational and administrative. The waste composition study indicated that approximately 33% of the campus waste which is landfilled is composed of potentially recyclable material. A survey was then conducted to gauge the campus population's views on recycling issues that could affect the design of a recycling program. Interestingly, 97% of the respondents indicated a high willingness to recycle, but were uncertain as to how and where to recycle on campus. The project is currently assessing potential diversion rates using new, clearly identifiable recycling receptacles placed within selected classrooms for all major materials. There is a significant tradeoff however because the cost for new receptacles is considerable: multiple materials containers are often placed in high pedestrian traffic locations (e.g., hallways) and not always in classrooms,of which there are often many. This project will evaluate the basic benefits and costs of implementing a more comprehensive recycling program, and recommend how other

  11. Impact of minor actinide recycling on sustainable fuel cycle options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidet, F.; Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.

    2017-11-01

    The recent Evaluation and Screening study chartered by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has identified four fuel cycle options as being the most promising. Among these four options, the two single-stage fuel cycles rely on a fast reactor and are differing in the fact that in one case only uranium and plutonium are recycled while in the other case minor actinides are also recycled. The two other fuel cycles are two-stage and rely on both fast and thermal reactors. They also differ in the fact that in one case only uranium and plutonium are recycled while in the other case minor actinides are also recycled. The current study assesses the impact of recycling minor actinides on the reactor core design, its performance characteristics, and the characteristics of the recycled material and waste material. The recycling of minor actinides is found not to affect the reactor core performance, as long as the same cycle length, core layout and specific power are being used. One notable difference is that the required transuranics (TRU) content is slightly increased when minor actinides are recycled. The mass flows are mostly unchanged given a same specific power and cycle length. Although the material mass flows and reactor performance characteristics are hardly affected by recycling minor actinides, some differences are observed in the waste characteristics between the two fuel cycles considered. The absence of minor actinides in the waste results in a different buildup of decay products, and in somewhat different behaviors depending on the characteristic and time frame considered. Recycling of minor actinides is found to result in a reduction of the waste characteristics ranging from 10% to 90%. These results are consistent with previous studies in this domain and depending on the time frame considered, packaging conditions, repository site, repository strategy, the differences observed in the waste characteristics could be beneficial and help improve

  12. Design study of advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. Conceptual study of recycle system using molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakehi, I.; Shirai, N.; Hatano, M.; Kajitani, M.; Yonezawa, S.; Kawai, T.; Kawamura, F.; Tobe, K.; Takahashi, K.

    1996-12-01

    For the purpose of developing the future nuclear fuel recycle system, the design study of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system is being conducted. This report describes intermediate accomplishments in the conceptual system study of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. Fundamental concepts of this system is the recycle system using molten salt which intend to break through the conventional concepts of purex and pellet fuel system. Contents of studies in this period are as follows, 1)feasibility study of the process by Cd-cathode for nitride fuel, 2)application study for the molten salt of low melting point (AlCl3+organic salt), 3)research for decladding (advantage of decladding by heat treatment), 4)behavior of FPs in electrorefining (behavior of iodine and volatile FP chlorides, FPs behavior in chlorination), 5)criticality analysis in electrorefiner, 6)drawing of off-gas flow diagram, 7)drawing of process machinery concept (cathode processor, vibration packing), 8)evaluation for the amounts of the high level radioactive wastes, 9)quality of the recycle fuels (FPs contamination of recycle fuel), 10)conceptual study of in-cell handling system, 11)meaning of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. The conceptual system study will be completed in describing concepts of the system and discussing issues for the developments. (author)

  13. Plutonium recycle in PWR reactors (Brazilian Nuclear Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.

    1978-02-01

    An evaluation is made of the material requirements of the nuclear fuel cycle with plutonium recycle. It starts from the calculation of a reference reactor and allows the evaluation of demand under two alternatives of nuclear fuel cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR): without plutonium recycle; and with plutonium recycle. Calculations of the reference reactor have been carried out with the CELL-CORE codes. For plutonium recycle, the concept of uranium and plutonium homogeneous mixture has been adopted, using self-produced plutonium at equilibrium, in order to get minimum neutronic perturbations in the reactor core. The refueling model studied in the reference reactor was the 'out-in' scheme with a constant number of changed fuel elements (approximately 1/3 of the core). Variations in the material requirements were studied considering changes in the installed nuclear capacity of PWR reactors, the capacity factor of these reactors, and the introduction of fast breeders. Recycling plutonium produced inside the system can reach economies of about 5%U 3 O 8 and 6% separative work units if recycle is assumed only after the 5th operation cycle of the thermal reactors. The cumulative amount of fissile plutonium obtained by the Brazilian Nuclear Program of PWR reactors by 1991 should be sufficient for a fast breeder with the same capacity as Angra 2. For the proposed fast breeder programs, the fissile plutonium produced by thermal reactors is sufficient to supply fast breeder initial necessities. Howewer, U 3 O 8 and SWU economy with recycle is not significant when the proposed fast breeder program is considered. (Author) [pt

  14. Energy Return on Investment from Recycling Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the Energy Return on Investment (EROI) from recycling an initial batch of 800 t/y of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through a Recycle Center under a number of different fuel cycle scenarios. The study assumed that apart from the original 800 t of UNF only depleted uranium was available as a feed. Therefore for each subsequent scenario only fuel that was derived from the previous fuel cycle scenario was considered. The scenarios represent a good cross section of the options available and the results contained in this paper and associated appendices will allow for other fuel cycle options to be considered.

  15. Spent fuel management in France: Reprocessing, conditioning, recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Montalembert, J.A. de

    1994-01-01

    The French energy policy has been based for 20 years on the development of nuclear power. The some 75% share of nuclear in the total electricity generation, representing an annual production of 317 TWh requires full fuel cycle control from the head-end to the waste management. This paper presents the RCR concept (Reprocessing, Conditioning, Recycling) with its industrial implementation. The long lasting experience acquired in reprocessing and MOX fuel fabrication leads to a comprehensive industrial organization with minimized impact on the environment and waste generation. Each 900 MWe PWR loaded with MOX fuel avoids piling up 2,500 m 3 per year of mine tailings. By the year 2000, less than 500 m 3 of high-level and long-lived waste will be annually produced at La Hague for the French program. The fuel cycle facilities and the associated MOX loading programs are ramping-up according to schedule. Thus, the RCR concept is a reality as well as a policy adopted in several countries. Last but not least, RCR represents a strong commitment to non-proliferation as it is the way to fully control and master the plutonium inventory

  16. Development of recycling processes for clean rejected MOX fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khot, P.M.; Singh, G.; Shelke, B.K.; Surendra, B.; Yadav, M.K.; Mishra, A.K.; Afzal, Mohd.; Panakkal, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dry and wet (MWDD) methods were developed for 100% recycling of CRO (0.4–44% PuO 2 ). • Dry method showed higher productivity and comparable powder/product characteristics. • MWDD batches demonstrated improved powder/product characteristics to that of virgin. • Second/multiple recycling is possible with MWDD with better powder/product characteristics. • MWDD batches prepared by little milling showed better macroscopic homogeneity to that of virgin. - Abstract: The dry and wet recycling processes have been developed for 100% recycling of Clean Reject Oxide (CRO) generated during the fabrication of MOX fuel, as CRO contains significant amount of plutonium. Plutonium being strategic material need to be circumvented from its proliferation issues related to its storage for long period. It was difficult to recycle CRO containing higher Pu content even with multiple oxidation and reduction steps. The mechanical recycling comprising of jaw crushing and sieving has been coupled with thermal pulverization for recycling CRO with higher Pu content in dry recycling technique. In wet recycling, MicroWave Direct Denitration (MWDD) technique has been developed for 100% recycling of CRO. The powder prepared by dry and wet (MWDD) recycling techniques was characterized by XRD and BET techniques and their effects on the pellets were evaluated. (U,21%Pu)O 2 pellets fabricated from virgin powder and MWDD were characterized using optical microscopy and α-autoradiography and the results obtained were compared

  17. Fuel cycle optimization. French industry experience with recycling, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    Treatment and recycling has been implemented in France from the very beginning of nuclear energy deployment. With the oil shocks in 1973 and 1979, very large scale industrial deployment of LWRs has then been conducted, with now 58 PWRs producing 80% of the total electricity. Modern large scale treatment and recycling facilities have been constructed in the same period: La Hauge treatment facilities and MELOX recycling plant. Important industrial feedback results from operation and optimization of fuel cycle backend facilities, which is summarized in the paper. Then are discussed perspectives with recycling. (author)

  18. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1984-04-01

    This report, the fifth of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes activities over the past year in the following areas: public interaction; used fuel storage and transportation; immobilization of used fuel and fuel recycle waste; geoscience research related to deep underground disposal; environmental research; and environmental and safety assessment

  19. Implications of plutonium and americium recycling on MOX fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, A.; Pilate, S.; Maldague, Th.; La Fuente, A.; Evrard, G.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of the multiple recycling of plutonium in power reactors on the radiation dose rates is analyzed for the most critical stage in a MOX fuel fabrication plant. The limitation of the number of Pu recycling in light water reactors would rather stem from reactor core physics features. The case of recovering americium with plutonium is also considered and the necessary additions of shielding are evaluated. A comparison between the recycling of Pu in fast reactors and in light water reactors is presented. (author)

  20. Recycling as an option of used nuclear fuel management strategy for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiguer, M.; Casabianca, J.L.; Gros, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    As soon as the civil nuclear power age got underway, it became unthinkable to imagine generating nuclear electricity without recycling nuclear materials. In every country where this form of energy was being developed, construction programs involved not only power plants, but also fuel cycle facilities, notably dedicated to recovering and recycling nuclear material. Today, the nuclear renaissance coupled with growing concerns about energy security and public acceptance will provide a trigger for European nuclear countries to look back on three decades of Recycling used nuclear fuel excellent track record. In addition, back-end policy is more and more one of the major topics that nuclear countries and utilities have to face when managing existing as well as a new nuclear power plant. 'What will be done with the used fuel' is a key question, especially in terms of public acceptance. Countries that have previously postponed this topic now have to rethink the best solution for complete sustainable nuclear power. With several decades of experience and excellent feedback recycling has reached a maturity throughout all its supply chain and therefore constitutes the best response. The outcome is outstanding performance in reactors of recycled fuels and a robust, economical and optimized solution to ultimate waste management, in other words: - Recycling allows to significantly reduce the volume and toxicity of the ultimate waste to be interim stored and disposed of while enhancing proliferation resistance, - Recycling features competitive and predictable economics, - Recycling Used Nuclear Fuel supports the sustainable development of nuclear power allowing mitigating supply risks. All this helps to increase public support towards nuclear energy and insure the sustainable development of nuclear energy here and now. (authors)

  1. Consolidated fuel reprocessing. Program progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    This progress report is compiled from major contributions from three programs: (1) the Advanced Fuel Recycle Program at ORNL; (2) the Converter Fuel Reprocessing Program at Savannah River Laboratory; and (3) the reprocessing components of the HTGR Fuel Recycle Program, primarily at General Atomic and ORNL. The coverage is generally overview in nature; experimental details and data are limited.

  2. COGEMA's national advertising campaign concerning nuclear fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallot, Christine

    1999-01-01

    Goals of COGEMA's advertising campaign concerning nuclear fuel recycling are to: speak out in an area where COGEMA has legitimacy and is expected; and to take part in the discussion to support and defend an activity that is important for COGEMA. Targets are: back up opinion relays by reaching the general public; and back COGEMA personnel. The advertising strategy can be defined as follows: what is recommended for other industries (sorting and then recycling) is COGEMA's practice for spent fuel, with very significant advantages for the community in terms of economy and ecology

  3. Heterogeneous Recycle of Transuranics Fuels in Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, Edward; Taiwo, Temitope; Hill, Robert

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary physics evaluation of the impacts of heterogeneous recycle using Pu+Np driver and minor actinide target fuel assemblies in fast reactor cores has been performed by comparing results to those obtained for a reference homogeneous recycle core using driver assemblies containing grouped transuranic (TRU) fuel. Parametric studies are performed on the reference heterogeneous recycle core to evaluate the impacts of variations in the pre- and post-separation cooling times, target material type (uranium and non-uranium based), target amount and location, and other parameters on the system performance. This study focused on startup, single-pass cores for the purpose of quantifying impacts and also included comparisons to the option of simply storing the LWR spent nuclear fuel over a 50-year period. An evaluation of homogeneous recycle cores with elevated minor actinide contents is presented to illustrate the impact of using progressively higher TRU content on the core and transmutation performance, as a means of starting with known fuel technology with the aim of ultimately employing grouped TRU fuel in such cores. Reactivity coefficients and safety parameters are presented to indicate that the cores evaluated appear workable from a safety perspective, though more detailed safety and systems evaluations are required. (authors)

  4. Safety evaluation of a conceptual fuel recycle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodges, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual design integration study for an integrated Fuel Recycle Complex (FRC) has been completed. A safety evaluation of the radiation shielding, fire precautions, handling of nonradioactive hazardous materials, criticality hazards, operating errors, and the influence of natural phenomena on the FRC shows that all federal regulations are met or exceeded

  5. Municipal recycling support program. Guide to applicants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The Municipal Recycling Support Program stems from the Ontario Ministry of the Environment's policies and programs begun in 1980 aimed at encouraging the development of source separation projects in Ontario. To qualify for financial assistance, municipalities must play a central role in the implementation and ongoing development of recycling; applications will be supported only if there is adequate and reasonable commitment from markets for recovered materials; recycling systems must operate within the framework of a complete waste management system in which cost effectiveness is an important factor; multi-material projects are encouraged as much as possible; and the Ministry will share the costs of projects with the municipalities. The Ministry provides grants for up to 5 years per project to cover the net operating cost of a project up to a specified maximum percentage of eligible gross operating expenses. This manual provides guidelines for applying for such funding, including definitions of eligibility for operating and capital costs, the use of household bins, and guidelines for promotion and advertising, education, demonstration, and feasibility studies.

  6. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    A survey of electrochemical methods applications in fuel reprocessing was completed. A dummy fuel assembly shroud was cut using the remotely operated laser disassembly equipment. Operations and engineering efforts have continued to correct equipment operating, software, and procedural problems experienced during the previous uranium compaigns. Fuel cycle options were examined for the liquid metal reactor fuel cycle. In high temperature gas cooled reactor spent fuel studies, preconceptual designs were completed for the concrete storage cask and open field drywell storage concept. These and other tasks operating under the consolidated fuel reprocessing program are examined.

  7. Spent fuels program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of this task is to support the Domestic Spent Fuel Storage Program through studies involving the transport of spent fuel. A catalog was developed to provide authoritative, timely, and accessible transportation information for persons involved in the transport of irradiated reactor fuel. The catalog, drafted and submitted to the Transportation Technology Center, Sandia National Laboratories, for their review and approval, covers such topics as federal, state, and local regulations, spent fuel characteristics, cask characteristics, transportation costs, and emergency response information

  8. Device for sampling HTGR recycle fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchomel, R.R.; Lackey, W.J.

    1977-03-01

    Devices for sampling High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuel microspheres were evaluated. Analysis of samples obtained with each of two specially designed passive samplers were compared with data generated by more common techniques. A ten-stage two-way sampler was found to produce a representative sample with a constant batch-to-sample ratio

  9. Romanian nuclear fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budan, O.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents and comments the policy adopted in Romania for the production of CANDU-6 nuclear fuel before and after 1990. The CANDU-6 nuclear fuel manufacturing started in Romania in December 1983. Neither AECL nor any Canadian nuclear fuel manufacturer were involved in the Romanian industrial nuclear fuel production before 1990. After January 1990, the new created Romanian Electricity Authority (RENEL) assumed the responsibility for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. It was RENEL's decision to stop, in June 1990, the nuclear fuel production at the Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors (IRNE) Pitesti. This decision was justified by the Canadian specialists team findings, revealed during a general, but well enough technically founded analysis performed at IRNE in the spring of 1990. All fuel manufactured before June 1990 was quarantined as it was considered of suspect quality. By that time more than 31,000 fuel bundles had already been manufactured. This fuel was stored for subsequent assessment. The paper explains the reasons which provoked this decision. The paper also presents the strategy adopted by RENEL after 1990 regarding the Romanian Nuclear Fuel Program. After a complex program done by Romanian and Canadian partners, in November 1994, AECL issued a temporary certification for the Romanian nuclear fuel plant. During the demonstration manufacturing run, as an essential milestone for the qualification of the Romanian fuel supplier for CANDU-6 reactors, 202 fuel bundles were produced. Of these fuel bundles, 66 were part of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 first fuel load (the balance was supplied by Zircatec Precision Industries Inc. ZPI). The industrial nuclear fuel fabrication re-started in Romania in January 1995 under AECL's periodical monitoring. In December 1995, AECL issued a permanent certificate, stating the Romanian nuclear fuel plant as a qualified and authorised CANDU-6 fuel supplier. The re-loading of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 started in the middle

  10. Development of a fissile particle for HTGR fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Lindemer, T.B.; Beatty, R.L.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1976-12-01

    Recycle fissile fuel particles for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) have been under development since the mid-1960s. Irradiation performance on early UO 2 and Th 0 . 8 U 0 . 2 O 2 kernels is described in this report, and the performance limitations associated with the dense oxide kernels are presented. The development of the new reference fuel kernel, the weak-acid-resin-derived (WAR) UO 2 --UC 2 , is discussed in detail, including an extensive section on the irradiation performance of this fuel in HFIR removable beryllium capsules HRB-7 through -10. The conclusion is reached that the irradiation performance of the WAR fissile fuel kernel is better than that of any coated particle fuel yet tested. Further, the present fissile kernel is adequate for steam cycle HTGRs as well as for many advanced applications such as gas turbine and process heat HTGRs

  11. Evaluation of the recycling costs, as a disposal form of the spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    At the moment there are 2 BWR reactors operating in the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde in Mexico. At the end of the programmed life of the reactors (40 years) its will have completed 26 operation cycles, with will have 6712 spent fuel assemblies will be in the pools of the power station. Up to now, the decision on the destination of the high level wastes (spent nuclear fuel) it has not been determined in Mexico, the same as in other countries, adopting a politics of 'to wait to see that it happens in the world', in this respect, in the world two practical alternatives exist, one is to store the fuel in repositories designed for that end, another is reprocess the fuel to recycle the plutonium contained in it, both solutions have their particular technical and economic problematic. In this work it is evaluated from the economic point of view the feasibility of having the spent fuel, using the one recycled fuel, for that which thinks about a consistent scenario of a BWR reactor in which the fuel discharged in each operation cycle is reprocessed and its are built fuel assemblies of the MOX type to replace partly to the conventional fuel. This scenario shows an alternative to the indefinite storage of the high level radioactive waste. The found results when comparing from the economic point of view both options, show that the one recycled, even with the current costs of the uranium it is of the order of 7% more expensive that the option of storing the fuel in repositories constructed for that purpose. However the volumes of spent fuel decrease in 66%. (Author)

  12. Need for Asian regional spent fuel recycle center (ARRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Energy demand is increasing rapidly in the Asia-Pacific region. From the viewpoint of preventing global warming, countries in the region are expected to introduce more nuclear power plants (NPPs) which do not emit greenhouse gases (GHGs). At the end of this century, the capacity for NPPs is estimated to reach around 1600 GWe and around 300,000 tons of uranium (TU) as spent fuel will be accumulated. The spent fuel from the NPPs should be reprocessed and fabricated into MOX fuel to decrease the amounts of radioactive wastes and future fuel recycling should be supported in the Asian Regional Spent Fuel Recycle Center (ARRC) under international regulation. The ARRC will include a reprocessing plant, an MOX fuel fabrication plant, a high-activity vitrified solid waste storage facility, and sea discharge pipes for extremely low activity liquid wastes etc. Furthermore, the ARRC should be operated as a component in an international organization scheme, an ASIATOM and it should accept the full scope of IAEA safeguards to verify the nonproliferation of nuclear materials. When the ARRC is designed, knowledge obtained through experiences in the Tokai and the Rokkasho reprocessing plants in Japan, which is a non-nuclear weapons country, will be used. (author)

  13. Blue Box Plus Quinte regional recycling demonstration program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    The Blue Box Plus recycling program was established in September 1990 in the Quinte region of Ontario. The program was intended to develop the necessary operational information so that the existing program could expand to include mixed plastics, corrugated cardboard, and boxboard. Over 33,000 recycling boxes were distributed over an area covering 15 municipalities with a population base of 95,000. The program showed the willingness of the public to participate in recycling, but advertising and promotion of the program were critical for success. Separation of the recycled materials on the collection trucks was found to be a viable approach and more efficient than sorting at the recycling plant. Adding new materials to be recycled could be done efficiently, and operating costs were in line with those for other programs collecting fewer materials. A cooperative market development with industrial players opened up a new and expanding market for boxboard. 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Plutonium bearing oxide fuels for recycling in thermal reactors and fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    Programs carried out in the past two decades have established the technical feasibility of using plutonium as a fuel material in both water-cooled power reactors and sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors. The problem facing the technical community is basically one of demonstrating plutonium fuel recycle under strict conditions of public safety, accountability, personnel exposure, waste management, transportation and diversion or theft which are still evolving. In this paper only technical and economic aspects of high volume production and the demonstration program required are discussed. This paper discusses the role of mixed oxide fuels in light water reactors and the objectives of the LMFBR required for continual growth of nuclear power during the next century. The results of studies showing the impact of using plutonium on uranium requirements, power costs, and the market share of nuclear power are presented. The influence of doubling time and the introduction date of LMFBRs on the benefits to be derived by its commercial use are discussed. Advanced fuel development programs scoped to meet future commerical LMFBR fuel requirements are described. Programs designed to provide the basic technology required for using plutonium fuels in a manner which will satisfy all requirements for public acceptance are described. Included are the high exposure plutonium fabrication development program centered around the High Performance Fuels Laboratory being built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory and the program to confirm the technology required for the production of mixed oxide fuels for light water reactors which is being coordinated by Savannah River Laboratories

  15. Conceptual design of a spent LWR fuel recycle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, B.H.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose was to design a licensable facility, to make cost-benefit analyses of alternatives, and to aid in developing licensing criteria. The Savannah River Plant was taken to be the site for the recycle complex. The spent LWR fuel will be processed through the plant at the rate of 3000 metric tons of heavy metal per year. The following aspects of the complex are discussed: operation, maintenance, co-conversion (Coprecal), waste disposal, off-gas treatment, ventilation, safeguards, accounting, equipment and fuel fabrication. Differences between the co-processing case and the separated streams case are discussed. 44 figures

  16. Recycling Mentors: an intergenerational, service-learning program to promote recycling and environmental awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'abundo, Michelle L; Fugate-Whitlock, Elizabeth I; Fiala, Kelly A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of Recycling Mentors was to implement an intergenerational, service-learning program focused on promoting recycling and environmental awareness among students enrolled in Community Health (HEA 301) and Current Issues in Gerontology (GRN 440/540) and adults older than 60 years. Recycling Mentors was conducted in New Hanover County (NHC), North Carolina, where a moderate climate and coastal location attracts many tourists, retirees, and college students. A community like NHC is a good place to implement service-learning that educates both students and older adults about the benefits of recycling to individual health and the environment. During the Fall 2009 semester, undergraduate and graduate students completed institutional review board training and then conducted the program with older adults. The education component of Recycling Mentors included a pre/post survey, brochure, and scheduled visits. Overall, Recycling Mentors was positive service-learning experience with students identifying salient outcomes such as learning about recycling and the environment and working with older adults. In addition, teaching the education component of Recycling Mentors was good practice for students who will be the future health professionals. While service-learning and environmentally themed projects are common, a program that combines the 2 like Recycling Mentors is unique and has the potential to motivate individual change while positively impacting the local community and the environment.

  17. Safety recycling of reactor fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinlaender, W.

    Additionally to the measures, which descent from the conventional safety techniques, a series of supplementary protective measures have to be taken in connection with the Atomic Energy Law, the Radiation Protection Ordinance and the nuclear-technical practice, which in particular guarantee a safe enclosure and a safe residual heat rejection of the handled radioactive material and an avoidance of nuclear chain reactions. The most important plant malfunctions to be considered within the scope of the plant safety control according to the atomic law are, the radioactivity release due to mechanical damage of fuel elements, containment leakage, explosions in process equipment and/or vessels, burning of run out organic solvents, criticality malfunctions, and the already mentioned accidental failure of after-heat removal. If we let alone the extremely low probabilities for the occurrence of such accidents due to the selected methods, the layout of the equipment and by taking the required quality warranty measures into consideration, and infer such accidents in spite of this, the resulting radiation doses outside the plant are in all cases much lower than 5 rem, which is the design limit according to the regulations for radiation protection. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Design study on advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. Conceptual design study of recycle system using molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Y.; Kakehi, I.; Moro, T.; Higashi, T.; Tobe, K.; Kawamura, F.; Yonezawa, S.; Yoshiuji, T.

    1998-10-01

    Advanced recycle system engineering group of OEC (Oarai Engineering Center) has being carried out a design study of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system using molten salt (electro-metallurgical process). This system is aiming for improvements of fuel cycle economy and reduction of environmental burden (MA recycles, Minimum of radioactive waste disposal), and also improvement of safety and nuclear non-proliferation. This report describes results of the design study that has been continued since December 1996. (1) A design concept of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system, that is a module type recycles system of pyrochemical reprocessing and fuel re-fabrication was studied. The module system has advantage in balance of Pu recycle where modules are constructed in coincidence with the construction plan of nuclear power plants, and also has flexibility for technology progress. A demonstration system, minimum size of the above module, was studies. This system has capacity of 10 tHM/y and is able to demonstrate recycle technology of MOX fuel, metal fuel and nitride fuel. (2) Each process of the system, which are pyrochemical electrorefining system, cathode processor, de-cladding system, waste disposal system, etc., were studied. In this study, capacity of an electrorefiner was discussed, and vitrification experiment of molten salt using lead-boric acid glass was conducted. (3) A hot cell system and material handling system of the demonstration system was studied. A robot driven by linear motor was studied for the handling system, and an arrangement plan of the cell system was made. Criticality analysis in the cell system and investigation of material accountancy system of the recycle plant were also made. This design study will be continued in coincidence with design study of reactor and fuel, aiming to establish the concept of FBR recycle system. (author)

  19. The plutonium recycle for PWR reactors from brazilian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the material requirements of the nuclear fuel cycle with plutonium recycle. The study starts with the calculation of a reference reactor and has flexibility to evaluate the demand under two alternatives of nuclear fuel cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR): Without plutonium recycle; and with plutonium recycle. Calculations of the reference reactor have been carried out with the CELL-CORE codes. Variations in the material requirements were studied considering changes in the installed nuclear capacity of PWR reactors, the capacity factor of these reactors, and the introduction of fast breeders. Recycling plutonium produced inside the system can reach economies of about 5% U 3 O 8 and 6% separative work units if recycle is assumed only after the fifth operation cycle of the thermal reactors. (author)

  20. Nuclear-fuel-cycle costs. Consolidated Fuel-Reprocessing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel-cycle costs are given for the pressurized-water reactor once-through and fuel-recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast-breeder-reactor system. These calculations show that fuel-cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel-cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder-reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment

  1. Actinide recycle potential in the integral fast reactor (IFR) fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.; Till, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    In the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system -- reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. The use of metallic fuel in the IFR allows a radically improved fuel cycle technology. Based on the recent IFR process development, a preliminary assessment has been made to investigate the feasibility of further adapting pyrochemical processes to directly extract actinides from LWR spent fuel. The results of this assessment indicate very promising potential and two most promising flowsheet options have been identified for further research and development. This paper also summarizes current thinking on the rationale for actinide recycle, its ramifications on the geologic repository and the current high-level waste management plans, and the necessary development programs

  2. Fuel cycle model and the cost of a recycling thorium in the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok; Park, Chang Je

    2005-01-01

    The dry process fuel technology has a high proliferation-resistance, which allows applications not only to the existing but also to the future nuclear fuel cycle systems. In this study, the homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 recycling fuel cycle in a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor was assessed for a fuel cycle cost evaluation. A series of parametric calculations were performed for the uranium fraction, enrichment of the initial uranium fuel, and the fission product removal rated of the recycled fuel. The fuel cycle cost was estimated by the levelized lifetime cost model provided by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency. Though it is feasible to recycle the homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel in the CANDU reactor from the viewpoint of a mass balance, the recycling fuel cycle cost is much higher than the conventional natural uranium fuel cycle cost for most cases due to the high fuel fabrication cost. (author)

  3. Recycling : The advanced fuel cycle for existing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamorlette, Guy

    1994-01-01

    In 1993, the Installed capacity of the world's 427 nuclear power plants was over 335 GWe. Additional plants representing 67 GWe were under construction or on order. Taking construction schedules into consideration, their start-up will stretch out over a period of ten years. Nuclear power will therefore increase by 20% at best in ten years, transiting into a relatively modest 2% average annual growth rate. Of these units, about 80% are light water reactors, whether PWR, BWR, or WER. All of these reactors utilize enriched uranium oxide fuel clad with zirconium alloy. From a fuel perspective, these reactors form a pretty homogeneous group. During reactor residence, energy is supplied by fission of three-fourths of the Initial uranium 235, but also by plutonium fission, which is formed in the fuel as soon as it is Irradiated. The plutonium supplies 40% of the generated power. When the fuel is unloaded, it consists of four elements : fission products and structural materials, such as cladding and end-fittings, which are the reel waste, and residual plutonium and uranium, which are energy materials that can be recycled in accordance with French legislation applicable to both non-nuclear and nuclear industries : 'the purpose of this law is to... make use of waste by reusing, recycling or otherwise obtaining reusable material or energy from.'. The nuclear power industry has entered a phase in which most of its capital-intensive projects are behind it. Now, It must depose Itself to ensuring the competitiveness of nuclear energy compared to other sources of power generation, while protecting the environment and respecting safety regulations. Significant gains have been achieved by improving fuel performance : optimization of fuel design, utilization of less neutron-absorbent materials, and increases in fuel burn-up have made it possible to increase the amount of energy derived from one kilogram of natural uranium by more than 50%. Recycling of the fuel in light water reactor

  4. HOUSEHOLD PARTICIPATION IN RECYCLING PROGRAMS: A CASE STUDY FROM MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azilah M Akil

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The increase in per capita income and rapid urbanization, have contributed significantly to changes in consumption behaviour leading to increased waste generation.  Waste disposed to landfill sites is fast becoming unfeasible thus requiring a more effective management of waste material involving waste reduction, reuse and recycling. The success of recycling program, however, is largely dependent on household participation activities which are essentially behaviour driven. The recycling performance of Malaysian households is still low as it stands at 5.5% compared to Singapore and Vietnam which are 56% and 22% respectively. This study examines recycling behaviour among households and the influence of socioeconomic, demographic and behavioural characteristics on households’ participation in recycling program in Malaysia.  A sample of 300 randomly selected household were surveyed.  The findings revealed that most of the households (70% claim that they are practicing recycling particularly types of paper and old clothes. The factors of participation in recycling show equal results both for environmental concerns and economic benefits. Those who did not participate in recycling, listed household issues or behaviour, namely lack of time and materials to recycle, inconvenient, lack of space, lack of facilities and information as well as laziness, as barriers. The paper finally highlights the factors which can encourage household to be involved in recycling and give recommendations to the authorities in terms of facilities and infrastructures to facilitate the program.

  5. Nuclear Fuel Leasing, Recycling and proliferation: Modeling a Global View

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crozat, M P; Choi, J; Reis, V H; Hill, R

    2004-01-01

    On February 11, 2004, U.S. President George W. Bush, in a speech to the National Defense University stated: ''The world must create a safe, orderly system to field civilian nuclear plants without adding to the danger of weapons proliferation. The world's leading nuclear exporters should ensure that states have reliable access at reasonable cost to fuel for civilian reactors, so long as those states renounce enrichment and reprocessing. Enrichment and reprocessing are not necessary for nations seeking to harness nuclear energy for peaceful purposes.'' This concept would require nations to choose one of two paths for civilian nuclear development: those that only have reactors and those that contain one or more elements of the nuclear fuel cycle, including recycling. ''Fuel cycle'' states would enrich uranium, manufacture and lease fuel to ''reactor'' states and receive the reactor states' spent fuel. All parties would accede to stringent security and safeguard standards, embedded within a newly invigorated international regime. Reactor states would be relieved of the financial, environmental (and political) burden of enriching and manufacturing fuel and dealing with spent fuel. Fuel cycle states would potentially earn money on leasing the fuel and perhaps on sales of reactors to the reactor states. Such a leasing concept is especially interesting in scenarios which envision growth in nuclear power, and an important consideration for such a nuclear growth regime is the role of recycling of civilian spent fuel. Recycling holds promise for improved management of spent fuel and efficient utilization of resources, but continues to raise the specter of a world with uncontrolled nuclear weapons proliferation. If done effectively, a fuel-leasing concept could help create a political and economic foundation for significant growth of clean, carbon-free nuclear power while providing a mechanism for significant international cooperation to reduce proliferation concern. This

  6. A review of glass-ceramics for the immobilization of nuclear fuel recycle wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    This report reviews the status of the Canadian, German, U.S., Japanese, U.S.S.R. and Swedish programs for the development of glass-ceramic materials for immobilizing the high-level radioactive wastes arising from the recycling of used nuclear fuel. The progress made in these programs is described, with emphasis on the Canadian program for the development of sphene-based glass-ceramics. The general considerations of product performance and process feasibility for glass-ceramics as a category of waste form material are discussed. 137 refs

  7. Radiotoxicity Characterization of Multi-Recycled Thorium Fuel - 12394

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, F.; Wenner, M. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Fiorina, C. [Polytechnic of Milano, Milan (Italy); Paul Sherrer Institute (Switzerland); Huang, M.; Petrovic, B. [Georgia Technology University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Krepel, J. [Paul Sherrer Institute (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    As described in companion papers, Westinghouse is proposing the implementation of a thorium based fuel cycle to burn the transuranic (TRU) contained in the used nuclear fuel. The potential of thorium as a TRU burner is described in another paper presented at this conference. This paper analyzes the long-term impact of thorium on the front-end and backend of the fuel cycle. This is accomplished by an assessment of the isotopic make-up of Th in a closed cycle and its impact on representative metrics, such as radiotoxicity, decay heat and gamma heat. The behavior in both thermal and fast neutron energy ranges has been investigated. Irradiation in a Th fuel PWR has been assumed as representative of the thermal range, while a Th fuel fast reactor (FR) has been employed to characterize the behavior in the high-energy range. A comparison with a U-fuel closed-cycle FR has been undertaken in an attempt of a more comprehensive evaluation of each cycle's long-term potential. As the Th fuel undergoes multiple cycles of irradiation, the isotopic composition of the recycled fuel changes. Minor Th isotopes are produced; U-232 and Pa-231 build up; the U vector gradually shifts towards increasing amounts of U-234, U-235 etc., eventually leading to the production of non negligible amounts of TRU isotopes, especially Pu-238. The impact of the recycled fuel isotopic makeup on the in-core behavior is mild, and for some aspects beneficial, i.e. the reactivity swing during irradiation is reduced as the fertile characteristics of the fuel increase. On the other hand, the front and the back-end of the fuel cycle are negatively affected due to the presence of Th-228 and U-232 and the build-up of higher actinides (Pu-238 etc.). The presence of U-232 can also be seen as advantageous as it represents an obstacle to potential proliferators. Notwithstanding the increase in the short-term radiotoxicity and decay heat in the multi-recycled fuel, the Th closed cycle has some potentially

  8. Automatic particle-size analysis of HTGR recycle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.E.; Pechin, W.H.

    1977-09-01

    An automatic particle-size analyzer was designed, fabricated, tested, and put into operation measuring and counting HTGR recycle fuel particles. The particle-size analyzer can be used for particles in all stages of fabrication, from the loaded, uncarbonized weak acid resin up to fully-coated Biso or Triso particles. The device handles microspheres in the range of 300 to 1000 μm at rates up to 2000 per minute, measuring the diameter of each particle to determine the size distribution of the sample, and simultaneously determining the total number of particles. 10 figures

  9. Fuel Cell Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Brun

    2006-09-15

    In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance

  10. Canadian fuel development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gacesa, M.; Young, E.G.

    1992-11-01

    CANDU power reactor fuel has demonstrated an enviable operational record. More than 99.9% of the bundles irradiated have provided defect-free service. Defect excursions are responsible for the majority of reported defects. In some cases research and development effort is necessary to resolve these problems. In addition, development initiatives are also directed at improvements of the current design or reduction of fueling cost. The majority of the funding for this effort has been provided by COG (CANDU Owners' Group) over the past 10 to 15 years. This paper contains an overview of some key fuel technology programs within COG. The CANDU reactor is unique among the world's power reactors in its flexibility and its ability to use a number of different fuel cycles. An active program of analysis and development, to demonstrate the viability of different fuel cycles in CANDU, has been funded by AECL in parallel with the work on the natural uranium cycle. Market forces and advances in technology have obliged us to reassess and refocus some parts of our effort in this area, and significant success has been achieved in integrating all the Canadian efforts in this area. This paper contains a brief summary of some key components of the advanced fuel cycle program. (Author) 4 figs., tab., 18 refs

  11. Advances in nuclear fuel technology. 3. Development of advanced nuclear fuel recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arie, Kazuo; Abe, Tomoyuki; Arai, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    Fast breeder reactor (FBR) cycle technology has a technical characteristics flexibly easy to apply to diverse fuel compositions such as plutonium, minor actinides, and so on and fuel configurations. By using this characteristics, various feasibilities on effective application of uranium resources based on breeding of uranium of plutonium for original mission of FBR, contribution to radioactive wastes problems based on amounts reduction of transuranium elements (TRU) in high level radioactive wastes, upgrading of nuclear diffusion resistance, extremely upgrading of economical efficiency, and so on. In this paper, were introduced from these viewpoints, on practice strategy survey study on FBR cycle performed by cooperation of the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) with electric business companies and so on, and on technical development on advanced nuclear fuel recycle systems carried out at the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and so on. Here were explained under a vision on new type of fuels such as nitride fuels, metal fuels, and so on as well as oxide fuels, a new recycle system making possible to use actinides except uranium and plutonium, an 'advanced nuclear fuel cycle technology', containing improvement of conventional wet Purex method reprocessing technology, fuel manufacturing technology, and so on. (G.K.)

  12. Multiple recycle of REMIX fuel at VVER-1000 operation in closed fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, P. N.; Bobrov, E. A., E-mail: evgeniybobrov89@rambler.ru; Chibinyaev, A. V.; Teplov, P. S.; Dudnikov, A. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The basic features of loading the VVER-1000 core with a new variant of REMIX fuel (REgenerated MIXture of U–Pu oxides) are considered during its multiple recycle in a closed nuclear fuel cycle. The fuel composition is produced on the basis of the uranium–plutonium regenerate extracted at processing the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from a VVER-1000, depleted uranium, and the fissionable material: {sup 235}U as a part of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from warheads superfluous for defense purposes or {sup 233}U accumulated in thorium blankets of fusion (electronuclear) neutron sources or fast reactors. Production of such a fuel assumes no use of natural uranium in addition. When converting a part of the VVER-1000 reactors to the closed fuel cycle based on the REMIX technology, the consumption of natural uranium decreases considerably, and there is no substantial degradation of the isotopic composition of plutonium or change in the reactor-safety characteristics at the passage from recycle to recycle.

  13. Determination of enrichment of recycle uranium fuels for different burnup values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabunoglu, Okan H.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium (U) recovered from spent LWR fuels by reprocessing, which contains small amounts of U-236, is to be enriched before being re-irradiated as the recycle U. During the enrichment of recovered U in U-235, the mass fraction of U-236 also increases. Since the existence of U-236 in the recycle U has a negative effect on neutron economy, a greater enrichment of U-235 in the recycle U is required for reaching the same burnup as can be reached by the fresh U fuel. Two burnup values play the most important role in determining the enrichment of recycle U: (1) discharge burnup of spent fuel from which the recycle U is obtained and (2) desired discharge burnup of the recycle U fuel. A step-by-step procedure for calculating the enrichment of the recycle U as a function of these two burnup values is introduced. The computer codes MONTEBURNS and ORIGEN-S are made use of and a three-component (U-235, U-236, U-238) enrichment scheme is applied for calculating the amount of U-236 in producing the recycle U from the recovered U. As was aimed, the resulting expression is simple enough for quick/hand calculations of the enrichment of the recycle U for any given discharge burnup of spent fuel and for any desired discharge burnup of the recycle U fuel, most accurately within the range of 33,000-50,000 MWd/tonU

  14. Multiple recycling of fuel in prototype fast breeder reactor in a closed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our previous study in this regard for the prototype fast breeder reactor ... This study aims at finding the feasibility of multiple recycling of PFBR fuel with external ...... maximum allowable Pu content in fuel based on chemistry/metallurgical ...

  15. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel recycle development. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotts, A.L.; Kasten, P.R.

    1978-09-01

    The status of the following tasks is reported: program management, studies and analysis, fuel processing, refabrication development, in-plant waste treatment, research general support, and major facilities including HTGR recycle reference facility, hot engineering test facility and cold prototype test facility-refabrication

  16. Actinide recycle potential in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.; Till, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    In the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system -- reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. The use of metallic fuel in the IFR allows a radically improved fuel cycle technology. Pyroprocessing, which utilizes high temperatures and molten salt and molten metal solvents, can be advantageously utilized for processing metal fuels because the product is metal suitable for fabrication into new fuel elements. The key step in the IFR process is electrorefining, which provides for recovery of the valuable fuel constituents, uranium and plutonium, and for removal of fission products. In the electrorefining operation, uranium and plutonium are selectively transported from an anode to a cathode, leaving impurity elements, mainly fission products, either in the anode compartment or in a molten salt electrolyte. A notable feature of the IFR process is that the actinide elements accompany plutonium through the process. This results in a major advantage in the high-level waste management, because these actinides are automatically recycled back into the reactor for in-situ burning. Based on the recent IFR process development, a preliminary assessment has also been made to investigate the feasibility of further adapting the pyrochemical processes to directly extract actinides from LWR spent fuel. The results of this assessment indicate very promising potential and two most promising flowsheet options have been identified for further research and development. This paper also summarizes current thinking on the rationale for actinide recycle, its ramifications on the geologic repository and the current high-level waste management plans, and the necessary development programs. 5 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Industry-led program recycles used oil materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The Alberta Used Oil Management Association (AUOMA) is running an industry-led program for recycling used oil filters, containers and used oil. The objective of the program is to help develop an infrastructure that will make recycling simple and convenient for consumers of oil materials. It was estimated that millions of litres of used oil are improperly discarded into the Alberta environment. The program is also aimed at increasing public awareness of the importance of recycling used oil materials, particularly to those consumers who change their own motor oil. By the end of 1997 AUOMA expects to open about 50 recycling centres called EcoCentres. An environmental handling charge (EHC) will be paid to AUOMA by wholesale suppliers on the first sale of oil materials in Alberta. The EHC will be the only funds used to support the program

  18. Nuclear fuel cycle waste recycling technology deverlopment - Radioactive metal waste recycling technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Moon, Jei Kwon; Jung, Chong Hun; Park, Sang Yoon

    1998-08-01

    With relation to recycling of the radioactive metal wastes which are generated during operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the following were described in this report. 1. Analysis of the state of the art on the radioactive metal waste recycling technologies. 2. Economical assessment on the radioactive metal waste recycling. 3. Process development for radioactive metal waste recycling, A. Decontamination technologies for radioactive metal waste recycling. B. Decontamination waste treatment technologies, C. Residual radioactivity evaluation technologies. (author). 238 refs., 60 tabs., 79 figs

  19. Overview of reductants utilized in nuclear fuel reprocessing/recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paviet-Hartmann, P. [Idaho National Laboratory, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Riddle, C. [Idaho National Laboratory, Material and Fuel Complex, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6150 (United States); Campbell, K. [University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89144 (United States); Mausolf, E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Batelle Blvd, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The most widely used reductant to partition plutonium from uranium in the Purex process was ferrous sulfamate, other alternates were proposed such as hydrazine-stabilized ferrous nitrate or uranous nitrate, platinum catalyzed hydrogen, and hydrazine, hydroxylamine salts. New candidates to replace hydrazine or hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) are pursued worldwide. They may improve the performance of the industrial Purex process towards different operations such as de-extraction of plutonium and reduction of the amount of hydrazine which will limit the formation of hydrazoic acid. When looking at future recycling technologies using hydroxamic ligands, neither acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) nor formohydroxamic acid (FHA) seem promising because they hydrolyze to give hydroxylamine and the parent carboxylic acid. Hydroxyethylhydrazine, HOC{sub 2}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}H{sub 3} (HEH) is a promising non-salt-forming reductant of Np and Pu ions because it is selective to neptunium and plutonium ions at room temperature and at relatively low acidity, it could serve as a replacement of HAN or AHA for the development of a novel used nuclear fuel recycling process.

  20. Japanese status-quo and our activities in the field of nuclear fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sada, Masao; Imai, Osamu

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear energy is expected to take the place of current petroleum-base-energy in the near future. In order to effectively utilize the nuclear energy, nuclear fuel recycle system has to be established. The technology for reprocessing the spent fuel, which is a part of this recycle system, is very similar to the ones in chemical industry. Our company has been keeping its eyes on the field of such nuclear energy as one of the future promising businesses and recentrly established Nuclear Energy Department as a center for further expanding the business opportunity in the field of such spent fuel reprocessing as well as other fields of nuclear fuel recycle system. (author)

  1. Nuclear Proliferation Risk Mitigation Approaches and Impacts in the Recycle of Used Nuclear Fuel in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesketh, K.; Gregg, R.; Phillips, Ch.

    2009-01-01

    EnergySolutions and its team partners, which include the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL), are one of four industry teams to have received an award from the US Department of Energy to carry out design studies in support of the US Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). This team has developed a detailed scenario model for a future US nuclear fuel cycle based on a closed used nuclear fuel recycle as an alternative to the current once-though-and-store system. This scenario enables the uranium and plutonium in Light Water Reactor (LWR) used fuel from the current reactor fleet, and from a fleet of replacement LWRs, to be recycled as both Uranium Oxide and Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel using reprocessing plants that conform to the requirements of GNEP. There is also a provision for 'burning' in thermal reactors certain long-lived transuranics (Np, Am, Cm) formed into targets. The residual fission product waste, without these long-term heat emitters, will be vitrified and consigned to the US National Geologic repository. Later in the scenario a fleet of Advanced Recycle Reactors (ARR), based on sodium cooled fast reactor technology, are introduced to enable full transmutation of all transuranics and thus attain the GNEP sustainability goal. The recycle scenario avoids the need for the Yucca Mountain repository to receive unprocessed used nuclear fuel and is effective at prolonging its lifetime and delaying the need for a second repository. This paper explains the process by which EnergySolutions selected the U-Pu and U-Pu-Np MOX products and the technological requirements for the recycle plants and describes materials flow analysis that has been carried for the US nuclear fuel cycle scenario using NNL's ORION scenario modelling program. One of the prime requisites of GNEP is to ensure that the risk of proliferation is minimized and the paper describes NNL's approach to objectively assessing the proliferation risk of the scenario relative to that of a conventional recycle

  2. Fuel self-sufficient and low proliferation risk multi-recycling of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, N. Z.; Hong, S. G.; Kim, T. H.; Greenspan, E.; Kastenberg, W. E.

    1998-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility study has been performed in search of promising nuclear energy systems which could make efficient use of the spent fuel from LWRs and be proliferation resistant. The energy considered consist of a dry process and a fuel-self-sufficient reactor which are synergistic. D 2 O, H 2 O and Pb (or Pb-Bi) are considered for the coolant. The most promising identified consists of Pb-cooled reactors with either an AIROX or an IFR-like reprocessing. H 2 O- (possibly mixed with D 2 O) cooled reactors can be designed to be fuel-self-sufficient and multi-recycle LWR spent fuel, provided they are accelerator driven. Moderator-free, D 2 O-cooled critical reactors can multi-recycle Th- 233 U fuel using IFR-type reprocessing; they are significantly more attractive than their thermal counterparts. H 2 O- (possibly mixed with D 2 O) cooled, accelerator-driven reactors appear attractive for converting Th into denatured 233 U using LWR spent fuel and the IFR process. The CANDU reactor technology appears highly synergistic with accelerator-driven systems. (author). 25 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  3. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Through its Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program, NREL researches, develops, analyzes, and validates fuel cell and hydrogen production, delivery, and storage technologies for transportation

  4. Overview of reductants utilized in nuclear fuel reprocessing/recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Catherine Riddle; Keri Campbell; Edward Mausolf

    2013-10-01

    Most of the aqueous processes developed, or under consideration worldwide for the recycling of used nuclear fuel (UNF) utilize the oxido-reduction properties of actinides to separate them from other radionuclides. Generally, after acid dissolution of the UNF, (essentially in nitric acid solution), actinides are separated from the raffinate by liquid-liquid extraction using specific solvents, associated along the process, with a particular reductant that will allow the separation to occur. For example, the industrial PUREX process utilizes hydroxylamine as a plutonium reductant. Hydroxylamine has numerous advantages: not only does it have the proper attributes to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III), but it is also a non-metallic chemical that is readily decomposed to innocuous products by heating. However, it has been observed that the presence of high nitric acid concentrations or impurities (such as metal ions) in hydroxylamine solutions increase the likelihood of the initiation of an autocatalytic reaction. Recently there has been some interest in the application of simple hydrophilic hydroxamic ligands such as acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) for the stripping of tetravalent actinides in the UREX process flowsheet. This approach is based on the high coordinating ability of hydroxamic acids with tetravalent actinides (Np and Pu) compared with hexavalent uranium. Thus, the use of AHA offers a route for controlling neptunium and plutonium in the UREX process by complexant based stripping of Np(IV) and Pu(IV) from the TBP solvent phase, while U(VI) ions are not affected by AHA and remain solvated in the TBP phase. In the European GANEX process, AHA is also used to form hydrophilic complexes with actinides and strip them from the organic phase into nitric acid. However, AHA does not decompose completely when treated with nitric acid and hampers nitric acid recycling. In lieu of using AHA in the UREX + process, formohydroxamic acid (FHA), although not commercially available, hold

  5. Development of an innovative PWR for low cost fuel recycle and waste reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanagawa, Takashi; Onoue, Masaaki

    2001-01-01

    In order to bear long-term and stable energy supply, it is important for nuclear power generation to realize establishment of energy security controlling dependence on natural resources and reduction of long-life radioactive wastes such as minor actinide elements (MA) and so on. For this, establishment of fast breeder reproducible on its fuel and of fuel recycling is essential and construction of the fuel recycling capable of repeatedly recycling of plutonium (Pu) and MA with low cost is required. Here were proposed a fuel recycling system combining recycling type PWR with advanced recycling system under development for Na cooling fast breeder reactor as a candidate filling such conditions, to show its characteristics and effects after its introduction. By this system, some facilities to realize flexible and low cost fuel recycling, to reduce longer-life radioactive wastes due to recycling burning of Pu and MA, and to realize an electric power supplying system independent on natural resources due to fuel breeding feature, were shown. (G.K.)

  6. Design study on advanced nuclear fuel recycling system by pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Yoshimitsu; Kakehi, Isao; Moro, Satoshi; Tobe, Kenji; Kawamura, Fumio; Higashi, Tatsuhiro; Yonezawa, Shigeaki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Yoshiuji, Takahiro

    1998-12-01

    The Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute is conducting research and development on the nuclear fuel recycling system, which will improve the economy, safety, and environmental impact of the nuclear fuel recycling system in the age of the FBR. The System Engineering Division in the O-arai Engineering Center has conducted a design study on an advanced nuclear fuel recycling system for FBRs by using pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology. The system is an economical and compact module-type system, and can be used for reprocessing oxide fuel and also new types of fuel (metal fuel and nitride fuel). This report describes the concept of this system and results of the design study. (author)

  7. Design study on advanced nuclear fuel recycling system by pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Yoshimitsu; Kakehi, Isao; Moro, Satoshi; Tobe, Kenji; Kawamura, Fumio; Higashi, Tatsuhiro; Yonezawa, Shigeaki; Yoshiuji, Takahiro

    1998-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute is conducting research and development on the nuclear fuel recycling system, which will improve the economy, safety, and environmental impact of the nuclear fuel recycling system in the age of the FBR. The System Engineering Division in the O-arai Engineering Center has conducted a design study on an advanced nuclear fuel recycling system for FBRs by using pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology. The system is an economical and compact module-type system, and can be used for reprocessing oxide fuel and also new types of fuel (metal fuel and nitride fuel). This report describes the concept of this system and results of the design study. (author)

  8. Evaluation of fuel cycle scenarios on MOX fuel recycling in PWRs and SFRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlier, B.; Caron-Charles, M.; Van Den Durpel, L. [AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, Paris La Defense (France); Senentz, G. [AREVA, 33 rue La Lafayette, 75009 Paris (France); Serpantie, J.P. [AREVA, 10 rue Juliette Recamier, Lyon (France)

    2013-07-01

    Prospects on advanced fuel cycle scenario are considered for achieving a progressive integration of Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) technology within the current French Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear fleet, in a view to benefit from fissile material multi-recycling capability. A step by step process is envisioned, and emphasis is put on its potential implementation through the nuclear mass inventory calculations with the COSAC code. The overall time scale is not optimized. The first step, already implemented in several countries, the plutonium coming from the reprocessing of used Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels is recycled into a small number of LWRs. The second step is the progressive introduction of the first SFRs, in parallel with the continuation of step 1. This second step lets to prepare the optimized multi recycling of MOX fuel which is considered in step 3. Step 3 is characterized by the introduction of a greater number of SFR and MOX management between EPR reactors and SFRs. In the final step 4, all the fleet is formed with SFRs. This study assesses the viability of each step of the overall scenario. The switch from one step to the other one could result from different constrains related to issues such as resources, waste, experience feedback, public acceptance, country policy, etc.

  9. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuban, D.P.; Noakes, M.W.; Bradley, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM) System consists of three major components: the ASM slave, the dual arm master controller or master, and the control system. The ASM is a remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program of (CFRP). This new manipulator addresses requirements of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing with emphasis on force reflection, remote maintainability, and reliability. It uses an all-gear force transmission system. The master arms were designed as a kinematic replica of ASM and use cable force transmission. Special digital control algorithms were developed to improve the system performance. The system is presently operational and undergoing evaluation. Preliminary testing has been completed and is reported. The system is now undergoing commercialization by transferring the technology to the private sector

  10. International collaborations about fuel studies for reactor recycling of military quality plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, H.; Chaudat, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    In November 1992, an agreement was signed between the French and Russian governments to use in Russia and for pacific purposes the plutonium recovered from the Russian nuclear weapons dismantling. This plutonium will be transformed into mixed oxide fuels (MOX) for nuclear power production. The French Direction of Military Applications (DAM) of the CEA is the operator of the French-Russian AIDA program. The CEA Direction of Fuel Cycle (DCC) and Direction of Nuclear Reactors (DRN) are involved in the transformation of metallic plutonium into sinterable oxide powder for MOX fuel manufacturing. The Russian TOMOX (Treatment of MOX powder Metallic Objects) and DEMOX (MOX Demonstration) plants will produce the MOX fuel assemblies for the 4 VVER 1000 reactors of Balakovo and the fast BN 600 reactor. The second part of the program will involve the German Siemens and GRS companies for the safety studies of the reactors and fuel cycle plants. The paper gives also a brief analysis of the US policy concerning the military plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  11. The European experience in safeguarding nuclear fuel recycle processes and Pu stores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synetos, Sotiris

    2013-01-01

    Civil nuclear programs in the European Union member states have from their onset included fuel recycling as an option. The EURATOM Treaty gives to the European Commission the obligation to apply safeguards controls to all civil Nuclear Material in the European Union, and to facilitate the implementation of IAEA safeguards. The European Commission (EURATOM) has thus gained years of experience in safeguarding reprocessing plants, Pu storages, and MOX fuel fabrication plants and is currently participating in the development of approaches and measures for safeguarding long term repositories. The aim of this paper is to present the regulator's views and experience on safeguarding nuclear fuel recycle processes and Pu stores, which is based on the following principles: -) Early involvement of the control organizations in the design of the safeguards measures to be developed for a plant (currently referred to as Safeguards by Design); -) Early definition of a safeguards strategy including key measurement points; -) The design and development of plant specific Safeguards equipment, including an on site laboratory for sample analysis; -) The development by the operator of an appropriate Nuclear Material accountancy system to facilitate their declaration obligations; -) The introduction of an inspection regime allowing comprehensive controls under the restrictions imposed by financial and Human Resources limitations; -) Optimization of the inspection effort by using unattended measuring stations, containment and surveillance systems and secure remote transmission of data to the regulator's headquarters. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  12. An evaluation of the deployment of AIROX-recycled fuel in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahshan, S.N.; McGeehan, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical evaluation is made of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) in-core performance of recycled light water reactor fuel that has been Atomics International reduction oxidation (AIROX) reprocessed and reenriched with fissile materials. The neutronics performance is shown to lie within the neutronics performance of existing high-performance and high-burnup fuels. Three AIROX-recycled fuels are compared with a high-burnup virgin fuel and an equivalent mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. The AIROX-recycled fuel neutronics performance lies consistently between the virgin and the MOX fuel for both the pin power peaking and the reactivity response characteristics in PWRs. Among the attractive features of AIROX-recycled fuel is that it can optimize fissile and fertile fuel use, minimize final fuel disposal impact on the environment, and provide energy in the process of denaturing weapons-grade fissile materials. The fuel material performance may be anticipated from high-burnup virgin fuel and from MOX fuel performance. Recommendations for lead rod testing and for optimization of the AIROX-processing and resintering techniques are made

  13. Proposed pyrometallurgical process for rapid recycle of discharged fuel materials from the integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Steindler, M.; Miller, W.

    1984-01-01

    The pool-type Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site recycle of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process and fabrication steps will be demonstrated in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility with IFR fuel irradiated in EBR-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. The proposed process consists of two major steps: a halide slagging step and an electrorefining step. The fuel is maintained in the metallic form to yield directly a metal product sufficiently decontaminated to allow recycle to the reactor as new fuel. The process is further described and available information to support its feasibility is presented

  14. A proposed pyrometallurgical process for rapid recycle of discharged fuel materials from the Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Steindler, M.; Miller, W.

    1984-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site recycle of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process and fabrication steps will be demonstrated in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility with IFR fuel irradiated in EBR-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. The proposed process consists of two major steps -- a halide slagging step and an electrorefining step. The fuel is maintained in the metallic form to yield directly a metal product sufficiently decontaminated to allow recycle to the reactor as new fuel. The process is further described and available information to support its feasibility is presented

  15. Japanese Fast Reactor Program for Homogeneous Actinide Recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Nagata, Takashi; Kondo, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    In the present report, the homogeneous actinide recycling scenario of Fast Reactor (FR) Cycle Technology Development Project (FaCT) is summarized. First, the scenario of nuclear energy policy in Japan are briefly reviewed. Second, the basic plan of Japan to manage all minor actinide (MA) by recycling is summarized objectives of which are the efficiency increase of uranium resources, the environmental burden reduction, and the increase of nuclear non-proliferation potential. Third, recent results of reactor physics study related to MA-loaded FR cores are briefly described. Fourth, typical nuclear design of MA-loaded FR cores in the FaCT project and their main features are demonstrated with the feasibility to recycle all MA in the future FR equilibrium society. Finally, the research and development program to realize the MA recycling in Japan is introduced, including international cooperation projects. (authors)

  16. Lessons learned from the blue box recycling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St Jacques, H. [Informa Market Research Co. Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2000-06-01

    The success of the Ontario Blue Box recycling program was described. The program, which was initiated by municipalities, is seen as a strong act for the environment which helps connect public behaviour with values. Canada produces the most waste per capita and is the second largest producer of greenhouse gases per capita. The program began in Kitchener, Ontario in 1981 in response to local pressure to take action to reduce waste. By 1998, 3,850,000 of 4,238,000 households in Ontario had access to the program with a participation rate of 90 per cent. In that year alone, 1,841,000 tonnes of household materials were recycled and diverted from the waste stream. The core materials that were initially collected at household curb sides were newsprint, glass containers, steel and aluminium cans. Apartment recycling was introduced as the program evolved but it is still a challenge to achieve recycling efficiencies in multi-unit residential buildings. The success of the program has been attributed to the fact that it was introduced at the right time and tapped into the strong desire to reduce the visible impact of consumerism. It provided a way to do an environmentally good thing with a minimum of inconvenience. Initially, the system was overwhelmed with an excess of recycled material and the closed loop system of the early days was full of gaps. Materials were stockpiled and waiting market development which would finally result in remanufacturing the recycled goods into new products. This part developed more slowly since market values priced virgin materials at lower costs. It was cautioned that this economic reality still applies and will not be corrected until full cost accounting is introduced. 4 tabs.

  17. Preliminary study on direct recycling of spent PWR fuel in PWR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waris, Abdul; Nuha; Novitriana; Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary study on direct recycling of PWR spent fuel to support SUPEL (Straight Utilization of sPEnt LWR fuel in LWR system) scenario has been conducted. Several spent PWR fuel compositions in loaded PWR fuel has been evaluated to obtain the criticality of reactor. The reactor can achieve it criticality for U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel is at least 4.0 a% with the minimum fraction of the spent fuel in the core is 15.0 %. The neutron spectra become harder with the escalating of U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel as well as the amount of the spent fuel in the core.

  18. Sustainable hydrocarbon fuels by recycling CO2 and H2O with renewable or nuclear energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Christopher R.; Ebbesen, Sune; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2011-01-01

    ) and biofuels have received the most attention, similar hydrocarbons can be produced without using fossil fuels or biomass. Using renewable and/or nuclear energy, carbon dioxide and water can be recycled into liquid hydrocarbon fuels in non-biological processes which remove oxygen from CO2 and H2O (the reverse...... of fuel combustion). Capture of CO2 from the atmosphere would enable a closed-loop carbon-neutral fuel cycle. This article critically reviews the many possible technological pathways for recycling CO2 into fuels using renewable or nuclear energy, considering three stages—CO2 capture, H2O and CO2...... by Fischer–Tropsch synthesis is identified as one of the most promising, feasible routes. An analysis of the energy balance and economics of this CO2 recycling process is presented. We estimate that the full system can feasibly operate at 70% electricity-to-liquid fuel efficiency (higher heating value basis...

  19. Thermophysical properties of the products of low-grade fuels thermal recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabakaev Roman B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the work is caused by reorientation of the modern power engineering to use of local low grade fuel resources. Some types of low grade fuels (peat, brown coal, sapropel, wood chips are considered in this work. Thermotechnical characteristics of the investigated fuels and products of their thermal recycling are determined. Thermal recycling process is accompanied by release of fuel dissociation heat (0.33-3.69 MJ/kg. The results of thermal low grade fuel recycling are solid carbonaceous product (semi-coke with a calorific value higher in 1.5-7 times than the value of natural fuels; pyrolysis resin with calorific value 29.4-36.8 MJ/kg; combustible gas with calorific value 15.16-19.06 MJ/m3.

  20. Multi-recycling of transuranic elements in a PWR assembly with reduced fuel rod diameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, Alex, E-mail: acchamb@gmail.com; Ragusa, Jean C., E-mail: jean.ragusa@tamu.edu

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Study of multiple recycling passes of transuranic elements: (a) without exceeding 5 wt.% on U-235 enrichment; (b) using PWR fuel assemblies compatible with current reactor core internals. • Isotopic concentrations tend towards an equilibrium after 15 recycle passes, suggesting that thermal recycling may be continued beyond that point. • Radiotoxicity comparisons for once-through UOX, once-recycle MOX-Pu, and multiple recycle passes of MOX-PuNpAm and MOX-PuNpAmCm are presented. - Abstract: This paper examines the multi-recycling of transuranic (TRU) elements (Pu-Np-Am-Cm) in standard Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies. The original feed of TRU comes from legacy spent UOX fuel. For all subsequent recycling passes, TRU elements from the previous generation are employed, supplemented by TRU from legacy UOX fuel, as needed. The design criteria include: {sup 235}U enrichment requirements to remain below 5 w/o, TRU loading limits to avoid return to criticality under voided conditions, and assembly power peaking factors. In order to carry out multiple recycling passes within the design envelope, additional neutron moderation is required and achieved by reducing the fuel pellet diameter by about 13%, thus keeping the assembly design compatible with current PWR core internals. TRU transmutation rates and long-term ingestion radiotoxicity results are presented for 15 recycling passes and compared to standard UOX and MOX once-through cycles. The results also show that TRU fuel isotopics and radiotoxicity tend towards an equilibrium, enabling further additional recycling passes.

  1. Multi-recycling of transuranic elements in a PWR assembly with reduced fuel rod diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, Alex; Ragusa, Jean C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Study of multiple recycling passes of transuranic elements: (a) without exceeding 5 wt.% on U-235 enrichment; (b) using PWR fuel assemblies compatible with current reactor core internals. • Isotopic concentrations tend towards an equilibrium after 15 recycle passes, suggesting that thermal recycling may be continued beyond that point. • Radiotoxicity comparisons for once-through UOX, once-recycle MOX-Pu, and multiple recycle passes of MOX-PuNpAm and MOX-PuNpAmCm are presented. - Abstract: This paper examines the multi-recycling of transuranic (TRU) elements (Pu-Np-Am-Cm) in standard Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies. The original feed of TRU comes from legacy spent UOX fuel. For all subsequent recycling passes, TRU elements from the previous generation are employed, supplemented by TRU from legacy UOX fuel, as needed. The design criteria include: 235 U enrichment requirements to remain below 5 w/o, TRU loading limits to avoid return to criticality under voided conditions, and assembly power peaking factors. In order to carry out multiple recycling passes within the design envelope, additional neutron moderation is required and achieved by reducing the fuel pellet diameter by about 13%, thus keeping the assembly design compatible with current PWR core internals. TRU transmutation rates and long-term ingestion radiotoxicity results are presented for 15 recycling passes and compared to standard UOX and MOX once-through cycles. The results also show that TRU fuel isotopics and radiotoxicity tend towards an equilibrium, enabling further additional recycling passes

  2. Melting of fuel element racks and their recycling as granulate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, U.; Kluth, T.; Kreh, R.

    1998-01-01

    In order to increase the storage capacity for spent fuel elements in the Spanish NPPs of Almaraz and Asco, the existing racks were replaced by compact one in 1991/1993. The 28 racks from Almaraz NPP were cut on site, packed in 200-I-drums and taken to intermediate storage. For the remaining 28 racks of Asco NPP, ENRESA preferred the melting alternative. To demonstrate the recycling path melting in Germany, a test campaign with six racks was performed in 1997. As a result of this test melt, the limits for Carla melting plant were modified to 200 Bq/g total, α, β, γ 100 Bq/g nuclear fuels, max. 3g/100 kg 2,000 Bq/g total Fe55, H 3 , C-14 and Ni63. After the test melt campaign, the German authorities licensed the import and treatment of the remaining 22 racks on the condition that the waste resulting from the melting process as well as the granules produced were taken back to Spain. The shipment from Asco via France to Germany has been carried out in F 20-ft-IPII containers in accordance with ADR. Size reduction to chargeable dimensions was carried out by a plasma burner and hydraulic shears. For melting, a 3.2 Mg medium frequency induction furnace, operated in a separate housing, was used. For granules production outside this housing, the liquid iron was cast into a 5Mg ladle and then, through a water jet, into the granulating basin. The total mass of 287,659 Kg of 28 fuel elements racks and components of the storage basin yielded 297,914 kg of iron granulate. Secondary waste from melting amounted to 9,920 kg, corresponding to 3.45% of the input mass. The granulating process produced 6,589 kg, corresponding to 2.28% of the total mass to be melted. Radiological analysis of samples taken from the melt and different waste components confirmed the main nuclides Co60, Cs134 and Cs137. Fe55 was highly overestimated by the preliminary analysis. (Author) 2 refs

  3. Study of the radiotoxicity of actinides recycling in boiling water reactors fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, J.L.; Guzman, J.R.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the production and destruction, as well as the radiotoxicity of plutonium and minor actinides (MA) obtained from the multi-recycling of boiling water reactors (BWR) fuel are analyzed. A BWR MOX fuel assembly, with uranium (from enrichment tails), plutonium and minor actinides is designed and studied using the HELIOS code. The actinides mass and the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel are compared with those of the once-through or direct cycle. Other type of fuel assembly is also analyzed: an assembly with enriched uranium and minor actinides; without plutonium. For this study, the fuel remains in the reactor for four cycles, where each cycle is 18 months length, with a discharge burnup of 48 MWd/kg. After this time, the fuel is placed in the spent fuel pool to be cooled during 5 years. Afterwards, the fuel is recycled for the next fuel cycle; 2 years are considered for recycle and fuel fabrication. Two recycles are taken into account in this study. Regarding radiotoxicity, results show that in the period from the spent fuel discharge until 1000 years, the highest reduction in the radiotoxicity related to the direct cycle is obtained with a fuel composed of MA and enriched uranium. However, in the period after few thousands of years, the lowest radiotoxicity is obtained using the fuel with plutonium and MA. The reduction in the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel after one or two recycling in a BWR is however very small for the studied MOX assemblies, reaching a maximum reduction factor of 2.

  4. Plutonium fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    A review is presented of the development of the (UPu)C sphere-pac fuel project during 1978. In particular, the problems encountered in obtaining good fuel quality in the fabrication process and their solution is discussed. The development of a fabrication pilot plant is considered, and the post-irradiation examination of fuel pins is presented. (Auth.)

  5. Recycle and reuse of materials and components from waste streams of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    All nuclear fuel cycle processes utilize a wide range of equipment and materials to produce the final products they are designed for. However, as at any other industrial facility, during operation of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, apart from the main products some byproducts, spent materials and waste are generated. A lot of these materials, byproducts or some components of waste have a potential value and may be recycled within the original process or reused outside either directly or after appropriate treatment. The issue of recycle and reuse of valuable material is important for all industries including the nuclear fuel cycle. The level of different materials involvement and opportunities for their recycle and reuse in nuclear industry are different at different stages of nuclear fuel cycle activity, generally increasing from the front end to the back end processes and decommissioning. Minimization of waste arisings and the practice of recycle and reuse can improve process economics and can minimize the potential environmental impact. Recognizing the importance of this subject, the International Atomic Energy Agency initiated the preparation of this report aiming to review and summarize the information on the existing recycling and reuse practice for both radioactive and non-radioactive components of waste streams at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This report analyses the existing options, approaches and developments in recycle and reuse in nuclear industry

  6. Evaluation of nuclear fuel reprocessing strategies. 2. LWR fuel storage, recycle economics and plutonium logistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, B.E.; Hadley, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part report intended as a critical review of certain issues involved with closing the Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel cycle and establishing the basis for future transition to commercial breeder applications. The report is divided into four main sections consisting of (1) a review of the status of the LWR spent fuel management and storage problem; (2) an analysis of the economic incentives for instituting reprocessing and recycle in LWRs; (3) an analysis of the time-dependent aspects of plutonium economic value particularly as related to the LWR-breeder transition; and (4) an analysis of the time-dependent aspects of plutonium requirements and supply relative to this transition

  7. Role of the consolidated fuel reprocessing program in the United States Breeder Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, W.W.; Burch, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    While present US policy precludes the commercial reprocessing of LWR fuels and the recycle of plutonium, the policy does encompass the need to continue a program to develop the technology for reprocessing breeder fuels. Some questions have again risen this year as to the pace of the entire breeder program, including recycle, and the answers are evolving. This paper and the other companion papers which describe several aspects of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program take a longer-range perspective on the total program. Whether the program is implemented in the general time frame described is dependent on future government actions dedicated to carrying out a systematic program that would permit breeders to be commercialized early in the next century

  8. Calculation Of Recycle And Open Cycle Nuclear Fuel Cost Using Lagistase Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djoko Birmano, Moch

    2002-01-01

    . To be presented the calculation of recycle and open cycle nuclear fuel cost for LWR type that have net power of 600 MWe. This calculation using LEGECOST method developed by IAEA which have characteristics,where i.e. money is stated in constant money (no inflation),discount rate is equalized with interest rate and not consider tax and depreciation.As a conclusion is that open cycle nuclear fuel cost more advantage because it is cheaper than recycle nuclear fuel cost. This is caused that at present, reprocessing process disadvantage because it has not found yet more efficient and cheaper method, besides price of fresh uranium is still cheap. In future, the cost of recycle nuclear fuel cycle will be more competitive toward the cost of open nuclear fuel cycle if is found technology of reprocessing process that more advance, efficient and cheap. Increase of Pu use for reactor fuel especially MOX type will rise Pu price that finally will decrease the cost of recycle nuclear fuel cycle

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant with an anode recycle loop turbocharger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kazuo; Skiba, Tommy; Patel, Kirtikumar H.

    2015-07-14

    An anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) has a turbocharger turbine (102) secured in fluid communication with a compressed oxidant stream within an oxidant inlet line (218) downstream from a compressed oxidant supply (104), and the anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) also includes a turbocharger compressor (106) mechanically linked to the turbocharger turbine (102) and secured in fluid communication with a flow of anode exhaust passing through an anode exhaust recycle loop (238) of the solid oxide fuel cell power plant (200). All or a portion of compressed oxidant within an oxidant inlet line (218) drives the turbocharger turbine (102) to thereby compress the anode exhaust stream in the recycle loop (238). A high-temperature, automotive-type turbocharger (100) replaces a recycle loop blower-compressor (52).

  10. A methodology for calculating the levelized cost of electricity in nuclear power systems with fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Roo, Guillaume; Parsons, John E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we show how the traditional definition of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) can be extended to alternative nuclear fuel cycles in which elements of the fuel are recycled. In particular, we define the LCOE for a cycle with full actinide recycling in fast reactors in which elements of the fuel are reused an indefinite number of times. To our knowledge, ours is the first LCOE formula for this cycle. Others have approached the task of evaluating this cycle using an 'equilibrium cost' concept that is different from a levelized cost. We also show how the LCOE implies a unique price for the recycled elements. This price reflects the ultimate cost of waste disposal postponed through the recycling, as well as other costs in the cycle. We demonstrate the methodology by estimating the LCOE for three classic nuclear fuel cycles: (i) the traditional Once-Through Cycle, (ii) a Twice-Through Cycle, and (iii) a Fast Reactor Recycle. Given our chosen input parameters, we show that the 'equilibrium cost' is typically larger than the levelized cost, and we explain why.

  11. A comparative study on recycling spent fuels in gas-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok; Baxter, Alan

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates advanced Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) fuel cycle scenarios which are based on recycling spent nuclear fuel for the sustainability of nuclear energy. A 600 MWth GFR was used for the fuel cycle analysis, and the equilibrium core was searched with different fuel-to-matrix volume ratios such as 70/30 and 60/40. Two fuel cycle scenarios, i.e., a one-tier case combining a Light Water Reactor (LWR) and a GFR, and a two-tier case using an LWR, a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), and a GFR, were evaluated for mass flow and fuel cycle cost, and the results were compared to those of LWR once-through fuel cycle. The mass flow calculations showed that the natural uranium consumption can be reduced by more than 57% and 27% for the one-tier and two-tier cycles, respectively, when compared to the once-through fuel cycle. The transuranics (TRU) which pose a long-term problem in a high-level waste repository, can be significantly reduced in the multiple recycle operation of these options, resulting in more than 110 and 220 times reduction of TRU inventory to be geologically disposed for the one-tier and two-tier fuel cycles, respectively. The fuel cycle costs were estimated to be 9.4 and 8.6 USD/MWh for the one-tier fuel cycle when the GFR fuel-to-matrix volume ratio was 70/30 and 60/40, respectively. However the fuel cycle cost is reduced to 7.3 and 7.1 USD/MWh for the two-tier fuel cycle, which is even smaller than that of the once-through fuel cycle. In conclusion the GFR can provide alternative fuel cycle options to the once-through and other fast reactor fuel cycle options, by increasing the natural uranium utilization and reducing the fuel cycle cost.

  12. Recycling and transmutation of spent fuel as a sustainable option for the nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, Jose R.; Moreira, Joao M.L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the option of recycling and transmutation of radioactive waste against Once-through Fuel Cycle (OTC) based on uranium feed under the perspective of sustainability. We use a qualitative analysis to compare OTC with closed fuel cycles based on studies already performed such as the Red Impact Project and the comparative study on accelerator driven systems and fast reactors for advanced fuel cycles performed by the Nuclear Energy Agency. The results show that recycling and transmutation fuel cycles are more attractive than the OTC from the point of view of sustainability. The main conclusion is that the decision about the construction of a deep geological repository for spent fuel disposal must be reevaluated. (author)

  13. Improved analysis on multiple recycling of fuel in prototype fast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-03

    Aug 3, 2011 ... ENDF/B-VII.0, and with the most recent specification of the fuel composition ... Fast breeder reactors; closed fuel cycle; fuel production and depletion; reprocessing .... set including self-shielding factors (SSF, i.e. self-shielded to ...

  14. Plutonium fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The work of the Project-Fuel Development reached the apex of its current programme during the course of the year. Notable success was recorded in the area of irradiation testing with the completion of the examination of the MFBS-7 irradiation. The irradiation group also prepared the seventh Filos experiment and this, as well as the DIDO-III test, began irradiation at the end of the year. Consideration was given and plans prepared for a revised pin filling line for bundle tests. Work also began on the conceptual design study for a pilot production line having a nominal capacity of 500 kg fuel per year. (Auth.)

  15. Addressing fuel recycling in solid oxide fuel cell systems fed by alternative fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    An innovative study on anode recirculation in solid oxide fuel cell systems with alternative fuels is carried out and investigated. Alternative fuels under study are ammonia, pure hydrogen, methanol, ethanol, DME and biogas from biomass gasification. It is shown that the amount of anode off......%. Furthermore, it is founded that for the case with methanol, ethanol and DME then at high utilization factors, low anode recirculation is recommended while at low utilization factors, high anode recirculation is recommended. If the plant is fed by biogas from biomass gasification then for each utilization...

  16. Alternative Fabrication of Recycling Fast Reactor Metal Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Jong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2015-01-01

    Metal fuels such as U-Zr/U-Pu-Zr alloys have been considered as a nuclear fuel for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) related to the closed fuel cycle for managing minor actinides and reducing a high radioactivity levels since the 1980s. In order to develop innovative fabrication method of metal fuel for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am, modified casting under inert atmosphere has been applied for metal fuel slugs for SFR. Alternative fabrication method of fuel slugs has been introduced to develop an improved fabrication process of metal fuel for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements. In this study, metal fuel slugs for SFR have been fabricated by modified casting method, and characterized to evaluate the feasibility of the alternative fabrication method. In order to prevent evaporation of volatile elements such as Am and improve quality of fuel slugs, alternative fabrication methods of metal fuel slugs have been studied in KAERI. U-10Zr-5Mn fuel slug containing volatile surrogate element Mn was soundly cast by modified injection casting under modest pressure. Evaporation of Mn during alternative casting could not be detected by chemical analysis. Mn element was most recovered with prevention of evaporation by alternative casting. Modified injection casting has been selected as an alternative fabrication method in KAERI, considering evaporation prevention, and proven benefits of high productivity, high yield, and good remote control

  17. To Recycle or Not to Recycle? An Intergenerational Approach to Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taebi, B.; Kloosterman, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    AbstractThis paper approaches the choice between the open and closed nuclear fuel cycles as a matter of intergenerational justice, by revealing the value conflicts in the production of nuclear energy. The closed fuel cycle improve sustainability in terms of the supply certainty of uranium and

  18. Alcohol fuels program technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-07-01

    The last issue of the Alcohol Fuels Process R/D Newsletter contained a work breakdown structure (WBS) of the SERI Alcohol Fuels Program that stressed the subcontracted portion of the program and discussed the SERI biotechnology in-house program. This issue shows the WBS for the in-house programs and contains highlights for the remaining in-house tasks, that is, methanol production research, alcohol utilization research, and membrane research. The methanol production research activity consists of two elements: development of a pressurized oxygen gasifier and synthesis of catalytic materials to more efficiently convert synthesis gas to methanol and higher alcohols. A report is included (Finegold et al. 1981) that details the experimental apparatus and recent results obtained from the gasifier. The catalysis research is principally directed toward producing novel organometallic compounds for use as a homogeneous catalyst. The utilization research is directed toward the development of novel engine systems that use pure alcohol for fuel. Reforming methanol and ethanol catalytically to produce H/sub 2/ and CO gas for use as a fuel offers performance and efficiency advantages over burning alcohol directly as fuel in an engine. An application of this approach is also detailed at the end of this section. Another area of utilization is the use of fuel cells in transportation. In-house researchers investigating alternate electrolyte systems are exploring the direct and indirect use of alcohols in fuel cells. A workshop is being organized to explore potential applications of fuel cells in the transportation sector. The membrane research group is equipping to evaluate alcohol/water separation membranes and is also establishing cost estimation and energy utilization figures for use in alcohol plant design.

  19. The DUPIC fuel development program in KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, M S; Park, H S [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    This study describes the DUPIC fuel development program in KAERI as follows; Burning spent PWR fuel again in CANDU by DUPIC, Compatibility with existing CANDU system, Feasibility of DUPIC fuel fabrication, Waste reduction, Safeguard ability, Economics of DUPIC fuel cycle, The DUPIC fuel development program, and International prospective. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Design and optimization of a combined fuel reforming and solid oxide fuel cell system with anode off-gas recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Seok; Chung, J.N.; Chen, Yen-Cho

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this work, an analytical, parametric study is performed to evaluate the feasibility and performance of a combined fuel reforming and SOFC system. → Specifically the effects of adding the anode off-gas recycling and recirculation components and the CO 2 absorbent unit are investigated. → The AOG recycle ratio increases with increasing S/C ratio and the addition of AOG recycle eliminates the need for external water consumption. → The key finding is that for the SOFC operating at 900 deg. C with the steam to carbon ratio at 5 and no AOG recirculation, the system efficiency peaks. - Abstract: An energy conversion and management concept for a combined system of a solid oxide fuel cell coupled with a fuel reforming device is developed and analyzed by a thermodynamic and electrochemical model. The model is verified by an experiment and then used to evaluate the overall system performance and to further suggest an optimal design strategy. The unique feature of the system is the inclusion of the anode off-gas recycle that eliminates the need of external water consumption for practical applications. The system performance is evaluated as a function of the steam to carbon ratio, fuel cell temperature, anode off gas recycle ratio and CO 2 adsorption percentage. For most of the operating conditions investigated, the system efficiency starts at around 70% and then monotonically decreases to the average of 50% at the peak power density before dropping down to zero at the limiting current density point. From an engineering application point of view, the proposed combined fuel reforming and SOFC system with a range of efficiency between 50% and 70% is considered very attractive. It is suggested that the optimal system is the one where the SOFC operates around 900 deg. C with S/C ratio higher than 3, maximum CO 2 capture, and minimum AOG recirculation.

  1. Recycled iron fuels new production in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafter, Patrick A; Sigman, Daniel M; Mackey, Katherine R M

    2017-10-24

    Nitrate persists in eastern equatorial Pacific surface waters because phytoplankton growth fueled by nitrate (new production) is limited by iron. Nitrate isotope measurements provide a new constraint on the controls of surface nitrate concentration in this region and allow us to quantify the degree and temporal variability of nitrate consumption. Here we show that nitrate consumption in these waters cannot be fueled solely by the external supply of iron to these waters, which occurs by upwelling and dust deposition. Rather, a substantial fraction of nitrate consumption must be supported by the recycling of iron within surface waters. Given plausible iron recycling rates, seasonal variability in nitrate concentration on and off the equator can be explained by upwelling rate, with slower upwelling allowing for more cycles of iron regeneration and uptake. The efficiency of iron recycling in the equatorial Pacific implies the evolution of ecosystem-level mechanisms for retaining iron in surface ocean settings where it limits productivity.

  2. Design requirements and performance requirements for reactor fuel recycle manipulator systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, J.G.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a new generation of remote handling devices for remote production work in support of reactor fuel recycle systems is discussed. These devices require greater mobility, speed and visual capability than remote handling systems used in research activities. An upgraded manipulator system proposed for a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuel refabrication facility is described. Design and performance criteria for the manipulators, cranes, and TV cameras in the proposed system are enumerated

  3. Proposal of a torus pumping and fuel recycling system for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perinic, D.; Mack, A.; Perinic, G.; Murdoch, D.

    1995-01-01

    A universal torus pumping and fuel recycling system is proposed for all operation modes of ITER. It comprises primary cryopumps and secondary fuel separating cryopumps located inside the cryostat and a common mechanical forepump station located outside the cryostat. In this paper two different primary cryopump options are compared. The results of Monte Carlo calculations of pumping probabilities for helium show a significant difference leading to a distinct preference for the concept of a co-pumping cryopump. (orig.)

  4. Nuclear Fuel Recovery and Recycling Center. License application, PSAR, volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A summary of the location and major design features of the proposed Nuclear Fuel Recovery and Recycling Center is presented. The safety aspects of the proposed facilities and operations are summarized, taking into account possible normal and abnormal operating and environmental conditions. A chapter on site characteristics is included

  5. Nuclear Fuel Recovery and Recycling Center. License application, PSAR, volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Volume 3 comprises Chapter 5 which provides descriptive information on Nuclear Fuel Recovery and Recycling Center buildings and other facilities, including their locations. The design features discussed include those used to withstand environmental and accidental forces and to insure radiological protection

  6. Fourth annual report of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinger, E.L.J.; Dixon, R.S.

    1982-12-01

    This report, the fourth of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes activities over the past year in the following areas: public interaction, used fuel storage and transportation, immobilization of used fuel and fuel recycle waste, geoscience research associated with deep underground disposal, environmental research, environmental and safety assessment

  7. Third annual report of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1981-12-01

    This report, the third of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel wastes. The report summarizes activities over the past year, in the areas of public interaction, irradiated fuel storage and transportation, immobilization of irradiated fuel and fuel recycle wastes, research and development associated with deep underground disposal, and environmental and safety assessment

  8. Impact of actinide recycle on nuclear fuel cycle health risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, G.E.

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this background paper is to summarize what is presently known about potential impacts on the impacts on the health risk of the nuclear fuel cycle form deployment of the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) 1 and Integral Fast Reactor (IF) 2 technology as an actinide burning system. In a companion paper the impact on waste repository risk is addressed in some detail. Therefore, this paper focuses on the remainder of the fuel cycle

  9. The reprocessing-recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinides separation - Application to wastes management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    After its use in the reactor, the spent fuel still contains lot of recoverable material for an energetic use (uranium, plutonium), but also fission products and minor actinides which represent the residues of nuclear reactions. The reprocessing-recycling of the spent fuel, as it is performed in France, implies the chemical separation of these materials. The development and the industrial implementation of this separation process represent a major contribution of the French science and technology. The reprocessing-recycling allows a good management of nuclear wastes and a significant saving of fissile materials. With the recent spectacular rise of uranium prices, this process will become indispensable with the development of the next generation of fast neutron reactors. This book takes stock of the present and future variants of the chemical process used for the reprocessing of spent fuels. It describes the researches in progress and presents the stakes and recent results obtained by the CEA. content: the separation of actinides, a key factor for a sustainable nuclear energy; the actinides, a discovery of the 20. century; the radionuclides in nuclear fuels; the aquo ions of actinides; some redox properties of actinides; some complexing properties of actinide cations; general considerations about treatment processes; some characteristics of nuclear fuels in relation with their reprocessing; technical goals and specific constraints of the PUREX process; front-end operations of the PUREX process; separation and purification operations of the PUREX process; elaboration of finite products in the framework of the PUREX process; management and treatment of liquid effluents; solid wastes of the PUREX process; towards a joint management of uranium and plutonium: the COEX TM process; technical options of treatment and recycling techniques; the fuels of generation IV reactors; front-end treatment processes of advanced fuels; hydrometallurgical processes for future fuel cycles

  10. The differential radiological impact of plutonium recycle in the light-water reactor fuel cycle: effluent discharges during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouville, A.; Guetat, P.; Jones, J.A.; Kelly, G.N.; Legrand, J.; White, I.F.

    1980-01-01

    The radiological impact of a light-water reactor fuel cycle utilizing enriched uranium fuel may be altered by the recycle of plutonium. Differences in impact may arise during various operations in the fuel cycle: those which arise from effluents discharged during normal operation of the various installations comprising the fuel cycle are evaluated in this study. The differential radiological impact on the population of the European Communities (EC) of effluents discharged during the recycling of 10 tonnes of fissile plutonium metal is evaluated. The contributions from each stage of the fuel cycle, i.e. fuel fabrication, reactor operation and fuel reprocessing and conversion, are identified. Separate consideration is given to airborne and liquid effluents and account is taken of a wide range of environmental conditions, representative of the EC, in estimating the radiological impact. The recycle of plutonium is estimated to result in a reduction in the radiological impact from effluents of about 30% of that when using enriched uranium fuel

  11. Fuel-pellet-fabrication experience using direct-denitration-recycle-PuO2-coprecipitated mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Schaus, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The fuel pellet fabrication experience described in this paper involved three different feed powders: coprecipitated PuO 2 -UO 2 which was flash calcined in a fluidized bed; co-direct denitrated PuO 2 -UO 2 ; and direct denitrated LWR recycle PuO 2 which was mechanically blended with natural UO 2 . The objectives of this paper are twofold; first, to demonstrate that acceptable quality fuel pellets were fabricated using feed powders manufactured by processes other than the conventional oxalate process; and second, to highlight some pellet fabrication difficulties experienced with the direct denitration LWR recycle PuO 2 feed material, which did not produce acceptable pellets. The direct denitration LWR recycle PuO 2 was available as a by-product and was not specifically produced for use in fuel pellet fabrication. Nevertheless, its characteristics and pellet fabrication behavior serve to re-emphasize the importance of continued process development involving both powder suppliers and fuel fabricators to close the fuel cycle in the future

  12. Potential for the use of hydrochloric acid in fission reactor fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Bell, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    The chemistry and the effects of the use of hydrochloric acid as the aqueous phase in fuel recycle are surveyed. Available data are sufficient to suggest that separations of actinides and fission products can be at least as good in an HCl-trialkyl amine system as in Purex. Advantages of the HCl system are simpler operations of the off-gas system, better separation of neptunium from uranium and plutonium, better control of oxidation states of the dissolved species, and simpler recycle of the acid. A possible advantage is the more complete dissolution of the fission products, leaving very little insoluble residue. Disadvantages include lack of development of methods for dissolution of oxide fuel in hydrochloric acid, the requirement for processing equipment constructed of titanium, possible complications in the waste-handling system, and the dissolution of much of the cladding in the case of stainless-steel clad fuel

  13. Radiological implications of plutonium recycle and the use of thorium fuels in power reactor operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, H. F.

    1976-01-15

    As economically attractive sources of natural uranium are gradually depleted attention will turn to recycling plutonium or to the use of thorium fuels. The radiological implications of these fuel cycles in terms of fuel handling and radioactive waste disposal are investigated in relation to a conventional /sup 235/U enriched oxide fuel. It is suggested that a comparative study of this nature may be an important aspect of the overall optimization of future fuel cycle strategies. It is shown that the use of thorium based fuels has distinct advantages in terms of neutron dose rates from irradiated fuels and long term proportional to decay heating commitment compared with conventional uranium/plutonium fuels. However, this introduces a ..gamma.. dose rate problem in the fabrication and handling of unirradiated /sup 233/U fuels. For both plutonium and thorium fuels these radiological problems increase during storage of the fuel prior to reactor irradiation. The novel health physics problems which arise in the handling and processing of thorium fuels are reviewed in an appendix.

  14. Analysis of transition to fuel cycle system with continuous recycling in fast and thermal reactors - 5060

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passereini, S.; Feng, B.; Fei, T.; Kim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A.; Brown, N.R.; Cuadra, A.

    2015-01-01

    A recent Evaluation and Screening study of nuclear fuel cycle options identified a few groups of options as most promising. One of these most promising Evaluation Groups (EGs) is characterized by the continuous recycling of uranium (U) and transuranics (TRU) with natural uranium feed in both fast and thermal critical reactors. This evaluation group, designated as EG30, is represented by an example fuel cycle option that employs a two-technology, two-stage fuel cycle system. The first stage involves the continuous recycling of co-extracted U/TRU in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) with metallic fuel and breeding ratio greater than 1. The second stage involves the use of the surplus TRU in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel in Pressurized Water Reactors that are MOX-capable (MOX-PWRs). This paper presents and discusses preliminary fuel cycle analysis results from the fuel cycle codes VISION and DYMOND for the transition to this fuel cycle option from the current once-through cycle in the United States (U.S.) that consists of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) that only use conventional UO 2 fuel. The analyses in this paper are applicable for a constant 100 GWe capacity, roughly the size of the U.S. nuclear fleet. Two main strategies for the transition to EG30 were analyzed: 1) deploying both SFRs and MOX-PWRs in parallel or 2) deploying them in series with the SFR fleet first. With an estimated retirement schedule for the existing LWRs, an assumed reactor lifetime of 60 years, and no growth, the nuclear system fully transitions to the new fuel cycle within 100 years for both strategies without SFR fuel shortages. Compared to the once-through cycle, transition to the SFR/MOX-PWR fleet with continuous recycle was shown to offer significant reductions in uranium consumption and waste disposal requirements. In addition, these initial calculations revealed a few notable modeling and strategy questions regarding how recycled resources are allocated, reactors that can switch between

  15. Plutonium and minor actinides recycle in equilibrium fuel cycles of pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waris, A.; Sekimoto, H. [Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A study on plutonium and minor actinides (MA) recycle in equilibrium fuel cycles of pressurized water reactors (PWR) has been performed. The calculation results showed that the enrichment and the required amount of natural uranium decrease significantly with increasing number of confined plutonium and MA when uranium is discharged from the reactor. However, when uranium is totally confined, the enrichment becomes extremely high. The recycle of plutonium and MA together with discharging uranium can reduce the radio-toxicity of discharged heavy metal (HM) waste to become less than that of loaded uranium. (author)

  16. Waste management analysis for the nuclear fuel cycle. II. Recycle preparation for wastewater streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.M.; Navratil, J.D.; Plock, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    Recycle preparation methods were evaluated for secondary aqueous waste streams likely to be produced during reactor fuel fabrication and reprocessing. Adsorption, reverse osmosis, and ozonization methods were evaluated on a laboratory scale for their application to the treatment of wastewater. Activated carbon, macroreticular resins, and polyurethanes were tested to determine their relative capabilities for removing detergents and corrosive anions from wastewater. Conceptual flow sheets were constructed for purifying wastewater by reverse osmosis. In addition, the application of ozonization techniques for water recycle preparation was examined briefly

  17. 75 FR 37733 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program AGENCY... direct final rule to amend the Renewable Fuel Standard program requirements on May 10, 2010. Because EPA... Fuel Standard program requirements, published on May 10, 2010. We stated in that direct final rule that...

  18. 1986 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1986-10-01

    Ninety nine brief papers are arranged under the following session headings: gas industry's 40 kw program, solid oxide fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell technology, molten carbonate fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell systems, power plants technology, fuel cell power plant designs, unconventional fuels, fuel cell application and economic assessments, and plans for commerical development. The papers are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  19. Transmutation Dynamics: Impacts of Multi-Recycling on Fuel Cycle Performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bays; S. Piet; M. Pope; G. Youinou; A. Dumontier; D. Hawn

    2009-09-01

    From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain continuous multi-recycle in either thermal or fast reactors. In Fiscal Year 2009, transmutaton work at INL provided important new insight, caveats, and tools on multi-recycle. Multi-recycle of MOX, even with all the transuranics, is possible provided continuous enrichment of the uranium phase to ~6.5% and also limitting the transuranic enrichment to slightly less than 8%. Multi-recycle of heterogeneous-IMF assemblies is possible with continuous enrichment of the UOX pins to ~4.95% and having =60 of the 264 fuel pins being inter-matrix. A new tool enables quick assessment of the impact of different cooling times on isotopic evolution. The effect of cooling time was found to be almost as controlling on higher mass actinide concentrations in fuel as the selection of thermal versus fast neutron spectra. A new dataset was built which provides on-the-fly estimates of gamma and neutron dose in MOX fuels as a function of the isotopic evolution. All studies this year focused on the impact of dynamic feedback due to choices made in option space. Both the equilibrium fuel cycle concentrations and the transient time to reach equilibrium for each isotope were evaluated over a range of reactor, reprocessing and cooling time combinations. New bounding cases and analysis methods for evaluating both reactor safety and radiation worker safety were established. This holistic collection of physics analyses and methods gives improved resolution of fuel cycle options, and impacts thereof, over that of previous ad-hoc and single-point analyses.

  20. Recycling of plutonium and uranium in water reactor fuel. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    The Technical Committee Meeting on Recycling of Plutonium and Uranium in Water Reactor Fuel was recommended by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT). Its aim was to obtain an overall picture of MOX fabrication capacity and technology, actual performance of this kind of fuel, and ways explored to dispose of the weapons grade plutonium. The subject of this meeting had been reviewed by the International Atomic Energy Agency every 5 to 6 years and for the first time the problem of weapons grade plutonium disposal was included. The papers presented provide a summary of experience on MOX fuel and ongoing research in this field in the participating countries. The meeting was hosted by British Nuclear Fuels plc, at Newby Bridge, United Kingdom, from 3 to 7 July 1995. Fifty-six participants from twelve countries or international organizations took part. Refs, figs, tabs

  1. Analysis of fuel options for the breakeven core configuration of the Advanced Recycling Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauff, N.E.; Klim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Fiorina, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Franceschini, F. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC., Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A trade-off study is performed to determine the impacts of various fuel forms on the core design and core physics characteristics of the sodium-cooled Toshiba- Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR). The fuel forms include oxide, nitride, and metallic forms of U and Th. The ARR core configuration is redesigned with driver and blanket regions in order to achieve breakeven fissile breeding performance with the various fuel types. State-of-the-art core physics tools are used for the analyses. In addition, a quasi-static reactivity balance approach is used for a preliminary comparison of the inherent safety performances of the various fuel options. Thorium-fueled cores exhibit lower breeding ratios and require larger blankets compared to the U-fueled cores, which is detrimental to core compactness and increases reprocessing and manufacturing requirements. The Th cores also exhibit higher reactivity swings through each cycle, which penalizes reactivity control and increases the number of control rods required. On the other hand, using Th leads to drastic reductions in void and coolant expansion coefficients of reactivity, with the potential for enhancing inherent core safety. Among the U-fueled ARR cores, metallic and nitride fuels result in higher breeding ratios due to their higher heavy metal densities. On the other hand, oxide fuels provide a softer spectrum, which increases the Doppler effect and reduces the positive sodium void worth. A lower fuel temperature is obtained with the metallic and nitride fuels due to their higher thermal conductivities and compatibility with sodium bonds. This is especially beneficial from an inherent safety point of view since it facilitates the reactor cool-down during loss of power removal transients. The advantages in terms of inherent safety of nitride and metallic fuels are maintained when using Th fuel. However, there is a lower relative increase in heavy metal density and in breeding ratio going from oxide to metallic

  2. Minimization of actinide waste by multi-recycling of thoriated fuels in the EPR reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttin A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The multi-recycling of innovative uranium/thorium oxide fuels for use in the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR has been investigated. If increasing quantities of 238U, the fertile isotope in standard UO2 fuel, are replaced by 232Th, then a greater yield of new fissile material (233U is produced during the cycle than would otherwise be the case. This leads to economies of natural uranium of around 45% if the uranium in the spent fuel is multi-recycled. In addition we show that minor actinide and plutonium waste inventories are reduced and hence waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are up to a factor of 20 lower after 103 years. Two innovative fuel types named S90 and S20, ThO2 mixed with 90% and 20% enriched UO2 respectively, are compared as an alternative to standard uranium oxide (UOX and uranium/plutonium mixed oxide (MOX fuels at the longest EPR fuel discharge burn-ups of 65 GWd/t. Fissile and waste inventories are examined, waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are extracted and safety feedback coefficients are calculated.

  3. Evaluation of Spent Fuel Recycling Scenario using Pyro-SFR related System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Kyo; Kim, Sang Ji; Kim, Young Jin

    2014-01-01

    It is needed to validate whether the recycling scenario connecting pyro-processing and sodium-cooled fast reactor(SFR) is promising or not. The latest technologies of pyro-processing are applied to SFR and the recycling scenario is evaluated through the SFR's performance analysis. The analyzed SFR is KALIMER-600 TRU burner which purpose is to transmute transuranics (TRU). National policy of CANDU SF management has not been decided yet. However, the stored quantity of this SF is large enough not to be neglected. So this study includes additionally the recycling scenario of CANDU SF. Adopting the mass ratio of TRU and RE recovered in pyro-processing is 4 to 1 on PWR SF recycling, the sodium void reactivity is higher than design basis of metal fuel. So the current pyro-processing technology is may not be acceptable. If pyro-processing technology of CANDU SF is assumed to be the same as PWR's case, CANDU recycling scenario is acceptable. Transmutation performance is worse than PWR's, while the sodium void reactivity is within design limit

  4. Canadian CANDU fuel development program and recent fuel operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, J.H.K.; Inch, W.W.R.; Cox, D.S.; Steed, R.G.; Kohn, E.; Macici, N.N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the performance of the CANDU fuel in the Canadian CANDU reactors in 1997 and 1998. The operating experience demonstrates that the CANDU fuel has performed very well. Over the 2-year period, the fuel-bundle defect rate for all bundles irradiated in the Canadian CANDU reactors has remained very low, at between 0.006% to 0.016%. On a fuel element basis, this represents an element defect rate of less than about 0.0005%. One of the reasons for the good fuel performance is the support provided by the Canadian fuel research and development programs. These programs address operational issues and provide evolutionary improvements to the fuel products. The programs consist of the Fuel Technology Program, funded by the CANDU Owners Group, and the Advanced Fuel and Fuel Cycles Technology Program, funded by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. These 2 programs, which have been in place for many years, complement each other by sharing expert resources and experimental facilities. This paper describes the programs in 1999/2000, to provide an overview of the scope of the programs and the issues that these programs address. (author)

  5. Available reprocessing and recycling services for research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozser, Sandor; Marshall, Frances M.; Adelfang, Pablo; Bradley, Edward [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Budu, Madalina Elena [SOSNY Research and Development Company, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chiguer, Mustapha [AREVA, Paris La Defense (France)

    2016-03-15

    International activities in the back end of the research reactor (RR) fuel cycle have so far been dominated by the programmes of acceptance of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) by the country where it was originally enriched. In the future inventories of LEU SNF will continue to be created and the back end solution of RR SNF remains a critical issue. The IAEA, based on the experience gained during the decade of international cooperation in supporting the objectives of the HEU take-back programmes, drew up a report presenting available reprocessing and recycling services for RR SNF. This paper gives an overview of the report, which will address all aspects of reprocessing and recycling services for RR SNF.

  6. Design of a PWR for long cycle and direct recycling of spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Nader M.A., E-mail: mnader73@yahoo.com

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Single-batch loading PWR with a new fuel assembly for 36 calendar months cycle was designed. • The new fuel assembly is constructed from a number of CANDU fuel bundles. • This design enables to recycle the spent fuel directly in CANDU reactors for high burnup. • Around 56 MWd/kgU burnup is achieved from fuel that has average enrichment of 4.8 w/o U-235 using this strategy. • Safety parameters such as the power distribution and CANDU coolant void reactivity were considered. - Abstract: In a previous work, a new design was proposed for the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assembly for direct use of the PWR spent fuel without processing. The proposed assembly has four zircaloy-4 tubes contains a number of 61-element CANDU fuel bundles (8 bundles per tube) stacked end to end. The space between the tubes contains 44 lower enriched UO{sub 2} fuel rods and 12 guide tubes. In this paper, this assembly is used to build a single batch loading 36-month PWR and the spent CANDU bundles are recycled in the on power refueling CANDU reactors. The Advanced PWR (APWR) is considered as a reference design. The average enrichment in the core is 4.76%w U-235. IFBA and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} as burnable poisons are used for controlling the excess reactivity and to flatten the power distribution. The calculations using MCNPX showed that the PWR will discharge the fuel with average burnup of 31.8 MWd/kgU after 1000 effective full power days. Assuming a 95 days plant outage, 36 calendar months can be achieved with a capacity factor of 91.3%. Good power distribution in the core is obtained during the cycle and the required critical boron concentration is less than 1750 ppm. Recycling of the discharged CANDU fuel bundles that represents 85% of the fuel in the assembly, in CANDU-6 or in 700 MWe Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR-700), an additional burnup of about 31 or 26 MWd/kgU burnup can be achieved, respectively. Averaging the fuel burnup on the all fuel in the PWR

  7. PWR core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for thorium-uranium breeding recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, G.; Liu, C.; Si, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper was focused on core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle in current PWRs, without any major change to the fuel lattice and the core internals, but substituting the UOX pellet with Thorium-based pellet. The fuel cycle analysis indicates that Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle is technically feasible in current PWRs. A 4-loop, 193-assembly PWR core utilizing 17 x 17 fuel assemblies (FAs) was taken as the model core. Two mixed cores were investigated respectively loaded with mixed reactor grade Plutonium-Thorium (PuThOX) FAs and mixed reactor grade 233 U-Thorium (U 3 ThOX) FAs on the basis of reference full Uranium oxide (UOX) equilibrium-cycle core. The UOX/PuThOX mixed core consists of 121 UOX FAs and 72 PuThOX FAs. The reactor grade 233 U extracted from burnt PuThOX fuel was used to fabrication of U 3 ThOX for starting Thorium-. Uranium breeding recycle. In UOX/U 3 ThOX mixed core, the well designed U 3 ThOX FAs with 1.94 w/o fissile uranium (mainly 233 U) were located on the periphery of core as a blanket region. U 3 ThOX FAs remained in-core for 6 cycles with the discharged burnup achieving 28 GWD/tHM. Compared with initially loading, the fissile material inventory in U 3 ThOX fuel has increased by 7% via 1-year cooling after discharge. 157 UOX fuel assemblies were located in the inner of UOX/U 3 ThOX mixed core refueling with 64 FAs at each cycle. The designed UOX/PuThOX and UOX/U 3 ThOX mixed core satisfied related nuclear design criteria. The full core performance analyses have shown that mixed core with PuThOX loading has similar impacts as MOX on several neutronic characteristic parameters, such as reduced differential boron worth, higher critical boron concentration, more negative moderator temperature coefficient, reduced control rod worth, reduced shutdown margin, etc.; while mixed core with U 3 ThOX loading on the periphery of core has no visible impacts on neutronic characteristics compared

  8. Spent nuclear fuel recycling with plasma reduction and etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Ho

    2012-06-05

    A method of extracting uranium from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) particles is disclosed. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) (containing oxides of uranium, oxides of fission products (FP) and oxides of transuranic (TRU) elements (including plutonium)) are subjected to a hydrogen plasma and a fluorine plasma. The hydrogen plasma reduces the uranium and plutonium oxides from their oxide state. The fluorine plasma etches the SNF metals to form UF6 and PuF4. During subjection of the SNF particles to the fluorine plasma, the temperature is maintained in the range of 1200-2000 deg K to: a) allow any PuF6 (gas) that is formed to decompose back to PuF4 (solid), and b) to maintain stability of the UF6. Uranium (in the form of gaseous UF6) is easily extracted and separated from the plutonium (in the form of solid PuF4). The use of plasmas instead of high temperature reactors or flames mitigates the high temperature corrosive atmosphere and the production of PuF6 (as a final product). Use of plasmas provide faster reaction rates, greater control over the individual electron and ion temperatures, and allow the use of CF4 or NF3 as the fluorine sources instead of F2 or HF.

  9. Process for recycling components of a PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Lawrence [Edison, NJ

    2012-02-28

    The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of a PEM fuel cell can be recycled by contacting the MEA with a lower alkyl alcohol solvent which separates the membrane from the anode and cathode layers of the assembly. The resulting solution containing both the polymer membrane and supported noble metal catalysts can be heated under mild conditions to disperse the polymer membrane as particles and the supported noble metal catalysts and polymer membrane particles separated by known filtration means.

  10. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesterinen, R.; Kallio, M.; Kirjalainen, T.; Kolsi, A.; Merta, M.

    1997-01-01

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  11. Fabrication of ORNL Fuel Irradiated in the Peach Bottom Reactor and Postirradiation Examination of Recycle Test Elements 7 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Jr. E.L.

    2001-01-01

    Seven full-sized Peach Bottom Reactor fuel elements were fabricated in a cooperative effort by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Gulf General Atomic (GGA) as part of the National HTGR Fuel Recycle Development Program. These elements contain bonded fuel rods and loose beds of particles made from several combinations of fertile and fissile particles of interest for present and future use in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). The portion of the fuel prepared for these elements by ORNL is described in detail in this report, and it is in conjunction with the GGA report (GA-10109) a complete fabrication description of the test. In addition, this report describes the results obtained to date from postirradiation examination of the first two elements removed from the Peach Bottom Reactor, RTE-7 and -4. The fuel examined had relatively low exposure, up to about 1.5 x 10 21 neutrons/cm* fast (>0.18 MeV) fluence, compared with the peak anticipated HTGR fluence of 8.0 x 10 21 , but it has performed well at this exposure. Dimensional data indicate greater irradiation shrinkage than expected from accelerated test data to higher exposures. This suggests that either the method of extrapolation of the higher exposure data back to low exposure is faulty, or the behavior of the coated particles in the neutron spectrum characteristic of the accelerated tests does not adequately represent the behavior in an HTGR spectrum

  12. Experience with Pu-recycle fuel for large light water reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, H.; Spierling, H.; Eickelpasch, N.; Stoll, W.

    1977-01-01

    In general, design and operational performance of Pu-bearing recycle fuel are quite similar to those of Uranium fuel. Up to Nov. 1976 153 Pu-bearing fuel assemblies with altogether 8000 fuel rods, fabricated by ALKEM, have been or are in operation in German power reactors. Their performance is very satisfactory. In the Obrigheim and in the Gundremmingen plant up to 20% of the core are made up of Pu-fuel. In either case all-Pu fuel assemblies are used, graded in their Pu-content for compatibility with the surrounding U-fuel. The physics calculations are accomplished with basically the same methods as applied for U-fuel. Theoretical investigations and physics measurements have shown that differences in reactivity balance can be minimized by proper loading patterns. In additional experiments at elevated temperature (KRITZ) the neutron physics methods were verified in greater detail. The main feature of fabrication of mixed oxide pellets is mechanical blending of natural UO 2 - and PuO 2 -powder before pressing green pellets, and a rather high degree of mechanisation in all fabrication steps including sintering, wet grinding, and rod filling operations. The Zircaloy cladding know-how, welding techniques, final surface treatment etc. were all taken from the large experience of KWU in the LWR fuel area. Several fuel assemblies have been examined in the spent fuel pools and in hot cell laboratories after a maximum burn-up of 30 GWd/t. The examinations revealed no significant differences compared to U-fuel. Fission gas release is somewhat higher, attributed to the inhomogeneous fissioning on the microscopic scale in the mechanically mixed oxide. For the same reason the rate of densification is reduced. No Pu-redistribution has been observed. β-scans ( 140 La) and isotopic analyses confirmed the adequate accuracy of the calculation methods. In order to investigate the thermo-mechanical behaviour especially under power ramping conditions in greater depth mixed oxide test

  13. Uranium-236 in light water reactor spent fuel recycled to an enriching plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de la Garza, A.

    1977-01-01

    The introduction of 236 U to an enriching plant by recycling spent fuel uranium results in enriched products containing 236 U, a parasitic neutron absorber in reactor fuel. Convenient approximate methodology determines 235 236 U, and total uranium flowsheets with associated separative work requirements in enriching plant operations for use by investigators of the light water reactor fuel cycle not having recourse to specialized multicomponent cascade technology. Application of the methodology has been made to compensation of an enriching plant product for 236 U content and to the value at an enriching plant of spent fuel uranium. The approximate methodology was also confirmed with more exact calculations and with some experience with 236 U in an enriching plant

  14. A Neutronic Feasibility Study on the Recycling of an Oxide Fuel in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok

    2006-06-15

    Neutronic feasibility was implemented for the recycling of a mixed oxide fuel in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) through a thermal/mechanical dry process, which is recognized as one of the most proliferation- resistant recycling processes. In order to assess the applicability of a simple dry process which is not capable of completely removing all the fission products from a spent fuel, sensitivity calculations were performed for the reactor physics parameters with a dependency on the fission product removal rate of the recycled spent fuel. The equilibrium core calculations were performed by the REBUS-3 code for a BN-600 core without blanket fuels and a modified core with an increased fuel volume fraction. The reactor performance parameters such as the transuranic content, breeding ratio, peak linear power, burnup reactivity swing and reactivity coefficients were calculated for an equilibrium core under a fixed fuel management scheme. The results showed that a recycling of the oxide fuel in the SFR is feasible if the fission products are removed by more than 70% through the dry process as far as the material balance is concerned. However the physics analysis also showed that some of the physics design parameters are slightly deteriorated. The results of this study indicate that the recycling characteristics can be improved if the dry process can remove more fission products, and the reactor configuration is further optimized or the spent fuel composition is adjusted.

  15. A Neutronic Feasibility Study on the Recycling of an Oxide Fuel in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok

    2006-06-01

    Neutronic feasibility was implemented for the recycling of a mixed oxide fuel in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) through a thermal/mechanical dry process, which is recognized as one of the most proliferation- resistant recycling processes. In order to assess the applicability of a simple dry process which is not capable of completely removing all the fission products from a spent fuel, sensitivity calculations were performed for the reactor physics parameters with a dependency on the fission product removal rate of the recycled spent fuel. The equilibrium core calculations were performed by the REBUS-3 code for a BN-600 core without blanket fuels and a modified core with an increased fuel volume fraction. The reactor performance parameters such as the transuranic content, breeding ratio, peak linear power, burnup reactivity swing and reactivity coefficients were calculated for an equilibrium core under a fixed fuel management scheme. The results showed that a recycling of the oxide fuel in the SFR is feasible if the fission products are removed by more than 70% through the dry process as far as the material balance is concerned. However the physics analysis also showed that some of the physics design parameters are slightly deteriorated. The results of this study indicate that the recycling characteristics can be improved if the dry process can remove more fission products, and the reactor configuration is further optimized or the spent fuel composition is adjusted

  16. Radiological impact of plutonium recycle in the fuel cycle of LWR type reactors: professional exposure during mormal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, I.F.; Kelly, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    The radiological impact of the fuel cycle of light water type reactors using enriched uranium may be changed by plutonium recycle. The impact on human population and on the persons professionally exposed may be different according to the different steps of the fuel cycle. This report analyses the differential radiological impact on the different types of personnel involed in the fuel cycle. Each step of the fuel cycle is separately studied (fuel fabrication, reactor operation, fuel reprocessing), as also the transport of the radioactive materials between the different steps. For the whole fuel cycle, one estimates that, with regard to the fuel cycle using enriched uranium, the plutonium recycle involves a small increase of the professional exposure

  17. Progress on Plant-Level Components for Nuclear Fuel Recycling: Commonality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Almeida, Valmor F.

    2011-01-01

    Progress made in developing a common mathematical modeling framework for plant-level components of a simulation toolkit for nuclear fuel recycling is summarized. This ongoing work is performed under the DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, which has an element focusing on safeguards and separations (SafeSeps). One goal of this element is to develop a modeling and simulation toolkit for used nuclear fuel recycling. The primary function of the SafeSeps simulation toolkit is to enable the time-dependent coupling of separation modules and safeguards tools (either native or third-party supplied) that simulate and/or monitor the individual separation processes in a separations plant. The toolkit integration environment will offer an interface for the modules to register in the toolkit domain based on the commonality of diverse unit operations. This report discusses the source of this commonality from a combined mathematical modeling and software design perspectives, and it defines the initial basic concepts needed for development of application modules and their integrated form, that is, an application software. A unifying mathematical theory of chemical thermomechanical network transport for physicochemical systems is proposed and outlined as the basis for developing advanced modules. A program for developing this theory from the underlying first-principles continuum thermomechanics will be needed in future developments; accomplishment of this task will enable the development of a modern modeling approach for plant-level models. Rigorous, advanced modeling approaches at the plant-level can only proceed from the development of reduced (or low-order) models based on a solid continuum field theory foundation. Such development will pave the way for future programmatic activities on software verification, simulation validation, and model uncertainty quantification on a scientific basis; currently, no satisfactory foundation exists for

  18. Progress on Plant-Level Components for Nuclear Fuel Recycling: Commonality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Progress made in developing a common mathematical modeling framework for plant-level components of a simulation toolkit for nuclear fuel recycling is summarized. This ongoing work is performed under the DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, which has an element focusing on safeguards and separations (SafeSeps). One goal of this element is to develop a modeling and simulation toolkit for used nuclear fuel recycling. The primary function of the SafeSeps simulation toolkit is to enable the time-dependent coupling of separation modules and safeguards tools (either native or third-party supplied) that simulate and/or monitor the individual separation processes in a separations plant. The toolkit integration environment will offer an interface for the modules to register in the toolkit domain based on the commonality of diverse unit operations. This report discusses the source of this commonality from a combined mathematical modeling and software design perspectives, and it defines the initial basic concepts needed for development of application modules and their integrated form, that is, an application software. A unifying mathematical theory of chemical thermomechanical network transport for physicochemical systems is proposed and outlined as the basis for developing advanced modules. A program for developing this theory from the underlying first-principles continuum thermomechanics will be needed in future developments; accomplishment of this task will enable the development of a modern modeling approach for plant-level models. Rigorous, advanced modeling approaches at the plant-level can only proceed from the development of reduced (or low-order) models based on a solid continuum field theory foundation. Such development will pave the way for future programmatic activities on software verification, simulation validation, and model uncertainty quantification on a scientific basis; currently, no satisfactory foundation exists for

  19. Available reprocessing and recycling services for research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozser, Sandor Miklos; Adelfang, Pablo; Bradley, Ed [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Budu, Madalina [SOSNY Research and Development Company, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chiguer, Mustapha [AREVA, Paris (France)

    2015-05-15

    International activities in the back-end of the research reactor (RR) fuel cycle have so far been dominated by the programmes of acceptance of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) by the country where it was originally enriched. These programmes will soon have achieved their goals and the SNF take-back programmes will cease. However, the needs of the nuclear community dictate that the majority of the research reactors continue to operate using low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in order to meet the varied mission objectives. As a result, inventories of LEU SNF will continue to be created and the back-end solution of RR SNF remains a critical issue. In view of this fact, the IAEA, based on the experience gained during the decade of international cooperation in supporting the objectives of the HEU take-back programmes, will draw up a report presenting available reprocessing and recycling services for research reactor spent nuclear fuel. This paper gives an overview of the guiding document which will address all aspects of Reprocessing and Recycling Services for RR SNF, including an overview of solutions, decision making support, service suppliers, conditions (prerequisites, options, etc.), services offered by the managerial and logistics support providers with a focus on available transport packages and applicable transport modes.

  20. The Direct Internal Recycling concept to simplify the fuel cycle of a fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, Christian; Giegerich, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The fusion fuel cycle is presented and its functions are discussed. • Tritium inventories are estimated for an early DEMO configuration. • The Direct Internal Recycling concept to reduce tritium inventories is described. • Concepts for its technical implementation are developed. -- Abstract: A new concept, the Direct Internal Recycling (DIR) concept, is proposed, which minimizes fuel cycle inventory by adding an additional short-cut between the pumped torus exhaust gas and the fuelling systems. The paper highlights quantitative modelling results derived from a simple fuel cycle spreadsheet which underline the potential benefits that can be achieved by implementation of the DIR concept into a fusion power plant. DIR requires a novel set-up of the torus exhaust pumping system, which replaces the batch-wise and cyclic operated cryogenic pumps by a continuous pumping solution and which offers at the same time an additional integral gas separation function. By that, hydrogen can be removed close to the divertor from all other gases and the main load to the fuel clean-up systems is a smaller, helium-rich gas stream. Candidate DIR relevant pump technology based on liquid metals (vapour diffusion and liquid ring pumps) and metal foils is discussed

  1. Nuclear recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinrad, B.I.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses two aspects of the economics of recycling nuclear fuel: the actual costs and savings of the recycling operation in terms of money spent, made, and saved; and the impact of the recycling on the future cost of uranium. The authors review the relevant physical and chemical processes involved in the recycling process. Recovery of uranium and plutonium is discussed. Fuel recycling in LWRs is examined and a table presents the costs of reprocessing and not reprocessing. The subject of plutonium in fast reactors is addressed. Safeguards and weapons proliferation are discussed

  2. Available Reprocessing and Recycling Services for Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The high enriched uranium (HEU) take back programmes will soon have achieved their goals. When there are no longer HEU inventories at research reactors and no commerce in HEU for research reactors, the primary driver for the take back programmes will cease. However, research reactors will continue to operate in order to meet their various mission objectives. As a result, inventories of low enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel will continue to be created during the research reactors' lifetime and, therefore, there is a need to develop national final disposition routes. This publication is designed to address the issues of available reprocessing and recycling services for research reactor spent fuel and discusses the various back end management aspects of the research reactor fuel cycle.

  3. Analysis of boiling water reactors capacities for the 100% MOX fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoche, Dietrich

    1999-01-01

    The electro-nuclear park exploitation leads to plutonium production. The plutonium recycling in boiling water reactors performs a use possibility. The difference between the neutronic characteristics of the uranium and the plutonium need to evaluate the substitution impact of UOX fuel by MOX fuel on the reactor operating and safety. The analysis of the main points reached to the following conclusions: the reactivity coefficients are negative, during a cooling accident the re-divergence depends on the isotopic vector of the used plutonium, the efficiency lost of control cross resulting from the plutonium utilization can be compensate by the increase of the B 4C enrichment by 10 B and the change of the steel structure by an hafnium structure, the reactivity control in evolution can be obtained by the fuel poisoning (gadolinium, erbium) and the power map control by the plutonium content monitoring. (A.L.B.)

  4. Actinide recycling by pyro process for future nuclear fuel cycle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, T.

    2001-01-01

    Pyrometallurgical technology is one of the potential devices for the future nuclear fuel cycle. Not only economic advantage but also environmental safety and strong resistance for proliferation are required. So as to satisfy the requirements, actinide recycling applicable to LWR and FBR cycles by pyro-process has been developed over a ten-year period at the CRIEPI. The main technology is electrorefining for U and Pu separation and reductive extraction for TRU separation, which can be applied on oxide fuels through reduction process as well as metal fuels. The application of this technology for separation of TRU in HLLW through chlorination could contribute to the improvement of public acceptance with regard to geologic disposal. The main achievements are summarised as follows: - Elemental technologies such as electrorefining, reductive extraction, injection casting and salt waste treatment and solidification have been successfully developed with lots of experiments. - Fuel dissolution into molten salt and uranium recovery on solid cathode for electrorefining has been demonstrated at an engineering scale facility in Argonne National Laboratory using spent fuels and at the CRIEPI through uranium tests. - Single element tests using actinides showed Li reduction to be technically feasible; the subjects of technical feasibility on multi-element systems and on effective recycle of Li by electrolysis of Li 2 O remain to be addressed. - Concerning the treatment of HLLW for actinide separation, the conversion to chlorides through oxides has also been established through uranium tests. - It is confirmed that more than 99% of TRU nuclides can be recovered from high-level liquid waste by TRU tests. - Through these studies, the process flowsheets for reprocessing of metal and oxide fuels and for partitioning of TRU separation have been established. The subjects to be emphasised for further development are classified into three categories: process development (demonstration

  5. Recycling of nuclear matters. Myths and realities. Calculation of recycling rate of the plutonium and uranium produced by the French channel of spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeytaux, X.; Schneider, M.

    2000-05-01

    The recycling rate of plutonium and uranium are: from the whole of the plutonium separated from the spent fuel ( inferior to 1% of the nuclear matter content) attributed to France is under 50% (under 42 tons on 84 tons); from the whole of plutonium produced in the French reactors is less than 20% (42 tons on 224 tons); from the whole of the uranium separated from spent fuels attributed to France is about 10 % (1600 tons on 16000 tons); from the whole of the uranium contained in the spent fuel is slightly over 5%. (N.C.)

  6. Feasibility Study on Nitrogen-15 Enrichment and Recycling System for Innovative FR Cycle System With Nitride Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki Inoue; Kiyoshi Ono; Tsuna-aki Fujioka; Koji Sato; Takeo Asaga

    2002-01-01

    Highly-isotopically-enriched nitrogen (HE-N 2 ; 15 N abundance 99.9%) is indispensable for a nitride fueled fast reactor (FR) cycle to minimize the effect of carbon-14 ( 14 C) generated mainly by 14 N(n,p) 14 C reaction in the core on environmental burden. Thus, the development of inexpensive 15 N enrichment and recycling technology is one of the key aspects for the commercialization of a nitride fueled FR cycle. Nitrogen isotope separation by the gas adsorption technique was experimentally confirmed in order to obtain its technological perspective. A conventional pressure swing adsorption technique, which is already commercialized for recovering the nitrogen gas from multi-composition gas-mixture, would be suitable for recovering in both reprocessing and fuel fabrication to recycle the HE-N 2 gas. A couple of the nitride fuel cycle system concepts including the reprocessing and fuel fabrication process flow diagrams with the HE-N 2 gas recycling were newly designed for both aqueous and non-aqueous (pyrochemical) nitride fuel recycle plants, and also the effect of the HE-N 2 gas recycling on the economics of each concept was evaluated. (authors)

  7. Use of Pilot Plants for Developing Used Nuclear Fuel Recycling Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Chris; Arm, Stuart [EnergySolutions LLC (United States); Banfield, Zara; Jeapes, Andrew; Taylor, Richard [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    EnergySolutions and its teaming partners are working with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop processes, equipment and facilities for recycling used nuclear fuel (UNF). Recycling significantly reduces the volume of wastes that ultimately will be consigned to the National Geologic Repository, enables the re-use in new fuel of the valuable uranium and plutonium in the UNF, and allows the long-lived minor actinides to be treated separately so they do not become long term heat emitters in the Repository. A major requirement of any new UNF recycling facility is that pure plutonium is not separated anywhere in the process, so as to reduce the nuclear proliferation attractiveness of the facility. EnergySolutions and its team partner the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) have developed the NUEX process to achieve this and to handle appropriately the treatment of other species such as krypton, tritium, neptunium and technetium. NUEX is based on existing successful commercial UNF recycling processes deployed in the UK, France and imminently in Japan, but with a range of modifications to the flowsheet to keep some uranium with the plutonium at all times and to minimize aerial and liquid radioactive discharges. NNL's long-term experience in developing the recycling and associated facilities at the Sellafield site in the UK, and its current duties to support technically the operation of the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) at Sellafield provides essential input to the design of the US NUEX-based facility. Development work for THORP and other first-of-kind nuclear plants employed miniature scale fully radioactive through large scale inactive pilot plants. The sequence of development work that we have found most successful is to (i) perform initial process development at small (typically 1/5000) scale in gloveboxes using trace active materials, (ii) demonstrate the processes at the same small scale with actual irradiated fuel in hot cells and (iii

  8. Policy in France regarding the back-end of the fuel cycle reprocessing/recycling route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloaguen, A.; Lenail, B.

    1991-01-01

    The decision taken in early 1970s to base the French power policy on the use of pressurized water reactors also included the strategy for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle based on reprocessing, waste conditioning for the final disposal in the most suitable form in terms of safety and plutonium recycling to fast breeder reactors. Twenty years have elapsed, and substantial development and investment have been made. New evidences have emerged especially regarding breeder development, and the initial choice has been proved to be sound. EDF and COGEMA, the French utility and fuel cycle companies, respectively, are working together in order to take the best advantage of past efforts. The good behavior of MOX fuel in EDF reactors and the excellent start of the UP3 reprocessing plant of La Hague, which was completed and commissioned in August, 1990, made EDF and COGEMA extremely confident for future decision. The French choice made in favor of fuel reprocessing the history of fuel reprocessing in France, the policy concerning the back end of nuclear fuel cycle of EDF, and the present consideration and circumstances on this matter are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinide partitioning - Application to waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abonneau, E.; Baron, P.; Berthon, C.; Berthon, L.; Beziat, A.; Bisel, I.; Bonin, L.; Bosse, E.; Boullis, B.; Broudic, J.C.; Charbonnel, M.C.; Chauvin, N.; Den Auwer, C.; Dinh, B.; Duhamet, J.; Escleine, J.M.; Grandjean, S.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaneux, D.; Guillaumont, D.; Hill, C.; Lacquement, J.; Masson, M.; Miguirditchian, M.; Moisy, P.; Pelletier, M.; Ravenet, A.; Rostaing, C.; Royet, V.; Ruas, A.; Simoni, E.; Sorel, C.; Vaudano, A.; Venault, L.; Warin, D.; Zaetta, A.; Pradel, P.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Forestier, A.; Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoob, P.; Vernaz, E.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.P.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    subsequent to its in-reactor dwell time, spent fuel still contains large amounts of materials that are recoverable, for value-added energy purposes (uranium, plutonium), together with fission products, and minor actinides, making up the residues from nuclear reactions. The treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel, as implemented in France, entail that such materials be chemically partitioned. The development of the process involved, and its deployment on an industrial scale stand as a high achievement of French science, and technology. Treatment and recycling allow both a satisfactory management of nuclear waste to be implemented, and substantial savings, in terms of fissile material. Bolstered of late as it has been, due to spectacularly skyrocketing uranium prices, this strategy is bound to become indispensable, with the advent of the next generation of fast reactors. This Monograph surveys the chemical process used for spent fuel treatment, and its variants, both current, and future. It outlines currently ongoing investigations, setting out the challenges involved, and recent results obtained by CEA. (authors)

  10. Treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinide partitioning - Application to waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abonneau, E.; Baron, P.; Berthon, C.; Berthon, L.; Beziat, A.; Bisel, I.; Bonin, L.; Bosse, E.; Boullis, B.; Broudic, J.C.; Charbonnel, M.C.; Chauvin, N.; Den Auwer, C.; Dinh, B.; Duhamet, J.; Escleine, J.M.; Grandjean, S.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaneux, D.; Guillaumont, D.; Hill, C.; Lacquement, J.; Masson, M.; Miguirditchian, M.; Moisy, P.; Pelletier, M.; Ravenet, A.; Rostaing, C.; Royet, V.; Ruas, A.; Simoni, E.; Sorel, C.; Vaudano, A.; Venault, L.; Warin, D.; Zaetta, A.; Pradel, P.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Forestier, A.; Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoob, P.; Vernaz, E.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.P.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2008-07-01

    subsequent to its in-reactor dwell time, spent fuel still contains large amounts of materials that are recoverable, for value-added energy purposes (uranium, plutonium), together with fission products, and minor actinides, making up the residues from nuclear reactions. The treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel, as implemented in France, entail that such materials be chemically partitioned. The development of the process involved, and its deployment on an industrial scale stand as a high achievement of French science, and technology. Treatment and recycling allow both a satisfactory management of nuclear waste to be implemented, and substantial savings, in terms of fissile material. Bolstered of late as it has been, due to spectacularly skyrocketing uranium prices, this strategy is bound to become indispensable, with the advent of the next generation of fast reactors. This Monograph surveys the chemical process used for spent fuel treatment, and its variants, both current, and future. It outlines currently ongoing investigations, setting out the challenges involved, and recent results obtained by CEA. (authors)

  11. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.

    1984-12-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program involves research into the storage and transportation of used nuclear fuel, immobilization of fuel waste, and deep geological disposal of the immobilized waste. The program is now in the fourth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the safety and environmental aspects of the deep underground disposal of immobilized fuel waste in plutonic rock. The objectives of the research for each component of the program and the progress made to the end of 1983 are described in this report

  12. Recycling versus Long-Term Storage of Nuclear Fuel: Economic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yolanda Moratilla Soria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to compare the associated costs of long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel—open cycle strategy—with the associated cost of reprocessing and recycling strategy of spent fuel—closed cycle strategy—based on the current international studies. The analysis presents cost trends for both strategies. Also, to point out the fact that the total cost of spent nuclear fuel management (open cycle is impossible to establish at present, while the related costs of the closed cycle are stable and known, averting uncertainties.

  13. Feed-forward control of a solid oxide fuel cell system with anode offgas recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, Maxime; Brandenburger, Ralf; Friede, Wolfgang; Lapicque, François; Limbeck, Uwe; da Silva, Pedro

    2015-05-01

    In this work a combined heat and power unit (CHP unit) based on the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is analysed. This unit has a special feature: the anode offgas is partially recycled to the anode inlet. Thus it is possible to increase the electrical efficiency and the system can be operated without external water feeding. A feed-forward control concept which allows secure operating conditions of the CHP unit as well as a maximization of its electrical efficiency is introduced and validated experimentally. The control algorithm requires a limited number of measurement values and few deterministic relations for its description.

  14. Numerical analysis on reduction of radioactive actinides by recycling of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balboa L, H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, human growth has reached unparalleled levels historically, this implies a need for more energy, and just in 2007 was consumed in the USA 4157 x 10 9 kWh of electricity and there were 6 x 10 9 metric tons of carbon dioxide, which causes a devastating effect on our environment. To this problem, a solution to the demand for non-fossil energy is nuclear energy, which is one of the least polluting and the cheapest among non-fossil energy; however, a problem remains unresolved the waste generation of nuclear fuels. In this work the option of a possible transmutation of actinides in a nuclear reactor of BWR was analyzed, an example of this are the nuclear reactors at the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant, which have generated spent fuel stored in pools awaiting a decision for final disposal or any other existing alternative. Assuming that the spent fuel was reprocessed to separate useful materials and actinides such as plutonium and uranium remaining, could take these actinides and to recycle them inside the same reactor that produced them, so il will be reduced the radiotoxicity of spent fuel. The main idea of this paper is to evaluate by means of numeric simulation (using the Core Management System (CMS)) the reduction of minor actinides in the case of being recycled in fresh fuel of the type BWR. The actinides were introduced hypothetically in the fuel pellets to 6% by weight, and then use a burned in the range of 0-65 G Wd/Tm, in order to have a better panorama of their behavior and thus know which it is the best choice for maximum reduction of actinides. Several cases were studied, that is to say were used as fuels; the UO 2 and MOX. Six different cases were also studied to see the behavior of actinides in different situations. The CMS platform calculation was used for the analysis of the cases presented. Favorable results were obtained, having decreased from a range of 35% to 65% of minor actinides initially introduced in the fuel rods, reducing the

  15. The Canadian fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, D.B.

    1986-04-01

    This report is the sixth in the series of annual reports on the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes progress in 1984 for the following activities: storage and transportation of used fuel, immobilization of nuclear fuel waste, geotechnical research, environmental research, and environmental and safety assessment. 186 refs

  16. Qualification of a Vitrified High Level Waste Product to Support Used Nuclear Fuel Recycling in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, P.; Bailly, F.; Strachan, D.; Senentz, G.; Veyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), AREVA formed the International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) consisting of recognized world-leading companies in the area of used nuclear fuel (UNF) recycling,. The INRA team, consisting of AREVA, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd (JNFL), Batelle Memorial Institute (BMI), URS Washington Division and Babcock and Wilcox (B and W), prepared a pre-conceptual design for an upgradable engineering-scale recycling plant with a nominal through put of 800 tHM/y. The pre-conceptual design of this leading-edge facility was based upon the extensive experience of the INRA team in recycling plant design and real world 'lessons learned' from actually building, commissioning, and operating recycling facilities in both France and Japan. The conceptual flowsheet, based upon the COEX TM separations process, separates the useful products for recycling into new fuel and sentences all the remaining fission products and minor actinides (MA) to the high level waste, (HLW) for vitrification. The proposed vitrified waste product will be similar to that currently produced in recycling plants in France. This wasteform has been qualified in France by conducting extensive studies and demonstrations. In the US, the qualification of vitrified glass products has been conducted by the US National Laboratories for the Defence Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP), and the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The vitrified waste product produced by recycling is sufficiently different from these current waste forms to warrant additional trials and studies. In this paper we review the differences in the vitrified waste forms previously qualified in the US with that produced from recycling of UNF in France. The lessons learned from qualifying a vitrified waste form in Europe is compared to the current US process for vitrified waste qualification including waste

  17. Data collection and analysis to improve the quality and effectiveness of recycling education programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapek, Raymond A [Department of Public Administration, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Although recycling participation rates and the success of recycling programs is determined by a multitude of social, economic and political factors, community participation is paramount in determining if recycling programs will accomplish their objectives. Research has tended to focus on the scientific aspects of waste reduction and management, but new concerns are about cost effectiveness factors. A considerable amount of money has been spent on recycling education/information programs with little or no measurement of the effects or results of these expenditures. This article reports the results of a survey of Florida's 67 counties to determine whether advertising media choices for recycling education/information programs were related to recycling rates. A mathematical model was developed which indicated correlations as well as predictability. Florida's recycling information/education effort is still new and does not yet provide a sufficient historical record of trends. This research provided some trend information through regression analysis techniques, but more importantly, suggests a framework for future analysis. It also revealed the deficiencies in current county and state data collection methods. Some of the lessons learned will permit a more accurate charting of the long-term results of dollar expenditures on media advertising for each county

  18. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gug, JeongIn; Cacciola, David; Sobkowicz, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in higher heating value. Analysis of the post-processing water uptake and compressive strength showed a correlation between density and stability to both mechanical stress and humid environment. Proximate analysis indicated heating values comparable to coal. The results showed that mechanical and moisture uptake stability were improved when the moisture and air contents were optimized. Moreover, the briquette

  19. Microwave based oxidation process for recycling the off-specification (U,Pu)O{sub 2} fuel pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, G., E-mail: gitendars@barctara.gov.in [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, 401 502 (India); Khot, P.M. [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, 401 502 (India); Kumar, Pradeep [Integrated Fuel Fabrication Facility (IFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400 085 (India); Bhatt, R.B.; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, Mohd [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, 401 502 (India)

    2017-02-15

    This paper reports development of a process named MicroWave Direct Oxidation (MWDO) for recycling the off-specification (U,Pu)O{sub 2} mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pellets generated during fabrication of typical fast reactor fuels. MWDO is a two-stage, single-cycle process based on oxidative pulverisation of pellets using 2450 MHz microwave. The powder sinterability was evaluated by bulk density and BET specific surface area. The oxidised powders were analyzed for phases using XRD and stoichiometry by thermogravimetry. The sinterability was significantly enhanced by carrying out oxidation in higher oxygen partial pressure and by subjecting MOX to multiple micronisation-oxidation cycles. After three cycles, the recycled powder from (U,28%Pu)O{sub 2} resulted surface area >3 m{sup 2}/g and 100% re-used for MOX fabrication. The flow sheet was developed for maximum utilization of recycled powder describable by a parameter called Scrap Recycling Ratio (SRR). The process demonstrates smaller processing cycle, better powder properties and higher oxidative pulverisation over conventional method. - Highlights: • A process for recycling the off-specification (U,Pu)O{sub 2} sintered fuel pellets of fast reactors was demonstrated. • The method is a two-stage, single cycle process based on oxidative pulverization of MOX pellets using 2450 MHz microwave. • The process demonstrated utilization of recycled powder with SRR of 1.

  20. Fires at storage sites of organic materials, waste fuels and recyclables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim; Alriksson, Stina; Kaczala, Fabio; Hogland, William

    2013-09-01

    During the last decade, the European Union has enforced the diversion of organic wastes and recyclables to waste management companies operating incineration plants, composting plants and recycling units instead of landfills. The temporary storage sites have been established as a buffer against fluctuations in energy demand throughout the year. Materials also need to be stored at temporary storage sites before recovery and recycling. However, regulations governing waste fuel storage and handling have not yet been developed, and, as a result, companies have engaged in risky practices that have resulted in a high number of fire incidents. In this study, a questionnaire survey was distributed to 249 of the 400 members of Avfall Sverige (Swedish Waste Management Association), which represents the waste management of 95% of the Swedish population. Information regarding 122 storage facilities owned by 69 companies was obtained; these facilities were responsible for the storage of 47% of the total treated waste (incineration + digestion + composting) in 2010 in Sweden. To identify factors related to fire frequency, the questionnaire covered the amounts of material handled and burnt per year, financial losses due to fires, storage duration, storage method and types of waste. The results show that 217 fire incidents corresponded to 170 kilotonnes of material burnt and cumulative losses of 49 million SEK (€4.3 million). Fire frequency and amount of material burnt per fire was found to be dependent upon type of management group (waste operator). Moreover, a correlation was found between fire frequency and material recycled during past years. Further investigations of financial aspects and externalities of fire incidents are recommended.

  1. Physics of plutonium and americium recycling in PWR using advanced fuel concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourcade, E.

    2004-01-01

    PWR waste inventory management is considered in many countries including Frances as one of the main current issues. Pu and Am are the 2 main contents both in term of volume and long term radio-toxicity. Waiting for the Generation IV systems implementation (2035-2050), one of the mid-term solutions for their transmutation involves the use of advanced fuels in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). These have to require as little modification as possible of the core internals, the cooling system and fuel cycle facilities (fabrication and reprocessing). The first part of this paper deals with some neutronic characteristics of Pu and/or Am recycling. In a second part, 2 technical solutions MOX-HMR and APA-DUPLEX-84 are presented and the third part is devoted to the study of a few global strategies. The main neutronic parameters to be considered for Pu and Am recycling in PWR are void coefficient, Doppler coefficient, fraction of delayed neutrons and power distribution (especially for heterogeneous configurations). The modification of the moderation ratio, the opportunity to use inert matrices (targets), the optimisation of Uranium, Plutonium and Americium contents are the key parameters to play with. One of the solutions (APA-DUPLEX-84) presented here is a heterogeneous assembly with regular moderation ratio composed with both target fuel rods (Pu and Am embedded in an inert matrix) and standard UO 2 fuel rods. An EPR (European Pressurised Reactor) type reactor, loaded only with assemblies containing 84 peripheral targets, can reach an Americium consumption rate of (4.4; 23 kg/TWh) depending on the assembly concept. For Pu and Am inventories stabilisation, the theoretical fraction of reactors loaded with Pu + Am or Pu assemblies is about 60%. For Americium inventory stabilisation, the fraction decreases down to 16%, but Pu is produced at a rate of 18.5 Kg/TWh (-25% compared to one through UOX cycle)

  2. Nuclear fuel cycle risk assessment: survey and computer compilation of risk-related literature. [Once-through Cycle and Plutonium Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, K.R.; Schreiber, A.M.; Rudolph, A.W.

    1982-10-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated the Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. Both the once-through cycle and plutonium recycle are being considered. A previous report generated by this program defines and describes fuel cycle facilities, or elements, considered in the program. This report, the second from the program, describes the survey and computer compilation of fuel cycle risk-related literature. Sources of available information on the design, safety, and risk associated with the defined set of fuel cycle elements were searched and documents obtained were catalogued and characterized with respect to fuel cycle elements and specific risk/safety information. Both US and foreign surveys were conducted. Battelle's computer-based BASIS information management system was used to facilitate the establishment of the literature compilation. A complete listing of the literature compilation and several useful indexes are included. Future updates of the literature compilation will be published periodically. 760 annotated citations are included.

  3. 76 FR 18066 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Changes to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 80 Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Changes to Renewable Fuel Standard Program CFR Correction In Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 72 to...-generating foreign producers and importers of renewable fuels for which RINs have been generated by the...

  4. Actinide transmutation using inert matrix fuels versus recycle in a low conversion fast burner reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deinert, M.R.; Schneider, E.A.; Recktenwald, G.; Cady, K.B. [The Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C2200, Austin, 78712 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reducing the disposal burden of the long lived radioisotopes that are contained within spent uranium oxide fuel is essential for ensuring the sustainability of nuclear power. Because of their non-fertile matrices, inert matrix fuels (IMFs) could allow light-water reactors to achieve a significant burn down of plutonium and minor actinides that are that are currently produced as a byproduct of operating light-water reactors. However, the extent to which this is possible is not yet fully understood. We consider a ZrO{sub 2} based IMF with a high transuranic loading and show that the neutron fluence (and the subsequent fuel residence time required to achieve it) present a practical limit for the achievable actinide burnup. The accumulation of transuranics in spent uranium oxide fuel is a major obstacle for the sustainability of nuclear power. While commercial light-water reactors (LWR's) produce these isotopes, they can be used to transmute them. At present, the only viable option for doing this is to partly fuel reactors with mixed oxide fuel (MOX) made using recycled plutonium. However, because of parasitic neutron capture in the uranium matrix of MOX, considerable plutonium and minor actinides are also bred as the fuel is burned. A better option is to entrain the recycled isotopes in a non-fertile matrix such as ZrO{sub 2}. Inert matrices such as these were originally envisioned for burning plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons [1]. However, because they achieve a conversion ratio of zero, they have also been considered as a better alternative to MOX [2-6]. Plutonium and minor actinides dominate the long term heat and radiological outputs from spent nuclear fuel. Recent work has shown that that IMFs can be used to reduce these outputs by at least a factor of four, on a per unit of energy generated basis [6]. The degree of reduction is strongly dependent on IMF burnup. In principle, complete transmutation of the transuranics could be achieved though this

  5. An analysis of the properties of levelized cost analysis of storage or recycling of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergueiro, Sophia M. C.; Ramos, Alexandre F., E-mail: alex.ramos@usp.br, E-mail: sophia.vergueiro@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Núcleo Interdisciplinar de Modelagem de Sistemas Complexos

    2017-07-01

    The demand for reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in the processes of electricity generation, plus the demand for firm energy matrices, make the nuclear matrix a central component to occupy the energy mix during the next hundred years. Increasing the share of nuclear power in electricity production in a multiple developing countries will lead to increased spent fuel production. Thus, the managing radioactive waste aiming to decide about storing or recycling it is a central issue to be addressed by environmental management and nuclear energy communities. In this manuscript we present our studies aiming to understand the levelized analysis of cost of electricity generation comparing storage or recycling of the spent fuel. (author)

  6. An analysis of the properties of levelized cost analysis of storage or recycling of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergueiro, Sophia M. C.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2017-01-01

    The demand for reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in the processes of electricity generation, plus the demand for firm energy matrices, make the nuclear matrix a central component to occupy the energy mix during the next hundred years. Increasing the share of nuclear power in electricity production in a multiple developing countries will lead to increased spent fuel production. Thus, the managing radioactive waste aiming to decide about storing or recycling it is a central issue to be addressed by environmental management and nuclear energy communities. In this manuscript we present our studies aiming to understand the levelized analysis of cost of electricity generation comparing storage or recycling of the spent fuel. (author)

  7. The use of nuclear data in the field of nuclear fuel recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Julie-Fiona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AREVA NC La Hague facility is the first step of the nuclear fuel recycling process implemented in France. The processing of the used fuel is governed by high standards of criticality-safety, and strong expectations on the quality of end-products. From the received used fuel assemblies, the plutonium and the uranium are extracted for further energy production purposes within the years following the reprocessing. Furthermore, the ultimate waste – fission products and minor actinides on the one hand, and hulls and end-pieces on the other hand – is adequately packaged for long term disposal. The used fuel is therefore separated into very different materials, and time scales which come into account may be longer than in some other nuclear fields of activity. Given the variety of the handled nuclear materials, as well as the time scales at stake, the importance given to some radionuclides, and hence to the associated nuclear data, can also be specific to the AREVA NC La Hague plant. A study has thus been led to identify a list of the most important radionuclides for the AREVA NC La Hague plant applications, relying on the running constraints of the facility, and the end-products expectations. The activities at the AREVA NC La Hague plant are presented, and the methodology to extract the most important radionuclides for the reprocessing process is detailed.

  8. The use of nuclear data in the field of nuclear fuel recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Julie-Fiona; Launay, Agnès; Grassi, Gabriele; Binet, Christophe; Lelandais, Jacques; Lecampion, Erick

    2017-09-01

    AREVA NC La Hague facility is the first step of the nuclear fuel recycling process implemented in France. The processing of the used fuel is governed by high standards of criticality-safety, and strong expectations on the quality of end-products. From the received used fuel assemblies, the plutonium and the uranium are extracted for further energy production purposes within the years following the reprocessing. Furthermore, the ultimate waste - fission products and minor actinides on the one hand, and hulls and end-pieces on the other hand - is adequately packaged for long term disposal. The used fuel is therefore separated into very different materials, and time scales which come into account may be longer than in some other nuclear fields of activity. Given the variety of the handled nuclear materials, as well as the time scales at stake, the importance given to some radionuclides, and hence to the associated nuclear data, can also be specific to the AREVA NC La Hague plant. A study has thus been led to identify a list of the most important radionuclides for the AREVA NC La Hague plant applications, relying on the running constraints of the facility, and the end-products expectations. The activities at the AREVA NC La Hague plant are presented, and the methodology to extract the most important radionuclides for the reprocessing process is detailed.

  9. The National Shipbuilding Research Program: Solid Waste Segregation and Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    decreasing landfill space, legislated recycling goals are being set, and your institution is expected to comply. The letter indicates that all...Larry Krull, (800) 837-3398, landfill covers, liners, and cap systems Canadian Forest Products, Ltd., New Westminister , BC, Joe Hargitt, (604) 520-9327

  10. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gug, JeongIn; Cacciola, David; Sobkowicz, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Briquetting was used to produce solid fuels from municipal solid waste and recycled plastics. • Optimal drying, processing temperature and pressure were found to produce stable briquettes. • Addition of waste plastics yielded heating values comparable with typical coal feedstocks. • This processing method improves utilization of paper and plastic diverted from landfills. - Abstract: Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in

  11. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gug, JeongIn, E-mail: Jeongin_gug@student.uml.edu; Cacciola, David, E-mail: david_cacciola@student.uml.edu; Sobkowicz, Margaret J., E-mail: Margaret_sobkowiczkline@uml.edu

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Briquetting was used to produce solid fuels from municipal solid waste and recycled plastics. • Optimal drying, processing temperature and pressure were found to produce stable briquettes. • Addition of waste plastics yielded heating values comparable with typical coal feedstocks. • This processing method improves utilization of paper and plastic diverted from landfills. - Abstract: Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in

  12. Hanford recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, I.M.

    1996-09-01

    This paper is a study of the past and present recycling efforts on the Hanford site and options for future improvements in the recycling program. Until 1996, recycling goals were voluntarily set by the waste generators: this year, DOE has imposed goals for all its sites to accomplish by 1999. Hanford is presently meeting the voluntary site goals, but may not be able to meet all the new DOE goals without changes to the program. Most of these new DOE goals are recycling goals: * Reduce the generation of radioactive (low-level) waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of low-level mixed waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of hazardous waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Recycle 33 percent of the sanitary waste from all operations. * Increase affirmative procurement of EPA-designated recycled items to 100 percent. The Hanford recycling program has made great strides-there has been a 98 percent increase in the amount of paper recycled since its inception in 1990. Hanford recycles paper, chemicals cardboard, tires, oil, batteries, rags, lead weights, fluorescent tubes, aerosol products, concrete, office furniture, computer software, drums, toner cartridges, and scrap metal. Many other items are recycled or reused by individual groups on a one time basis without a formal contract. Several contracts are closed-loop contracts which involve all parts of the recycle loop. Considerable savings are generated from recycling, and much more is possible with increased attention and improvements to this program. General methods for improving the recycling program to ensure that the new goals can be met are: a Contract and financial changes 0 Tracking database and methods improvements 0 Expanded recycling efforts. Specifically, the Hanford recycling program would be improved by: 0 Establishing one overall

  13. Material control and accountability aspects of safeguards for the USA 233U/Th fuel recycle plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.A. Jr.; McNeany, S.R.; Angelini, P.; Holder, N.D.; Abraham, L.

    1978-01-01

    The materials control and accountability aspects of the reprocessing and refabrication of a conceptual large-scale HTGR fuel recycle plant have been discussed. Two fuel cycles were considered. The traditional highly enriched uranium cycle uses an initial or makeup fuel element with a fissile enrichment of 93% 235 U. The more recent medium enriched uranium cycle uses initial or makeup fuel elements with a fissile enrichment less than 20% 235 U. In both cases, 233 U bred from the fertile thorium is recycled. Materials control and accountability in the plant will be by means of a real-time accountability method. Accountability data will be derived from monitoring of total material mass through the processes and a system of numerous assays, both destructive and nondestructive

  14. Optimization of the recycle used oil and its fuel quality characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyitayo A. AFOLABI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of recycling of used engine oil with clay sample has been studied using Response Surface Methodology. Acid concentration, activation temperature and time were the independent variables considered in optimizing the recycling of used oil and six responses evaluated. The surface characterization of the clay samples was performed using the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectra and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET analyses. The relationship between independent variables and response was described by a second order polynomial equation. Statistical testing of the model was performed with F-test to obtain the correlation between the experimental data and predicted results for all responses. The adequacy of the model equations were evaluated by the Adjusted and Predicted R2 coefficients observed to be close to each other for all the six responses. Data obtained from recycling used oil using clay sample showed the optimum condition as; activation temperature of 106.80oC, acid concentration of 3M and activation time of 180 minutes. A yield of 66.28% was obtained at optimum condition and characterized fuel qualities found close to fresh oil used as standard in this work. The surface area and adsorption capacity of raw clay and activated clay samples was observed to have increase from 19.8m2/g to 437.83m2/g and 1.41 mg/g to 8.64 mg/g respectively. This difference adequately described the improvement of the adsorption phenomena of the activated clay over raw clay samples.

  15. Controlling accumulation of fermentation inhibitors in biorefinery recycle water using microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnivetskaya Tatiana A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial fuel cells (MFC and microbial electrolysis cells are electrical devices that treat water using microorganisms and convert soluble organic matter into electricity and hydrogen, respectively. Emerging cellulosic biorefineries are expected to use large amounts of water during production of ethanol. Pretreatment of cellulosic biomass results in production of fermentation inhibitors which accumulate in process water and make the water recycle process difficult. Use of MFCs to remove the inhibitory sugar and lignin degradation products from recycle water is investigated in this study. Results Use of an MFC to reduce the levels of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, vanillic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxyacetophenone while simultaneously producing electricity is demonstrated here. An integrated MFC design approach was used which resulted in high power densities for the MFC, reaching up to 3700 mW/m2 (356 W/m3 net anode volume and a coulombic efficiency of 69%. The exoelectrogenic microbial consortium enriched in the anode was characterized using a 16S rRNA clone library method. A unique exoelectrogenic microbial consortium dominated by δ-Proteobacteria (50%, along with β-Proteobacteria (28%, α-Proteobacteria (14%, γ-Proteobacteria (6% and others was identified. The consortium demonstrated broad substrate specificity, ability to handle high inhibitor concentrations (5 to 20 mM with near complete removal, while maintaining long-term stability with respect to power production. Conclusion Use of MFCs for removing fermentation inhibitors has implications for: 1 enabling higher ethanol yields at high biomass loading in cellulosic ethanol biorefineries, 2 improved water recycle and 3 electricity production up to 25% of total biorefinery power needs.

  16. Ansaldo programs on fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcenaro, B.G.; Federici, F. [Ansaldo Ricerche Srl, Genova (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    The growth in traffic and the importance of maintaining a stable ecology at the global scale, particularly with regard to atmospheric pollution, raises the necessity to realize a new generation of vehicles which are more efficient, more economical and compatible with the environment. At European level, the Car of Tomorrow task force has identified fuel cells as a promising alternative propulsion system. Ansaldo Ricerche has been involved in the development of fuel cell vehicles since the early nineties. Current ongoing programs relates to: (1) Fuel cell bus demonstrator (EQHEPP BUS) Test in 1996 (2) Fuel cell boat demonstrator (EQHHPP BOAT) Test in 1997 (3) Fuel cell passenger car prototype (FEVER) Test in 1997 (4) 2nd generation Fuel cell bus (FCBUS) 1996-1999 (5) 2nd generation Fuel cell passenger car (HYDRO-GEN) 1996-1999.

  17. Recycled tire crumb rubber anodes for sustainable power production in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heming; Davidson, Matthew; Zuo, Yi; Ren, Zhiyong

    One of the greatest challenges facing microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in large scale applications is the high cost of electrode material. We demonstrate here that recycled tire crumb rubber coated with graphite paint can be used instead of fine carbon materials as the MFC anode. The tire particles showed satisfactory conductivity after 2-4 layers of coating. The specific surface area of the coated rubber was over an order of magnitude greater than similar sized graphite granules. Power production in single chamber tire-anode air-cathode MFCs reached a maximum power density of 421 mW m -2, with a coulombic efficiency (CE) of 25.1%. The control graphite granule MFC achieved higher power density (528 mW m -2) but lower CE (15.6%). The light weight of tire particle could reduce clogging and maintenance cost but posts challenges in conductive connection. The use of recycled material as the MFC anodes brings a new perspective to MFC design and application and carries significant economic and environmental benefit potentials.

  18. Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Belard

    2006-09-21

    Verizon is presently operating the largest Distributed Generation Fuel Cell project in the USA. Situated in Long Island, NY, the power plant is composed of seven (7) fuel cells operating in parallel with the Utility grid from the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA). Each fuel cell has an output of 200 kW, for a total of 1.4 mW generated from the on-site plant. The remaining power to meet the facility demand is purchased from LIPA. The fuel cell plant is utilized as a co-generation system. A by-product of the fuel cell electric generation process is high temperature water. The heat content of this water is recovered from the fuel cells and used to drive two absorption chillers in the summer and a steam generator in the winter. Cost savings from the operations of the fuel cells are forecasted to be in excess of $250,000 per year. Annual NOx emissions reductions are equivalent to removing 1020 motor vehicles from roadways. Further, approximately 5.45 million metric tons (5 millions tons) of CO2 per year will not be generated as a result of this clean power generation. The project was partially financed with grants from the New York State Energy R&D Authority (NYSERDA) and from Federal Government Departments of Defense and Energy.

  19. Expansive development of a decommissioning program 'recycle simulator' in nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiuchi, T.; Ozaki, S.; Hironaga, M.

    2004-01-01

    A decommissioning program 'Recycle Simulator' should be put into practice in careful consideration of both recycle of non-radioactive wastes and reduce of radioactive wastes in the coming circulatory social system. Nevertheless current support systems for decommissioning planning mainly deal with decontamination, safety storage and dismantlement, so-called the prior part of the total decommissioning process. Authors emphasize the necessity of total planning of decommissioning including recycle or reuse of a large amount of demolition materials and are propelling the development of the multi expert system named 'Recycle Simulator'. This paper presents an algorithm of the recycling and reusing scenario of demolition materials and a summarized configuration. 'Recycle Simulator' for the demolished concrete was developed in 2000 and presented at a previous International Conference on Nuclear Engineering. Construction of a supporting multi expert system for the totally planning of decommissioning projects is objected by expansive development of the previous version. 3 main conclusions obtained from this paper are the following. (1) The previously developed expert system was advanced in its estimation function toward the satisfaction of decommissioning planners. (2) The applicability of the system was enlarged to all the radioactive and non-radioactive wastes, demolished metal and concrete products, in a corresponding site of decommissioning. (3) Finally decommissioning recycle simulator was completed in a harmonized unification. (authors)

  20. Fueling with edge recycling to high-density in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, A.W., E-mail: leonard@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Elder, J.D. [University of Toronto Institute of Aerospace Studies, Toronto, Canada M3H 5T6 (Canada); Canik, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Groebner, R.J.; Osborne, T.H. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Pedestal fueling through edge recycling is examined with the interpretive OEDGE code for high-density discharges in DIII-D. A high current, high-density discharge is found to have a similar radial ion flux profile through the pedestal to a lower current, lower density discharge. The higher density discharge, however, has a greater density gradient indicating a pedestal particle diffusion coefficient that scales near linear with 1/I{sub p}. The time dependence of density profile is taken into account in the analysis of a discharge with low frequency ELMs. The time-dependent analysis indicates that the inferred neutral ionization source is inadequate to account for the increase in the density profile between ELMs, implying an inward density convection, or density pinch, near the top of the pedestal.

  1. Dresden 1 Plutonium Recycle Program report, January 1, 1976--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, M.Y.

    1977-01-01

    This report on the Dresden 1 Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program covers the period from January 1, 1976 through June 30, 1976. Included are a summary of reactor operations, power and exposure histories for each mixed-oxide assembly, and the plans and schedule for the remainder of the program

  2. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummery, T.E.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1983-05-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is now well established. This report outlines the generic research and technological development underway in this program to assess the concept of immobilization and subsequent disposal of nuclear fuel waste deep in a stable plutonic rock in the Canadian Shield. The program participants, funding, schedule and associated external review processes are briefly outlined. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely, immobilization studies, geoscience research and environmental and safety assessment, are described in more detail

  3. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummery, T.E.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1984-12-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is in the fourth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the basic safety and environmental aspects of the concept of isolating immobilized fuel waste by deep underground disposal in plutonic rock. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely immobilization studies, geoscience research, and environmental and safety assessment, are described. Program funding, scheduling and associated external review processes are briefly outlined

  4. Recycling Carbon Dioxide into Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels: Electrolysis of Carbon Dioxide and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher Ronald

    Great quantities of hydrocarbon fuels will be needed for the foreseeable future, even if electricity based energy carriers begin to partially replace liquid hydrocarbons in the transportation sector. Fossil fuels and biomass are the most common feedstocks for production of hydrocarbon fuels. However, using renewable or nuclear energy, carbon dioxide and water can be recycled into sustainable hydrocarbon fuels in non-biological processes which remove oxygen from CO2 and H2O (the reverse of fuel combustion). Capture of CO2 from the atmosphere would enable a closed-loop carbon-neutral fuel cycle. The purpose of this work was to develop critical components of a system that recycles CO2 into liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The concept is examined at several scales, beginning with a broad scope analysis of large-scale sustainable energy systems and ultimately studying electrolysis of CO 2 and H2O in high temperature solid oxide cells as the heart of the energy conversion, in the form of three experimental studies. The contributions of these studies include discoveries about electrochemistry and materials that could significantly improve the overall energy use and economics of the CO2-to-fuels system. The broad scale study begins by assessing the sustainability and practicality of the various energy carriers that could replace petroleum-derived hydrocarbon fuels, including other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and storage of electricity on-board vehicles in batteries, ultracapacitors, and flywheels. Any energy carrier can store the energy of any energy source. This sets the context for CO2 recycling -- sustainable energy sources like solar and wind power can be used to provide the most energy-dense, convenient fuels which can be readily used in the existing infrastructure. The many ways to recycle CO2 into hydrocarbons, based on thermolysis, thermochemical loops, electrolysis, and photoelectrolysis of CO2 and/or H 2O, are critically reviewed. A process based on high temperature co

  5. French development program on fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viala, M.; Bourgeois, M.

    1991-01-01

    The need to close the fuel cycle of fast reactors makes the development of the cycle installations (fuel fabrication, irradiated assembly conditioning before reprocessing, reprocessing and waste management) especially independent with the development of the reactor. French experience with the integrated cycle over a period of about 25 years, the tonnage of fuels fabricated (more than 100 t of mixed oxides) for the Rapsodie, Phoenix and SuperPhoenix reactors, and the tonnage of reprocessed fuel (nearly 30 t of plutonium fuel) demonstrate the control of the cycle operations. The capacities of the cycle installations in existence and under construction are largely adequate for presents needs, even including a new European EFR reactor. They include the Cadarache fuel fabrication complex, the La Hague UP2-800 reprocessing plant, and the Marcoule pilot facility. Short- and medium-term R and D programs are connected with fuel developments, with the primary objective of very high burnups. For the longer term and for a specific plant to reprocess fast reactor fuels, the programs could concern new fabrication and reprocessing systems and the study of the consequences of the reduction in fuel out-of-core time

  6. A study on the criticality search of transuranium recycling BWR core by adjusting supplied fuel composition in equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Takeshi; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    There have been some difficulties in carrying out an extensive evaluation of the equilibrium state of Light Water Reactor (LWR) recycling operations keeping their fixed criticality condition using conventional design codes because of the complexity of their calculation model for practical fuel and core design and because of a large amount of calculation time. This study presents an efficient approach to secure the criticality in an equilibrium cycle by adjusting a supplied fuel composition. The criticality search is performed by the use of fuel importance obtained from the equation adjoint to a continuously fuel supplied core burnup equation. Using this method, some numerical analyses were carried out in order to evaluate the mixed oxide (MOX) fuel composition of equilibrium Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) cores satisfying the criticality requirement. The results showed the comprehensive and quantitative characteristics on the equilibrium cores confining transuraniums for different MOX fuel loading fractions and irradiating conditions

  7. A study on the criticality search of transuranium recycling BWR core by adjusting supplied fuel composition in equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Takeshi; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    1997-01-01

    There have been some difficulties in carrying out an extensive evaluation of the equilibrium state of Light Water Reactor (LWR) recycling operations keeping their fixed criticality condition using conventional design codes, because of the complexity of their calculational model for practical fuel and core design and because of a large amount of calculation time. This study presents an efficient approach to secure the criticality in an equilibrium cycle by adjusting a supplied fuel composition. The criticality search is performed by the use of fuel importance obtained from the equilibrium adjoint to a continuously fuel supplied core burnup equation. Using this method, some numerical analyses were carried out in order to evaluate the mixed oxide (MOX) fuel composition of equilibrium Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) cores satisfying the criticality requirement. The results showed the comprehensive and quantitative characteristics on the equilibrium cores confining transuranium for different MOX fuel loading fractions and irradiating conditions. (author)

  8. Renewable Fuel Pathways II Final Rule to Identify Additional Fuel Pathways under Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    This final rule describes EPA’s evaluation of biofuels derived from biogas fuel pathways under the RFS program and other minor amendments related to survey requirements associated with ULSD program and misfueling mitigation regulations for E15.

  9. Determining the success of curbside recycling programs by surveys and direct measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, J.W. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science; Riley, P.C. [Waste Management of Oklahoma, Inc., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Curbside collection of recyclable material can be expensive because the inherent costs of curbside collection are high, but also because amounts collected per residence are small compared to the total waste stream, and extra time may be required to carry out additional activities, such as sorting. A better understanding of how households participate in curbside recycling programs may help operators reduce costs. In this paper, a survey and direct observation of set-out behavior are used to increase the understanding of a recycling program in the City of the Village, OK. Specifically, the paper addresses: (1) relationships between set-out amount, set-out frequency, and demographics; and (2) respondent awareness of their own recycling behavior and activity on their street. Analysis of set-out amount, set-out frequency, and household size data indicates that, on average, smaller households set out less recyclables overall, but more per person, compared to larger households. As expected, set-out frequency appears to be related to the amount of recyclables set out for collection; houses storing more recyclables per week set them out more often. However, infrequent participants (one set-out in ten weeks) set out less material per week than other participating households, but in larger amounts. On the rare occasions that they set out material, they set out approximately 25 pounds of materials, whereas the average amount set out by other households is less than 15 pounds per set-out. Variability in set-out frequency and amount, not explained by household size or other demographic variables, indicates that other factors are important. There is hope that program operators can influence participants to minimize set-out frequency, thus increasing the efficiency of collection.

  10. Control System Based on Anode Offgas Recycle for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanghong Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The conflicting operation objectives between rapid load following and the fuel depletion avoidance as well as the strong interactions between the thermal and electrical parameters make the SOFC system difficult to control. This study focuses on the design of the decoupling control for the thermal and electrical characteristics of the SOFC system through anode offgas recycling (AOR. The decoupling control system can independently manipulate the thermal and electrical parameters, which interact with one another in most cases, such as stack temperatures, burner temperature, system current, and system power. Under the decoupling control scheme, the AOR is taken as a manipulation variable. The burner controller maintains the burner temperature without being affected by abrupt power change. The stack temperature controller properly coordinates with the burner temperature controller to independently modulate the stack thermal parameters. For the electrical problems, the decoupling control scheme shows its superiority over the conventional controller in alleviating rapid load following and fuel depletion avoidance. System-level simulation under a power-changing case is performed to validate the control freedom between the thermal and electrical characteristics as well as the stability, efficiency, and robustness of the novel system control scheme.

  11. Nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear fuel makes the rounds: choosing a closed fuel cycle, nuclear fuel cycle processes, front-end of the fuel cycle: from crude ore to enriched uranium, back-end of the fuel cycle: the second life of nuclear fuel, and tomorrow: multiple recycling while generating increasingly less waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippon, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    France has opted for a policy of processing and recycling spent fuel. This option has already been deployed commercially since the 1990's, but will reach its full potential with the fourth generation. The CEA developed the processes in use today, and is pursuing research to improve, extend, and adapt these technologies to tomorrow's challenges. France has opted for a 'closed cycle' to recycle the reusable materials in spent fuel (uranium and plutonium) and optimise ultimate waste management. France has opted for a 'closed' nuclear fuel cycle. Spent fuel is processed to recover the reusable materials: uranium and plutonium. The remaining components (fission products and minor actinides) are the ultimate waste. This info-graphic shows the main steps in the fuel cycle currently implemented commercially in France. From the mine to the reactor, a vast industrial system ensures the conversion of uranium contained in the ore to obtain uranium oxide (UOX) fuel pellets. Selective extraction, purification, enrichment - key scientific and technical challenges for the teams in the Nuclear Energy Division (DEN). The back-end stages of the fuel cycle for recycling the reusable materials in spent fuel and conditioning the final waste-forms have reached maturity. CEA teams are pursuing their research in support of industry to optimise these processes. Multi-recycle plutonium, make even better use of uranium resources and, over the longer term, explore the possibility of transmuting the most highly radioactive waste: these are the challenges facing future nuclear systems. (authors)

  12. The economics of plutonium-uranium recycling to the nuclear program in the country of Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzig, W.F.; Serradell, V.

    1982-01-01

    The increasing uncertainty of oil supplies and the rapid price changes associated with this uncertainty have encouraged some nations to turn increasingly to nuclear energy to produce electricity. The economic penalty associated with no spent fuel reprocessing for the country of Spain is determined, and this serves as an example of one of the consequences of a nonproliferation policy of a ''throw-away'' fuel cycle. The growth rate of electricity is forecast, and the Spanish plan for the addition of nuclear plants is examined. The neutronics of the ''throw-away'', the uranium recycle, and the uranium and plutonium cycle systems are reviewed and the economics of each system compared. There is a definite economic advantage to the uranium and plutonium recycle system being employed as early as possible. Such employment will have favorable foreign trade imbalance implications and foster national independence of imported oil

  13. Highlights of the French program on PWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pages, J P [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires

    1997-12-01

    The presentation reviews the French programme on PWR fuel including the overall results of the year 1996 for nuclear operation; fuel management and economy; French nuclear electricity generation sites; production of nuclear generated electricity; energy availability of the 900 and 1,300 Mw PWR units; average radioactive liquid releases excluding tritium per unit; plutonium recycling experience.

  14. Economic potential of fuel recycling options: A lifecycle cost analysis of future nuclear system transition in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Ruxing; Choi, Sungyeol; Il Ko, Won; Kim, Sungki

    2017-01-01

    In today's profit-driven market, how best to pursue advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies while maintaining the cost competitiveness of nuclear electricity is of crucial importance to determine the implementation of spent fuel reprocessing and recycling in China. In this study, a comprehensive techno-economic analysis is undertaken to evaluate the economic feasibility of ongoing national projects and the technical compatibility with China's future fuel cycle transition. We investigated the dynamic impacts of technical and economic uncertainties in the lifecycle of a nuclear system. The electricity generation costs associated with four potential fuel cycle transition scenarios were simulated by probabilistic and deterministic approaches and then compared in detail. The results showed that the total cost of a once-through system is lowest compared those of other advanced systems involving reprocessing and recycling. However, thanks to the consequential uncertainties caused by the further progress toward technology maturity, the economic potential of fuel recycling options was proven through a probabilistic uncertainty analysis. Furthermore, it is recommended that a compulsory executive of closed fuel cycle policy would pose some investment risk in the near term, though the execution of a series of R&D initiatives with a flexible roadmap would be valuable in the long run. - Highlights: • Real-time economic performance of the four scenarios of China's nuclear fuel cycle system transition until 2100. • Systematic assessments of techno-economic feasibility for ongoing national reprocessing projects. • Investigation the cost impact on nuclear electricity generation caused by uncertainties through probabilistic analysis. • Recommendation for sustainable implementation of fuel cycle R&D initiative ingrate with flexible roadmap in the long run.

  15. Development of a pneumatic transfer system for HTGR recycle fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.E.; Johnson, D.R.

    1978-02-01

    In support of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Fuel Refabrication Development Program, an experimental pneumatic transfer system was constructed to determine the feasibility of pneumatically conveying pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles of Triso and Biso designs. Tests were conducted with these particles in each of their nonpyrophoric forms to determine pressure drops, particle velocities, and gas flow requirements during pneumatic transfer as well as to evaluate particle wear and breakage. Results indicated that the material can be pneumatically conveyed at low pressures without excessive damage to the particles or their coatings

  16. Anolyte recycling enhanced bioelectricity generation of the buffer-free single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yueping; Chen, Jinli; Shi, Yugang; Li, Xiufen; Yang, Na; Wang, Xinhua

    2017-11-01

    Anolyte acidification is an inevitable restriction for the bioelectricity generation of buffer-free microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this work, acidification of the buffer-free KCl anolyte has been thoroughly eliminated through anolyte recycling. The accumulated HCO 3 - concentration in the recycled KCl anolyte was above 50mM, which played as natural buffer and elevated the anolyte pH to above 8. The maximum power density (P max ) increased from 322.9mWm -2 to 527.2mWm -2 , which is comparable with the phosphate buffered MFC. Besides Geobacter genus, the gradually increased anolyte pH and conductivity induced the growing of electrochemically active Geoalkalibacter genus, in the anode biofilm. Anolyte recycling is a feasible strategy to strengthen the self-buffering capacity of buffer-free MFCs, thoroughly eliminate the anolyte acidification and prominently enhance the electric power. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermodynamic and exergoeconomic analysis of biogas fed solid oxide fuel cell power plants emphasizing on anode and cathode recycling: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehr, A.S.; Mahmoudi, S.M.S.; Yari, M.; Chitsaz, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Four biogas-fed solid oxide fuel cell power plants are proposed. • Performance of systems is compared with each other economically. • Efficiency of biogas fed fuel cell with anode–cathode recycling is the highest. • For current density of 6000 A/m"2 the optimum anode recycle ratio is around 0.25. • Unit product cost of biogas fed fuel cell with anode–cathode recycling is 19.07$/GJ. - Abstract: Four different configurations of natural gas and biogas fed solid oxide fuel cell are proposed and analyzed thermoeconomically, focusing on the influence of anode and/or cathode gas recycling. It is observed that the net output power is maximized at an optimum current density the value of which is lowered as the methane concentration in the biogas is decreased. Results indicate that when the current density is low, there is an optimum anode recycling ratio at which the thermal efficiency is maximized. In addition, an increase in the anode recycling ratio increases the unit product cost of the system while an increase in the cathode recycling ratio has a revers effect. For the same working conditions, the solid oxide fuel cell with anode and cathode recycling is superior to the other configurations and its thermal efficiency is calculated as 46.09% being 6.81% higher than that of the simple solid oxide fuel cell fed by natural gas. The unit product cost of the solid oxide fuel cell-anode and cathode recycling system is calculated as 19.07$/GJ which is about 35% lower than the corresponding value for the simple natural gas fed solid oxide fuel cell system.

  18. Evaluation of the recycling costs, as a disposal form of the spent nuclear fuel; Evaluacion de los costos del reciclado como una forma de disposicion del combustible nuclear gastado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios, J.C. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jrrs@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    At the moment there are 2 BWR reactors operating in the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde in Mexico. At the end of the programmed life of the reactors (40 years) its will have completed 26 operation cycles, with will have 6712 spent fuel assemblies will be in the pools of the power station. Up to now, the decision on the destination of the high level wastes (spent nuclear fuel) it has not been determined in Mexico, the same as in other countries, adopting a politics of 'to wait to see that it happens in the world', in this respect, in the world two practical alternatives exist, one is to store the fuel in repositories designed for that end, another is reprocess the fuel to recycle the plutonium contained in it, both solutions have their particular technical and economic problematic. In this work it is evaluated from the economic point of view the feasibility of having the spent fuel, using the one recycled fuel, for that which thinks about a consistent scenario of a BWR reactor in which the fuel discharged in each operation cycle is reprocessed and its are built fuel assemblies of the MOX type to replace partly to the conventional fuel. This scenario shows an alternative to the indefinite storage of the high level radioactive waste. The found results when comparing from the economic point of view both options, show that the one recycled, even with the current costs of the uranium it is of the order of 7% more expensive that the option of storing the fuel in repositories constructed for that purpose. However the volumes of spent fuel decrease in 66%. (Author)

  19. Beyond case studies: Quantitative effects of recycling, incentive, and diversion program choices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skumatz, L.A. [Skumatz Economic Research Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Communities, facing tight budgets, volatile markets, and the recycling backlash are turning their attention to making their programs more efficient and effective. Unfortunately, communities have very little quantitative information available to help them improve their programs. This is despite the fact that the majority of recycling programs have been running for over 6 years. Further, the author found that there are many thousands of curbside and dropoff recycling programs across the nation, as well as thousands of yard waste and variable rate programs. Still, with all these years of operating experience across the nation, at conferences, when planners ask about the likely impacts of possible program improvements, the answers usually begin, ``well, the City of [fill in the blank] made that change and found...``. Answers like this are seldom transferable to other communities. Similarly, most published information also relies on one or a few (less than ten) case studies, and published case studies usually describe programs that are outstanding in some way, making the information even less transferable. This type of information is wholly inadequate to derive information that is transferable to any other community. Can one really expect information from the City of San Jose, California, to transfer directly to the Village of Hartland, Wisconsin? That is the level of information that has been available thus far to planners. This study uses specially collected data from over 500 communities across North America as the basis for a statistical analysis of those programmatic and socio-demographic factors that contribute most to higher levels of recycling diversion. The work is unique in that it provides the first reliable quantitative information for use by community program planners in analyzing impacts of alternative programs and their cost-effectiveness to design sustainable, appropriate programs to improve diversion.

  20. MOX recycling-an industrial reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shallo, G.D.F.

    1996-01-01

    Reprocessing and plutonium recycling have now attained industrial maturity in France and Europe. Specifically, mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel is fabricated and used in light water reactors (LWRs) in satisfactory operating conditions. The utilities and the fuel cycle industry experience no technical difficulties, and European recycling programs are growing steadily, from 18 reactors in operation today up to 50 expected around the year 2000, putting the system reprocessing-recycling in coherence: 25 t of plutonium will then be used each year to produce the electricity equivalence of 25 millions tons of oil. Plutonium recycling in MOX fuel in current LWRs proves to be technically safe and economically competitive and meets natural resource savings and environmental protection objectives. And recycling responds properly to the nonproliferation concerns. Such an industrial experience gives a unique reference for weapons plutonium disposition through MOX use in reactors

  1. Introduction of the Recycling program for Nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Beom; Shin, Byung Woo; Park, Jae Whan; Park, Soo Jin

    2009-01-01

    The LOF is the abbreviation of Location outside Facilities using in safeguards. IAEA want to control the location using the small nuclear material over the world. The depleted uranium used in Industrial field should be controlled by the Government according to the agreement between the IAEA and the ROK. From 2006, The ROK is managing the locations in the LOF. The detail article governing the locations is on the Location attachment agreed between two bodies. As of end of 2007, The LOF was consisting of 64 locations. Now, A number of Locations are increasing up to 75. The KINAC(Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control) is controlling the data about the amount of nuclear material in LOF. The KINAC is trying to upgrade the efficiency and accuracy about the data. The KINAC will make a storage house at the underground of head office from 2009. The purpose of the storage system in KINAC is gathering the nuclear material, which is difficult to control by the industries, especially the nuclear material involved in LOF. The final goal for gathering the nuclear materials are recycling to new another machine. I would like to introduce the handling case of the Depleted uranium in their countries. On this paper, I will show 4 countries case briefly

  2. The low-enrichment fuel development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, D.

    1993-01-01

    In the 1950s and 1960s, low-power research reactors were built around the world utilized MTR-type fuel elements containing 20% enriched uranium. However, the demand for higher specific power created a need for greater uranium-235 concentrations. Early difficulties in increasing uranium content led to the substitution of highly enriched uranium in place of the 20% enriched fuel previously utilized. The highly enriched material also yielded other benefits including longer core residence time, higher specific reactivity, and somewhat lower cost. Highly enriched material then became readily available and was used for high-power reactors as well as in low-power reactors where 20% enriched material would have sufficed. The trend toward higher and higher specific power also led to the development of the dispersion-type fuels which utilized highly enriched uranium at a concentration of about 40 wt%. In the 1970's, however, concerns were raised about the proliferation resistance of fuels and fuel cycles. As a consequence, the U.S. Department of State has recently prohibited the foreign shipment of highly enriched material, except where prior contractual obligation or special merit exists. This will impact on the availability and utilization of highly enriched uranium for research and test reactor fuel. It has also stimulated development programs on fuels with higher uranium content which would allow the use of uranium of lower enrichment. The purpose of this report is to briefly describe the overall fuel-development program which is coordinated by Argonne National Laboratory for the Department of Energy, and to indicate the current and potential uranium loadings. Other reports will address the individual fuel-development activities in greater detail

  3. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan (September 2011)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    The Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan outlines the strategy, activities, and plans of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, which includes hydrogen and fuel cell activities within the EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program and the DOE offices of Nuclear Energy, Fossil Energy, and Science.

  4. Program on MOX fuel utilization in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenda, Hirofumi

    2000-01-01

    MOX fuel utilization program by the Japanese electric power companies was released in February, 1997. Principal philosophy for MOX fuel design is that MOX fuel shall be compatible with Uranium fuel and behavior of core loaded with MOX fuel shall be similar to that of conventional core. MOX fuel is designed so that geometry and nuclear capability of MOX fuel are equivalent to Uranium fuel. (author)

  5. The ORNL plasma fueling program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Milora, S.L.; Foster, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing pellet injectors for over ten years. These devices produce frozen hydrogen isotope pellets and then accelerate the projectiles to speeds in the km/s range by either pneumatic or mechanical techniques. A variety of designs have been developed, including single-shot guns, multiple-shot guns, machine guns, and centrifugal accelerators. These injectors have been used to inject hydrogen and deuterium pellets into plasmas on numerous tokamak experiments resulting in improved plasma performance. ORNL has recently provided pellet fueling systems for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), the Joint European Torus (JET), and the Tore Supra tokamak. This paper discusses developments on these injector designs. 10 refs

  6. Final generic environmental statement on the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel in light water cooled reactors. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    An assessment is presented of the health, safety and environmental effects of the entire light water reactor fuel cycle, considering the comparative effects of three major alternatives: no recycle, recycle of uranium only, and recycle of both uranium and plutonium. The assessment covers the period from 1975 through the year 2000 and includes the cumulative effects for the entire period as well as projections for specific years. Topics discussed include: the light water reactor with plutonium recycle; mixed oxide fuel fabrication; reprocessing plant operations; supporting uranium fuel cycle; transportation of radioactive materials; radioactive waste management; storage of plutonium; radiological health assessment; extended spent fuel storage; and blending of plutonium and uranium at reprocessing plants

  7. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels; Kloorattujen orgaanisten yhdisteiden muodostuminen kierraetyspolttoaineiden leijukerrospoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesterinen, R.; Kallio, M.; Kirjalainen, T.; Kolsi, A.; Merta, M. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  8. Unconventional recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, K.M.

    1996-05-01

    Despite advances made in recycling technology and markets for materials over the past few years, recycling at convention centers, particularly on the show floor itself, can be a vexing problem. Part of the problem lies in the fact that recycling at convention centers has more to do with logistics than it does with these industry trends. However, given the varied nature of convention centers, and the shows they book, a rigid approach to recycling at convention centers is not always feasible. Like the numerous different curbside programs serving communities across the country, what works for one convention center--and one show--many not work for another. These difficulties notwithstanding, more convention centers are offering recycling programs today, and more groups booking conventions these days have begun requesting recycling services.

  9. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1973. [HTGR fuel reprocessing, fuel fabrication, fuel irradiation, core materials, and fission product distribution; GCFR fuel irradiation and steam generator modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Coobs, J.H.; Lotts, A.L.

    1976-04-01

    Progress is summarized in studies relating to HTGR fuel reprocessing, refabrication, and recycle; HTGR fuel materials development and performance testing; HTGR PCRV development; HTGR materials investigations; HTGR fuel chemistry; HTGR safety studies; and GCFR irradiation experiments and steam generator modeling.

  10. Development of fusion fuel cycles: Large deviations from US defense program systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, James Edward, E-mail: james.klein@srnl.doe.gov; Poore, Anita Sue; Babineau, David W.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • All tritium fuel cycles start with a “Tritium Process.” All have similar tritium processing steps. • Fusion tritium fuel cycles minimize process tritium inventories for various reasons. • US defense program facility designs did not minimize in-process inventories. • Reduced inventory tritium facilities will lower public risk. - Abstract: Fusion energy research is dominated by plasma physics and materials technology development needs with smaller levels of effort and funding dedicated to tritium fuel cycle development. The fuel cycle is necessary to supply and recycle tritium at the required throughput rate; additionally, tritium confinement throughout the facility is needed to meet regulatory and environmental release limits. Small fuel cycle development efforts are sometimes rationalized by stating that tritium processing technology has already been developed by nuclear weapons programs and these existing processes only need rescaling or engineering design to meet the needs of fusion fuel cycles. This paper compares and contrasts features of tritium fusion fuel cycles to United States Cold War era defense program tritium systems. It is concluded that further tritium fuel cycle development activities are needed to provide technology development beneficial to both fusion and defense programs tritium systems.

  11. A status report on the integral fast reactor fuels and safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, D.R.; Seidel, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    The integral fast reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor (ALMR) concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The IFR program is specifically responsible for the irradiation performance, advanced core design, safety analysis, and development of the fuel cycle for the US Department of Energy's ALMR program. The basic elements of the IFR concept are (a) metallic fuel, (b) liquid-sodium cooling, (c) modular, pool-type reactor configuration, (d) an integral fuel cycle based upon pyrometallurgical processing. The most significant safety aspects of the IFR program result from its unique fuel design, a ternary alloy of uranium, plutonium, and zirconium. This fuel is based on experience gained through > 25 yr operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) with a uranium alloy metallic fuel. The ultimate criteria for fuel pin design is the overall integrity at the target burnup. The probability of core meltdown is remote; however, a theoretical possibility of core meltdown remains. The next major step in the IFR development program will be a full-scale pyroprocessing demonstration to be carried out in conjunction with EBR-II. The IFR fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing will also have a dramatic impact on waste management options and on actinide recycling

  12. Program summary. Nuclear waste management and fuel cycle programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This Program Summary Document describes the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Programs. Particular emphasis is given to near-term, specifically Fiscal Year (FY) 1982, activities. The overall objective of these programs will be achieved by the demonstration of: (1) safe radioactive waste management practices for storage and disposal of high-level waste and (2) advanced technologies necessary to close the nuclear fuel cycle on a schedule which would assure a healthy future for the development of nuclear power in this country

  13. Development and application of special instrumentation for materials accountancy and process control in spent fuel recycle plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, P.A.; Gardner, N.; Merrill, N.H.; Whitehouse, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    Safe and optimum operations of spent fuel recycle plants rely on the availability of real time measurement systems at key points in the process. More than thirty types of special instrument systems have been developed and commissioned on the THORP reprocessing plant at Sellafield. These systems are compiled together with the associated information on measurement purpose, measurement technique and plant performance. A number of these measurement systems are of interest to support Safeguards arrangements on the plant. A more detailed overview of two such instrument systems respectively within the Head End and Product Finishing Stages of THORP is provided. The first of these is the Hulls Monitor, based on high resolution gamma spectrometry, as well as active and passive neutron measurements, of the basket of leached fuel cladding. This provides vital data for criticality assurance, nuclear material accountancy and inventory determination for ultimate disposal of the cladding waste. The second system is the Plutonium Inventory Monitoring System (PIMS) which employs passive neutron counting from a distributed array of neutron detectors within the Pu Finishing Line. This provides a near real time estimate of Pu inventories both during operations and at clean out of the Finishing Line. Both the Hulls Monitor and PIMS technologies are applicable to MOX Fuel recycle. Both systems enhance the control of fissile material in key areas of the recycle process which are of interest to the Safeguards authorities. (author)

  14. A method for recovering and separating palladium, technetium, rhodium and ruthenium contained in solutions resulting from nuclear fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.H.

    1974-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for recovering and separating technetium and metals of the platinum group, i.e. palladium, rhodium and ruthenium existing as fission products. The method according to the invention is characterized by contacting a residuary acid aqueous solution provided by nuclear fuel recycling with successive carbon beds which have adsorbed different chelating agents specific for the metals to be recovered in order that said metals be selectively chelated and extracted from the solution. This method is suitable for recovering the above metals from solutions provided by reprocessing spent fuels [fr

  15. Recycling of nuclear fuel swarf at the fabrication of UO sub(2)-pellets and its influence on the irradiation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.S.; Lameiras, F.S.; Santos, A.M.M. dos

    1991-01-01

    From the fabrication of UO sub(2) pellets for light water reactor fuel rods, nuclear fuel scraps results in form of UO sub(2) grinding swarf and UO sub(2) sinter scraps oxidized to U sub(3)O sub(8) powder. Detailed investigations on five types of UO sub(2) pellets fabricated with different portions of this scrap kinds added to the UO sub(2) press powder showed that there is only a small influence of such scrap additions on the irradiation behavior, especially for the fission gas release. This allows to recycle the fabrication scrap in a simple and economic way. (author)

  16. Economic and policy instrument analyses in support of the scrap tire recycling program in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ni-Bin

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the cost-effectiveness and the role of economic and policy instruments, such as the combined product tax-recycling subsidy scheme or a tradable permit, for scrap tire recycling has been of crucial importance in a market-oriented environmental management system. Promoting product (tire) stewardship on one hand and improving incentive-based recycling policy on the other hand requires a comprehensive analysis of the interfaces and interactions in the nexus of economic impacts, environmental management, environmental valuation, and cost-benefit analysis. This paper presents an assessment of the interfaces and interactions between the implementation of policy instruments and its associated economic evaluation for sustaining a scrap tire recycling program in Taiwan during the era of the strong economic growth of the late 1990s. It begins with an introduction of the management of the co-evolution between technology metrics of scrap tire recycling and organizational changes for meeting the managerial goals island-wide during the 1990s. The database collected and used for such analysis covers 17 major tire recycling firms and 10 major tire manufacturers at that time. With estimates of scrap tire generation and possible scale of subsidy with respect to differing tire recycling technologies applied, economic analysis eventually leads to identify the associated levels of product tax with respect to various sizes of new tires. It particularly demonstrates a broad perspective of how an integrated econometric and engineering economic analysis can be conducted to assist in implementing policy instruments for scrap tire management. Research findings indicate that different subsidy settings for collection, processing, and end use of scrap tires should be configured to ameliorate the overall managerial effectiveness. Removing the existing boundaries between designated service districts could strengthen the competitiveness of scrap tires recycling industry, helping to

  17. Fuel costs of a light water reactor with fissile material recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, J.

    1984-01-01

    In the light of the present prices of natural uranium and separative work and fabrication costs, savings can be achieved by reloading recycled fissile material. As in all recycling techniques, the product recovered cannot meet the whole new requirement. No excessive economic expectations should be associated with fissile material recycling in ligth water reactors. The main advantages of the procedure are the conservation of resources and the safety against proliferation. Besides, the original purpose of reprocessing should not be forgotten, i.e., in addition to the recycling of fissile material, to have a safe and easy method of secular disposal of high level waste (concentrated fission products). (orig.) [de

  18. Fuel Flexible Turbine System (FFTS) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-12-31

    In this fuel flexible turbine system (FFTS) program, the Parker gasification system was further optimized, fuel composition of biomass gasification process was characterized and the feasibility of running Capstone MicroTurbine(TM) systems with gasification syngas fuels was evaluated. With high hydrogen content, the gaseous fuel from a gasification process of various feed stocks such as switchgrass and corn stover has high reactivity and high flashback propensity when running in the current lean premixed injectors. The research concluded that the existing C65 microturbine combustion system, which is designed for natural gas, is not able to burn the high hydrogen content syngas due to insufficient resistance to flashback (undesired flame propagation to upstream within the fuel injector). A comprehensive literature review was conducted on high-hydrogen fuel combustion and its main issues. For Capstone's lean premixed injector, the main mechanisms of flashback were identified to be boundary layer flashback and bulk flow flashback. Since the existing microturbine combustion system is not able to operate on high-hydrogen syngas fuels, new hardware needed to be developed. The new hardware developed and tested included (1) a series of injectors with a reduced propensity for boundary layer flashback and (2) two new combustion liner designs (Combustion Liner Design A and B) that lead to desired primary zone air flow split to meet the overall bulk velocity requirement to mitigate the risk of core flashback inside the injectors. The new injector designs were evaluated in both test apparatus and C65/C200 engines. While some of the new injector designs did not provide satisfactory performance in burning target syngas fuels, particularly in improving resistance to flashback. The combustion system configuration of FFTS-4 injector and Combustion Liner Design A was found promising to enable the C65 microturbine system to run on high hydrogen biomass syngas. The FFTS-4 injector

  19. Industrial waste recycling strategies optimization problem: mixed integer programming model and heuristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiafu; Liu, Yang; Fung, Richard; Luo, Xinggang

    2008-12-01

    Manufacturers have a legal accountability to deal with industrial waste generated from their production processes in order to avoid pollution. Along with advances in waste recovery techniques, manufacturers may adopt various recycling strategies in dealing with industrial waste. With reuse strategies and technologies, byproducts or wastes will be returned to production processes in the iron and steel industry, and some waste can be recycled back to base material for reuse in other industries. This article focuses on a recovery strategies optimization problem for a typical class of industrial waste recycling process in order to maximize profit. There are multiple strategies for waste recycling available to generate multiple byproducts; these byproducts are then further transformed into several types of chemical products via different production patterns. A mixed integer programming model is developed to determine which recycling strategy and which production pattern should be selected with what quantity of chemical products corresponding to this strategy and pattern in order to yield maximum marginal profits. The sales profits of chemical products and the set-up costs of these strategies, patterns and operation costs of production are considered. A simulated annealing (SA) based heuristic algorithm is developed to solve the problem. Finally, an experiment is designed to verify the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed method. By comparing a single strategy to multiple strategies in an example, it is shown that the total sales profit of chemical products can be increased by around 25% through the simultaneous use of multiple strategies. This illustrates the superiority of combinatorial multiple strategies. Furthermore, the effects of the model parameters on profit are discussed to help manufacturers organize their waste recycling network.

  20. Statement on the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has chosen the following objectives for future reprocessing plant design: reduced radiation exposure to workers; minimal environmental impact; improved plant operation and maintenance; improved accountability; no plutonium diversion; and reduced overall capital and operating cost. These objectives lead to a plant with totally remote operation. The Breeder Reactor Engineering Test (BRET) has been designed to perform a key role in demonstrating advanced reprocessing technology. It has been scheduled to be available to reprocess spent fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility. The principal features of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program and of the BRET facility are appropriate for all reactor types

  1. Future of alcohol fuels programs in Brasil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, A. V., Jr.; Rechtschaffen, E.; Goldstein, L., Jr.

    An updating is given of the Brazilian National Alcohol Program's production and utilization achievements to date in the substitution of ethanol and methanol for imported oil products. A series of Eucalyptus forestry and processing-industry projections are made for fuel output and jobs creation that may be expected by the year 2000. With few exceptions, methanol produced from wood grown on poorer soils than can now be used for sugarcane substitute for oil products and result in jobs creation several orders of magnitude higher than petroleum fuels.

  2. Fuel cycle cost comparison of choices in U-235 recycle in the HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothstein, M.P.

    1976-07-01

    An analysis of alternative options for the recycle of discharged makeup U-235 (''residual'' makeup) in HTGRs shows that the three-particle system which has been the reference plan remains optimal. This result considers both the resource utilization and the handling costs attendant to the alternative strategies (primarily in the recycle facility and in waste disposal). Furthermore, this result appears to be true under all forseeable economic conditions. A simple risk assessment indicates that recycle cost (including reprocessing, refabrication, and related waste disposal) would have to double or triple in order for the alternative U-235 recycle schemes to become attractive. This induces some degree of confidence in the choice of staying with the reference cycle in spite of the large degree of uncertainty over recycle and its costs

  3. Coordinated irradiation plan for the Fuel Refabrication and Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barner, J.O.

    1979-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Fuel Refabrication and Development (FRAD) Program is developing a number of proliferation-resistant fuel systems and forms for alternative use in nuclear reactors. A major portion of the program is the development of irradiation behavioral information for the fuel system/forms with the ultimate objective of qualifying the design for licensing and commercial utilization. The nuclear fuel systems under development include denatured thoria--urania fuels and spiked urania--plutonia or thoria--plutonia fuels. The fuel forms being considered include pellet fuel produced from mechanically mixed or coprecipitated feed materials, pellet fuel fabricated from partially calcined gel-derived or freeze-dried spheres (hybrid fuel) and packed-particle fuel produced from sintered gel-derived spheres (sphere-pac). This document describes the coordinated development program that will be used to test and demonstrate the irradiation performance of alternative fuels

  4. GCRA review and appraisal of fuel material development programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The Fuel material Development Program has as its principal objective and responsibility the development of a fuel that is both economical and licensable and that, at the same time, will fulfill the required performance criteria. To accomplish this, the program is broken down into the following major fuel development task areas: development of the experimental and analytical data base for selecting, qualifying, and verifying the reference fuel design; providing the data base and developing models for evaluating fuel performance under upset and accident conditions; and developing and justifying fuel fabrication specifications which are consistent with the overall fuel performance criteria and with the fuel fabrication process capabilities

  5. An Optimization Model for Expired Drug Recycling Logistics Networks and Government Subsidy Policy Design Based on Tri-level Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to recycle and dispose of all people’s expired drugs, the government should design a subsidy policy to stimulate users to return their expired drugs, and drug-stores should take the responsibility of recycling expired drugs, in other words, to be recycling stations. For this purpose it is necessary for the government to select the right recycling stations and treatment stations to optimize the expired drug recycling logistics network and minimize the total costs of recycling and disposal. This paper establishes a tri-level programming model to study how the government can optimize an expired drug recycling logistics network and the appropriate subsidy policies. Furthermore, a Hybrid Genetic Simulated Annealing Algorithm (HGSAA is proposed to search for the optimal solution of the model. An experiment is discussed to illustrate the good quality of the recycling logistics network and government subsides obtained by the HGSAA. The HGSAA is proven to have the ability to converge on the global optimal solution, and to act as an effective algorithm for solving the optimization problem of expired drug recycling logistics network and government subsidies.

  6. An Optimization Model for Expired Drug Recycling Logistics Networks and Government Subsidy Policy Design Based on Tri-level Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Li, Yuyu; Huang, Bo; Pi, Xing

    2015-07-09

    In order to recycle and dispose of all people's expired drugs, the government should design a subsidy policy to stimulate users to return their expired drugs, and drug-stores should take the responsibility of recycling expired drugs, in other words, to be recycling stations. For this purpose it is necessary for the government to select the right recycling stations and treatment stations to optimize the expired drug recycling logistics network and minimize the total costs of recycling and disposal. This paper establishes a tri-level programming model to study how the government can optimize an expired drug recycling logistics network and the appropriate subsidy policies. Furthermore, a Hybrid Genetic Simulated Annealing Algorithm (HGSAA) is proposed to search for the optimal solution of the model. An experiment is discussed to illustrate the good quality of the recycling logistics network and government subsides obtained by the HGSAA. The HGSAA is proven to have the ability to converge on the global optimal solution, and to act as an effective algorithm for solving the optimization problem of expired drug recycling logistics network and government subsidies.

  7. Study on high conversion type core of innovative water reactor for flexible fuel cycle (FLWR) for minor actinide (MA) recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Yuji; Nakano, Yoshihiro; Okubo, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    In order to ensure sustainable energy supplies in the future based on the well-established light water reactor (LWR) technologies, conceptual design studies have been performed on the innovative water reactor for flexible fuel cycle (FLWR) with the high conversion ratio core. For early introduction of FLWR without a serious technical gap from the LWR technologies, the conceptual design of the high conversion type one (HC-FLWR) was constructed to recycle reprocessed plutonium. Furthermore, an investigation of minor actinide (MA) recycling based on the HC-FLWR core concept has been performed and is presented in this paper. Because HC-FLWR is a near-term technology, it would be a good option in the future if HC-FLWR can recycle MAs. In order to recycle MAs in HC-FLWR, it has been found that the core design should be changed, because the loaded MA makes the void reactivity coefficient worse and decreases the discharge burn-up. To find a promising core design specification, the investigation on the core characteristics were performed using the results from parameter surveys with core burn-up calculations. The final core designs were established by coupled three dimensional neutronics and thermal-hydraulics core calculations. The major core specifications are as follows. The plutonium fissile (Puf) content is 13 wt%. The discharge burn-up is about 55 GWd/t. Around 2 wt% of Np or Am can be recycled. The MA conversion ratios are around unity. In particular, it has been found that loaded Np can be transmuted effectively in this core concept. Therefore, these concepts would be a good option to reduce environmental burdens.

  8. Canadian fuel development program in 1997/98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, J.H.; Kohn, E.; Sejnoha, R.; Cox, D.S.; Macici, N.N.; Steed, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the CANDU fuel development activities in Canada during 1997 through 1998. The activities include those of the Fuel Technology Program sponsored by the CANDU Owners Group. The goal of the Fuel Technology Program is to maintain and improve the reliability, economics and safety of CANDU fuel in operating reactors. These activities, therefore, concentrate on the present designs of 28-element and 37-element fuel bundles. The Canadian fuel development activities also include those of the Advanced Fuel and Fuel Cycle Technology Program at AECL. These activities concentrate on the development of advanced fuel designs and advanced fuel cycles, which among other advantages, can reduce the capital and fuelling costs, maintain operating margins in aging reactors, improve natural-uranium utilization, and reduce the amount of spent fuel. (author)

  9. Improving the Estimates of Waste from the Recycling of Used Nuclear Fuel - 13410

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Chris; Willis, William; Carter, Robert [EnergySolutions Federal EPC., 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States); Baker, Stephen [UK National Nuclear Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    assumptions were agreed. These include an assumed reprocessing capacity of 800 tonnes per year, the requirement to remove as waste forms the volatile fission products carbon-14, iodine-129, krypton-85, tritium and ruthenium-106, the restriction of discharge of any water from the facility unless it meets US Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standards, no intentional blending of wastes to lower their classification, and the requirement for the recovered uranium to be sufficiently free from fission products and neutron-absorbing species to allow it to be re-enriched and recycled as nuclear fuel. The results from this work showed that over 99.9% of the radioactivity in the UNF can be concentrated via reprocessing into a fission-product-containing vitrified product, bottles of compressed krypton storage and a cement grout containing the tritium, that together have a volume of only about one eighth the volume of the original UNF. The other waste forms have larger volumes than the original UNF but contain only the remaining 0.1% of the radioactivity. (authors)

  10. ZZ WPPR, Pu Recycling Benchmark Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, D.; Mattes, M.; Delpech, Marc; Juanola, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Description of program or function: The NEA NSC Working Party on Physics of Plutonium Recycling has commissioned a series of benchmarks covering: - Plutonium recycling in pressurized-water reactors; - Void reactivity effect in pressurized-water reactors; - Fast Plutonium-burner reactors: beginning of life; - Plutonium recycling in fast reactors; - Multiple recycling in advanced pressurized-water reactors. The results have been published (see references). ZZ-WPPR-1-A/B contains graphs and tables relative to the PWR Mox pin cell benchmark, representing typical fuel for plutonium recycling, one corresponding to a first cycle, the second for a fifth cycle. These computer readable files contain the complete set of results, while the printed report contains only a subset. ZZ-WPPR-2-CYC1 are the results from cycle 1 of the multiple recycling benchmarks

  11. The American 'severe fuel damage program'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sdouz, G.

    1982-03-01

    The TMI-2 accident has initiated a new phase of safety research. It is necessary to consider severe accidents with degraded or molten core. For NRC there was a need for an improved understanding of this reactor behaviour and the 'Severe Fuel Dage Program' was initiated. Planned are in-pile experiments in PBF, NRU and ESSOR and in addition separate effects tests and results from TMI-2. The analytical component of the program is the development of different versions of the code SCDAP for the detailed analysis during severe accident transients. (Author) [de

  12. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/California recycling programs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrons, Ralph Jordan; Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2007-07-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management Department between May 2006 and March 2007, to evaluate the current site-wide recycling program for potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the program. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM Pollution Prevention (P2) staff worked with the SNL/CA P2 Staff to arrive at these options.

  13. Capacity of burning and transmutation reactor and grouping in partitioning of HLW in self-consistent fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamoto, A.; Mulyanto

    1993-01-01

    The concept of capacity of B/T reactor and grouping for partitioning of HLW has been developed in order to perform self-consistent fuel recycle. The concept of grouping of radionuclides is proposed herein, such as Group MA1 (MA below Cm), Group MA2 (Cm and higher MA), Group A ( 99 Te, 129 I, and 135 Cs), Group B ( 137 Cs and 90 Sr) and Group R (the partitioned remain of HLW). In this study P-T treatment were optimized for the in-core and out-core system, respectively. (author). 7 refs., 10 figs

  14. Development and engineering plan for graphite spent fuels conditioning program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendixsen, C.L.; Fillmore, D.L.; Kirkham, R.J.; Lord, D.L.; Phillips, M.B.; Pinto, A.P.; Staiger, M.D.

    1993-09-01

    Irradiated (or spent) graphite fuel stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) includes Fort St. Vrain (FSV) reactor and Peach Bottom reactor spent fuels. Conditioning and disposal of spent graphite fuels presently includes three broad alternatives: (1) direct disposal with minimum fuel packaging or conditioning, (2) mechanical disassembly of spent fuel into high-level waste and low-level waste portions to minimize geologic repository requirements, and (3) waste-volume reduction via burning of bulk graphite and other spent fuel chemical processing of the spent fuel. A multi-year program for the engineering development and demonstration of conditioning processes is described. Program costs, schedules, and facility requirements are estimated

  15. Analysis of transient fuel failure mechanisms: selected ANL programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitrich, L.W.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical programs at Argonne National Laboratory related to fuel pin failure mechanisms in fast-reactor accident transients are described. The studies include transient fuel pin mechanics, mechanics of unclad fuel, and mechanical effects concerning potential fuel failure propagation. (U.S.).

  16. Green Science: Revisiting Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palliser, Janna

    2011-01-01

    Recycling has been around for a long time--people have reused materials and refashioned them into needed items for thousands of years. More recently, war efforts encouraged conservation and reuse of materials, and in the 1970s recycling got its official start when recycling centers were created. Now, curbside recycling programs and recycling…

  17. Final generic environmental statement on the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel in light water cooled reactors. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    This environmental statement assesses the impacts of the implementation of plutonium recycle in the LWR industry. It is based on assumptions that are intended to reflect conservatively an acceptable level of the application of current technology. It is not intended to be a representation of the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) philosophy. This generic environmental statement discusses the anticipated effects of recycling plutonium in light water nuclear power reactors. It is based on about 30 years of experience with the element in the context of a projected light water nuclear power industry that is already substantial. A background perspective on plutonium, its safety, and its recycling as a reactor fuel is presented

  18. 14 CFR 121.1113 - Fuel tank system maintenance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank system maintenance program. 121... Improvements § 121.1113 Fuel tank system maintenance program. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this... capacity of 7500 pounds or more. (b) For each airplane on which an auxiliary fuel tank is installed under a...

  19. 14 CFR 125.507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank system inspection program. 125... Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 125.507 Fuel tank system inspection program. (a) Except as provided in... fuel tank is installed under a field approval, before June 16, 2008, the certificate holder must submit...

  20. 14 CFR 129.113 - Fuel tank system maintenance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank system maintenance program. 129... Continued Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 129.113 Fuel tank system maintenance program. (a) Except... on which an auxiliary fuel tank is installed under a field approval, before June 16, 2008, the...

  1. 14 CFR 91.1507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank system inspection program. 91... Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 91.1507 Fuel tank system inspection program. (a) Except as provided in... fuel tank is installed under a field approval, before June 16, 2008, the operator must submit to the...

  2. Spent fuel receipt and lag storage facility for the spent fuel handling and packaging program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, J.E.; King, F.D.

    1979-01-01

    Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is participating in the Spent Fuel Handling and Packaging Program for retrievable, near-surface storage of spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel. One of SRL's responsibilities is to provide a technical description of the wet fuel receipt and lag storage part of the Spent Fuel Handling and Packaging (SFHP) facility. This document is the required technical description

  3. Recycling used palm oil and used engine oil to produce white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-abbas, Mustafa Hamid; Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Sanagi, Mohd. Marsin

    2012-09-01

    Recycling waste materials produced in our daily life is considered as an additional resource of a wide range of materials and it conserves the environment. Used engine oil and used cooking oil are two oils disposed off in large quantities as a by-product of our daily life. This study aims at providing white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel from the disposed oils. Toxic organic materials suspected to be present in the used engine oil were separated using vacuum column chromatography to reduce the time needed for the separation process and to avoid solvent usage. The compounds separated were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and found to contain toxic aromatic carboxylic acids. Used cooking oils (thermally cracked from usage) were collected and separated by vacuum column chromatography. White bio oil produced was examined by GC-MS. The white bio oil consists of non-toxic hydrocarbons and is found to be a good alternative to white mineral oil which is significantly used in food industry, cosmetics and drugs with the risk of containing polycyclic aromatic compounds which are carcinogenic and toxic. Different portions of the used cooking oil and used engine were mixed to produce several blends for use as heavy oil fuels. White bio oil was used to produce bio petroleum diesel by blending it with petroleum diesel and kerosene. The bio petroleum diesel produced passed the PETRONAS flash point and viscosity specification test. The heat of combustion of the two blends of heavy fuel produced was measured and one of the blends was burned to demonstrate its burning ability. Higher heat of combustion was obtained from the blend containing greater proportion of used engine oil. This study has provided a successful recycled alternative for white bio oil, bio petroleum fuel and diesel which can be an energy source.

  4. Alternative transportation fuels in the USA: government hydrogen vehicle programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    The linkage between natural gas-based transportation and hydrogen-based transportation strategies, two clean burning gaseous fuels, provides a strong policy rationale for increased government sponsorship of hydrogen vehicle research and demonstration programs. Existing federal and state government hydrogen vehicle projects are discussed in this paper: research at the NREL, alternate-fueled buses, Renewable Hydrogen for the State of Hawaii program, New York state alternative transportation fuels program, Colorado program. 9 refs

  5. The spent fuel disposal program in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.K.

    1994-01-01

    It is important, especially for countries with plan to develop nuclear power, to recognize that two key factors to the future prosperity of nuclear power are the safety of nuclear power plants and the appropriate management of backend activities. This paper described the financial, managerial, technical, and political status of the spent fuel disposal program in a newly industrialized country. It is concluded that the R ampersand D works and operational practices associated with the backend activities must be carried out in parallel with the development of nuclear power

  6. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, E.R.; Cracraft, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) development activities and current program status. The Westinghouse goal is to develop a cost effective cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 hours. Progress toward this goal will be discussed and test results presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 56,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Results of development efforts to reduce cost and increase power output of tubular SOFCs are described.

  7. 75 FR 79964 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... renewable fuel facility to be considered biogas for purposes of Table 1 to Sec. 80.1426; --Sec. 80.1452(b... explained that many developers of ethanol facilities, including their own, sought to obtain construction permits without going through EPA's New Source Review (NSR) program, and were able to do so by obtaining...

  8. Emergency fuels utilization guidebook. Alternative Fuels Utilization Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    The basic concept of an emergency fuel is to safely and effectively use blends of specification fuels and hydrocarbon liquids which are free in the sense that they have been commandeered or volunteered from lower priority uses to provide critical transportation services for short-duration emergencies on the order of weeks, or perhaps months. A wide variety of liquid hydrocarbons not normally used as fuels for internal combustion engines have been categorized generically, including limited information on physical characteristics and chemical composition which might prove useful and instructive to fleet operators. Fuels covered are: gasoline and diesel fuel; alcohols; solvents; jet fuels; kerosene; heating oils; residual fuels; crude oils; vegetable oils; gaseous fuels.

  9. Recyclable cross-linked anion exchange membrane for alkaline fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jianqiu; Liu, Yazhi; Ge, Qianqian; Yang, Zhengjin; Wu, Liang; Xu, Tongwen

    2018-01-01

    Cross-linking can effectively solve the conductivity-swelling dilemma in anion exchange membranes (AEMs) but will generate solid wastes. To address this, we developed an AEM cross-linked via disulfide bonds, bearing quaternary ammonium groups, which can be easily recycled. The membrane (RC-QPPO) with IEC of 1.78 mmol g-1, when cross-linked, showed enhanced mechanical properties and good hydroxide conductivity (24.6 mS cm-1 at 30 °C). Even at higher IEC value (2.13 mmol g-1), it still has low water uptake, low swelling ratio and delivers a peak power density of 150 mW cm-2 at 65 °C. Exploiting the formation of disulfide bonds from -SH groups, the membrane can be readily cross-linked in alkaline condition and recycled by reversibly breaking disulfide bonds with dithiothreitol (DTT). The recycled membrane solution can be directly utilized to cast a brand-new AEM. By washing away the residual DTT with water and exposure to air, it can be cross-linked again and this process is repeatable. During the recycling and cross-linking processes, the membrane showed a slight IEC decrease of 5% due to functional group degradation. The strategy presented here is promising in enhancing AEM properties and reducing the impact of artificial polymers on the environment.

  10. Tritium control by water recycle in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, N.E.; Ward, G.N.

    1975-06-01

    A preliminary study was made of the use of water recycle within a reprocessing plant to control the escape of tritium and to consolidate it for disposal. Tritium distribution was evaluated in the leacher, high-level, and low-level systems for seven different flowsheet conditions. Tritium retention efficiency was also evaluated for these flowsheet conditions. Impact of tritiated water recycle on the plant design and operation is assessed. It is concluded that tritium control by water recycle is feasible. Achievement of satisfactory retention efficiencies and economic volumes of solidified tritium waste will require extension of existing technology and development of new technology. Evaluation of potential abnormal conditions indicate that releases from upsets need not be excessive. Some increase in occupational exposure will occur because of the pervasiveness, persistence, and ease of uptake of tritiated water vapor. Incentives for tritium control by water recycle may prove marginal if this increased exposure to plant personnel is significant compared to the small reduction in exposure to the general public. Recommendations are presented for further studies

  11. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormuth, K.W.; Nuttall, K.

    1987-01-01

    Canada has established an extensive research program to develop and demonstrate the technology for safely disposing of nuclear fuel waste from Canadian nuclear electric generating stations. The program focuses on the concept of disposal deep in plutonic rock, which is abundant in the province of Ontario, Canada's major producer of nuclear electricity. Research is carried out at field research areas in the Canadian Precambrian Shield, and in government and university laboratories. The schedule calls for a document assessing the disposal concept to be submitted to regulatory and environmental agencies in late 1988. This document will form the basis for a review of the concept by these agencies and by the public. No site selection will be carried out before this review is completed. 10 refs.; 2 figs

  12. 76 FR 67287 - Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; Alternative Fueled Vehicle Credit Program (Subpart F...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... additional credits for the use of biodiesel in blends of 20 percent biodiesel or greater and have provided an... discussion in Part II.A), the original program based upon AFV acquisitions and biodiesel use became known as... example, B20 (a 20 percent blend of biodiesel with 80 percent petroleum diesel) is not an alternative fuel...

  13. National fuel cell bus program : proterra fuel cell hybrid bus report, Columbia demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the experience and early results from a fuel cell bus demonstration funded by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) under the National Fuel Cell Bus Program. A team led by the Center for Transportation and the Environment an...

  14. A proposed framework of food waste collection and recycling for renewable biogas fuel production in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, Kok Sin; Lo, Irene M C

    2016-01-01

    Hong Kong is experiencing a pressing need for food waste management. Currently, approximately 3600 tonnes of food waste are disposed of at landfills in Hong Kong daily. The landfills in Hong Kong are expected to be exhausted by 2020. In the long run, unavoidable food waste should be sorted out from the other municipal solid waste (MSW) and then valorized into valuable resources. A simple sorting process involving less behavioural change of residents is, therefore, of paramount importance in order to encourage residents to sort the food waste from other MSW. In this paper, a sustainable framework of food waste collection and recycling for renewable biogas fuel production is proposed. For an efficient separation and collection system, an optic bag (i.e. green bag) can be used to pack the food waste, while the residual MSW can be packed in a common plastic bag. All the wastes are then sent to the refuse transfer stations in the conventional way (i.e. refuse collection vehicles). At the refuse transfer stations, the food waste is separated from the residual MSW using optic sensors which recognize the colours of the bags. The food waste in the optic bags is then delivered to the proposed Organic Waste Treatment Facilities, in which biogas is generated following the anaerobic digestion technology. The biogas can be further upgraded via gas upgrading units to a quality suitable for use as a vehicle biogas fuel. The use of biogas fuel from food waste has been widely practiced by some countries such as Sweden, France, and Norway. Hopefully, the proposed framework can provide the epitome of the waste-to-wealth concept for the sustainable collection and recycling of food waste in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 75 FR 15893 - Tire Fuel Efficiency Consumer Information Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... how much the proposed consumer information program would affect consumer tire purchasing behavior and... 575 Tire Fuel Efficiency Consumer Information Program; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75, No... 2127-AK45 Tire Fuel Efficiency Consumer Information Program AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety...

  16. Irradiation experiments of recycled PuO2-UO2 fuels by SAXTON reactor, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumoto, Ryozo; Akutsu, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    Seventy two mixed oxide fuel rods made by PNC were irradiated in Saxton Core 3. This paper generally describes the fuel specifications, the power history of the fuel and the post-irradiation examination of the PNC fuel. The specifications of the 4.0 w/o and 5.0 w/o enriched PuO 2 fuel rods with zircaloy-4 cladding are presented in a table and a figure. The positions of PNC fuel rods in the Saxton reactor are shown in a figure. Sixty eight 5.0 w/o PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel rods were assembled in a 9 x 9 rod array together with zircaloy-4 bars, a flux thimble, and a Sb-Be source. The power history of the Saxton Core 3 and the irradiation history of the PNC fuel rods are summarized in tables. The peak power and burnup of each fuel rod and the axial power profile are also presented. The maximum linear power rate and burnup attained were 512W/cm and 8700 MWD/T, respectively. As for the post irradiation examination, the items of nondestructive test, destructive test, and cladding test are presented together with the working flow diagram of the examination. It is concluded that the performance of all fuel rods was safe and satisfactory throughout the power history. (Aoki, K.)

  17. Improved Retrieval Technique of pin-wise composition for spent fuel recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, YunSeo; Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyung Hee University , Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    New reutilization method which does not require fabrication processing was suggested and showed feasibility by Dr. Aung Tharn Daing. This new reutilization method is predict spent nuclear fuel pin composition, reconstruct new fuel assembly by spent nuclear pin, and directly reutilize in same PWR core. There are some limitation to predict spent nuclear fuel pin composition on his methodology such as spatial effect was not considered enough. This research suggests improving Dr. Aung Tharn Daing's retrieval technique of pin-wise composition. This new method classify fuel pin groups by its location effect in fuel assembly. Most of fuel pin composition along to burnup in fuel assembly is not highly dependent on location. However, compositions of few fuel pins where near water hole and corner of fuel assembly are quite different in same burnup. Required number of nuclide table is slightly increased from 3 to 6 for one fuel assembly with this new method. Despite of this little change, prediction of the pin-wise composition became more accurate. This new method guarantees two advantages than previous retrieving technique. First, accurate pin-wise isotope prediction is possible by considering location effect in a fuel assembly. Second, it requires much less nuclide tables than using full single assembly database. Retrieving technique of pin-wise composition can be applied on spent fuel management field useful. This technique can be used on direct use of spent fuel such as Dr. Aung Tharn Daing showed or applied on pin-wise waste management instead of conventional assembly-wise waste management.

  18. Hawaii alternative fuels utilization program. Phase 3, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, C.M.; Staackmann, M.

    1996-08-01

    The Hawaii Alternative Fuels Utilization Program originated as a five-year grant awarded by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) to the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The overall program included research and demonstration efforts aimed at encouraging and sustaining the use of alternative (i.e., substitutes for gasoline and diesel) ground transportation fuels in Hawaii. Originally, research aimed at overcoming technical impediments to the widespread adoption of alternative fuels was an important facet of this program. Demonstration activities centered on the use of methanol-based fuels in alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). In the present phase, operations were expanded to include flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) which can operate on M85 or regular unleaded gasoline or any combination of these two fuels. Additional demonstration work was accomplished in attempting to involve other elements of Hawaii in the promotion and use of alcohol fuels for ground transportation in Hawaii.

  19. Pu-recycling in light water reactors: calculation of fuel burn-up data for the design of reprocessing plants as well as the influence on the demand of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasteiger, R.

    1977-02-01

    This report gives a detailed review on the composition of radionuclides in spent LWR fuel in the case of Pu-recycling. These calculations are necessary for the design of spent fuel reprocessing plants. Furthermore the influence of Pu-recycling on the demand of uranium for a single LWR as well as for a certain growing LWR-population is shown. (orig.) [de

  20. The Canadian CANDU fuel development program and recent fuel operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, J.H.K.; Inch, W.W.R.; Cox, D.S.; Steed, R.G.; Kohn, E.; Macici, N.N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the performance of the CANDU fuel in the Canadian CANDU reactors in 1997 and 1998. The operating experience demonstrates that the CANDU fuel has performed very well. Over the two-year period, the fuel-bundle defect rate for all bundles irradiated in the Canadian CANDU reactors has remained very low, at between 0.006% to 0.016%. On a fuel element basis, this represents an element defect rate of less than about 0.0005%. One of the reasons for the good fuel performance is the support provided by the Canadian fuel research and development programs. These programs address operational issues and provide evolutionary improvements to the fuel products. The programs consist of the Fuel Technology Program, funded by the CANDU Owners Group, and the Advanced Fuel and Fuel Cycles Technology Program, funded by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. These two programs, which have been in place for many years, complement each other by sharing expert resources and experimental facilities. This paper describes the programs in 1999/2000, to provide an overview of the scope of the programs and the issues that these programs address. (author)

  1. Reprocessing flowsheet and material balance for MEU spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, L.

    1978-10-01

    In response to nonproliferation concerns, the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) Fuel Recycle Development Program is investigating the processing requirements for a denatured medium-enriched uranium--thorium (MEU/Th) fuel cycle. Prior work emphasized the processing requirements for a high-enriched uranium--thorium (HEU/Th) fuel cycle. This report presents reprocessing flowsheets for an HTGR/MEU fuel recycle base case. Material balance data have been calculated for reprocessing of spent MEU and recycle fuels in the HTGR Recycle Reference Facility (HRRF). Flowsheet and mass flow effects in MEU-cycle reprocessing are discussed in comparison with prior HEU-cycle flowsheets

  2. LEU and thorium fuel cycles for the high temperature reactor (once-through and recycle)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Sets of performance parameters, optimised for minimum costs within the bounds of current technical confidence, are presented for each of the four fuel cycle variants mentioned in the title. The overall cost of the HEU once-through system is found to be significantly more expensive than the other three which are similar. Data are presented on fissile material utilisation, on the isotopic composition of discharged fuel, and on fuel cycle costs. Comments are made on technical status, development needs, safety, environmental concerns including the storage and disposal of irradiated fuel, and on characteristics relevant to proliferation control

  3. Dynamical Simulation of Recycling and Particle Fueling in TJ-II Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Bruna, D.; Ferreira, J. A.; Tabares, F. L.; Castejon, F.; Guasp, J.

    2007-01-01

    With the aim of improving the calculation tools for transport analysis in TJ-II plasmas, in this work we analyze the simplified model for a kinetic equation that ASTRA uses to calculate the neutral particle distribution in the plasma. Next, we act on the boundary conditions for this kinetic equation (particularly on the neutral density in the plasma boundary) so we can simulate the recycling conditions for the TJ-II in a simple way. With the resulting transport models we can easily analyze the sensibility of these plasmas to the cold gas puffing depending on the recycling conditions. These transport models evidence the problem of density control in the TJ-II. Likewise, we estimate the importance of recycling in the plasmas heated by energetic neutral beam injection. The experimentally observed increments in density when the energetic neutrals are injected would respond, according to the calculations here presented, to a large increment of the neutrals influx that cannot be explained by the beam itself. (Author) 22 refs

  4. Concept of the plant for the BN-800 fast reactor fuel recycling with application of pyro-process and vibro-packing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.V.; Skiba, O.V.; Mayorshin, A.A.; Demidova, L.S.; Kormilitzyna, L.A.; Ishunin, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    The conception of Plant was developed for MOX-fuel recycle at two BN-800 type fast reactors by pyrochemical reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel (INF) and production of vibro-pac fuel pins and SA. INF production process and stages of pyrochemical reprocessing were analyzed. Starting materials were chosen. Characteristics of irradiated SA and requirements for finished products were defined. Volumes of production were estimated. Procedure of waste management was defined. The following description was made: (1) general flow sheet of fuel recycling and partial schemes of single reprocessing; (2) composition of production process equipment; (3) arrangement of production process equipment; (4) lay out of Plant building and engineering communications. Principle economical assessments were made for production under design. (authors)

  5. 1990 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains author prepared short resumes of the presentations at the 1990 Fuel Cell Seminar held November 25-28, 1990 in Phoenix, Arizona. Contained herein are 134 short descriptions organized into topic areas entitled An Environmental Overview, Transportation Applications, Technology Advancements for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells, Technology Advancements for Solid Fuel Cells, Component Technologies and Systems Analysis, Stationary Power Applications, Marine and Space Applications, Technology Advancements for Acid Type Fuel Cells, and Technology Advancement for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

  6. Dresden 1 Plutonium Recycle Program report for the period July 1, 1975--December 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, M.Y.

    1976-07-01

    Included are a summary of reactor operations, power and exposure histories for each mixed-oxide assembly, 4 reports on the fuel inspections which were performed during the Cycle 8 refueling outage, and plans and schedules for the remainder of the program

  7. Tire Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Cryopolymers, Inc. tapped NASA expertise to improve a process for recycling vehicle tires by converting shredded rubber into products that can be used in asphalt road beds, new tires, hoses, and other products. In conjunction with the Southern Technology Applications Center and Stennis Space Center, NASA expertise in cryogenic fuel-handling needed for launch vehicle and spacecraft operations was called upon to improve the recycling concept. Stennis advised Cryopolymers on the type of equipment required, as well as steps to reduce the amount of liquid nitrogen used in the process. They also guided the company to use more efficient ways to control system hardware. It is estimated that more than 300 million tires nationwide are produced per year. Cryopolymers expects to reach a production rate of 5,000 tires recycled per day.

  8. Development for fissile assay in recycled fuel using lead slowing down spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Je Park, C.; Kim, Ho-Dong; Song, Kee Chan

    2013-01-01

    A future nuclear energy system is under development to turn spent fuels produced by PWRs into fuels for a SFR (Sodium Fast Reactor) through the pyrochemical process. The knowledge of the isotopic fissile content of the new fuel is very important for fuel safety. A lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS) is under development to analyze the fissile material content (Pu 239 , Pu 241 and U 235 ) of the fuel. The LSDS requires a neutron source, the neutrons will be slowed down through their passage in a lead medium and will finally enter the fuel and will induce fission reactions that will be analysed and the isotopic content of the fuel will be then determined. The issue is that the spent fuel emits intense gamma rays and neutrons by spontaneous fission. The threshold fission detector screens the prompt fast fission neutrons and as a result the LSDS is not influenced by the high level radiation background. The energy resolution of LSDS is good in the range 0.1 eV to 1 keV. It is also the range in which the fission reaction is the most discriminating for the considered fissile isotopes. An electron accelerator has been chosen to produce neutrons with an adequate target through (e - ,γ)(γ,n) reactions

  9. Alcohol Fuels Program technical review, Spring 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-01

    The alcohol fuels program consists of in-house and subcontracted research for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel alcohols via thermoconversion and bioconversion technologies. In the thermoconversion area, the SERI gasifier has been operated on a one-ton per day scale and produces a clean, medium-Btu gas that can be used to manufacture methanol with a relatively small gas-water shift reaction requirement. Recent research has produced catalysts that make methanol and a mixture of higher alcohols from the biomass-derived synthetic gas. Three hydrolysis processes have emerged as candidates for more focused research. They are: a high-temperature, dilute-acid, plug-flow approach based on the Dartmouth reactor; steam explosion pretreatment followed by hydrolysis using the RUT-C30 fungal organism; and direct microbial conversion of the cellulose to ethanol using bacteria in a single or mixed culture. Modeling studies, including parametric and sensitivity analyses, have recently been completed. The results of these studies will lead to a better definition of the present state-of-the-art for these processes and provide a framework for establishing the research and process engineering issues that still need resolution. In addition to these modeling studies, economic feasibility studies are being carried out by commercial engineering firms. Their results will supplement and add commercial validity to the program results. The feasibility contractors will provide input at two levels: Technical and economic assessment of the current state-of-the-art in alcohol production from lignocellulosic biomass via thermoconversion to produce methanol and higher alcohol mixtures and bioconversion to produce ethanol; and identification of research areas having the potential to significantly reduce the cost of production of alcohols.

  10. CANFLEX-RU fuel development programs as one option of advanced fuel cycles in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, Ho Chun; Sim, Ki-Seob; Chung, Jang Hwan

    1999-01-01

    As one of the possible fuel cycles in Korea, RU (Recycled Uranium) fuel offers a very attractive alternative to the use of NU (Natural Uranium) and SEU in the CANDU reactors, because Korea is a unique country having both PWR and CANDU reactors. Korea can therefore exploit the natural synergism between the two reactor types to minimise overall waste production, and maximise energy derived from the fuel, by burning the spent fuel from its PWR reactors in CANDU reactors. Potential benefits can be derived from a number of stages in the fuel cycle: no enrichment required, no enrichment tails, direct conversion to UO 2 lower sensitivity to 234 U and 236 U absorption in the CANDU reactor, expected lower cost relative to NU and SEU. These benefits all fit well with the PWR-CANDU fuel cycle synergy. RU arising from the reprocessing of European and Japanese oxide spent fuel by 2000 is projected to be approaching 25,000 te. The use of RU fuel in a CANDU-6 reactor should result in no serious radiological difficulties and no requirements for special precautions and should not require any new technologies for the fuel fabrication and handling. A KAERI's feasibility shows that the use of the CANFLEX bundle as the carrier for RU will be compatible with the reactor design, current safety and operational requirements, and there will be no significant fuel performance difference from the CANDU 37-element NU fuel bundle. Compared with the 37-element NU bundle, the RU fuel has significantly improved fuel cycle economics derived from increased burnups, a large reduction in fuel requirements and spent fuel arisings and the potential lower cost for RU material. There is the potential for annual fuel cost savings to be in the range of one-third to two-thirds, with enhanced operating margins using RU in the CANFLEX bundle design. These benefits provide the rationale for justifying R and D effort on the use of RU fuel for advanced fuel cycles in the CANDU reactors of Korea. The RU fuel

  11. LOFT fuel modules design, characterization, and fabrication program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.L.

    1977-06-01

    The loss-of-fluid test [LOFT) fuel modules have evolved from a comprehensive five-year design, characterization, and fabrication program which has resulted in the accomplishment of many technical activities of interest in pressurized water reactor fuel design development and safety research. Information is presented concerning: determination of fundamental high-temperature reactor material properties; design invention related to in-core instrumentation attachment; implementation of advanced and/or unique fuel bundle characterization techniques; implementation of improved fuel bundle fabrication techniques; and planning and execution of a multimillion dollar design, characterization, and fabrication program for pressurized water reactor fuel

  12. Overview of the US spent nuclear fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurt, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    This report, Overview of the United States Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, December, 1997, summarizes the U.S. strategy for interim management and ultimate disposition of spent nuclear fuel from research and test reactors. The key elements of this strategy include consolidation of this spent nuclear fuel at three sites, preparation of the fuel for geologic disposal in road-ready packages, and low-cost dry interim storage until the planned geologic repository is opened. The U.S. has a number of research programs in place that are intended to Provide data and technologies to support both characterization and disposition of the fuel. (author)

  13. Fuel cell energy service Enron`s commerical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, M.W.

    1996-04-01

    Enron, the premier provider of clean fuels worldwide, has launched a unique energy service based on fuel cell technology. The goal of this program is to bring the benefits of fuel cell power to the broad commercial marketplace. Enron`s Energy Service is currently based on a 200 kilowatt phosphoric acid power plant manufactured by ONSI Corporation. This plant is fueled by natural gas or propane, and exhibits superior performance. Enron offers a `no hassle` package that provides customers with immediate benefits with no upfront capital or technical risks. This paper describes Enron`s fuel cell commercial program.

  14. Nitrogen recycling from fuel-extracted algal biomass: residuals as the sole nitrogen source for culturing Scenedesmus acutus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huiya; Nagle, Nick; Pienkos, Philip T; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the reuse of nitrogen from fuel-extracted algal residues was investigated. The alga Scenedesmus acutus was found to be able to assimilate nitrogen contained in amino acids, yeast extracts, and proteinaceous alga residuals. Moreover, these alternative nitrogen resources could replace nitrate in culturing media. The ability of S. acutus to utilize the nitrogen remaining in processed algal biomass was unique among the promising biofuel strains tested. This alga was leveraged in a recycling approach where nitrogen is recovered from algal biomass residuals that remain after lipids are extracted and carbohydrates are fermented to ethanol. The protein-rich residuals not only provided an effective nitrogen resource, but also contributed to a carbon "heterotrophic boost" in subsequent culturing, improving overall biomass and lipid yields relative to the control medium with only nitrate. Prior treatment of the algal residues with Diaion HP20 resin was required to remove compounds inhibitory to algal growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Discussion paper: direction for Canada's alternate fuels program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    There is a growing need to accelerate the consideration of alternate fuels for use in Canadian vehicle transportation. At the present time various governments and corporations are initiating alternate fuel programs involving ethanol, methanol, CNG, propane, etc. There is a bewildering array of perspectives as to which fuel or fuels will best serve Canada's needs in the future. In response to the 'Discussion Paper on Liquid Fuels Options, 1980', by the Federal Dept. of Energy, Mines and Resources, Ford of Canada has prepared this perspective on each of the alternate fuels from the company's vantage point as a vehicle manufacturer.

  16. Recycling of blast furnace sludge by briquetting with starch binder: Waste gas from thermal treatment utilizable as a fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobíková, Klára; Plachá, Daniela; Motyka, Oldřich; Gabor, Roman; Kutláková, Kateřina Mamulová; Vallová, Silvie; Seidlerová, Jana

    2016-02-01

    Steel plants generate significant amounts of wastes such as sludge, slag, and dust. Blast furnace sludge is a fine-grained waste characterized as hazardous and affecting the environment negatively. Briquetting is one of the possible ways of recycling of this waste while the formed briquettes serve as a feed material to the blast furnace. Several binders, both organic and inorganic, had been assessed, however, only the solid product had been analysed. The aim of this study was to assess the possibilities of briquetting using commonly available laundry starch as a binder while evaluating the possible utilization of the waste gas originating from the thermal treatment of the briquettes. Briquettes (100g) were formed with the admixture of starch (UNIPRET) and their mechanical properties were analysed. Consequently, they were subjected to thermal treatment of 900, 1000 and 1100°C with retention period of 40min during which was the waste gas collected and its content analysed using gas chromatography. Dependency of the concentration of the compounds forming the waste gas on the temperature used was determined using Principal component analysis (PCA) and correlation matrix. Starch was found to be a very good binder and reduction agent, it was confirmed that metallic iron was formed during the thermal treatment. Approximately 20l of waste gas was obtained from the treatment of one briquette; main compounds were methane and hydrogen rendering the waste gas utilizable as a fuel while the greatest yield was during the lowest temperatures. Preparation of blast furnace sludge briquettes using starch as a binder and their thermal treatment represents a suitable method for recycling of this type of metallurgical waste. Moreover, the composition of the resulting gas is favourable for its use as a fuel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fuel isolation research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    This document is intended to give a broad outline of the Fuel Isolatikn program and to indicate how this program fits into the overall framework of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Similar activities in other countries are described, and the differences in philosophy behind these and the Canadian program are highlighted. A program plan is presented that outlines the development of research programs that contribute to the safety assessment of the disposal concept and the development of technology required for selection and optimization of a feasible fuel isolation system. Some indication of the work that might take place beyond concept assessment, at the end of the decade, is also given. The current program is described in some detail, with emphasis on what the prkgram has achieved to date and hopes to achieve in the future for the concept assessment phase of the waste management program. Finally, some major capital facilities associated with the fuel isolation program are described

  18. Ciclon: A neutronic fuel management program for PWR's consecutive cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragones, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The program description and user's manual of a new computer code is given. Ciclon performs the neutronic calculation of consecutive reload cycles for PWR's fuel management optimization. Fuel characteristics and burnup data, region or batch sizes, loading schemes and state of previously irradiated fuel are input to the code. Cycle lengths or feed enrichments and burnup sharing for each region or batch are calculate using different core neutronic models and printed or punched in standard fuel management format. (author) [es

  19. RERTR program progress in qualifying reduced-enrichment fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, James L.

    1983-01-01

    In order to provide the technical means for reducing the enrichment of uranium used to fuel research and test reactors, the U.S. Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program has been engaged in the development and testing of higher-uranium-density fuels than had been used previously. This fuel development effort included work to increase the density of fuels which were being used at the time the Program began and work on a fuel with the potential for much higher density. The ultimate goal of the fuel development and testing phase of the Program is to 'qualify' the fuel for use. A fuel is considered qualified when a sufficient data base for the fuel exists that it can be approved by regulating bodies for use in reactors. To convert a core to the use of reduced-enrichment fuel it is necessary to show that the core will behave properly during normal and off-normal operating conditions and to show that the fuel will behave properly to a reasonable margin beyond the conditions expected during normal operation. It is this latter area that this paper will address. The main characteristics to be considered in evaluating the performance of a fuel are its swelling, its blister-threshold temperature, and its metallurgical appearance. Data for the qualification of the reduced-enrichment fuels being developed by the RERTR Program are obtained from examination of miniature fuel plates (miniplates) which successfully pass the irradiation screening tests and from examinations of full-sized fuel elements. This paper will summarize the miniplate data reported in other papers presented during this meeting and will give the status of full-sized element irradiations. Finally, the current status of qualification of the various fuel types will be discussed and some projections of the future will be given

  20. Fuel Cell Seminar, 1992: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This year`s theme, ``Fuel Cells: Realizing the Potential,`` focuses on progress being made toward commercial manufacture and use of fuel cell products. Fuel cell power plants are competing for market share in some applications and demonstrations of market entry power plants are proceeding for additional applications. Development activity on fuel cells for transportation is also increasing; fuel cell products have potential in energy and transportation industries, with very favorable environmental impacts. This Seminar has the purpose of fostering communication by providing a forum for the international community interested in development, application, and business opportunities related fuel cells. Over 190 technical papers are included, the majority being processed for the data base.

  1. Skidder load capacity and fuel consumption HP-41C program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross A. Phillips

    1983-01-01

    This program gives the log weight that the skidder can move and gives fuel consumption either in liters or gallons per turn. Slope of the skid trail, skidder weight, and skid distance must be entered into the program.

  2. TAO2000 V2 computer-assisted force feedback tele-manipulators used as maintenance and production tools at the AREVA NC-La Hague fuel recycling plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geffard, Franck; Garrec, Philippe; Piolain, Gerard; Brudieu, Marie-Anne; Thro, Jean-Francois; Coudray, Alain; Lelann, Eric

    2012-01-01

    During a 15-year joint research program, French Atomic Energy Agency Interactive Robotics Laboratory (CEA LIST) and AREVA have developed several remote operation devices, also called tele-robots. Some of them are now commonly used for maintenance operations at the AREVA NC (Nuclear Cycle) La Hague reprocessing plant. Since the first maintenance operation in 2005, several other successful interventions have been realized using the industrial MA23/RX170 tele-manipulation system. Moreover, since 2010, the through-the-wall tele-robot named MT200 TAO based on the slave arm of the MSM MT200 (La Calhene TM ), has been evaluated in an active production cell at the AREVA NC La Hague fuel recycling plant. Although these evaluations are ongoing, the positive results obtained have led to an update and industrialization program. All these developments are based on the same generic control platform, called TAO2000 V2. TAO2000 V2 is the second release of the CEA LIST core software platform dedicated to computer aided force-feedback tele-operation (TAO is the French acronym for computer aided tele-operation). This paper presents all these developments resulting from the joint research program CEA LIST/AREVA. The TAO2000 V2 controller is first detailed, and then two maintenance operations using the industrial robot RX170 are presented: the removal of the nuclear fuel dissolver wheel rollers and the cleanup of the dissolver wheel inter-bucket spaces. Finally, the new MT200 TAO system and its evaluations at the AREVA NC La Hague facilities are discussed. (authors)

  3. PBF severe fuel damage program: results and comparison to analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.E.; Buescher, B.J.; Gruen, G.E.; Hobbins, R.R.; McCardell, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a severe fuel damage research program in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) to investigate fuel rod and core response, and fission product and hydrogen release and transport under degraded core cooling accident conditions. This paper presents a description of Phase I of the PBF Severe Fuel Damage Program, discusses the results of the first experiment, and compares those results with analysis performed using the TRAC-BD1 computer code

  4. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Sensitivity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Shropshire; Kent Williams; J.D. Smith; Brent Boore

    2006-12-01

    A fuel cycle economic analysis was performed on four fuel cycles to provide a baseline for initial cost comparison using the Gen IV Economic Modeling Work Group G4 ECON spreadsheet model, Decision Programming Language software, the 2006 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis report, industry cost data, international papers, the nuclear power related cost study from MIT, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. The analysis developed and compared the fuel cycle cost component of the total cost of energy for a wide range of fuel cycles including: once through, thermal with fast recycle, continuous fast recycle, and thermal recycle.

  5. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-12-23

    The 2015 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2015 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; and market transformation.

  6. 2016 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-03-09

    The 2016 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2016 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; market transformation; and Small Business Innovation Research projects.

  7. Improving the actinides recycling in closed fuel cycles, a major step towards nuclear energy sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, C.; Grandjean, S.; Masson, M.; Bouillis, B.; Warin, D.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing the sustainability of nuclear energy is a longstanding road that requires a stepwise approach to successively tackle the following 3 objectives. First of all, optimize the consumption of natural resource to preserve them for future generations and hence guarantee the energetic independence of the countries (no uranium ore is needed anymore). The current twice-through cycle of Pu implemented by France, UK, Japan and soon China is a first step in this direction and already allows the development and optimization of the relevant industrial processes. It also allows a major improvement regarding the conditioning of the ultimate waste in a durable and robust nuclear glass. Secondly, the recycling of americium could be an interesting option for the future with the deployment of FR fleet to save the repository resource and optimize its use by allowing a denser disposal. It would limit the burden towards the future generations and the need for additional repositories before several centuries. Thirdly, the recycling of the whole minor actinides inventory could be an interesting option for the far-future for strongly decreasing the waste long-term toxicity, down to a few centuries. It would bring the waste issue back within the human history, which should promote its acceptance by the social opinion

  8. Spent fuel disassembly and canning programs at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townes, G.A.

    1979-10-01

    Methods of disassembling and canning spent fuel to allow more efficient storage are being investigated at the BNFP. Studies and development programs are aimed at dry disassembly of fuel to allow storage and shipment of fuel pins rather than full fuel assemblies. Results indicate that doubling existing storage capacity or tripling the carrying capacity of existing transportation equipment is achievable. Disassembly could be performed in the BNFP hot cells at rates of about 12 to 15 assemblies per day

  9. Romanian nuclear fuel program: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budan, O.; Rotaru, I.; Galeriu, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents and comments the policy adopted in Romania for the production of CANDU-6 nuclear fuel before and after 1990. In this paper the word 'past' refers to the period before 1990 and 'present' to the 1990-1997 period. The CANDU-6 nuclear fuel manufacturing started in Romania in December 1983. Neither AECL nor any Canadian nuclear fuel manufacturer were involved in the Romanian industrial nuclear fuel production before 1990. After January 1990, the new created Romanian Electricity Authority (RENEL) assumed the responsibility for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. It was RENEL's decision to stop, in June 1990, the nuclear fuel production at the Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors (IRNE) Pitesti. This decision was justified by the Canadian specialists team findings, revealed during a general, but well enough technically founded analysis performed at IRNE in the spring of 1990. All fuel manufactured before June 1990 was quarantined as it was considered of suspect quality. By that time more than 31,000 fuel bundles had already been manufactured. This fuel was stored for subsequent assessment. The paper explains the reasons which provoked this decision. The paper also presents the strategy adopted by RENEL after 1990 regarding the Romanian Nuclear Fuel Program. After a complex program done by Romanian and Canadian partners, in November 1994, AECL issued a temporary certification for the Romanian nuclear fuel plant. During the demonstration manufacturing run, as an essential milestone for the qualification of the Romanian fuel supplier for CANDU-6 reactors, 202 fuel bundles were produced. Of these fuel bundles, 66 were part of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 first fuel load (the balance was supplied by Zircatec Precision Industries Inc. - ZPI). The industrial nuclear fuel fabrication re-started in Romania in January 1995 under AECL's periodical monitoring. In December 1995, AECL issued a permanent certificate, stating the Romanian nuclear fuel plant as a qualified

  10. Strategies for plutonium recycle in a system of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaver, D.E.W.

    1976-01-01

    A methodology is developed to allow a utility fuel manager to determine economic strategies for recycling plutonium in a system of light water reactors. One possible plutonium recycle strategy would be self-generated recycle, in which plutonium discharged from a reactor is recycled back to that same reactor as soon as possible. Another possible strategy is to recycle all the plutonium discharged from several reactors into one reactor. Such a strategy might be advantageous if the reactor receiving the plutonium were of a type that utilized plutonium more effectively than other reactors in the system. There are several considerations which affect the economics of recycling a batch of plutonium to one reactor or cycle vs. another, or which would favor a special recycling strategy. Among these are cycle energy, length of time that plutonium is stored prior to recycle, and isotopes of the plutonium. The methodology developed is used to quantitatively illustrate the effect on recycle strategy of these parameters. The problem of choosing the plutonium recycle strategy which results in the minimum fuel cost is formulated as a mathematical programming problem. The objective function for this problem is the total discounted fuel cost for the reactor system over a specified planning period. The savings of an optimal recycle strategy over self-generated recycle would be typically one million dollars per year for a utility with several large PWRs

  11. Update on the Vancouver Fuel Cell Vehicle Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, B.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The Vancouver Fuel Cell Vehicle Program (VFCVP) is a $5.8 million initiative designed to test four Ford Focus Fuel Cell Vehicles for three years in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. The project is the first of its kind in Canada and is led by Fuel Cells Canada (FCC), the Ford Motor Company (Ford), and the Governments of Canada and British Columbia. This presentation will provide program details and an update on activities leading up to currently planned delivery to Vancouver in November 2004. The VFCVP will test the performance, durability and reliability of the Ford fuel cell vehicle cars in real-world conditions and will examine fuelling issues and solutions, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and public acceptance of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The program will generate data to help evolve the technology and develop international codes and standards E cents Epnd the implementation and adoption of fuel cell technology. (author)

  12. Online gas composition estimation in solid oxide fuel cell systems with anode off-gas recycle configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, B.; Vrečko, D.; Juričić, Ð.; Pohjoranta, A.; Pianese, C.

    2017-03-01

    Degradation and poisoning of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks are continuously shortening the lifespan of SOFC systems. Poisoning mechanisms, such as carbon deposition, form a coating layer, hence rapidly decreasing the efficiency of the fuel cells. Gas composition of inlet gases is known to have great impact on the rate of coke formation. Therefore, monitoring of these variables can be of great benefit for overall management of SOFCs. Although measuring the gas composition of the gas stream is feasible, it is too costly for commercial applications. This paper proposes three distinct approaches for the design of gas composition estimators of an SOFC system in anode off-gas recycle configuration which are (i.) accurate, and (ii.) easy to implement on a programmable logic controller. Firstly, a classical approach is briefly revisited and problems related to implementation complexity are discussed. Secondly, the model is simplified and adapted for easy implementation. Further, an alternative data-driven approach for gas composition estimation is developed. Finally, a hybrid estimator employing experimental data and 1st-principles is proposed. Despite the structural simplicity of the estimators, the experimental validation shows a high precision for all of the approaches. Experimental validation is performed on a 10 kW SOFC system.

  13. Learning and education on environmental radioactivity by residents of Rokkasho Site for the spent fuel recycling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawauchi, Kiye; Itoh, Natsuko; Ishikawa, Tomiye; Nihonyanagi, Haruko; Aratani, Michi

    2005-01-01

    The neutron criticality accident at the JCO, a private company for nuclear fuel processing facilities in Tokai has drastically changed minds and attitudes of residents toward environmental radioactivity. The accident happened on September 30, 1999. Before the accident the residents of the Rokkasho Site were not anxious about environmental radioactivity, because they thought the facilities were safe enough concerning containment policy of the radioactivity inside the facilities. Residents, however, had not been taught on a neutron. It is an unfamiliar radiation for them. So, they promptly learnt on neutrons, and some of them began the fixed point measurement of neutrons at the nearest site of the Spent Fuel Recycling Facilities of Rokkasho by the help of Prof. Kazuhisa. Komura, Kanazawa University. Members of the Reading Cicle, Rokkasho Culture Society, mainly women, learnt measurements of environmental radioactivity using simplified counters for alpha-, beta-, and gamma-ray from natural radioactive elements and prepared various kinds of environmental samples. After learning of environmental radioactivity, they began educational activities on the environmental radioactivity for boys and girls in the region. Monitoring of environmental radioactivity is performed by different institutions and with their purposes. Here is reported learning of environmental radioactivity by the residents and education of environmental radioactivity toward the young. Even with the simplest counters, we think that the monitoring of environmental radioactivity by the residents themselves is the royal road to the safety of the regional society. (author)

  14. Methanol supply issues for alternative fuels demonstration programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teague, J.M.; Koyama, K.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper surveys issues affecting the supply of fuel-grade methanol for the California Energy Commission's alternative fuels demonstration programs and operations by other public agencies such as transit and school districts. Establishing stable and reasonably priced sources of methanol (in particular) and of alternative fuels generally is essential to their demonstration and commercialization. Development both of vehicle technologies and of fuel supply and distribution are complementary and must proceed in parallel. However, the sequence of scaling up supply and distribution is not necessarily smooth; achievement of volume thresholds in demand and through-put of alternative fuels are marked by different kinds of challenges. Four basic conditions should be met in establishing a fuel supply: (1) it must be price competitive with petroleum-based fuels, at least when accounting for environmental and performance benefits; (2) bulk supply must meet volumes required at each phase; necessitating resilience among suppliers and a means of designating priority for high value users; (3) distribution systems must be reliable, comporting with end users' operational schedules; (4) volatility in prices to the end user for the fuel must be minimal. Current and projected fuel volumes appear to be insufficient to induce necessary economies of scale in production and distribution for fuel use. Despite their benefits, existing programs will suffer absent measures to secure economical fuel supplies. One solution is to develop sources that are dedicated to fuel markets and located within the end-use region

  15. Multi-criteria group decision making for evaluating the performance of e-waste recycling programs under uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Santoso; Deng, Hepu

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a multi-criteria group decision making approach for effectively evaluating the performance of e-waste recycling programs under uncertainty in an organization. Intuitionistic fuzzy numbers are used for adequately representing the subjective and imprecise assessments of the decision makers in evaluating the relative importance of evaluation criteria and the performance of individual e-waste recycling programs with respect to individual criteria in a given situation. An interactive fuzzy multi-criteria decision making algorithm is developed for facilitating consensus building in a group decision making environment to ensure that all the interest of individual decision makers have been appropriately considered in evaluating alternative e-waste recycling programs with respect to their corporate sustainability performance. The developed algorithm is then incorporated into a multi-criteria decision support system for making the overall performance evaluation process effectively and simple to use. Such a multi-criteria decision making system adequately provides organizations with a proactive mechanism for incorporating the concept of corporate sustainability into their regular planning decisions and business practices. An example is presented for demonstrating the applicability of the proposed approach in evaluating the performance of e-waste recycling programs in organizations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Uranium/fuel cycle 74, New Orleans, Louisiana, 17--20 March 1974. Program report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The highlight of papers presented at the conference are summarized. The sessions covered uranium raw material, transportation of spent fuel and radioactive waste, plutonium recycle, waste management, and safeguards. (U.S.)

  17. Fast Reactor Systems and Innovative Fuels for Minor Actinides Homogeneous Recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, R.

    2013-01-01

    The capability of nuclear energy source to limit GHG emissions at a competitive cost is still a potential driver for its development in the near- and medium-term. The sustainability of nuclear energy is concerned by various issues such as the shortage of natural uranium resources, the management of steadily increasing inventories of spent nuclear fuel as well as competitiveness. Nuclear technology should be, for its societal acceptability, affordable, safe and featured by low proliferation risks. In this regard innovative fast reactors could improve the management of spent nuclear fuel inventories a reducing the burden on the geological repository. The development of MA-bearing oxide fuels is ongoing both on the definition of under-irradiation behaviour as well as the investigations of new fabrication routes and significant efforts in R&D are necessary. This paper confirms the expected performance of investigated FRs and the synergistic use of NFCSS and DESAE proved to be capable in modelling with reasonable accuracy an innovative fuel cycle strategy. The reduction of GHG emissions by means of a steep expansion of nuclear energy needs to be carefully investigated where a multi-criteria approach is of crucial importance

  18. Algae biorefinery : an experimental study on liquid fuels production and nutrients recycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Alba, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Mankind needs renewable resources to cover for the growing energy demand in a sustainable manner and thereby alleviate the environmental/socio/political issues driven by the use of fossil fuels. Biomass, a renewable source, is one of the sustainable alternatives that can contribute to both the

  19. Status of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.B.

    1985-10-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is in the fifth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The major objective of this phase of the program is to assess the basic safety and environmental aspects of the concept of isolating immobilized fuel waste by deep underground disposal in plutonic rock. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely immobilization studies, geoscience research, and environmental and safety assessment, are well established

  20. Modeling minor actinide multiple recycling in a lead-cooled fast reactor to demonstrate a fuel cycle without long-lived nuclear waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisz Przemysław

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of closed nuclear fuel cycle seems to be the most promising options for the efficient usage of the nuclear energy resources. However, it can be implemented only in fast breeder reactors of the IVth generation, which are characterized by the fast neutron spectrum. The lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR was defined and studied on the level of technical design in order to demonstrate its performance and reliability within the European collaboration on ELSY (European Lead-cooled System and LEADER (Lead-cooled European Advanced Demonstration Reactor projects. It has been demonstrated that LFR meets the requirements of the closed nuclear fuel cycle, where plutonium and minor actinides (MA are recycled for reuse, thereby producing no MA waste. In this study, the most promising option was realized when entire Pu + MA material is fully recycled to produce a new batch of fuel without partitioning. This is the concept of a fuel cycle which asymptotically tends to the adiabatic equilibrium, where the concentrations of plutonium and MA at the beginning of the cycle are restored in the subsequent cycle in the combined process of fuel transmutation and cooling, removal of fission products (FPs, and admixture of depleted uranium. In this way, generation of nuclear waste containing radioactive plutonium and MA can be eliminated. The paper shows methodology applied to the LFR equilibrium fuel cycle assessment, which was developed for the Monte Carlo continuous energy burnup (MCB code, equipped with enhanced modules for material processing and fuel handling. The numerical analysis of the reactor core concerns multiple recycling and recovery of long-lived nuclides and their influence on safety parameters. The paper also presents a general concept of the novel IVth generation breeder reactor with equilibrium fuel and its future role in the management of MA.

  1. Environmental impact of radioactive releases from recycle of thorium-based fuel using current containment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennery, V.J.; Bomar, E.S.; Bond, W.D.; Morse, L.E.; Meyer, H.R.; Till, J.E.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    The analysis of thorium mining and milling suggests that the resulting doses should be similar to those from uranium operations. An absolute comparison cannot be made at this time, however, due to differences in some assumptions utilized by the various investigators and the lack in some cases of site-specific meteorology and population data at thorium resource sites in the western United States. A distinct difference resulting from the short half-life of 220 Rn (T/sub 1/2/ = 55.6 s) in the thorium decay chain compared to that for 222 Rn (T/sub 1/2/ = 3.82 d) in uranium decay was noted for emissions following mill shutdown. This effect is to make potential releases following thorium mill shutdown of lesser consequence than in the uranium case. Thorium tailings activity would also decrease relatively rapidly due to the comparatively short half-life (T/sub 1/2 = 5.75 y) of 228 Ra. Doses due to airborne releases from thorium-uranium carbide fuel refabrication are significantly less than that due to fuel reprocessing. Tritium is the principal contributor to reprocessing plant doses while carbon-14, 131 Cs, and 232 U account for most of the remaining dose. A tenfold increase in reprocessing plant CF for tritium reduces both individual and population doses by about 60%. For refabrication operations, a near linear dependence upon dose with 232 U content of the fuel was calculated between concentrations of 10 ppM and 5000 ppM. Comparison of (Th, U)C and (U, Pu)C showed little difference in dose commitment, but the presence of 232 U in the (Th, U) fuel causes a notable increase in the refabrication plant dose over that previously calculated for (U, Pu) type fuels

  2. The unrivalled expertise for Pu recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, W.; Pouilloux, M.

    1997-01-01

    Relying on the outstanding performances of the reprocessing facilities and the growing fabrication facilities, the in-reactor Pu recycling program in France and in other European countries is steadily implemented and has reached full-scale industrial operation. The RCR strategy -Reprocessing, Conditioning and Recycling- developed by COGEMA is now a well proven industrial reality. In 1997, plutonium recycling through MOX fuel is a mature industry, with successful operational experience and large-scale fabrication plants. In this field, COGEMA is the main actor, on operating simultaneously three complete multidesign fuel production plants: MELOX plant (in Marcoule), CADARACHE plant and DESSEL plant (in Belgium). Present MOX production capacity available to COGEMA fits 175 tHM per year and will be extended to reach about 325 tHM in the year 2000, that will represent 75% of the total MOX fabrication capacity in Europe. The industrial mastery and the high production level in MOX production assured by high technology processes confers COGEMA an unrivalled expertise for Pu recycling. This allows COGEMA to be a major actor in Pu-based fuels in the coming second nuclear era with advanced fuel cycles. The paper depicts the steps of the progressive advance of COGEMA to reach the Pu recycling expertise. (author)

  3. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage and reprocessing since 1953. Reprocessing of SNF has resulted in an existing inventory of 1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid waste and 3800 cubic meters (m 3 ) of calcine, in addition to the 768 metric tons (MT) of SNF and various other fuel materials in inventory. To date, the major activity of the ICPP has been the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium; however, recent changes in world events have diminished the demand to recover and recycle this material. As a result, DOE has discontinued reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery, making the need to properly manage and dispose of these and future materials a high priority. In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended, disposal of SNF and high-level waste (HLW) is planned for a geological repository. Preparation of SNF, HLW, and other radioactive wastes for disposal may include mechanical, physical, and/or chemical processes. This plan outlines the program strategy of the ICPP Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF ampersand WMTDP) to develop and demonstrate the technology required to ensure that SNF and radioactive waste will properly stored and prepared for final disposal. Program elements in support of acceptable interim storage and waste minimization include: developing and implementing improved radioactive waste treatment technologies; identifying and implementing enhanced decontamination and decommissioning techniques; developing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) recycle capabilities; and developing and implementing improved technologies for the interim storage of SNF

  4. 78 FR 62462 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... renewable fuel is defined as fuel produced from renewable biomass that is used to replace or reduce the quantity of fossil fuel present in home heating oil or jet fuel.\\3\\ In essence, additional renewable fuel... of ``home heating oil.'' EPA determined that this term was ambiguous, and defined it by incorporating...

  5. Commercial waste and spent fuel packaging program. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakl, A.R.

    1981-10-01

    This document is a report of activities performed by Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems Division - Nevada Operations in meeting subtask objectives described in the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project Plan and revised planning documentation for Fiscal Year (FY) 1981. Major activities included: completion of the first fuel exchange in the Spent Fuel Test - Climax program; plasma arc welder development; modification and qualification of a canister cutter; installation, and activation of a remote area monitor, constant air monitor and an alpha/beta/gamma counting system; qualification of grapples required to handle pressurized water reactor or boiling water reactor fuel and high level waste (HLW) logs; data acquisition from the 3 kilowatt soil temperature test, 2 kw fuel temperature test, and 2 kw drywell test; calorimetry of the fuel assembly used in the fuel temperature test; evaluation of moisture accumulation in the drywells and recommendations for proposed changes; revision of safety assessment document to include HLW log operations; preparation of quality assurance plan and procedures; development and qualification of all equipment and procedures to receive, handle and encapsulate both the HLW log and spent fuel for the basalt waste isolation program/near surface test facility program; preliminary studies of both the requirements to perform waste packaging for the test and evaluation facility and a cask storage program for the DOE Interim Spent Fuel Management program; and remote handling operations on radioactive source calibration in support of other contractors

  6. Canadian fuel development program and recent operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.S.; Kohn, E.; Lau, J.H.K.; Dicke, G.J.; Macici, N.N.; Sancton, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current Canadian CANDU fuel R and D programs and operational experience. The details of operational experience for fuel in Canadian reactors are summarized for the period 1991-1994; excellent fuel performance has been sustained, with steady-state bundle defect rates currently as low as 0.02%. The status of introducing long 37-element bundles, and bundles with rounded bearing pads is reviewed. These minor changes in fuel design have been selectively introduced in response to operational constraints (end-plate cracking and pressure-tube fretting) at Ontario Hydro's Bruce-B and Darlington stations. The R and D programs are generating a more complete understanding of CANDU fuel behaviour, while the CANDU Owners Group (COG) Fuel Technology Program is being re-aligned to a more exclusive focus on the needs of operating stations. Technical highlights and realized benefits from the COG program are summarized. Re-organization of AECL to provide a one-company focus, with an outward looking view to new CANDU markets, has strengthened R and D in advanced fuel cycles. Progress in AECL's key fuel cycle programs is also summarized. (author)

  7. INEL metal recycle annual report, FY-94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtold, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    In 1992, the mission of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was changed from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels to development of technologies for conditioning of spent nuclear fuels and other high-level wastes for disposal in a geologic repository. In addition, the Department of Energy (DOE) directed Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a program plan addressing the management of radioactive contaminated scrap metal (RSM) within the DOE complex. Based on discussions with the EM-30 organization, the INEL Metal Recycle program plan was developed to address all issues of RSM management. Major options considered for RSM management were engineered interim storage, land disposal as low-level waste, and beneficial reuse/recycle. From its inception, the Metal Recycle program has emphasized avoidance of storage and disposal costs through beneficial reuse of RSM. The Metal Recycle program plan includes three major activities: Site-by-site inventory of RSM resources; validation of technologies for conversion of RSM to usable products; and identification of parties prepared to participate in development of a RSM recycle business

  8. Review of the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, S.R.

    1980-06-01

    Progress over the previous year in the nuclear fuel waste management program is reviewed. Universities, industry and consultants have become increasingly involved, and the work is being overseen by a Technical Advisory Committee. The program has also been investigated by Ontario's Porter Commission and Select Committe on Ontario Hydro Affairs. A public information program has been extended to cover most of the Canadian Shield region of Ontario. Ontario Hydro is studying spent fuel storage and transportation, while AECL is covering immobilization of spent fuel or processing wastes, geotechnical and geochemical research in the laboratory and in the field, design of disposal facilities, and environmental and safety assessments. (L.L.)

  9. System Design Description and Requirements for Modeling the Off-Gas Systems for Fuel Recycling Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daryl R. Haefner; Jack D. Law; Troy J. Tranter

    2010-08-01

    This document provides descriptions of the off-gases evolved during spent nuclear fuel processing and the systems used to capture the gases of concern. Two reprocessing techniques are discussed, namely aqueous separations and electrochemical (pyrochemical) processing. The unit operations associated with each process are described in enough detail so that computer models to mimic their behavior can be developed. The document also lists the general requirements for the desired computer models.

  10. U-Mo fuel qualification program in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.H.; Lee, C.S.; Kim, H.R.; Kuk, I.H.; Kim, C.K.

    2000-01-01

    Atomized U-Mo fuel has shown good performance from the results of previous out-of-pile tests and post-irradiation examinations. A qualification program of rod type U-Mo fuel is in progress and the fuel will be irradiated in HANARO. 6 gU/cm 3 U-7Mo, U-8Mo and U-9Mo are considered in this program. The laboratory test results of porosity, mechanical property, thermal conductivity, and thermal compatibility test are discussed in this paper. In parallel with this qualification program, the feasibility study on the core conversion from the present U 3 Si fuel to U-Mo in HANARO will be initiated to provide technical bases for the policy making. Several options of core conversion for HANARO are proposed and each option will be addressed briefly in terms of the operation policy, fuel management, and licensing of HANARO. (author)

  11. The French development program for a UMo fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, R.; Nigon, J.L.; Languille, A.; Le Borgne, E.; Freslon, H.

    1999-01-01

    Until now high density U 3 Si 2 fuels were satisfactory for LEU conversion of certain reactors, but their use is limited because their density is physically limited to 5,8 gU/cm3 and they have very poor reprocessing capacities. After the end of the present US return policy in may 2006, the reactor operators will be indeed in a very difficult position with silicides. The international community is thus interested in a very high density fuel with good reprocessing capacities in order to convert most reactors and to find a back end solution. In France, CEA, CERCA, and COGEMA have thus launched an important program in order to sort potential candidates of uranium alloys. UMo is one of the most interesting candidates. After the selection of UMo alloys, France has pooled different skills to start an important program on UMo fuels: CEA has started an important project for a new reactor (Jules Horowitz); CERCA is the main manufacturer for MTR fuel; TECHNICATOME is the design expert for research reactors and associated cores; FRAMATOME is the parent company of CERCA and is interested in the development of new reactors; COGEMA is interested in reprocessing spent fuels. This new fuel has three aims: to allow reactors to benefit from a high performing fuel; to have a reprocessable fuel to limit the fuel storage period and the associate safety problem, and solve the back end issue; to support the international effort for non proliferation involving the end of the use of HEU. This high density fuel will decrease the number of fuel assemblies needed to run the reactors and decrease the global cost of the fuel cycle as the back end management cost is in proportion with the quantity of fuel. Reactor operators will thus derive an advantage from this new fuel, in terms of economy

  12. Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program 2015 Research Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Ann Heinsch; Charles W. McHugh; Colin C. Hardy

    2016-01-01

    The Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program (FFS) of the U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station focuses on fundamental and applied research in wildland fire, from fire physics and fire ecology to fuels management and smoke emissions. Located at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana, the scientists, engineers, technicians, and support...

  13. Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Program: 2014 Research Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Ann Heinsch; Robin J. Innes; Colin C. Hardy; Kristine M. Lee

    2015-01-01

    The Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program (FFS) of the U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station focuses on fundamental and applied research in wildland fire, from fire physics and fire ecology to fuels management and smoke emissions. Located at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana, the scientists, engineers, technicians, and support staff in FFS...

  14. Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program: 2013 Research accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Ann Heinsch; Robin J. Innes; Colin C. Hardy; Kristine M. Lee

    2014-01-01

    The Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program (FFS) of the U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, focuses on fundamental and applied research in wildland fire, from fire physics and fire ecology to fuels management and smoke emissions. Located at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana, the scientists, engineers, technicians, and support staff in...

  15. Computerised programming of the Dragon reactor fuel handling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, P.

    1976-11-01

    Two suites of FORTRAN IV computer programs have been written to produce check lists for the operation of the two remote control fuel handling machines of the Dragon Reactor. This document describes the advantages of these programs over the previous manual system of writing check lists, and provides a detailed guide to the programs themselves. (author)

  16. A new UO2 sintering technology for the recycling of defective fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K. W.; Kim, K. S.; Jeong, Y. H.

    1998-01-01

    A new UO 2 sintering technology to recycle defective UO 2 pellets has been developed. The defective UO 2 pellets were oxidized in an air to produce U 3 O 8 powder, and the U 3 O 8 powder was mixed with fresh AUC-UO 2 powder in the range of 10 to 100 wt%. Nb 2 O 5 and TiO 2 are added to the mixed powder. The mixed powder was pressed and sintered at 1680 deg C for 4 hours in hydrogen. The density of UO 2 pellets without sintering agents decreased linearly with the U 3 O 8 content at the rate of 0.2 %TD per 1 wt% U 3 O 8 , and the density was below 93.5 %TD at the U 3 O 8 contents above 10 wt%. However, the mixed UO 2 and U 3 O 8 powder containing Nb 2 O 5 (≥0.3 wt%) and TiO 2 (≥0.1 wt%) yielded a sintered density above 94 %TD in all ranges of U 3 O 8 contents. It was found that higher mixing ratios of U 3 O 8 to UO 2 powder did not affect the grain size of UO 2 pellets under the addition of Nb 2 O 5 , but decreased the grain size of UO 2 pellets under the addition of TiO 2 . The doped UO 2 pellets have grain sizes larger than 20 μm, and have small density gain after re-sintering test, owing to large pores. Therefore, the sintering agents such as Nb 2 O 5 and TiO 2 can make highly densified UO 2 pellets from the powder comprising a large amount of U 3 O 8 powder

  17. 75 FR 14669 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Changes to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... RINs from producers of the renewable fuel. The obligated parties do not need lead time for construction... fuels and new limits on renewable biomass feedstocks. This rulemaking marks the first time that... advanced biofuel and multiple cellulosic-based fuels with their 60% threshold. Additional fuel pathways...

  18. Status of Away From Reactor spent fuel storage program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.D.

    1979-07-01

    The Away From Reactor (AFR) Spent Fuel Program that the US Department of Energy established in 1977 is intended to preclude the shutting down of commercial nuclear power reactors because of lack of storage space for spent fuel. Legislation now being considered by Congress includes plans to provide storage space for commercial spent fuel beginning in 1983. Utilities are being encouraged to provide as much storage space as possible in their existing storage facilities, but projections indicate that a significant amount of AFR storage will be required. The government is evaluating the use of both existing and new storage facilities to solve this forecasted storage problem for commercial spent fuel

  19. The US Army Foreign Comparative Test fuel cell program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostic, Elizabeth; Sifer, Nicholas; Bolton, Christopher; Ritter, Uli; Dubois, Terry

    The US Army RDECOM initiated a Foreign Comparative Test (FCT) Program to acquire lightweight, high-energy dense fuel cell systems from across the globe for evaluation as portable power sources in military applications. Five foreign companies, including NovArs, Smart Fuel Cell, Intelligent Energy, Ballard Power Systems, and Hydrogenics, Inc., were awarded competitive contracts under the RDECOM effort. This paper will report on the status of the program as well as the experimental results obtained from one of the units. The US Army has interests in evaluating and deploying a variety of fuel cell systems, where these systems show added value when compared to current power sources in use. For low-power applications, fuel cells utilizing high-energy dense fuels offer significant weight savings over current battery technologies. This helps reduce the load a solider must carry for longer missions. For high-power applications, the low operating signatures (acoustic and thermal) of fuel cell systems make them ideal power generators in stealth operations. Recent testing has been completed on the Smart Fuel Cell A25 system that was procured through the FCT program. The "A-25" is a direct methanol fuel cell hybrid and was evaluated as a potential candidate for soldier and sensor power applications.

  20. GCFR Fuels and Materials Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neimark, L.A.; Greenberg, S.; Johnson, C.E.; Purohit, A.; Liu, Y.Y.; Rest, J.; Reimann, K.J.; McLennan, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    The F-5 fuel-pin irradiation experiment in EBR-II is a cornerstone of the GCFR program. It is the largest-scale fuel-pin experiment in the present program and will provide data on the performance of pins and a pin-support structure that are prototypic of the GCFR Demonstration Plant. The fuel pins are presently undergoing interim examination after successfully achieving 4.6 at.% burnup. Studies of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the U--Cs--O system, supplemented by analysis of the results of previously irradiated fuel pins, have led to the incorporation of fuel-design modifications in the F-5 experiment to insure adequate performance of the vented fuel. The effect of ribbing, as well as the ribbing process, on the short- and long-term structural performance of fuel-pin cladding is being evaluated via in-reactor and out-of-reactor tests and with the fuel-element modeling code LIFE-GCFR and the finite element program, ADINA

  1. Reuse of spent fuel cladding Zr by molten salt toward advanced recycle society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Osamu; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Kazunori; Yasuike, Y.; Sato, Nobuaki

    2003-01-01

    Cladding tubes of zircaloy 95% generated from reprocessing process for spent nuclear fuels are to be chopped in about 3 cm length, compacted and solidified with cements. This paper reports the summary of investigation of the present possible techniques for zirconium recovery: (1) electrolysis of molten salts (Zr-chlorides and/or fluorides) and (2) separation as volatile zirconium chlorides (ZrCl 4 ) (chloride volatility process) followed by reaction with metallic magnesium at 900degC to produce sponged Zr (Kroll method). The feasibility are discussed from the point of view of reduction of secondary radioactive wastes, accumulation of such nuclides as Co-60 and Ni-63 in electrolytic basin, radioactivity estimation in the products, and also problems of cleaning and reducing chemicals. (S. Ohno)

  2. On the hazard accumulation of actinide waste in a Pu-fueled LMFBR power economy with and without by-product actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmi, L.; Caruso, K.; Hage, W.; Schmidt, E.

    1979-01-01

    The actinide waste arisings in terms of hazard potential for ingestion and inhalation are given for a Pu-fueled LMFBR Power Economy as function of decay time. The data were assessed for two simplified fuel cycles, one considering the recycling of by-product actinides and the other their complete discharge to the high-level waste. Two durations of nuclear power and several loss fractions of actinides to the waste were considered. The major contributors in form of chemical elements or isotopes to the actinide waste hazard built up during the nuclear power duration were identified for various decay intervals

  3. Program on fuels for transmutation: present status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouault, J.; Garnier, J.C.; Chauvin, N.; Pillon, S. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles

    2001-07-01

    The performance calculations of appropriate fuel cycle facilities and reactor configurations (scenarios) relying on current reactor technologies (Pressurized Water Reactor and Fast neutrons Reactors) or innovative reactors (Accelerator Driven Systems) have proved the scientific feasibility of some P and T strategies. To insure the technological feasibility, a large program on fuels and materials is underway, including advanced concepts for PWRs and the development of specific targets (dispersed fuels) for transmutation in Fast Reactors. Experiments in different reactors including Phenix are being prepared. The program is presented and recent results are given. (author)

  4. Program on fuels for transmutation: present status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouault, J.; Garnier, J.C.; Chauvin, N.; Pillon, S.

    2001-01-01

    The performance calculations of appropriate fuel cycle facilities and reactor configurations (scenarios) relying on current reactor technologies (Pressurized Water Reactor and Fast neutrons Reactors) or innovative reactors (Accelerator Driven Systems) have proved the scientific feasibility of some P and T strategies. To insure the technological feasibility, a large program on fuels and materials is underway, including advanced concepts for PWRs and the development of specific targets (dispersed fuels) for transmutation in Fast Reactors. Experiments in different reactors including Phenix are being prepared. The program is presented and recent results are given. (author)

  5. Fifth annual report to congress. Federal alternative motor fuels programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the status of the US Department of Energy`s alternative fuel vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs being conducted in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. These programs comprise the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative transportation fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The report summarizes tests and results from the fifth year. Electric vehicles are not included in these programs, and the annual report does not include information on them. Since the inception of the programs, great strides have been made in developing commercially viable alternative fuel vehicle technologies. However, as is the case in the commercialization of all new technologies, some performance problems have been experienced on vehicles involved in early demonstration efforts. Substantial improvements have been recorded in vehicle practicality, safety, and performance in real-world demonstrations. An aspect of particular interest is emissions output. Results from light duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated superior inservice emissions performance. Heavy duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated dramatic reductions in particulate emissions. However, emissions results from vehicles converted to run on alternative fuel have not been as promising. Although the technologies available today are commercially viable in some markets, further improvements in infrastructure and economics will result in greater market expansion. Information is included in this report on light and heavy duty vehicles, transit buses, vehicle conversions, safety, infrastructure support, vehicle availability, and information dissemination.

  6. On-site fuel cell field test support program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniunas, J. W.; Merten, G. P.

    1982-01-01

    In order to assess the impact of grid connection on the potential market for fuel cell service, applications studies were conducted to identify the fuel cell operating modes and corresponding fuel cell sizing criteria which offer the most potential for initial commercial service. The market for grid-connected fuel cell service was quantified using United's market analysis program and computerized building data base. Electric and gas consumption data for 268 buildings was added to our surveyed building data file, bringing the total to 407 buildings. These buildings were analyzed for grid-isolated and grid-connected fuel cell service. The results of the analyses indicated that the nursing home, restaurant and health club building sectors offer significant potential for fuel cell service.

  7. Efficiency gain of solid oxide fuel cell systems by using anode offgas recycle - Results for a small scale propane driven unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Ralph-Uwe; Oelze, Jana; Lindermeir, Andreas; Spitta, Christian; Steffen, Michael; Küster, Torben; Chen, Shaofei; Schlitzberger, Christian; Leithner, Reinhard

    The transfer of high electrical efficiencies of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) into praxis requires appropriate system concepts. One option is the anode-offgas recycling (AOGR) approach, which is based on the integration of waste heat using the principle of a chemical heat pump. The AOGR concept allows a combined steam- and dry-reforming of hydrocarbon fuel using the fuel cell products steam and carbon dioxide. SOFC fuel gas of higher quantity and quality results. In combination with internal reuse of waste heat the system efficiency increases compared to the usual path of partial oxidation (POX). The demonstration of the AOGR concept with a 300 Wel-SOFC stack running on propane required: a combined reformer/burner-reactor operating in POX (start-up) and AOGR modus; a hotgas-injector for anode-offgas recycling to the reformer; a dynamic process model; a multi-variable process controller; full system operation for experimental proof of the efficiency gain. Experimental results proof an efficiency gain of 18 percentage points (η·POX = 23%, η·AOGR = 41%) under idealized lab conditions. Nevertheless, further improvements of injector performance, stack fuel utilization and additional reduction of reformer reformer O/C ratio and system pressure drop are required to bring this approach into self-sustaining operation.

  8. The Canadian long-term experimental used fuel storage program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasywich, K.M.; Taylor, P.

    1993-01-01

    The Canadian experimental fuel storage program consists of four components: (1) storage of used CANDU (CANadian Deuterium Uranium, registered trademark of AECL) fuel under water, with periodic examination; (2) storage of used CANDU fuel in dry air at seasonally varying temperatures, and in both dry and moisture-saturated air at 150 C, also with periodic examination; (3) underlying research on the oxidation of unused and used UO 2 in dry and moist air at temperatures up to 300 C; and (4) modeling of UO 2 oxidation in dry air. The primary objective of the fuel-storage experiments is to investigate the stability of used CANDU fuel during long-term storage. Burnup of the fuel in these experiments ranges from ∼43 to 582 MW h/kg U, while the outer-element linear power ratings range from 22 to 79 kW/m. The storage behavior of intact and intentionally defected fuel, and fuel that defected in-reactor, is being investigated in the above experiments. Since differences in UO 2 oxidation behavior were observed between dry-air, moisture-saturated air and wet storage of intentionally defected used CANDU fuel, underlying research was initiated on oxidation of unused and used fuel to develop a better understanding of the different mechanisms. Modeling of UO 2 oxidation based on the results of the dry-storage experiments is also under way

  9. Results of 200 KW fuel cell evaluation programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrey, J.M.; Merten, G.P. [SAIC, San Diego, CA (United States); Binder, M.J. [Army Construction Engineering Research Labs., Champaign, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) has installed six monitoring systems on ONSI Corporation 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cells. Three of the systems were installed for the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) which is coordinating the Department of Defense (DoD) fuel cell Demonstration Program and three were installed under a contract with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). Monitoring of the three NYSERDA sites has been completed. Monitoring systems for the DoD fuel cells were installed in August, 1996 and thus no operating data was available at the time of this writing, but will be presented at the Fuel Cell Seminar. This paper will present the monitoring configuration and research approach for each program. Additionally, summary performance data is presented for the completed NYSERDA program.

  10. Segmented fuel irradiation program: investigation on advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, H.; Goto, K.; Sabate, R.; Abeta, S.; Baba, T.; Matias, E. de; Alonso, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Segmented Fuel Irradiation Program, started in 1991, is a collaboration between the Japanese organisations Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), the Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. (KEPCO) representing other Japanese utilities, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI); and the Spanish Organisations Empresa Nacional de Electricidad, S.A. (ENDESA) representing A.N. Vandellos 2, and Empresa Nacional Uranio, S.A. (ENUSA); with the collaboration of Westinghouse. The objective of the Program is to make substantial contribution to the development of advanced cladding and fuel materials for better performance at high burn-up and under operational power transients. For this Program, segmented fuel rods were selected as the most appropriate vehicle to accomplish the aforementioned objective. Thus, a large number of fuel and cladding combinations are provided while minimising the total amount of new material, at the same time, facilitating an eventual irradiation extension in a test reactor. The Program consists of three major phases: phase I: design, licensing, fabrication and characterisation of the assemblies carrying the segmented rods (1991 - 1994); phase II: base irradiation of the assemblies at Vandellos 2 NPP, and on-site examination at the end of four cycles (1994-1999). Phase III: ramp testing at the Studsvik facilities and hot cell PIE (1996-2001). The main fuel design features whose effects on fuel behaviour are being analysed are: alloy composition (MDA and ZIRLO vs. Zircaloy-4); tubing texture; pellet grain size. The Program is progressing satisfactorily as planned. The base irradiation is completed in the first quarter of 1999, and so far, tests and inspections already carried out are providing useful information on the behaviour of the new materials. Also, the Program is delivering a well characterized fuel material, irradiated in a commercial reactor, which can be further used in other fuel behaviour experiments. The paper presents the main

  11. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  12. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-03-01

    This plan details the goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks and schedule for EERE's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen Program. Similar detailed plans exist for the other DOE offices that make up the Hydrogen Program.

  13. The KFB Program on Biobased Fuels for Vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    KFB supports research and demonstration projects for bio-based transport fuels, alcohols and biogas. The program started in 1991 and will continue through 1997. The program focuses on heavy vehicles, e.g. buses for public transportation. Projects and intermediate results are described in the brochure. Information is also available at the KFB homepage. //www.kfb.se

  14. 2013 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2013 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  15. 2014 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2014 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  16. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyapal, Sunita [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2011 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  17. 2016 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyapal, Sunita [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-02-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  18. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil

    2015-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  19. 2012 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  20. HTGR Fuels and Core Development Program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending August 31, 1977. [Graphite and fuel irradiation; fission product release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    The work reported includes studies of reactions between core materials and coolant impurities, basic fission product transport mechanisms, core graphite development and testing, the development and testing of recyclable fuel systems, and physics and fuel management studies. Materials studies include irradiation capsule tests of both fuel and graphite. Experimental procedures and results are discussed and data are presented.

  1. Operations monitoring concept. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    Operations monitoring is a safeguards concept which could be applied in future fuel cycle facilities to significantly enhance the effectiveness of an integrated safeguards system. In general, a variety of operations monitoring techniques could be developed for both international and domestic safeguards application. The goal of this presentation is to describe specific examples of operations monitoring techniques as may be applied in a fuel reprocessing facility. The operations monitoring concept involves monitoring certain in-plant equipment, personnel, and materials to detect conditions indicative of the diversion of nuclear material. An operations monitoring subsystem should be designed to monitor operations only to the extent necessary to achieve specified safeguards objectives; there is no intent to monitor all operations in the facility. The objectives of the operations monitoring subsystem include: verification of reported data; detection of undeclared uses of equipment; and alerting the inspector to potential diversion activities. 1 fig

  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Monthly Activities Report for August 1966 AEC Division of Reactor Development and Technology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SL Fawcett

    1966-08-01

    This report has the following sections: Summary; Civilian Power Reactors; Applied and Reactor Physics; Reactor Fuels and Materials; Engineering Development; Plutonium Recycle Program; and Nuclear Safety.

  3. Russian research reactor fuel return program starts shipping fuel to Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedik, T.; Bolshinsky, I.; Krass, A.

    2003-01-01

    For almost four years the United States (U.S), the Russian Federation (R.F.), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have been discussing an initiative to return Soviet/Russian-origin research reactor fuel to the Russian Federation. In a series of bilateral and trilateral meetings in Vienna and Moscow, considerable progress has been made toward defining the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program as well as obtaining the necessary technical data to facilitate the return. More than 20 research reactors in 17 countries that have Soviet- or Russian-supplied fuel have identified. Most of these reactors have stocks of both fresh and irradiated HEU fuel that must be carefully stored and managed for many years to come. On September 21, 2003 the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return program shipped 14 kg of fresh Russian-origin HEU fuel from Romania to the nuclear fuel fabrication facility in Russia, which represented the beginning of the practical implementation of the program. (author)

  4. Yugoslav spent nuclear fuel management program and international perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Subotic, K.; Sotic, O.; Plecas, I.; Ljubenov, V.; Peric, A.; Milosevic, M.

    2002-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel stored in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Yugoslavia, consists of about 2.5 tons of metal uranium (initial enrichment 2%) and about 20 kg uranium dioxide (dispersed in aluminum matrix, initial fuel uranium enrichment 80%). This spent nuclear fuel is generated in operation of the RA heavy water research reactor during 1959-1984 period. Both types of fuel are of ex-USSR origin, have the same shape and dimensions and approximately the same initial mass of 235 nuclide. They are known as the TVR-S type of fuel elements. The total of 8030 spent fuel elements are stored at the RA research reactor premises, almost all in the spent fuel pool filled by ordinary water. The last used 480 high-enriched uranium spent fuel elements are kept in the drained RA reactor core since 1984. Fuel layer of both enrichments is covered with thin aluminium cladding. Due to non-suitable chemical parameters of water in the spent fuel storage pool, the corrosion processes penetrated aluminium cladding and aluminium walls od storage containers during storage period long from 20 to 40 years. Activity of fission products ( 137 Cs) is detected in water samples during water inspection in 1996 and experts of the lAEA Russia and USA were invited to help. By end of 2001, some remediation of the water transparency of the storage pool and inspections of water samples taken from the storage containers with the spent fuel elements were carried out by the Vinca Institute staff and with the help of experts from the Russia and the IAEA. Following new initiatives on international perspective on spent fuel management, a proposal was set by the IAEA, and was supported by the governments of the USA and the Russian Federation to ship the spent fuel elements of the RA research reactor to Mayak spent fuel processing plant in Russia. This paper describes current status of the reactor RA spent fuel elements, initiative for new Yugoslav spent fuel management program speculates on some of the

  5. Recycled water reuse permit renewal application for the materials and fuels complex industrial waste ditch and industrial waste pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Name, No

    2014-10-01

    This renewal application for the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (IWRP) WRU-I-0160-01 at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Industrial Waste Ditch (IWD) and Industrial Waste Pond (IWP) is being submitted to the State of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). This application has been prepared in compliance with the requirements in IDAPA 58.01.17, Recycled Water Rules. Information in this application is consistent with the IDAPA 58.01.17 rules, pre-application meeting, and the Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater (September 2007). This application is being submitted using much of the same information contained in the initial permit application, submitted in 2007, and modification, in 2012. There have been no significant changes to the information and operations covered in the existing IWRP. Summary of the monitoring results and operation activity that has occurred since the issuance of the WRP has been included. MFC has operated the IWP and IWD as regulated wastewater land treatment facilities in compliance with the IDAPA 58.01.17 regulations and the IWRP. Industrial wastewater, consisting primarily of continuous discharges of nonhazardous, nonradioactive, routinely discharged noncontact cooling water and steam condensate, periodic discharges of industrial wastewater from the MFC facility process holdup tanks, and precipitation runoff, are discharged to the IWP and IWD system from various MFC facilities. Wastewater goes to the IWP and IWD with a permitted annual flow of up to 17 million gallons/year. All requirements of the IWRP are being met. The Operations and Maintenance Manual for the Industrial Wastewater System will be updated to include any new requirements.

  6. Power Burst Facility severe-fuel-damage test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCardell, R.K.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    As a result of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has initiated a severe fuel damage research program to investigate fuel rod and core response, and fission product and hydrogen release and transport during degraded core cooling accidents. This paper presents a discussion of the expected benefits of the PBF severe fuel damage tests to the nuclear industry, a description of the first five planned experiments, the results of pretest analysis performed to predict the fuel bundle heatup for the first two experiments, and a discussion of Phase II severe fuel damage experiments. Modifications to the fission product detection system envisioned for the later experiments are also described

  7. Fuzzy risk explicit interval linear programming model for end-of-life vehicle recycling planning in the EU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    End-of-life vehicles (ELVs) are vehicles that have reached the end of their useful lives and are no longer registered or licensed for use. The ELV recycling problem has become very serious in the last decade and more and more efforts are made in order to reduce the impact of ELVs on the environment. This paper proposes the fuzzy risk explicit interval linear programming model for ELV recycling planning in the EU. It has advantages in reflecting uncertainties presented in terms of intervals in the ELV recycling systems and fuzziness in decision makers' preferences. The formulated model has been applied to a numerical study in which different decision maker types and several ELV types under two EU ELV Directive legislative cases were examined. This study is conducted in order to examine the influences of the decision maker type, the α-cut level, the EU ELV Directive and the ELV type on decisions about vehicle hulks procuring, storing unprocessed hulks, sorting generated material fractions, allocating sorted waste flows and allocating sorted metals. Decision maker type can influence quantity of vehicle hulks kept in storages. The EU ELV Directive and decision maker type have no influence on which vehicle hulk type is kept in the storage. Vehicle hulk type, the EU ELV Directive and decision maker type do not influence the creation of metal allocation plans, since each isolated metal has its regular destination. The valid EU ELV Directive eco-efficiency quotas can be reached even when advanced thermal treatment plants are excluded from the ELV recycling process. The introduction of the stringent eco-efficiency quotas will significantly reduce the quantities of land-filled waste fractions regardless of the type of decision makers who will manage vehicle recycling system. In order to reach these stringent quotas, significant quantities of sorted waste need to be processed in advanced thermal treatment plants. Proposed model can serve as the support for the European

  8. Reprocessing yields and material throughput: HTGR recycle demonstration facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, N.; Abraham, L.

    1977-08-01

    Recovery and reuse of residual U-235 and bred U-233 from the HTGR thorium-uranium fuel cycle will contribute significantly to HTGR fuel cycle economics and to uranium resource conservation. The Thorium Utilization National Program Plan for HTGR Fuel Recycle Development includes the demonstration, on a production scale, of reprocessing and refabrication processes in an HTGR Recycle Demonstration Facility (HRDF). This report addresses process yields and material throughput that may be typically expected in the reprocessing of highly enriched uranium fuels in the HRDF. Material flows will serve as guidance in conceptual design of the reprocessing portion of the HRDF. In addition, uranium loss projections, particle breakage limits, and decontamination factor requirements are identified to serve as guidance to the HTGR fuel reprocessing development program

  9. Reference thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driggers, F.E.

    1978-08-01

    In the reference fuel cycle for the TFCT program, fissile U will be denatured by mixing with 238 U; the plants will be located in secure areas, with Pu being recycled within these secure areas; Th will be recycled with recovered U and Pu; the head end will handle a variety of core and blanket fuel assembly designs for LWRs and HWRs; the fuel may be a homogeneous mixture either of U and Th oxide pellets or sol-gel microspheres; the cladding will be Zircaloy; and MgO may be added to the fuel to improve Th dissolution. Th is being considered as the fertile component of fuel in order to increase proliferation resistance. Spent U recovered from Th-based fuels must be re-enriched before recycle to prevent very rapid buildup of 238 U. Stainless steel will be considered as a backup to Zircaloy cladding in case Zr is incompatible with commercial aqueous dissolution. Storage of recovered irradiated Th will be considered as a backup to its use in the recycle of recovered Pu and U. Estimates are made of the time for introducing the Th fuel cycle into the LWR power industry. Since U fuel exposures in LWRs are likely to increase from 30,000 to 50,000 MWD/MT, the Th reprocessing plant should also be designed for Th fuel with 50,000 MWD/MT exposure

  10. Management of radioactive fuel wastes: the Canadian disposal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulton, J.

    1978-10-01

    This report describes the research and development program to verify and demonstrate the concepts for the safe, permanent disposal of radioactive fuel wastes from Canadian nuclear reactors. The program is concentrating on deep underground disposal in hard-rock formations. The nature of the radioactive wastes is described, and the options for storing, processing, packaging and disposing of them are outlined. The program to verify the proposed concept, select a suitable site and to build and operate a demonstration facility is described. (author)

  11. The EBR-II spent fuel treatment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; McFarlane, H.F.

    1995-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has refurbished and equipped an existing hot cell facility for demonstrating a high-temperature electrometallurgical process for treating spent nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-11. Two waste forms will be produced and qualified for geologic disposal of the fission and activation products. Relatively pure uranium will be separated for storage. Following additional development, transuranium elements will be blended into one of the high-level waste streams. The spent fuel treatment program will help assess the viability of electrometallurgical technology as a spent fuel management option

  12. Actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaman, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    A strategy of actinide burnup in fast reactor systems has been investigated as an approach for reducing the long term hazards and storage requirements of the actinide waste elements and their decay daughters. The actinide recycle studies also included plutonium burnup studies in the event that plutonium is no longer required as a fuel. Particular emphasis was placed upon the timing of the recycle program, the requirements for separability of the waste materials, and the impact of the actinides on the reactor operations and performance. It is concluded that actinide recycle and plutonium burnout are attractive alternative waste management concepts. 25 refs., 14 figs., 34 tabs

  13. Nuclear recycling: costs, savings, and safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinrad, B.I.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter discusses the economics, physical and chemical processes, and safety of nuclear fuel recycling. The spent fuel must be chemically reprocessed in order to recover uranium and plutonium. Topics considered include indifference costs, recycling in light water reactors (LWRs), plutonium in fast reactors, the choice between recycling and storage, safeguards, and weapons proliferation. It is shown that the economics of recycling nuclear fuel involves the actual costs and savings of the recycling operation in terms of money spent, made, and saved, and the impact of the recycling on the future cost of uranium

  14. 40 CFR 80.610 - What acts are prohibited under the diesel fuel sulfur program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel... supply, store or transport motor vehicle diesel fuel, NRLM diesel fuel, ECA marine fuel or heating oil... transport any diesel fuel for use in motor vehicle or nonroad engines that contains greater than 0.10...

  15. DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has produced spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for many years as part of its various missions and programs. The historical process for managing this SNF was to reprocess it whereby valuable material such as uranium or plutonium was chemically separated from the wastes. These fuels were not intended for long-term storage. As the need for uranium and plutonium decreased, it became necessary to store the SNF for extended lengths of time. This necessity resulted from a 1992 DOE decision to discontinue reprocessing SNF to recover strategic materials (although limited processing of SNF to meet repository acceptance criteria remains under consideration, no plutonium or uranium extraction for other uses is planned). Both the facilities used for storage, and the fuel itself, began experiencing aging from this extended storage. New efforts are now necessary to assure suitable fuel and facility management until long-term decisions for spent fuel disposition are made and implemented. The Program Plan consists of 14 sections as follows: Sections 2--6 describe objectives, management, the work plan, the work breakdown structure, and the responsibility assignment matrix. Sections 7--9 describe the program summary schedules, site logic diagram, SNF Program resource and support requirements. Sections 10--14 present various supplemental management requirements and quality assurance guidelines

  16. DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has produced spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for many years as part of its various missions and programs. The historical process for managing this SNF was to reprocess it whereby valuable material such as uranium or plutonium was chemically separated from the wastes. These fuels were not intended for long-term storage. As the need for uranium and plutonium decreased, it became necessary to store the SNF for extended lengths of time. This necessity resulted from a 1992 DOE decision to discontinue reprocessing SNF to recover strategic materials (although limited processing of SNF to meet repository acceptance criteria remains under consideration, no plutonium or uranium extraction for other uses is planned). Both the facilities used for storage, and the fuel itself, began experiencing aging from this extended storage. New efforts are now necessary to assure suitable fuel and facility management until long-term decisions for spent fuel disposition are made and implemented. The Program Plan consists of 14 sections as follows: Sections 2--6 describe objectives, management, the work plan, the work breakdown structure, and the responsibility assignment matrix. Sections 7--9 describe the program summary schedules, site logic diagram, SNF Program resource and support requirements. Sections 10--14 present various supplemental management requirements and quality assurance guidelines.

  17. An Optimization Model for Expired Drug Recycling Logistics Networks and Government Subsidy Policy Design Based on Tri-level Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hui; Li, Yuyu; Huang, Bo; Pi, Xing

    2015-01-01

    In order to recycle and dispose of all people’s expired drugs, the government should design a subsidy policy to stimulate users to return their expired drugs, and drug-stores should take the responsibility of recycling expired drugs, in other words, to be recycling stations. For this purpose it is necessary for the government to select the right recycling stations and treatment stations to optimize the expired drug recycling logistics network and minimize the total costs of recycling and disp...

  18. Analysis of fuel cycles with natural uranium, Phase I, Economic analysis of plutonium recycling in BHWR; Analiza gorivnih ciklusa sa prirodnim uranom, II faza - Ekonomska analiza recikliranja plutonijuma u BHWR reaktorima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N; Bosevski, T [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za fiziku i dinamiku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1965-11-15

    The objective of this analysis was establishing a method for determination of the fuel price fraction in the total cost of nuclear power production. Special attention was devoted to recycling of plutonium in natural uranium reactors, plutonium to be used in the same reactor type. The adopted method would enable economic comparison of different types of fuel cycles for different reactors.

  19. Waste management considerations in HTGR recycle operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pence, D.T.; Shefcik, J.J.; Heath, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    Waste management considerations in the recycle of HTGR fuel are different from those encountered in the recycle of LWR fuel. The types of waste associated with HTGR recycle operations are discussed, and treatment methods for some of the wastes are described

  20. Overview of the fast reactors fuels program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.A.; Cox, C.M.; Hayward, B.R.; Rice, L.H.; Yoshikawa, H.H.

    1980-04-01

    Each nation involved in LMFBR development has its unique energy strategies which consider energy growth projections, uranium resources, capital costs, and plant operational requirements. Common to all of these strategies is a history of fast reactor experience which dates back to the days of the Manhatten Project and includes the CLEMENTINE Reactor, which generated a few watts, LAMPRE, EBR-I, EBR-II, FERMI, SEFOR, FFTF, BR-1, -2, -5, -10, BOR-60, BN-350, BN-600, JOYO, RAPSODIE, Phenix, KNK-II, DFR, and PFR. Fast reactors under design or construction include PEC, CRBR, SuperPhenix, SNR-300, MONJU, and Madras (India). The parallel fuels and materials evolution has fully supported this reactor development. It has involved cermets, molten plutonium alloy, plutonium oxide, uranium metal or alloy, uranium oxide, and mixed uranium-plutonium oxides and carbides

  1. Nuclear criticality safety program at the Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, R.M.; Fujita, E.K.; Tracy, D.B.; Klann, R.T.; Imel, G.R.; Benedict, R.W.; Rigg, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel commercial-scale remote pyrometallurgical process for metallic fuels from liquid metal-cooled reactors and to show closure of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Requirements for nuclear criticality safety impose the most restrictive of the various constraints on the operation of FCF. The upper limits on batch sizes and other important process parameters are determined principally by criticality safety considerations. To maintain an efficient operation within appropriate safety limits, it is necessary to formulate a nuclear criticality safety program that integrates equipment design, process development, process modeling, conduct of operations, a measurement program, adequate material control procedures, and nuclear criticality analysis. The nuclear criticality safety program for FCF reflects this integration, ensuring that the facility can be operated efficiently without compromising safety. The experience gained from the conduct of this program in the Fuel cycle Facility will be used to design and safely operate IFR facilities on a commercial scale. The key features of the nuclear criticality safety program are described. The relationship of these features to normal facility operation is also described

  2. Technical basis for the proposed high efficiency nuclear fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Herring, J.S.; Crawford, D.C.; Neimark, L.E.

    1999-01-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fired electricity generating stations will dramatically increase over the next 20 years. Nuclear energy is the only fully developed technology able to supply large amounts of electricity without generation of greenhouse gases. However, the problem of noncompetitive economics and public concerns about radioactive waste disposal, safety, and nuclear weapons proliferation may prevent the reemergence of nuclear power as a preferred option for new electric energy generation in the U.S. This paper discusses a new research program to help address these issues, by developing fuel designs capable of burnup values in excess of 60 MWD/kgU. The objectives of the program are to: improve the reliability and robustness of light water reactor fuel, thereby improving safety margins; Significantly increase the energy generated by each fuel loading, thereby achieving longer operating cycles, higher capacity factors, and lower cost electric power; Significantly reduce the volume of spent nuclear fuel discharged for disposal by allowing more energy to be extracted from each fuel element prior to discharge; Develop fuel that is much more proliferation resistant. (author)

  3. Mental Models Research to Inform Community Outreach for a Campus Recycling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Lauren; Arvai, Joseph; Thorp, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a better understanding of the state of knowledge of students and faculty on the Michigan State University (MSU) campus; identify relevant gaps in knowledge and misconceptions about recycling; and provide recommendations regarding how these gaps and misconceptions may be addressed through education…

  4. Interval linear programming model for long-term planning of vehicle recycling in the Republic of Serbia under uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simic, Vladimir; Dimitrijevic, Branka

    2015-02-01

    An interval linear programming approach is used to formulate and comprehensively test a model for optimal long-term planning of vehicle recycling in the Republic of Serbia. The proposed model is applied to a numerical case study: a 4-year planning horizon (2013-2016) is considered, three legislative cases and three scrap metal price trends are analysed, availability of final destinations for sorted waste flows is explored. Potential and applicability of the developed model are fully illustrated. Detailed insights on profitability and eco-efficiency of the projected contemporary equipped vehicle recycling factory are presented. The influences of the ordinance on the management of end-of-life vehicles in the Republic of Serbia on the vehicle hulks procuring, sorting generated material fractions, sorted waste allocation and sorted metals allocation decisions are thoroughly examined. The validity of the waste management strategy for the period 2010-2019 is tested. The formulated model can create optimal plans for procuring vehicle hulks, sorting generated material fractions, allocating sorted waste flows and allocating sorted metals. Obtained results are valuable for supporting the construction and/or modernisation process of a vehicle recycling system in the Republic of Serbia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Recycling of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randl, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Since nuclear power was first exploited in the Federal Republic of Germany, the philosophy underlying the strategy of the nuclear fuel cycle has been to make optimum use of the resource potential of recovered uranium and plutonium within a closed fuel cycle. Apart from the weighty argument of reprocessing being an important step in the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, permitting their optimum ecological conditioning after the reprocessing step and subsequent storage underground, another argument that, no doubt, carried weight was the possibility of reducing the demand of power plants for natural uranium. In recent years, strategies of recycling have emerged for reprocessed uranium. If that energy potential, too, is to be exploited by thermal recycling, it is appropriate to choose a slightly different method of recycling from the one for plutonium. While the first generation of reprocessed uranium fuel recycled in the reactor cuts down natural uranium requirement by some 15%, the recycling of a second generation of reprocessed, once more enriched uranium fuel helps only to save a further three per cent of natural uranium. Uranium of the second generation already carries uranium-232 isotope, causing production disturbances, and uranium-236 isotope, causing disturbances of the neutron balance in the reactor, in such amounts as to make further fabrication of uranium fuel elements inexpedient, even after mixing with natural uranium feed. (orig./UA) [de

  6. ERDA activities related to reprocessing and plutonium recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurgeon, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    ERDA has redirected its program in support of the LWR fuel cycle from one emphasizing the commercialization of existing fuel cycle technology to a broader based assessment of alternative fuel cycle concepts with the emphasis on safeguardability and avoidance of proliferation risks. As part of this program, ERDA will evaluate a number of possible technical and institutional options to reduce proliferation risks. ERDA will continue its current program of LWR fuel reprocessing R and D with added emphasis on improved safeguards capability as well as the applicability of conventional reprocessing technology to large multinational plants. These activities and supporting design studies will provide the basis for a decision regarding the design of an optimized system for the management of spent LWR fuel. Such a system would provide a model for the development of future domestic and foreign facilities and programs. A recently completed ERDA study of the benefits of LWR reprocessing and recycle would also be expected to be factored into such a decision. The study concluded that based on currently available data, recycle of uranium and plutonium in LWR's is attractive from the standpoint of economics and resource utilization relative to the discarding of spent fuel. The LWR reprocessing/recycle picture today is clouded by several unresolved policy issues. These include the need for adequate spent fuel storage capacity for both domestic and foreign reactors; the possibility of foreign reprocessing of U.S. produced fuel; the possibility of the disposal of foreign fuel in the U.S.; the possible need to dispose of wastes generated by multinational reprocessing plants; and finally, determination of the optimum balance between recycling recovered plutonium and saving it for the breeder

  7. Underlying chemistry research for the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.; Sagert, N.H.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Taylor, P.

    1984-04-01

    This document reviews the underlying chemistry research part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, carried out in the Research Chemistry Branch. This research is concerned with developing the basic chemical knowledge and under-standing required in other parts of the Program. There are four areas of underlying research: Waste Form Chemistry, Solute and Solution Chemistry, Rock-Water-Waste Interactions, and Abatement and Monitoring of Gas-Phase Radionuclides

  8. Irradiation testing of miniature fuel plates for the RERTR program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senn, R L; Martin, M M [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    1983-08-01

    An irradiation test facility, which provides a test bed for irradiating a variety of miniature fuel plates miniplates) for the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, has been placed into operation. The objective of these tests is to screen various candidate fuel materials as to their suitability for replacing the highly enriched uranium fuel materials currently used by the world's test and research reactors with a lower enrichment fuel material, without significantly degrading reactor operating characteristics and power levels. The use of low uranium enrichment of about 20% {sup 235}U in place of highly enriched fuel for these reactors would reduce the potential for {sup 235}U diversion. Fuel materials currently being evaluated in this first phase of these screening tests include aluminum-base dispersion-type fuel plates with fuel cores of 1) high uranium content U{sup 3}){sup 8}-Al being developed by ORNL, 2) high uranium content UAI{sub x}-Al being developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., and 3) very high uranium content U{sub 3}Si-Al- being developed by ANL. The miniplates are 115-mm long by 50-mm wide with overall plate thicknesses of 1.27 or 1.52 mm. The fuel core dimensions vary according to overall plate thicknesses with a minimal clad thickness requirement of 0.20 mm. Sixty such miniplates (thirty of each thickness) can be irradiated in one test facility. The irradiation test facility, designated as HFED-1 is operating in core position E-7 in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR), a 30-MW water-moderated reactor. The peak neutron flux measured for this experiment is 1.96 x 10{sup 18} neutrons m{sub -2} s{sub -1}. The various types of miniplates will achieve burnups of up to approximately 2.2x10{sup 27} fissions/m{sup 3} of fuel, which will require approximately eight full power months of irradiation. During reactor shutdown periods, the experiment is removed from the reactor, moved to a special poolside station, disassembled, and inspected

  9. Fuel System: Automotive Mechanics Instructional Program. Block 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Ralph D.

    The fourth of six instructional blocks in automotive mechanics, the lessons and supportive information in the document provide a guide for teachers in planning an instructional program in automotive fuel systems at the secondary and post secondary level. The material, as organized, is a suggested sequence of instruction within each block. Each…

  10. Conservation education for Fire, Fuel and Smoke Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne Cook

    2009-01-01

    The mission of Conservation Education for the Fire, Fuel and Smoke (FFS) Program is to develop and deliver high-quality, science-based education about wildland fire to students, educators, the general public, and agency staff. Goals: 1) Increase awareness of the scope and content of FFS research. 2) Improve understanding of fundamental concepts in wildland fire science...

  11. Molten salt actinide recycler and transforming system without and with Th–U support: Fuel cycle flexibility and key material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, V.; Feynberg, O.; Gnidoi, I.; Merzlyakov, A.; Surenkov, A.; Uglov, V.; Zagnitko, A.; Subbotin, V.; Sannikov, I.; Toropov, A.; Afonichkin, V.; Bovet, A.; Khokhlov, V.; Shishkin, V.; Kormilitsyn, M.; Lizin, A.; Osipenko, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We examine feasibility of MOSART system without and with U–Th support. • We experimentally studied key material properties to prove MOSART flowsheet. • MOSART potential as the system with flexible fuel cycle scenarios is emphasized. • MOSART can operate with different TRU loadings in transmuter or even breeder modes. - Abstract: A study is under progress to examine the feasibility of MOlten Salt Actinide Recycler and Transforming (MOSART) system without and with U–Th support fuelled with different compositions of transuranic elements (TRU) trifluorides from spent LWR fuel. New design options with homogeneous core and fuel salt with high enough solubility for transuranic elements trifluorides are being examined because of new goals. The paper has the main objective of presenting the fuel cycle flexibility of the MOSART system while accounting technical constrains and experimental data received in this study. A brief description is given of the experimental results on key physical and chemical properties of fuel salt and combined materials compatibility to satisfy MOSART system requirements

  12. Westinghouse accident tolerant fuel program. Current results and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Sumit; Xu, Peng; Lahoda, Edward; Hallstadius, Lars; Boylan, Frank [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Hopkins, SC (United States)

    2016-07-15

    This paper discusses the current status, results from initial tests, as well as the future direction of the Westinghouse's Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program. The current preliminary testing is addressed that is being performed on these samples at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) test reactor, initial results from these tests, as well as the technical learning from these test results. In the Westinghouse ATF approach, higher density pellets play a significant role in the development of an integrated fuel system.

  13. Status of Westinghouse coal-fueled combustion turbine programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalzo, A.J.; Amos, D.J.; Bannister, R.L.; Garland, R.V.

    1992-01-01

    Developing clean, efficient, cost effective coal utilization technologies for future power generation is an essential part of our National Energy Strategy. Westinghouse is actively developing power plants utilizing advanced gasification, atmospheric fluidized beds (AFB), pressurized fluidized beds (PFB), and direct firing technology through programs sponsored by the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE). The DOE Office of Fossil Energy is sponsoring the Direct Coal-Fired Turbine program. This paper presents the status of current and potential Westinghouse Power Generation Business Unit advanced coal-fueled power generation programs as well as commercial plans

  14. Quality assurance program plan fuel supply shutdown project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, I.L.

    1998-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Program plan (QAPP) describes how the Fuel Supply Shutdown (FSS) project organization implements the quality assurance requirements of HNF-MP-599, Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and the B and W Hanford Company Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP), FSP-MP-004. The QAPP applies to facility structures, systems, and components and to activities (e.g., design, procurement, testing, operations, maintenance, etc.) that could affect structures, systems, and components. This QAPP also provides a roadmap of applicable Project Hanford Policies and Procedures (PHPP) which may be utilized by the FSS project organization to implement the requirements of this QAPP

  15. Program SYVAC, for stochastic assessment of nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, G.R.; Hoffman, K.J.; Donahue, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, the computer program SYVAC, used to assess concepts for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste, is described with regard to the development approach, the basic program structure, and quality assurance. The interrelationships of these aspects are illustrated by detailed descriptions of two concepts of fundamental importance to the program: the method of selecting parameter values from input probability density functions, and the numerical evaluation of the convolution integral. Quality assurance procedures, including different types of comparisons and peer review, are presented

  16. Status of US program for disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.

    1991-04-01

    In this paper, a brief history of the United States' program for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and the legislative acts that have guided the program are discussed. The current plans and schedules for beginning acceptance of SNF from the nuclear utilities for disposal are described, and some of the development activities supporting the program are discussed. And finally, the viability of the SNF disposal fee presently paid into the Nuclear Waste Fund by the owners/generators of commercial SNF and high-level waste (HLW) is examined. 12 refs., 9 figs

  17. Requirements for a Dynamic Solvent Extraction Module to Support Development of Advanced Technologies for the Recycle of Used Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Jack; Rutledge, Veronica; Pereira, Candido; Copple, Jackie; Frey, Kurt; Krebs, John; Maggos, Laura; Nichols, Kevin; Wardle, Kent; Sadasivan, Pratap; DeAlmieda, Valmor; Depaoli, David

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program has been established to create and deploy next generation, verified and validated nuclear energy modeling and simulation capabilities for the design, implementation, and operation of future nuclear energy systems to improve the U.S. energy security. As part of the NEAMS program, Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC's) are being produced to significantly advance the status of modeling and simulation of energy systems beyond what is currently available to the extent that the new codes be readily functional in the short term and extensible in the longer term. The four IPSC areas include Safeguards and Separations, Reactors, Fuels, and Waste Forms. As part of the Safeguards and Separations (SafeSeps) IPSC effort, interoperable process models are being developed that enable dynamic simulation of an advanced separations plant. A SafeSepss IPSC 'toolkit' is in development to enable the integration of separation process modules and safeguards tools into the design process by providing an environment to compose, verify and validate a simulation application to be used for analysis of various plant configurations and operating conditions. The modules of this toolkit will be implemented on a modern, expandable architecture with the flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options while preserving their stand-alone usability. Modules implemented at the plant-level will initially incorporate relatively simple representations for each process through a reduced modeling approach. Final versions will incorporate the capability to bridge to subscale models to provide required fidelity in chemical and physical processes. A dynamic solvent extraction model and its module implementation are needed to support the development of this integrated plant model. As a stand-alone application, it will also support solvent development of extraction flowsheets and integrated

  18. Requirements for a Dynamic Solvent Extraction Module to Support Development of Advanced Technologies for the Recycle of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Law; Veronica Rutledge; Candido Pereira; Jackie Copple; Kurt Frey; John Krebs; Laura Maggos; Kevin Nichols; Kent Wardle; Pratap Sadasivan; Valmor DeAlmieda; David Depaoli

    2011-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program has been established to create and deploy next generation, verified and validated nuclear energy modeling and simulation capabilities for the design, implementation, and operation of future nuclear energy systems to improve the U.S. energy security. As part of the NEAMS program, Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC's) are being produced to significantly advance the status of modeling and simulation of energy systems beyond what is currently available to the extent that the new codes be readily functional in the short term and extensible in the longer term. The four IPSC areas include Safeguards and Separations, Reactors, Fuels, and Waste Forms. As part of the Safeguards and Separations (SafeSeps) IPSC effort, interoperable process models are being developed that enable dynamic simulation of an advanced separations plant. A SafeSepss IPSC 'toolkit' is in development to enable the integration of separation process modules and safeguards tools into the design process by providing an environment to compose, verify and validate a simulation application to be used for analysis of various plant configurations and operating conditions. The modules of this toolkit will be implemented on a modern, expandable architecture with the flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options while preserving their stand-alone usability. Modules implemented at the plant-level will initially incorporate relatively simple representations for each process through a reduced modeling approach. Final versions will incorporate the capability to bridge to subscale models to provide required fidelity in chemical and physical processes. A dynamic solvent extraction model and its module implementation are needed to support the development of this integrated plant model. As a stand-alone application, it will also support solvent development of extraction flowsheets

  19. Fuel channel in-service inspection programs program design for maximum cost effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Brekel, N.C.

    1995-01-01

    Inspection is an integral part of fuel channel life management strategy. Inspection data is used to assess the state of reactor core integrity and provide the information necessary to optimize long term maintenance programs. This paper will provide an overview of the structured approach to developing fuel channel inspection programs within OHN. The inspection programs are designed to balance the resources utilized (cost, outage time, and dose expenditure) with the benefits provided by the inspection data obtained (improved knowledge of component status, degradation mechanisms and rates, etc..). The CANDU community has yet to have a fuel channel operate for a full 30 year design life. Since research programs can not fully simulate reactor operating conditions, inspections become an essential feature of the life management strategy as the components age. Inspection programs often include activities designed to develop predictive capability for long term fuel channel behaviour and provide early warning of changes in behaviour. It should be noted that although this paper addresses the design of fuel channel inspection programs, the basic principles presented can be applied to the design of inspection programs for any major power plant component or system. (author)

  20. IAEA activities related to research reactor fuel conversion and spent fuel return programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, Ira N.; Adelfang, Pablo; Ritchie, Iain G.

    2005-01-01

    The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non-proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly associated efforts to return research reactor fuel to the country where it was originally enriched. IAEA efforts have included the development and maintenance of several data bases with information related to research reactors and research reactor spent fuel inventories that have been essential in planning and managing both RERTR and spent fuel return programmes. Other IAEA regular budget programs have supported research reactor fuel conversion from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU), and in addressing issues common to many member states with spent fuel management problems and concerns. The paper briefly describes IAEA involvement since the early 1980's in these areas, including regular budget and Technical Co-operation programme activities, and focuses on efforts in the past five years to continue to support and accelerate U.S. and Russian research reactor spent fuel return programmes. (author)

  1. Thorium utilization program progress report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotts, A.L.; Kasten, P.R.

    1977-07-01

    Status of the following tasks is reported: program management and analysis; reprocessing development; refabrication development; waste treatment; fuels irradiation and examination; HTGR fuel recycle demonstration facility; hot engineering test project; and cold prototype refabrication development

  2. Thorium utilization program progress report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotts, A.L.; Kasten, P.R.

    1977-07-01

    Status of the following tasks is reported: program management and analysis; reprocessing development; refabrication development; waste treatment; fuels irradiation and examination; HTGR fuel recycle demonstration facility; hot engineering test project; and cold prototype refabrication development. (LK)

  3. 75 FR 26049 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... comment period on this action. Any parties interested in commenting must do so at this time. For further... Technologies for Renewable Fuel Pathways The final RFS2 rule includes two corn ethanol pathways in Table 1 of... construction of the grandfathered facilities commenced would be contained in Sec. 80.1450(b)(vi), since Sec. 80...

  4. Integrated Nuclear Recycle Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patodi, Anuj; Parashar, Abhishek; Samadhiya, Akshay K.; Ray, Saheli; Dey, Mitun; Singh, K.K.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Recycle Board (NRB), Tarapur proposes to set up an 'Integrated Nuclear Recycle Plant' at Tarapur. This will be located in the premises of BARC facilities. The project location is at coastal town of Tarapur, 130 Km north of Mumbai. Project area cover of INRP is around 80 hectares. The plant will be designed to process spent fuel received from Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). This is the first large scale integrated plant of the country. INRP will process spent fuel obtained from indigenous nuclear power plants and perform left over nuclear waste disposal

  5. Commentary on the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, G.; Shemilt, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    A summary of the first formal review of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited on the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is presented. The Program is described briefly and the composition and role of TAC in relation to the Program is outlined. Salient points and major recommendations are presented from the First Annual Report of TAC in which geoscience aspects of the Program were emphasized. It is the view of the Committee that overall, the whole Waste Management Program is well conceived, that there are many impressive accomplishments of high quality, that detailed research objectives are becoming more clearly delineated, that there is growing clarification as to the most critical areas in which research needs to be accomplished and that the increasing participation by university and industry scientists and engineers is reassuring

  6. Quality Assurance Program Plan for SFR Metallic Fuel Data Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit, Timothy [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Hlotke, John Daniel [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2017-07-05

    This document contains an evaluation of the applicability of the current Quality Assurance Standards from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Standard NQA-1 (NQA-1) criteria and identifies and describes the quality assurance process(es) by which attributes of historical, analytical, and other data associated with sodium-cooled fast reactor [SFR] metallic fuel and/or related reactor fuel designs and constituency will be evaluated. This process is being instituted to facilitate validation of data to the extent that such data may be used to support future licensing efforts associated with advanced reactor designs. The initial data to be evaluated under this program were generated during the US Integral Fast Reactor program between 1984-1994, where the data includes, but is not limited to, research and development data and associated documents, test plans and associated protocols, operations and test data, technical reports, and information associated with past United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews of SFR designs.

  7. In-core fuel management programs for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    In response to the interest shown by Member States, the IAEA organized a co-ordinated research programme to develop and make available in the open domain a set of programs to perform in-core fuel management calculations. This report summarizes the work performed in the context of the CRP. As a result of this programme, complete in-core fuel management packages for three types of reactors, namely PWR's, BWR's and PHWR are now available from the NEA Data Bank. For some reactor types, these program packages are available with three levels of sophistication ranging from simple methods for educational purposes to more comprehensive methods that can be used for reactor design and operation. In addition some operating data have been compiled to allow code validation. (author)

  8. Geoscience research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of deep disposal of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock. As part of that assessment, a broad program of geoscience and geotechnical work has been undertaken to develop methods for characterizing sites, incorporating geotechnical data into disposal facility design, and incorporating geotechnical data into environmental and safety assessment of the disposal system. General field investigations are conducted throughout the Precambrian Shield, subsurface investigations are conducted at designated field research areas, and in situ rock mass experiments are being conducted in an Underground Research Laboratory. Samples from the field research areas and elsewhere are subjected to a wide range of tests and experiments in the laboratory to develop an understanding of the physical and chemical processes involved in ground-water-rock-waste interactions. Mathematical models to simulate these processes are developed, verified and validated. 114 refs.; 13 figs

  9. A Practical Recycling Project . . .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Raymond H.; Mikuska, James M.

    1973-01-01

    Descirbes a school district's recycling program of aluminum lunch trays that are collected after their use. The trays are used as scrap metal in industrial education workshop and used for sand castings. (PS)

  10. Fuel cycle and waste management demonstration in the IFR Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; Benedict, R.W.; Laidler, J.J.; Battles, J.E.; Miller, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    Argonne's National Laboratory's Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is the main element in the US advanced reactor development program. A unique fuel cycle and waste process technology is being developed for the IFR. Demonstration of this technology at engineering scale will begin within the next year at the EBR-II test facility complex in Idaho. This paper describes the facility being readied for this demonstration, the process to be employed, the equipment being built, and the waste management approach

  11. Current status of Westinghouse tubular solid oxide fuel cell program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W.G. [Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    In the last ten years the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) development program at Westinghouse has evolved from a focus on basic material science to the engineering of fully integrated electric power systems. Our endurance for this cell is 5 to 10 years. To date we have successfully operated at power for over six years. For power plants it is our goal to have operated before the end of this decade a MW class power plant. Progress toward these goals is described.

  12. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, G. Ivan; Christenson, John M.; Renier, J.P.; Marcille, T.F.; Casal, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs). A top-level objective of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis program element of the DOE NERI program is to investigate spent fuel treatment and recycling options for current light water reactors (LWRs). Accordingly, this project targets to expand the traditional scope of nuclear fuel management optimization into the following two complementary specific objectives: (1) To develop a direct coupling between the pin-by-pin within-bundle loading control variables and core-wide (bundle-by-bundle) optimization objectives, (2) to extend the methodology developed to explicitly encompass control variables, objectives, and constraints designed to maximize minor actinide incineration in BWR bundles and cycles. The first specific objective is projected to 'uncover' dormant thermal margin made available by employing additional degrees of freedom within the optimization process, while the addition of minor actinides is expected to 'consume' some of the uncovered thermal margin. Therefore, a key underlying goal of this project is to effectively invest some of the uncovered thermal margin into achieving the primary objective.

  13. Nuclear fuel waste management - biosphere program highlights - 1978 to 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zach, R

    1997-07-01

    The biosphere program in support of the development of the disposal concept for Canadian nuclear fuel waste since 1978 is scheduled for close-out. AECL`s Environmental Science Branch (ESB) was mainly responsible for work in this program. In order to preserve as much information as possible, this report highlights many of the key achievements of the program, particularly those related to the development of the BIOTRAC biosphere model and its supporting research. This model was used for the assessment and review of the disposal concept in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report also treats highlights related to alternative models, external scientific/technical reviews, EIS feedback, and the international BIOMOVS model validation program. Furthermore, it highlights basic aspects of future modelling and research needs in relation to siting a disposal facility. In this, feedback from the various reviews and the EIS is taken into account. Appendices of the report include listings of key ESB staff involved in the program, all the scientific/technical reports and papers produced under the program, contracts let to outside agencies, and issues raised by various participants or intervenors during the EIS review. Although the report is concerned with close-out of the biosphere program, it also provides valuable information for a continuing program concerned with siting a disposal facility. One of the conclusions of the report is that such a program is essential for successfully siting such a facility. (author) Refs.

  14. Nuclear fuel waste management - biosphere program highlights - 1978 to 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, R.

    1997-07-01

    The biosphere program in support of the development of the disposal concept for Canadian nuclear fuel waste since 1978 is scheduled for close-out. AECL's Environmental Science Branch (ESB) was mainly responsible for work in this program. In order to preserve as much information as possible, this report highlights many of the key achievements of the program, particularly those related to the development of the BIOTRAC biosphere model and its supporting research. This model was used for the assessment and review of the disposal concept in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report also treats highlights related to alternative models, external scientific/technical reviews, EIS feedback, and the international BIOMOVS model validation program. Furthermore, it highlights basic aspects of future modelling and research needs in relation to siting a disposal facility. In this, feedback from the various reviews and the EIS is taken into account. Appendices of the report include listings of key ESB staff involved in the program, all the scientific/technical reports and papers produced under the program, contracts let to outside agencies, and issues raised by various participants or intervenors during the EIS review. Although the report is concerned with close-out of the biosphere program, it also provides valuable information for a continuing program concerned with siting a disposal facility. One of the conclusions of the report is that such a program is essential for successfully siting such a facility. (author)

  15. Methods and computer programs for PWR's fuel management: Programs Sothis and Ciclon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragones, J.M.; Corella, M.R.; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Methos and computer programs developed at JEN for fuel management in PWR are discussed, including scope of model, procedures for sistematic selection of alternatives to be evaluated, basis of model for neutronic calculation, methods for fuel costs calculation, procedures for equilibrium and trans[tion cycles calculation with Soth[s and Ciclon codes and validation of methods by comparison of results with others of reference (author) ' [es

  16. Metallic Reactor Fuel Fabrication for SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Ko, Young-Mo; Woo, Yoon-Myung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The metal fuel for an SFR has such advantages such as simple fabrication procedures, good neutron economy, high thermal conductivity, excellent compatibility with a Na coolant, and inherent passive safety 1. U-Zr metal fuel for SFR is now being developed by KAERI as a national R and D program of Korea. The fabrication technology of metal fuel for SFR has been under development in Korea as a national nuclear R and D program since 2007. The fabrication process for SFR fuel is composed of (1) fuel slug casting, (2) loading and fabrication of the fuel rods, and (3) fabrication of the final fuel assemblies. Fuel slug casting is the dominant source of fuel losses and recycled streams in this fabrication process. Fabrication on the rod type metallic fuel was carried out for the purpose of establishing a practical fabrication method. Rod-type fuel slugs were fabricated by injection casting. Metallic fuel slugs fabricated showed a general appearance was smooth.

  17. Recycling of used oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vipulanandan, C.; Ghurye, G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on used oil which is a valuable resource that should be recycled. Recycling used oil saves energy and natural resources. Used oil can be reprocessed and used as fuel in industrial burners and boilers. Unfortunately, more than 400 million gallons/year of used oil is lost through widespread dumping, partly due to lack of effective recycling procedures. Although used oil is not currently a federally listed hazardous waste, the U.S. EPA has proposed to list it as a hazardous waste, which will make recycling of used oil even more attractive. Laboratory samples, representing used oil, were used for detailed parametric studies and to determine the limitation of extending some of the current physical separation techniques such as sedimentation and centrifuging developed for oil-water and solid-liquid separation

  18. The Australian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Education Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luigi Bonadio

    2006-01-01

    The next generation of engineers and scientists will face great technical, economic and political challenges to satisfy increasing demands for a secure, reliable and affordable global energy system that maintains and enhances current standards of living. The Australian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Education Program aims to bolster the quality and relevance of primary and secondary school teaching in emerging areas of science, technology and environmental/sustainability studies using hydrogen, in its capacity as a versatile energy carrier, as the educational basis for teacher and student learning. Critical advances in specific areas of hydrogen production, distribution, storage and end-use technologies arise when students are engaged to develop and apply a broad range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary knowledge and practical skills. A comprehensive hydrogen and fuel cell technology teaching module will be developed to complement existing fuels and energy curricula across Australian schools. The pilot program will be delivered via the collaboration of nine trial schools, a broad range of technical and pedagogy experts and representatives of professional bodies and industry. The program features essential and extensive teacher consultation, a professional learning and development course, industry site visits and a dedicated research and evaluation study. This initiative aims to bolster teacher literacy and student participation in the design, construction and operation of various hydrogen and fuel cell devices and extended activities. Students will reflect on and formally present their learning experiences via several dedicated fora including an awards ceremony where outstanding performance of leading schools, teachers and student groups within the cluster will be acknowledged. (authors)

  19. The Australian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luigi Bonadio [Senior Consultant Luigi Bonadio and Associates (Australia)

    2006-07-01

    The next generation of engineers and scientists will face great technical, economic and political challenges to satisfy increasing demands for a secure, reliable and affordable global energy system that maintains and enhances current standards of living. The Australian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Education Program aims to bolster the quality and relevance of primary and secondary school teaching in emerging areas of science, technology and environmental/sustainability studies using hydrogen, in its capacity as a versatile energy carrier, as the educational basis for teacher and student learning. Critical advances in specific areas of hydrogen production, distribution, storage and end-use technologies arise when students are engaged to develop and apply a broad range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary knowledge and practical skills. A comprehensive hydrogen and fuel cell technology teaching module will be developed to complement existing fuels and energy curricula across Australian schools. The pilot program will be delivered via the collaboration of nine trial schools, a broad range of technical and pedagogy experts and representatives of professional bodies and industry. The program features essential and extensive teacher consultation, a professional learning and development course, industry site visits and a dedicated research and evaluation study. This initiative aims to bolster teacher literacy and student participation in the design, construction and operation of various hydrogen and fuel cell devices and extended activities. Students will reflect on and formally present their learning experiences via several dedicated fora including an awards ceremony where outstanding performance of leading schools, teachers and student groups within the cluster will be acknowledged. (authors)

  20. Automotive Stirling engine development program. [fuel economy assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzner, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    The Ford/DOE automotive Stirling engine development program is directed towards establishing the technological and developmental base that would enable a decision on whether an engineering program should be directed at Stirling engine production. The fuel economy assessment aims to achieve, with a high degree of confidence, the ERDA proposal estimate of 20.6 MPG (gasoline) for a 4500 lb 1WC Stirling engine passenger car. The current M-H fuel economy projection for the 170 HP Stirling engine is 15.7 MPG. The confidence level for this projection is 32%. A confidence level of 29% is projected for a 22.1 MPG estimate. If all of the planned analyses and test work is accomplished at the end of the one year effort, and the projected improvements are substantiated, the confidence levels would rise to 59% for the 20.6 MPG projection and 54% for the 22.1 MPG projection. Progress achieved thus far during the fuel economy assessment is discussed.

  1. You're a "What"? Recycling Coordinator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    Recycling coordinators supervise curbside and dropoff recycling programs for municipal governments or private firms. Today, recycling is mandatory in many communities. And advancements in collection and processing methods have helped to increase the quantity of materials for which the recycling coordinator is responsible. In some communities,…

  2. Memento. Maritime transport of MOX fuels from Europe to Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The maritime transport of MOX fuels from Europe to Japan represents the last of the 3 steps of transport of the nuclear fuel reprocessing-recycling program settled between ORC (Japan), BNFL (UK) and Cogema (France). This document summarizes the different aspects of this program: the companies concerned, the physical protection measures, the US-Japan agreements (accompanying warship), the in-depth safety, the handling of MOX fuels (containers and ships), and the Japan MOX fuel needs. (J.S.)

  3. A UK perspective on recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.

    1991-01-01

    The United Kingdom, through the recycling of depleted uranium from Magnox reactors into Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel, has already recycled significant quantities of reprocessed material in reactors owned by Nuclear Electric plc and Scottish Nuclear Limited. This AGR fuel has been satisfactorily irradiated and discharged over a decade or more, and will be reprocessed in the new Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP), currently under construction in the UK. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) and the UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) have also been exploiting the potential of plutonium recycled in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, which they have been making since 1963. All of the UK nuclear companies are committed to further recycling of Magnox depleted uranium during the 1990s, and it is anticipated that oxide recycling will also become firmly established during the next decade. British Nuclear Fuels and Urenco Ltd, as the providers of fuel cycle services, are developing an infrastructure to close the fuel cycle for oxide nuclear fuel, using both the uranium and plutonium arising from reprocessing. (author)

  4. A recyclable ionic liquid-oxomolybdenum(vi) catalytic system for the oxidative desulfurization of model and real diesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julião, Diana; Gomes, Ana C; Pillinger, Martyn; Valença, Rita; Ribeiro, Jorge C; Gonçalves, Isabel S; Balula, Salete S

    2016-10-14

    The oxidative desulfurization of model and real diesel has been studied using the complex [MoO2Cl2(4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine)] as (pre)catalyst, aq. H2O2 as oxidant, and an ionic liquid as extraction solvent. Under moderate conditions (50 °C) and short reaction times (desulfurization and ECODS steps, 76% sulfur removal was achieved for a real diesel (Sinitial = 2300 ppm). For both the model and real diesels, the catalyst/IL phase could be easily recycled and reused with no loss of desulfurization efficiency.

  5. Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors of Older Adults and College Students Participating in Recycling Mentors, a Service-Learning, Environmental Health Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abundo, Michelle Lee; Fugate-Whitlock, Elizabeth; Fiala, Kelly Ann; Covan, Eleanor Krassen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of both students and older adults that participated in a service-learning, environmental health education program called Recycling Mentors (RM). Methods: Surveys were conducted before and after participation in RM. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS.…

  6. Status of plutonium recycle from mixed oxide fuel fabrication wastes (U,Pu)O2 facility activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada, Calixto A.; Adelfang, Pablo; Greiner, G.; Orlando, Oscar S.; Mathot, Sergio R.

    1999-01-01

    Within the specific subject of mixed oxides corresponding to the Fuel Cycle activities performed at CNEA, the recovery of plutonium from wastes originated during tests and pre-fabrication stages is performed. (author)

  7. The potential environmental gains from recycling waste plastics: Simulation of transferring recycling and recovery technologies to Shenyang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xudong; Xi Fengming; Geng Yong; Fujita, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Urban symbiosis creates compatibility of industrial development and waste management. → Mechanical technology leads to more CO 2 emission reduction. → Energy recovery technology leads to more fossil fuel saving. → Clean energy makes recycling technologies cleaner. → Demand management is crucial for realizing potential environmental gains of recycling. - Abstract: With the increasing attention on developing a low-carbon economy, it is necessary to seek appropriate ways on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through innovative municipal solid waste management (MSWM), such as urban symbiosis. However, quantitative assessments on the environmental benefits of urban symbiosis, especially in developing countries, are limited because only a limited number of planned synergistic activities have been successful and it is difficult to acquire detailed inventory data from private companies. This paper modifies and applies a two-step simulation system and used it to assess the potential environmental benefits, including the reduction of GHG emissions and saving of fossil fuels, by employing various Japanese plastics recycling/energy-recovery technologies in Shenyang, China. The results showed that among various recycling/energy-recovery technologies, the mechanical waste plastics recycling technology, which produces concrete formwork boards (NF boards), has the greatest potential in terms of reducing GHG emissions (1.66 kg CO 2 e/kg plastics), whereas the technology for the production of refuse plastic fuel (RPF) has the greatest potential on saving fossil fuel consumption (0.77 kgce/kg-plastics). Additional benefits can be gained by applying combined technologies that cascade the utilization of waste plastics. Moreover, the development of clean energy in conjunction with the promotion of new waste plastics recycling programs could contribute to additional reductions in GHG emissions and fossil fuel consumption.

  8. Technology options for future recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T.

    2001-01-01

    Recycling of nuclear material is indispensable, not only for using valuable resources but also for reducing the debt which we may leave to the next generations. Advanced reprocessing technologies have been developed in several countries to deal with the diversification of nuclear fuels. Also technologies derived from reprocessing or other fuel cycle areas have continued to be developed in terms of recycling. Cost effectiveness and waste-free processing are increasingly important factors in the applicable of an alternate recycling policy. This paper introduces an example of the studies in this field conducted in some countries including Japan and considers the establishment of effective recycling methodologies taking into account the uncertainty of future recycling policy. (author)

  9. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  10. A summary of the program and progress to 1984 December of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.

    1986-08-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program involves research into the storage and transportation of used nuclear fuel, immobilization of fuel waste, and deep geological disposal of the immobilized waste. The program is now in the fifth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the safety and environmental aspects of the deep underground disposal of immobilized fuel waste in plutonic rock. The objectives of the research for each component of the program and the progress made to the end of 1984 are described in this report. 74 refs

  11. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-08-01

    This report identifies the commercial and near-commercial (emerging) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  12. National Jet Fuels Combustion Program – Area #3 : Advanced Combustion Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-31

    The goal of this study is to develop, conduct, and analyze advanced laser and optical measurements in the experimental combustors developed under ASCENT National Fuel Combustion Program to measure sensitivity to fuel properties. We conducted advanced...

  13. Ethanol Research : Alternative Fuels & Life-Cycle Engineering Program : November 29, 2006 to November 28, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    This report presents the results of the successful ethanol fuel demonstration program conducted from September 2007 to September 2010. This project was a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Alternative Fuels and Life Cycle Engineering...

  14. Programa piloto de reciclaje en colegios del estado Anzoátegui, Venezuela | Schools pilot recycling program in Anzoátegui state, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ghanem

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Between october 2013 and june 2015, a solid waste pilot recycling program was applied in six educational units located in Juan Antonio Sotillo and Diego Bautista Urbaneja counties, Anzoátegui state, Venezuela. The program was designed for its implementation in schools with educational levels from kinder garden to high school, with the purpose of contributing to environmental education for developing awareness on preservation of the environment and natural resources. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the program. For developing the program, undergraduate students participated as a human resource along with the authors, schools personnel and schools students. During two consecutives phases, a series of activities were performed to achieve the proposed goals. Some of the most significant were environmental education for recycling and its practice. Data were collected by direct observation, structured interviews, questionnaire and on-site measuring techniques. Results reflected that students had a better response during the first phase of the program, with respect to participation and materials recovering. In addition, it was observed that preschool and elementary school students had the best response to the program application. Motivation was one of the main factors that influenced on the results. The lack of a municipal recycling program could also have influenced over the results.

  15. The reprocessing-recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinides separation - Application to wastes management; Le traitement-recyclage du combustible nucleaire use. La separation des actinides - Application a la gestion des dechets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    After its use in the reactor, the spent fuel still contains lot of recoverable material for an energetic use (uranium, plutonium), but also fission products and minor actinides which represent the residues of nuclear reactions. The reprocessing-recycling of the spent fuel, as it is performed in France, implies the chemical separation of these materials. The development and the industrial implementation of this separation process represent a major contribution of the French science and technology. The reprocessing-recycling allows a good management of nuclear wastes and a significant saving of fissile materials. With the recent spectacular rise of uranium prices, this process will become indispensable with the development of the next generation of fast neutron reactors. This book takes stock of the present and future variants of the chemical process used for the reprocessing of spent fuels. It describes the researches in progress and presents the stakes and recent results obtained by the CEA. content: the separation of actinides, a key factor for a sustainable nuclear energy; the actinides, a discovery of the 20. century; the radionuclides in nuclear fuels; the aquo ions of actinides; some redox properties of actinides; some complexing properties of actinide cations; general considerations about treatment processes; some characteristics of nuclear fuels in relation with their reprocessing; technical goals and specific constraints of the PUREX process; front-end operations of the PUREX process; separation and purification operations of the PUREX process; elaboration of finite products in the framework of the PUREX process; management and treatment of liquid effluents; solid wastes of the PUREX process; towards a joint management of uranium and plutonium: the COEX{sup TM} process; technical options of treatment and recycling techniques; the fuels of generation IV reactors; front-end treatment processes of advanced fuels; hydrometallurgical processes for future fuel

  16. 75 FR 5248 - Requirements and Procedures for Consumer Assistance To Recycle and Save Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... time will allow the public to benefit from the availability of lower cost used vehicle parts from... CARS program. The additional time would allow the public to benefit from the availability of lower cost... public benefit of having cheaper used vehicle parts from the vehicles traded in under the CARS program...

  17. Chemistry research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikis, A.C.; Garisto, F.; Lemire, R.J.; Paquette, J.; Sagert, N.H.; Saluja, P.P.S.; Sunder, S.; Taylor, P.

    1988-01-01

    This publication reviews chemical research in support of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The overall objective of this research is to develop the fundamental understanding required to demonstrate the suitability of waste immobilization media and processes, and to develop the chemical information required to predict the long-term behaviour of radionuclides in the geosphere after the waste form and the various engineered barriers containing it have failed. Key studies towards the above objective include experimental and theoretical studies of uranium dioxide oxidation/dissolution; compilation of thermodynamic databases and an experimental program to determine unavailable thermodynamic data; studies of hydrothermal alteration of minerals and radionuclide interactions with such minerals; and a study examining actinide colloid formation, as well as sorption of actinides on groundwater colloids

  18. Post-irradiation examination and R and D programs using irradiated fuels at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Yong Bum; Min, Duck Kee; Kim, Eun Ka and others

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the Post-Irradiation Examination(PIE) and R and D programs using irradiated fuels at KAERI. The objectives of post-irradiation examination (PIE) for the PWR irradiated fuels, CANDU fuels, HANARO fuels and test fuel materials are to verify the irradiation performance and their integrity as well as to construct a fuel performance data base. The comprehensive utilization program of the KAERI's post-irradiation examination related nuclear facilities such as Post-Irradiation Examination Facility (PIEF), Irradiated Materials Examination Facility (IMEF) and HANARO is described

  19. Post-irradiation examination and R and D programs using irradiated fuels at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Yong Bum; So, Dong Sup; Lee, Byung Doo; Lee, Song Ho; Min, Duck Kee

    2001-09-01

    This report describes the Post-Irradiation Examination(PIE) and R and D programs using irradiated fuels at KAERI. The objectives of post-irradiation examination (PIE) for the PWR irradiated fuels, CANDU fuels, HANARO fuels and test fuel materials are to verify the irradiation performance and their integrity as well as to construct a fuel performance data base. The comprehensive utilization program of the KAERI's post-irradiation examination related nuclear facilities such as Post-Irradiation Examination Facility (PIEF), Irradiated Materials Examination Facility (IMEF) and HANARO is described

  20. Modeling of a thermally integrated 10 kWe planar solid oxide fuel cell system with anode offgas recycling and internal reforming by discretization in flow direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Stefanie; Segarra, Ana Gallet; Horstmann, Peter; Carré, Maxime; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Lapicque, François; Friedrich, K. Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Combined heat and power production (CHP) based on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is a very promising technology to achieve high electrical efficiency to cover power demand by decentralized production. This paper presents a dynamic quasi 2D model of an SOFC system which consists of stack and balance of plant and includes thermal coupling between the single components. The model is implemented in Modelica® and validated with experimental data for the stack UI-characteristic and the thermal behavior. The good agreement between experimental and simulation results demonstrates the validity of the model. Different operating conditions and system configurations are tested, increasing the net electrical efficiency to 57% by implementing an anode offgas recycle rate of 65%. A sensitivity analysis of characteristic values of the system like fuel utilization, oxygen-to-carbon ratio and electrical efficiency for different natural gas compositions is carried out. The result shows that a control strategy adapted to variable natural gas composition and its energy content should be developed in order to optimize the operation of the system.

  1. Update on Canada's nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.

    1992-09-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP) was launched in 1978 as a joint initiative by the governments of Canada and Ontario. Under the program, AECL has been developing and assessing a generic concept to dispose of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The disposal concept has been referred for review under the Environmental Assessment and Review Process. AECL will submit an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to an Environmental Assessment Panel, which was appointed in late 1989. Hearings will be held in areas that have a particular interest in the concept and its application. At the end of the review, the Panel will make recommendations as to the acceptability of the concept and the course of future action. The federal government will decide on the next steps to be taken. In the spring of 1990 public open houses were held to tell prospective participants how to enter the process. Sessions designed to assist the Panel in determining the scope of the EIS took place in the autumn of 1990. In June 1991 the Panel issued for comment a set of draft guidelines for the EIS. More than 30 groups and individuals submitted comments. The final guidelines were issued in March 1992, and AECL expects to submit its EIS to the Panel in 1993. If the concept review is completed by 1995 and if the concept is approved, disposal could begin some time after 2025. (L.L.) (12 refs.)

  2. Gas-cooled reactor programs. Fuel-management positioning and accounting module: FUELMANG Version V1. 11, September 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medlin, T.W.; Hill, K.L.; Johnson, G.L.; Jones, J.E.; Vondy, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    This report documents the code module FUELMANG for fuel management of a reactor. This code may be used to position fuel during the calculation of a reactor history, maintain a mass balance history of the fuel movement, and calculate the unit fuel cycle component of the electrical generation cost. In addition to handling fixed feed fuel without recycle, provision has been made for fuel recycle with various options applied to the recycled fuel. A continuous fueling option is also available with the code. A major edit produced by the code is a detailed summary of the mass balance history of the reactor and a fuel cost analysis of that mass balance history. This code is incorporated in the system containing the VENTURE diffusion theory neutronics code for routine use. Fuel movement according to prescribed instructions is performed without the access of additional user input data during the calculation of a reactor operating history. Local application has been primarily for analysis of the performance of gas-cooled thermal reactor core concepts.

  3. Gas-cooled reactor programs. Fuel-management positioning and accounting module: FUELMANG Version V1.11, September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medlin, T.W.; Hill, K.L.; Johnson, G.L.; Jones, J.E.; Vondy, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    This report documents the code module FUELMANG for fuel management of a reactor. This code may be used to position fuel during the calculation of a reactor history, maintain a mass balance history of the fuel movement, and calculate the unit fuel cycle component of the electrical generation cost. In addition to handling fixed feed fuel without recycle, provision has been made for fuel recycle with various options applied to the recycled fuel. A continuous fueling option is also available with the code. A major edit produced by the code is a detailed summary of the mass balance history of the reactor and a fuel cost analysis of that mass balance history. This code is incorporated in the system containing the VENTURE diffusion theory neutronics code for routine use. Fuel movement according to prescribed instructions is performed without the access of additional user input data during the calculation of a reactor operating history. Local application has been primarily for analysis of the performance of gas-cooled thermal reactor core concepts

  4. U.S. technology for mechanized/automated fabrication of fast reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, D.H.; Bennett, D.W.; Claudson, T.T.; Dahl, R.E.; Graham, R.A.; Keating, J.J.; Yatabe, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The status of the U.S. fast reactor Fuel Fabrication Development Program is discussed. The objectives of the program are to develop and evaluate a high throughput pilot fuel fabrication line including close-coupled chemistry and wet scrap recycle operations. The goals of the program are to demonstrate by mechanized/automated and remote processes: reduced personnel exposure, enhanced safegurads/accountability, improved fuel performance, representative fabrication rates and reduced fuel costs

  5. NEPA implementation: The Department of Energy's program to manage spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) in its management of spent nuclear fuel. The DOE strategy is to address the short-term safety concerns about existing spent nuclear fuel, to study alternatives for interim storage, and to develop a long-range program to manage spent nuclear fuel. This paper discusses the NEPA process, the environmental impact statements for specific sites as well as the overall program, the inventory of DOE spent nuclear fuel, the alternatives for managing the fuel, and the schedule for implementing the program

  6. EXTENDCHAIN: a package of computer programs for calculating the buildup of heavy metals, fission products, and activation products in reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, M.W.

    1977-01-01

    Design of HTGR recycle and refabrication facilities requires a detailed knowledge of the concentrations of around 400 nuclides which are segregated into four different fuel particle types. The EXTENDCHAIN package of computer programs and the supporting input data files were created to provide an efficient method for calculating the 1600 different concentrations required. The EXTENDCHAIN code performs zero-dimensional nuclide burnup, decay, and activation calculations in nine energy groups for up to 108 nuclides per run. Preparation and handling of the input and output for the sixteen EXTENDCHAIN runs required to produce the desired data are the most time consuming tasks in the computation of the spent fuel element composition. The EXTENDCHAIN package of computer programs contains four codes to aid in the preparation and handling of these data. Most of the input data such as cross sections, decay constants, and the nuclide interconnection scheme will not change when calculating new cases. These data were developed for the life cycle of a typical HTGR and stored on archive tapes for future use. The fuel element composition for this typical HTGR life has been calculated and the results for an equilibrium recycle reload are presented. 12 figures, 7 tables

  7. The potential environmental gains from recycling waste plastics: simulation of transferring recycling and recovery technologies to Shenyang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xudong; Xi, Fengming; Geng, Yong; Fujita, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing attention on developing a low-carbon economy, it is necessary to seek appropriate ways on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through innovative municipal solid waste management (MSWM), such as urban symbiosis. However, quantitative assessments on the environmental benefits of urban symbiosis, especially in developing countries, are limited because only a limited number of planned synergistic activities have been successful and it is difficult to acquire detailed inventory data from private companies. This paper modifies and applies a two-step simulation system and used it to assess the potential environmental benefits, including the reduction of GHG emissions and saving of fossil fuels, by employing various Japanese plastics recycling/energy-recovery technologies in Shenyang, China. The results showed that among various recycling/energy-recovery technologies, the mechanical waste plastics recycling technology, which produces concrete formwork boards (NF boards), has the greatest potential in terms of reducing GHG emissions (1.66 kg CO(2)e/kg plastics), whereas the technology for the production of refuse plastic fuel (RPF) has the greatest potential on saving fossil fuel consumption (0.77 kg ce/kg-plastics). Additional benefits can be gained by applying combined technologies that cascade the utilization of waste plastics. Moreover, the development of clean energy in conjunction with the promotion of new waste plastics recycling programs could contribute to additional reductions in GHG emissions and fossil fuel consumption. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of the burn-up of TRIGA fuel elements by calculation with new TRIGLAV program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.

    1996-01-01

    The results of fuel element burn-up calculations with new TRIGLAV program are presented. TRIGLAV program uses two dimensional model. Results of calculation are compared to results calculated with program, which uses one dimensional model. The results of fuel element burn-up measurements with reactivity method are presented and compared with the calculated results. (author)

  9. Assessing environmental and health impact of the nuclear fuel cycle. Methodology and application to prospective actinides recycling options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzenne, Claude; Grouiller, Jean-Paul; Le Boulch, Denis

    2005-01-01

    French Industrial Companies: EDF, AREVA (COGEMA and FRAMATOME-ANP), associated with ANDRA, the organization in charge of the waste management in France, and Public Research Institute CEA and IRSN, involved in the nuclear waste management, have developed in collaboration a methodology intended to assess the environmental and health impact of the nuclear fuel cycle. This methodology, based on fuel cycle simulation, Life Cycle Analysis, and Impact Studies of each fuel cycle facilities, has been applied to a set of nuclear scenarios covering a very contrasted range of waste management options, in order to characterize the effect of High Level Waste transmutation, and to estimate to what extent it could contribute to reduce their overall impact on health and environment. The main conclusion we could draw from this study is that it is not possible to discriminate, as far as health and environmental impacts are concerned, nuclear scenarios implementing very different levels of HLW transmutation, representative of the whole range of available options. The main limitation of this work is due to the hypothesis of normal behavior of all fuel cycle facilities: main future improvement of the methodology would be to take the accidental risk into account. (author)

  10. Recycling at Penn State's Beaver Stadium. "Recycle on the Go" Success Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2009

    2009-01-01

    With a 13-year-old recycling program, The Pennsylvania State University's (Penn State) Beaver Stadium in the past diverted nearly 30 tons of recyclables per year from local landfills. A new initiative to promote recycling in the stadium's tailgating area has helped Penn State more than triple its old recycling record, collecting 112 tons in 2008.…

  11. The economics of plutonium recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.A.

    1977-11-01

    The individual cost components and the total fuel cycle costs for natural uranium and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel cycles for CANDU-PHW reactors are discussed. A calculation is performed to establish the economic conditions under which plutonium recycle would be economically attractive. (auth)

  12. Characteristics of used CANDU fuel relevant to the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasywich, K M

    1993-05-01

    Literature data on the characteristics of used CANDU power reactor fuel that are relevant to its performance as a waste form have been compiled in a convenient handbook. Information about the quantities of used fuel generated, burnup, radionuclide inventories, fission gas release, void volume and surface area, fuel microstructure, fuel cladding properties, changes in fuel bundle properties due to immobilization processes, radiation fields, decay heat and future trends is presented for various CANDU fuel designs. (author). 199 refs., 39 tabs., 100 figs.

  13. Characteristics of used CANDU fuel relevant to the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasywich, K.M.

    1993-05-01

    Literature data on the characteristics of used CANDU power reactor fuel that are relevant to its performance as a waste form have been compiled in a convenient handbook. Information about the quantities of used fuel generated, burnup, radionuclide inventories, fission gas release, void volume and surface area, fuel microstructure, fuel cladding properties, changes in fuel bundle properties due to immobilization processes, radiation fields, decay heat and future trends is presented for various CANDU fuel designs. (author). 199 refs., 39 tabs., 100 figs

  14. Environmental aspects of recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansma, R.; Van Gemert, F.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced recycling options were studied. Emphasis was on the production of high-level waste. All other impacts, e.g. emissions, were considered to be of minor importance, since from a technical point of view they can be limited to any desired extent. An objective was to gather data from the industry and to use them in a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of several fuel cycle options. It was necessary to complete our data set with literature data. At the end of our project we could benefit from the results of several Expert Working Groups of OECD/NEA. Detailed information was available for the once-through fuel cycle (OFC) and the fuel cycle with mono recycling of MOX. For the other more advanced fuel cycle options information was of a more qualitative nature. The established set of data was sufficient to conduct a streamlined LCA with focus on waste production for final disposal. Some remarks should be made before comparing the various fuel cycle options studied. The first relates to plutonium that contributes to more than 90% of the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel for more than 1000 centuries. Large concern for transmutation of minor actinides will disproportional if plutonium itself is not eliminated. The second remark is that the fission products contribute potentially very little to the radiotoxicity especially when some long-lived radionuclides after separation are imprisoned in stable matrices to prevent them to be carried by underground water. From all nuclear fuel cycles considered, the MIX cycle in LWRs, with recycling of plutonium and minor actinides has the lowest minor actinides production (0.018 kg/TW e h) and the plutonium production is also quite low (0.06 kg/TW e h). The MIX cycle without minor actinides recycling performs a little better with respect to plutonium production (0.04 kg/TW e h) but has a relatively high minor actinides production (8.7 kg/TW e h). Another conclusion is that burning of minor actinides in fast reactors (MA 0.28 kg/TW e h, Pu 0

  15. Renewing Rock-Tenn: A Biomass Fuels Assessment for Rock-Tenn's St. Paul Recycled Paper Mill.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Carl

    2007-03-31

    In the summer of 2006 the Green Institute started the study for the RockTenn paper mill that would evaluate the economics and supply chain reliability of wood waste and other clean biomass as a fuel for the facility. The Green Institute obtained sponsorship from a broad coalition representing the community and the project team included other consultants and university researchers specializing in biomass issues. The final product from the project was a report to: 1) assess the availability of clean biomass fuel for use at the Rock-Tenn site; 2) roughly estimate costs at various annual usage quantities; and 3) develop the building blocks for a supply chain procurement plan. The initial report was completed and public presentations on the results were completed in spring of 2007.

  16. Functionalized ultra-porous titania nanofiber membranes as nuclear waste separation and sequestration scaffolds for nuclear fuels recycle.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haiqing; Bell, Nelson S; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Sava, Dorina Florentina; Nenoff, Tina Maria

    2012-09-01

    Advanced nuclear fuel cycle concept is interested in reducing separations to a simplified, one-step process if possible. This will benefit from the development of a one-step universal getter and sequestration material so as a simplified, universal waste form was proposed in this project. We have developed a technique combining a modified sol-gel chemistry and electrospinning for producing ultra-porous ceramic nanofiber membranes with controllable diameters and porous structures as the separation/sequestration materials. These ceramic nanofiber materials have been determined to have high porosity, permeability, loading capacity, and stability in extreme conditions. These porous fiber membranes were functionalized with silver nanoparticles and nanocrystal metal organic frameworks (MOFs) to introduce specific sites to capture gas species that are released during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Encapsulation into a durable waste form of ceramic composition was also demonstrated.

  17. Extended burnup demonstration: reactor fuel program. Pre-irradiation characterization and summary of pre-program poolside examinations. Big Rock Point extended burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exarhos, C.A.; Van Swam, L.F.; Wahlquist, F.P.

    1981-12-01

    This report is a resource document characterizing the 64 fuel rods being irradiated at the Big Rock Point reactor as part of the Extended Burnup Demonstration being sponsored jointly by the US Department of Energy, Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and General Public Utilities. The program entails extending the exposure of standard BWR fuel to a discharge average of 38,000 MWD/MTU to demonstrate the feasibility of operating fuel of standard design to levels significantly above current limits. The fabrication characteristics of the Big Rock Point EBD fuel are presented along with measurement of rod length, rod diameter, pellet stack height, and fuel rod withdrawal force taken at poolside at burnups up to 26,200 MWD/MTU. A review of the fuel examination data indicates no performance characteristics which might restrict the continued irradiation of the fuel

  18. Implications of wall recycling and carbon source locations on core plasma fueling and impurity content in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groth, M.; Porter, G.D.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Lasnier, C.J.; Meyer, W.M.; Rensink, M.E.; Wolf, N.S.; Boedo, J.A.; Moyer, R.A.; Rudakov, D.L.; Brooks, N.H.; Groebner, R.J.; Petrie, T.W.; Owen, L.W.; Wang, G.; Zeng, L.; Watkins, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Measurement and modeling of the 2-D poloidal D α intensity distribution in DIII-D low and medium density L-mode and ELMy H-mode plasmas indicate that hydrogen neutrals predominantly fuel the core from the divertor X-point region. The 2-D distribution of neutral deuterium and low-charge-state carbon were measured in the divertor and the high-field side midplane scrape-off layer (SOL) using tangentially viewing cameras. The emission in the high-field SOL at the equatorial plane was found to be three to four orders of magnitude lower than at the strike points in the divertor, suggesting a strong divertor particle source. Modeling using the UEDGE/DEGAS codes predicted the poloidal fueling distribution to be dependent on the direction of the ion Bx∇B drift. In plasmas with the Bx∇B drift into the divertor stronger fueling from the inner divertor than from the outer is predicted, due to a lower-temperature and higher-density plasma in the inner leg. UEDGE simulations with carbon produced by both physical and chemical sputtering at the divertor plates and walls only are in agreement with a large set of diagnostic data. The simulations indicate flow reversal in the inner divertor that augments the leakage of carbon ions from the divertor into the core. (author)

  19. Effects of forest fuels extraction (whole tree harvesting) and ash recycling, experience and results from Swedish research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westling, Olle; Egnell, Gustaf; Dahlberg, Anders

    2005-01-01

    This review of Swedish research and environmental assessment studies during more than a decade is based on an ongoing synthesis of long term experiments with whole tree harvesting and wood ash recycling and other relevant research. The review is focused on effects of whole tree harvesting and compensatory fertilisation (wood ash) on forest production, biodiversity and soil and surface water. The studied extraction of biofuels (logging residues) from forest is primarily a complement to the conventional harvest of pulpwood and timber. General conclusions are that a large part of the theoretical potential of extraction of logging residues, in the form of branches and tops, can be utilised on condition that the losses of nutrients and acid neutralising capacity are compensated for through nutrient addition. To protect valuable fauna and flora, biotopes where conventional forestry is presently not applied should, with some exceptions, not be utilised for extraction of biofuels. The usage of wood ashes and other fertilisers will not increase the net accumulation of heavy metals and toxic organic elements in the forest ecosystems, on condition that the concentrations are low in the fertilisers

  20. The Diffusion Effect of MSW Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Tui Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to compare the recycling performance for some waste fractions selected including food waste, bulk waste, paper, metal products, plastics/rubber and glass products and then to develop some directions for the future improvements. The priority of each waste fraction for recycling is also analyzed by using an importance-performance analysis. Traditionally, the recycling rate that is calculated by the ratio of waste recycled to waste collected is used as an indicator to measure recycling performance. Due to a large variation among waste fractions in municipal solid waste (MSW, the recycling rate cannot reflect the actual recycling performance. The ceiling of recycling rate for each waste fraction estimated from the diffusion models is incorporated into a model to calculate recycling performance. The results show that (1 the diffusion effect exists significantly for the recycling of most recyclables but no evidence is found to support the diffusion effect for the recycling of food waste and bulk waste; (2 the recycling performance of waste metal products ranks the top, compared to waste paper, waste glass and other waste fractions; (3 furthermore, an importance-performance analysis (IPA is employed to analyze the priority of recycling programs and thus this paper suggests that the recycling of food waste should be seen as the most priority item to recycle.

  1. Nonproliferation characteristics of advanced fuel cycle concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persiani, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to comment on the proliferation characteristic profiles of some of the proposed fuel cycle alternatives to help ensure that nonproliferation concerns are introduced into the early stages of a fuel cycle concept development program, and to perhaps aid in the more effective implementation of the international nonproliferation regime initiatives and safeguards methods and systems. Alternative cycle concepts proposed by several countries involve the recycle of spent fuel without the separation of plutonium from uranium and fission products

  2. Closing the fuel cycle: A superior option for India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balu, K.; Purushotham, D.S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1999-01-01

    The closed fuel cycle option with reprocessing and recycle of uranium and plutonium (U and Pu) for power generation allows better utilization of the uranium resources. On its part, plutonium is a unique energy source. During the initial years of nuclear fuel cycle activities, reprocessing and recycle of uranium and plutonium for power generation was perceived by many countries to be among the best of long term strategies for the management of spent fuel. But, over the years, some of the countries have taken a position that once-through fuel cycle is both economical and proliferation-resistant. However, such perceptions do vary as a function of economic growth and energy security of a given country. This paper deals with techno-economic perspectives of reprocessing and recycling in the Indian nuclear power programme. Experience of developing Mixed Oxide UO 2 -PuO 2 (MOX) fuel and its actual use in a power reactor (BWR) is presented. The paper further deals with the use of MOX in PHWRs in the future and current thinking, in the Indian context, in respect of advanced fuel cycles for the future. From environmental safety considerations, the separation of long-lived isotopes and minor actinides from high level waste (HLW) would enhance the acceptability of reprocessing and recycle option. The separated actinides are suitable for recycling with MOX fuel. However, the advanced fuel cycles with such recycling of Uranium and transuranium elements call for additional sophisticated fuel cycle activities which are yet to be mastered. India is interested in both uranium and thorium fuel cycles. This paper describes the current status of the Indian nuclear power scenario with reference to the program on reactors, reprocessing and radioactive waste management, plutonium recycle options, thorium-U233 fuel cycle studies and investigations on partitioning of actinides from Purex HLW as relevant to PHWR spent fuels. (author)

  3. VANTAGE 5 PWR fuel assembly demonstration program at Virgil C. Summer nuclear station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, D.C.; Orr, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    VANTAGE 5 is an improved PWR fuel product designed and manufactured by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. The VANTAGE 5 fuel design features integral fuel burnable absorbers, intermediate flow mixer grids, axial blankets, high burnup capability, and a reconstitutable top nozzle. A demonstration program for this fuel design commenced in late 1984 in cycle 2 of the Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station. Objectives for VANTAGE 5 fuel are reduced fuel cycle costs, better core operating margins, and increased design and operating flexibility. Inspections of the VANTAGE 5 demonstration assemblies are planned at each refueling outage

  4. Technology options for future recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T.

    2000-01-01

    It goes without saying that recycling of nuclear material is indispensable, not only for the effective use of valuable resources but also to reduce the debt which we may leave to the next generations. Many developments in advanced reprocessing technologies have been carried out in several countries to deal with the diversification of nuclear fuels. Also technologies derived from reprocessing or other fuel cycle areas have continued to be developed in terms of recycling. Cost effectiveness and waste-free processing are increasingly important factors in the applicable of an alternate recycling policy. This paper introduces an example of the studies in this field, which has been conducted in Japan and considers the establishment of effective recycling methodologies taking into account the uncertainty of future policy. (authors)

  5. The United States foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program: Proposal to modify the program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the Department of State (DOS), adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in May 1996. The policy was slated to expire in May 2009. However, in October 2003, a petition requesting a program extension was delivered to the United States Secretary of Energy from a group of research reactor operators from foreign countries. In April 2004, the Secretary directed DOE undertake an analysis, as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to consider potential extension of the Program. On December 1, 2004, a Federal Register Notice was issued approving the program extension. This paper discusses the findings from the NEPA analysis and the potential changes in the program that may result from implementation of the proposed changes. (author)

  6. Second annual report of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulton, J.

    1980-12-01

    This report, the second of a series of annual reports, reviews in general terms the progress which has been achieved in the research and development program for the safe, permanent disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel wastes. The report summarizes activities over the past year, in the areas of public interaction, used fuel storage and transportation, immobilization of used fuel and fuel reprocessing wastes, research and development associated with deep underground disposal, and environmental and safety assessment. (auth)

  7. Possibilities for recycling of weapon-grade uranium and plutonium and its peaceful use as reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floeter, W.

    2000-01-01

    At present 90% of the energy production is based on fossil fuels. Since March 1999, however, the peaceful use of weapon-grade uranium as reactor fuel is being discussed politically. Partners of this discussion is a group of some private western companies on one side and a state-owned company of the Russian Federation (GUS) on the other. Main topic of the deal besides the winning of electrical energy is the useful disposal of the surplus on weapon-grade material of both leading nations. According to the deal, about 160,000 t of Russian uranium, expressed as natural uranium U 3 O 8 , would be processed during the next 15 years. Proven processes would be applied. Those methods are being already used in Russian facilities at low capacity rates. There are shortages in the production of low enriched uranium (LEU), because of the low capacity rates in the old facilities. The capacity should be increased by a factor of ten, but there is not enough money available in Russia for financing the remodeling of the plants. Financing should therefore probably be provided by the western clients of this deal. The limited amount of uranium produced could be furnised to the uranium market without major difficulties for the present suppliers of natural uranium. The discussions regarding the security of the details of the deal - however - are not yet finalized. (orig.) [de

  8. Establishing and sustaining a technical program to achieve zero fuel failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshon, J.; Whiteside, K.; Burnham, R.

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, Chief Nuclear Officers (CNOs) of electric utilities operating 103 commercial reactors in the United States (U.S.) formally endorsed an initiative to achieve failure-free fuel performance by the end of 2010. This became known as the Zero-by- Ten Fuel Failure Initiative. The endorsement manifested during a meeting at the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) while nuclear fuel performance trends were being reviewed. Declining fuel performance generated backing for the Initiative. This paper provides a brief review of some of the drivers that caused those trends, the Initiative elements designed to address them, and a review of the technical program that helped achieve, and thus far sustain, improved fuel performance. (author) Key Words: Nuclear Fuel, Fuel, Fuel Failures, Fuel Failure Initiative, Zero by Ten Initiative

  9. Surveillance program for former PCB-exposed workers of a transformer and capacitor recycling company, family members, employees of surrounding companies, and area residents--executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Thomas; Gube, Monika; Lang, Jessica; Esser, Andre; Sturm, Walter; Fimm, Bruno; Willmes, Klaus; Neulen, Joseph; Baron, Jens Malte; Merk, Hans; Schettgen, Thomas; Konrad, Kerstin; Deisz, Sabine; Rink, Lothar; Hagmann, Michael; Fillies, Birgit; Zschiesche, Wolfgang; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In a German company polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)-containing transformers and capacitors were recycled on a large scale. Human biomonitoring revealed a high PCB body burden in workers of the recycling company, in surrounding locations of this plant, in companies in the neighborhood of this plant, and in family members of these employees. In order to clarify whether possible adverse health effects occurred or may occur in the future, a prospective surveillance program was initiated. After an extensive literature search, an interdisciplinary group of experts developed a surveillance program based on current knowledge with respect to possible adverse health effects that might occur in the recycling process of transformers and capacitors. Exposure to various hazardous substances (PCB, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzo-furans [PCDD/F], metals, solvents) was considered. Criteria derived from human biomonitoring results of PCB were used for admission to the program. Participants in the surveillance program are first informed about risks and aims of the program. Subsequently, physicians started a detailed documentation of participants' general and occupational history, with their complaints, diseases, and nutritional habits, as well as information regarding their living areas, by means of a standardized questionnaire. In addition, separate examinations were performed to detect possible neurological, immunological, (neuro)psychological, hormonal, and skin effects. Moreover, DNA exposure as assessed by the comet assay and antioxidative status were determined. The program will be offered at yearly intervals for 3 years, and then at 5 and 10 years after program onset. Until now the program has proved to be feasible, and acceptance among workers and their families has been high. Based on the results, criteria will be developed to define adverse health effects that might be attributable to a hazardous substance exposure.

  10. Fuel ethanol production from granular corn starch using Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a long term repeated SSF process with full stillage recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białas, Wojciech; Szymanowska, Daria; Grajek, Włodzimierz

    2010-05-01

    A major problem with fermentative ethanol production is the formation of large amounts of numerous organic pollutants. In an industrial distillery, stillage, fermenter and condenser cooling water are the main sources of wastewater. However, the selection of a proper technology makes it possible to almost completely avoid emissions of such kind of wastewater to the environment. This study examines the effect of stillage recirculation on fuel ethanol production. It is based on the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process using a native starch obtained from corn flour. It was shown that the yield of the ethanol production was not influenced by the recycled stillage, a mean yield being 83.38% of the theoretical value. No significant trend for change in the ethanol concentration or in the residual starch was observed during any particular run, even after the 75% of fresh water was replaced with stillage. Thus, by applying this new clean technology it is possible to significantly reduce the rate of water consumption and in this way the production of by-products such as stillage. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A review of methods for immobilizing iodine-129 arising from a nuclear fuel recycle plant, with emphasis on waste-form chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.

    1990-07-01

    Possible methods for the separation and immobilization of iodine (mainly iodine-129) in a fuel recycle plant are reviewed, with special emphasis placed on the evaluation of waste forms. A distinction is drawn between waste forms selected by thermodynamic (solubility) or kinetic (dissolution rate) considerations. The most promising solubility-limited waste forms appear to be AgI (or AgI + AgCl) and a combination of Bi 2 O 3 and Bi 5 O 7 I. These materials use relatively scarce metals, Ag and Bi. They also have substantial chemical limitations, such as susceptibility to reductive dissolution and anion-displacement reactions; this calls for special care in the choice of a disposal site. All other organic iodides and iodates considered here and elsewhere appear to be still more limited in this respect. The most promising kinetically limited candidate waste form appears to be iodide-sodalite, but further information is needed on both the fabrication and leaching behaviour of this material. The possibility of disposal in a more soluble but isotopically dilute waste form, employing abundant raw materials, also warrants further consideration

  12. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    , Bubbles and precipitates, Modeling fuel behavior); Modeling defects and fission products in UO 2 ceramic by ab initio computation (Ab initio computation, Point defects in uranium dioxide, Fission products in uranium dioxide, The indispensable coupling of modeling and experiment); Cladding and assembly materials (What is the purpose of cladding?, Zirconium alloys, Claddings: required to exhibit good mechanical strength, Mechanical behavior of irradiated Zr alloys, Claddings: required to prove corrosion resistant); Pellet-cladding interaction (The phenomena involved in pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), Experimental simulation of PCI and the lessons to be drawn from it, The requirement for an experimental basis, Numerical simulation of PCI, Towards a lifting of PCI-related operating constraints); Advanced UO 2 and MOX ceramics (Chromium oxide-doped UO 2 fuel, Novel MOX microstructures); Mechanical behavior of fuel assemblies (Assembly mechanical behavior in normal operating conditions, Assembly mechanical behavior in accident situations, Fuel in a loss of primary coolant accident (LOCA)); Introduction to LOCA-type accident transients (Overview of thermal-hydraulic and fuel-related aspects, Incidence of LOCA transients on the thermal-metallurgical-mechanical behavior of zirconium-base alloy cladding); Fuel in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA) (Safety criteria); Fuel in a severe accident (The VERCORS analytical program, The Phebus-FP global tests, Control of severe accidents in the EPR reactor); In-core fuel management (Relationships between cycle length, maximum burnup, and batch fraction Enrichment and burnable poisons, The impact of the nature of the fuel used, and its evolution, on the major parameters of core physics, and management Prospects for future trends in core management); Fuel cycle material balances (In-core evolution of materials, Decay heat and potential radiotoxicity, Plutonium management); Long-term behavior of spent fuel (The nature of spent nuclear

  13. Nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    irradiation, Bubbles and precipitates, Modeling fuel behavior); Modeling defects and fission products in UO{sub 2} ceramic by ab initio computation (Ab initio computation, Point defects in uranium dioxide, Fission products in uranium dioxide, The indispensable coupling of modeling and experiment); Cladding and assembly materials (What is the purpose of cladding?, Zirconium alloys, Claddings: required to exhibit good mechanical strength, Mechanical behavior of irradiated Zr alloys, Claddings: required to prove corrosion resistant); Pellet-cladding interaction (The phenomena involved in pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), Experimental simulation of PCI and the lessons to be drawn from it, The requirement for an experimental basis, Numerical simulation of PCI, Towards a lifting of PCI-related operating constraints); Advanced UO{sub 2} and MOX ceramics (Chromium oxide-doped UO{sub 2} fuel, Novel MOX microstructures); Mechanical behavior of fuel assemblies (Assembly mechanical behavior in normal operating conditions, Assembly mechanical behavior in accident situations, Fuel in a loss of primary coolant accident (LOCA)); Introduction to LOCA-type accident transients (Overview of thermal-hydraulic and fuel-related aspects, Incidence of LOCA transients on the thermal-metallurgical-mechanical behavior of zirconium-base alloy cladding); Fuel in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA) (Safety criteria); Fuel in a severe accident (The VERCORS analytical program, The Phebus-FP global tests, Control of severe accidents in the EPR reactor); In-core fuel management (Relationships between cycle length, maximum burnup, and batch fraction Enrichment and burnable poisons, The impact of the nature of the fuel used, and its evolution, on the major parameters of core physics, and management Prospects for future trends in core management); Fuel cycle material balances (In-core evolution of materials, Decay heat and potential radiotoxicity, Plutonium management); Long-term behavior of spent fuel (The

  14. The Canadian program for management of spent fuel and high level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.W.; Mayman, S.A.

    A brief history and description of the nuclear power program in Canada is given. Schedules and programs are described for storing spent fuel in station fuel bays, centralized water pool storage facilities, concrete canisters, convection vaults, and rock or salt formations. High-level wastes will be retrievable initially, therefore the focus is on storage in mined cavities. The methods developed for high-level waste storage/disposal will ideally be flexible enough to accommodate spent fuel. (E.C.B.)

  15. PBF Severe Fuel-Damage Program: results and comparison to analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Buescher, B.J.; Hobbins, R.R.; McCardell, R.K.; Gruen, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a severe fuel-damage research program in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) to investigate fuel-rod and core response, and fission-product and hydrogen release and transport under degraded-core-cooling accident conditions. This paper presents a description of Phase I of the PBF Severe Fuel Damage Program, discusses the results of the first experiment, and compares those results with analysis performed using the TRAC-BD1 computer code

  16. Application of room temperature ionic liquids in advanced fuel cycles RIAR research concept program users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, Alexander V.; Kormilitsyn, Michael V.; Savochkin, Yuri P.; Osipenko, Alexander G.; Smolensky, Valeri V.; Shadrin, Alexander Yu.; Babain, Vladimir A.

    2005-01-01

    The paper reviews briefly the research program on application of Room Temperature Ionic Liquids (RTILs) in some processes of the nuclear fuel reprocessing, particularly in the uranium-aluminum fuel reprocessing and separation of TPEs and REEs from the PUREX process liquid waste, and approaches to implementation of this program. (author)

  17. 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  18. 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 9-13, 2011, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  19. 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 13-17, 2013, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  20. 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 16-20, 2014, in Washington, DC. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  1. 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 14-18, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  2. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Robert F.; Miller, Robert N.

    1986-01-01

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  3. Spent fuel characterization program in Jose Cabrera nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloret, M.; Canencia, R.; Blanco, J.; POMAR, C.

    2010-01-01

    Jose Cabrera Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is a 14x14 PWR reactor built in 1964 in Spain (160 MWe). The commercial operation started in 1969 and finished in 2006. During year 2009, 377 fuel assemblies from cycles 11 to 29 have been stored in 12 containers HI-STORM 100, and positioned in an Interim Spent Fuel Storage Installation built near the NPP. The spent fuel characterization and classification is a critical and complex activity that could impact all the storage process. As every container has a number of positions for damaged fuel, the loading plans and the quantity of containers depends on the total fuels classified as damaged. The classification of the spent fuel in Jose Cabrera has been performed on the basis of the Interim Staff Guidance ISG-1 from USNRC, 'Damaged Fuel'. As the storage system should assure thermal limitations, criticality control, retrievability, confinement and shielding for radioactive protection, the criteria analyzed for every spent fuel have been the existence/non existence of fuel leaks; damage that could affect the criticality analysis (as missing fuel pins) and any situation that could affect the future retrievability, as defects on the top nozzle. The first classification was performed based upon existing core records. If there were no indication of operating leakers during the concerned cycles and the structural integrity was adequate, the fuel was classified as intact or undamaged. When operating records indicated a fuel leaker, an additional inspection by ultrasonic testing of all the fuel in the concerned cycle was performed to determine the fuel leakers. If the examination results indicated that the fuel has cladding cracks, it was classified as damaged fuel without considering if it was a gross breach or a hairline crack. Additionally, it was confirmed that the water chemistry specifications for spent fuel pool has been fulfilled. Finally, a visual inspection before dry cask storage was performed and foreign particles were

  4. Spent fuel characterization program in Jose Cabrera nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloret, M.; Canencia, R. [Product Engineering, Enusa Industrias Avanzadas S.A., Santiago Rusinol 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, J.; POMAR, C. [Direction of Nuclear Generation, Gas Natural SDG, Avda. San Luis 77, 28033 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Jose Cabrera Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is a 14x14 PWR reactor built in 1964 in Spain (160 MWe). The commercial operation started in 1969 and finished in 2006. During year 2009, 377 fuel assemblies from cycles 11 to 29 have been stored in 12 containers HI-STORM 100, and positioned in an Interim Spent Fuel Storage Installation built near the NPP. The spent fuel characterization and classification is a critical and complex activity that could impact all the storage process. As every container has a number of positions for damaged fuel, the loading plans and the quantity of containers depends on the total fuels classified as damaged. The classification of the spent fuel in Jose Cabrera has been performed on the basis of the Interim Staff Guidance ISG-1 from USNRC, 'Damaged Fuel'. As the storage system should assure thermal limitations, criticality control, retrievability, confinement and shielding for radioactive protection, the criteria analyzed for every spent fuel have been the existence/non existence of fuel leaks; damage that could affect the criticality analysis (as missing fuel pins) and any situation that could affect the future retrievability, as defects on the top nozzle. The first classification was performed based upon existing core records. If there were no indication of operating leakers during the concerned cycles and the structural integrity was adequate, the fuel was classified as intact or undamaged. When operating records indicated a fuel leaker, an additional inspection by ultrasonic testing of all the fuel in the concerned cycle was performed to determine the fuel leakers. If the examination results indicated that the fuel has cladding cracks, it was classified as damaged fuel without considering if it was a gross breach or a hairline crack. Additionally, it was confirmed that the water chemistry specifications for spent fuel pool has been fulfilled. Finally, a visual inspection before dry cask storage was performed and foreign particles

  5. Fuel utilization potential in light water reactors with once-through fuel irradiation (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampolla, D.S.; Conley, G.H.; Candelore, N.R.; Cowell, G.K.; Estes, G.P.; Flanery, B.K.; Duncombe, E.; Dunyak, J.; Satterwhite, D.G.

    1979-07-01

    Current commercial light water reactor cores operate without recylce of fuel, on a once-through fuel cycle. To help conserve the limited nuclear fuel resources, there is interest in increasing the energy yield and, hence, fuel utilization from once-through fuel irradiation. This report evaluates the potential increase in fuel utilization of light water reactor cores operating on a once-through cycle assuming 0.2% enrichment plant tails assay. This evaluation is based on a large number of survey calculations using techniques which were verified by more detailed calculations of several core concepts. It is concluded that the maximum fuel utilization which could be achieved by practical once-through pressurized light water reactor cores with either uranium or thorium is about 17 MWYth/ST U 3 O 8 (Megawatt Years Thermal per Short Ton of U 3 O 8 ). This is about 50% higher than that of current commercial light water reactor cores. Achievement of this increased fuel utilization would require average fuel burnup beyond 50,000 MWD/MT and incorporation of the following design features to reduce parasitic losses of neutrons: reflector blankets to utilize neutrons that would otherwise leak out of the core; fuel management practices in which a smaller fraction of the core is replaced at each refueling; and neutron economic reactivity control, such as movable fuel control rather than soluble boron control. For a hypothetical situation in which all neutron leakage and parasitic losses are eliminated and fuel depletion is not limited by design considerations, a maximum fuel utilization of about 20 MWYth/ST U 3 O 8 is calculated for either uranium or thorium. It is concluded that fuel utilization for comparable reactor designs is better with uranium fuel than with thorium fuel for average fuel depletions of 30,000 to 35,000 MWD/MT which are characteristic of present light water reactor cores

  6. Physics of plutonium recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The commercial recycling of plutonium as PuO 2 /UO 2 mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel is an established practice in pressurised water reactors (PWRs) in several countries, the main motivation being the consumption of plutonium arising from spent fuel reprocessing. Although the same motivating factors apply in the case of boiling water reactors (BWRs), they have lagged behind PWRs for various reasons, and MOX utilisation in BWRs has been implemented in only a few reactors to date. One of the reasons is that the nuclear design of BWR MOX assemblies (or bundles) is more complex than that of PWR assemblies. Recognizing the need and the timeliness to address this issue at the international level, the OECD/NEA Working Party on the Physics of Plutonium Fuels and Innovative Fuel Cycles (WPPR) conducted a physics code benchmark test for a BWR assembly. This volume reports on the benchmark results and conclusions that can be drawn from it. (authors)

  7. Initiation of depleted uranium oxide and spent fuel testing for the spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molecke, M.A.; Gregson, M.W.; Sorenson, K.B. [Sandia National Labs. (United States); Billone, M.C.; Tsai, H. [Argonne National Lab. (United States); Koch, W.; Nolte, O. [Fraunhofer Inst. fuer Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin (Germany); Pretzsch, G.; Lange, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (Germany); Autrusson, B.; Loiseau, O. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (France); Thompson, N.S.; Hibbs, R.S. [U.S. Dept. of Energy (United States); Young, F.I.; Mo, T. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

    2004-07-01

    We provide a detailed overview of an ongoing, multinational test program that is developing aerosol data for some spent fuel sabotage scenarios on spent fuel transport and storage casks. Experiments are being performed to quantify the aerosolized materials plus volatilized fission products generated from actual spent fuel and surrogate material test rods, due to impact by a high energy density device, HEDD. The program participants in the U.S. plus Germany, France, and the U.K., part of the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC have strongly supported and coordinated this research program. Sandia National Laboratories, SNL, has the lead role for conducting this research program; test program support is provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. WGSTSC partners need this research to better understand potential radiological impacts from sabotage of nuclear material shipments and storage casks, and to support subsequent risk assessments, modeling, and preventative measures. We provide a summary of the overall, multi-phase test design and a description of all explosive containment and aerosol collection test components used. We focus on the recently initiated tests on ''surrogate'' spent fuel, unirradiated depleted uranium oxide, and forthcoming actual spent fuel tests. The depleted uranium oxide test rodlets were prepared by the Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, in France. These surrogate test rodlets closely match the diameter of the test rodlets of actual spent fuel from the H.B. Robinson reactor (high burnup PWR fuel) and the Surry reactor (lower, medium burnup PWR fuel), generated from U.S. reactors. The characterization of the spent fuels and fabrication into short, pressurized rodlets has been performed by Argonne National Laboratory, for testing at SNL. The ratio of the aerosol and respirable particles released from HEDD-impacted spent

  8. Spent fuel characterization for the commercial waste and spent fuel packaging program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, R.L.; Davis, R.B.; Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R.W.

    1980-03-01

    This document presents the rationale for spent fuel characterization and provides a detailed description of the characterization examinations. Pretest characterization examinations provide quantitative and qualitative descriptions of spent fuel assemblies and rods in their irradiated conditions prior to disposal testing. This information is essential in evaluating any subsequent changes that occur during disposal demonstration and laboratory tests. Interim examinations and post-test characterization will be used to identify fuel rod degradation mechanisms and quantify degradation kinetics. The nature and behavior of the spent fuel degradation will be defined in terms of mathematical rate equations from these and laboratory tests and incorporated into a spent fuel performance prediction model. Thus, spent fuel characterization is an essential activity in the development of a performance model to be used in evaluating the ability of spent fuel to meet specific waste acceptance criteria and in evaluating incentives for modification of the spent fuel assemblies for long-term disposal purposes

  9. RU fuel development program for an advanced fuel cycle in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, Hochum; Sim, Kiseob; Kim, Bongghi; Inch, W.W.; Page, R.

    1998-01-01

    Korea is a unique country, having both PWR and CANDU reactors. Korea can therefore exploit the natural synergism between the two reactor types to minimize overall waste production, and maximize energy derived from the fuel, by ultimately burning the spent fuel from its PWR reactors in CANDU reactors. As one of the possible fuel cycles, Recovered Uranium (RU) fuel offers a very attractive alternative to the use of Natural Uranium (NU) and slightly enriched uranium (SEU) in CANDU reactors. Potential benefits can be derived from a number of stages in the fuel cycle: no enrichment required, therefore no enrichment tails, direct conversion to UO 2 , lower sensitivity to 234 U and 236U absorption in the CANDU reactor, and expected lower cost relative to NU and SEU. These benefits all fit well with the PWR-CANDU fuel cycle synergy. RU arising from the conventional reprocessing of European and Japanese oxide spent fuel by 2000 is projected to be approaching 25,000 te. The use of RU fuel in a CANDU 6 reactor should result in no serious radiological difficulties and no requirements for special precautions and should not require any new technologies for the fuel fabrication and handling. The use of the CANDU Flexible Fueling (CANFLEX) bundle as the carrier for RU will be fully compatible with the reactor design, current safety and operational requirements, and there will be improved fuel performance compared with the CANDU 37-element NU fuel bundle. Compared with the 37-element NU bundle, the RU fuel has significantly improved fuel cycle economics derived from increased burnups, a large reduction in both fuel requirements and spent fuel, arisings, and the potential lower cost for RU material. There is the potential for annual fuel cost savings in the range of one-third to two-thirds, with enhanced operating margins using RU in the CANFLEX bundle design. These benefits provide the rationale for justifying R and D efforts on the use of RU fuel for advanced fuel cycles in CANDU

  10. Advances and highlights of the CNEA qualification program as high density fuel manufacturer for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelfang, P.; Alvarez, L.; Boero, N.; Calabrese, R.; Echenique, P.; Markiewicz, M.; Pasqualini, E.; Ruggirello, G.; Taboada, H. [Unidad de Actividad Combustibles Nucleares Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNE4), Avda. del Libertador, 8250 C1429BNO Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    One of the main objectives of CNEA regarding the fuel for research reactors is the development and qualification of the manufacturing of LEU high-density fuels. The qualification programs for both types of fuels, Silicide fuel and U- x Mo fuel, are similar. They include the following activities: development and set up of the fissile compound manufacturing technology, set up of fuel plate manufacturing, fabrication and irradiation of mini plates and plates, design and fabrication of fuel assembly prototypes for irradiation, post-irradiation examination and feedback for manufacturing improvements. This paper describes the different activities performed within each program during the last year and the main advances and achievements of the programs within this period. The main achievements may be summarized in the following activities: Continuation of the irradiation of the first silicide fuel element in the R A3. Completion of the manufacturing of the second silicide fuel element, licensing and beginning of its irradiation in the R A3. Development of the HMD Process to manufacture U-Mo powder (pUMA project). Set up of fuel plates manufacturing at industrial level using U-Mo powder. Preliminary studies and the design for the irradiation of mini plates, plates and full scale fuel elements with U-Mo and 7 g U/cm{sup 3}. PIE destructive studies for the P-04 silicide fuel prototype (accurate burnup determination through chemical analysis, metallography and SEM of samples from the irradiated fuel plates). Improvement and development of new characterization techniques for high density fuel plates quality control including US testing and densitometric analysis of X-ray examinations. The results obtained in this period are encouraging and also allow to foresee a wider participation of CNEA in the international effort to qualify U-Mo as a new material for the manufacturing of research reactor fuels. (author)

  11. Advances and highlights of the CNEA qualification program as high density fuel manufacturer for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelfang, P.; Alvarez, L.; Boero, N.; Calabrese, R.; Echenique, P.; Markiewicz, M.; Pasqualini, E.; Ruggirello, G.; Taboada, H.

    2002-01-01

    One of the main objectives of CNEA regarding the fuel for research reactors is the development and qualification of the manufacturing of LEU high-density fuels. The qualification programs for both types of fuels, Silicide fuel and U- x Mo fuel, are similar. They include the following activities: development and set up of the fissile compound manufacturing technology, set up of fuel plate manufacturing, fabrication and irradiation of mini plates and plates, design and fabrication of fuel assembly prototypes for irradiation, post-irradiation examination and feedback for manufacturing improvements. This paper describes the different activities performed within each program during the last year and the main advances and achievements of the programs within this period. The main achievements may be summarized in the following activities: Continuation of the irradiation of the first silicide fuel element in the R A3. Completion of the manufacturing of the second silicide fuel element, licensing and beginning of its irradiation in the R A3. Development of the HMD Process to manufacture U-Mo powder (pUMA project). Set up of fuel plates manufacturing at industrial level using U-Mo powder. Preliminary studies and the design for the irradiation of mini plates, plates and full scale fuel elements with U-Mo and 7 g U/cm 3 . PIE destructive studies for the P-04 silicide fuel prototype (accurate burnup determination through chemical analysis, metallography and SEM of samples from the irradiated fuel plates). Improvement and development of new characterization techniques for high density fuel plates quality control including US testing and densitometric analysis of X-ray examinations. The results obtained in this period are encouraging and also allow to foresee a wider participation of CNEA in the international effort to qualify U-Mo as a new material for the manufacturing of research reactor fuels. (author)

  12. Chemical Engineering Division Fuel Cycle Programs: October--December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Bernstein, G.; Flynn, K.; Gerding, T.; Jardine, L.; Kullen, B.; Mecham, W.; Saunders, B.; Seefeldt, W.; Seitz, M.; Siczek, A.; Trevorrow, L.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel-cycle studies reported for this period include pyrochemical separation of plutonium and americium oxides from contaminated materials of construction such as steel. The actinides are partitioned to a high degree into slags that are contacted by the molten metal. Studies of advanced solvent extraction techniques focussed on the development of centrifugal contactors for use in Purex processes. A miniature contactor is to be used for performance studies applicable to larger units. Review of literature on the process chemistry of zirconium and ruthenium has been carried out to aid in improving the process when fast contactors are used. A review of information on the dispersion of reagents during accidents in reprocessing has been initiated to develop systematic data useful in identifying source terms. A review and evaluation of the encapsulation of high level waste in a metal matrix has been initiated. The data will be used to identify the state of the art and the importance of selected features of this process. Criteria for the handling of hulls are being developed on the basis of past work on the pyrophoricity of zirconium alloys and related criteria from several sources. These suggested criteria will be assembled together with the necessary technical rationalization, into a package for review by interested parties. A brief program to explore the disposal of noble gas fission products by deep-well injection has been started

  13. Status of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Stephens, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    The Canadian Concept for the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel waste has been developed extensively over the past several years, and is now well-advanced. The Concept, which involves the construction of a waste vault 500 to 1000 metres deep in plutonic rock located in the Canadian Precambrian Shield, is supported by an R ampersand D program with the following objectives: (1) to develop and demonstrate technology to site, design, build and operate a disposal facility; (2) to develop and demonstrate a methodology to evaluate the performance of the disposal system; and (3) to demonstrate that sites are likely to exist in the Canadian Precambrian Shield that would meet the regulatory requirements. A combination of engineered and natural barriers will be used to ensure that the vault design will meet rigorous safety standards. Experimental work is being carried out to elucidate all the important phenomena associated with the safety of the vault, including the performance of engineered barriers, natural geological barriers, and the biosphere

  14. Spent Fuel Handling and Packaging Program: a survey of hot cell facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.N.

    1978-07-01

    Hot cell facilities in the United States were surveyed to determine their capabilities for conducting integral fuel assembly and individual fuel rod examinations that are required in support of the Spent Fuel Handling and Packaging Program. The ability to receive, handle, disassemble and reconstitute full-length light water reactor spent fuel assemblies, and the ability to conduct nondestructive and destructive examinations on full-length fuel rods were of particular interest. Three DOE-supported facilities and three commercial facilities were included in the survey. This report provides a summary of the findings

  15. Fuel performance improvement program. Quarterly/annual progress report, October 1977--September 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouthamel, C.E.

    1978-10-01

    This quarterly/annual report reviews and summarizes the activities performed in support of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP) during Fiscal Year 1978 with emphasis on those activities that transpired during the quarter ending September 30, 1978. Significant progress has been made in achieving the primary objectives of the program, i.e., to demonstrate commercially viable fuel concepts with improved fuel - cladding interaction (FCI) behavior. This includes out-of-reactor experiments to support the fuel concepts being evaluated, initiation of instrumented test rod experiments in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), and fabrication of the first series of demonstration rods for irradiation in the Big Rock Point Reactor

  16. HTGR Fuel Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Fuel Technology Program at General Atomic during the first half of FY-81. The activities include the fuel process, fuel materials, fuel cycle, fission product transport, and core component verification testing tasks necessary to support the design and development of a steam cycle/cogeneration (SC/C) version of the HTGR with a follow-on reformer (R) version. An important effort which was initiated during this period was the preparation of input data for a long-range technology program plan

  17. HTGR Fuel-Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending September 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Fuel Technology Program at GA Technologies Inc. during the second half of FY-1982. The activities include the fuel process, fuel materials, fuel cycle, fission product transport, and core component verification testing tasks necessary to support the design and development of a steam cycle/cogeneration (SC/C) version of the HTGR with a follow-on reformer (R) version. An important effort which was completed during this period was the preparation of input data for a long-range technology program plan

  18. First annual report of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulton, J.; Gibson, A.R.

    1979-12-01

    The research and development program for the safe, permanent disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel wastes has been established. This report, the first of a series of annual reports, reviews in general terms the progress which has been achieved. After briefly reviewing the rationale and organization of the program, the report summarizes activities in the area of public information, used fuel storage and transportation, immobilization of used fuel and fuel reprocessing wastes, research and development associated with deep underground disposal, and environmental and safety assessment. (auth) [fr

  19. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-11-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  20. Certification Report: Army Aviation Alternative Fuels Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Fuel Injector Coking Rig Description • Combustor Section Rig • Full Annular Rig • Sea Level and Simulated Altitude Engine Testing...purpose requirements in ASTM D4054 and MIL-HDBK- 510 for aviation fuel, as modified by the tri-service group to include diesel engine-related properties...atomized and vaporized when passing through the fuel nozzles into the combustor. In the combustor, it is vaporized, ignited and burned to provide the