WorldWideScience

Sample records for fuel irradiation capsule

  1. Fabrication of Non-instrumented capsule for DUPIC simulated fuel irradiation test in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B.G.; Kang, Y.H.; Park, S.J.; Shin, Y.T. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    In order to develope DUPIC nuclear fuel, the irradiation test for simulated DUPIC fuel was planed using a non-instrumented capsule in HANARO. Because DUPIC fuel is highly radioactive material the non-instrumented capsule for an irradiation test of simulated DUPIC fuel in HANARO was designed to remotely assemble and disassemble in hot cell. And then, according to the design requirements the non-instrumented DUPIC capsule was successfully manufactured. Also, the manufacturing technologies of the non-instrumented capsule for irradiating the nuclear fuel in HANARO were established, and the basic technology for the development of the instrumented capsule technology was accumulated. This report describes the manufacturing of the non-instrumented capsule for simulated DUPIC fuel. And, this report will be based to develope the instrumented capsule, which will be utilized to irradiate the nuclear fuel in HANARO. 26 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  2. Design and manufacturing of 05F-01K instrumented capsule for nuclear fuel irradiation in Hanaro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, J. M.; Shin, Y. T.; Park, S. J. (and others)

    2007-07-15

    An instrumented capsule was developed to be able to measure fuel characteristics, such as fuel temperature, internal pressure of fuel rod, fuel pellet elongation, and neutron flux, etc., during the irradiation test of nuclear fuel in Hanaro. The instrumented capsule(02F-11K) for measuring and monitoring and monitoring fuel centerline temperature and neutron flux was designed and manufactured. It was successfully irradiated in the test hole OR5 of Hanaro from March 14, 2003 to June 1, 2003 (53.84 full power days at 24 MW). In the year of 2004, 3 test fuel rods and the instrumented capsule(03F-05K) were designed and manufactured to measure fuel centerline temperature, internal pressure of fuel rod, and fuel axial deformation during irradiation test. This capsule was irradiated in the test hole OR5 of Hanaro reactor from April 26, 2004 to October 1, 2004 (59.5 EFPD at 24 {approx} 30 MW). The six typed dual instrumented fuel rods, which allow for two characteristics to be measured simultaneously in one fuel rod, have been designed and manufactured to enhance the efficiency of the irradiation test using the instrumented fuel capsule. The 05F-01K instrumented fuel capsule was designed and manufactured for a design verification test of the three dual instrumented fuel rods. The irradiation test of the 05F-01K instrumented fuel capsule will be carried out at the OR5 vertical experimental hole of Hanaro.

  3. Structural analysis and design optimization of double shell system for fuel irradiation capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. S.; Choi, Y. J.; Choi, M. H.; Rhu, C. H.; Go, J. H.; Hong, S. J.; Lee, H. C. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    During irradiation tests, the fuel capsule expect that the high temperature will be occur. Thus, to estimate the structural integrity of fuel capsule during irradiation tests, it is needed to perform structural analysis and to obtain the information of mechanical characteristics for the system. In this study, the structure analysis of the circular capsule is performed using the finite element analysis program, ANSYS and analysis calculation. To obtain the mechanical characteristics of the circular capsule structure such as stresses, critical buckling loads and natural frequencies et al. the static nd model analysis are conducted. The effects of various wall thicknesses of capsule outer tube and support tube for circular capsule are obtained. Also, the effects of boundary conditions and principal materials of the fuel capsule on the structural behavior are investigated. The FE results are compared with the analysis results in case of possible. 13 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs. (Author)

  4. Design and manufacturing of non-instrumented capsule for advanced PWR fuel pellet irradiation test in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Lee, C. B.; Song, K. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    This project is preparing to irradiation test of the developed large grain UO{sub 2} fuel pellet in HANARO for pursuit fuel safety and high burn-up in 'Advanced LWR Fuel Technology Development Project' as a part Nuclear Mid and Long-term R and D Program. On the basis test rod is performed the nuclei property and preliminary fuel performance analysis, test rod and non-instrumented capsule are designed and manufactured for irradiation test in HANARO. This non-instrumented irradiation capsule of Advanced PWR Fuel pellet was referred the non-instrumented capsule for an irradiation test of simulated DUPIC fuel in HANARO(DUPIC Rig-001) and 18-element HANARO fuel, was designed to ensure the integrity and the endurance of non-instrumented capsule during the long term(2.5 years) irradiation. To irradiate the UO{sub 2} pellets up to the burn-up 70 MWD/kgU, need the time about 60 months and ensure the integrity of non-instrumented capsule for 30 months until replace the new capsule. This non-instrumented irradiation capsule will be based to develope the non-instrumented capsule for the more long term irradiation in HANARO. 22 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  5. The Thermal Hydraulic Test of SFR Irradiation Test Capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Yong; Park, Sung Jae; Choo, Kee Nam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Irradiation test using a capsule has been performed for fuel or material performance test in the test reactor. Irradiation capsule for the HANARO reactor must satisfy the hydraulic conditions and structural integrity from a out-pile test. Items of a out-pile test are pressure drop, flow-induced vibration test and endurance test. The results of test must show that a test capsule satisfy the HANARO operational requirement with sufficient margin. This paper describes the devices of thermal hydraulic test and the results of SFR test capsule

  6. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Kang, Y. H.; Cho, M. S. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The essential technology for an irradiation test of materials and nuclear fuel has been successively developed and utilized to meet the user's requirements in Phase I(July 21, 1997 to March 31, 2000). It enables irradiation tests to be performed for a non-fissile material under a temperature control(300{+-}10 .deg. C) in a He gas environment, and most of the irradiation tests for the internal and external users are able to be conducted effectively. The basic technology was established to irradiate a nuclear fuel, and a creep capsule was also developed to measure the creep property of a material during an irradiation test in HANARO in Phase II(April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2003). The development of a specific purpose capsule, essential technology for a re-irradiation of a nuclear fuel, advanced technology for an irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel were performed in Phase III(April 1, 2003 to February 28, 2007). Therefore, the technology for an irradiation test was established to support the irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel which is required for the National Nuclear R and D Programs. In addition, an improvement of the existing capsule design and fabrication technology, and the development of an instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel and a specific purpose will be able to satisfy the user's requirements. In order to support the irradiation test of materials and a nuclear fuel for developing the next generation nuclear system, it is also necessary to continuously improve the design and fabrication technology of the existing capsule and the irradiation technology.

  7. Final Report on Design, Fabrication and Test of HANARO Instrumented Capsule (07M-13N) for the Researches of Irradiation Performance of Parts of X-Gen Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K. N.; Kim, B. G.; Kang, Y. H. (and others)

    2008-08-15

    An instrumented capsule of 07M-13N was designed, fabricated and irradiated for an evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of the parts of a X-Gen nuclear fuel assembly for PWR requested by KNF. Some specimens of control rod materials of AP1000 reactor requested by Westinghouse Co. were inserted in this capsule as a preliminary irradiation test and Polyimide specimens requested by Hanyang university were also inserted. 463 specimens such as buckling and spring test specimens of cell spacer grid, tensile, microstructure and tensile of welded parts, irradiation growth, spring test specimens made of HANA tube, Zirlo, Zircaloy-4, Inconel-718, Polyimide, Ag and Ag-In-Cd alloys were placed in the capsule. During the irradiation test, the temperature of the specimens and the thermal/fast neutron fluences were measured by 14 thermocouples and 7 sets of neutron fluence monitors installed in the capsule. A new friction welded tube between STS304 and Al1050 alloys was introduced in the capsule to prevent a coolant leakage into a capsule during a capsule cutting process in HANARO. The capsule was irradiated for 95.19 days (4 cycles) in the CT test hole of HANARO of a 30MW thermal output at 230 {approx} 420 .deg. C. The specimens were irradiated up to a maximum fast neutron fluence of 1.27x10{sup 21}(n/cm{sup 2}) (E>1.0MeV) and the dpa of the irradiated specimens were evaluated as 1.21 {approx} 1.97. The irradiated specimens were tested to evaluate the irradiation performance of the parts of an X-Gen fuel assembly in the IMEF hot cell and the obtained results will be very valuable for the related researches of the users.

  8. Interim Report on Design, Fabrication and Test of HANARO Instrumented Capsule (07M-13N) for the Researches of Irradiation Performance of Parts of X-Gen Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K. N.; Kim, B. G.; Kang, Y. H.; Choi, M. H.; Cho, M. S.; Son, J. M.; Shin, Y. T.; Park, S. J.; Seo, C. G.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, J. H

    2008-02-15

    An instrumented capsule of 07M-13N was designed, fabricated and irradiated for and evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of the parts of a a X-Gen nuclear fuel assembly for PWR requested by KNF (Korea Nuclear Fuel). The basic structure of the 07M-13N capsule was based on the 05M-07U capsule in which similar materials has been successfully irradiated in HANARO in 2006. Some specimens of control rod materials of AP1000 reactor requested by Westinghouse Co. were inserted in this capsule as a preliminary irradiation test and Polyimide specimens requested by Hanyang university were also inserted. 463 specimens such as bucking and spring test specimens of 1x1 cell spacer grid, tensile, microstructure and tensile of welded parts, irradiation growth, spring test specimens made of HANA tube, Zirlo, Zircaloy-4, Inconel-718, Polyimide, Ag and Ag-In-Cd alloys were placed in the capsule. The capsule was composed of 5 stages having many kinds of specimens and an independent electric heater at each stage. During the irradiation test, the temperature of the specimens and the thermal/fast neutron fluences were measured by 14 thermocouples and 7 sets of Ni-Ti-Fe neutron fluence monitors installed in the capsule. A new friction welded tube between STS304 and Al1050 alloys was introduced in the capsule to prevent a coolant leakage into a capsule during a capsule cutting process in HANARO. The capsule was irradiated for 49days (2 cycles) in the CT test hole of HANARO of a 30MW thermal output at 295 {approx} 460 .deg. C and maintained in the service pool because of reactor shut-down for the FTL construction. The specimen will be irradiated up to a maximum fast neutron fluence of 1.2x10{sup 21}(n/cm{sup 2}) (E>1.0MeV) after 4 cycle irradiation. The obtained results will be very valuable for the related researches of the users.

  9. Post irradiation test report of irradiated DUPIC simulated fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Jung, I. H.; Moon, J. S. and others

    2001-12-01

    The post-irradiation examination of irradiated DUPIC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) simulated fuel in HANARO was performed at IMEF (Irradiated Material Examination Facility) in KAERI during 6 months from October 1999 to March 2000. The objectives of this post-irradiation test are i) the integrity of the capsule to be used for DUPIC fuel, ii) ensuring the irradiation requirements of DUPIC fuel at HANARO, iii) performance verification in-core behavior at HANARO of DUPIC simulated fuel, iv) establishing and improvement the data base for DUPIC fuel performance verification codes, and v) establishing the irradiation procedure in HANARO for DUPIC fuel. The post-irradiation examination performed are {gamma}-scanning, profilometry, density, hardness, observation the microstructure and fission product distribution by optical microscope and electron probe microanalyser (EPMA)

  10. Irradiation and performance evaluation of DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ki Kwang; Yang, M. S.; Song, K. C. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The objectives of the project is to establish the performance evaluation system for the experimental verification of DUPIC fuel. The scope and content for successful accomplishment of the phase 1 objectives is established as follows : irradiation test of DUPIC fuel at HANARO using a noninstrument capsule, study on the characteristics of DUPIC pellets, development of the analysis technology on the thermal behaviour of DUPIC fuel, basic design of a instrument capsule. The R and D results of the phase 1 are summarized as follows : - Performance analysis technology development of DUPIC fuel by model development for DUPIC fuel, review on the extendability of code(FEMAXI-IV, FRAPCON-3, ELESTRESS). - Study on physical properties of DUPIC fuel by design and fabrication of the equipment for measuring the thermal property. - HANARO irradiation test of simulated DUPIC fuel by the noninstrument capsule development. - PIE and result analysis.

  11. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  12. Steady state heat transfer in ORR irradiation capsules. Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, R.C.; Michaels, S.L.; Wilkes, G.R.

    1976-04-26

    The mathematical model developed by Stiros for prediction of temperature profiles in ORR irradiation capsules was modified and a numerical solution obtained. A Fortran computer program was written to solve the generalized finite difference equations applied to a fixed lattice system superimposed on the capsule cross section. The Liebmann iterative method was employed. The solution accounts for changes in internal heat generation, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity induced by both temperature and fluence. The computed temperatures deviated from actual experimental measurements in the fuel rods by less than 2.0 percent.

  13. Spectral measurements of asymmetrically irradiated capsule backlighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-11-01

    Capsule backlighters provide a quasi-continuum x-ray spectrum over a wide range of photon energies [J. F. Hansen et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 013504 (2008)]. Ideally one irradiates the capsule backlighter symmetrically, however, in complex experimental geometries, this is not always possible. In recent experiments we irradiated capsule backlighters asymmetrically and measured the x-ray spectrum from multiple directions. We will present time-integrated spectra over the photon energy range of 2-13 keV and time-resolved spectra over the photon energy range of 2-3 keV. We will compare the spectra from different lines of sight to determine if the laser asymmetry results in an angular dependence in the x-ray emission.

  14. Irradiation of Polyimide and Neutron Poison Materials by Using a HANARO Capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K. N.; Cho, M. S.; Shin, Y. T.; Kim, B. G.; Seo, C. G.; Kim, Y. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    A material capsule system has been developed for an irradiation test of non-fissile materials in HANARO (High flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr).This capsule system has been actively utilized for the various material irradiation tests requested by users from research institutes, universities, and the industries. The capsules were mainly designed for an irradiation of the RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) and reactor core materials, and Zr-based alloys of parts of nuclear fuel assembly. Recently, irradiation tests of neutron poison materials and Polyimide were requested by Westinghouse Electric Company (WEC) and Hanyang University, respectively. As a candidate material of control rod of AP1000 reactor, Ag and Ag-In-Cd alloys were requested to be irradiated in HANARO by WEC. Polyimide has been studied as a shielding material against thermal and fast neutrons. The irradiation of these new materials which might affect the safety of a reactor was carried out for the first time in HANARO. As a preliminary test, small amount of these materials were determined to be inserted in a KNF (Korea Nuclear Fuel) irradiation capsule of 07M-13N. Due to the new materials, the irradiation test of the 07M-13N capsule was examined and approved by the 'HANARO Safety Review Committee'. The 07M-13N capsule was safely irradiated for 95.19 days (4 cycles) in the CT test hole of HANARO of a 30MW thermal output at 230{approx}420 .deg. C. The specimens of these new materials were irradiated up to a maximum fast neutron fluence of 1.13x1021(n/cm{sup 2}) (E>1.0MeV) and the dpa of the irradiated specimens were evaluated as 1.87.

  15. An Analysis of the Thermal and Structure Behaviour of the UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}-Fuel in the Irradiation Experiment of the UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}-Fuel in the Irradiation Experiment FR2 Capsule Test Series 5a; Analisis termico y estructural del combustible UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} irradiado en el reactor FR2 dentro del experimento KVE-Vg.5a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.; Helmut, E.

    1981-07-01

    In the Karlsruhe research reactor FR2 nine fuel pins were irradiated within three irradiation capsules in the course of the test series 5a. The pins contained UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} fuel pellets. They reached bump values of about 6, 17 and 47 Mwd/Kg Me with linear rod powers of 400 to 600 W/cm and clad surface temperature between 500 and 700 degree centigree. A detailed analysis of the fuel structuration data (columnar-grain and equiaxed- -grain growth regions) have allowed to determine, with the help of physic-mathematical models, the radii of these regions and the heat transfer through the contact zone between fuel and clad depending on the bump. The results of the analysis showed that the fuel surface temperature rose with increasing burnup. (Author) 16 refs.

  16. FY 2013 Summary Report: Post-Irradiation Examination of Zircaloy-4 Samples in Target Capsules and Initiation of Bending Fatigue Testing for Used Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Richard H [ORNL; Yan, Yong [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    This report documents ongoing work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Department of Energy, Office of Fuel Cycle Technology Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), and satisfies the deliverable for milestone M2FT-13OR0805041, “Data Report on Hydrogen Doping and Irradiation in HFIR.” This work is conducted under WBS 1.02.08.05, Work Package FT-13OR080504 ST “Storage and Transportation-Experiments – ORNL.” The objectives of work packages that make up the S&T Experiments Control Account are to conduct the separate effects tests (SET) and small-scale tests that have been identified in the Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Data Gap Prioritization (FCRD-USED-2012-000109). In FY 2013, the R&D focused on cladding and container issues and small-scale tests as identified in Sections A-2.9 and A-2.12 of the prioritization report.

  17. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules.

  18. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Accident Tolerant Fuels Series 1 (ATF-1) Irradiation Testing FY 2016 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Core, Gregory Matthew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report contains a summary of irradiation testing of Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Accident Tolerant Fuels Series 1 (ATF 1) experiments performed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in FY 2016. ATF 1 irradiation testing work performed in FY 2016 included design, analysis, and fabrication of ATF-1B drop in capsule ATF 1 series experiments and irradiation testing of ATF-1 capsules in the ATR.

  19. Thermohydraulic design of saturated temperature capsule for IASCC irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Itabashi, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2002-10-01

    An advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is being developed in JAERI, to perform irradiation tests for irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) research concerned with aging of LWR. This device enables the irradiation tests under the water chemistry condition and the temperature, which simulate the conditions for BWR core internals. The advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is composed of saturated temperature capsule inserted into the JMTR core and the water chemistry control unit installed in the reactor building. Regarding the saturated temperature capsule, the Thermohydraulic design of capsule structure was done, aimed at controlling the specimen's temperature, feeding water velocity on specimen's surface to the environment of BWR nearer. As the result of adopting the new capsule structure based on the design study, it was found out that feeding water velocity at the surface of specimen's is increased to about 10 times as much as before, and nuclear heat generated in the capsule components can be removed safely even in the abnormal event such as the case of loss of feeding water. (author)

  20. Research on Technology of Filling Sodium into Fuel Test Capsules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Chi; XIE; Chun; WANG; Shu-xing; MI; Zheng-feng; YU; Tuan-jie; CUI; Chao; WANG; Ming-zheng

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide a high pure sodium environment for properties testing in the fuel research for fast reactor,it is essential to fill sodium into fuel testing capsules.By the method of vacuum,temperature-controlling and inert gas protection,quantificational sodium had been filled into the fuel testing capsules.Fig.1shows the schematic diagram of sodium filling device.Table 1shows

  1. Irradiated test fuel shipment plan for the LWR MOX fuel irradiation test project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shappert, L.B.; Dickerson, L.S.; Ludwig, S.B.

    1998-10-16

    This document outlines the responsibilities of DOE, DOE contractors, the commercial carrier, and other organizations participating in a shipping campaign of irradiated test specimen capsules containing mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The shipments described here will be conducted according to applicable regulations of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and all applicable DOE Orders. This Irradiated Test Fuel Shipment Plan for the LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project addresses the shipments of a small number of irradiated test specimen capsules and has been reviewed and agreed to by INEEL and ORNL (as participants in the shipment campaign). Minor refinements to data entries in this plan, such as actual shipment dates, exact quantities and characteristics of materials to be shipped, and final approved shipment routing, will be communicated between the shipper, receiver, and carrier, as needed, using faxes, e-mail, official shipping papers, or other backup documents (e.g., shipment safety evaluations). Any major changes in responsibilities or data beyond refinements of dates and quantities of material will be prepared as additional revisions to this document and will undergo a full review and approval cycle.

  2. Status of Post Irradiation Examination of FCAB and FCAT Irradiation Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD)

    2016-09-29

    A series of irradiation programs are ongoing to address the need for determining the radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys. These irradiation programs, deemed the FCAT and FCAB irradiation programs, use the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to irradiate second generation wrought FeCrAl alloys and early-generation powder-metallurgy (PM) oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys. Irradiations have been or are being performed at temperatures of 200°C, 330°C, and 550°C from doses of 1.8 dpa up to 16 dpa. Preliminary post-irradiation examination (PIE) on low dose (<2 dpa) irradiation capsules of tensile specimens has been performed. Analysis of co-irradiated SiC thermometry have shown reasonable matching between the nominal irradiation temperatures and the target irradiation temperatures. Room temperature tensile tests have shown typical radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement at irradiations of 200°C and 330°C, but a propensity for softening when irradiated to 550°C for the wrought alloys. The PM-ODS FeCrAl specimens showed less hardening compared to the wrought alloys. Future PIE includes high temperature tensile tests on the low dose irradiation capsules as well as the determination of reference fracture toughness transition temperature, To, in alloys irradiated to 7 dpa and higher.

  3. Status of Post Irradiation Examination of FCAB and FCAT Irradiation Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD)

    2016-09-29

    A series of irradiation programs are ongoing to address the need for determining the radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys. These irradiation programs, deemed the FCAT and FCAB irradiation programs, use the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to irradiate second generation wrought FeCrAl alloys and early generation powder-metallurgy (PM) oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys. Irradiations have been or are being performed at temperatures of 200°C, 330°C, and 550°C from doses of 1.8 dpa up to 16 dpa. Preliminary post-irradiation examination (PIE) on low dose (<2 dpa) irradiation capsules of tensile specimens has been performed. Analysis of co-irradiated SiC thermometry have shown reasonable matching between the nominal irradiation temperatures and the target irradiation temperatures. Room temperature tensile tests have shown typical radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement at irradiations of 200°C and 330°C but a propensity for softening when irradiated to 550°C for the wrought alloys. The PM-ODS FeCrAl specimens showed less hardening compared to the wrought alloys. Future PIE includes high temperature tensile tests on the low dose irradiation capsules as well as the determination of reference fracture toughness transition temperature, To, in alloys irradiated to 7 dpa and higher.

  4. Status Report on Irradiation Capsules Designed to Evaluate FeCrAl-UO2 Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-24

    This status report provides the background and current status of a series of irradiation capsules that were designed and are being built to test the interactions between candidate FeCrAl cladding for enhanced accident tolerant applications and prototypical enriched commercial UO2 fuel in a neutron radiation environment. These capsules will test the degree, if any, of fuel cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) between FeCrAl and UO2. The capsules are to be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory to burn-ups of 10, 30, and 50 GWd/MT with a nominal target temperature at the interfaces between the pellets and clad of 350°C.

  5. Project of a new circuit for nuclear fuel irradiation; Projeto de um novo circuito para irradiacao de combustiveis nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeituni, Carlos A.; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Perrotta, Jose A.; Silva, Jose E.R. da [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear. Div. de Engenharia do Combustivel. E-mail: czeituni@usp.br

    2000-07-01

    This paper reports information about the operation of the old Irradiated Fuel Assembly for nuclear miniplates irradiation in the reactor IEA-R1, named CICON (Circuit for Nuclear Fuels Irradiation), and presents the project of the new one. This paper also describes the problems of the old capsule and which details we will change in the new project. (author)

  6. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Charles A. Baldwin; Philip L. Winston; Jason M. Harp; Scott A. Ploger; Tyler Gerczak; Isabella J. van Rooyen; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva

    2014-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.5% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel–including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures–was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocrabon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1×10 4 to 5×10 4 for 154Eu and 8×10 7 to 3×10 5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs release from compacts was <3×10 6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98×105 experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs release in two capsules to approximately 10 5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that released cesium during irradiation, where SiC corrosion was found adjacent to IPyC cracks. Palladium, silver, and uranium were found in the SiC layer of irradiated particles, and characterization

  7. A safety review for irradiation test of the creep capsule(02S-08K)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, M. S.; Seo, C. G.; Choi, M. H.; Choo, K. N.; Sohn, J. M.; Kang, Y. H.; Kim, B. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The creep capsule(02S-08K), which is aimed to confirm the design characteristics and the structural integrity, will be irradiated at the IR2 test hole in October, 2004. To review a safety in the irradiation test of the capsule, the reactivity effect in HANARO was analyzed and stress and temperatures on the capsule were estimated. In the abnormal operating condition during the test of the capsule, the effect exerted on the capsule outer body by leakage or breakage of the stress loading unit equipped in the capsule was analyzed.

  8. Acetylene bubble-powered autonomous capsules: towards in situ fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moo, James Guo Sheng; Wang, Hong; Pumera, Martin

    2014-12-28

    A fuel-free autonomous self-propelled motor is illustrated. The motor is powered by the chemistry of calcium carbide and utilising water as a co-reactant, through a polymer encapsulation strategy. Expulsion of acetylene bubbles powers the capsule motor. This is an important step, going beyond the toxic hydrogen peroxide fuel used normally, to find alternative propellants for self-propelled machines.

  9. Milestone M3FT-15OR0203112. Build redesigned HFIR rabbit capsules and make ready for insertion for irradiation in HFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Richard H [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McDuffee, Joel Lee [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Okuniewski, Maria A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report details the fabrication and delivery of two Fuel Cycle Research and Development irradiation capsules (FCRP20 and FCRP03), with associated quality assurance documentation, to the High Flux Isotope Reactor. The capsules and documentation were delivered by September 30, 2015, thus meeting the deadline for milestone M3FT-15OR0203112. These irradiation experiments irradiate metal parallelepiped specimens that may consist of various compositions including uranium metal, steel, etc. This document contains a copy of the completed capsule fabrication request sheets, which detail all constituent components, pertinent drawings, etc., along with a detailed summary of the capsule assembly process performed by the Thermal Hydraulics and Irradiation Engineering Group (THIEG) in the Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division. A complete fabrication package record is maintained by THIEG and is available upon request.

  10. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  11. Summary of the irradiation history of the TRIST-ER1 capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A.L.; Eatherly, W.S.; Heatherly, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The TRIST-ERI capsule was assembled and irradiated in a large Removable Beryllium (RB{star}) position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) during this reporting period. Irradiation began on March 8, 1996, was completed on June 20, 1996, during operating cycles 344, 345, and 346. This report describes the thermal operation of the capsule.

  12. Design, fabrication and irradiation test report on HANARO instrumented capsule (05M-07U) for the researches of universities in 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K. N.; Kim, B. G.; Kang, Y. H.; Choi, M. H.; Cho, M. S.; Son, J. M.; Choi, M. H.; Shin, Y. T.; Park, S. J.

    2006-09-15

    As a part of the 2005 project for an active utilization of HANARO, an instrumented capsule (05M-07U) was designed, fabricated and irradiated for an irradiation test of various unclear materials under irradiation conditions which was requested by external researchers from universities. The basic structure of the 05M-07U capsule was based on the 00M-01U, 01M-05U, 02M-05U, 03M-06U and 04M-07U capsules which had been successfully irradiated in HANARO as part of the 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2004 projects. However, because of a limited number of specimens and the budget of one university, the remaining space in the capsule was filled with various KAERI specimens for researches on a nuclear core and SMART materials, and parts of a nuclear fuel assembly of KNFC. Various types of specimens such as tensile, Charpy, TEM, hardness, compression and growth specimens made of Zr 702, Ti and Ni alloys, Zirlo, Inconel, STS 316L and Cr-Mo alloys were placed in the capsule. Especially, this capsule was designed to evaluate the nuclear characteristics of the parts of a nuclear fuel assembly and the Ti tubes in HANARO. The capsule was composed of 5 stages having many kinds of specimens and an independent electric heater at each stage. During the irradiation test, the temperature of the specimens and the thermal/fast neutron fluences were measured by 14 thermocouples and 5 sets of Ni-Ti-Fe neutron fluence monitors installed in the capsule. The capsule was irradiated in the CT test hole of HANARO of a 30MW thermal output at 270 ∼ 400 .deg. C up to a fast neutron fluence of 5.7 x 10{sup 20} (n/cm{sup 2}) (E >1.0MeV). The obtained results will be very valuable for the related research of the users.

  13. HTGR fuels and core development program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending November 30, 1976. [Graphite and fuel irradiations; fission product release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-12-27

    The work reported includes studies of reactions between core materials and coolant impurities, basic fission product transport mechanisms, core graphite development and testing, the development and testing of recyclable fuel systems, and physics and fuel management studies. Materials studies include irradiation capsule tests of both fuel and graphite. Experimental procedures and results are discussed and the data are presented in tables, graphs, and photographs.

  14. HTGR Fuels and Core Development Program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending August 31, 1977. [Graphite and fuel irradiation; fission product release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    The work reported includes studies of reactions between core materials and coolant impurities, basic fission product transport mechanisms, core graphite development and testing, the development and testing of recyclable fuel systems, and physics and fuel management studies. Materials studies include irradiation capsule tests of both fuel and graphite. Experimental procedures and results are discussed and data are presented.

  15. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Joseph Palmer; David A. Petti; S. Blaine Grover

    2014-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which each consist of at least five separate capsules, are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gases also have on-line fission product monitoring the effluent from each capsule to track performance of the fuel during irradiation. The first two experiments (designated AGR-1 and AGR-2), have been completed. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. The design of the fuel qualification experiment, designated AGR-5/6/7, is well underway and incorporates lessons learned from the three previous experiments. Various design issues will be discussed with particular details related to selection of thermometry.

  16. Post-irradiation examination of capsule P13T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffel, W.J.

    1981-08-01

    Postirradiation examination revealed excellent performance of the H-451 and TS-1240 graphite bodies and fuel rods irraidated to a peak fluence of 8.0 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/ and to a peak volume-average fuel rod temperature of 1215/sup 0/C. A range of fuel rod variables was tested matrix filler graphite, shim particles, compositions; no variable was detrimental to the rod integrity. Particle batches with coating designs representative of the LHTGR (Large HTGR) design requirements exhibited fair irradiation performance to full fast neutron exposure ((8.0 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/) (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/) and burnups of 75%. True in-service particle failures were concluded to be <0.3% for all P13T particles. The observed failure was attributed to the outer pyrolytic carbons (OPyC) layer. The failure fraction for 32 P13T fuel rods are greater than predicted, but the mean observed value is less than predicted up to fast fluences of approx. 6.0 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGT/ at 50% confidence. Incipient degradation of the SiC coating due to palladium attack was observed in the HEU UC/sub 2/-TRISO and the UCO (oxygen/uranium ratio (O/U) = 0.64) fuel rods.

  17. Irradiation characteristics examination technology development of irradiated nuclear material and high burn-up fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Kwon Pyo; Choo, Y. S.; Oh, Y. W. [and others

    2002-12-01

    The research and development for the first year of the project are performed through specialization of researchers, information from aborad and international cooperation, securement of advanced nuclear technology, development and installation of test equipment, application of external man-power, establishment of advanced test techniques, and certified test method. 1. Absolute efficiency measurement examination technology development of gamma scanning system 2. Sample preparation technology development of SEM and EPMA for micro-structural observation and chemical composition analysis 3. Irradiated high burn-up nuclear fuel transportation and test for PWR 4. Development of hot cell examination techniques and equipment 5. Acquirement of KOLAS system. In addition to the project, the following activities are carried out as follows; - PIE of Hanaro fuel(KH99H-001) - PIE of U-Mo advanced nuclear fuel irradiated at Hanaro - PIE of Hi-MET advanced nuclear fuel irradiated at Hanaro - PIE of DUPIC project - Hot cell examination of Hanaro irradiated capsule - Leaching test of PWR fuels - Surveillance test of PWR vessels - Mechanical test of CANDU pressure tubes.

  18. Irradiation Test in HANARO of the Parts of an X-Gen Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K. N.; Kim, B. G.; Kang, Y. H. (and others)

    2008-08-15

    An instrumented capsule of 07M-13N was designed, fabricated and irradiated for an evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of the parts of an X-Gen nuclear fuel assembly for PWR requested by KNF. Some specimens requested by Westinghouse Co. and Hanyang university were also inserted. 389 KNF specimens such as bucking and spring test specimens of 1x1 cell spacer grid, tensile, microstructure and tensile of welded parts, irradiation growth, spring test specimens made of HANA tube, Zirlo, Zircaloy-4, Inconel-718 were placed in the capsule. The capsule was composed of 5 stages having many kinds of specimens and an independent electric heater at each stage. During the irradiation test, the temperature of the specimens and the thermal/fast neutron fluences were measured by 14 thermocouples and 7 sets of Ni-Ti-Fe (2 sets contain additional Nb-Ag) neutron fluence monitors installed in the capsule. The capsule was irradiated for 59.19days (4 cycles) in the CT test hole of HANARO of a 30MW thermal output at 300 {approx} 420 .deg. C(for KNF specimens) up to a fast neutron fluence of 1.27x10{sup 21}(n/cm{sup 2}) (E>1MeV). After an irradiation test, the main body of the capsule was cut off at the bottom of the protection tube with a cutting system and it was transported to the IMEF (Irradiated Materials Examination Facility). The irradiated specimens were tested to evaluate the irradiation performance of the parts of an X-Gen fuel assembly in the IMEF hot cell.

  19. Post irradiation examination of thermal reactor fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, D. N.; Viswanathan, U. K.; Ramadasan, E.; Unnikrishnan, K.; Anantharaman, S.

    2008-12-01

    The post irradiation examination (PIE) facility at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has been in operation for more than three decades. Over these years this facility has been utilized for examination of experimental fuel pins and fuels from commercial power reactors operating in India. In a program to assess the performance of (U,Pu)O 2 MOX fuel prior to its introduction in commercial reactors, three experimental MOX fuel clusters irradiated in the pressurized water loop (PWL) of CIRUS up to burnup of 16 000 MWd/tU were examined. Fission gas release from these pins was measured by puncture test. Some of these fuel pins in the cluster contained controlled porosity pellets, low temperature sintered (LTS) pellets, large grain size pellets and annular pellets. PIE has also been carried out on natural UO 2 fuel bundles from Indian PHWRs, which included two high burnup (˜15 000 MWd/tU) bundles. Salient investigations carried out consisted of visual examination, leak testing, axial gamma scanning, fission gas analysis, microstructural examination of fuel and cladding, β, γ autoradiography of the fuel cross-section and fuel central temperature estimation from restructuring. A ThO 2 fuel bundle irradiated in Kakrapar Atomic Power Station (KAPS) up to a nominal fuel burnup of ˜11 000 MWd/tTh was also examined to evaluate its in-pile performance. The performance of the BWR fuel pins of Tarapur Atomic Power Stations (TAPS) was earlier assessed by carrying out PIE on 18 fuel elements selected from eight fuel assemblies irradiated in the two reactors. The burnup of these fuel elements varied from 5000 to 29 000 MWd/tU. This paper provides a brief review of some of the fuels examined and the results obtained on the performance of natural UO 2, enriched UO 2, MOX, and ThO 2 fuels.

  20. Disassembly of irradiated lithium-bonded capsules containing vanadium alloy specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.

    1996-04-01

    Capsules containing vanadium alloy specimens from irradiation experiments in FFTF and EBR-II are being processed to remove the lithium bond and retrieve the specimens for testing. The work has progressed smoothly.

  1. HTGR fuels and core development program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending November 30, 1977. [Graphite and fuel irradiation; fission product release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    The work reported here includes studies of basic fission product transport mechanisms, core graphite development and testing, and the development and testing of recyclable fuel systems. Materials studied include irradiation capsule tests of both fuel and graphite. Experimental procedures and results are discussed and data are presented.

  2. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  3. Irradiation behavior of metallic fast reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.; Walters, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Metallic fuels were the first fuels chosen for liquid metal cooled fast reactors (LMR's). In the late 1960's world-wide interest turned toward ceramic LMR fuels before the full potential of metallic fuel was realized. However, during the 1970's the performance limitations of metallic fuel were resolved in order to achieve a high plant factor at the Argonne National Laboratory's Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The 1980's spawned renewed interest in metallic fuel when the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept emerged at Argonne National Laboratory. A fuel performance demonstration program was put into place to obtain the data needed for the eventual licensing of metallic fuel. This paper will summarize the results of the irradiation program carried out since 1985.

  4. Post-irradiation examination and R and D programs using irradiated fuels at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Yong Bum; Min, Duck Kee; Kim, Eun Ka and others

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the Post-Irradiation Examination(PIE) and R and D programs using irradiated fuels at KAERI. The objectives of post-irradiation examination (PIE) for the PWR irradiated fuels, CANDU fuels, HANARO fuels and test fuel materials are to verify the irradiation performance and their integrity as well as to construct a fuel performance data base. The comprehensive utilization program of the KAERI's post-irradiation examination related nuclear facilities such as Post-Irradiation Examination Facility (PIEF), Irradiated Materials Examination Facility (IMEF) and HANARO is described.

  5. Thermal analysis of an irradiation capsule for high-temperature materials to be used in future nuclear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Kim, Sung Ryul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Neutron Application Technology

    2016-05-15

    The requirement of irradiation of materials at high temperature are gradually increasing with the development of Gen-IV (Generation-IV) reactors, which will be operated at high temperatures and under a high neutron flux. To overcome the restrictions for the high temperature use of Al thermal media of the existing standard capsule, a new capsule was designed and fabricated. Through the irradiation test, the structural integrity and safety of the capsule during irradiation at high temperature were confirmed.

  6. Ignition capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel for the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho D.D.-M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available For high repetition-rate fusion power plant applications, capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel can have much reduced fill time compared to β-layering a solid DT fuel layer. The melting point of liquid DT can be lowered once liquid DT is embedded in an aerogel matrix, and the DT vapor density is consequently closer to the desired density for optimal capsule design requirement. We present design for NIF-scale aerogel-filled capsules based on 1-D and 2-D simulations. An optimal configuration is obtained when the outer radius is increased until the clean fuel fraction is within 65 – 75% at peak velocity. A scan (in ablator and fuel thickness parameter space is used to optimize the capsule configurations. The optimized aerogel-filled capsule has good low-mode robustness and acceptable high-mode mix.

  7. Fabrication Report for the AFC-2A and AFC-2B Capsule Irradiations in the ATR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy A. Hyde

    2007-10-01

    This document provides a general narrative description of the AFC-2A and 2B fuel fabrication processes for the AFC 2A and AFC 2B fuel irradiation experiments fabricated at the Idaho National Laboratory’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR).

  8. Status of the Combined Third and Fourth NGNP Fuel Irradiations In the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti; Michael E. Davenport

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in September 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this combined experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  9. Fabrication of the Supplemental Surveillance Capsules to Construct the Data of High-dose Irradiation Embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Ki; Maeng, Young Jae; Kim, Kyung Sik; Lim, Mi Joung; Yoo, Choon Sung; Kim, Byoung Chul [Korea Reactor Integrity Surveillance Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In order to monitor the neutron irradiation embrittlement of the reactor vessel material, the surveillance program should be implemented during the reactor operation through the plant life. This surveillance program requires the surveillance capsules which contain the various test specimens, thermal monitors, and neutron dosimeters. For PWRs in Korea, total six surveillance capsules are installed before plant operation and are programmed to be withdrawn and tested periodically in accordance with the surveillance program. The surveillance capsules are typically installed in the downcomer region and are located closer to the reactor core than the vessel wall in order to get more accelerated embrittlement characteristics of the vessel material. The supplemental surveillance capsules were fabricated to obtain the data of high-dose irradiation embrittlement. All test specimens in the capsules were made with the archive material of Hanbit Units 3 and 4. The supplemental capsules were designed to have the same outside dimensions as the capsules of Hanbit Unit 1 and were installed in Hanbit Unit 1. The withdrawal schedule will be calculated.

  10. Summary report on the fuel performance modeling of the AFC-2A, 2B irradiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavel G. Medvedev

    2013-09-01

    The primary objective of this work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to determine the fuel and cladding temperature history during irradiation of the AFC-2A, 2B transmutation metallic fuel alloy irradiation experiments containing transuranic and rare earth elements. Addition of the rare earth elements intends to simulate potential fission product carry-over from pyro-metallurgical reprocessing. Post irradiation examination of the AFC-2A, 2B rodlets revealed breaches in the rodlets and fuel melting which was attributed to the release of the fission gas into the helium gap between the rodlet cladding and the capsule which houses six individually encapsulated rodlets. This release is not anticipated during nominal operation of the AFC irradiation vehicle that features a double encapsulated design in which sodium bonded metallic fuel is separated from the ATR coolant by the cladding and the capsule walls. The modeling effort is focused on assessing effects of this unanticipated event on the fuel and cladding temperature with an objective to compare calculated results with the temperature limits of the fuel and the cladding.

  11. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hayes, Steven Lowe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dempsey, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  12. The 3rd irradiation test plan of DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Song, K. C.; Park, J. H. and others

    2001-05-01

    The objective of the 3rd irradiation test of DUPIC fuel at the HANARO is to estimate the in-core behaviour of a DUPIC pellet that is irradiated up to more than average burnup of CANDU fuel. The irradiation of DUPIC fuel is planned to start at May 21, 2001, and will be continued at least for 8 months. The burnup of DUPIC fuel through this irradiation test is thought to be more than 7,000 MWd/tHE. The DUPIC irradiation rig instrumented with three SPN detectors will be used to accumulate the experience for the instrumented irradiation and to estimate the burnup of irradiated DUPIC fuel more accurately. Under normal operating condition, the maximum linear power of DUPIC fuel was estimated as 55.06 kW/m, and the centerline temperature of a pellet was calculated as 2510 deg C. In order to assess the integrity of DUPIC fuel under the accident condition postulated at the HANARO, safety analyses on the locked rotor and reactivity insertion accidents were carried out. The maximum centerline temperature of DUPIC fuel was estimated 2590 deg C and 2094 deg C for each accident, respectively. From the results of the safety analysis, the integrity of DUPIC fuel during the HANARO irradiation test will be secured. The irradiated DUPIC fuel will be transported to the IMEF. The post-irradiation examinations are planned to be performed at the PIEF and IMEF.

  13. Project on New Domestic Zirconium Alloy Fuel Assembly Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Pei-sheng; ZHANG; Ai-min

    2012-01-01

    <正>The objectives of the project is to conduct irradiation at research reactor for small fuel assembly with domestic new zirconium alloy, and then to carry out post irradiation examination, and finally to acquire

  14. Design and Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-3/4 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in November 2013. Since the purpose of this experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  15. Status Report on Irradiation Capsules Containing Welded FeCrAl Specimens for Radiation Tolerance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-02-26

    This status report provides the background and current status of a series of irradiation capsules, or “rabbits”, that were designed and built to test the contributions of microstructure, composition, damage dose, and irradiation temperature on the radiation tolerance of candidate FeCrAl alloys being developed to have enhanced weldability and radiation tolerance. These rabbits will also test the validity of using an ultra-miniature tensile specimen to assess the mechanical properties of irradiated FeCrAl base metal and weldments. All rabbits are to be irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to damage doses up to ≥15 dpa at temperatures between 200-550°C.

  16. AGR-1 Fuel Compact 6-3-2 Post-Irradiation Examination Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul demkowicz; jason Harp; Scott Ploger

    2012-12-01

    Destructive post-irradiation examination was performed on fuel Compact 6-3-2, which was irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment to a final compact average burnup of 11.3% FIMA and a time-average, volume-average temperature of 1070°C. The analysis of this compact was focused on characterizing the extent of fission product release from the particles and examining particles to determine the condition of the kernels and coating layers. The work included deconsolidation of the compact and leach-burn-leach analysis, visual inspection and gamma counting of individual particles, measurement of fuel burnup by several methods, metallurgical preparation of selected particles, and examination of particle cross-sections with optical microscopy. A single particle with a defective SiC layer was identified during deconsolidation-leach-burn-leach analysis, which is in agreement with previous measurements showing elevated cesium in the Capsule 6 graphite fuel holder associated with this fuel compact. The fraction of the compact europium inventory released from the particles and retained in the matrix was relatively high (approximately 6E-3), indicating release from intact particle coatings. The Ag-110m inventory in individual particles exhibited a very broad distribution, with some particles retaining =80% of the predicted inventory and others retaining less than 25%. The average degree of Ag-110m retention in 60 gamma counted particles was approximately 50%. This elevated silver release is in agreement with analysis of silver on the Capsule 6 components, which indicated an average release of 38% of the Capsule 6 inventory from the fuel compacts. In spite of the relatively high degree of silver release from the particles, virtually none of the Ag-110m released was found in the compact matrix, and presumably migrated out of the compact and was deposited on the irradiation capsule components. Release of all other fission products from the particles appears to be less than a single

  17. HANARO instrumented capsule development for supporting a study on the irradiation damage of stainless steels for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Y. H.; Cho, M. S.; Sohn, J. M.; Kim, H. R.; Lee, B. C.; Kim, K. H

    2000-10-01

    As a part of the program for the maximum utilization of HANARO by MOST, Korea, an instrumented capsule (00M-01U) was designed and fabricated for supporting a study on the irradiation damage of stainless steels for nuclear applications. The basic structure of the capsule for the irradiation of Stainless steels was based on that of the 99M-01K capsule irradiated successfully in HANARO. To satisfy the user requirements such as irradiation temperature and neutron fluence, the optimal arrangement of test specimens was done in the axial and circumferential direction. The temperature distribution and thermal stress of a capsule with multi-holes were obtained by a finite element analysis code, ANSYS. From these analyzed data, this capsule was found to be compatible with HANARO design requirement. Various types of specimens such as small tensile, Charpy, TEM and EPMA specimens were inserted in the capsule. The specimens will be irradiated in the IR2 test hole of HANARO at 288, 300 and 350 deg C up to a fast neutron fluence of 1.0x10{sup 20}(n/cm{sup 2})(E>1.0MeV)

  18. Summary of the U.S. specimen matrix for the HFIR 13J varying temperature irradiation capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The US specimen matrix for the collaborative DOE/Monbusho HFIR 13J varying temperature irradiation capsule contains two ceramics and 29 different metals, including vanadium alloys, ferritic/martensitic steels, pure iron, austenitic stainless steels, nickel alloys, and copper alloys. This experiment is designed to provide fundamental information on the effects of brief low-temperature excursions on the tensile properties and microstructural evolution of a wide range of materials irradiated at nominal temperatures of 350 and 500 C to a dose of {approximately}5 dpa. A total of 340 miniature sheet tensile specimens and 274 TEM disks are included in the US-supplied matrix for the irradiation capsule.

  19. Disassembly of the fusion-1 capsule after irradiation in the BOR-60 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kazakov, V.A.; Chakin, V.P. [and others

    1997-04-01

    A U.S./Russia (RF) collaborative irradiation experiment, Fusion-1, was completed in June 1996 after reaching a peak exposure of {approx}17 dpa in the BOR-60 fast reactor at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Russia. The specimens were vanadium alloys, mainly of recent heats from both countries. In this reporting period, the capsule was disassembled at the RIAR hot cells and all test specimens were successfully retrieved. For the disassembly, an innovative method of using a heated diffusion oil to melt and separate the lithium bond from the test specimens was adopted. This method proved highly successful.

  20. PIE results on MOX fuel irradiated in MIHAMA Unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamate, K. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan). Mihama Power Station; Abeta, S. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. (Japan); Kosaka, Y. [Nuclear Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Abe, Y. [Japan Atomic Power Co. (Japan); Kuwahara, H. [Mitsubishi Atomic Power Industries, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the results of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) on the MOX fuel rods irradiated in the Japanese commercial PWR, MIHAMA Unit 1. The objective of the PIE is not only to confirm the fuel integrity but also to build up the irradiation data base for MOX fuel design. After three cycles irradiation up to the assembly burnup of 23 GWd/t, they were examined at the site and further PIE was carried out on eight MOX fuel rods at a hot laboratory. The non-destructive test results of PIE proved the integrity of the MOX fuel rods up to the burnup of about 25GWd/t, and revealed the similar irradiation behaviour of dimensional change with the standards UO{sub 2} fuel rods. Results of the following destructive tests also revealed the similar irradiation behaviour of FGR, fuel pellet dimensional change and cladding oxidation with the standard UO{sub 2} fuel, and confirmed no abnormality in microstructure changes of fuel pellets. (author).

  1. Fabrication of DUPIC fuel for the 3rd irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, S. S.; Lee, J. W. and others

    2001-09-01

    In this project, based on the simulated DUPIC fuel fabrication experiment and DUPIC fuel characterization experiment at PIEF, DUPIC fuel manufacturing technologies and processes have been developed at DFDF(DUPIC Fuel Development Facility, IMEF M6). DUPIC fuel has been fabricated for the irradiation test at a research reactor. SIMFUEL and DUPIC fuel fabricated using spent PWR fuel were successfully irradiated at HANARO reactor. In this study, DUPIC fuel pellets and mini-elements were manufactured in March 2001 for the third irradiation test to closely investigate the dynamic characteristics of DUPIC fuel at a reactor core for long period. As a result of the experiment, 15 DUPIC pellets with 10.194 10.312 g/cm{sup 3} of sintered density, 3.53 {delta}9.48 {mu}m of averaged grain size, and less than Ra 0.81 {mu}m of surface roughness satisfying the specifications of DUPIC fuel for the third irradiation test have been remotely fabricated at hot cell. 5 DUPIC pellets were loaded in a mini-element made of Zircaloy-4. The soundness of the weld of the mini-elements has been evaluated by microstructural test, helium leak test, and X-ray inspection. Three DUPIC mini-elements are currently under the third irradiation test at HANARO reactor.

  2. MICRO/NANO-STRUCTURAL EXAMINATION AND FISSION PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION IN NEUTRON IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Rooyen, I. J.; Lillo, T. M.; Wen, H. M.; Hill, C. M.; Holesinger, T. G.; Wu, Y. Q.; Aguiara, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    Advanced microscopic and microanalysis techniques were developed and applied to study irradiation effects and fission product behavior in selected low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO-coated particles from fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.6% FIMA. Although no TRISO coating failures were detected during the irradiation, the fraction of Ag-110m retained in individual particles often varied considerably within a single compact and at the capsule level. At the capsule level Ag-110m release fractions ranged from 1.2 to 38% and within a single compact, silver release from individual particles often spanned a range that extended from 100% retention to nearly 100% release. In this paper, selected irradiated particles from Baseline, Variant 1 and Variant 3 type fueled TRISO coated particles were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atom Probe Tomography; Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy; Precession Electron Diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), High Resolution Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) examinations and Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer. Particle selection in this study allowed for comparison of the fission product distribution with Ag retention, fuel type and irradiation level. Nano sized Ag-containing features were predominantly identified in SiC grain boundaries and/or triple points in contrast with only two sitings of Ag inside a SiC grain in two different compacts (Baseline and Variant 3 fueled compacts). STEM and HRTEM analysis showed evidence of Ag and Pd co-existence in some cases and it was found that fission product precipitates can consist of multiple or single phases. STEM analysis also showed differences in precipitate compositions between Baseline and Variant 3 fuels. A higher density of fission product precipitate clusters were identified in the SiC layer in particles from the Variant 3 compact compared with the Variant 1 compact. Trend analysis shows

  3. Interim irradiated fuel storage facility for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolich, Jose [INVAP SE, Bariloche (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    In most research reactors irradiated fuel discharged from the reactor is initially stored underwater inside the reactor building for along period of time. This allows for heat dissipation and fission product decay. In most cases this initial storage is done in a irradiated fuel storage facility pool located closed to the reactor core. After a certain cooling time, the fuel discharged should be relocated for long-term interim storage in a Irradiated Fuel Storage (IFS) Facility. IFS facilities are required for the safe storage of irradiated nuclear fuel before it is reprocessed or conditioned for disposal as radioactive waste. The IFS Facility described in this report is not an integral part of an operating nuclear reactor. This facility many be either co-located with nuclear facilities (such as a nuclear reactor or reprocessing plant) or sited independently of other nuclear facilities. (author)

  4. KEY RESULTS FROM IRRADIATION AND POST-IRRADIATION EXAMINATION OF AGR-1 UCO TRISO FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.; Petti, David A.; Morris, Robert N.

    2016-11-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation experiment was performed as the first test of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel in the US Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The experiment consisted of 72 right cylinder fuel compacts containing approximately 3×105 coated fuel particles with uranium oxide/uranium carbide (UCO) fuel kernels. The fuel was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor for a total of 620 effective full power days. Fuel burnup ranged from 11.3 to 19.6% fissions per initial metal atom and time average, volume average irradiation temperatures of the individual compacts ranged from 955 to 1136°C. This paper focuses on key results from the irradiation and post-irradiation examination, which revealed a robust fuel with excellent performance characteristics under the conditions tested and have significantly improved the understanding of UCO coated particle fuel irradiation behavior within the US program. The fuel exhibited a very low incidence of TRISO coating failure during irradiation and post-irradiation safety testing at temperatures up to 1800°C. Advanced PIE methods have allowed particles with SiC coating failure to be isolated and meticulously examined, which has elucidated the specific causes of SiC failure in these specimens. The level of fission product release from the fuel during irradiation and post-irradiation safety testing has been studied in detail. Results indicated very low release of krypton and cesium through intact SiC and modest release of europium and strontium, while also confirming the potential for significant silver release through the coatings depending on irradiation conditions. Focused study of fission products within the coating layers of irradiated particles down to nanometer length scales has provided new insights into fission product transport through the coating layers and the role various fission products may have on coating integrity. The broader implications of these results and the application of

  5. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear], e-mail: laaterre@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    The recording of gamma-ray spectra along an irradiated fuel rod allows the fission products to be qualitatively and quantitatively examined. Among all nondestructive examinations performed on irradiated fuel rods by gamma-ray spectroscopy, the most comprehensive one is the average burnup measurement, which is quantitative. Moreover, burnup measurements by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy are less time-consuming and waste-generating than burnup measurements by radiochemical, destructive methods. This work presents the theoretical foundations and experimental techniques necessary to measure, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the average burnup of irradiated fuel rods in a laboratory equipped with hot cells. (author)

  6. Production of LEU Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Irradiation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Kiggans Jr, James O [ORNL; McMurray, Jake W [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL; Trammell, Michael P [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles embedded inside a SiC matrix. This fuel inherently possesses multiple barriers to fission product release, namely the various coating layers in the TRISO fuel particle as well as the dense SiC matrix that hosts these particles. This coupled with the excellent oxidation resistance of the SiC matrix and the SiC coating layer in the TRISO particle designate this concept as an accident tolerant fuel (ATF). The FCM fuel takes advantage of uranium nitride kernels instead of oxide or oxide-carbide kernels used in high temperature gas reactors to enhance heavy metal loading in the highly moderated LWRs. Production of these kernels with appropriate density, coating layer development to produce UN TRISO particles, and consolidation of these particles inside a SiC matrix have been codified thanks to significant R&D supported by US DOE Fuel Cycle R&D program. Also, surrogate FCM pellets (pellets with zirconia instead of uranium-bearing kernels) have been neutron irradiated and the stability of the matrix and coating layer under LWR irradiation conditions have been established. Currently the focus is on production of LEU (7.3% U-235 enrichment) FCM pellets to be utilized for irradiation testing. The irradiation is planned at INL s Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This is a critical step in development of this fuel concept to establish the ability of this fuel to retain fission products under prototypical irradiation conditions.

  7. LIGHT WATER REACTOR ACCIDENT TOLERANT FUELS IRRADIATION TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, William Jonathan [Idaho National Laboratory; Barrett, Kristine Eloise [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) experiments is to test novel fuel and cladding concepts designed to replace the current zirconium alloy uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The objective of this Research and Development (R&D) is to develop novel ATF concepts that will be able to withstand loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period than the current fuel system while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, design basis, and beyond design basis events. It was necessary to design, analyze, and fabricate drop-in capsules to meet the requirements for testing under prototypic LWR temperatures in Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Three industry led teams and one DOE team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided fuel rodlet samples for their new concepts for ATR insertion in 2015. As-built projected temperature calculations were performed on the ATF capsules using the BISON fuel performance code. BISON is an application of INL’s Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE), which is a massively parallel finite element based framework used to solve systems of fully coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. Both 2D and 3D models were set up to examine cladding and fuel performance.

  8. Chemical state of fission products in irradiated uranium carbide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasuo; Iwai, Takashi; Ohmichi, Toshihiko

    1987-12-01

    The chemical state of fission products in irradiated uranium carbide fuel has been estimated by equilibrium calculation using the SOLGASMIX-PV program. Solid state fission products are distributed to the fuel matrix, ternary compounds, carbides of fission products and intermetallic compounds among the condensed phases appearing in the irradiated uranium carbide fuel. The chemical forms are influenced by burnup as well as stoichiometry of the fuel. The results of the present study almost agree with the experimental ones reported for burnup simulated carbides.

  9. Design, Fabrication and Test Report on a Verification Capsule (05M-06K) for the Control of a Neutron Irradiation Fluence of Specimens in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K. N.; Kim, B. G.; Kang, Y. H.; Cho, M. S.; Son, J. M.; Shin, Y. T.; Park, S. J.; Choi, M. H.; Lee, D. S.

    2007-02-15

    As a part of a project for a capsule development and utilization for an irradiation test, a verification capsule (05M-06K) was designed, fabricated and tested for the development of new instrumented capsule technology for a more precise control of the irradiation fluence of a specimen, irrespective of the reactor operation condition. The basic structure of the 05M-06K capsule was based on the 04M-22K mock-up capsule which was successfully designed and out-pile tested to confirm the various key technologies necessary for the fluence control of a specimen. 21 square and round shaped specimens made of STS 304 were inserted into the capsule. The capsule was constructed in 5 stages with specimens and an independent electric heater at each stage. Each of the five specimens which were accommodated in the 1st stage (top) of the capsule can be taken out of the HANARO core during a normal reactor operation. The specimen is extracted by a specimen extraction mechanism using a steel wire. During the out-pile test, the temperatures of the specimens were measured by 12 thermocouples installed in the capsule. The capsule was successfully out-pile tested in a single channel test loop. The obtained results will be used for a safety evaluation of the new irradiation capsule for controlling the irradiation fluence of specimens in HANARO.

  10. Metallographic analysis of irradiated RERTR-3 fuel test specimens.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M. K.; Hofman, G. L.; Strain, R. V.; Clark, C. R.; Stuart, J. R.

    2000-11-08

    The RERTR-3 irradiation test was designed to investigate the irradiation behavior of aluminum matrix U-MO alloy dispersion fuels under high-temperature, high-fission-rate conditions. Initial postirradiation examination of RERTR-3 fuel specimens has concentrated on binary U-MO atomized fuels. The rate of matrix aluminum depletion was found to be higher than predictions based on low temperature irradiation data. Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (WDS) indicates that aluminum is present in the interior of the fuel particles. WDS data is supported by a mass and volume balance calculation performed on the basis of image analysis results. The depletion of matrix aluminum seems to have no detrimental effects on fuel performance under the conditions tested to date.

  11. Study on the Effects of Liquid Thermal Media on the Irradiation Capsule of High-Temperature Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Soon Cho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation tests of materials at HANARO have usually been conducted using a standard capsule at temperatures of about 300°C for irradiation of materials used at PWR. Thus, the standard capsule uses aluminum as the specimen holder, which acts to dissipate the thermal energy. Future nuclear systems such as a VHTR and SFR require the irradiation tests at a relatively high temperature. As an alternative to aluminum which has been used as the thermal media in a standard material capsule, the characteristics of liquid metals such as NaK and LBE are reviewed. The temperatures of the capsule are affected by the variation of parameters such as the gap and wall thickness of the container. In particular, the external gap is most important in determining the temperature of the specimen. LBE raises the temperature of the specimen higher than NaK at the same configuration of the capsule. Thus, LBE can lessen the gap of the parts and reduce the vibration for a stable long-term test in reactor.

  12. Thermal Analysis of KAERI TRISO Fuel Irradiation at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Moon-Sung; Kim, B. G.; Yang, S. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The TRISO(Tri-structural Isotropic)-coated fuel particle for a VHTR has a diameter of around 1 mm, and is composed of a nuclear fuel kernel and four different outer coating layers. These coating layers consist of a buffer PyC (pyrolytic carbon) layer, an inner PyC layer, a SiC layer, and an outer PyC layer. The fuel kernel is a source of a heat generation by the nuclear fission of fissile uranium. The role of each of the four coating layers is different in view of retaining the generated fission products and other interactions during in-reactor service. KAERI has been developing a TRISO-coated particle fuel technology as a part of the Korean VHTR (Very High Temperature modular gas cooled Reactor) project, which started in 2004, and completed its first irradiation test of TRISO fuels in its research reactor, HANARO for an evaluation and prediction of the irradiation behavior of the fuel. The test was started in August 4, 2013 and finished in March 31, 2014 completing its 5 cycle irradiation of 132.2 EFPD. In this paper, thermal performance of TRISO fuels was evaluated for its five cycle irradiation at HANARO which had been carried out in the absence of the fuel temperature monitoring. A COMSOL based FE (finite element) model was utilized in this analysis. Thermal performance of TRISO fuels was evaluated for its five cycle irradiation at HANARO which had been carried out in the absence of the fuel temperature monitoring. A maximum peak temperature of 1,083 .deg. C was obtained in the rod 1 at 25.06 EFPD and the temperatures decreased as the cycle progresses.

  13. Irradiation effects on thermal properties of LWR hydride fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrani, Kurt; Balooch, Mehdi; Carpenter, David; Kohse, Gordon; Keiser, Dennis; Meyer, Mitchell; Olander, Donald

    2017-04-01

    Three hydride mini-fuel rods were fabricated and irradiated at the MIT nuclear reactor with a maximum burnup of 0.31% FIMA or ∼5 MWd/kgU equivalent oxide fuel burnup. Fuel rods consisted of uranium-zirconium hydride (U (30 wt%)ZrH1.6) pellets clad inside a LWR Zircaloy-2 tubing. The gap between the fuel and the cladding was filled with lead-bismuth eutectic alloy to eliminate the gas gap and the large temperature drop across it. Each mini-fuel rod was instrumented with two thermocouples with tips that are axially located halfway through the fuel centerline and cladding surface. In-pile temperature measurements enabled calculation of thermal conductivity in this fuel as a function of temperature and burnup. In-pile thermal conductivity at the beginning of test agreed well with out-of-pile measurements on unirradiated fuel and decreased rapidly with burnup.

  14. Recovery of minor actinides from irradiated superfact fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apoltolidis, C.; Glatz, J.P.; Molinet, R.; Nicholl, A.; Pagliosa, G.; Romer, K.; Bokelund, H.; Koch, L. [European Commission, JRC, Institute fuer Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    It could be demonstrated that the reprocessing of fast reactor oxide fuels containing up to 45 % MA (Np and Am), irradiated in the PHENIX reactor in the frame of a transmutation study, is possible. The fuels were dissolved under PUREX type conditions in order to determine their behaviour in the head-end step of the reprocessing process. For one of the fuels containing 20 % Am and 20 % Np before irradiation, an almost complete partitioning of actinides from the dissolver solution could be achieved. Chromatographic extraction was used for the separation of the main bulk elements U, Pu and Np, whereas centrifugal extractors were used to separate the minor actinides from the remaining high level liquid wastes (HLLW). For the relevant radio-toxic isotopes a high recovery rate from the irradiation targets was reached. Those elements are thus available for new fuel fabrication. (authors) 12 refs.

  15. Tensile Hoop Behavior of Irradiated Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaramillo, Roger A [ORNL; Hendrich, WILLIAM R [ORNL; Packan, Nicolas H [ORNL

    2007-03-01

    A method for evaluating the room temperature ductility behavior of irradiated Zircaloy-4 nuclear fuel cladding has been developed and applied to evaluate tensile hoop strength of material irradiated to different levels. The test utilizes a polyurethane plug fitted within a tubular cladding specimen. A cylindrical punch is used to compress the plug axially, which generates a radial displacement that acts upon the inner diameter of the specimen. Position sensors track the radial displacement of the specimen outer diameter as the compression proceeds. These measurements coupled with ram force data provide a load-displacement characterization of the cladding response to internal pressurization. The development of this simple, cost-effective, highly reproducible test for evaluating tensile hoop strain as a function of internal pressure for irradiated specimens represents a significant advance in the mechanical characterization of irradiated cladding. In this project, nuclear fuel rod assemblies using Zircaloy-4 cladding and two types of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel pellets were irradiated to varying levels of burnup. Fuel pellets were manufactured with and without thermally induced gallium removal (TIGR) processing. Fuel pellets manufactured by both methods were contained in fuel rod assemblies and irradiated to burnup levels of 9, 21, 30, 40, and 50 GWd/MT. These levels of fuel burnup correspond to fast (E > 1 MeV) fluences of 0.27, 0.68, 0.98, 1.4 and 1.7 1021 neutrons/cm2, respectively. Following irradiation, fuel rod assemblies were disassembled; fuel pellets were removed from the cladding; and the inner diameter of cladding was cleaned to remove residue materials. Tensile hoop strength of this cladding material was tested using the newly developed method. Unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding was also tested. With the goal of determining the effect of the two fuel types and different neutron fluences on clad ductility, tensile hoop strength tests were

  16. Axial gas flow in irradiated PWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagbjartsson, S.J.; Murdock, B.A.; Owen, D.E.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1977-09-01

    Transient and steady state axial gas flow experiments were performed on six irradiated, commercial pressurized water reactor fuel rods at ambient temperature and 533 K. Laminar flow equations, as used in the FRAP-T2 and SSYST fuel behavior codes, were used with the gas flow results to calculate effective fuel rod radial gaps. The results of these analyses were compared with measured gap sizes obtained from metallographic examination of one fuel rod. Using measured gap sizes as input, the SSYST code was used to calculate pressure drops and mass fluxes and the results were compared with the experimental gas flow data.

  17. The irradiation test plan and safety analysis of the creep capsule(03S-07K) equipped with double specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Kim, B. G.; Choo, K. N.; Sohn, J. M.; Choi, M. H.; Kim, Y

    2005-04-15

    The irradiation test plan and safety analysis of the creep capsule(03S-07K) equipped with double specimen. In this report, the reactivity effect was reviewed and an analysis for the structural and thermal integrity was performed to review the safety of the creep capsule 03S-07K, which will be irradiated at a temperature higher than 550 .deg. C. The irradiation test will be performed at the in-core IR2 hole for 23 days at the 30 MWth power of HANARO. In the irradiation test, the temperature of the inside parts in the capsule will be measured and compared with the design value for reviewing the design data, and also the integrity of the bellows and LVDT etc. will be confirmed. The reactivity worth by the insertion of the creep capsule is no more than +9.2 mk, and this indicates that the reactivity effect does not exceed +12.5mk as specified in 'the HANARO operation technical specification'. The temperatures of the specimen, LVDT and the center rods of the bellows are less than the melting temperatures of the corresponding materials, therefore, the integrity of the materials are maintained. The center rod is made as a hollow tube shape of {phi}13mm x 2.5mmt of Ti material instead of the STS304 rod to lower the temperature. Thus, the temperature of the center rod of the bellows reaches 332{approx}1,095 .deg. C according to the vacuum condition of the capsules inside. By the structural analysis considering this temperature, the combined stress(the primary membrane and the secondary thermal) on the outer tube is 96.06 MPa for the HANARO 30 MWth power. The results of this stress analysis satisfiy the allowable stress limits.

  18. Radiochemical Assays of Irradiated VVER-440 Fuel for Use in Spent Fuel Burnup Credit Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, L J

    2005-04-25

    The objective of this spent fuel burnup credit work was to study and describe a VVER-440 reactor spent fuel assembly (FA) initial state before irradiation, its operational irradiation history and the resulting radionuclide distribution in the fuel assembly after irradiation. This work includes the following stages: (1) to pick out and select a specific spent (irradiated) FA for examination; (2) to describe the FA initial state before irradiation; (3) to describe the irradiation history, including thermal calculations; (4) to examine the burnup distribution of select radionuclides along the FA height and cross-section; (5) to examine the radionuclide distributions; (6) to determine the Kr-85 release into the plenum; (7) to select and prepare FA rod specimens for destructive examinations; (8) to determine the radionuclide compositions, isotope masses and burnup in the rod specimens; and (9) to analyze, document and process the results. The specific workscope included the destructive assay (DA) of spent fuel assembly rod segments with an {approx}38.5 MWd/KgU burnup from a single VVER-440 fuel assembly from the Novovorenezh reactor in Russia. Based on irradiation history criteria, four rods from the fuel assembly were selected and removed from the assembly for examination. Next, 8 sections were cut from the four rods and sent for destructive analysis of radionuclides by radiochemical analyses. The results were documented in a series of seven reports over a period of {approx}1 1/2 years.

  19. Radiochemical Assays of Irradiated VVER-440 Fuel for Use in Spent Fuel Burnup Credit Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, L J

    2005-04-25

    The objective of this spent fuel burnup credit work was to study and describe a VVER-440 reactor spent fuel assembly (FA) initial state before irradiation, its operational irradiation history and the resulting radionuclide distribution in the fuel assembly after irradiation. This work includes the following stages: (1) to pick out and select a specific spent (irradiated) FA for examination; (2) to describe the FA initial state before irradiation; (3) to describe the irradiation history, including thermal calculations; (4) to examine the burnup distribution of select radionuclides along the FA height and cross-section; (5) to examine the radionuclide distributions; (6) to determine the Kr-85 release into the plenum; (7) to select and prepare FA rod specimens for destructive examinations; (8) to determine the radionuclide compositions, isotope masses and burnup in the rod specimens; and (9) to analyze, document and process the results. The specific workscope included the destructive assay (DA) of spent fuel assembly rod segments with an {approx}38.5 MWd/KgU burnup from a single VVER-440 fuel assembly from the Novovorenezh reactor in Russia. Based on irradiation history criteria, four rods from the fuel assembly were selected and removed from the assembly for examination. Next, 8 sections were cut from the four rods and sent for destructive analysis of radionuclides by radiochemical analyses. The results were documented in a series of seven reports over a period of {approx}1 1/2 years.

  20. Segmented fuel irradiation program: investigation on advanced materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, H. [NUPEC (Japan); Goto, K. [KEPCO, Osaka (Japan); Sabate, R. [A.N. Asco - C.N. Vandellos, Barcelona (Spain); Abeta, S.; Baba, T. [MHI, Nishi-Ku, Yokohama (Japan); Matias, E. de; Alonso, J. [ENUSA, Madrid (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    The Segmented Fuel Irradiation Program, started in 1991, is a collaboration between the Japanese organisations Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), the Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. (KEPCO) representing other Japanese utilities, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI); and the Spanish Organisations Empresa Nacional de Electricidad, S.A. (ENDESA) representing A.N. Vandellos 2, and Empresa Nacional Uranio, S.A. (ENUSA); with the collaboration of Westinghouse. The objective of the Program is to make substantial contribution to the development of advanced cladding and fuel materials for better performance at high burn-up and under operational power transients. For this Program, segmented fuel rods were selected as the most appropriate vehicle to accomplish the aforementioned objective. Thus, a large number of fuel and cladding combinations are provided while minimising the total amount of new material, at the same time, facilitating an eventual irradiation extension in a test reactor. The Program consists of three major phases: phase I: design, licensing, fabrication and characterisation of the assemblies carrying the segmented rods (1991 - 1994); phase II: base irradiation of the assemblies at Vandellos 2 NPP, and on-site examination at the end of four cycles (1994-1999). Phase III: ramp testing at the Studsvik facilities and hot cell PIE (1996-2001). The main fuel design features whose effects on fuel behaviour are being analysed are: alloy composition (MDA and ZIRLO vs. Zircaloy-4); tubing texture; pellet grain size. The Program is progressing satisfactorily as planned. The base irradiation is completed in the first quarter of 1999, and so far, tests and inspections already carried out are providing useful information on the behaviour of the new materials. Also, the Program is delivering a well characterized fuel material, irradiated in a commercial reactor, which can be further used in other fuel behaviour experiments. The paper presents the main

  1. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1973. [HTGR fuel reprocessing, fuel fabrication, fuel irradiation, core materials, and fission product distribution; GCFR fuel irradiation and steam generator modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Coobs, J.H.; Lotts, A.L.

    1976-04-01

    Progress is summarized in studies relating to HTGR fuel reprocessing, refabrication, and recycle; HTGR fuel materials development and performance testing; HTGR PCRV development; HTGR materials investigations; HTGR fuel chemistry; HTGR safety studies; and GCFR irradiation experiments and steam generator modeling.

  2. SLIGHTLY IRRADIATED FUEL (SIF) INTERIM DISPOSITION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NORTON SH

    2010-02-23

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL PRC) is proud to submit the Slightly Irradiated Fuel (SIF) Interim Disposition Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2010. The SIF Project was a set of six interrelated sub-projects that delivered unique stand-alone outcomes, which, when integrated, provided a comprehensive and compliant system for storing high risk special nuclear materials. The scope of the six sub-projects included the design, construction, testing, and turnover of the facilities and equipment, which would provide safe, secure, and compliant Special Nuclear Material (SNM) storage capabilities for the SIF material. The project encompassed a broad range of activities, including the following: Five buildings/structures removed, relocated, or built; Two buildings renovated; Structural barriers, fencing, and heavy gates installed; New roadways and parking lots built; Multiple detection and assessment systems installed; New and expanded communication systems developed; Multimedia recording devices added; and A new control room to monitor all materials and systems built. Project challenges were numerous and included the following: An aggressive 17-month schedule to support the high-profile Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) decommissioning; Company/contractor changeovers that affected each and every project team member; Project requirements that continually evolved during design and construction due to the performance- and outcome-based nature ofthe security objectives; and Restrictions imposed on all communications due to the sensitive nature of the projects In spite of the significant challenges, the project was delivered on schedule and $2 million under budget, which became a special source of pride that bonded the team. For years, the SIF had been stored at the central Hanford PFP. Because of the weapons-grade piutonium produced and stored there, the PFP had some of the tightest security on the Hanford

  3. Irradiated MTR fuel assemblies sipping test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrotta, J.A.; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Zeituni, Carlos A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Engenharia do Nucleo

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes the procedure and methodology used to perform sipping test with the IEA-R1 fuel assemblies at the storage pool, and presents the results obtained for Cs-137 sipping water activity for each fuel assembly analyzed. Discussion is made correlating corrosion pits to the activity values measured. A Cs-137 leaking rate is determined which can be compared to the criteria established for canning spent fuel assemblies inside the pool of for shipment abroad. 3 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Non destructive testing of irradiated fuel assemblies at the IEA-R1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jose Eduardo Rosa da; Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac; Castanheira, Myrthes; Teodoro, Celso Antonio; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Damy, Margaret de Almeida; Lucki, Georgi [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: jersilva@ipen.br; laaterre@ipen.br; myrthes@ipen.br; cteodoro@ipen.br; teixeira@ipen.br; madamy@ipen.br; glucki@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Fuel performance and nuclear fuel qualification require a post-irradiation analysis. Non-destructive methods are utilised both in irradiated fuel storage pools and in hot-cells laboratories. As Brazil does not have hot-cells facilities for post-irradiation analysis, a qualification program for the Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements made at IPEN/CNEN-SP was adopted, based on non-destructive tests. The IPEN Fuel Engineering Group - CENC developed basic facilities for fuels post-irradiated analysis inside the reactor pool, which gives indications of: general state, by visual inspection; the integrity of the irradiated fuel cladding, by sipping tests; thickness measurements of the fuel miniplates during the irradiation time, for swelling evaluation; and, local burn-up evaluation by gamma spectrometry along the active area of the fuel element. This work describes that facilities, equipment and examples of some irradiated fuels analysis performed. (author)

  5. RECENT DEVELOPMENT IN TEM CHARACTERIZATION OF IRRADIATED RERTR FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Gan; B.D. Miller; D.D. Keiser Jr.; A.B. Robinson; J.W. Madden; P.G. Medvedev; D.M. Wachs

    2011-10-01

    The recent development on TEM work of irradiated RERTR fuels includes microstructural characterization of the irradiated U-10Mo/alloy-6061 monolithic fuel plate, the RERTR-7 U-7Mo/Al-2Si and U-7Mo/Al-5Si dispersion fuel plates. It is the first time that a TEM sample of an irradiated nuclear fuel was prepared using the focused-ion-beam (FIB) lift-out technical at the Idaho National Laboratory. Multiple FIB TEM samples were prepared from the areas of interest in a SEM sample. The characterization was carried out using a 200kV TEM with a LaB6 filament. The three dimensional orderings of nanometer-sized fission gas bubbles are observed in the crystalline region of the U-Mo fuel. The co-existence of bubble superlattice and dislocations is evident. Detailed microstructural information along with composition analysis is obtained. The results and their implication on the performance of these fuels are discussed.

  6. DISSOLUTION OF IRRADIATED MURR FUEL ASSEMBLIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyser, E.

    2010-06-17

    A literature survey on the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel from the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has been performed. This survey encompassed both internal and external literature sources for the dissolution of aluminum-clad uranium alloy fuels. The most limiting aspect of dissolution in the current facility configuration involves issues related to the control of the flammability of the off-gas from this process. The primary conclusion of this work is that based on past dissolution of this fuel in H-Canyon, four bundles of this fuel (initial charge) may be safely dissolved in a nitric acid flowsheet catalyzed with 0.002 M mercuric nitrate using a 40 scfm purge to control off-gas flammability. The initial charge may be followed by a second charge of up to five bundles to the same dissolver batch depending on volume and concentration constraints. The safety of this flowsheet relies on composite lower flammability limits (LFL) estimated from prior literature, pilot-scale work on the dissolution of site fuels, and the proposed processing flowsheet. Equipment modifications or improved LFL data offer the potential for improved processing rates. The fuel charging sequence, as well as the acid and catalyst concentrations, will control the dissolution rate during the initial portion of the cycle. These parameters directly impact the hydrogen and off-gas generation and, along with the purge flowrate determine the number of bundles that may be charged. The calculation approach within provides Engineering a means to determine optimal charging patterns. Downstream processing of this material should be similar to that of recent processing of site fuels requiring only minor adjustments of the existing flowsheet parameters.

  7. Dearomatization of jet fuel on irradiated platinum-supported catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múčka, V.; Ostrihoňová, A.; Kopernický, I.; Mikula, O.

    The effect of ionizing radiation ( 60Co γ-rays) on Pt-supported catalyst used for the dearomatization of jet fuel with distillation in the range 395-534 K has been studied. Pre-irradiation of the catalyst with doses in the range 10 2-5 × 10 4 Gy leads to the partial catalyst activation. Irradiation of the catalyst enhances its resistance to catalyst poisons, particularly to sulphur-compounds, and this is probably the reason for its catalytic activity being ˜60-100% greater than that of un-irradiated catalyst. Optimum conditions for dearomatization on the irradiated catalyst were found and, by means of a rotary three-factorial experiment, it was shown that these lie at lower temperatures and lower pressures than those for un-irradiated catalyst.

  8. Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA): an integrated system for HTGR coated particle fuel performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kania, M.J.; Valentine, K.H.

    1980-02-01

    The Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA) System, designed and built at ORNL, provides the capability of making statistically accurate failure fraction measurements on irradiated HTGR coated particle fuel. The IMGA records the gamma-ray energy spectra from fuel particles and performs quantitative analyses on these spectra; then, using chemical and physical properties of the gamma emitters it makes a failed-nonfailed decision concerning the ability of the coatings to retain fission products. Actual retention characteristics for the coatings are determined by measuring activity ratios for certain gamma emitters such as /sup 137/Cs//sup 95/Zr and /sup 144/Ce//sup 95/Zr for metallic fission product retention and /sup 134/Cs//sup 137/Cs for an indirect measure of gaseous fission product retention. Data from IMGA (which can be put in the form of n failures observed in N examinations) can be accurately described by the binomial probability distribution model. Using this model, a mathematical relationship between IMGA data (n,N), failure fraction, and confidence level was developed. To determine failure fractions of less than or equal to 1% at confidence levels near 95%, this model dictates that from several hundred to several thousand particles must be examined. The automated particle handler of the IMGA system provides this capability. As a demonstration of failure fraction determination, fuel rod C-3-1 from the OF-2 irradiation capsule was analyzed and failure fraction statistics were applied. Results showed that at the 1% failure fraction level, with a 95% confidence level, the fissile particle batch could not meet requirements; however, the fertile particle exceeded these requirements for the given irradiation temperature and burnup.

  9. Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) Furnace for Post-Irradiation Heating Tests of VHTR Fuel Compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul A Demkowicz; Paul Demkowicz; David V Laug

    2010-10-01

    Abstract –Fuel irradiation testing and post-irradiation examination are currently in progress as part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Fuels Development and Qualification Program. The PIE campaign will include extensive accident testing of irradiated very high temperature reactor fuel compacts to verify fission product retention characteristics at high temperatures. This work will be carried out at both the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, beginning with accident tests on irradiated fuel from the AGR-1 experiment in 2010. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested at INL to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000°C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, Eu, and I) and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

  10. Pulse irradiation tests of rock-like oxide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonogi, K.; Nakamura, T.; Yoshinaga, M.; Ishijima, K.; Akie, H.; Takano, H.

    1999-08-01

    Pulse irradiation tests of special oxide fuel designed for plutonium disposal, called rock-like oxide (ROX), have been conducted in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate the transient behavior of ROX fuel under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. An uranium free ROX, (Zr,Y)O 2-MgAl 2O 4-PuO 2, is proposed for once-through use of Pu in light water reactors. However, because of smaller negative Doppler and void reactivity coefficients in the ROX fuel, higher peak fuel enthalpies are expected under RIAs than for UO 2 fuel. Thus, the tests of simulated ROX, in which Pu was replaced by U for easier realization, were conducted to a peak fuel enthalpy of 0.96 kJ g -1 (230 cal g -1), which is above current Japanese safety limits for UO 2. The transient behavior of the simulated ROX fuel was quite different from that of UO 2, because of its different thermo-physical properties. Fuel failure was associated with fuel melting at peak fuel enthalpies of 1.63 kJ g -1 (390 cal g -1) to 2.22 kJ g -1 (530 cal g -1). Significant mechanical energy generation, the reason for the limit, however, was not observed.

  11. The re-instrumentation irradiation test of nuclear fuel using fuel test loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Yong; Joung, C. Y.; Hong, J. T.; Ahn, S. H.; Choo, K. N. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    This report is the status art report on re-instrumentation. The main techniques described in this report are technology that is developed in Norway HALDEN and domestic research facilities. Although re-instrumentation is not gone vigorously after 1990, HALDEN's re-instrumentation equipment was made until recently. In the meantime, re-instrumentation research was gone in domestic, but irradiation test did not performed actually. But DUPIC fuel irradiation is similar to re-instrumentation, so the irradiation test can be utilized directly to the Fuel Test Loop

  12. DUPIC fuel irradiation test and performance evaluation; the performance analysis of pellet-cladding contact fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K. I.; Kim, H. M.; Yang, K. B.; Choi, S. J. [Suwon University, Whasung (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    Thermal and mechanical models were reviewed, and selected for the analysis of nuclear fuel performance in reactor. 2 dimensional FEM software was developed. Thermal models-gap conductances, thermal conductivity of pellets, fission gas release, temperature distribution-were set and packaged into a software. Both thermal and mechanical models were interrelated to each other, and the final results, fuel performance during irradiation is obtained by iteration calculation. Also, the contact phenomena between pellet and cladding was analysed by mechanical computer software which was developed during this work. dimensional FEM program was developed which estimate the mechanical behavior and the thermal behaviors of nuclear fuel during irradiation. Since there is a importance during the mechanical deformation analysis in describing pellet-cladding contact phenomena, simplified 2 dimensional calculation method is used after the contact. The estimation of thermal fuel behavior during irradiation was compared with the results of other. 8 refs., 17 figs. (Author)

  13. Irradiated Xenon Isotopic Ratio Measurement for Failed Fuel Detection and Location in Fast Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Chikara; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Harano, Hideki

    2009-08-01

    The accuracy of xenon isotopic ratio burn-up calculations used for failed fuel identification was evaluated by an irradiation test of xenon tag gas samples in the Joyo test reactor. The experiment was carried out using pressurized steel capsules containing unique blend ratios of stable xenon tag gases in an on-line creep rupture experiment in Joyo. The tag gas samples were irradiated to total neutron fluences of 1.6 to 4.8 × 1026 n/m2. Laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry was used to analyze the cover gas containing released tag gas diluted to isotopic ratios of 100 to 102 ppb. The isotopic ratios of xenon tag gases after irradiation were calculated using the ORIGEN2 code. The neutron cross sections of xenon nuclides were based on the JENDL-3.3 library. These cross sections were collapsed into one group using the neutron spectra of Joyo. The comparison of measured and calculated xenon isotopic ratios provided C/E values that ranged from 0.92 to 1.10. The differences between calculation and measurement were considered to be mainly due to the measurement errors and the xenon nuclide cross section uncertainties.

  14. Microbial Biofilm Growth on Irradiated, Spent Nuclear Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.M. Frank

    2009-02-01

    A fundamental criticism regarding the potential for microbial influenced corrosion in spent nuclear fuel cladding or storage containers concerns whether the required microorganisms can, in fact, survive radiation fields inherent in these materials. This study was performed to unequivocally answer this critique by addressing the potential for biofilm formation, the precursor to microbial-influenced corrosion, in radiation fields representative of spent nuclear fuel storage environments. This study involved the formation of a microbial biofilm on irradiated spent nuclear fuel cladding within a hot cell environment. This was accomplished by introducing 22 species of bacteria, in nutrient-rich media, to test vessels containing irradiated cladding sections and that was then surrounded by radioactive source material. The overall dose rate exceeded 2 Gy/h gamma/beta radiation with the total dose received by some of the bacteria reaching 5 × 103 Gy. This study provides evidence for the formation of biofilms on spent-fuel materials, and the implication of microbial influenced corrosion in the storage and permanent deposition of spent nuclear fuel in repository environments.

  15. Description and status of the U.S./JAERI HFIR-MFE-RB-10J irradiation capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, J.P.; Lenox, K.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Jitsukawa, S.; Shiba, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the HFIR-MFE-RB-10J experiment conducted under the US DOE/Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Collaborative Testing Program. The irradiation will take place in a Removable Beryllium (RB) position in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for approximately 8 cycles (about 4 dpa in steel). The experiment consists of two distinct parts: the upper region of the capsule will contain vanadium specimens operating at either 420 or 480 C and the lower region will contain austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steel specimens operating at 250 C. The capsule will be surrounded by a Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} shield in order to harden the spectrum and prevent unwanted transmutations.

  16. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Brown, N. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Baek, J. S [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Hanson, A. L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Cuadra, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Cheng, L. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Diamond, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.

    2014-04-30

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-Enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size-Plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). A summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented. Fuel element tolerance assumptions and hot channel factors used in the safety analysis are also given.

  17. Radionuclide release from irradiated Th-Pu mox fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, N.; Quinones, J. [Ciemat., Avda. Complutense 22. E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Cobos, J. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Parque Tecnologico Cartuja 93, Av. Thomas Alva Edison, 7, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain); Rondinella, V.V.; Van Winckel, S.; Somers, J.; Papaioanu, D.; Glatz, J.P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Plutonium and minor actinides produced as by-products of the UO{sub 2} nuclear cycle could be considered as waste or energy source depending on the strategy selected in the nuclear energy programme. Considering Pu and Minor Actinides as a source, they can be burned in existing water reactor for diminishing the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel, it is necessary to use 'inactive' materials as matrix like ThO{sub 2}. ThO{sub 2} matrix has demonstrated its Pu burning efficiency and higher corrosion resistance than UO{sub 2}. Uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel efficiency is low because the presence of U in MOX results in the creation of some new Pu under irradiation. The dissolution behaviour of irradiated (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} pellets with burn-up of 38.8 MWd/kg Th has been studied in carbonated (20 mM HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), deionised and granite ground water solution in a hot cell. The dissolution behaviour of Th, Pu, U and Np was studied in order to find out whether radionuclides release is depending on the matrix dissolution (solubility control). After irradiating the samples, K-ORIGEN and ORIGEN ARP codes were used to find out the theoretical inventory. Afterwards, fuel samples were dissolved completely and analyzed, in order to determine the experimental radionuclide inventory of the irradiated fuel. Th matrix alteration appears to reach an steady state and radionuclides dissolution shows dependence on the matrix behaviour as can be observed through the FIAP results. (authors)

  18. Report on FY16 Low-dose Metal Fuel Irradiation and PIE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmondson, Philip D.

    2016-09-01

    This report gives an overview of the efforts into the low-dose metal fuel irradiation and PIE as part of the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) milestone M3FT-16OR020303031. The current status of the FCT and FCRP irradiation campaigns are given including a description of the materials that have been irradiated, analysis of the passive temperature monitors, and the initial PIE efforts of the fuel samples.

  19. A study on the development of instrumented capsule for the material irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Park, J. M.; Choo, K. N.; Maeng, W. Y.; Park, D. K.; Oh, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Jung, S. H.; Park, J. S.; Kim, T. R.; Park, J. H.; Yang, S. Y.; Jun, Y. K.; Yang, S. H.

    1997-08-01

    Extensive efforts have been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO`s characteristics. (author). 86 refs., 45 tabs., 146 figs.

  20. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown N. R.; Brown,N.R.; Baek,J.S; Hanson, A.L.; Cuadra,A.; Cheng,L.Y.; Diamond, D.J.

    2013-03-31

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. . The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). In addition, a summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented.

  1. Test requirement for PIE of HANARO irradiated fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, I. C.; Cho, Y. G

    2000-06-01

    Since the first criticality of HANARO reached in Feb. of 1995, the rod type U{sub 3}Si-A1 fuel imported from AECL has been used. From the under-water fuel inspection which has been conducted since 1997, a ballooning-rupture type abnormality was observed in several fuel rods. In order to find the root cause of this abnormality and to find the resolution, the post irradiation examination(PIE) was proposed as the best way. In this document, the information from the under-water inspection as well as the PIE requirements are described. Based on the information in this document, a detail test plan will be developed by the project team who shall conduct the PIE.

  2. Recent Accomplishments in the Irradiation Testing of Engineering-Scale Monolithic Fuel Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; D.M. Wachs; M.K. Meyer; H.W. Glunz; R.B. Nielson

    2012-10-01

    The US fuel development team is focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel including irradiation testing of engineering-scale specimens. The team has recently accomplished the successful irradiation of the first monolithic multi-plate fuel element assembly within the AFIP-7 campaign. The AFIP-6 MKII campaign, while somewhat truncated by hardware challenges, exhibited successful irradiation of a large-scale monolithic specimen under extreme irradiation conditions. The channel gap and ultrasonic data are presented for AFIP-7 and AFIP-6 MKII, respectively. Finally, design concepts are summarized for future irradiations such as the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiment campaigns.

  3. UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION OF CALCULATED TEMPERATURES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR FUEL IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Binh Thi-Cam [Idaho National Laboratory; Hawkes, Grant Lynn [Idaho National Laboratory; Einerson, Jeffrey James [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the quantification of uncertainty of the calculated temperature data for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel irradiation experiments conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory in support of the Advanced Reactor Technology Research and Development program. Recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR tests, the results of the numerical simulations are used in combination with statistical analysis methods to improve qualification of measured data. The temperature simulation data for AGR tests are also used for validation of the fission product transport and fuel performance simulation models. These crucial roles of the calculated fuel temperatures in ensuring achievement of the AGR experimental program objectives require accurate determination of the model temperature uncertainties. To quantify the uncertainty of AGR calculated temperatures, this study identifies and analyzes ABAQUS model parameters of potential importance to the AGR predicted fuel temperatures. The selection of input parameters for uncertainty quantification of the AGR calculated temperatures is based on the ranking of their influences on variation of temperature predictions. Thus, selected input parameters include those with high sensitivity and those with large uncertainty. Propagation of model parameter uncertainty and sensitivity is then used to quantify the overall uncertainty of AGR calculated temperatures. Expert judgment is used as the basis to specify the uncertainty range for selected input parameters. The input uncertainties are dynamic accounting for the effect of unplanned events and changes in thermal properties of capsule components over extended exposure to high temperature and fast neutron irradiation. The sensitivity analysis performed in this work went beyond the traditional local sensitivity. Using experimental design, analysis of pairwise interactions of model parameters was performed to establish

  4. Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Ploger; Paul Demkowicz; John Hunn; Robert Morris

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3×105 total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Five compacts have been examined so far, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose between approximately 40-80 individual particles on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer-IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, over 800 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in approximately 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel swelling into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer-IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only three particles, all in conjunction with IPyC-SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures, IPyC-SiC debonds, and SiC fractures.

  5. Status of Wrought FeCrAl-UO2 Capsules Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harp, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Core, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Linton, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Candidate cladding materials for accident tolerant fuel applications require extensive testing and validation prior to commercial deployment within the nuclear power industry. One class of cladding materials, FeCrAl alloys, is currently undergoing such effort. Within these activities is a series of irradiation programs within the Advanced Test Reactor. These programs are developed to aid in commercial maturation and understand the fundamental mechanisms controlling the cladding performance during normal operation of a typical light water reactor. Three different irradiation programs are on-going; one designed as a simple proof-of-principle concept, the other to evaluate the susceptibility of FeCrAl to fuel-cladding chemical interaction, and the last to fully simulate the conditions of a pressurized water reactor experimentally. To date, nondestructive post-irradiation examination has been completed on the rodlet deemed FCA-L3 from the simple proof-of-concept irradiation program. Initial results show possible breach of the rodlet under irradiation but further studies are needed to conclusively determine whether breach has occurred and the underlying reasons for such a possible failure. Further work includes characterizing additional rodlets following irradiation.

  6. Analysis of Fission Products on the AGR-1 Capsule Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; Jason M. Harp; Philip L. Winston; Scott A. Ploger

    2013-03-01

    The components of the AGR-1 irradiation capsules were analyzed to determine the retained inventory of fission products in order to determine the extent of in-pile fission product release from the fuel compacts. This includes analysis of (i) the metal capsule components, (ii) the graphite fuel holders, (iii) the graphite spacers, and (iv) the gas exit lines. The fission products most prevalent in the components were Ag-110m, Cs 134, Cs 137, Eu-154, and Sr 90, and the most common location was the metal capsule components and the graphite fuel holders. Gamma scanning of the graphite fuel holders was also performed to determine spatial distribution of Ag-110m and radiocesium. Silver was released from the fuel components in significant fractions. The total Ag-110m inventory found in the capsules ranged from 1.2×10 2 (Capsule 3) to 3.8×10 1 (Capsule 6). Ag-110m was not distributed evenly in the graphite fuel holders, but tended to concentrate at the axial ends of the graphite holders in Capsules 1 and 6 (located at the top and bottom of the test train) and near the axial center in Capsules 2, 3, and 5 (in the center of the test train). The Ag-110m further tended to be concentrated around fuel stacks 1 and 3, the two stacks facing the ATR reactor core and location of higher burnup, neutron fluence, and temperatures compared with Stack 2. Detailed correlation of silver release with fuel type and irradiation temperatures is problematic at the capsule level due to the large range of temperatures experienced by individual fuel compacts in each capsule. A comprehensive Ag 110m mass balance for the capsules was performed using measured inventories of individual compacts and the inventory on the capsule components. For most capsules, the mass balance was within 11% of the predicted inventory. The Ag-110m release from individual compacts often exhibited a very large range within a particular capsule.

  7. Analysis of Fission Products on the AGR-1 Capsule Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; Jason M. Harp; Philip L. Winston; Scott A. Ploger

    2013-03-01

    The components of the AGR-1 irradiation capsules were analyzed to determine the retained inventory of fission products in order to determine the extent of in-pile fission product release from the fuel compacts. This includes analysis of (i) the metal capsule components, (ii) the graphite fuel holders, (iii) the graphite spacers, and (iv) the gas exit lines. The fission products most prevalent in the components were Ag-110m, Cs 134, Cs 137, Eu-154, and Sr 90, and the most common location was the metal capsule components and the graphite fuel holders. Gamma scanning of the graphite fuel holders was also performed to determine spatial distribution of Ag-110m and radiocesium. Silver was released from the fuel components in significant fractions. The total Ag-110m inventory found in the capsules ranged from 1.2×10 2 (Capsule 3) to 3.8×10 1 (Capsule 6). Ag-110m was not distributed evenly in the graphite fuel holders, but tended to concentrate at the axial ends of the graphite holders in Capsules 1 and 6 (located at the top and bottom of the test train) and near the axial center in Capsules 2, 3, and 5 (in the center of the test train). The Ag-110m further tended to be concentrated around fuel stacks 1 and 3, the two stacks facing the ATR reactor core and location of higher burnup, neutron fluence, and temperatures compared with Stack 2. Detailed correlation of silver release with fuel type and irradiation temperatures is problematic at the capsule level due to the large range of temperatures experienced by individual fuel compacts in each capsule. A comprehensive Ag 110m mass balance for the capsules was performed using measured inventories of individual compacts and the inventory on the capsule components. For most capsules, the mass balance was within 11% of the predicted inventory. The Ag-110m release from individual compacts often exhibited a very large range within a particular capsule.

  8. Development and utilization of irradiational capsule - Mechanical and thermal performance analysis and development of design program on the cylindrical structures with multi-holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Shin; Choi, M. H.; Shin, D. S. [Chungnam National University, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    Irradiation tests in the research reactor are used with the specially designed capsules for irradiation test and loop. Accordingly, suitable instrumented capsule for HANARO must be designed and manufactured. To satisfy the requirements of users and to conduct irradiation test effectively, the accurate informations on the thermal and mechanical characteristics of capsule should be understood. The structural analysis results show that stress characteristics of the cylinder with multi-holes is not significantly effected by the sizes of specimen hole, numbers of specimen and eccentric characteristics. The thermal and structural analysis of the capsule with multi-holes under thermal loading shows that the peak temperature in the circular cylinder is occurred in the specimens inserted in the center or specimen holes and is significantly effected by gap size between the holder and the external tube. In this study, CAPSYS program is developed by interfacing finite element analysis program, ANSYS with graphic user interface program, VISUAL C++. This program will be useful on the design and safety analysis of the capsule for material irradiation test. 20 refs., 37 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  9. Protective Effects of Hong Shan Capsule against Lethal Total-Body Irradiation-Induced Damage in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hong Shan Capsule (HSC, a crude drug of 11 medicinal herbs, was used in clinical practice for the treatment of radiation injuries in China. In this study, we investigated its protection in rats against acute lethal total-body irradiation (TBI. Pre-administration of HSC reduced the radiation sickness characteristics, while increasing the 30-day survival of the irradiated rats. Administration of HSC also reduced the radiation sickness characteristics and increased the 30-day survival of mice after exposure to lethal TBI. Ultrastructural observation illustrated that the pretreatment of rats with HSC significantly attenuated the TBI-induced morphological changes in the different organs of irradiated rats. Gene expression profiles revealed the dramatic effect of HSC on alterations of gene expression caused by lethal TBI. Pretreatment with HSC prevented differential expression of 66% (1398 genes of 2126 genes differentially expressed in response to TBI. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 32 pathways, such as pathways in cancer and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. Our analysis indicated that the pretreatment of rats with HSC modulated these pathways induced by lethal TBI, such as multiple MAPK pathways, suggesting that pretreatment with HSC might provide protective effects on lethal TBI mainly or partially through the modulation of these pathways. Our data suggest that HSC has the potential to be used as an effective therapeutic or radio-protective agent to minimize irradiation damage.

  10. Protective Effects of Hong Shan Capsule against Lethal Total-Body Irradiation-Induced Damage in Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianzhong; Xu, Jing; Xu, Weiheng; Qi, Yang; Lu, Yiming; Qiu, Lei; Hu, Zhenlin; Chu, Zhiyong; Chai, Yifeng; Zhang, Junping

    2015-08-12

    Hong Shan Capsule (HSC), a crude drug of 11 medicinal herbs, was used in clinical practice for the treatment of radiation injuries in China. In this study, we investigated its protection in rats against acute lethal total-body irradiation (TBI). Pre-administration of HSC reduced the radiation sickness characteristics, while increasing the 30-day survival of the irradiated rats. Administration of HSC also reduced the radiation sickness characteristics and increased the 30-day survival of mice after exposure to lethal TBI. Ultrastructural observation illustrated that the pretreatment of rats with HSC significantly attenuated the TBI-induced morphological changes in the different organs of irradiated rats. Gene expression profiles revealed the dramatic effect of HSC on alterations of gene expression caused by lethal TBI. Pretreatment with HSC prevented differential expression of 66% (1398 genes) of 2126 genes differentially expressed in response to TBI. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 32 pathways, such as pathways in cancer and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Our analysis indicated that the pretreatment of rats with HSC modulated these pathways induced by lethal TBI, such as multiple MAPK pathways, suggesting that pretreatment with HSC might provide protective effects on lethal TBI mainly or partially through the modulation of these pathways. Our data suggest that HSC has the potential to be used as an effective therapeutic or radio-protective agent to minimize irradiation damage.

  11. An Assessment of ORNL PIE Capabilities for the AGR Program Capsule Post Irradiation Examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL

    2006-09-01

    ORNL has facilities and experienced staff that can execute +the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) task. While the specific PIE breakdown needs to be more formally defined, the basic outline is clear and the existing capabilities can be assessed within the needs of the tasks defined in the program plan. A one-to-one correspondence between the program plan tasks and the current ORNL PIE status was conducted and while some shortcomings were identified, the general capability is available. Specific upgrade needs were identified and reviewed. A path forward was formulated. Building 3525 is available for this work and this building is currently receiving renewed attention from management so that it will be in good working order prior to the expected PIE start date. This building is equipped with the tools necessary for PIEs of this nature, but the long hiatus in coated particle fuel work has left it with aging analysis tools. This report identified several of these tools and rough estimates of what would be required to update and replace them. In addition, other ORNL buildings are available to support Building 3525 in specialized tasks along with the normal laboratory infrastructure. Before the AGR management embarks on any equipment development effort, the PIE tasks should be updated against current program (modeling and data) needs and better defined so that the items to be measured, their measurement uncertainties, and thru-put needs can be reviewed. A Data Task Matrix (DTM) should be prepared so that the program data needs can be compared against the identified PIE tasks and what is practical in the hot cell environment to make sure nothing is overlooked. Finally, thought should be given to the development of standardized equipment designs between sites to avoid redundant design efforts and different measurement techniques. This is a potentially cost saving effort that can also avoid data inconsistencies.

  12. Ceramographic Examinations of Irradiated AGR-1 Fuel Compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Demkowicz; Scott Ploger; John Hunn; Jay S. Kehn

    2012-09-01

    The AGR 1 experiment involved irradiating 72 cylindrical fuel compacts containing tri-structural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particles to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures observed out of almost 300,000 particles. Six irradiated AGR 1 fuel compacts were selected for microscopy that span a range of irradiation conditions (temperature, burnup, and fast fluence). These six compacts also included all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR experiment. The six compacts were cross-sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, mounted, ground, and polished after development of careful techniques for preserving particle structures against preparation damage. From 36 to 79 particles within each cross section were exposed near enough to midplane for optical microscopy of kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. The microstructural analysis focused on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracture, debonding between the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layers, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Three basic particle morphologies were established according to the extent of bonding between the buffer and IPyC layers: complete debonding along the interface (Type A), no debonding along the interface (Type B), and partial debonding (Type AB). These basic morphologies were subdivided according to whether the buffer stayed intact or fractured. The resulting six characteristic morphologies were used to classify particles within each cross section, but no spatial patterns were clearly observed in any of the cross-sectional morphology maps. Although positions of particle types appeared random within compacts, examining a total of 931 classified particles allowed other relationships among morphological types to be established.

  13. Ceramographic Examinations of Irradiated AGR-1 Fuel Compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Demkowicz; Scott Ploger; John Hunn

    2012-05-01

    The AGR 1 experiment involved irradiating 72 cylindrical fuel compacts containing tri-structural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particles to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures observed out of almost 300,000 particles. Five irradiated AGR 1 fuel compacts were selected for microscopy that span a range of irradiation conditions (temperature, burnup, and fast fluence). These five compacts also included all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR experiment. The five compacts were cross-sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, mounted, ground, and polished after development of careful techniques for preserving particle structures against preparation damage. Approximately 40 to 80 particles within each cross section were exposed near enough to mid-plane for optical microscopy of kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. The microstructural analysis focused on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracture, debonding between the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layers, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Three basic particle morphologies were established according to the extent of bonding between the buffer and IPyC layers: complete debonding along the interface (Type A), no debonding along the interface (Type B), and partial debonding (Type AB). These basic morphologies were subdivided according to whether the buffer stayed intact or fractured. The resulting six characteristic morphologies were used to classify particles within each cross section, but no spatial patterns were clearly observed in any of the cross-sectional morphology maps. Although positions of particle types appeared random within compacts, examining a total of 830 classified particles allowed other relationships among morphological types to be established.

  14. DETERMINATION OF THE AGR-1 CAPSULE TO FPMS SPECTROMETER TRANSPORT VOLUMES FROM LEADOUT FLOW TEST DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Hartwell; J. B. Walter; D. M. Scates; M. W. Drigert

    2007-05-01

    The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment being conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. A flow experiment conducted during the AGR-1 irradiation provided data that included the effect of flow rate changes on the decay of a short-lived radionuclide (23Ne). This data has been analyzed to determine the capsule-specific downstream transport volume through which the capsule effluents must pass before arrival at the fission product monitoring system spectrometers. These resultant transport volumes when coupled with capsule outlet flow rates determine the transport times from capsule-to-detector. In this work an analysis protocol is developed and applied in order to determine capsule-specific transport volumes to precisions of better than +/- 7%.

  15. First Results of Scanning Thermal Diffusivity Microscope (STDM) Measurements on Irradiated Monolithic and Dispersion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. K. Huber; M. K. Figg; J. R. Kennedy; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

    2012-07-01

    The thermal conductivity of the fuel material in a reactor before and during irradiation is a sensitive and fundamental parameter for thermal hydraulic calculations that are useds to correctly determine fuel heat fluxes and meat temperatures and to simulate performance of the fuel elements during operation. Several techniques have been developed to measure the thermal properties of fresh fuel to support these calculations, but it is crucial to also investigate the change of thermal properties during irradiation.

  16. Project Progress of New Domestic Zirconium Alloy Fuel Sub-assembly Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Ai-min; ZHANG; Pei-sheng; LIU; Jia-zheng; LIU; Wei

    2015-01-01

    At present,the project of new domestic zirconium alloy fuel sub-assembly irradiation is ongoing according to schedule.This paper presents progress of the project such as fuel sub-assembly detailed design,manufacturing process and fuel transportation method.1 Fuel sub-assembly detailed designing

  17. Fabrication of DUPIC fuel for the 5th irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, S. S.; Lee, J. W. [and others

    2004-03-01

    In this study, 10 DUPIC pellets and two mini-elements were fabricated to investigate the thermal characteristics of DUPIC fuel in December 2003. As a result of the experiment, DUPIC pellets with 10.310{approx}10.415 g/cm{sup 3} (95.3{approx}96.3 % of T.D.) of sintered density and less than Ra 0.76 {mu}m of surface roughness satisfying the specifications of DUPIC fuel for the 5th irradiation test have been remotely fabricated at hot cell. 5 DUPIC pellets including 3 pellets equipped with thermal sensor in the center of the pellet were loaded in a mini-element. Endcap welding of the mini-element was performed by Nd:YAG laser. The soundness of the weld of the mini-element has been confirmed by microstructural test, helium leak test, and X-ray inspection. The DUPIC mini-elements assembled in an instrumented rig are under the irradiation at HANARO reactor.

  18. Separation of Plutonium from Irradiated Fuels and Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Leonard W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Holliday, Kiel S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Murray, Alice [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Thompson, Major [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Thorp, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yarbro, Stephen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Venetz, Theodore J. [Hanford Site, Benton County, WA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Spent nuclear fuel from power production reactors contains moderate amounts of transuranium (TRU) actinides and fission products in addition to the still slightly enriched uranium. Originally, nuclear technology was developed to chemically separate and recover fissionable plutonium from irradiated nuclear fuel for military purposes. Military plutonium separations had essentially ceased by the mid-1990s. Reprocessing, however, can serve multiple purposes, and the relative importance has changed over time. In the 1960’s the vision of the introduction of plutonium-fueled fast-neutron breeder reactors drove the civilian separation of plutonium. More recently, reprocessing has been regarded as a means to facilitate the disposal of high-level nuclear waste, and thus requires development of radically different technical approaches. In the last decade or so, the principal reason for reprocessing has shifted to spent power reactor fuel being reprocessed (1) so that unused uranium and plutonium being recycled reduce the volume, gaining some 25% to 30% more energy from the original uranium in the process and thus contributing to energy security and (2) to reduce the volume and radioactivity of the waste by recovering all long-lived actinides and fission products followed by recycling them in fast reactors where they are transmuted to short-lived fission products; this reduces the volume to about 20%, reduces the long-term radioactivity level in the high-level waste, and complicates the possibility of the plutonium being diverted from civil use – thereby increasing the proliferation resistance of the fuel cycle. In general, reprocessing schemes can be divided into two large categories: aqueous/hydrometallurgical systems, and pyrochemical/pyrometallurgical systems. Worldwide processing schemes are dominated by the aqueous (hydrometallurgical) systems. This document provides a historical review of both categories of reprocessing.

  19. Using Orthogonal Images to Infer Spatial Variations in Opacity of Remaining Ablator and Fuel Mass in Imploding Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Laura Robin; Bradley, David; Glenn, Steven; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Khan, Shahab; Kyrala, George; Ma, Tammy; Pak, Art; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Tommasini, Riccardo; Town, Richard

    2012-10-01

    Experiments at the National Ignition Facility attempt to achieve laser-driven inertial confinement fusion by imploding a capsule of DT fuel. In order to achieve sufficient density and temperature to drive nuclear fusion, the imploding capsule must be both highly convergent and highly symmetric. X-ray self-emission from imploding capsules is imaged for size and symmetry along two orthogonal axes by time-integrated (image plates) and time-resolved (framing cameras) diagnostics. Differences in emission along these axes indicate either an anisotropic hot core or anisotropy in total optical depth of the remaining ablator and fuel mass. We compare integrated emission intensity along a common-line-of-sight to further remove the ambiguity between anisotropy of emission and absorption. While we find good correlation for some recent NIF implosions (indicating isotropic or optically thin remaining mass), we find significant variations for others, suggesting an observable anisotropy in the thickness or density of the remaining mass. These results may help explain observations of asymmetric neutron yield. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL-ABS-564186.

  20. Components production and assemble of the irradiation capsule of the Surveillance Program of Materials of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde;Fabricacion de componentes y ensamble de la capsula de irradiacion del Programa de Vigilancia de Materiales de la central nuclear Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medrano, A. [ININ, Departamento de Tecnologia de Materiales, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    To predict the effects of the neutrons radiation and the thermal environment about the mechanical properties of the reactor vessel materials of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, a surveillance program is implemented according to the outlines settled by Astm E185-02 -Standard practice for design of surveillance programs for light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels-. This program includes the installation of three irradiation capsules of similar materials to those of the reactor vessels, these samples are test tubes for mechanical practices of impact and tension. In the National Institute of Nuclear Research and due to the infrastructure as well as of the actual human resources of the Pilot Plant of Nuclear Fuel Assembles Production it was possible to realize the materials rebuilding extracted in 2005 of Unit 2 of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde as well as the production, assemble and reassignment of the irradiation capsule made in 2006. At the present time the surveillance materials extracted in 2008 of Unit 1 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde are reconstituting and the components are manufactured for the assembles of the irradiation capsule that will be reinstalled in the reactor vessel in 2010. The purpose of the present work is to describe the necessary components as well as its disposition during the assembles of the irradiation capsule for the surveillance program of the reactors vessel of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  1. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated MTR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, L.A.A. E-mail: laaterre@net.ipen.br; Zeituni, C.A.; Perrotta, J.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da

    2000-08-11

    The availability of burnup data is an important requirement in any systematic approach to the enhancement of safety, economics and performance of a nuclear research reactor. This work presents the theory and experimental techniques applied to determine, by means of nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the burnup of Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the IEA-R1 research reactor. Burnup measurements, based on analysis of spectra that result from collimation and detection of gamma-rays emitted in the decay of radioactive fission products, were performed at the reactor pool area. The measuring system consists of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector together with suitable fast electronics and an on-line microcomputer data acquisition module. In order to achieve absolute burnup values, the detection set (collimator tube+HPGe detector) was previously calibrated in efficiency. The obtained burnup values are compared with ones provided by reactor physics calculations, for three kinds of MTR fuel elements with different cooling times, initial enrichment grades and total number of fuel plates. Both values show good agreement within the experimental error limits.

  2. Post-irradiation examination of AlFeNi cladded U 3Si 2 fuel plates irradiated under severe conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaers, A.; Koonen, E.; Parthoens, Y.; Lemoine, P.; Van den Berghe, S.

    2008-04-01

    Three full size AlFeNi cladded U 3Si 2 fuel plates were irradiated in the BR2 reactor of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK·CEN) under relatively severe, but well defined conditions. The irradiation was part of the qualification campaign for the fuel to be used in the future Jules Horowitz reactor in Cadarache, France. After the irradiation, the fuel plates were submitted to an extensive post-irradiation campaign in the hot cell laboratory of SCK·CEN. The PIE shows that the fuel plates withstood the irradiation successfully, as no detrimental defects have been found. At the cladding surface, a multilayered corrosion oxide film has formed. The U-Al-Si layer resulting from the interaction between the U 3Si 2 fuel and the Al matrix, has been quantified as U(Al,Si) 4.6. It is found that the composition of the fuel particles is not homogenous; zones of USi and U 3Si 2 are observed and measured. The fission gas-related bubbles generated in both phases show a different morphology. In the USi fuel, the bubbles are small and numerous while in U 3Si 2 the bubbles are larger but there are fewer.

  3. Performance evaluation of large U-Mo particle dispersed fuel irradiated in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Oh, Seok Jin; Jang, Se Jung; Yu, Byung Ok; Lee, Choong Seong; Seo, Chul Gyo; Chae, Hee Taek; Kim, Chang Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel is being developed as advanced fuel for research reactors. Irradiation behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel has been studied to evaluate its fuel performance. One of the performance limiting factors is a chemical interaction between the U-Mo particle and the Al matrix because the thermal conductivity of fuel meat is decreased with the interaction layer growth. In order to overcome the interaction problem, large-sized U-Mo particles were fabricated by controlling the centrifugal atomization conditions. The fuel performance behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel was estimated by using empirical models formulated based on the microstructural analyses of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) on U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel irradiated in HANARO reactor. Temperature histories of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel during irradiation tests were estimated by considering the effect of an interaction layer growth on the thermal conductivity of the fuel meat. When the fuel performances of the dispersion fuel rods containing U-Mo particles with various sizes were compared, fuel temperature was decreased as the average U-Mo particles with various sizes were compared, fuel temperature was decreased as the average U-Mo particle size was increases. It was found that the dispersion of a larger U-Mo particle was effective for mitigating the thermal degradation which is associated with an interaction layer growth.

  4. Low-temperature irradiation behavior of uranium-molybdenum alloy dispersion fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. K.; Hofman, G. L.; Hayes, S. L.; Clark, C. R.; Wiencek, T. C.; Snelgrove, J. L.; Strain, R. V.; Kim, K.-H.

    2002-08-01

    Irradiation tests have been conducted to evaluate the performance of a series of high-density uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy, aluminum matrix dispersion fuels. Fuel plates incorporating alloys with molybdenum content in the range of 4-10 wt% were tested. Two irradiation test vehicles were used to irradiate low-enrichment fuels to approximately 40 and 70 at.% 235U burnup in the advanced test reactor at fuel temperatures of approximately 65 °C. The fuel particles used to fabricate dispersion specimens for most of the test were produced by generating filings from a cast rod. In general, fuels with molybdenum contents of 6 wt% or more showed stable in-reactor fission gas behavior, exhibiting a distribution of small, stable gas bubbles. Fuel particle swelling was moderate and decreased with increasing alloy content. Fuel particles with a molybdenum content of 4 wt% performed poorly, exhibiting extensive fuel-matrix interaction and the growth of relatively large fission gas bubbles. Fuel particles with 4 or 6 wt% molybdenum reacted more rapidly with the aluminum matrix than those with higher-alloy content. Fuel particles produced by an atomization process were also included in the test to determine the effect of fuel particle morphology and microstructure on fuel performance for the U-10Mo composition. Both of the U-10Mo fuel particle types exhibited good irradiation performance, but showed visible differences in fission gas bubble nucleation and growth behavior.

  5. RERTR-12 Insertion 2 Irradiation Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Perez; G. S. Chang; D. M. Wachs; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme

    2012-09-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-12 was designed to provide comprehensive information on the performance of uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) based monolithic fuels for research reactor applications.1 RERTR-12 insertion 2 includes the capsules irradiated during the last three irradiation cycles. These capsules include Z, Y1, Y2 and Y3 type capsules. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-12 insertion 2 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

  6. Irradiation behavior of modified high-performance nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungwirth, Rainer

    2011-11-03

    To overcome the problem of UMo/Al fuel swelling, four different possibilities have been identified: (i) the modification of the Al matrix by adding diffusion limiting elements (ii) the insertion of a diffusion barrier at the interface UMo-Al (iii) further alloying the UMo with a third element to stabilize the γ-UMo phase (iv) a combination of means (i)-(iii). In consequence, 20 different UMoX/AlY (X=Si, Ti, Mg, Bi, with and without oxidation layer; Y=Nb, Ti, Pt) samples have been examined before and after irradiation with Iodine at 80MeV. First it has been shown, that a protective oxidation layer on the UMo grains does not prevent the formation of a interdiffusion layer. In contrast, additions to the Al matrix can be reduced to the self-acting formation of a protective layer at the UMo/Al interface. Additions to the UMo to stabilize the γ-UMo upon heating are of minor importance since irradiation reverses the phase decomposition of UMo.

  7. Preliminary diagnosis of areal density in the deuterium fuel capsule by proton measurement at SG-III facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Luo, Xing; Zheng, Jianhua; Chen, Zhongjing; Yan, Ji; Pu, Yudong; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Tianxuan; Yang, Zhenghua; Yang, Pin; Tang, Qi; Song, Zifeng; Jiang, Shao'en; Liu, Shenye; Yang, Jiamin; Wang, Feng

    2017-05-01

    Areal density (ρR) is one of the crucial parameters in the inertial confinement fusion. Measurement of the fusion products is a more feasible method to diagnose ρR than other methods, such as X-ray. In the capsules filled with D2 fuel or D-3He fuel, proton is an ideal probe to diagnose the implosion ρR in different emission times and directions by measurements of the proton yields and spectra. By D-D reaction protons and D-3He reaction protons, the diagnostics of the total and fuel ρR, ρR evolution, implosion asymmetry and mix effect have been demonstrated at OMEGA and NIF facilities. Also some advanced proton diagnostics instruments are developed with a high level capability. Preliminary diagnosis of ρR in the deuterium involved fuel capsules by measurement of protons at SG-III facility was implemented. A fusion product emission and transport code by Monte-Carlo method was developed. The primary and secondary protons emission and transport in the fuel and shell plasmas were able to be simulated. The relations of the proton energy loss and the secondary proton yields with the areal density were inspected. Several proton spectrometers have been built up at SG-III facility, such as a step ranged filter (SRF) proton spectrometer and a wedged range filter (WRF) proton spectrometer. Some proton response simulation codes and the codes for proton spectra reconstruction were also developed. The demonstrations of ρR diagnostics at SG-III facility by D-D reaction and D-3He reaction proton spectra measurements are presented.

  8. Post irradiation examination of HANARO nucler mini-element fuel (metallographic and density test)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Ok; Hong, K. P.; Park, D. G.; Choo, Y. S.; Baik, S. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, H. C.; Jung, Y. H

    2001-05-01

    The post irradiation examination of a HANARO mini-element nuclear fuel, KH96C-004, was done in June 6, 2000. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the in-core performance and reliability of mini-element nuclear fuel for HANARO developed by the project ''The Nuclear Fuel Material Development of Research Reactor''. And, in order to examine the performance of mini-element nuclear fuel in normal output condition, the post irradiation examination of a nuclear fuel bundle composed by 6 mini nuclear fuel rods and 12 dummy fuel rods was performed. Based on these examination results, the safety and reliability of HANARO fuel and the basic data on the design of HANARO nuclear fuel can be ensured and obtained,.

  9. Remote fabrication and irradiation test of recycled nuclear fuel prepared by the oxidation and reduction of spent oxide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin Ryu, Ho; Chan Song, Kee; Il Park, Geun; Won Lee, Jung; Seung Yang, Myung

    2005-02-01

    A direct dry recycling process was developed in order to reuse spent pressurized light water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel in CANDU reactors without the separation of sensitive nuclear materials such as plutonium. The benefits of the dry recycling process are the saving of uranium resources and the reduction of spent fuel accumulation as well as a higher proliferation resistance. In the process of direct dry recycling, fuel pellets separated from spent LWR fuel rods are oxidized from UO2 to U3O8 at 500 °C in an air atmosphere and reduced into UO2 at 700 °C in a hydrogen atmosphere, which is called OREOX (oxidation and reduction of oxide fuel). The pellets are pulverized during the oxidation and reduction processes due to the phase transformation between cubic UO2 and orthorhombic U3O8. Using the oxide powder prepared from the OREOX process, the compaction and sintering processes are performed in a remote manner in a shielded hot cell due to the high radioactivity of the spent fuel. Most of the fission gas and volatile fission products are removed during the OREOX and sintering processes. The mini-elements fabricated by the direct dry recycling process are irradiated in the HANARO research reactor for the performance evaluation of the recycled fuel pellets. Post-irradiation examination of the irradiated fuel showed that microstructural evolution and fission gas release behavior of the dry-recycled fuel were similar to high burnup UO2 fuel.

  10. Osiris, an irradiation reactor for material and nuclear fuel testing; Osiris, reacteur d'irradiation pour materiaux et combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubiere, S.; Durande-Ayme, P. [CEA Saclay, Div. Nucleaire Energie, Dept. Reacteurs et Nucleaire Service, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2005-07-01

    Since 1966 the Osiris reactor located at Saclay has been participating in French and international irradiation programs for research and development in the field of nuclear fuel and materials. Today the French atomic commission (Cea) pursues irradiation programs in support of existing reactors, mainly PWR, strengthening its own knowledge and the one of its clients on fuel and material behaviour under irradiation, pertaining to plant life-time issues and high burn-up. For instance important programs have been performed on pressure vessel steel aging, pellet-clad interaction, internal component aging and mox fuel qualification. With the arising of the Generation 4 research and development programs, the Osiris reactor has developed capacities to undertake material and fuel irradiation under high temperature conditions. Routine irradiations such as the doping of silicon or the production of radio-nuclides for medical or imaging purposes are made on a daily basis. The specificities of the Osiris reactor are presented in the first part of this paper while the second part focuses on the experimental devices available in Osiris to perform irradiation in light water reactor conditions and in high temperature reactor conditions and on their associated programs.

  11. Performance evaluation of large U-Mo particle dispersed fuel irradiated in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Oh, Seok Jin; Jang, Se Jung; Yu, Byung Ok; Lee, Choong Seong; Seo, Chul Gyo; Chae, Hee Taek; Kim, Chang Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel is being developed as advanced fuel for research reactors. Irradiation behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel has been studied to evaluate its fuel performance. One of the performance limiting factors is a chemical interaction between the U-Mo particle and the Al matrix because the thermal conductivity of fuel meat is decreased with the interaction layer growth. In order to overcome the interaction problem, large-sized U-Mo particles were fabricated by controlling the centrifugal atomization conditions. The fuel performance behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel was estimated by using empirical models formulated based on the microstructural analyses of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) on U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel irradiated in HANARO reactor. Temperature histories of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel during tests were estimated by considering the effect of an interaction layer growth on the thermal conductivity of the fuel meat. When the fuel performances of the dispersion fuel rods containing U-Mo particles were compared, fuel temperature was decreased as the average U-Mo particle size was increased. It was found that the dispersion of a larger U-Mo particle was effective for mitigating the thermal degradation which is associated with an interaction layer growth.

  12. Changes to Irradiation Conditions of VVER-1000 Surveillance Specimens Resulting from Fuel Assemblies with Greater Fuel Height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panferov Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the work was to obtain experimental data on the influence of newtype fuel assemblies with higher fuel rods on the irradiation conditions of surveillance specimens installed on the baffe of VVER-1000. For this purpose, two surveillance sets with container assemblies of the same design irradiated in reactors with different fuel assemblies in the core were investigated. Measurements of neutron dosimeters from these sets and retrospective measurements of 54Mn activity accumulated in each irradiated specimen allow a detailed distribution of the fast neutron flux in the containers to be obtained. Neutron calculations have been done using 3D discrete ordinate code KATRIN. On the basis of the obtained results, a change of the lead factor due to newtype fuel assemblies was evaluated for all types of VVER-1000 container assemblies.

  13. Changes to Irradiation Conditions of VVER-1000 Surveillance Specimens Resulting from Fuel Assemblies with Greater Fuel Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panferov, Pavel; Kochkin, Viacheslav; Erak, Dmitry; Makhotin, Denis; Reshetnikov, Alexandr; Timofeev, Andrey

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the work was to obtain experimental data on the influence of newtype fuel assemblies with higher fuel rods on the irradiation conditions of surveillance specimens installed on the baffe of VVER-1000. For this purpose, two surveillance sets with container assemblies of the same design irradiated in reactors with different fuel assemblies in the core were investigated. Measurements of neutron dosimeters from these sets and retrospective measurements of 54Mn activity accumulated in each irradiated specimen allow a detailed distribution of the fast neutron flux in the containers to be obtained. Neutron calculations have been done using 3D discrete ordinate code KATRIN. On the basis of the obtained results, a change of the lead factor due to newtype fuel assemblies was evaluated for all types of VVER-1000 container assemblies.

  14. Simulation of the irradiation behaviour of the PBMR fuel in the SAFARI-1 reactor / B.M. Makgopa

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Irradiation experiments for the pebble bed modular reactor PBMR fuel (coated fuel particles and pebble fuel) are planned at the South African First Atomic Reactor Installation (SAFARI-1). The experiments are conducted to investigate the behavior of the fuel under normal operating and accelerated/accident simulating conditions because the safe operation of the reactor relies on the integrity of the fuel for retention of radioactivity. For fuel irradiation experiments, the accura...

  15. Jules Horowitz Reactor Project- Fuel irradiation device, innovative instrumentation proposal for experimental phenomena real time measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillot, Stephane; Cheymol, Guy [CEA, Paris (France)

    2013-07-01

    The fuel irradiation devices used for the tests or rods allow reproducing at small scales the conditions of the studied nuclear reactors (as LWR type). During the irradiation phase, the tested fuel rod can be stressed due to thermal, mechanical, nuclear effects which can modify its geometry (dilatation, swelling effects). After the test, the return to normal conditions can have as consequence the disappearance of the phenomenon or give access to partial information (final deformation). Generally, to follow the phenomena related to the irradiation phase, the experimental rod contained in the test device is instrumented with thermocouples and LVDT. As complement of this instrumentation, new sensors using innovating technologies are studied (deformation sensor integrating optical fibres). Through the example of a fuel irradiation device foreseen for the JHR, this paper aims to describe the present development of an innovating instrumentation with the objective to measure, in real time and under flux, the fuel rod deformation phenomena during a ramp test.

  16. Characterization of LWRS Hybrid SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Fuel Cladding after Gamma Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabella J van Rooyen

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the gamma irradiation tests conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was to obtain a better understanding of chemical interactions and potential changes in microstructural properties of a mock-up hybrid nuclear fuel cladding rodlet design (unfueled) in a simulated PWR water environment under irradiation conditions. The hybrid fuel rodlet design is being investigated under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program for further development and testing of one of the possible advanced LWR nuclear fuel cladding designs. The gamma irradiation tests were performed in preparation for neutron irradiation tests planned for a silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic matrix composite (CMC) zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) hybrid fuel rodlet that may be tested in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) if the design is selected for further development and testing

  17. Microstructure of the irradiated U 3Si 2/Al silicide dispersion fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Jue, J.-F.; Robinson, A. B.; Madden, J. W.; Medvedev, P. G.; Wachs, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The silicide dispersion fuel of U 3Si 2/Al is recognized as the best performance fuel for many nuclear research and test reactors with up to 4.8 gU/cm 3 fuel loading. An irradiated U 3Si 2/Al dispersion fuel ( 235U ˜ 75%) from the high-flux side of a fuel plate (U0R040) from the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR)-8 test was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fuel was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) for 105 days. The average irradiation temperature and fission density of the U 3Si 2 fuel particles for the TEM sample are estimated to be approximately 110 °C and 5.4 × 10 27 f/m 3. The characterization was performed using a 200-kV TEM. The U/Si ratio for the fuel particle and (Si + Al)/U for the fuel-matrix-interaction layer are approximately 1.1 and 4-10, respectively. The estimated average diameter, number density and volume fraction for small bubbles (fuel particle are ˜94 nm, 1.05 × 10 20 m -3 and ˜11%, respectively. The results and their implication on the performance of the U 3Si 2/Al silicide dispersion fuel are discussed.

  18. Fabrication and Quality Inspection of U-10wt.%Zr Fuel Rod for Irradiation Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Song, Hoon; Oh, Seok Jin; Lee, Jung Won; Park, Jeong Yong; Lee, Chan Bock [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Metallic fuel has advantages such as simple fabrication procedures, good neutron economy, high thermal conductivity, excellent compatibility with a Na coolant and inherent passive safety. Metal fuels such as U-Zr alloy have been considered as a starting driver fuel for a proto-type Gen-IV sodium cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) in Korea. To confirm the design and fabrication technologies of metallic fuels with FMS cladding for the loading of metallic fuel in PGSFR, an irradiation test will be performed in BOR-60 in Russia in 2016. In this study, U-10wt.%Zr fuel rods using low enrichment uranium (LEU) have been fabricated and inspected in quality for the fuel verification of PGSFR. Fuel slugs per melting batch without casting defects were fabricated by development of the advanced casting technology and evaluation tests. The optimal GTAW welding conditions and parameters were also established through lots of experiments. And, the qualification test carried out to prove the weld quality of end plug welding of the metallic fuel rods. The wire wrapping of metallic fuel rods for the irradiation test was successfully accomplished in KAERI. So, PGSFR fuel rods for the irradiation test in BOR-60 have been soundly fabricated in KAERI.

  19. Plan and safety analysis on the high power irradiation test program of full length fuel element for Hanaro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.S.; Kim, C.K.; Park, H.D.; Kim, K.H.; Park, J.M.; Lee, D.B.; Kim, J.D.; Ko, Y.M.; Jang, S.J.; Ahn, H.S.; Woo, Y.M.; Kim, E.S.; Kim, H.R.; Chae, H.T.; Lee, C.S

    1999-06-01

    The advanced research reactor fuel development project has been carried out for a localization of HANARO nuclear fuels. The design and fabrication technologies of the localized fuel are almost developed, and the quality assurance procedure and assessment criteria were established. The characteristics of the fuel fabricated in KAERI were investigated through out-pile test. In order to verify the localized fuel performance, irradiation test plan of the developed fuel has been worked out. It consists of 3 stages. The 1st stage is normal power irradiation test and the final burn-up of the test fuel was supposed to be 85 at%. The fuel has been successfully irradiated until now and will be unloaded in June. The 2nd irradiation test will be done to confirm the fuel performance and to get the in-pile data under the high neutron flux level. This test fuel is identical with the 36-element fuel assembly. After the 1st and 2nd irradiation tests are completed with acceptable results, the 3rd irradiation test of final stage will be carried out as a demonstration. In this report, the results of the 1st irradiation test is introduced. Then the objectives, schedule and test condition, the design documents of fuel elements and bundle, the methods of fabrication, out-pile test results, post-irradiation examination scheme, calculation of linear power distribution, and safety analysis results for the 2nd irradiation test bundle are described. (author). 2 refs., 14 tabs., 12 figs.

  20. The 4th irradiation test of dry process fuel in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C. Y.; Moon, J. S.; Kang, K. H.; Jung, I. H.; Song, K. C.; Yang, M. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    The 4th irradiation test of dry process pellet using non-instrumented rig is being performed in the HANARO research reactor. Among the three mini-elements for the 4{sup th} irradiation test, the element No.1 is dedicated to the extended irradiation of the DUPIC pellets irradiated in the 3{sup rd} irradiation test, the element No.2 and No.3 are used for the comparative analysis on the in-core behaviors of simulated DUPIC fuel and actual DUPIC fuel. For these purposes, the irradiated rig of the 3{sup rd} irradiation test was disassembled in a hot cell to select the element No.1. Also the SIMFUEL that is fabricated in the DUPIC laboratory is welded by laser in a welding chamber and the DUPIC fuel that is remotely fabricated in DFDF is welded by a laser method as done in the second and third irradiation tests. The rig was remotely assembled using a rig assembler and loaded into the OR5 hole. Since June 2002, the 4{sup th} irradiation test is being performed.

  1. AGR-2 IRRADIATION TEST FINAL AS-RUN REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise, Collin

    2014-07-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test

  2. 10 CFR 71.97 - Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... fuel and nuclear waste. 71.97 Section 71.97 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING... notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste. (a) As specified in paragraphs (b), (c... advance notification of transportation of nuclear waste was published in the Federal Register on June...

  3. Post-irradiation data on fuel elements from KER Loop 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, E.C.

    1963-01-10

    Fourteen NAE1 fuel elements were discharged from KER Loop-4, after irradiation to an average exposure of 1250 MWD, at prototype N-Reactor coolant temperature and pressure. The elements were disassembled and measured in the KE fuel examination facility. This report includes all measurements, except the profilometer data.

  4. Continuous dissolution of irradiated nuclear fuels; Dissolution continue des combustibles nucleaires irradies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, P.; Talmont, X.; Tarnerq, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    In the case of the continuous dissolution of nuclear fuels, the equations for the calculation of the fuel concentration of the solution flowing out of a pot dissolver have been written. Nitric acid feed flow rates have been calculated in order to obtain an adjusted solution when starting or stopping a dissolution, or when changing the number of rods introduced per hour. Then some transient states brought on by perturbations, have been studied: a) sudden change in nitric acid flow rate; b) continuous drift of the latter; c) sudden change in nitric acid feed concentration; d) transition from a fuel concentration to another by changing the flow rate of nitric acid feed. It has been shown that some transient states cannot be solved with general equations. Computer calculation programs would be probably more useful. (authors) [French] L'etude se rapporte a la dissolution dans l'acide nitrique des combustibles nucleaires irradies, en vue de la recuperation de la matiere fissile qu'ils contiennent. On a etabli, dans le cas de la dissolution continue, les differentes equations permettant le calcul de la concentration en combustible a la sortie d'un dissolveur du type 'marmite'. On a etudie les regimes du debit d'alimentation en acide nitrique a imposer lors du demarrage, de l'arret d'une dissolution, ou lors d'un changement de cadence d'introduction des barreaux, de facon a obtenir une solution ajustee. On a etudie ensuite differents regimes transitoires consecutifs a des perturbations: changement brusque du debit d'acide d'alimentation, derive continue de ce debit, changement brusque de la concentration de l'acide d'alimentation, passage d'une concentration en combustible a une autre par changement du debit d'acide d'alimentation. On a pu montrer que certains regimes transitoires ne peuvent se traiter par des equations generales, et necessiteraient plustot l'etablissement d

  5. Fabrication of DUPIC fuel pellets for irradiation testing in the NRU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, S. S.; Park, K. I. [and others

    2003-12-01

    In this project, DUPIC fuel manufacturing processes were established, and the irradiation test of DUPIC fuel at NRU in Canada was planned for the evaluation of DUPIC fuel performance. To establish manufacturing processes satisfying the requirements of NRU irradiation test, pre-qualification test and qualification test were performed. As a result of the qualification test, the DUPIC pellet fabrication processes were qualified and accepted by AECL. 8 batches of experiments were performed to fabricate 375 DUPIC pellets satisfying the requirements of NRU irradiation test under control of the quality assurance manual complying with CAN3-Z299.2-85. Sintered densities of the fabricated DUPIC pellets ranged from 10.26 g/cm{sup 3} to 10.43 g/cm{sup 3}. The DUPIC pellets have been stored in a box filled with helium gas. The pellets will be used to fabricate DUPIC elements for the irradiation testing.

  6. Ceramography of Irradiated tristructural isotropic (TRISO) Fuel from the AGR-2 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, Francine Joyce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Stempien, John Dennis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Ceramography was performed on cross sections from four tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel compacts taken from the AGR-2 experiment, which was irradiated between June 2010 and October 2013 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The fuel compacts examined in this study contained TRISO-coated particles with either uranium oxide (UO2) kernels or uranium oxide/uranium carbide (UCO) kernels that were irradiated to final burnup values between 9.0 and 11.1% FIMA. These examinations are intended to explore kernel and coating morphology evolution during irradiation. This includes kernel porosity, swelling, and migration, and irradiation-induced coating fracture and separation. Variations in behavior within a specific cross section, which could be related to temperature or burnup gradients within the fuel compact, are also explored. The criteria for categorizing post-irradiation particle morphologies developed for AGR-1 ceramographic exams, was applied to the particles in the AGR-2 compacts particles examined. Results are compared with similar investigations performed as part of the earlier AGR-1 irradiation experiment. This paper presents the results of the AGR-2 examinations and discusses the key implications for fuel irradiation performance.

  7. Anodic dissolution of irradiated metallic fuels in LiCl-KCl melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, T.; Kato, T.; Rodrigues, A.; Ougier, M.; Iizuka, M.; Koyama, T.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2014-09-01

    Electrorefining is the main step in pyro-process of spent nuclear fuels, where actinides are recovered and separated from fission products. In the present study, electrorefining of irradiated metallic fuels called METAPHIX-1 (U-19 wt%Pu-10 wt%Zr alloy irradiated at PHENIX reactor, approximate maximum burn-up 2.5 at%) was performed. A major focus was on minimization of Zr co-dissolution from spent metallic fuels to reduce the burden to the pyro-process. Based on the ICP-MS analysis results and the SEM-EDX observations, the anodic dissolution behavior of the irradiated metallic fuels and the mass balances of actinides and fission products during the electrorefining were evaluated.

  8. Anodic dissolution of irradiated metallic fuels in LiCl–KCl melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, T., E-mail: m-tsuyo@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Komaeshi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Kato, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Komaeshi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Rodrigues, A.; Ougier, M. [Joint Research Center–Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC–ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Iizuka, M.; Koyama, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Komaeshi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Glatz, J.-P. [Joint Research Center–Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC–ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Electrorefining is the main step in pyro-process of spent nuclear fuels, where actinides are recovered and separated from fission products. In the present study, electrorefining of irradiated metallic fuels called METAPHIX-1 (U–19 wt%Pu–10 wt%Zr alloy irradiated at PHENIX reactor, approximate maximum burn-up 2.5 at%) was performed. A major focus was on minimization of Zr co-dissolution from spent metallic fuels to reduce the burden to the pyro-process. Based on the ICP-MS analysis results and the SEM–EDX observations, the anodic dissolution behavior of the irradiated metallic fuels and the mass balances of actinides and fission products during the electrorefining were evaluated.

  9. AGC-1 Post Irradiation Examination Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank

    2011-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Graphite R&D program is currently measuring irradiated material property changes in several grades of nuclear graphite for predicting their behavior and operating performance within the core of new Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment consisting of six irradiation capsules will generate this irradiated graphite performance data for NGNP reactor operating conditions. All six AGC capsules in the experiment will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), disassembled in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF), and examined at the INL Research Center (IRC) or Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This is the first in a series of status reports on the progress of the AGC experiment. As the first capsule, AGC1 was irradiated from September 2009 to January 2011 to a maximum dose level of 6-7 dpa. The capsule was removed from ATR and transferred to the HFEF in April 2011 where the capsule was disassembled and test specimens extracted from the capsules. The first irradiated samples from AGC1 were shipped to the IRC in July 2011and initial post irradiation examination (PIE) activities were begun on the first 37 samples received. PIE activities continue for the remainder of the AGC1 specimen as they are received at the IRC.

  10. Development of Tools for Treating an Irradiated Fuel Rod Assembly in the Pool of HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, J. T.; Ahn, S. H.; Kim, K. H.; Joung, C. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To inspect a fuel rod during irradiation testing at the test loop of a research reactor, the test rig should be disassembled from the IPS (In-pile test section), and the targeted fuel rod assembly should be disassembled from the test rig and encapsulated in a cask to deliver the assembly to the hot cell. In addition, the fuel rod assembly under inspection in the hot cell should be delivered to the reactor pool and reassembled into the test rig to resume the irradiation test. Because the irradiated fuel rod is highly radioactive, all of the assembly and disassembly operations should be carried out in the reactor pool. Therefore, special tools need to be developed to treat the test rig in the pool of a research reactor. In this study, a new mechanically detachable fuel rod assembly has been developed for intermediate inspection during irradiation test at HANARO. A fuel rod assembly can be divided into two parts, such as an instrumented fuel rod assembly and a non-instrumented fuel rod assembly. In particular, an instrumented fuel rod assembly is assembled at the lower part of the test rig, and a non-instrumented fuel rod assembly is assembled at the bottom of the instrumented fuel rod assembly. The non-instrumented fuel rod assembly is locked in the test rig during irradiation test, and is easily disassembled from the instrumented fuel rod assembly by pushing the anchor button and twisting the non-instrumented fuel rod assembly. In addition, because a test rig is 5.4 meters long and the disassembling operation should be carried out at 6 meters deep in the pool of HANARO, tools to help disassemble and assemble the non-instrumented fuel rod assembly have also been developed. All components were designed to operate mechanically and are made of stainless steel and Al 6061 to minimize the effects from the radioactivity. The performance of the developed fuel rod assembly and tools have been verified through an out pile test.

  11. Highly nitrogen-doped carbon capsules: scalable preparation and high-performance applications in fuel cells and lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuangang; Xiao, Ying; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Zhipan; Cao, Minhua; Qu, Liangti

    2013-04-07

    Highly nitrogen-doped carbon capsules (hN-CCs) have been successfully prepared by using inexpensive melamine and glyoxal as precursors via solvothermal reaction and carbonization. With a great promise for large scale production, the hN-CCs, having large surface area and high-level nitrogen content (N/C atomic ration of ca. 13%), possess superior crossover resistance, selective activity and catalytic stability towards oxygen reduction reaction for fuel cells in alkaline medium. As a new anode material in lithium-ion battery, hN-CCs also exhibit excellent cycle performance and high rate capacity with a reversible capacity of as high as 1046 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 50 mA g(-1) after 50 cycles. These features make the hN-CCs developed in this study promising as suitable substitutes for the expensive noble metal catalysts in the next generation alkaline fuel cells, and as advanced electrode materials in lithium-ion batteries.

  12. AFC-1 Transmutation Fuels Post-Irradiation Hot Cell Examination 4-8 at.% - Final Report (Irradiation Experiments AFC-1B, -1F and -1Æ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Hilton; Douglas Porter; Steven Hayes

    2006-09-01

    The AFC-1B, AFC-1F and AFC-1Æ irradiation tests are part of a series of test irradiations designed to evaluate the feasibility of the use of actinide bearing fuel forms in advanced fuel cycles for the transmutation of transuranic elements from nuclear waste. The tests were irradiated in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to an intermediate burnup of 4 to 8 at% (2.7 - 6.8 x 1020 fiss/cm3). The tests contain metallic and nitride fuel forms with non-fertile (i.e., no uranium) and low-fertile (i.e., uranium bearing) compositions. Results of postirradiation hot cell examinations of AFC-1 irradiation tests are reported for eleven metallic alloy transmutation fuel rodlets and five nitride transmutation fuel rodlets. Non-destructive examinations included visual examination, dimensional inspection, gamma scan analysis, and neutron radiography. Detailed examinations, including fission gas puncture and analysis, metallography / ceramography and isotopics and burnup analyses, were performed on five metallic alloy and three nitride transmutation fuels. Fuel performance of both metallic alloy and nitride fuel forms was best correlated with fission density as a burnup metric rather than at.% depletion. The actinide bearing transmutation metallic alloy compositions exhibit irradiation performance very similar to U-xPu-10Zr fuel at equivalent fission densities. The irradiation performance of nitride transmutation fuels was comparable to limited data published on mixed nitride systems.

  13. Next generation fuel irradiation capability in the High Flux Reactor Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuetterer, Michael A., E-mail: michael.fuetterer@jrc.n [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy (JRC-IE), P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); D' Agata, Elio; Laurie, Mathias; Marmier, Alain; Scaffidi-Argentina, Francesco [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy (JRC-IE), P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Raison, Philippe [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), D-76334 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bakker, Klaas; Groot, Sander de; Klaassen, Frodo [Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    This paper describes selected equipment and expertise on fuel irradiation testing at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands. The reactor went critical in 1961 and holds an operating license up to at least 2015. While HFR has initially focused on Light Water Reactor fuel and materials, it also played a decisive role since the 1970s in the German High Temperature Reactor (HTR) development program. A variety of tests related to fast reactor development in Europe were carried out for next generation fuel and materials, in particular for Very High Temperature Reactor (V/HTR) fuel, fuel for closed fuel cycles (U-Pu and Th-U fuel cycle) and transmutation, as well as for other innovative fuel types. The HFR constitutes a significant European infrastructure tool for the development of next generation reactors. Experimental facilities addressed include V/HTR fuel tests, a coated particle irradiation rig, and tests on fast reactor, transmutation and thorium fuel. The rationales for these tests are given, results are provided and further work is outlined.

  14. Results of Recent Microstructural Characterization of Irradiated U-Mo Dispersion Fuels with Al Alloy Matrices that Contain Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiser, Jr, D D; Robinson, A B; Janney, D E; Jue, J F

    2008-03-01

    RERTR U-Mo dispersion fuel plates are being developed for application in research reactors throughout the world. Of particular interest is the irradiation performance of U-Mo dispersion fuels with Si added to the Al matrix. Si is added to improve the performance of U-Mo dispersion fuels. Microstructural examinations have been performed on fuel plates with either Al-0.2Si or 4043 Al (~4.8% Si) alloy matrix in the as-fabricated and/or as-irradiated condition using optical metallography and/or scanning electron microscopy. Fuel plates with either matrix can have Si-rich layers around the U-7Mo particles after fabrication, and during irradiation these layers were observed to grow in thickness and to become Si-deficient in some areas of the fuel plates. For the fuel plates with 4043 Al, this was observed in fuel plate areas that were exposed to very aggressive irradiation conditions.

  15. FLASHPOINT - a tool to routinely calculate the heat load in the irradiated fuel bays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyskocil, E.; Morrison, C.; Gifford, E.; Inglot, A.; Kozlowski, K.; Gocmanac, M. [AMEC NSS, Reactor and Radiation Physics, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Parlatan, Y. [Ontario Power Generation, Safety Analysis Improvement Project Dept., Pickering, Ontario (Canada); Alabasha, H. [Bruce Power, Nuclear Safety Analysis and Support, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    At the recommendation of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), a tool was developed as an enhancement of NuFLASH (Nuclear Fuel Location and Storage History) in order to routinely calculate the Irradiated Fuel Bay (IFB) heat load. It uses information stored in NuFLASH regarding the location and details of spent fuel bundle properties to calculate the decay power on a bundle by bundle basis and then sum the decay powers of all bundles in a particular IFB. FLASHPOINT employs a two-step approximation of the bundle irradiation history based on the record of the life cycle for each individual fuel bundle. The primary parameter affecting the decay power of any individual irradiated CANDU fuel bundle following its discharge from core is the period of time elapsed since the bundle last operated at power within the reactor. The remaining factors influencing the decay power of an individual fuel bundle concern the irradiation history of that bundle while in core. The accuracy of the FLASHPOINT methodology has been assessed primarily through comparison of results obtained using the two step history representation implemented in FLASHPOINT against results from a more detailed ORIGEN-S calculation of the decay heat based on the SORO power history for a randomly selected sample of bundles. The results for individual bundles and the aggregate group are presented and the accuracy of the two-step approximation is demonstrated to be acceptable. (author)

  16. EVALUATION OF U10MO FUEL PLATE IRRADIATION BEHAVIOR VIA NUMERICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL BENCHMARKING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel J. Miller; Hakan Ozaltun

    2012-11-01

    This article analyzes dimensional changes due to irradiation of monolithic plate-type nuclear fuel and compares results with finite element analysis of the plates during fabrication and irradiation. Monolithic fuel plates tested in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Lab (INL) are being used to benchmark proposed fuel performance for several high power research reactors. Post-irradiation metallographic images of plates sectioned at the midpoint were analyzed to determine dimensional changes of the fuel and the cladding response. A constitutive model of the fabrication process and irradiation behavior of the tested plates was developed using the general purpose commercial finite element analysis package, Abaqus. Using calculated burn-up profiles of irradiated plates to model the power distribution and including irradiation behaviors such as swelling and irradiation enhanced creep, model simulations allow analysis of plate parameters that are either impossible or infeasible in an experimental setting. The development and progression of fabrication induced stress concentrations at the plate edges was of primary interest, as these locations have a unique stress profile during irradiation. Additionally, comparison between 2D and 3D models was performed to optimize analysis methodology. In particular, the ability of 2D and 3D models account for out of plane stresses which result in 3-dimensional creep behavior that is a product of these components. Results show that assumptions made in 2D models for the out-of-plane stresses and strains cannot capture the 3-dimensional physics accurately and thus 2D approximations are not computationally accurate. Stress-strain fields are dependent on plate geometry and irradiation conditions, thus, if stress based criteria is used to predict plate behavior (as opposed to material impurities, fine micro-structural defects, or sharp power gradients), unique 3D finite element formulation for each plate is required.

  17. UN TRISO Compaction in SiC for FCM Fuel Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trammell, Michael P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kiggans, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jolly, Brian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skitt, Darren J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is conducting research and development to elevate the technology readiness level of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuels, a candidate nuclear fuel with potentially enhanced accident tolerance due to very high fission product retention. One of the early activities in FY17 was to demonstrate production of FCM pellets with uranium nitride TRISO particles. This was carried out in preparation of the larger pellet production campaign in support of the upcoming irradiation testing of this fuel form at INL’s Advanced Test Reactor.

  18. Modeling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of mixed oxide fuel for sodium fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Aydın; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2010-01-01

    An engineering code to model the irradiation behavior of UO2-PuO2 mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named fuel engineering and structural analysis tool (FEAST-OXIDE). FEAST-OXIDE has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe: (1) fission gas release and swelling, (2) fuel chemistry and restructuring, (3) temperature distribution, (4) fuel-clad chemical interaction and (5) fuel-clad mechanical analysis. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST-OXIDE can analyze fuel and cladding thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis transient scenarios. The code was written in FORTRAN-90 program language. The mechanical analysis module implements the LIFE algorithm. Fission gas release and swelling behavior is described by the OGRES and NEFIG models. However, the original OGRES model has been extended to include the effects of joint oxide gain (JOG) formation on fission gas release and swelling. A detailed fuel chemistry model has been included to describe the cesium radial migration and JOG formation, oxygen and plutonium radial distribution and the axial migration of cesium. The fuel restructuring model includes the effects of as-fabricated porosity migration, irradiation-induced fuel densification, grain growth, hot pressing and fuel cracking and relocation. Finally, a kinetics model is included to predict the clad wastage formation. FEAST-OXIDE predictions have been compared to the available FFTF, EBR-II and JOYO databases, as well as the LIFE-4 code predictions. The agreement was found to be satisfactory for steady-state and slow-ramp over-power accidents.

  19. Irradiated microstructure of U-10Mo monolithic fuel plate at very high fission density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, J.; Miller, B. D.; Keiser, D. D.; Jue, J. F.; Madden, J. W.; Robinson, A. B.; Ozaltun, H.; Moore, G.; Meyer, M. K.

    2017-08-01

    Monolithic U-10Mo alloy fuel plates with Al-6061 cladding are being developed for use in research and test reactors as low enrichment fuel (< 20% U-235 enrichment) as a result of its high uranium loading capacity compared to that of U-7Mo dispersion fuel. These fuel plates contain a Zr diffusion barrier between the U-10Mo fuel and Al-6061 cladding that suppresses the interaction between the U-Mo fuel foil and Al alloy cladding that is known to be problematic under irradiation. This paper discusses the TEM results of the U-10Mo/Zr/Al6061 monolithic fuel plate (Plate ID: L1P09T, ~ 59% U-235 enrichment) irradiated in Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory as part of RERTR-9B irradiation campaign with an unprecedented high local fission density of 9.8E+21 fissions/cm3. The calculated fuel foil centerline temperature at the beginning of life and the end of life is 141 and 194 C, respectively. A total of 5 TEM lamellas were prepared using focus ion beam lift-out technique. The estimated U-Mo fuel swelling, based on the fuel foil thickness change from SEM, is approximately 76%. Large bubbles (> 1 µm) are distributed evenly in U-Mo and interlink of these bubbles is evident. The average size of subdivided grains at this fission density appears similar to that at 5.2E+21 fissions/cm3. The measured average Mo and Zr content in the fuel matrix is ~ 30 at% and ~ 7 at%, respectively, in general agreement with the calculated Mo and Zr from fission density.

  20. Simulation of irradiation hardening of Zircaloy within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yijie; Wang, Qiming; Cui, Yi; Huo, Yongzhong; Ding, Shurong

    2011-06-01

    Within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements, the metal matrix and cladding attacked continuously by fast neutrons undergo irradiation hardening, which might have remarkable effects upon the mechanical behaviors within fuel elements. In this paper, with the irradiation hardening effect of metal materials mainly considered together with irradiation growth effect of the cladding, the three-dimensional large-deformation constitutive relations for the metal matrix and cladding are developed. The method of virtual temperature increase in the previous studies is further developed to model the irradiation swelling of fuel particles; the method of anisotropic thermal expansion is introduced to model irradiation growth of the cladding; and a method of multi-step-temperature loading is proposed to simulate the coupling features of irradiation-induced swelling of the fuel particles together with irradiation growth of the cladding. Above all, based on the developed relationship between irradiation growth at certain burnup and the loaded virtual temperatures, with considering that certain burnup corresponds to certain fast neutron fluence, the time-dependent constitutive relation due to irradiation hardening effect is replaced by the virtual-temperature-dependent one which is introduced into the commercial software to simulate the irradiation hardening effects of the matrix and cladding. Numerical simulations of the irradiation-induced mechanical behaviors are implemented with the finite element method in consideration of the micro-structure of the fuel meat. The obtained results indicate that when the irradiation hardening effects are introduced into the constitutive relations of the metal matrix and cladding: (1) higher maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the matrix exist with the equivalent plastic strains remaining almost the same at lower burnups; (2) the maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the cladding are enhanced while the maximum equivalent

  1. Repurposing an irradiated instrumented TRIGA fuel element for regular use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Paulo F.; Souza, Luiz C.A., E-mail: pfo@cdtn.br, E-mail: lcas@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    TRIGA IPR-R1 is a research reactor also used for training and radioisotope production, located at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear da Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (Nuclear Technology Development Centre, Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission - CDTN/CNEN). Its first criticality occurred in November 1960. All original fuel elements were aluminum-clad. In 1971 nine new fuel elements, stainless steel-clad were acquired. One of them was an instrumented fuel element (IFE), equipped with 3 thermocouples. The IFE was introduced into the core only on August 2004, and remained there until July 2007. It was removed from the core after the severing of contacts between the thermocouples and their extension cables. After an unsuccessful attempt to recover electrical access to the thermocouples the IFE was transferred from the reactor pool to an auxiliary spent fuel storage well, with water, in the reactor room. In December 2011 the IFE was transferred to an identical well, dry, where it remains so far. This work is a proposal for recovery of this instrumented fuel element, by removing the cable guide rod and adaptation of a superior terminal plug similar to conventional fuel elements. This will enable its handling through the same tool used for regular fuel elements and its return to the reactor core. This is a delicate intervention in terms of radiological protection, and will require special care to minimize the exposure of operators. (author)

  2. Microstructural Analysis of Irradiated U-Mo Fuel Plates: Recent Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. D. Keiser, Jr.; J. Jue; B. D. Miller; J. Gan; A. B. Robinson; P. V. Medvedev

    2012-03-01

    Microstructural characterization of irradiated dispersion and monolithic RERTR fuel plates using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is being performed in the Electron Microscopy Laboratory at the Idaho National Laboratory. The SEM analysis of samples from U-Mo dispersion fuel plates focuses primarily on the behavior of the Si that has been added to the Al matrix to improve the irradiation performance of the fuel plate and on the overall behavior of fission gases (e.g., Xe and Kr) that develop as bubbles in the fuel microstructure. For monolithic fuel plates, microstructural features of interest, include those found in the U-Mo foil and at the U-Mo/Zr and Zr/6061 Al cladding interfaces. For both dispersion and monolithic fuel plates, samples have been produced using an SEM equipped with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB). These samples are of very high quality and can be used to uncover some very unique microstructural features that are typically not observed when characterizing samples produced using more conventional techniques. Overall, for the dispersion fuel plates with matrices that contained Si, narrower fuel/matrix interaction layers are typically observed compared to the fuel plates with pure Al matrix, and for the monolithic fuel plates microstructural features have been observed in the U-10Mo foil that are similar to what have been observed in the fuel particles found in U-Mo dispersion fuels. Most recently, more prototypic monolithic fuel samples have been characterized and this paper describes the microstructures that have been observed in these samples.

  3. Characterization of fission gas bubbles in irradiated U-10Mo fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, Andrew M.; Burkes, Douglas E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.

    2017-09-01

    Irradiated U-10Mo fuel samples were prepared with traditional mechanical potting and polishing methods with in a hot cell. They were then removed and imaged with an SEM located outside of a hot cell. The images were then processed with basic imaging techniques from 3 separate software packages. The results were compared and a baseline method for characterization of fission gas bubbles in the samples is proposed. It is hoped that through adoption of or comparison to this baseline method that sample characterization can be somewhat standardized across the field of post irradiated examination of metal fuels.

  4. Key Differences in the Fabrication, Irradiation, and Safety Testing of U.S. and German TRISO-coated Particle Fuel and Their Implications on Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Maki, John Thomas; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hobbins, Richard Redfield

    2002-06-01

    High temperature gas reactor technology is achieving a renaissance around the world. This technology relies on high quality production and performance of coated particle fuel. Historically, the irradiation performance of TRISO-coated gas reactor particle fuel in Germany has been superior to that in the United States. German fuel generally displayed in-pile gas release values that were three orders of magnitude lower than U.S. fuel. Thus, we have critically examined the TRISO-coated fuel fabrication processes in the U.S. and Germany and the associated irradiation database with a goal of understanding why the German fuel behaves acceptably, why the U.S. fuel has not faired as well, and what process/ production parameters impart the reliable performance to this fuel form. The postirradiation examination results are also reviewed to identify failure mechanisms that may be the cause of the poorer U.S. irradiation performance. This comparison will help determine the roles that particle fuel process/product attributes and irradiation conditions (burnup, fast neutron fluence, temperature, and degree of acceleration) have on the behavior of the fuel during irradiation and provide a more quantitative linkage between acceptable processing parameters, as-fabricated fuel properties and subsequent in-reactor performance.

  5. Key Differences in the Fabrication, Irradiation, and Safety Testing of U.S. and German TRISO-coated Particle Fuel and Their Implications on Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Maki, John Thomas; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hobbins, Richard Redfield

    2002-06-01

    High temperature gas reactor technology is achieving a renaissance around the world. This technology relies on high quality production and performance of coated particle fuel. Historically, the irradiation performance of TRISO-coated gas reactor particle fuel in Germany has been superior to that in the United States. German fuel generally displayed in-pile gas release values that were three orders of magnitude lower than U.S. fuel. Thus, we have critically examined the TRISO-coated fuel fabrication processes in the U.S. and Germany and the associated irradiation database with a goal of understanding why the German fuel behaves acceptably, why the U.S. fuel has not faired as well, and what process/ production parameters impart the reliable performance to this fuel form. The postirradiation examination results are also reviewed to identify failure mechanisms that may be the cause of the poorer U.S. irradiation performance. This comparison will help determine the roles that particle fuel process/product attributes and irradiation conditions (burnup, fast neutron fluence, temperature, and degree of acceleration) have on the behavior of the fuel during irradiation and provide a more quantitative linkage between acceptable processing parameters, as-fabricated fuel properties and subsequent in-reactor performance.

  6. Fabrication of U-10 wt.%Zr Metallic Fuel Rodlets for Irradiation Test in BOR-60 Fast Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Ki-Hwan Kim; Jong-Hwan Kim; Seok-Jin Oh; Jung-Won Lee; Ho-Jin Lee; Chan-Bock Lee

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication technology for metallic fuel has been developed to produce the driver fuel in a PGSFR in Korea since 2007. In order to evaluate the irradiation integrity and validate the in-reactor of the starting metallic fuel with FMS cladding for the loading of the metallic fuel, U-10 wt.%Zr fuel rodlets were fabricated and evaluated for a verification of the starting driver fuel through an irradiation test in the BOR-60 fast reactor. The injection casting method was applied to U-10 wt.%Zr...

  7. On-site gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements of fission gas release in irradiated nuclear fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsson, I; Grapengiesser, B; Andersson, B

    2007-01-01

    An experimental, non-destructive in-pool, method for measuring fission gas release (FGR) in irradiated nuclear fuel has been developed. Using the method, a significant number of experiments have been performed in-pool at several nuclear power plants of the BWR type. The method utilises the 514 keV gamma-radiation from the gaseous fission product (85)Kr captured in the fuel rod plenum volume. A submergible measuring device (LOKET) consisting of an HPGe-detector and a collimator system was utilised allowing for single rod measurements on virtually all types of BWR fuel. A FGR database covering a wide range of burn-ups (up to average rod burn-up well above 60 MWd/kgU), irradiation history, fuel rod position in cross section and fuel designs has been compiled and used for computer code benchmarking, fuel performance analysis and feedback to reactor operators. Measurements clearly indicate the low FGR in more modern fuel designs in comparison to older fuel types.

  8. Final Report on IFA-10, the first Swedish Instrumented Fuel Assembly Irradiated in HBWR, Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyllander, J.Aa.

    1967-12-15

    A final report is given on IFA-10, the first Swedish instrumented fuel assembly irradiated in HBWR. The post-irradiation data are presented and correlated with the irradiation statistics. No bowing of the bundle was observed, no equi-axed grain growth was discernible, the fission gas release was very small, and the relative dimensional changes in length and diameter were of the order of magnitude 9 x 10{sup -4} The hydride content of the can increased from 35 ppm to 65 ppm and, in the contact point of the spacer, to 180 ppm.

  9. Design, fabrication and installation of irradiation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Sung; Lee, C. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Chi, D. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Ahn, S. H.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, J. K.; Yang, S. H.; Yang, S. Y.; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H.; Lee, K. H.; Lee, B. C.; Park, C.; Lee, C. T.; Cho, S. W.; Kwak, K. K.; Suk, H. C. [and others

    1997-07-01

    The principle contents of this project are to design, fabricate and install the steady-state fuel test loop and non-instrumented capsule in HANARO for nuclear technology development. This project will be completed in 1999, the basic and detail design, safety analysis, and procurement of main equipment for fuel test loop have been performed and also the piping in gallery and the support for IPS piping in reactor pool have been installed in 1994. In the area of non-instrumented capsule for material irradiation test, the fabrication of capsule has been completed. Procurement, fabrication and installation of the fuel test loop will be implemented continuously till 1999. As besides, as these irradiation facilities will be installed in HANARO, review of safety concern, discussion with KINS for licensing and safety analysis report has been submitted to KINS to get a license and review of HANARO interface have been performed respectively. (author). 39 refs., 28 tabs., 21 figs.

  10. Metallography and fuel cladding chemical interaction in fast flux test facility irradiated metallic U-10Zr MFF-3 and MFF-5 fuel pins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, W. J.; Chichester, H. M.; Porter, D. L.; Wootan, D. W.

    2016-05-01

    The Mechanistic Fuel Failure (MFF) series of metal fuel irradiations conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) provides an important comparison between data generated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) and that expected in a larger-scale fast reactor. The MFF fuel operated with a peak cladding temperature at the top of the fuel column, but developed peak burnup at the centerline of the core. This places the peak fuel temperature midway between the core center and the top of fuel, lower in the fuel column than in EBR-II experiments. Data from the MFF-3 and MFF-5 assemblies are most comparable to the data obtained from the EBR-II X447 experiment. The two X447 pin breaches were strongly influenced by fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) at the top of the fuel column. Post irradiation examination data from MFF-3 and MFF-5 are presented and compared to historical EBR-II data.

  11. Four-point Bend Testing of Irradiated Monolithic U-10Mo Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabin, B. H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lloyd, W. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schulthess, J. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wright, J. K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lind, R. P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Scott, L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wachs, K. M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents results of recently completed studies aimed at characterizing the mechanical properties of irradiated U-10Mo fuel in support of monolithic base fuel qualification. Mechanical properties were evaluated in four-point bending. Specimens were taken from fuel plates irradiated in the RERTR-12 and AFIP-6 Mk. II irradiation campaigns, and tests were conducted in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The monolithic fuel plates consist of a U-10Mo fuel meat covered with a Zr diffusion barrier layer fabricated by co-rolling, clad in 6061 Al using a hot isostatic press (HIP) bonding process. Specimens exhibited nominal (fresh) fuel meat thickness ranging from 0.25 mm to 0.64 mm, and fuel plate average burnup ranged from approximately 0.4 x 1021 fissions/cm3 to 6.0 x 1021 fissions/cm3. After sectioning the fuel plates, the 6061 Al cladding was removed by dissolution in concentrated NaOH. Pre- and post-dissolution dimensional inspections were conducted on test specimens to facilitate accurate analysis of bend test results. Four-point bend testing was conducted on the HFEF Remote Load Frame at a crosshead speed of 0.1 mm/min using custom-designed test fixtures and calibrated load cells. All specimens exhibited substantially linear elastic behavior and failed in a brittle manner. The influence of burnup on the observed slope of the stress-strain curve and the calculated fracture strength is discussed.

  12. Study of irradiation induced restructuring of high burnup fuel - Use of computer and accelerator for fuel science and engineering -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sataka, M.; Ishikawa, N.; Chimn, Y.; Nakamura, J.; Amaya, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka Gun (Japan); Iwasawa, M.; Ohnuma, T.; Sonoda, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Kinoshita, M.; Geng, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Kaneta, Y. [The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Yasunaga, K.; Matsumura, S.; Yasuda, K. [Kyushu Univ., Motooka (Japan); Iwase [Osaka Prefecture Univ., Osaka (Japan); Ichinomiya, T.; Nishiuran, Y. [Hokkaido Univ., Kitaku (Japan); Matzke, HJ. [Academy of Ceramics, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    In order to develop advanced fuel for future LWR reactors, trials were made to simulate the high burnup restructuring of the ceramics fuel, using accelerator irradiation out of pile and with computer simulation. The target is to reproduce the principal complex process as a whole. The reproduction of the grain subdivision (sub grain formation) was successful at experiments with sequential combined irradiation. It was made by recovery process of the accumulated dislocations, making cells and sub-boundaries at grain boundaries and pore surfaces. Details of the grain sub division mechanism is now in front of us outside of the reactor. Extensive computer science studies, first principle and molecular dynamics gave behavior of fission gas atoms and interstitial oxygen, assisting the high burnup restructuring.

  13. The Design and Manufacturing Report of Non-Instrumented Rig for Dual-cooled Annular Fuel Irradiation Test in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Je Geon; Lim, Ik Sung; Kim, Sun Ki; Yang, Yong Sik; Song, Kun Woo; Seo, Chul Gyo; Park, Chan Kook

    2008-09-15

    This project is preparing to irradiation test of the developed double cooled annular fuel pellet in HANARO for pursuit advanced performance in High Performance Fuel Technology Development as a part Nuclear Mid and Long-term R and D Program. On the basis test rod is performed the nuclei property and preliminary fuel performance analysis, test rod and non-instrumented rig designed and manufactured for irradiation test in HANARO OR hole. This non- instrumented rig was confirmed the compatibility of HANARO and the integrity of rig structure, and satisfied the quality assurance requirements. This non- instrumented rig is adopt to the irradiation test for double cooled annular fuel pellet in HANARO.

  14. Delivery of completed irradiation vehicles and the quality assurance document to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McDuffee, Joel Lee [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report details the initial fabrication and delivery of two Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) irradiation capsules (ATFSC01 and ATFSC02), with associated quality assurance documentation, to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The capsules and documentation were delivered by September 30, 2015, thus meeting the deadline for milestone M3FT-15OR0202268. These irradiation experiments are testing silicon carbide composite tubes in order to obtain experimental validation of thermo-mechanical models of stress states in SiC cladding irradiated under a prototypic high heat flux. This document contains a copy of the completed capsule fabrication request sheets, which detail all constituent components, pertinent drawings, etc., along with a detailed summary of the capsule assembly process performed by the Thermal Hydraulics and Irradiation Engineering Group (THIEG) in the Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division (RNSD). A complete fabrication package record is maintained by the THIEG and is available upon request.

  15. Pre-qualification experiments of DUPIC fuel pellets for irradiation testing in the NRU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, S. S.; Lee, J. W. and others

    2002-02-01

    DUPIC fuel manufacturing technologies and processes have been developed at DFDF(DUPIC Fuel Development Facility, IMEF M6). Using DUPIC powder prepared by the oxidation and reduction processes, the DUPIC fuel pellets and mini-elements were fabricated for the irradiation test and performance evaluation at HANARO. In this study, the irradiation test was planned for the performance evaluation of DUPIC fuel pellets and elements at NRU. To establish fabrication process satisfying the requirements of NRU irradiation test, sintered DUPIC pellets were fabricated with a variety of process parameters involving compaction pressure and characterized by the inspection system. As a result of the experiment, DUPIC pellets with 12.19 mm of diameter, 10.37{approx}10.45 g/cm{sup 3} of sintered density, and less than Ra 0.8{mu}m of surface roughness have been successfully fabricated at hot cell. The optimum DUPIC pellet fabrication process satisfying the requirements of NRU irradiation has been established based on the result of this experiment.

  16. Gamma spectrometry of irradiated fuel plates; Espectrometria gama em elementos combustiveis tipo placa irradiados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Perrotta, Jose A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Engenharia do Nucleo

    1997-10-01

    This work describes the fundamental aspects of a method which uses gamma-ray spectroscopy in order to perform non-destructive burnup measurements in irradiated MTR fuel elements. Experiments based on such method will be conducted at the storage pool area of the IEA-R1 research reactor. Some preliminary results are presented. (author). 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Analysis of sample and fuel pin irradiation experiments in Phenix for basic nuclear data validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Angelo, A.; Cleri, F. (ENEA, Casaccia Nuclear Research Centre, Dipartimento Reattori Veloci, 0060 Casaccia (IT)); Marimbeau, P.; Salvatores, M.; Grouiller, J.P. (Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, Service de Physique des Reacteurs et du Cycle, Dept. de Recherche Physique, 13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance (FR))

    1990-07-01

    This paper presents comparisons between calculations and experimental data from fuel irradiation experiments performed in Phenix. Both the French CARNAVAL-IV system and the recently developed JEF-1 basic data file are used. The global consistency of the results is excellent and the compared values are, in general, very satisfactory. In some cases, indications for evaluated data modifications are obtained.

  18. Validation of the Physics Analysis used to Characterize the AGR-1 TRISO Fuel Irradiation Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James W.; Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Chang, Gray S.

    2015-05-01

    The results of a detailed physics depletion calculation used to characterize the AGR-1 TRISO-coated particle fuel test irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory are compared to measured data for the purpose of validation. The particle fuel was irradiated for 13 ATR power cycles over three calendar years. The physics analysis predicts compact burnups ranging from 11.30-19.56% FIMA and cumulative neutron fast fluence from 2.21?4.39E+25 n/m2 under simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor conditions in the ATR. The physics depletion calculation can provide a full characterization of all 72 irradiated TRISO-coated particle compacts during and post-irradiation, so validation of this physics calculation was a top priority. The validation of the physics analysis was done through comparisons with available measured experimental data which included: 1) high-resolution gamma scans for compact activity and burnup, 2) mass spectrometry for compact burnup, 3) flux wires for cumulative fast fluence, and 4) mass spectrometry for individual actinide and fission product concentrations. The measured data are generally in very good agreement with the calculated results, and therefore provide an adequate validation of the physics analysis and the results used to characterize the irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel.

  19. Irradiation performance of PFBR MOX fuel after 112 GWd/t burn-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkiteswaran, C. N.; Jayaraj, V. V.; Ojha, B. K.; Anandaraj, V.; Padalakshmi, M.; Vinodkumar, S.; Karthik, V.; Vijaykumar, Ran; Vijayaraghavan, A.; Divakar, R.; Johny, T.; Joseph, Jojo; Thirunavakkarasu, S.; Saravanan, T.; Philip, John; Rao, B. P. C.; Kasiviswanathan, K. V.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-06-01

    The 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) which is in advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam, India, will use mixed oxide (MOX) fuel with a target burnup of 100 GWd/t. The fuel pellet is of annular design to enable operation at a peak linear power of 450 W/cm with the requirement of minimum duration of pre-conditioning. The performance of the MOX fuel and the D9 clad and wrapper material was assessed through Post Irradiation Examinations (PIE) after test irradiation of 37 fuel pin subassembly in Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) to a burn-up of 112 GWd/t. Fission product distribution, swelling and fuel-clad gap evolution, central hole diameter variation, restructuring, fission gas release and clad wastage due to fuel-clad chemical interaction were evaluated through non-destructive and destructive examinations. The examinations have indicated that the MOX fuel can safely attain the desired target burn-up in PFBR.

  20. IRRADIATION TESTING OF THE RERTR FUEL MINIPLATES WITH BURNABLE ABSORBERS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. Glagolenko; D. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G. Chang; B. Rabin; C. Clark; T. Wiencek

    2010-10-01

    Based on the results of the reactor physics assessment, conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) can be potentially accomplished in two ways, by either using U-10Mo monolithic or U-7Mo dispersion type plates in the ATR fuel element. Both designs, however, would require incorporation of the burnable absorber in several plates of the fuel element to compensate for the excess reactivity and to flatten the radial power profile. Several different types of burnable absorbers were considered initially, but only borated compounds, such as B4C, ZrB2 and Al-B alloys, were selected for testing primarily due to the length of the ATR fuel cycle and fuel manufacturing constraints. To assess and compare irradiation performance of the U-Mo fuels with different burnable absorbers we have designed and manufactured 28 RERTR miniplates (20 fueled and 8 non-fueled) containing fore-mentioned borated compounds. These miniplates will be tested in the ATR as part of the RERTR-13 experiment, which is described in this paper. Detailed plate design, compositions and irradiations conditions are discussed.

  1. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a

  2. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test

  3. Build-up of actinides in irradiated fuel rods of the ET-RR-1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, M.; Naguib, K.; Morcos, H.N

    2001-09-01

    The content concentrations of actinides are calculated as a function of operating reactor regime and cooling time at different percentage of fuel burn-up. The build-up transmutation equations of actinides content in an irradiated fuel are solved numerically .A computer code BAC was written to operate on a PC computer to provide the required calculations. The fuel element of 10% {sup 235}U enrichment of ET-RR-1 reactor was taken as an example for calculations using the BAC code. The results are compared with other calculations for the ET-RR-1 fuel rod. An estimation of fissile build-up content of a proposed new fuel of 20% {sup 235}U enrichment for ET-RR-1 reactor is given. The sensitivity coefficients of build-up plutonium concentrations as a function of cross-section data uncertainties are also calculated.

  4. Status Report on the Fabrication of Fuel Cladding Chemical Interaction Test Articles for ATR Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-28

    FeCrAl alloys are a promising new class of alloys for light water reactor (LWR) applications due to their superior oxidation and corrosion resistance in high temperature environments. The current R&D efforts have focused on the alloy composition and processing routes to generate nuclear grade FeCrAl alloys with optimized properties for enhanced accident tolerance while maintaining properties needed for normal operation conditions. Therefore, the composition and processing routes must be optimized to maintain the high temperature steam oxidation (typically achieved by increasing the Cr and Al content) while still exhibiting properties conducive to normal operation in a LWR (such as radiation tolerance where reducing Cr content is favorable). Within this balancing act is the addition of understanding the influence on composition and processing routes on the FeCrAl alloys for fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI). Currently, limited knowledge exists on FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system. To overcome the knowledge gaps on the FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system a series of fueled irradiation tests have been developed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) housed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The first series of tests has already been reported. These tests used miniaturized 17x17 PWR fuel geometry rodlets of second-generation FeCrAl alloys fueled with industrial Westinghouse UO2 fuel. These rodlets were encapsulated within a stainless steel housing.To provide high fidelity experiments and more robust testing, a new series of rodlets have been developed deemed the Accident Tolerant Fuel Experiment #1 Oak Ridge National Laboratory FCCI test (ATF-1 ORNL FCCI). The main driving factor, which is discussed in detail, was to provide a radiation environment where prototypical fuel-clad interface temperatures are met while still maintaining constant contact between industrial fuel and the candidate cladding alloys

  5. Erythrocyte-like hollow carbon capsules and their application in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2010-12-14

    Hierarchical nanostructured erythrocyte-like hollow carbon (EHC) with a hollow hemispherical macroporous core of ca. 230 nm in diameter and 30-40 nm thick mesoporous shell was synthesized and explored as a cathode catalyst support in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The morphology control of EHC was successfully achieved using solid core/mesoporous shell (SCMS) silica template and different styrene/furfuryl alcohol mixture compositions by a nanocasting method. The EHC-supported Pt (20 wt%) cathodes prepared have demonstrated markedly enhanced catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) and greatly improved PEMFC polarization performance compared to carbon black Vulcan XC-72 (VC)-supported ones, probably due to the superb structural characteristics of the EHC such as uniform size, well-developed porosity, large specific surface area and pore volume. In particular, Pt/EHC cathodes exhibited ca. 30-60% higher ORR activity than a commercial Johnson Matthey Pt catalyst at a low catalyst loading of 0.2 mg Pt cm(-2).

  6. Transportation impact analysis for shipment of irradiated N-reactor fuel and associated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daling, P.M.; Harris, M.S.

    1994-12-01

    An analysis of the radiological and nonradiological impacts of highway transportation of N-Reactor irradiated fuel (N-fuel) and associated materials is described in this report. N-fuel is proposed to be transported from its present locations in the 105-KE and 105-KW Basins, and possibly the PUREX Facility, to the 327 Building for characterization and testing. Each of these facilities is located on the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. The projected annual shipping quantity is 500 kgU/yr for 5 years for a total of 2500 kgU. It was assumed the irradiated fuel would be returned to the K- Basins following characterization, so the total amount of fuel shipped was assumed to be 5000 kgU. The shipping campaign may also include the transport and characterization of liquids, gases, and sludges from the storage basins, including fuel assembly and/or canister parts that may also be present in the basins. The impacts of transporting these other materials are bounded by the impacts of transporting 5000 kgU of N-fuel. This report was prepared to support an environmental assessment of the N-fuel characterization program. The RADTRAN 4 and GENII computer codes were used to evaluate the radiological impacts of the proposed shipping campaign. RADTRAN 4 was used to calculate the routine exposures and accident risks to workers and the general public from the N-fuel shipments. The GENII computer code was used to calculate the consequences of the maximum credible accident. The results indicate that the transportation of N-fuel in support of the characterization program should not cause excess radiological-induced latent cancer fatalities or traffic-related nonradiological accident fatalities. The consequences of the maximum credible accident are projected to be small and result in no excess latent cancer fatalities.

  7. Evaluation of FSV-1 cask for the transport of LWR irradiated fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    The Model FSV-1 spent fuel shipping cask was designed by General Atomic Company (GA) to service the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) nuclear generating station, a High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) owned and operated by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC). This report presents an evaluation of the suitability of the FSV-1 cask for the transport of irradiated Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies from both Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The FSV-1 cask evaluation parameters covered a wide spectrum of LWR fuel assemblies, based on burnup in Megawatt Days/Metric Ton of Heavy Metal (MWD/MTHM) and years of decay since irradiation. The criteria for suitability included allowable radiation dose rates, cask surface and interior temperatures and the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) of the complete shipping system.

  8. Dissolution of Irradiated Commercial UO2 Fuels in Ammonium Carbonate and Hydrogen Peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Johnsen, Amanda M.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Hanson, Brady D.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.; Carson, Katharine J.; Peper, Shane M.

    2011-01-18

    We propose and test a disposition path for irradiated nuclear fuel using ammonium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide media. We demonstrate on a 13 g scale that >98% of the irradiated fuel dissolves. Subsequent expulsion of carbonate from the dissolver solution precipitates >95% of the plutonium, americium, curium, and substantial amounts of fission products, effectively partitioning the fuel at the dissolution step. Uranium can be easily recovered from solution by any of several means, such as ion exchange, solvent extraction, or direct precipitation. Ammonium carbonate can be evaporated from solution and recovered for re-use, leaving an extremely compact volume of fission products, transactinides, and uranium. Stack emissions are predicted to be less toxic, less radioactive, chemically simpler, and simpler to treat than those from the conventional PUREX process.

  9. X-ray shadow imprint of hydrodynamic instabilities on the surface of inertial confinement fusion capsules by the fuel fill tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, A. G.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Felker, S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O. L.; Martinez, D. A.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Moore, A.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Stadermann, M.; Weber, C. R.

    2017-03-01

    Measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth for a high-density carbon ablator for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion implosions on the National Ignition Facility are reported. We observe significant unexpected features on the capsule surface created by shadows of the capsule fill tube, as illuminated by laser-irradiated x-ray spots on the hohlraum wall. These shadows increase the spatial size and shape of the fill tube perturbation in a way that can significantly degrade performance in layered implosions compared to previous expectations. The measurements were performed at a convergence ratio of ˜2 using in-flight x-ray radiography. The initial seed due to shadow imprint is estimated to be equivalent to ˜50-100 nm of solid ablator material. This discovery has prompted the need for a mitigation strategy for future inertial confinement fusion designs as proposed here.

  10. SILICON CARBIDE GRAIN BOUNDARY DISTRIBUTIONS, IRRADIATION CONDITIONS, AND SILVER RETENTION IN IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillo, T. M.; Rooyen, I. J.; Aguiar, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    Precession electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope was used to map grain orientation and ultimately determine grain boundary misorientation angle distributions, relative fractions of grain boundary types (random high angle, low angle or coincident site lattice (CSL)-related boundaries) and the distributions of CSL-related grain boundaries in the SiC layer of irradiated TRISO-coated fuel particles. Two particles from the AGR-1 experiment exhibiting high Ag-110m retention (>80%) were compared to a particle exhibiting low Ag-110m retention (<19%). Irradiated particles with high Ag-110m retention exhibited a lower fraction of random, high angle grain boundaries compared to the low Ag-110m retention particle. An inverse relationship between the random, high angle grain boundary fraction and Ag-110m retention is found and is consistent with grain boundary percolation theory. Also, comparison of the grain boundary distributions with previously reported unirradiated grain boundary distributions, based on SEM-based EBSD for similarly fabricated particles, showed only small differences, i.e. a greater low angle grain boundary fraction in unirradiated SiC. It was, thus, concluded that SiC layers with grain boundary distributions susceptible to Ag-110m release were present prior to irradiation. Finally, irradiation parameters were found to have little effect on the association of fission product precipitates with specific grain boundary types.

  11. Behavior of pre-irradiated fuel under a simulated RIA condition. Results of NSRR Test JM-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuketa, Toyoshi; Sasajima, Hideo; Mori, Yukihide; Tanzawa, Sadamitsu; Ishijima, Kiyomi; Kobayashi, Shinsho; Kamata, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Homma, Kozo; Sakai, Haruyuki

    1995-11-01

    This report presents results from the power burst experiment with pre-irradiated fuel rod, Test JM-5, conducted in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR). The data concerning test method, pre-irradiation, pre-pulse fuel examination, pulse irradiation, transient records and post-pulse fuel examination are described, and interpretations and discussions of the results are presented. Preceding to the pulse irradiation in the NSRR, test fuel rod was irradiated in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) up to a fuel burnup of 25.7 MWd/kgU with average linear heat rate of 33.4 kW/m. The fuel rod was subjected to the pulse irradiation resulting in a desposited energy of 223 {+-} 7 cal/g{center_dot}fuel (0.93 {+-} 0.03 kJ/g{center_dot}fuel) and a peak fuel enthalpy of 167 {+-} 5 cal/g{center_dot}fuel (0.70 {+-} 0.02 kJ/g{center_dot}fuel) under stagnant water cooling condition at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. Test fuel rod behavior was assessed from pre- and post-pulse fuel examinations and transient records during the pulse. The Test JM-5 resulted in cladding failure. More than twenty small cracks were found in the post-test cladding, and most of the defects located in pre-existing locally hydrided region. The result indicates an occurrence of fuel failure by PCMI (pellet/cladding mechanical interaction) in combination with decreased integrity of hydrided cladding. (author).

  12. System of leak inspection of irradiated fuel; Sistema de inspeccion de fuga de combustible irradiado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delfin L, A.; Castaneda J, G.; Mazon R, R.; Aguilar H, F. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: rmr@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through the project RLA/04/18 Irradiated Fuel Management in Research reactors, recommended among other that the participant countries (Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Peru and Mexico), develop the sipping tool to generate registrations of the state that keep the irradiated fuels in the facilities of each country. The TRIGA Mark lll Reactor (RTMIII) Department, generated a project that it is based on the dimensions of the used fuel by the RTMIII, for design and to build an inspection system of irradiated fuel well known as SIPPING. This technique, provides a high grade of accuracy in the detection of gassy fission products or liquids that escape from the enveloping of fuels that have flaws or flights. The operation process of the SIPPING is carried out generating the migration of fission products through the creation of a pressure differential gas or vacuum to identify fuel assemblies failed by means of the detection of the xenon and/or krypton presence. The SIPPING system, is a device in revolver form with 4 tangential nozzles, which will discharge the fluid between the external surface of the enveloping of the fuel and the interior surface of the encircling one; the device was designed with independent pieces, with threaded joining and with stamps to impede flights of the fluid toward the exterior of the system. The System homogenizes and it distributes the fluid pressure so that the 4 nozzles work to equality of conditions, for what the device was designed in 3 pieces, an internal that is denominated revolver, one external that calls cover, and a joining called mamelon that will unite with the main encircling of the system. The detection of fission products in failed fuels, its require that inside the encircling one where the irradiated fuel element is introduced, be generated a pressure differential of gas or vacuum, and that it allows the samples extraction of water. For what generated a top for the encircling with the

  13. A Model to Predict Thermal Conductivity of Irradiated U-Mo Dispersion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas; Huber, Tanja K.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-05-01

    The Office of Materials Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program continues to develop existing and new research and test reactor fuels to achieve maximum attainable uranium loadings to support the conversion of a number of the world’s remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. The program is focused on assisting with the development and qualification of a fuel design that consists of a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix as one option for reactor conversion. Thermal conductivity is an important consideration in determining the operational temperature of the fuel and can be influenced by interaction layer formation between the dispersed phase and matrix and upon the concentration of the dispersed phase within the matrix. This paper extends the use of a simple model developed previously to study the influence of interaction layer formation as well as the size and volume fraction of fuel particles dispersed in the matrix, Si additions to the matrix, and Mo concentration in the fuel particles on the effective thermal conductivity of the U-Mo/Al composite during irradiation. The model has been compared to experimental measurements recently conducted on U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels at two different fission densities with acceptable agreement. Observations of the modeled results indicate that formation of an interaction layer and subsequent consumption of the matrix reveals a rather significant effect on effective thermal conductivity. The modeled interaction layer formation and subsequent consumption of the high thermal conductivity matrix was sensitive to the average dispersed fuel particle size, suggesting this parameter as one of the most effective in minimizing thermal conductivity degradation of the composite, while the influence of Si additions to the matrix in the model was highly dependent upon irradiation conditions.

  14. A model to predict thermal conductivity of irradiated U-Mo dispersion fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Huber, Tanja K.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-05-01

    Numerous global programs are focused on the continued development of existing and new research and test reactor fuels to achieve maximum attainable uranium loadings to support the conversion of a number of the world's remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. Some of these programs are focused on assisting with the development and qualification of a fuel design that consists of a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix as one option for reactor conversion. Thermal conductivity is an important consideration in determining the operational temperature of the fuel and can be influenced by interaction layer formation between the dispersed phase and matrix and upon the concentration of the dispersed phase within the matrix. This paper extends the use of a simple model developed previously to study the influence of interaction layer formation as well as the size and volume fraction of fuel particles dispersed in the matrix, Si additions to the matrix, and Mo concentration in the fuel particles on the effective thermal conductivity of the U-Mo/Al composite during irradiation. The model has been compared to experimental measurements recently conducted on U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels at two different fission densities with acceptable agreement. Observations of the modeled results indicate that formation of an interaction layer and subsequent consumption of the matrix reveals a rather significant effect on effective thermal conductivity. The modeled interaction layer formation and subsequent consumption of the high thermal conductivity matrix was sensitive to the average dispersed fuel particle size, suggesting this parameter as one of the most effective in minimizing thermal conductivity degradation of the composite, while the influence of Si additions to the matrix in the model was highly dependent upon irradiation conditions.

  15. Fabrication of U-10 wt.%Zr Metallic Fuel Rodlets for Irradiation Test in BOR-60 Fast Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Hwan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication technology for metallic fuel has been developed to produce the driver fuel in a PGSFR in Korea since 2007. In order to evaluate the irradiation integrity and validate the in-reactor of the starting metallic fuel with FMS cladding for the loading of the metallic fuel, U-10 wt.%Zr fuel rodlets were fabricated and evaluated for a verification of the starting driver fuel through an irradiation test in the BOR-60 fast reactor. The injection casting method was applied to U-10 wt.%Zr fuel slugs with a diameter of 5.5 mm. Consequently, fuel slugs per melting batch without casting defects were fabricated through the development of advanced casting technology and evaluation tests. The optimal GTAW welding conditions were also established through a number of experiments. In addition, a qualification test was carried out to prove the weld quality of the end plug welding of the metallic fuel rodlets. The wire wrapping of metallic fuel rodlets was successfully accomplished for the irradiation test. Thus, PGSFR fuel rodlets have been soundly fabricated for the irradiation test in a BOR-60 fast reactor.

  16. Study on containerisation of irradiated fuel at JRC ISPRA for medium/long-term storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertelli, S.; Bielli, G.; Covini, R.

    2001-07-01

    During the last 40 years big amounts of wastes arising from past experiments have been generated at JRC Ispra. These wastes are now stored on site in unconditioned form and must be characterised and re-conditioned to ensure their acceptance by future repositories. Among the several types of wastes produced, spent fuel has a great importance in JRC waste management. In fact, there are more than the tons of irradiated material, varying widely from commercial to experimental fuel elements or pins, in form of oxides and metal fuel, with very different geometry, dry and wet stored. The biggest part of it can be considered as unirradiated, according to the IAEA regulations (ST-1, 1996), while a relatively small amount (nearly 720 kg U total) are to be considered as irradiated and treated accordingly. Studies on the most suitable solutions for medium/long term storage for such irradiated experimental fuel are being performed, taking into account two main options, containerisation of the nuclear materials, as it is, in suitable casks or reprocessing. The technical aspects of the project for containerisation are here discussed. (Author)

  17. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Phillips; Charles Barnes; John Hunn

    2010-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on

  18. Observed Changes in As-Fabricated U-10Mo Monolithic Fuel Microstructures After Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Madden, James

    2017-08-01

    A low-enriched uranium U-10Mo monolithic nuclear fuel is being developed by the Material Management and Minimization Program, earlier known as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, for utilization in research and test reactors around the world that currently use high-enriched uranium fuels. As part of this program, reactor experiments are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor. It must be demonstrated that this fuel type exhibits mechanical integrity, geometric stability, and predictable behavior to high powers and high fission densities in order for it to be a viable fuel for qualification. This paper provides an overview of the microstructures observed at different regions of interest in fuel plates before and after irradiation for fuel samples that have been tested. These fuel plates were fabricated using laboratory-scale fabrication methods. Observations regarding how microstructural changes during irradiation may impact fuel performance are discussed.

  19. Swelling of U-7Mo/Al-Si dispersion fuel plates under irradiation - Non-destructive analysis of the AFIP-1 fuel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachs, D. M.; Robinson, A. B.; Rice, F. J.; Kraft, N. C.; Taylor, S. C.; Lillo, M.; Woolstenhulme, N.; Roth, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    Extensive fuel-matrix interactions leading to plate pillowing have proven to be a significant impediment to the development of a suitable high density low-enriched uranium molybdenum alloy (U-Mo) based dispersion fuel for high power applications in research reactors. The addition of silicon to the aluminum matrix was previously demonstrated to reduce interaction layer growth in mini-plate experiments. The AFIP-1 project involved the irradiation, in-canal examination, and post-irradiation examination of two fuel plates. The irradiation of two distinct full size, flat fuel plates (one using an Al-2wt%Si matrix and the other an Al-4043 (∼4.8 wt% Si) matrix) was performed in the INL ATR reactor in 2008-2009. The irradiation conditions were: ∼250 W/cm2 peak Beginning Of Life (BOL) power, with a ∼3.5e21 f/cm3 peak burnup. The plates were successfully irradiated and did not show any pillowing at the end of the irradiation. This paper reports the results and interpretation of the in-canal and post-irradiation non-destructive examinations that were performed on these fuel plates. It further compares additional PIE results obtained on fuel plates irradiated in contemporary campaigns in order to allow a complete comparison with all results obtained under similar conditions. Except for a brief indication of accelerated swelling early in the irradiation of the Al-2Si plate, the fuel swelling is shown to evolve linearly with the fission density through the maximum burnup.

  20. Transfer of Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant and N Reactor irradiated fuel for storage at the 105-KE and 105-KW fuel storage basins, Hanford Site, Richland Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to remove irradiated fuel from the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant and N Reactor at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, to stabilize the facilities in preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) and to reduce the cost of maintaining the facilities prior to D&D. DOE is proposing to transfer approximately 3.9 metric tons (4.3 short tons) of unprocessed irradiated fuel, by rail, from the PUREX Plant in the 200 East Area and the 105 N Reactor (N Reactor) fuel storage basin in the 100 N Area, to the 105-KE and 105-KW fuel storage basins (K Basins) in the 100 K Area. The fuel would be placed in storage at the K Basins, along with fuel presently stored, and would be dispositioned in the same manner as the other existing irradiated fuel inventory stored in the K Basins. The fuel transfer to the K Basins would consolidate storage of fuels irradiated at N Reactor and the Single Pass Reactors. Approximately 2.9 metric tons (3.2 short tons) of single-pass production reactor, aluminum clad (AC) irradiated fuel in four fuel baskets have been placed into four overpack buckets and stored in the PUREX Plant canyon storage basin to await shipment. In addition, about 0.5 metric tons (0.6 short tons) of zircaloy clad (ZC) and a few AC irradiated fuel elements have been recovered from the PUREX dissolver cell floors, placed in wet fuel canisters, and stored on the canyon deck. A small quantity of ZC fuel, in the form of fuel fragments and chips, is suspected to be in the sludge at the bottom of N Reactor`s fuel storage basin. As part of the required stabilization activities at N Reactor, this sludge would be removed from the basin and any identifiable pieces of fuel elements would be recovered, placed in open canisters, and stored in lead lined casks in the storage basin to await shipment. A maximum of 0.5 metric tons (0.6 short tons) of fuel pieces is expected to be recovered.

  1. A model for evolution of oxygen potential and stoichiometry deviation in irradiated UO 2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozrin, V. D.

    2011-12-01

    A model for radial redistribution of oxygen in irradiated UO 2 fuel under conditions of temperature and fission rate gradients has been developed. The oxygen transport in irradiated fuel is considered as a two-scale problem. On the local scale defined by the grain size, irradiated fuel is considered as a multi-phase system including solid solution of fission products in UO 2 matrix, solid precipitates (metal phase, grey phase of complex ternary compounds, the phase of condensed CsI) formed at the gas/solid interface and the gas phase in the intergranular bubbles. Intraganular transport of fission products is described by a set of diffusion equations which are supplemented by the condition of partial thermochemical equilibrium in the subsystem "precipitates & gas phase". The boundary conditions are formulated basing on thermochemical equilibrium on the interface of subsystems "solid solution" and "precipitates & gas phase". Calculation of the partial thermochemical equilibrium yields local values of the oxygen chemical potential and the deviation from fuel stoichiometry. On the global scale defined by the fuel pellet size, spatial variations of the oxygen potential caused by the temperature gradients or the presence of sources/sinks at the pellet boundary determine thermal diffusion fluxes resulting in redistribution of oxygen. The whole set of equations describing local equilibration and the transport in the local and global scales is solved in a self-consistent manner. The model results for radial distribution of oxygen potential of UO 2 calculated for typical reactor operating conditions and the fuel burnup up ˜100 MW d/kg HM are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  2. Loss-of-flow test L5 on FFTF-type irradiated fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, R.; Gehl, S.M.; Lo, R.K.; Rothman, A.B.

    1978-03-01

    Test L5 simulated a hypothetical loss-of-flow accident in an LMFBR using three (Pu, U)O/sub 2/ fuel elements of the FTR type. The test elements were irradiated before TREAT Test L5 in the General Electric Test Reactor to 8 at. % burnup at about 40 kW/m. The preirradiation in GETR caused a fuel-restructuring range characteristic of moderate-power structure relative to the FTR. The test transient was devised so that a power burst would be initiated at incipient cladding melting after the loss of flow. The test simulation corresponds to a scenario for FTR in which fuel in high-power-structure subassemblies slump, resulting in a power excursion. The remaining subassemblies are subjected to this power burst. Test L5 addressed the fuel-motion behavior of the subassemblies in this latter category. Data from test-vehicle sensors, hodoscope, and post-mortem examinations were used to construct the sequence of events within the test zone. From these observations, the fuel underwent a predominantly dispersive event just after reaching a peak power six times nominal at, or after, scram. The fuel motion was apparently driven by the release of entrained fission-product gases, since fuel vapor pressure was deliberately kept below significant levels for the transient. The test remains show a wide range of microstructural evolution, depending on the extent of heat deposition along the active fuel column. Extensive fuel swelling was also observed as a result of the lack of the cladding restraint. The results of the thermal-hydraulic calculations with the SAS3A code agreed qualitatively with the postmortem results with respect to the extent of the melting and the dispersal of cladding and fuel. However, the calculated times of certain events did not agree with the observed times.

  3. Fabrication of DUPIC Fuel for the 6th Irradiation Test at HANARO Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woong Ki; Lee, D. Y.; Cho, K. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lee, J. W.; Lee, Jae W.; Park, G. I.; Lee, C. Y.; Yang, M. S

    2006-02-15

    In this study, 15 DUPIC pellets and two mini-elements were fabricated to precisely investigate the thermal characteristics of DUPIC fuel. As a result of the experiment, DUPIC pellets with 10.221{approx}10.278 g/cm{sup 3} (94.5{approx}95.0 % of T.D.) of sintered density and less than Ra 0.96 {mu}m of surface roughness satisfying the specifications of DUPIC fuel for the 6th irradiation test have been remotely fabricated at hot cell. 5 DUPIC pellets including 3 pellets equipped with thermal sensor in the center of the pellet were loaded in a mini-element. Endcap welding of the mini-element was performed by Nd:YAG laser. The DUPIC mini-elements assembled in an instrumented rig will be irradiated at HANARO research reactor.

  4. Development of SPND-instrumented rig of HANARO irradiation test of DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C. Y.; Mun, J. S.; Park, H. S.; Song, K. C.; Kang, K. H.; Jeong, I. H.; Yang, M. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    The 3rd irradiation test of DUPIC fuel, which was fabricated in the DFDF has been performed at HANARO. For the objectives of this irradiation test, The SPND-instrumented rig was designed and manufactured on the basis of the design specifications of the non-instrumented rig used in the last irradiation test. The newly designed irradiation rig was equipped with three Rh-type SPND sensors around DUPIC mini-elements for estimating the thermal neutron flux in the OR4 hole. Manufacturing of mini-elements and assembly of the irradiation rig were remotely done in the hot cells using the laser welding system and assembling equipments. The DUPIC rig is installed through the guide tube at the HANARO OR4 hole and the thermal neutron flux measured at that location is transmitted to the monitoring system. This irradiation test launched in June, 2001 at the HANARO OR4, and its anticipated discharge burnup is about 7,000 MWd/tHE.

  5. Performance of AGR-1 high-temperature reactor fuel during post-irradiation heating tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Robert N., E-mail: morrisrn@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Baldwin, Charles A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Demkowicz, Paul A. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Reber, Edward L. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • High-temperature safety tests were performed on 14 irradiated HTGR fuel compacts. • Significant krypton release was detected in only one of the safety tests. • Cesium retention by intact SiC was excellent, even up to 1800 °C. • Release of Ag, Eu, and Sr was dominated by previous release during irradiation. • Silver exhibited the highest fractional release. - Abstract: The fission product retention of irradiated low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts from the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor 1 (AGR-1) experiment has been evaluated at temperatures of 1600–1800 °C during post-irradiation safety tests. Fourteen compacts (a total of ∼58,000 particles) with a burnup ranging from 13.4% to 19.1% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) have been tested using dedicated furnace systems at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The release of fission products {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 85}Kr was monitored while heating the fuel specimens in flowing helium. The behavior of silver, europium, and strontium appears to be dominated by inventory that was originally released through intact SiC coating layers during irradiation, but was retained in the compact at the end of irradiation and subsequently released during the safety tests. However, at a test temperature of 1800 °C, the data suggest that release of these elements through intact coatings may become significant after ∼100 h. Cesium was very well retained by intact SiC layers, with a fractional release <5 × 10{sup −6} after 300 h at 1600 °C or 100 h at 1800 °C. However, it was rapidly released from individual particles if the SiC layer failed, and therefore the overall cesium release fraction was dominated by the SiC defect and failure fractions in the fuel compacts. No complete TRISO coating layer failures were observed after 300 h at 1600 or 1700 °C, and {sup

  6. HIGH-TEMPERATURE SAFETY TESTING OF IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John D.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Reber, Edward L.; Chrisensen, Cad L.

    2016-11-01

    High-Temperature Safety Testing of Irradiated AGR-1 TRISO Fuel John D. Stempien, Paul A. Demkowicz, Edward L. Reber, and Cad L. Christensen Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA Corresponding Author: john.stempien@inl.gov, +1-208-526-8410 Two new safety tests of irradiated tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel have been completed in the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). In the first test, three fuel compacts from the first Advanced Gas Reactor irradiation experiment (AGR-1) were simultaneously heated in the FACS furnace. Prior to safety testing, each compact was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to a burnup of approximately 15 % fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA), a fast fluence of 3×1025 n/m2 (E > 0.18 MeV), and a time-average volume-average (TAVA) irradiation temperature of about 1020 °C. In order to simulate a core-conduction cool-down event, a temperature-versus-time profile having a peak temperature of 1700 °C was programmed into the FACS furnace controllers. Gaseous fission products (i.e., Kr-85) were carried to the Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) by a helium sweep gas and captured in cold traps featuring online gamma counting. By the end of the test, a total of 3.9% of an average particle’s inventory of Kr-85 was detected in the FGMS traps. Such a low Kr-85 activity indicates that no TRISO failures (failure of all three TRISO layers) occurred during the test. If released from the compacts, condensable fission products (e.g., Ag-110m, Cs-134, Cs-137, Eu-154, Eu-155, and Sr-90) were collected on condensation plates fitted to the end of the cold finger in the FACS furnace. These condensation plates were then analyzed for fission products. In the second test, five loose UCO fuel kernels, obtained from deconsolidated particles from an irradiated AGR-1 compact, were heated in the FACS furnace to a peak temperature of 1600 °C. This test had two

  7. Irradiation of Microbes from Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Pool Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckenridge, C.R.; Watkins, C.S.; Bruhn, D.F.; Roberto, F.F.; Tsang, M.N.; Pinhero, P.J. [INEEL (US); Brey, R.F. [ISU (US); Wright, R.N.; Windes, W.F.

    1999-09-03

    Microbes have been isolated and identified from spent nuclear fuel storage pools at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Included among these are Corynebacterium aquaticum, Pseudomonas putida, Comamonas acidovorans, Gluconobacter cerinus, Micrococcus diversus, Rhodococcus rhodochrous, and two strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). We examined the sensitivity of these microbes to a variety of total exposures of radiation generated by a 6-MeV linear accelerator (LINAC). The advantage of using a LINAC is that it provides a relatively quick screen of radiation tolerance. In the first set of experiments, we exposed each of the aforementioned microbes along with four additional microbes, pseudomonas aeruginosa, Micrococcus luteus, Escherchia coli, and Deinococcus radiodurans to exposures of 5 x 10{sup 3} and 6 x 10{sup 4} rad. All microbial specimens withstood the lower exposure with little or no reduction in cell population. Upon exposing the microbes to the larger dose of 6 x 10{sup 4} rad, we observed two distinct groupings: microbes that demonstrate resistance to radiation, and microbes that display intolerance through a dramatic reduction from their initial population. Microbes in the radiation tolerant grouping were exposed to 1.1 x 10{sup 5} rad to examine the extent of their resistance. We observe a correlation between radiation resistance and gram stain. The gram-positive species we examined seem to demonstrate a greater radiation resistance.

  8. A model to predict failure of irradiated U–Mo dispersion fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E., E-mail: Douglas.Burkes@pnnl.gov; Senor, David J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Simple model to predict failure of dispersion fuel meat designs. • Evaluated as a function of fabrication parameters and irradiation conditions. • Predictions compare well with experimental measurements of miniature fuel plates. • Interaction layer formation reduces matrix strength and increases temperature. • Si additions to the matrix appear effective only at moderate heat flux and burnup. - Abstract: Numerous global programs are focused on the continued development of existing and new research and test reactor fuels to achieve maximum attainable uranium loadings to support the conversion of a number of the world’s remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. Some of these programs are focused on development and qualification of a fuel design that consists of a uranium–molybdenum (U–Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix as one option for reactor conversion. The current paper extends a failure model originally developed for UO{sub 2}-stainless steel dispersion fuels and uses currently available thermal–mechanical property information for the materials of interest in the currently proposed design. A number of fabrication and irradiation parameters were investigated to understand the conditions at which failure of the matrix, classified as onset of pore formation in the matrix, might occur. The results compared well with experimental observations published as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR)-6 and -7 mini-plate experiments. Fission rate, a function of the {sup 235}U enrichment, appeared to be the most influential parameter in premature failure, mainly as a result of increased interaction layer formation and operational temperature, which coincidentally decreased the strength of the matrix and caused more rapid fission gas production and recoil into the surrounding matrix material. Addition of silicon to the matrix appeared effective at reducing the rate of

  9. A model to predict failure of irradiated U–Mo dispersion fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Senor, David J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous global programs are focused on the continued development of existing and new research and test reactor fuels to achieve maximum attainable uranium loadings to support the conversion of a number of the world’s remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. Some of these programs are focused on development and qualification of a fuel design that consists of a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix as one option for reactor conversion. The current paper extends a failure model originally developed for UO2-stainless steel dispersion fuels and used currently available thermal-mechanical property information for the materials of interest in the current proposed design. A number of fabrication and irradiation parameters were investigated to understand the conditions at which failure of the matrix, classified as pore formation in the matrix, might occur. The results compared well with experimental observations published as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR)-6 and -7 mini-plate experiments. Fission rate, a function of the 235U enrichment, appeared to be the most influential parameter in premature failure, mainly as a result of increased interaction layer formation and operational temperature, which coincidentally decreased the yield strength of the matrix and caused more rapid fission gas production and recoil into the surrounding matrix material. Addition of silicon to the matrix appeared effective at reducing the rate of interaction layer formation and can extend the performance of a fuel plate under a certain set of irradiation conditions, primarily moderate heat flux and burnup. Increasing the dispersed fuel particle diameter may also be effective, but only when combined with other parameters, e.g., lower enrichment and increased Si concentration. The model may serve as a valuable tool in initial experimental design.

  10. Results of High-Temperature Heating Test for Irradiated Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, June-Hyung; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Lee, Byoung-Oon; Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kim, Hee-Moon; Yoo, Boung-Ok; Jung, Yang-Hong; Ahn, Sang-Bok; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The U and Pu constituents in the fuel, however, tend to interact metallurgically with iron-based claddings at elevated temperatures during nominal steady-state operating conditions and off-normal reactor events. In particular, if the temperature is raised above the eutectic temperature of metallic fuel, e.g., in an off-normal reactor event, the fuel can form a mixture of liquid and solid phases that may promote further cladding interaction. Such fuel-cladding chemical interaction, in conjunction with fission gas pressure loading, can potentially shorten fuel pin lifetime and eventually cause cladding breach. In this work, microstructure observation results through microscope, SEM and EPMA are reported for the irradiated U-10Zr and U-10Zr-5Ce fuel slugs with T92 cladding after high-temperature heating test. Also, the measured eutectic penetration rate is compared with the prediction value by the existing eutectic penetration correlation being used for design and modelling purposes. Microstructure of the irradiated U-10Zr and U-10Zr-5Ce fuel slug with T92 cladding after high-temperature heating test were investigated through the microscope, SEM and EPMA. Also, the measured maximum eutectic penetration rate along cladding direction was compared with the prediction value by existing eutectic penetration correlation. In the case of U-10Zr/T92 specimen, migration phenomena of U, Zr, and Fe as well as Nd lanthanide fission product were observed at the eutectic melting region. The measured penetration rate was almost similar to prediction value by existing eutectic penetration rate correlation.

  11. Thorium utilization program progress report for January 1, 1974--June 30, 1975. [Reprocessing; refabrication; recycle fuel irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotts, A.L.; Kasten, P.R.

    1976-05-01

    Work was carried out on the following: HTGR reprocessing development and pilot plant, refabrication development and pilot plant, recycle fuel irradiations, engineering and economic studies, and conceptual design of a commercial recycle plant. (DLC)

  12. NSRR experiment with un-irradiated uranium-zirconium hydride fuel. Design, fabrication process and inspection data of test fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasajima, Hideo; Fuketa, Toyoshi; Ishijima, Kiyomi; Kuroha, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Yoshikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Aizawa, Keiichi

    1998-08-01

    An experiment plan is progressing in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to perform pulse-irradiation with uranium-zirconium hydride (U-ZrH{sub x}) fuel. This fuel is widely used in the training research and isotope production reactor of GA (TRIGA). The objectives of the experiment are to determine the fuel rod failure threshold and to investigate fuel behavior under simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. This report summarizes design, fabrication process and inspection data of the test fuel rods before pulse-irradiation. The experiment with U-ZrH{sub x} fuel will realize precise safety evaluation, and improve the TRIGA reactor performance. The data to be obtained in this program will also contribute development of next-generation TRIGA reactor and its safety evaluation. (author)

  13. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Jason M.; Lessing, Paul A.; Hoggan, Rita E.

    2015-11-01

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinations that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ± 0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. Pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.

  14. Test design description Volume 2, Part 1. IFR-1 metal fuel irradiation test (AK-181) element as-built data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodds, N. E.

    1986-06-01

    The IFR-1 Test, designated as the AK-181 Test Assembly, will be the first irradiation test of wire wrapped, sodium-bonded metallic fuel elements in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The test is part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuels program conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the Innovative Reactor Concepts Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). One subassembly, containing 169 fuel elements, will be irradiated for 600 full power days to achieve 10 at.% burnup. Three metal fuel alloys (U-10Zr, U-8Pu-10Zr) will be irradiated in D9 cladding tubes. The metal fuel elements have a fuel-smeared density of 75% and each contains five slugs. The enriched zone contains three slugs and is 36-in. long. One 6.5-in. long depleted uranium axial blanket slug (DU-10Zr) was loaded at each end of the enriched zone. the fuel elements were fabricated at ANL-W and delivered to Westinghouse-Hanford for wirewrapping and assembly into the test article. This Test Design Description contains relevant data on compositions, densities, dimensions and weights for the cast fuel slugs and completed fuel elements. The elements conform to the requirements in MG-22, "Users` Guide for the Irradiation of Experiments in the FTR."

  15. Comparative Analysis of Structural Changes In U-Mo Dispersed Fuel of Full-Size Fuel Elements And Mini-Rods Irradiated In The MIR Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izhutov, Aleksey L.; Iakovlev, Valeriy V.; Novoselov, Andrey E. and others

    2013-12-15

    The paper summarizes the irradiation test and post-irradiation examination (PIE) data for the U-Mo low-enriched fuel that was irradiated in the MIR reactor under the RERTR Program. The PIE data were analyzed for both full-size fuel rods and mini-rods with atomized powder dispersed in Al matrix as well as with additions of 2%, 5% and 13% of silicon in the matrix and ZrN protective coating on the fuel particles. The full-size fuel rods were irradiated up to an average burnup of ∼ 60%{sup 235}U; the mini-rods were irradiated to an average burnup of ∼ 85%{sup 235}U. The presented data show a significant increase of the void fraction in the U-Mo alloy as the U-235 burnup rises from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%. The effect of irradiation test conditions and U-235 burnup were analyzed with regard to the formation of an interaction layer between the matrix and fuel particles as well as generation of porosity in the U-Mo alloy. Shown here are changes in distribution of U fission products as the U-235 burnup increases from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%.

  16. Gel-sphere-pac fuel for thermal reactors: assessment of fabrication technology and irradiation performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, R.L. Norman, R.E.; Notz, K.J. (comps.)

    1979-11-01

    Recent interest in proliferation-resistant fuel cycles for light-water reactors has focused attention on spiked plutonium and /sup 233/U-Th fuels, requiring remote refabrication. The gel-sphere-pac process for fabricating metal-clad fuel elements has drawn special attention because it involves fewer steps. Gel-sphere-pac fabrication technology involves two major areas: the preparation of fuel spheres of high density and loading these spheres into rods in an efficiently packed geometry. Gel sphere preparation involves three major steps: preparation of a sol or of a special solution (broth), gelation of droplets of sol or broth to give semirigid spheres of controlled size, and drying and sintering these spheres to a high density. Gelation may be accomplished by water extraction (suitable only for sols) or ammonia gelation (suitable for both sols and broths but used almost exclusively with broths). Ammonia gelation can be accomplished either externally, via ammonia gas and ammonium hydroxide, or internally via an added ammonia generator such as hexamethylenetetramine. Sphere-pac fuel rod fabrication involves controlled blending and metering of three sizes of spheres into the rod and packing by low- to medium-energy vibration to achieve about 88% smear density; these sizes have diametral ratios of about 40:10:1 and are blended in size fraction amounts of about 60% coarse, 18% medium, and 22% fine. Irradiation test results indicate that sphere-pac fuel performs at least as well as pellet fuel, and may in fact offer an advantage in significantly reducing mechanical and chemical interaction between the fuel and cladding. The normal feed for gel sphere preparation, heavy metal nitrate solution, is the usual product of fuel reprocessing, so that fabrication of gel spheres performs all the functions performed by both conversion and pellet fabrication in the case of pellet technology.

  17. The influence of cladding on fission gas release from irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    The monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy has been proposed as a fuel design capable of converting the world's highest power research reactors from use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. However, a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier must be used to eliminate interactions that form between the U-Mo monolith and aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding during fabrication and are enhanced during irradiation. One aspect of fuel development and qualification is to demonstrate an appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An exothermic reaction has previously been observed between the AA6061 cladding and Zr diffusion layer. In this paper, two fuel segments with different irradiation history were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Samples from each segment were tested with cladding and without cladding to investigate the effect, if any, that the exothermic reaction has on fission gas release mechanisms. Measurements revealed there is an instantaneous effect of the cladding/Zr exothermic reaction, but not necessarily a cumulative effect above approximately 973 K (700 °C). The mechanisms responsible for fission gas release events are discussed.

  18. Determination of plutonium resent in highly radioactive irradiated fuel solution by spectrophotometric method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhamodharam, Krishnan [Reprocessing Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Pius, Anitha [The Gandhigram Rural Institute - Deemed University, Gandhigram (India)

    2016-06-15

    A simple and rapid spectrophotometric method has been developed to enable the determination of plutonium concentration in an irradiated fuel solution in the presence of all fission products. An excess of ceric ammonium nitrate solution was employed to oxidize all the valence states of plutonium to +6 oxidation state. Interference due to the presence of fission products such as ruthenium and zirconium, and corrosion products such as iron in the envisaged concentration range, as in the irradiated fuel solution, was studied in the determination of plutonium concentration by the direct spectrophotometric method. The stability of plutonium in +6 oxidation state was monitored under experimental conditions as a function of time. Results obtained are reproducible, and this method is applicable to radioactive samples resulting before the solvent extraction process during the reprocessing of fast reactor spent fuel. An analysis of the concentration of plutonium shows a relative standard deviation of <1.2% in standard as well as in simulated conditions. This reflects the fast reactor fuel composition with respect to uranium, plutonium, fission products such as ruthenium and zirconium, and corrosion products such as iron.

  19. Partitioning of selected fission products from irradiated oxide fuel induced by thermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbina, Natalia; Kivel, Niko; Günther-Leopold, Ines

    2013-06-01

    The release of fission products (FPs) from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) has been studied as a function of the temperature and redox conditions. The present paper concerns essentially the high temperature separation of Cs and Sr from irradiated pressurized (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel of different burn-up levels with use of an in-house designed system for inductive vaporization (InVap). Using thermodynamic calculations with the Module of Fission Product Release (MFPR) code along with annealing experiments on SNF in the InVap it was shown that the speciation of Cs and Sr, hence their release behavior at high temperature, is sensitive to the redox conditions during thermal treatment. It was demonstrated that annealing conditions in the InVap can be adjusted in the way to promote the release of selected FPs without significant loss of the fuel matrix or actinides: complete release of Cs and I was achieved during treatment of irradiated fuel at 1800 °C under reducing atmosphere (0.7% H2/Ar mixture). The developed partitioning procedure can be used for the SNF pretreatment as an advanced head-end step in the hydrometallurgical or pyrochemical reprocessing technology.

  20. Partitioning of selected fission products from irradiated oxide fuel induced by thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbina, Natalia, E-mail: natalia.shcherbina@psi.ch [Department of Nuclear Energy and Safety, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Kivel, Niko; Günther-Leopold, Ines [Department of Nuclear Energy and Safety, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen 5232 (Switzerland)

    2013-06-15

    The release of fission products (FPs) from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) has been studied as a function of the temperature and redox conditions. The present paper concerns essentially the high temperature separation of Cs and Sr from irradiated pressurized (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel of different burn-up levels with use of an in-house designed system for inductive vaporization (InVap). Using thermodynamic calculations with the Module of Fission Product Release (MFPR) code along with annealing experiments on SNF in the InVap it was shown that the speciation of Cs and Sr, hence their release behavior at high temperature, is sensitive to the redox conditions during thermal treatment. It was demonstrated that annealing conditions in the InVap can be adjusted in the way to promote the release of selected FPs without significant loss of the fuel matrix or actinides: complete release of Cs and I was achieved during treatment of irradiated fuel at 1800 °C under reducing atmosphere (0.7% H{sub 2}/Ar mixture). The developed partitioning procedure can be used for the SNF pretreatment as an advanced head-end step in the hydrometallurgical or pyrochemical reprocessing technology.

  1. Comparison of Material Behavior of Matrix Graphite for HTGR Fuel Elements upon Irradiation: A literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The fuel elements for the HTGRs (i.e., spherical fuel element in pebble-bed type core design and fuel compact in prismatic core design) consists of coated fuel particles dispersed and bonded in a closely packed array within a carbonaceous matrix. This matrix is generally made by mixing fully graphitized natural and needle- or pitchcoke originated powders admixed with a binder material (pitch or phenolic resin), The resulting resinated graphite powder mixture, when compacted, may influence a number of material properties as well as its behavior under neutron irradiation during reactor operation. In the fabrication routes of these two different fuel element forms, different consolidation methods are employed; a quasi-isostatic pressing method is generally adopted to make pebbles while fuel compacts are fabricated by uni-axial pressing mode. The result showed that the hardness values obtained from the two directions showed an anisotropic behavior: The values obtained from the perpendicular section showed much higher micro hardness (176.6±10.5MPa in average) than from the parallel section ((125.6±MPa in average). This anisotropic behavior was concluded to be related to the microstructure of the matrix graphite. This may imply that the uni-axial pressing method to make compacts influence the microstructure of the matrix and hence the material properties of the matrix graphite.

  2. Internal hydriding in irradiated defected Zircaloy fuel rods: A review (LWBR Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, J C

    1987-10-01

    Although not a problem in recent commercial power reactors, including the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor, internal hydriding of Zircaloy cladding was a persistent cause of gross cladding failures during the 1960s. It occurred in the fuel rods of water-cooled nuclear power reactors that had a small cladding defect. This report summarizes the experimental findings, causes, mechanisms, and methods of minimizing internal hydriding in defected Zircaloy-clad fuel rods. Irradiation test data on the different types of defected fuel rods, intentionally fabricated defected and in-pile operationally defected rods, are compared. Significant factors affecting internal hydriding in defected Zircaloy-clad fuel rods (defect hole size, internal and external sources of hydrogen, Zircaloy cladding surface properties, nickel alloy contamination of Zircaloy, the effect of heat flux and fluence) are discussed. Pertinent in-pile and out-of-pile test results from Bettis and other laboratories are used as a data base in constructing a qualitative model which explains hydrogen generation and distribution in Zircaloy cladding of defected water-cooled reactor fuel rods. Techniques for minimizing internal hydride failures in Zircaloy-clad fuel rods are evaluated.

  3. Corrosion of irradiated MOX fuel in presence of dissolved H 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbol, P.; Fors, P.; Van Winckel, S.; Spahiu, K.

    2009-07-01

    The corrosion behaviour of irradiated MOX fuel (47 GWd/tHM) has been studied in an autoclave experiment simulating repository conditions. Fuel fragments were corroded at room temperature in a 10 mM NaCl/2 mM NaHCO 3 solution in presence of dissolved H 2 for 2100 days. The results show that dissolved H 2 in concentration 1 mM and higher inhibits oxidation and dissolution of the fragments. Stable U and Pu concentrations were measured at 7 × 10 -10 and 5 × 10 -11 M, respectively. Caesium was only released during the first two years of the experiment. The results indicate that the UO 2 matrix of a spent MOX fuel is the main contributor to the measured dissolution, while the corrosion of the high burn-up Pu-rich islands appears negligible.

  4. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Bionta, R M; Casey, D T; Caggiano, J A; Hatarik, R; Khater, H Y; Sayre, D B; Knauer, J P; Sangster, T C; Herrmann, H W; Kilkenny, J D

    2014-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4-20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80-140 mg/cm(2) and CH-ablator ρR's of 400-680 mg/cm(2) are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  5. Restructuring and redistribution of actinides in Am-MOX fuel during the first 24 h of irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kosuke; Miwa, Shuhei; Sekine, Shin-ichi; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Shin-ichi

    2013-09-01

    In order to confirm the effect of minor actinide additions on the irradiation behavior of MOX fuel pellets, 3 wt.% and 5 wt.% americium-containing MOX (Am-MOX) fuels were irradiated for 10 min at 43 kW/m and for 24 h at 45 kW/m in the experimental fast reactor Joyo. Two nominal values of the fuel pellet oxygen-to-metal ratio (O/M), 1.95 and 1.98, were used as a test parameter. Emphasis was placed on the behavior of restructuring and redistribution of actinides which directly affect the fuel performance and the fuel design for fast reactors. Microstructural evolutions in the fuels were observed by optical microscopy and the redistribution of constituent elements was determined by EPMA using false color X-ray mapping and quantitative point analyses. The ceramography results showed that structural changes occurred quickly in the initial stage of irradiation. Restructuring of the fuel from middle to upper axial positions developed and was almost completed after the 24-h irradiation. No sign of fuel melting was found in any of the specimens. The EPMA results revealed that Am as well as Pu migrated radially up the temperature gradient to the center of the fuel pellet. The increase in Am concentration on approaching the edge of the central void and its maximum value were higher than those of Pu after the 10-min irradiation and the difference was more pronounced after the 24-h irradiation. The increment of the Am and Pu concentrations due to redistribution increased with increasing central void size. In all of the specimens examined, the extent of redistribution of Am and Pu was higher in the fuel of O/M ratio of 1.98 than in that of 1.95.

  6. AGR-1 Compact 5-3-1 Post-Irradiation Examination Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Demkowicz; Jason Harp; Phil Winston; Scott A. Ploger

    2016-12-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program was established to perform the requisite research and development on tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel to support deployment of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The work continues as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) TRISO Fuel program. The overarching program goal is to provide a baseline fuel qualification data set to support licensing and operation of an HTGR. To achieve these goals, the program includes the elements of fuel fabrication, irradiation, post-irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance, and fission product transport (INL 2015). A series of fuel irradiation experiments is being planned and conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These experiments will provide data on fuel performance under irradiation, support fuel process development, qualify the fuel for normal operating conditions, provide irradiated fuel for safety testing, and support the development of fuel performance and fission product transport models. The first of these irradiation tests, designated AGR-1, began in the ATR in December 2006 and ended in November 2009. This experiment was conducted primarily to act as a shakedown test of the multicapsule test train design and provide early data on fuel performance for use in fuel fabrication process development. It also provided samples for post-irradiation safety testing, where fission product retention of the fuel at high temperatures will be experimentally measured. The capsule design and details of the AGR-1 experiment have been presented previously.

  7. Comparison of US and FRG post-irradiation examination procedures to measure statistically significant failure fractions of irradiated coated-particle fuels. [HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kania, M.J.; Homan, F.J.; Mehner, A.W.

    1982-08-01

    Two methods for measuring failure fraction on irradiated coated-particle fuels have been developed, one in the United States (the IMGA system - Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer) and one in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) (the PIAA procedure - Postirradiation Annealing and Beta Autoradiography). A comparison of the two methods on two standardized sets of irradiated particles was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy, operational procedures, and expense of each method in obtaining statistically significant results. From the comparison, the postirradiation examination method employing the IMGA system was found to be superior to the PIAA procedure for measuring statistically significant failure fractions. Both methods require that the irradiated fuel be in the form of loose particles, each requires extensive remote hot-cell facilities, and each is capable of physically separating failed particles from unfailed particles. Important differences noted in the comparison are described.

  8. WESF cesium capsule behavior at high temperature or during thermal cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tingey, G.L.; Gray, W.J.; Shippell, R.J.; Katayama, Y.B.

    1985-06-01

    Double-walled stainless steel (SS) capsules prepared for storage of radioactive /sup 137/Cs from defense waste are now being considered for use as sources for commercial irradiation. Cesium was recovered at B-plant from the high-level radioactive waste generated during processing of defense nuclear fuel. It was then purified, converted to the chloride form, and encapsulated at the Hanford Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The molten cesium chloride salt was encapsulated by pouring it into the inner of two concentric SS cylinders. Each cylinder was fitted with a SS end cap that was welded in place by inert gas-tungsten arc welding. The capsule configuration and dimensions are shown in Figure 1. In a recent review of the safety of these capsules, Tingey, Wheelwright, and Lytle (1984) indicated that experimental studies were continuing to produce long-term corrosion data, to reaffirm capsule integrity during a 90-min fire where capsule temperatures reached 800/sup 0/C, to monitor mechanical properties as a function of time, and to assess the effects of thermal cycling due to periodic transfer of the capsules from a water storage pool to the air environment of an irradiator facility. This report covers results from tests that simulated the effects of the 90-min fire and from thermal cycling actual WESF cesium capsules for 3845 cycles over a period of six months. 11 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Evaluation of FFTF fuel pin design procedure vis-a-vis steady state irradiation performance in EBR II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, R.J.

    1976-11-01

    The FFTF fuel pin design analysis is shown to be conservative through comparison with pin irradiation experience in EBR-II. This comparison shows that the actual lifetimes of EBR-II fuel pins are either greater than 80,000 MWd/MTM or greater than the calculated allowable lifetimes based on thermal creep strain.

  10. AGR-5/6/7 Irradiation Test Predictions using PARFUME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skerjanc, William F.

    2017-09-14

    PARFUME, (PARticle FUel ModEl) a fuel performance modeling code used for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), was used to model the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 irradiation test using predicted physics and thermal hydraulics data. The AGR-5/6/7 test consists of the combined fifth, sixth, and seventh planned irradiations of the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The AGR-5/6/7 test train is a multi-capsule, instrumented experiment that is designed for irradiation in the 133.4-mm diameter north east flux trap (NEFT) position of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Each capsule contains compacts filled with uranium oxycarbide (UCO) unaltered fuel particles. This report documents the calculations performed to predict the failure probability of tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated fuel particles during the AGR-5/6/7 experiment. In addition, this report documents the calculated source term from the driver fuel. The calculations include modeling of the AGR-5/6/7 irradiation that is scheduled to occur from October 2017 to April 2021 over a total of 13 ATR cycles, including nine normal cycles and four Power Axial Locator Mechanism (PALM) cycle for a total between 500 – 550 effective full power days (EFPD). The irradiation conditions and material properties of the AGR-5/6/7 test predicted zero fuel particle failures in Capsules 1, 2, and 4. Fuel particle failures were predicted in Capsule 3 due to internal particle pressure. These failures were predicted in the highest temperature compacts. Capsule 5 fuel particle failures were due to inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) cracking causing localized stresses concentrations in the SiC layer. This capsule predicted the highest particle failures due to the lower irradiation temperature. In addition, shrinkage of the buffer and IPyC layer during irradiation resulted in formation of a buffer-IPyC gap. The two capsules at the two ends of the test train, Capsules 1 and 5 experienced the smallest buffer-IPyC gap

  11. Structural and mechanical characterization of ion-irradiated glassy polymeric carbon for TRISO fuel nuclear application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abunaemeh, Malek; Seif, Mohamed; Elsamadicy, Abdalla; Ila, Daryush

    2012-08-01

    Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel is considered as the fuel design of choice for the next generation of nuclear reactors (Generation IV). Its design consists of a fuel kernel of UO x coated with several layers having different functions. One of these functions is a containment shell/diffusion barrier for the fission fragments. Normally, the material of choice for this shell is pyrolytic carbon (PyC). The material does not offer a perfect barrier, due to its inherent crystalline structure, which is planar (like graphite) and therefore impossible to mold in one continuous sheet around the spherical fuel bead. Plane boundaries allow fragment diffusion at a much higher rate than through the plane. In this study, we investigate the possibility of replacing PyC with a different form of carbon, glassy polymeric carbon (GPC). We prepared samples of GPC and studied the evolution of their physical properties and structure as a function of the radiation environment that they were exposed to. The temperature at which the samples were held during irradiation was very similar to the Generation IV nuclear reactor (∼1000°C). During the fission of U235, the fission fragment mass distribution has two maxima around 98 and 137 amu, which would best correspond to elements Rb and Cs, respectively. However, both ions are hard to produce from our SNICS ion source at the Center for Irradiation of Materials; therefore, we used 107Ag and 197Au as best replacements. The irradiation sessions consisted in various fluences of 5 MeV Ag, and 5 MeV Au. For elemental sample analysis, we used transmission electron microscopy. For mechanical analysis, we used nano-indentation. It is of prime importance to measure the penetration of the implanted 107Ag.and 197Au and the evolution of mechanical properties of GPC irradiated with these ions. A procedure for manufacturing GPC with analysis is presented. This will show how the GPC structure differs as the temperature that it is prepared at increases

  12. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). VHTR Program

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel.

  13. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). VHTR Program

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: 1. Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. 2. Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. 3. Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tristructural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S.-produced fuel.

  14. Design of high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells. (Spent fuel inspection cells) in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ino, Hiroichi; Ueta, Shouhei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sawa, Kazuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tobita, Tsutomu [Nuclear Engineering Company, Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes design requirements and design results for shields, ventilation system and fuel handling devices for the high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells (spent fuel inspection cells). These cells are small cells to carry out few post-irradiation examinations of spent fuels, specimen, etc., which are irradiated in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, since the cells should be built in limited space in the HTTR reactor building, the cells are designed considering relationship between the cells and the reactor building to utilize the limited space effectively. The cells consist of three partitioned hot cells with wall for neutron and gamma-ray shields, ventilation system including filtering units and fuel handling devices. The post-irradiation examinations of the fuels and materials are planed by using the cells and the Hot Laboratory of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor to establish the technology basis on high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). In future, irradiation tests and post-irradiation examinations will be carried out with the cells to upgrade present HTGR technologies and to make the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  15. Measurement of Fission Gas Release from Irradiated U-Mo Monolithic Fuel Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Luscher, Walter G.; Rice, Francine; Pool, Karl N.

    2015-06-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An apparatus capable of annealing post-irradiated small-scale samples cut from larger fuel segments according to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere has been installed into a hot cell. Results show that optimized experimental parameters to investigate fission product release from small samples have been established. Initial measurements conducted on aluminum alloy clad uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel samples reveal three clear fission gas release events over the temperature range of 30-1050 C. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in literature.

  16. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated U–Mo monolithic fuel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Andrew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Luscher, Walter G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rice, Francine J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pool, Karl N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The uranium–molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An apparatus capable of heating post-irradiated small-scale samples cut from larger fuel segments according to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere has been installed into a hot cell. Results show that optimized experimental parameters to investigate fission product release from small samples have been established. Initial measurements conducted on aluminum alloy clad uranium–molybdenum monolithic fuel samples reveal three clear fission gas release events over the temperature range of 30-1000 °C. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature.

  17. Uranium-molybdenum nuclear fuel plates behaviour under heavy ion irradiation: An X-ray diffraction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palancher, H.; Wieschalla, N.; Martin, P.; Tucoulou, R.; Sabathier, C.; Petry, W.; Berar, J.-F.; Valot, C.; Dubois, S.

    2009-03-01

    Heavy ion irradiation has been proposed for discriminating UMo/Al specimens which are good candidates for research reactor fuels. Two UMo/Al dispersed fuels (U-7 wt%Mo/Al and U-10 wt%Mo/Al) have been irradiated with a 80 MeV 127I beam up to an ion fluence of 2 × 1017 cm-2. Microscopy and mainly X-ray diffraction using large and micrometer sized beams have enabled to characterize the grown interaction layer: UAl3 appears to be the only produced crystallized phase. The presence of an amorphous additional phase can however not be excluded. These results are in good agreement with characterizations performed on in-pile irradiated fuels and encourage new studies with heavy ion irradiation.

  18. Feasibility study of on-line digital X-ray imaging for irradiated fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthoens, Y.; Gys, A. [Reactor Material Research Department, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Smolders, V. [Industrial Engineer Department, Katholieke Hogeschool Kempen, Geel (Belgium)

    2003-07-01

    At the Reactor Material Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN Xray imaging of the internal parts of irradiated fuel rods is done on silver-halide films using a 420 kV X-ray source. The replacement of the films by an on-line digital X-ray imaging system implies several advantages. Images can be evaluated instantly and source parameters can be optimized more easily. Time consuming film development is superfluous. The images can digitally be enhanced, processed, reported and archived. Within this work the feasibility of four commercial on-line digital X-ray imaging systems were studied for post-irradiation examination on fuel rods in a hot cell environment. The criteria to evaluate the systems were image quality, integration in the existing hot cell infrastructure, durability and cost price. For the evaluation and comparison of the image quality a simulation fuel rod was fabricated. Three systems suffered from lack of sensitivity, contrast and/or resolution. Only the CsI-scintillator coupled to a CCD-camera with image intensifier gave a sufficient image quality. On the other hand the image intensifiers' dimensions are difficult to integrate in the existing hot cell infrastructure. Also the durability of intensifier screens is questionable as they are susceptible to image burn. Smaller image intensifiers easier to integrate are commercial available nowadays.

  19. Conceptual Design Parameters for HFIR LEU U-Mo Fuel Conversion Experimental Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL

    2013-03-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a versatile research reactor that is operated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The HFIR core is loaded with high-enriched uranium (HEU) and operates at a power level of 85 MW. The primary scientific missions of the HFIR include cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, and isotope production. An engineering design study of the conversion of the HFIR from HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The LEU fuel considered is based on a uranium-molybdenum alloy that is 10 percent by weight molybdenum (U-10Mo) with a 235U enrichment of 19.75 wt %. The LEU core design discussed in this report is based on the design documented in ORNL/TM-2010/318. Much of the data reported in Sections 1 and 2 of this document was derived from or taken directly out of ORNL/TM-2010/318. The purpose of this report is to document the design parameters for and the anticipated normal operating conditions of the conceptual HFIR LEU fuel to aid in developing requirements for HFIR irradiation experiments.

  20. Pyrometallurgical separation processes of radionuclides contained in the irradiated nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Cordoba, Guadalupe; Caravaca, Concha; Quinones, Javier; Gonzalez de la Huebra, Angel

    2005-01-01

    Faced with the new options for the high level waste management, the ''Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T)'' of the radio nuclides contained in the irradiated nuclear fuel appear as a promising option from different points of view, such as environmental risk, radiotoxic inventory reduction, economic, etc.. The present work is part of a research project called ''PYROREP'' of the 5th FWP of the EU that studied the feasibility of the actinide separation from the rest of fission products contained in the irradiated nuclear fuel by pyrometallurgical processes with the aim of their transmutation. In order to design these processes it is necessary to determine basic thermodynamic and kinetic data of the radionuclides contained in the nuclear fuel in molten salt media. The electrochemical study of uranium, samarium and molybdenum in the eutectic melt LiCl - KCl has been performed at a tungsten electrode in the temperature range of 450 - 600 deg C in order to obtain these basic properties. (Author)

  1. Irradiation Performance of U-Mo Alloy Based ‘Monolithic’ Plate-Type Fuel – Design Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. B. Robinson; G. S. Chang; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; D. M. Wachs; D. L. Porter

    2009-08-01

    A down-selection process has been applied to the U-Mo fuel alloy based monolithic plate fuel design, supported by irradiation testing of small fuel plates containing various design parameters. The irradiation testing provided data on fuel performance issues such as swelling, fuel-cladding interaction (interdiffusion), blister formation at elevated temperatures, and fuel/cladding bond quality and effectiveness. U-10Mo (wt%) was selected as the fuel alloy of choice, accepting a somewhat lower uranium density for the benefits of phase stability. U-7Mo could be used, with a barrier, where the trade-off for uranium density is critical to nuclear performance. A zirconium foil barrier between fuel and cladding was chosen to provide a predictable, well-bonded, fuel-cladding interface, allowing little or no fuel-cladding interaction. The fuel plate testing conducted to inform this selection was based on the use of U-10Mo foils fabricated by hot co-rolling with a Zr foil. The foils were subsequently bonded to Al-6061 cladding by hot isostatic pressing or friction stir bonding.

  2. Results of Recent Microstructural Characterization of Irradiated U-Mo Dispersion Fuels with Al Alloy Matrices that Contain Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D D. Keiser, Jr.; A. B. Robinson; D. E. Janney; J. F. Jue

    2008-03-01

    RERTR U-Mo dispersion fuel plates are being developed for application in research reactors throughout the world. As part of this development, reactor experiments are being conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor to determine the irradiation performance of different dispersion fuels that contain U-Mo alloys with different Mo contents and Al alloy matrices with different Si contents. Of particular interest is the performance of the dispersion fuels depending on the Si content of the Al alloy matrix, since the addition of Si is being looked to for improving the performance of these dispersion fuels. This paper will describe the results of recent microstructural examinations that have been performed using optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy on as-fabricated and as-irradiated dispersion fuels with different amounts of Si added to the Al matrix. Differences in the microstructural development during irradiation as a function of the Si content in the Al matrix will be discussed, and comments will be made about the development and stability of the fuel/matrix interaction layers that are commonly present in irradiated dispersion fuels.

  3. Swelling behavior detection of irradiated U-10Zr alloy fuel using indirect neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Huo, He-yong; Wu, Yang; Li, Jiangbo; Zhou, Wei; Guo, Hai-bing; Li, Hang; Cao, Chao; Yin, Wei; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Bin; Feng, Qi-jie; Tang, Bin

    2016-11-01

    It is hopeful that fusion-fission hybrid energy system will become an effective approach to achieve long-term sustainable development of fission energy. U-10Zr alloy (which means the mass ratio of Zr is 10%) fuel is the key material of subcritical blanket for fusion-fission hybrid energy system which the irradiation performance need to be considered. Indirect neutron radiography is used to detect the irradiated U-10Zr alloy because of the high residual dose in this paper. Different burnup samples (0.1%, 0.3%, 0.5% and 0.7%) have been tested with a special indirect neutron radiography device at CMRR (China Mianyang Research Reactor). The resolution of the device is better than 50 μm and the quantitative analysis of swelling behaviors was carried out. The results show that the swelling behaviors relate well to burnup character which can be detected accurately by indirect neutron radiography.

  4. Cladding corrosion and hydriding in irradiated defected zircaloy fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, J.C.

    1985-08-01

    Twenty-one LWBR irradiation test rods containing ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ fuel and Zircaloy cladding with holes or cracks operated successfully. Zircaloy cladding corrosion on the inside and outside diameter surfaces and hydrogen pickup in the cladding were measured. The observed outer surface Zircaloy cladding corrosion oxide thicknesses of the test rods were similar to thicknesses measured for nondefected irradiation test rods. An analysis model, which was developed to calculate outer surface oxide thickness of non-defected rods, gave results which were in reasonable agreement with the outer surface oxide thicknesses of defected rods. When the analysis procedure was modified to account for additional corrosion proportional to fission rate and to time, the calculated values agreed well with measured inner oxide corrosion film values. Hydrogen pickup in the defected rods was not directly proportional to local corrosion oxide weight gain as was the case for non-defected rods. 16 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. High temperature nanoindentation hardness and Young's modulus measurement in a neutron-irradiated fuel cladding material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kese, K.; Olsson, P. A. T.; Alvarez Holston, A.-M.; Broitman, E.

    2017-04-01

    Nanoindentation, in combination with scanning probe microscopy, has been used to measure the hardness and Young's modulus in the hydride and matrix of a high burn-up neutron-irradiated Zircaloy-2 cladding material in the temperature range 25-300 °C. The matrix hardness was found to decrease only slightly with increasing temperature while the hydride hardness was essentially constant within the temperature range. Young's modulus decreased with increasing temperature for both the hydride and the matrix of the high burn-up fuel cladding material. The hydride Young's modulus and hardness were higher than those of the matrix in the temperature range.

  6. Performance of AGR-1 High-Temperature Reactor Fuel During Post-Irradiation Heating Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Baldwin, Charles A [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Demkowicz, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Reber, Edward [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2014-01-01

    The fission product retention of irradiated low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO fuel compacts from the AGR-1 experiment has been evaluated at temperatures of 1600 1800 C during post-irradiation safety tests. Fourteen compacts (a total of ~58,000 particles) with a burnup ranging from 13.4 to 19.1% FIMA have been tested using dedicated furnace systems at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The release of fission products 110mAg, 134Cs, 137Cs, 154Eu, 155Eu, 90Sr, and 85Kr was monitored while heating the fuel specimens in flowing helium. The behavior of silver, europium, and strontium appears to be dominated by inventory that was originally released through intact SiC coating layers during irradiation, but was retained in the compact at the end of irradiation and subsequently released during the safety tests. However, at a test temperature of 1800 C, the data suggest that release of these elements through intact coatings may become significant after ~100 h. Cesium was very well retained by intact SiC layers, with a fractional release <5 10-6 after 300 h at 1600 C or 100 h at 1800 C. However, it was rapidly released from individual particles if the SiC layer failed, and therefore the overall cesium release fraction was dominated by the SiC defect and failure fractions in the fuel compacts. No complete TRISO coating layer failures were observed after 300 h at 1600 or 1700 C, and 85Kr release was very low during the tests (particles with breached SiC, but intact outer pyrocarbon, retained most of their krypton). Krypton release from TRISO failures was only observed after ~210 h at 1800 C in one compact. Post-safety-test examination of fuel compacts and particles has focused on identifying specific particles from each compact with notable fission product release and detailed analysis of the coating layers to understand particle behavior.

  7. Chemical forms of solid fission products in the irradiated uranium—plutonium mixed nitride fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasuo; Maeda, Atsushi; Shiozawa, Ken-ichi; Ohmichi, Toshihiko

    1994-06-01

    Chemical forms of solid fission products in the irradiated (U, Pu)N fuel were estimated by both thermodynamic equilibrium calculation and electron microprobe analysis on burnup simulated samples prepared by carbothermic reduction. Besides the MX type matrix phase dissolving zirconium, niobium, yttrium and rare earth elements, the existence of two kinds of inclusion was recognized. One is URu 3 type intermetallic compound constituted by uranium and platinum group elements. The other is an alloy containing molybdenum as a principal constituent. Furthermore, the swelling rate due to solid fission products precipitation was evaluated to be about 0.5% per %FIMA.

  8. Improving the AGR Fuel Testing Power Density Profile Versus Irradiation-Time in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray S. Chang; David A. Petti; John T. Maki; Misti A. Lillo

    2009-05-01

    The Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR), which is currently being developed, achieves simplification of safety through reliance on ceramic-coated fuel particles. Each TRISO-coated fuel particle has its own containment which serves as the principal barrier against radionuclide release under normal operating and accident conditions. These fuel particles, in the form of graphite fuel compacts, are currently undergoing a series of irradiation tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel qualification program. A representive coated fuel particle with an 235U enrichment of 19.8 wt% was used in this analysis. The fuel burnup analysis tool used to perform the neutronics study reported herein, couples the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. The fuel burnup methodology known as Monte-Carlo with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) was used to evaluate the AGR experiment assembly and demonstrate compliance with ATR safety requirements. For the AGR graphite fuel compacts, the MCWO-calculated fission power density (FPD) due to neutron fission in 235U is an important design parameter. One of the more important AGR fuel testing requirements is to maintain the peak fuel compact temperature close to 1250°C throughout the proposed irradiation campaign of 550 effective full power days (EFPDs). Based on the MCWO-calculated FPD, a fixed gas gap size was designed to allow regulation of the fuel compact temperatures throughout the entire fuel irradiation campaign by filling the gap with a mixture of helium and neon gases. The chosen fixed gas gap can only regulate the peak fuel compact temperature in the desired range during the irradiation test if the ratio of the peak power density to the time-dependent low power density (P/T) at 550 EFPDs is less than 2.5. However, given the near constant neutron flux within the ATR driver core and the depletion of 235U in

  9. Coupled thermochemical, isotopic evolution and heat transfer simulations in highly irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, M. H. A.; Banfield, J.; Clarno, K. T.; Simunovic, S.; Besmann, T. M.; Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.

    2013-10-01

    Predictive capabilities for simulating irradiated nuclear fuel behavior are enhanced in the current work by coupling thermochemistry, isotopic evolution and heat transfer. Thermodynamic models that are incorporated into this framework not only predict the departure from stoichiometry of UO2, but also consider dissolved fission and activation products in the fluorite oxide phase, noble metal inclusions, secondary oxides including uranates, zirconates, molybdates and the gas phase. Thermochemical computations utilize the spatial and temporal evolution of the fission and activation product inventory in the pellet, which is typically neglected in nuclear fuel performance simulations. Isotopic computations encompass the depletion, decay and transmutation of more than 2000 isotopes that are calculated at every point in space and time. These computations take into consideration neutron flux depression and the increased production of fissile plutonium near the fuel pellet periphery (i.e., the so-called “rim effect”). Thermochemical and isotopic predictions are in very good agreement with reported experimental measurements of highly irradiated UO2 fuel with an average burnup of 102 GW d t(U)-1. Simulation results demonstrate that predictions are considerably enhanced when coupling thermochemical and isotopic computations in comparison to empirical correlations. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  10. GEH-4-63, 64: Proposal for irradiation of production brazed Zircaloy-2 clad fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tverberg, J.C.

    1961-05-18

    A brazed end closure is currently being used on prototypical NPR fuel elements. The production closure will use a braze alloy composed of 5% Be + 95% Zry-2 to braze the Zircaloy-2 cap to the jacket and to the metallic uranium core. A similar MTR test, a GEH-4-57, 58, used a braze alloy of the composition 4% Be + 12% Fe + 84% Zry-2 which melts at a lower temperature. In this previous test, element GEH-4-57 failed through a cladding defect located at the base of the braze heat affected zone. Because of this failure it would be desirable to subject a fuel element, which had been subjected to more severe brazing conditions, to the same conditions as GEH-4-57, 58. For this reason the thermal conditions of this test essentially match those of GEH-4-57, 58. This irradiation test consists of two identical fuel elements. The fuel material is normal metallic uranium, Zircaloy-2 clad of the tubular geometry, NPR inner size. The fuel was coextruded at Hanford by General Electric`s Fuels Preparation Department. Each element is 10.8 inches in length with flat Zircaloy-2 end caps brazed to the jacket and uranium core with the 5 Be + 95 Zry-2 brazing alloy, then TIG welded to further insure closure integrity. The elements ar 1.254 inches OD and 0.439 inches ID. For hydraulic purposes a 0.343 inch diamater flow restrictor has been fitted into the central flow channel of both elements.

  11. Applicability of a set of tomographic reconstruction algorithms for quantitative SPECT on irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan; Holcombe, Scott; Grape, Sophie

    2015-05-01

    A fuel assembly operated in a nuclear power plant typically contains 100-300 fuel rods, depending on fuel type, which become strongly radioactive during irradiation in the reactor core. For operational and security reasons, it is of interest to experimentally deduce rod-wise information from the fuel, preferably by means of non-destructive measurements. The tomographic SPECT technique offers such possibilities through its two-step application; (1) recording the gamma-ray flux distribution around the fuel assembly, and (2) reconstructing the assembly's internal source distribution, based on the recorded radiation field. In this paper, algorithms for performing the latter step and extracting quantitative relative rod-by-rod data are accounted for. As compared to application of SPECT in nuclear medicine, nuclear fuel assemblies present a much more heterogeneous distribution of internal attenuation to gamma radiation than the human body, typically with rods containing pellets of heavy uranium dioxide surrounded by cladding of a zirconium alloy placed in water or air. This inhomogeneity severely complicates the tomographic quantification of the rod-wise relative source content, and the deduction of conclusive data requires detailed modelling of the attenuation to be introduced in the reconstructions. However, as shown in this paper, simplified models may still produce valuable information about the fuel. Here, a set of reconstruction algorithms for SPECT on nuclear fuel assemblies are described and discussed in terms of their quantitative performance for two applications; verification of fuel assemblies' completeness in nuclear safeguards, and rod-wise fuel characterization. It is argued that a request not to base the former assessment on any a priori information brings constraints to which reconstruction methods that may be used in that case, whereas the use of a priori information on geometry and material content enables highly accurate quantitative assessment, which

  12. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated UMo dispersion fuel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-09-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an Al-Si matrix has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. In this paper, two irradiated samples containing 53.6 vol% U-7wt% Mo fuel particles dispersed in an Al-2wt% Si matrix were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Measurements revealed three distinct fission gas release events for the samples from 400 to 700 oC, as well as a number of minor fission gas releases below and above this temperature range. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature with exceptional agreement.

  13. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated Usbnd Mo dispersion fuel samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-09-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (Usbnd Mo) alloy dispersed in an Alsbnd Si matrix has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world's highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. In this paper, two irradiated samples containing 53.9 vol% U-7wt% Mo fuel particles dispersed in an Al-2wt% Si matrix were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Measurements revealed three distinct fission gas release events for the samples from 400 to 700 °C, as well as a number of minor fission gas releases below and above this temperature range. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature with exceptional agreement.

  14. Tag gas capsule with magnetic piercing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ira V.

    1976-06-22

    An apparatus for introducing a tag (i.e., identifying) gas into a tubular nuclear fuel element. A sealed capsule containing the tag gas is placed in the plenum in the fuel tube between the fuel and the end cap. A ferromagnetic punch having a penetrating point is slidably mounted in the plenum. By external electro-magnets, the punch may be caused to penetrate a thin rupturable end wall of the capsule and release the tag gas into the fuel element. Preferably the punch is slidably mounted within the capsule, which is in turn loaded as a sealed unit into the fuel element.

  15. Behavior of irradiated BWR fuel under reactivity-initiated-accident conditions; Results of tests FK-1, -2 and -3

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) fuels with burnups of 41 to 45 GWd/tU were pulse-irradiated in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate fuel behavior under cold startup reactivity-initiated-accident (RIA) conditions. BWR fuel segment rods of 8times8BJ (STEP I) type from Fukushima-Daiichi Unit 3 nuclear power plant were refabricated into short test rods, and they were subjected to prompt enthalpy insertion from 293 to 607 J/g (70 to 145 cal/g) within about 20 ms. The fuel cladding...

  16. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL in-pile capsule shipping cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.H.; Chipley, K.K.; Haynie, C.B.; Crowley, W.K.; Just, R.A.

    1977-11-01

    The ORNL in-pile capsule shipping cask is used to transport irradiated experimental capsules and spent fuel elements. The cask was analytically evaluated to determine its compliance with the applicable regulations governing containers in which radioactive materials are transported. Computational procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the cask relative to the general standards for normal conditions of transport and the standards for the hypothetical accident conditions. The results of the evaluation show that the cask is in compliance with the applicable regulations.

  17. Fission product release and microstructure changes of irradiated MOX fuel at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, J.-Y.; Hiernaut, J.-P.; Wiss, T.; Beneš, O.; Thiele, H.; Papaioannou, D.; Rondinella, V. V.; Sasahara, A.; Sonoda, T.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Samples of irradiated MOX fuel of 44.5 GWd/tHM mean burn-up were prepared by core drilling at three different radial positions of a fuel pellet. They were subsequently heated in a Knudsen effusion mass spectrometer up to complete vaporisation of the sample (˜2600 K) and the release of fission gas (krypton and xenon) as well as helium was measured. Scanning electron microscopy was used in parallel to investigate the evolution of the microstructure of a sample heated under the same condition up to given key temperatures as determined from the gas release profiles. A clear initial difference for fission gas release and microstructure was observed as a function of the radial position of the samples and therefore of irradiation temperature. A good correlation between the microstructure evolution and the gas release peaks could be established as a function of the temperature of irradiation and (laboratory) heating. The region closest to the cladding (0.58 < r/r0 < 0.96), designated as sample type A in Fig. 1. It represents the "cooler" part of the fuel pellet. The irradiation temperatures (Tirrad) in this range are from 854 to 1312 K (ΔT: 458 K). The intermediate radial zone of the pellet (0.42 < r/r0 < 0.81), designated sample type B in Fig. 1, has a Tirrad ranging from 1068 to 1434 K (ΔT: 365 K). The central zone of the pellet (0.003 < r/r0 < 0.41), designated sample type C in Fig. 1, which was close to the hottest part of the pellet, has a Tirrad ranging from 1442 to 1572 K (ΔT: 131 K). The sample irradiation temperatures were determined from the calculated temperature profile (exponential function) knowing the core temperature of the fuel (1573 K) [11], the standard temperature for this type of fuel at the inner side of the cladding (800 K). The average burnup was calculated with TRANSURANUS code [12] and the PA burnup is the average burnup multiplied by the ratio of the fissile Pu concentration in PA over average fissile Pu concentration in fuel [11]. Calculated

  18. AGR-2 Irradiated Test Train Preliminary Inspection and Disassembly First Look

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploger, Scott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Demkowciz, Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The AGR 2 irradiation experiment began in June 2010 and was completed in October 2013. The test train was shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex in July 2014 for post-irradiation examination (PIE). The first PIE activities included nondestructive examination of the test train, followed by disassembly of the test train and individual capsules and detailed inspection of the capsule contents, including the fuel compacts and their graphite fuel holders. Dimensional metrology was then performed on the compacts, graphite holders, and steel capsule shells. AGR 2 disassembly and metrology were performed with the same equipment used successfully on AGR 1 test train components. Gamma spectrometry of the intact test train gave a preliminary look at the condition of the interior components. No evidence of damage to compacts or graphite components was evident from the isotopic and gross gamma scans. Disassembly of the AGR 2 test train and its capsules was conducted rapidly and efficiently by employing techniques refined during the AGR 1 disassembly campaign. Only one major difficulty was encountered while separating the test train into capsules when thermocouples (of larger diameter than used in AGR 1) and gas lines jammed inside the through tubes of the upper capsules, which required new tooling for extraction. Disassembly of individual capsules was straightforward with only a few minor complications. On the whole, AGR 2 capsule structural components appeared less embrittled than their AGR 1 counterparts. Compacts from AGR 2 Capsules 2, 3, 5, and 6 were in very good condition upon removal. Only relatively minor damage or markings were visible using high resolution photographic inspection. Compact dimensional measurements indicated radial shrinkage between 0.8 to 1.7%, with the greatest shrinkage observed on Capsule 2 compacts that were irradiated at higher temperature. Length shrinkage ranged from 0.1 to 0.9%, with by far the lowest axial shrinkage on Capsule 3 compacts

  19. Capsule endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is about the size of a large vitamin pill. The person swallows the capsule, and it takes pictures all the way through ... can be started in the doctor's office. The capsule is the size of a large vitamin pill, about an inch (2.5 centimeters) long ...

  20. Irradiation performance of uranium-molybdenum alloy dispersion fuels; Desempenho sob irradiacao de elementos combustiveis do tipo U-Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Cirila Tacconi de

    2005-07-01

    The U-Mo-Al dispersion fuels of Material Test Reactors (MTR) are analyzed in terms of their irradiation performance. The irradiation performance aspects are associated to the neutronic and thermal hydraulics aspects to propose a new core configuration to the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP using U-Mo-Al fuels. Core configurations using U-10Mo-Al fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 8 gU/cm{sup 3} were analyzed with the computational programs Citation and MTRCR-IEA R1. Core configurations for fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 5 gU/cm{sup 3} showed to be adequate to use in IEA-R1 reactor e should present a stable in reactor performance even at high burn-up. (author)

  1. Iterative ct reconstruction from few projections for the nondestructive post irradiation examination of nuclear fuel assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abir, Muhammad Imran Khan

    The core components (e.g. fuel assemblies, spacer grids, control rods) of the nuclear reactors encounter harsh environment due to high temperature, physical stress, and a tremendous level of radiation. The integrity of these elements is crucial for safe operation of the nuclear power plants. The Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) can reveal information about the integrity of the elements during normal operations and off?normal events. Computed tomography (CT) is a tool for evaluating the structural integrity of elements non-destructively. CT requires many projections to be acquired from different view angles after which a mathematical algorithm is adopted for reconstruction. Obtaining many projections is laborious and expensive in nuclear industries. Reconstructions from a small number of projections are explored to achieve faster and cost-efficient PIE. Classical reconstruction algorithms (e.g. filtered back projection) cannot offer stable reconstructions from few projections and create severe streaking artifacts. In this thesis, conventional algorithms are reviewed, and new algorithms are developed for reconstructions of the nuclear fuel assemblies using few projections. CT reconstruction from few projections falls into two categories: the sparse-view CT and the limited-angle CT or tomosynthesis. Iterative reconstruction algorithms are developed for both cases in the field of compressed sensing (CS). The performance of the algorithms is assessed using simulated projections and validated through real projections. The thesis also describes the systematic strategy towards establishing the conditions of reconstructions and finds the optimal imaging parameters for reconstructions of the fuel assemblies from few projections.

  2. Evaluation of fretting failures on PWR fuel by post-irradiation examinations and modeling in the DEGRAD-1 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castanheira, Myrthes; Silva, Jose Eduardo Rosa da; Lucki, Georgi; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Teodoro, Celso A.; Damy, Margaret de A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: myrthes@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    One of the major recognized causes of fuel rod failures is fretting of the clad due to the entrapment of debris in a fuel rod spacer. Such debris, inadvertently dropped into the primary system during maintenance operations, includes various sizes of particles. Intermediate size particles, such as metal cuttings, electrical connectors, metal fittings, pieces of wire, and small nuts and bolts can become trapped between fuel rods in a spacer where hydraulically induced vibrations can cause fretting failure of the fuel rod. An evaluation of debris fretting failure on PWR fuel is presented. The inquiries on fuel rods failures are based on results of analysis using post-irradiation non-destructive examination. The complementary analysis includes a modeling approach by code DEGRAD-1 to characterize the degradation phenomenon after primary failure integrated in the reactor operational history. (author)

  3. Capsule endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsen, Anders Peter; Burcharth, Jakob; Burgdorf, Stefan Kobbelgaard

    2013-01-01

    with ultrasound, MRI, and subsequently a capsule endoscopy. Six months later, the patient presented, and an abdominal CT-scan showed mechanical small bowel obstruction with suspicion of metallic foreign body and perforation. Laparotomy showed perforation, stenosis, and foreign body, approximately 5 cm from...... the ileocecal valve. A right hemicolectomy and distal ileectomy (60 cm) with an ileostomy were performed. On further inspection of resection, a capsule endoscope was found impacted in a stenosis. The ileostomy was later reversed without complications. Conclusion. It is important to be aware of the possibility...... of capsule retention, especially in patients with known or suspected Crohn's disease, due to the propensity of Crohn's disease to form stenosis of the bowel. In cases where a stenosis is suspected, it is warranted to perform a patency capsule swallow before subjecting the patient to a capsule endoscopy....

  4. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN U-MO DISPERSED FUEL OF FULL-SIZE FUEL ELEMENTS AND MINI-RODS IRRADIATED IN THE MIR REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSEY. L. IZHUTOV

    2013-12-01

    The full-size fuel rods were irradiated up to an average burnup of ∼ 60%235U; the mini-rods were irradiated to an average burnup of ∼ 85%235U. The presented data show a significant increase of the void fraction in the U-Mo alloy as the U-235 burnup rises from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%. The effect of irradiation test conditions and U-235 burnup were analyzed with regard to the formation of an interaction layer between the matrix and fuel particles as well as generation of porosity in the U-Mo alloy. Shown here are changes in distribution of U fission products as the U-235 burnup increases from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%.

  5. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY ANALYSIS OF FUEL/MATRIX INTERACTION LAYERS IN HIGHLY-IRRADIATED U-Mo DISPERSION FUEL PLATES WITH Al AND Al–Si ALLOY MATRICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENNIS D. KEISER, JR.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate how the microstructure of fuel/matrix-interaction (FMI layers change during irradiation, different U–7Mo dispersion fuel plates have been irradiated to high fission density and then characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Specifially, samples from irradiated U–7Mo dispersion fuel elements with pure Al, Al-2Si and AA4043 (∼4.5 wt.%Si matrices were SEM characterized using polished samples and samples that were prepared with a focused ion beam (FIB. Features not observable for the polished samples could be captured in SEM images taken of the FIB samples. For the Al matrix sample, a relatively large FMI layer develops, with enrichment of Xe at the FMI layer/Al matrix interface and evidence of debonding. Overall, a significant penetration of Si from the FMI layer into the U–7Mo fuel was observed for samples with Si in the Al matrix, which resulted in a change of the size (larger and shape (round of the fission gas bubbles. Additionally, solid fission product phases were observed to nucleate and grow within these bubbles. These changes in the localized regions of the microstructure of the U–7Mo may contribute to changes observed in the macroscopic swelling of fuel plates with Al-Si matrices.

  6. HELIOS: the new design of the irradiation of U-free fuels for americium transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agata, E. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Klaassen, F.; Sciolla, C. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Dept. Life Cycle and Innovations, P.O. Box 25 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fernandez-Carretero, A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bonnerot, J.M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEC/SESC/LC2I CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2009-06-15

    Americium is one of the radioactive elements that mostly contribute to the radiotoxicity of the nuclear spent fuel. Transmutation of long-lived nuclides like Americium is an option for the reduction of the mass, the radiotoxicity and the decay heat of nuclear waste. The HELIOS irradiation experiment is the last evolution in a series of experiments on americium transmutation. The previous experiments, EFTTRA-T4 and T4bis, have shown that the release or trapping of helium is the key issue for the design of such kind of target. In fact, the production of helium, which is characteristic of {sup 241}Am transmutation, is quite significant. The experiment is carried out in the framework of the 4-year project EUROTRANS of the EURATOM 6. Framework Programme (FP6). Therefore, the main objective of the HELIOS experiment is to study the in-pile behaviour of U-free fuels such as CerCer (Pu, Am, Zr)O{sub 2} and Am{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}+MgO or CerMet (Pu, Am)O{sub 2}+Mo in order to gain knowledge on the role of the fuel microstructure and of the temperature on the gas release and on the fuel swelling. The experiment was planned to be conducted in the HFR (High Flux Reactor) in Petten (The Netherlands) starting the first quarter of 2007. Because of the innovative aspects of the fuel, the fabrication has had some delays as well as the final safety analyses of the original design showed some unexpected deviation. Besides, the HFR reactor has been unavailable since August 2008. Due to the reasons described above, the experiment has been postponed. HELIOS should start in the first quarter of 2009 and will last 300 full power days. The paper will cover the description of the new design of the irradiation experiment HELIOS. The experiment has been split in two parts (HELIOS1 and HELIOS2) which will be irradiated together. Moreover, due to the high temperature achieved in cladding and to the high amount of helium produced during transmutation the experiment previously designed for a

  7. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TOFFER, H.

    2006-07-18

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Fuel that had experienced a neutron environment in a reactor is known as spent, exposed, or irradiated fuel. In contrast fuel that has not yet been placed in a reactor is known as green, unexposed, or unirradiated fuel. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled (References 1 and 2) and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements (Reference 3). The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprised of two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with unirradiated fuel and one with irradiated fuel. Both the unirradiated and irradiated fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, three (3) green fuel

  8. Electron Microscopic Examination of Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles of Compact 6-3-2 of AGR-1 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rooyen, Isabella Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Demkowicz, Paul Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Riesterer, Jessica Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, Brandon Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Janney, Dawn Elizabeth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ploger, Scott Arden [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The electron microscopic examination of selected irradiated TRISO coated particles of the AGR-1 experiment of fuel compact 6-3-2 are presented in this report. Compact 6-3-2 refers to the compact in Capsule 6 at level 3 of Stack 2. The fuel used in capsule 6 compacts, are called the “baseline” fuel as it is fabricated with refined coating process conditions used to fabricate historic German fuel, because of its excellent irradiation performance with UO2 kernels. The AGR-1 fuel is however made of low-enriched uranium oxycarbide (UCO). Kernel diameters are approximately 350 µm with a U-235 enrichment of approximately 19.7%. Compact 6-3-2 has been irradiated to 11.3% FIMA compact average burn-up with a time average, volume average temperature of 1070.2°C and with a compact average fast fluence of 2.38E21 n/cm

  9. A new code for predicting the thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic fuels in sodium fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Aydın; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2010-01-01

    An engineering code to predict the irradiation behavior of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr metallic alloy fuel pins and UO2-PuO2 mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named Fuel Engineering and Structural analysis Tool (FEAST). FEAST has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe fission gas release and fuel swelling, fuel chemistry and restructuring, temperature distribution, fuel-clad chemical interaction, and fuel and clad mechanical analysis including transient creep-fracture for the clad. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST can analyze fuel and clad thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis (non-disruptive) transient scenarios. FEAST was written in FORTRAN-90 and has a simple input file similar to that of the LWR fuel code FRAPCON. The metal-fuel version is called FEAST-METAL, and is described in this paper. The oxide-fuel version, FEAST-OXIDE is described in a companion paper. With respect to the old Argonne National Laboratory code LIFE-METAL and other same-generation codes, FEAST-METAL emphasizes more mechanistic, less empirical models, whenever available. Specifically, fission gas release and swelling are modeled with the GRSIS algorithm, which is based on detailed tracking of fission gas bubbles within the metal fuel. Migration of the fuel constituents is modeled by means of thermo-transport theory. Fuel-clad chemical interaction models based on precipitation kinetics were developed for steady-state operation and transients. Finally, a transient intergranular creep-fracture model for the clad, which tracks the nucleation and growth of the cavities at the grain boundaries, was developed for and implemented in the code. Reducing the empiricism in the constitutive models should make it more acceptable to extrapolate FEAST-METAL to new fuel compositions and higher burnup, as envisioned in advanced sodium reactors

  10. A new code for predicting the thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic fuels in sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahan, Aydin, E-mail: karahan@mit.ed [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Buongiorno, Jacopo [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

    2010-01-31

    An engineering code to predict the irradiation behavior of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr metallic alloy fuel pins and UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named Fuel Engineering and Structural analysis Tool (FEAST). FEAST has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe fission gas release and fuel swelling, fuel chemistry and restructuring, temperature distribution, fuel-clad chemical interaction, and fuel and clad mechanical analysis including transient creep-fracture for the clad. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST can analyze fuel and clad thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis (non-disruptive) transient scenarios. FEAST was written in FORTRAN-90 and has a simple input file similar to that of the LWR fuel code FRAPCON. The metal-fuel version is called FEAST-METAL, and is described in this paper. The oxide-fuel version, FEAST-OXIDE is described in a companion paper. With respect to the old Argonne National Laboratory code LIFE-METAL and other same-generation codes, FEAST-METAL emphasizes more mechanistic, less empirical models, whenever available. Specifically, fission gas release and swelling are modeled with the GRSIS algorithm, which is based on detailed tracking of fission gas bubbles within the metal fuel. Migration of the fuel constituents is modeled by means of thermo-transport theory. Fuel-clad chemical interaction models based on precipitation kinetics were developed for steady-state operation and transients. Finally, a transient intergranular creep-fracture model for the clad, which tracks the nucleation and growth of the cavities at the grain boundaries, was developed for and implemented in the code. Reducing the empiricism in the constitutive models should make it more acceptable to extrapolate FEAST-METAL to new fuel compositions and higher burnup, as envisioned in advanced sodium

  11. Development of the advanced PHWR technology -Design, fabrication and installation of irradiation facilities-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Sung; Lee, Jung Yung; Lee, Sung Hoh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    The principal contents of this project are to design, fabricate and install the steady-state fuel test loop and non-instrumented capsule and to develop the instrumented capsule in HANARO for nuclear technology development. This project will be completed in 1997, the detail design, safety analysis, and procurement of main equipment for fuel test loop have been performed and also the piping in gallery and the support for IPS piping in reactor pool have been installed in 1994 as the second year of the first phase in implementing this project. In the area of non-instrumented capsule for material irradiation test, the fabrication of capsule has been completed, so the manufacturing process has been accomplished by the preparation of QA procedure manual, machining and assembling, test and inspection. In the area of instrumented capsule technology development, mock-ups of capsule and supporting system have been designed and fabricated for the development of the in-pile test technology. It has been confirmed that the capsule and supporting system are compatible with the HANARO operating conditions and structural requirements. Capsule supporting system has been installed in the HANARO. As besides, as these irradiation facilities will be installed in HANARO, review of safety concern, discussion with KINS for licensing and review of HANARO interface have been performed respectively. 36 figs, 18 tabs, 21 refs. (Author).

  12. A new approach to determine {sup 147}Pm in irradiated fuel solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennetot, R.; Stadelmann, G.; Caussignac, C.; Gombert, C.; Fouque, M.; Lamouroux, Ch. [CEA, Dept Chim Phys, Serv Etud Comportement Radionucleides, Lab Anal Nucl Isotop et Elementaires, Ctr Etud Sacl, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2009-07-01

    Developments carried out in the Laboratory of Isotopic Nuclear and Elementary Analyses in order to quantify {sup 147}Pm in spent nuclear fuels analyzed at the CEA within the framework of the Burn Up Credit research program for neutronic code validation are presented here. This determination is essential for safety-criticality Studies. The quantity and the nature of the radionuclides in irradiated fuel solutions force LIS to separate the elements of interest before measuring their isotopic content by mass spectrometry. The main objective of this study is to modify the separation protocol used in our laboratory in order to recover and to measure the {sup 147}Pm at the same time as the other lanthanides and actinides determined by mass spectrometry. A very complete study oil synthetic solution (containing or not {sup 147}Pm) Was undertaken in order to determine the yield of the various stages of separation carried out before obtaining the isolated Pm fraction from the whole of the elements present in the spent fuel Solutions. With the lack of natural tracer to carry out the measurement with the isotope dilution technique, the great number of isotopes in fuel, the originality of this work tests oil the use of another present lanthanide in fuel to define the output of separation. The yields were measured at the conclusion of each stage of separation with two others lanthanides in order to show that one of them could be used as a tracer to correct the measurement of the {sup 147}Pm with the separation yield. The total yield (at the conclusion of the two stages of separation) was measured at the same time by ICP-MS and liquid scintillation. This last determination made it possible to validate the use of the Sm-147 (natural) to measure the {sup 147}Pm in ICP-MS since the outputs determined in liquid scintillation and ICP-MS (starting from the radioactive decrease of the source having been used to make the synthetic solution) were equivalent. It is the first time that such

  13. AGR 3/4 Irradiation Test Final As Run Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Several fuel and material irradiation experiments have been planned for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Reactor Technologies Technology Development Office Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program (referred to as the INL ART TDO/AGR fuel program hereafter), which supports the development and qualification of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The goals of these experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination and safety testing (INL 05/2015). AGR-3/4 combined the third and fourth in this series of planned experiments to test TRISO coated low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide fuel. This combined experiment was intended to support the refinement of fission product transport models and to assess the effects of sweep gas impurities on fuel performance and fission product transport by irradiating designed-to-fail fuel particles and by measuring subsequent fission metal transport in fuel-compact matrix material and fuel-element graphite. The AGR 3/4 fuel test was successful in irradiating the fuel compacts to the burnup and fast fluence target ranges, considering the experiment was terminated short of its initial 400 EFPD target (Collin 2015). Out of the 48 AGR-3/4 compacts, 42 achieved the specified burnup of at least 6% fissions per initial heavy-metal atom (FIMA). Three capsules had a maximum fuel compact average burnup < 10% FIMA, one more than originally specified, and the maximum fuel compact average burnup was <19% FIMA for the remaining capsules, as specified. Fast neutron fluence fell in the expected range of 1.0 to 5.5×1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for all compacts. In addition, the AGR-3/4 experiment was globally successful in keeping the

  14. The Hydraulic Test Procedure for Non-instrumented Irradiation Test Rig of Annular Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Kang Hee; Shin, Chang Hwan; Park, Chan Kook

    2008-08-15

    This report presents the procedure of pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test for the non-instrumented rig using the irradiation test in HANARO of advanced PWR annular fuel which were designed and fabricated by KAERI. From the out-pile thermal hydraulic tests, confirm the flow rate at the 200 kPa pressure drop and measure the RMS displacement at this time. And the endurance test is confirmed the wear and the integrity of the non-instrumented rig at the 110% design flow rate. This out-pile test perform the Flow-Induced Vibration and Pressure Drop Experimental Tester(FIVPET) facility. The instruments in FIVPET facility was calibrated in KAERI and the pump and the thermocouple were certified by manufacturer.

  15. A concise design o the irradiation of U-10Zr metallic fuel at a very low burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hai Bing; Zhou, Wei; Sun, Yong; Qian, Dazhi; Ma, Jimin; Leng, Jun; Huo, Hyoung; Wang, Shaohua [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China)

    2017-06-15

    In order to investigate the swelling behavior and fuel–cladding interaction mechanism of U–10Zr alloy metallic fuel at very low burnup, an irradiation experiment was concisely designed and conducted on the China Mianyang Research Reactor. Two types of irradiation samples were designed for studying free swelling without restraint and the fuel–cladding interaction mechanism. A new bonding material, namely, pure aluminum powder, was used to fill the gap between the fuel slug and sample shell for reducing thermal resistance and allowing the expansion of the fuel slug. In this paper, the concise irradiation rig design is introduced, and the neutronic and thermal–hydraulic analyses, which were carried out mainly using MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) and FLUENT codes, are presented. Out-of-pile tests were conducted prior to irradiation to verify the manufacturing quality and hydraulic performance of the rig. Nondestructive postirradiation examinations using cold neutron radiography technology were conducted to check fuel cladding integrity and swelling behavior. The results of the preliminary examinations confirmed the safety and effectiveness of the design.

  16. Oxidizing dissolution mechanism of an irradiated MOX fuel in underwater aerated conditions at slightly acidic pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnin, M.; Jégou, C.; Caraballo, R.; Broudic, V.; Tribet, M.; Peuget, S.; Talip, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The (U,Pu)O2 matrix behavior of an irradiated MIMAS-type (MIcronized MASter blend) MOX fuel, under radiolytic oxidation in aerated pure water at pH 5-5.5 was studied by combining chemical and radiochemical analyses of the alteration solution with Raman spectroscopy characterizations of the surface state. Two leaching experiments were performed on segments of irradiated fuel under different conditions: with or without an external γ irradiation field, over long periods (222 and 604 days, respectively). The gamma irradiation field was intended to be representative of the irradiation conditions for a fuel assembly in an underwater interim storage situation. The data acquired enabled an alteration mechanism to be established, characterized by uranium (UO22+) release mainly controlled by solubility of studtite over the long-term. The massive precipitation of this phase was observed for the two experiments based on high uranium oversaturation indexes of the solution and the kinetics involved depended on the irradiation conditions. External gamma irradiation accelerated the precipitation kinetics and the uranium concentrations (2.9 × 10-7 mol/l) were lower than for the non-irradiated reference experiment (1.4 × 10-5 mol/l), as the quantity of hydrogen peroxide was higher. Under slightly acidic pH conditions, the formation of an oxidized UO2+x phase was not observed on the surface and did not occur in the radiolysis dissolution mechanism of the fuel matrix. The Raman spectroscopy performed on the heterogeneous MOX fuel matrix surface, showed that the fluorite structure of the mainly UO2 phase surrounding the Pu-enriched aggregates had not been particularly impacted by any major structural change compared to the data obtained prior to leaching. For the plutonium, its behavior in solution involved a continuous release up to concentrations of approximately 3 × 10-6 mol L-1 with negligible colloid formation. This data appears to support a predominance of the +V oxidation

  17. Capsule Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because experience with it is limited and traditional upper endoscopy is widely available. Your doctor might recommend a capsule endoscopy procedure to: Find the cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. If you have unexplained bleeding in your digestive ...

  18. Metallography and fuel cladding chemical interaction in fast flux test facility irradiated metallic U-10Zr MFF-3 and MFF-5 fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, W. J.; Chichester, H. M.; Porter, D. L.; Wootan, D. W.

    2016-05-01

    Abstract The Mechanistic Fuel Failure (MFF) series of metal fuel irradiations conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) provides an important potential comparison between data generated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) and that expected in a larger-scale fast reactor. The irradiations were the beginning tests to qualify U-10wt%Zr as a driver fuel for FFTF. The FFTF core, with a 91.4 cm tall fuel column and a chopped cosine neutron flux profile, operated with a peak cladding temperature at the top of the fuel column, but developed peak burnup at the centerline of the core. This places the peak fuel temperature midway between the core center and the top of fuel, lower in the fuel column than in previous EBR-II experiments that had a 32-cm height core. The MFF-3 and MFF-5 qualification assemblies operated in FFTF to >10 at% burnup, and performed very well with no cladding breaches. The MFF-3 assembly operated to 13.8 at% burnup with a peak inner cladding temperature of 643°C, and the MFF-5 assembly operated to 10.1 at% burnup with a peak inner cladding temperature of 651°C. Because of the very high operating temperatures for both the fuel and the cladding, data from the MFF assemblies are most comparable to the data obtained from the EBR-II X447 experiment, which experienced two pin breaches. The X447 breaches were strongly influenced by a large amount of fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). The MFF pins benefitted from different axial locations of high burnup and peak cladding temperature, which helped to reduce interdiffusion between rare earth fission products and stainless steel cladding. Post-irradiation examination evidence illustrates this advantage. Comparing other performance data of the long MFF pins to prior EBR-II test data, the MFF fuel inside the cladding grew less axially, and the gas release data did not reveal a definitive difference.

  19. Photocatalytic fuel cell (PFC) and dye self-photosensitization photocatalytic fuel cell (DSPFC) with BiOCl/Ti photoanode under UV and visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kan; Xu, Yunlan; He, Yi; Yang, Chen; Wang, Yalin; Jia, Jinping

    2013-04-02

    A fuel cell that functioned as a photo fuel cell (PFC) when irradiated with UV light and as a dye self-photosensitization photo fuel cell (DSPFC) when irradiated with visible light was proposed and investigated in this study. The system included a BiOCl/Ti plate photoanode and a Pt cathode, and dye solutions were employed as fuel. Electricity was generated at the same time as the dyes were degraded. 26.2% and 24.4% Coulombic efficiency were obtained when 20 mL of 10 mg · L(-1) Rhodamine B solution was treated with UV for 2 h and visible light for 3 h, respectively. Irradiation with natural and artificial sunlight was also evaluated. UV and visible light could be utilized at the same time and the photogenerated current was observed. The mechanism of electricity generation in BiOCl/Ti PFC and DSPFC was studied through degradation of the colorless salicylic acid solution. Factors that affect the electricity generation and dye degradation performance, such as solution pH and cathode material, were also investigated and optimized.

  20. Irradiation dose and temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high dose HT9 steel from the fuel duct of FFTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-14

    To expand the knowledge base for fast reactor core materials, fracture toughness has been evaluated for high dose HT9 steel using miniature disk compact tension (DCT) specimens. The HT9 steel DCT specimens were machined from the ACO-3 fuel duct of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), which achieved high doses in the range of 3–148 dpa at 378–504 C. The static fracture resistance (J-R) tests have been performed in a servohydraulic testing machine in vacuum at selected temperatures including room temperature, 200 C, and each irradiation temperature. Brittle fracture with a low toughness less than 50 MPa pm occurred in room temperature tests when irradiation temperature was below 400 C, while ductile fracture with stable crack growth was observed when irradiation temperature was higher. No fracture toughness less than 100 MPa pm was measured when the irradiation temperature was above 430 C. It was shown that the influence of irradiation temperature was dominant in fracture toughness while the irradiation dose has only limited influence over the wide dose range 3–148 dpa. A slow decrease of fracture toughness with test temperature above room temperature was observed for the nonirradiated and high temperature (>430 *C) irradiation cases, which indicates that the ductile–brittle transition temperatures (DBTTs) in those conditions are lower than room temperature. A comparison with the collection of existing data confirmed the dominance of irradiation temperature in the fracture toughness of HT9 steels.

  1. Comparison of laser welding conditions of Zircaloy-4 and stainless steel for nuclear fuel irradiation rig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kahye; Hong, Jintae; Joung, Changyoung; Heo, Sungho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Various materials for Zircaloy-4, SUS 316L, such as Inconel, are used as a survey rig that has been produced for fuel irradiation testing. Precision sensors, thermocouples, LVDT, and SPND should also be assembled. Therefore, a welding device for connecting them is necessary. With a high density of energy, laser welding can be properly used in a deep permeation, and in precisely welding narrow and deep joints. In particular, it has been applied to other fields such as metal welding. Since the technology bears no pores or cavities, resulting in a clean surface after the welding process, it does not require an 'after-process' such as grinding or polishing, which is useful where high water-tightness is required. Therefore, we developed and researched a special fiber laser welding system for the production of a nuclear research rig. Through the above test, the different conditions of laser welding were found for Zircaloy-4 and AISI 316L used for producing a nuclear fuel research rig, performing the most optimal welding conditions according to the properties of the materials in the future.

  2. Post-irradiation examination of prototype Al-64 wt% U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel rods from NRU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, D.F.; Primeau, M.F.; Buchanan, C.; Rose, D. [Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada)

    1997-08-01

    Three prototype fuel rods containing Al-64 wt% U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} (3.15 gU/cm{sup 3}) have been irradiated to their design burnup in the NRU reactor without incident. The fuel was fabricated using production-scale equipment and processes previously developed for Al-U{sub 3}Si fuel fabrication at Chalk River Laboratories, and special equipment developed for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} powder production and handling. The rods were irradiated in NRU up to 87 at% U-235 burnup under typical driver fuel conditions; i.e., nominal coolant inlet temperature 37{degrees}C, inlet pressure 654 kPa, mass flow 12.4 L/s, and element linear power ratings up to 73 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations showed that the fuel elements survived the irradiation without defects. Fuel core diametral increases and volumetric swelling were significantly lower than that of Al-61 wt% U{sub 3}Si fuel irradiated under similar conditions. This irradiation demonstrated that the fabrication techniques are adequate for full-scale fuel manufacture, and qualified the fuel for use in AECL`s research reactors.

  3. Performance evaluation and post-irradiation examination of a novel LWR fuel composed of U0.17ZrH1.6 fuel pellets bonded to Zircaloy-2 cladding by lead bismuth eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balooch, Mehdi; Olander, Donald R.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Hosemann, Peter; Casella, Andrew M.; Senor, David J.; Buck, Edgar C.

    2017-04-01

    A novel light water reactor fuel has been designed and fabricated at the University of California, Berkeley; irradiated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor; and examined within the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This fuel consists of U0.17ZrH1.6 fuel pellets core-drilled from TRIGA reactor fuel elements that are clad in Zircaloy-2 and bonded with lead-bismuth eutectic. The performance evaluation and post irradiation examination of this fuel are presented here.

  4. Experimental test plan: USDOE/JAERI collaborative program for the coated particle fuel performance test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kania, M.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Fukuda, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1989-12-01

    This document describes the coated-particle fuel performance test agreed to under Annex 2 of the arrangement between the US Department of Energy and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute on cooperation in research and development regarding high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The test will evaluate the behavior of reference fuel compacts containing coated-particle fuels fabricated according to the specifications for the US Modular HTGR and the Japanese High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) concepts. Two experimental capsules, HRB-21 and HRB-22, are being tested. Capsule HRB-21 contains only US reference fuel, and HRB-22 contains only JAERI reference fuel. Both capsules will be irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Capsule HRB-21 will be operated at a mean volumetric fuel temperature of 975{degrees}C and will achieve a peak fissile burnup of 26% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) and a fast fluence of {le}4.5 {times} 10{sup 25} neutrons/m{sup 2}. Capsule HRB-22 will be operated at a mean centerline fuel temperature of 1250 to 1300{degrees}C and will achieve a peak fissile burnup of 5.5% FIMA and a fast fluence of 1.7 {times} 10{sup 25} neutrons/m{sup 2}. Performance of the fuels during irradiation will be closely monitored using on-line fission gas surveillance. Following irradiation, both capsules will undergo detailed examinations and core heatup simulation testing. Results from in-reactor monitoring and postirradiation testing will be analyzed to comparatively assess US and Japanese coated-particle fuel performance. 3 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Investigation of the Feasibility of Utilizing Gamma Emission Computed Tomography in Evaluating Fission Product Migration in Irradiated TRISO Fuel Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz

    2014-10-01

    In the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) the TRISO particle fuel serves as the primary fission product containment. However the large number of TRISO particles present in proposed HTGRs dictates that there will be a small fraction (~10-4 to 10-5) of as manufactured and in-pile particle failures that will lead to some fission product release. The matrix material surrounding the TRISO particles in fuel compacts and the structural graphite holding the TRISO particles in place can also serve as sinks for containing any released fission products. However data on the migration of solid fission products through these materials is lacking. One of the primary goals of the AGR-3/4 experiment is to study fission product migration from failed TRISO particles in prototypic HTGR components such as structural graphite and compact matrix material. In this work, the potential for a Gamma Emission Computed Tomography (GECT) technique to non-destructively examine the fission product distribution in AGR-3/4 components and other irradiation experiments is explored. Specifically, the feasibility of using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) Precision Gamma Scanner (PGS) system for this GECT application is considered. To test the feasibility, the response of the PGS system to idealized fission product distributions has been simulated using Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations. Previous work that applied similar techniques during the AGR-1 experiment will also be discussed as well as planned uses for the GECT technique during the post irradiation examination of the AGR-2 experiment. The GECT technique has also been applied to other irradiated nuclear fuel systems that were currently available in the HFEF hot cell including oxide fuel pins, metallic fuel pins, and monolithic plate fuel.

  6. The status and prospects of the irradiation tests at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Yang, Seong Woo; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The integrity assessment of NPP and the extension of lifetime are being considered as important issue, and so the irradiation tests for the structural materials and fuels of NPP should necessarily be conducted. And, the capability of irradiation test is important because Korea participates in developing SFR and VHTR while the development of future nuclear systems is going on to obtain new energy sources all over the world. To effectively support the R and D for new nuclear systems at HANARO, the advanced irradiation technologies such as high-temperature irradiation, instrumentation, and long-term irradiation are being developed. In addition, the researches on the irradiation characteristics of super-conductor materials and new chemical materials are being progressed as a part of fundamental research. Korea is conducting R and D programs relevant to new nuclear systems including research reactor, future nuclear system such as VHTR, SFR and fusion reactor system. In addition, research on the irradiation characteristics of super-conductor materials and new electronic materials is being conducted as a part of fundamental research. Irradiation tests in HANARO are mostly related to the R and D relevant to the ageing management and safety evaluation of NPP and development of the future nuclear system and production of design data of research reactor. The HANARO irradiation capsule system has been developed and actively utilized for the irradiation testing of fuels and materials. The irradiation tests of materials up to the present have been performed usually at temperatures below 300 .deg. C, at which the RPV of PWR materials is being operated. As the irradiation tests of the materials and fuels for a Gen-IV nuclear system are recently required and the development of new research reactors is going on, the capsules for high- and low-temperature irradiation are being developed at HANARO.

  7. Feasibility study of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-240 content determination in an irradiated fuel by neutron transmission analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naguib, K.; Michaiel, M.L.; Morcos, H.N

    1998-07-01

    A proposed nondestructive method and its feasibility for the determination of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-240 contents in an irradiated fuel is described. The method is based on the use of shape fit analysis of the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) neutron transmission data of the irradiated fuel for neutron energies below 3 eV. The neutron transmission experiment of the irradiated fuel is planned to carry out using one of the TOF spectrometers installed at ET-RR-1 reactor. The computer code SHAPE is adapted taking into account the known parameters of resonances of certain fissile and fission product nuclei to provide the fit analysis. The content of the gross-fissile and fission product isotopes are determined from the burn-up calculations of the fuel assembly of the ET-RR-1 reactor with defined history. The effect of both uncertainties in resonance parameters on the deduced contents of fissile nuclei and statistical accuracy of the TOF measurements are estimated.

  8. AGR-1 Irradiated Test Train Preliminary Inspection and Disassembly First Look

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Demkowicz; Lance Cole; Scott Ploger; Philip Winston; Binh Pham; Michael Abbott

    2011-01-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation experiment ended on November 6, 2009, after 620 effective full power days in the Advanced Test Reactor, achieving a peak burnup of 19.6% FIMA. The test train was shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex in March 2010 for post-irradiation examination. The first PIE activities included non-destructive examination of the test train, followed by disassembly of the test train and individual capsules and detailed inspection of the capsule contents, including the fuel compacts and the graphite fuel holders. Dimensional measurements of the compacts, graphite holders, and steel capsules shells were performed using a custom vision measurement system (for outer diameters and lengths) and conventional bore gauges (for inner diameters). Gamma spectrometry of the intact test train gave a preliminary look at the condition of the interior components. No evidence of damage to compacts or graphite components was evident from the isotopic and gross gamma scans. Neutron radiography of the intact Capsule 2 showed a high degree of detail of interior components and confirmed the observation that there was no major damage to the capsule. Disassembly of the capsules was initiated using procedures qualified during out-of-cell mockup testing. Difficulties were encountered during capsule disassembly due to irradiation-induced changes in some of the capsule components’ properties, including embrittled niobium and molybdenum parts that were susceptible to fracture and swelling of the graphite fuel holders that affected their removal from the capsule shells. This required various improvised modifications to the disassembly procedure to avoid damage to the fuel compacts. Ultimately the capsule disassembly was successful and only one compact from Capsule 4 (out of 72 total in the test train) sustained damage during the disassembly process, along with the associated graphite holder. The compacts were generally in very good condition upon removal. Only relatively minor

  9. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  10. The behaviour under irradiation of molybdenum matrix for inert matrix fuel containing americium oxide (CerMet concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, E.; Knol, S.; Fedorov, A. V.; Fernandez, A.; Somers, J.; Klaassen, F.

    2015-10-01

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors or Accelerator Driven System (ADS, subcritical reactors dedicated to transmutation) of long-lived nuclides like 241Am is therefore an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity of waste packages to be stored in a repository. In order to safely burn americium in a fast reactor or ADS, it must be incorporated in a matrix that could be metallic (CerMet target) or ceramic (CerCer target). One of the most promising matrix to incorporate Am is molybdenum. In order to address the issues (swelling, stability under irradiation, gas retention and release) of using Mo as matrix to transmute Am, two irradiation experiments have been conducted recently at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten (The Netherland) namely HELIOS and BODEX. The BODEX experiment is a separate effect test, where the molybdenum behaviour is studied without the presence of fission products using 10B to ;produce; helium, the HELIOS experiment included a more representative fuel target with the presence of Am and fission product. This paper covers the results of Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the two irradiation experiments mentioned above where molybdenum behaviour has been deeply investigated as possible matrix to transmute americium (CerMet fuel target). The behaviour of molybdenum looks satisfying at operating temperature but at high temperature (above 1000 °C) more investigation should be performed.

  11. Construction of a Post-Irradiated Fuel Examination Shielded Enclosure Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Lehto, Ph.D.; Boyd D. Christensen

    2008-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to provide funding to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for new post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment in support of advanced fuels development. This equipment will allow researchers at the INL to accurately characterize the behavior of experimental test fuels after they are removed from an experimental reactor also located at the INL. The accurate and detailed characterization of the fuel from the reactor, when used in conjunction with computer modeling, will allow DOE to more quickly understand the behavior of the fuel and to guide further development activities consistent with the missions of the INL and DOE. Due to the highly radioactive nature of the specimen samples that will be prepared and analyzed by the PIE equipment, shielded enclosures are required. The shielded cells will be located in the existing Analytical Laboratory (AL) basement (Rooms B-50 and B-51) at the INL Material and Fuels Complex (MFC). AL Rooms B-50 and B-51 will be modified to establish an area where sample containment and shielding will be provided for the analysis of radioactive fuels and materials while providing adequate protection for personnel and the environment. The area is comprised of three separate shielded cells for PIE instrumentation. Each cell contains an atmosphere interface enclosure (AIE) for contamination containment. The shielding will provide a work area consistent with the as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) concept, assuming a source term of 10 samples in each of the three shielded areas. Source strength is assumed to be a maximum of 3 Ci at 0.75 MeV gamma for each sample. Each instrument listed below will be installed in an individual shielded enclosure: Shielded electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) Focused ion beam instrument (FIB) Micro-scale x-ray diffractometer (MXRD). The project is designed and expected to be built incrementally as funds are allocated. The initial phase will be to fund the

  12. Chemical thermodynamics of Cs and Te fission product interactions in irradiated LMFBR mixed-oxide fuel pins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, M. G.; Aitken, E. A.; Lindemer, T. B.

    1985-02-01

    A combination of fuel chemistry modelling and equilibrium thermodynamic calculations has been used to predict the atom ratios of Cs and Te fission products (Cs:Te) that find their way into the fuel-cladding interface region of irradiated stainless steel-clad mixed-oxide fast breeder reactor fuel pins. It has been concluded that the ratio of condensed, chemically-associated Cs and Te in the interface region,Čs:Te, which in turn determines the Te activity, is controlled by an equilibrium reaction between Cs 2Te and the oxide fuel, and that the value of Čs:Te is, depending on fuel 0:M, either equal to or slightly less than 2:1. Since Cs and Te fission products are both implicated as causative agents in FCCI (fission product-assisted inner surface attack of stainless steel cladding) and in FPLME (fission product-assisted liquid metal embrittlement of AISI-Type 316), the observed out-of-pile Cs:Te thresholds for FCCI (4˜:1) and FPLME (2˜:1) have been rationalized in terms of Cs:Te thermochemistry and phase equilibria. Also described in the paper is an updated chemical evolution model for reactive/volatile fission product behavior in irradiated oxide pins.

  13. Chemical thermodynamics of Cs and Te fission product interactions in irradiated LMFBR mixed-oxide fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, M.G.; Aitken, E.A. (General Electric Co., Sunnyvale, CA (USA). Advanced Nuclear Technology Operation)

    1985-02-01

    A combination of fuel chemistry modelling and equilibrium thermodynamic calculations has been used to predict the atom ratios of Cs and Te fission products (Cs:Te) that find their way into the fuel-cladding interface region of irradiated stainless steel-clad mixed-oxide fast breeder reactor fuel pins. It has been concluded that the ratio of condensed, chemically-associated Cs and Te in the interface region, fuel, and that the value of fuel O:M, either equal to or slightly less than 2:1. Since Cs and Te fission products are both implicated as causative agents in FCCI (fission product-assisted inner surface attack of stainless steel cladding) and in FPLME (fission product-assisted liquid metal embrittlement of AISI-Type 316), the observed out-of-pile Cs:Te thresholds for FCCI (proportional4:1) and FPLME (proportional2:1) have been rationalized in terms of Cs:Te thermochemistry and phase equilibria. Also described in the paper is an updated chemical evolution model for reactive/volatile fission product behavior in irradiated oxide pins.

  14. 新型四物胶囊对辐射损伤小鼠造血功能的影响%Effect of New Si-wu Capsules on Hematopoietic Function of Irradiated Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭洪玲; 高月; 马增春; 邵帅; 刘浩生; 洪倩; 王宇光; 梁乾德; 肖成荣; 甄蓓

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the hematopoietic function of new Si-wu capsules on low-dose 60Coγ irradiated mice. Methods Balb/c mice were irradiated using 60Coγ resources. Following irradiation, the extract of new Si-wu capsules was administered intragastrically for 7 consecutive days at doses of 20.0,10. 0,5.0 g·kg-1. The normal group and model group were given an equal volume of distilled water. Blood samples were collected from the tail end and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted on day 0,1,4,7,11,14,17 and 23 using a microcell counter. The ability of the colony-forming unit of bone marrow cells and the percentage of CD34 + cells in bone marrow were observed. Results Extracts of new Si-wu capsules could increase the percentage of CD34+ cells and the ability of the colony-forming unit of granulocyte macrophage. High doses of new Si-wu capsules treatment could also improve the ability of erythroid and mixed colony-forming units, new Si-wu capsule could accelerate the recovery of white blood cells and platelets. Conclusion new Si-wu capsule can reverse hematopoietic injury induced by 2.5 Gy 60Coγ irradiation, improve the hematopoietic function of bone marrow and accelerate blood cell recovery.%目的 评价新型四物胶囊对60C0 γ射线所致小鼠造血功能损伤的影响,为该药的临床研究提供参考依据.方法 采用2.5 Gy60C0γ射线全身照射,照后连续给药7d.正常组和模型组给予等体积的蒸馏水,新型四物胶囊高、中、低剂量(20.0、10.0、5.0 g·kg-1)组分别在照前、照后第1、4、7、11、14、17、23天检测外周血象,同时在照后第7天进行CD34+细胞检测、骨髓造血祖细胞集落培养.结果 新型四物胶囊各剂量在造模后7d提高CD34+细胞数,促进CFU-GM增殖,同时高剂量还促进CFU-E、BFU-E及CFU-Mix增殖;第7~14天显著升高白细胞与血小板数.结论 新型四物胶囊可有效改善60C0 γ射线对小鼠所致的造血损伤,提高骨髓造血功能,

  15. Armor: An {alpha}{beta}{gamma} assembly for irradiated fuel analysis; Armor: Chaine {alpha}{beta}{gamma} pour l'analyse des combustibles irradies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beraud, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-04-15

    The assembly ARMOR which was built with a view to carrying out research on irradiated fuels consists of an {alpha}{beta}{gamma} enclosure made up of 11 cells in line. After a general description of the assembly in its present form, the various functions are reviewed: introduction of the samples, chemical de-canning, dissolution of the irradiated uranium pellets, preparation of solutions for mass spectrometric analyses, disposal of the effluents and of the solid waste. The assembly-has been working since 1961. During the 5 to 6 years operation, various improvements have been made and a certain number of observations have been collected concerning the work. (author) [French] Construite en vue de repondre a un programme d'etudes de combustibles Irradies, la chaine Armor est une enceinte {alpha}{beta}{gamma} composee de 11 cellules en ligne. Apres une description generale de la chaine dans son etat actuel, les differentes fonctions sont passees en revue: entree des echantillons, degainage chimique, dissolution des pastilles d'uranium irradie, preparation des solutions pour les analyses par spectrometrie de masse, rejet des effluents et des dechets solides. La chaine est en service depuis 1961. Au cours des cinq a six annees d'exploitation, differentes ameliorations ont ete apportees et un ensemble d'observations sur le travail a ete recueilli. (auteur)

  16. Microstructural Characterization of a Mg Matrix U-Mo Dispersion Fuel Plate Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to High Fission Density: SEM Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon D.; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam B.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Madden, James W.; Moore, Glenn A.

    2016-06-01

    Low-enriched (U-235 reactors. In most cases, fuel plates with Al or Al-Si alloy matrices have been tested in the Advanced Test Reactor to support this development. In addition, fuel plates with Mg as the matrix have also been tested. The benefit of using Mg as the matrix is that it potentially will not chemically interact with the U-Mo fuel particles during fabrication or irradiation, whereas with Al and Al-Si alloys such interactions will occur. Fuel plate R9R010 is a Mg matrix fuel plate that was aggressively irradiated in ATR. This fuel plate was irradiated as part of the RERTR-8 experiment at high temperature, high fission rate, and high power, up to high fission density. This paper describes the results of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of an irradiated fuel plate using polished samples and those produced with a focused ion beam. A follow-up paper will discuss the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Using SEM, it was observed that even at very aggressive irradiation conditions, negligible chemical interaction occurred between the irradiated U-7Mo fuel particles and Mg matrix; no interconnection of fission gas bubbles from fuel particle to fuel particle was observed; the interconnected fission gas bubbles that were observed in the irradiated U-7Mo particles resulted in some transport of solid fission products to the U-7Mo/Mg interface; the presence of microstructural pathways in some U-9.1 Mo particles that could allow for transport of fission gases did not result in the apparent presence of large porosity at the U-7Mo/Mg interface; and, the Mg-Al interaction layers that were present at the Mg matrix/Al 6061 cladding interface exhibited good radiation stability, i.e. no large pores.

  17. Preliminary results of post-irradiation examination of the AGR-1 TRISO fuel compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Demkowicz; John Hunn; Robert Morris; Jason Harp; Philip Winston; Charles Baldwin; Fred Montgomery; Scott Ploger; Isabella van Rooyen

    2012-10-01

    Five irradiated fuel compacts from the AGR-1 experiment have been examined in detail in order to assess in-pile fission product release behavior. Compacts were electrolytically deconsolidated and analyzed using the leach-burn-leach technique to measure fission product inventory in the compact matrix and identify any particles with a defective SiC layer. Loose particles were then gamma counted to measure the fission product inventory. One particle with a defective SiC layer was found in the five compacts examined. The fractional release of Ag 110m from the particles was significant. The total fraction of silver released from all the particles within a compact ranged from 0-0.63 and individual particles within a single compact often exhibited a very wide range of silver release. The average fractional release of Eu-154 from all particles in a compact was 2.4×10-4—1.3×10-2, which is indicative of release through intact coatings. The fractional Cs-134 inventory in the compact matrix was <2×10-5 when all coatings remained intact, indicating good cesium retention. Approximately 1% of the palladium inventory was found in the compact matrix for two of the compacts, indicating significant release through intact coatings.

  18. Characterization of pitch prepared from pyrolysis fuel oil via electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Gun; Park, Mira; Kim, Hak-Yong; Kwac, Lee Ku; Shin, Hye Kyoung

    2017-06-01

    Pitch samples were obtained from pyrolysis fuel oil by thermal treatment for 2 h at 300 °C after electron beam irradiation (EBI) treatment and by thermal treatment alone for different temperature of 250 °C, 300 °C, and 350 °C. EBI treatment was found to be an effective treatment for preparing pitch compare to the pitch obtained without EBI treatment. These results were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) analyses, which showed the increase in the intensities of peaks corresponding to aromatic compounds. In the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) spectra, the amount of components with medium molecular weights in the pitch was found to increase with the temperature; likewise, in the case of the pitch obtained via EBI treatment, we found that the amount of components with higher molecular weight over 1000 (m/v) similarly increased. Further, the thermal stability and carbon yield at 850 °C of the pitch obtained by EBI were greater than those of samples subjected to thermal treatment at 250 and 300 °C.

  19. Recent irradiation tests for future nuclear system at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Yang, Seong Woo; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The capsule at HANARO is a device that evaluates the irradiation effects of nuclear materials and fuels, which can reproduce the environment of nuclear power plants and accelerate to reach to the end of life condition. As the integrity assessment and the extension of lifetime of nuclear power plants are recently considered as important issues in Korea, the requirements for irradiation test are gradually being increased. The capacity and capability irradiation tests at HANARO are becoming important because Korea strives to develop SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor) and VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) among the future nuclear system and to export the research reactors and to develop the fusion reactor technology.

  20. Design of an experiment to measure the decay heat of an irradiated PWR fuel: MERCI experiment; Conception d'une experience de mesure de la puissance residuelle d'un combustible irradie: l'experience MERCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourganel, St

    2002-11-01

    After a reactor shutdown, a significant quantity of energy known as 'decay heat' continues to be generated from the irradiated fuel. This heat source is due to the disintegration energy of fission products and actinides. Decay heat determination of an irradiated fuel is of the utmost importance for safety analysis as the design cooling systems, spent fuel transport, or handling. Furthermore, the uncertainty on decay heat has a straight economic impact. The unloading fuel spent time is an example. The purpose of MERCI experiment (irradiated fuel decay heat measurement) consists in qualifying computer codes, particularly the DARWIN code system developed by the CEA in relation to industrial organizations, as EDF, FRAMATOME and COGEMA. To achieve this goal, a UOX fuel is irradiated in the vicinity of the OSIRIS research reactor, and then the decay heat is measured by using a calorimeter. The objective is to reduce the decay heat uncertainties from 8% to 3 or 4% at short cooling times. A full simulation on computer of the MERCI experiment has been achieved: fuel irradiation analysis is performed using transport code TRIPOLI4 and evolution code DARWIN/PEPIN2, and heat transfer with CASTEM2000 code. The results obtained are used for the design of this experiment. Moreover, we propose a calibration procedure decreasing the influence of uncertainty measurements and an interpretation method of the experimental results and evaluation of associated uncertainties. (author)

  1. STEM-EDS analysis of fission products in neutron-irradiated TRISO fuel particles from AGR-1 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, B.; van Rooyen, I. J.; Wu, Y. Q.; Szlufarska, I.; Sridharan, K.

    2016-07-01

    Historic and recent post-irradiation-examination from the German AVR and Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Project have shown that 110 m Ag is released from intact tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. Although TRISO fuel particle research has been performed over the last few decades, little is known about how metallic fission products are transported through the SiC layer, and it was not until March 2013 that Ag was first identified in the SiC layer of a neutron-irradiated TRISO fuel particle. The existence of Pd- and Ag-rich grain boundary precipitates, triple junction precipitates, and Pd nano-sized intragranular precipitates in neutron-irradiated TRISO particle coatings was investigated using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy analysis to obtain more information on the chemical composition of the fission product precipitates. A U-rich fission product honeycomb shape precipitate network was found near a micron-sized precipitate in a SiC grain about ∼5 μm from the SiC-inner pyrolytic carbon interlayer, indicating a possible intragranular transport path for uranium. A single Ag-Pd nano-sized precipitate was found inside a SiC grain, and this is the first research showing such finding in irradiated SiC. This finding may possibly suggest a possible Pd-assisted intragranular transport mechanism for Ag and may be related to void or dislocation networks inside SiC grains. Preliminary semi-quantitative analysis indicated the micron-sized precipitates to be Pd2Si2U with carbon existing inside these precipitates. However, the results of such analysis for nano-sized precipitates may be influenced by the SiC matrix. The results reported in this paper confirm the co-existence of Cd with Ag in triple points reported previously.

  2. Technical Development of Gamma Scanning for Irradiated Fuel Rod after Upgrade of System in Hot-cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, Hee Moon; Baik, Seung Je; Yoo, Byung Ok; Choo, Yong Sun

    2007-06-15

    Non-destructive test system was installed at hot-cell(M1) in IMEF(Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) more than 10 years ago for the diametric measurement and gamma scanning of fuel rod. But this system must be needed to be remodeled for the effective operations. In 2006, the system was upgraded for 3 months. The collimator bench can be movable with horizontal direction(x-direction) by motorized system for sectional gamma scanning and 3-dimensional tomography of fuel rod. So, gamma scanning for fuel rod can be detectable by x, y and rotation directions. It may be possible to obtain the radioactivities with radial and axial directions of pellet. This system is good for the series experiments with several positions. Operation of fuel bench and gamma detection program were linked each other by new program tools. It can control detection and bench moving automatically when gamma inspection of fuel rod is carried out with axial or radial positions. Some of electronic parts were added in PLC panel, and operating panel was re-designed for the remote control. To operate the fuel bench by computer, AD converter and some I/O cards were installed in computer. All of software were developed in Windows-XP system instead of DOS system. Control programs were made by visual-C language. After upgrade of system, DUPIC fuel which was irradiated in HANARO research reactor was detected by gamma scanning. The results were good and operation of gamma scanning showed reduced inspection time and easy control of data on series of detection with axial positions. With consideration of ECT(Eddy Current Test) installation, the computer program and hardware were set up as well. But ECT is not installed yet, so we have to check abnormal situation of program and hardware system. It is planned to install ECT in 2007.

  3. Results of High-Temperature Heating Test for Irradiated U-10Zr(-5Ce with T92 Cladding Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June-Hyung Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A microstructure observation using an optical microscope, SEM and EPMA was performed for the irradiated U-10Zr and U-10Zr-5Ce fuel slugs with a T92 cladding specimen after a high-temperature heating test. Also, the measured eutectic penetration rate was compared with the value predicted by the existing eutectic penetration correlation being used for design and modeling purposes. The heating temperature and duration time for the U-10Zr/T92 specimen were 750 °C and 1 h, and those for the U-10Zr-5Ce/T92 specimen were 800 °C and 1 h. In the case of the U-10Zr/T92 specimen, the migration phenomena of U, Zr, Fe, and Cr as well as the Nd lanthanide fission product were observed at the eutectic melting region. The measured penetration rate was similar to the value predicted by the existing eutectic penetration rate correlation. In addition, when comparing with measured eutectic penetration rates for the unirradiated U-10Zr fuel slug with FMS (ferritic martensitic steel, HT9 or Gr.91 cladding specimens which had been reported in the literature, the measured eutectic penetration rate for the irradiated fuel specimen was higher than that for the unirradiated U-10Zr specimen. In the case of the U-10Zr-5Ce/T92 specimen in which there had been a gap between the fuel slug and cladding after the irradiation test, the eutectic melting region was not found because contact between the fuel slug and cladding did not take place during the heating test.

  4. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise P. Collin

    2012-06-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one

  5. Irradiation dose and temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high dose HT9 steel from the fuel duct of FFTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang, E-mail: byunts@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Toloczko, Mychailo B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Saleh, Tarik A.; Maloy, Stuart A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    To expand the knowledge base for fast reactor core materials, fracture toughness has been evaluated for high dose HT9 steel using miniature disk compact tension (DCT) specimens. The HT9 steel DCT specimens were machined from the ACO-3 fuel duct of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), which achieved high doses in the range of 3-148 dpa at 378-504 Degree-Sign C. The static fracture resistance (J-R) tests have been performed in a servohydraulic testing machine in vacuum at selected temperatures including room temperature, 200 Degree-Sign C, and each irradiation temperature. Brittle fracture with a low toughness less than 50 MPa {radical}m occurred in room temperature tests when irradiation temperature was below 400 Degree-Sign C, while ductile fracture with stable crack growth was observed when irradiation temperature was higher. No fracture toughness less than 100 MPa {radical}m was measured when the irradiation temperature was above 430 Degree-Sign C. It was shown that the influence of irradiation temperature was dominant in fracture toughness while the irradiation dose has only limited influence over the wide dose range 3-148 dpa. A slow decrease of fracture toughness with test temperature above room temperature was observed for the nonirradiated and high temperature (>430 Degree-Sign C) irradiation cases, which indicates that the ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTTs) in those conditions are lower than room temperature. A comparison with the collection of existing data confirmed the dominance of irradiation temperature in the fracture toughness of HT9 steels.

  6. Oxidizing dissolution mechanism of an irradiated MOX fuel in underwater aerated conditions at slightly acidic pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnin, M., E-mail: magali.magnin@cea.fr; Jégou, C.; Caraballo, R.; Broudic, V.; Tribet, M.; Peuget, S.; Talip, Z.

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Oxidizing dissolution mechanism of MOX fuel. • Effect of the influence of the interim storage conditions. • Raman spectroscopy characterizations. • Precipitation of Studtite-type secondary phases. • Heterogeneous microstructure of the (U,Pu)O{sub 2} oxide. - Abstract: The (U,Pu)O{sub 2} matrix behavior of an irradiated MIMAS-type (MIcronized MASter blend) MOX fuel, under radiolytic oxidation in aerated pure water at pH 5–5.5 was studied by combining chemical and radiochemical analyses of the alteration solution with Raman spectroscopy characterizations of the surface state. Two leaching experiments were performed on segments of irradiated fuel under different conditions: with or without an external γ irradiation field, over long periods (222 and 604 days, respectively). The gamma irradiation field was intended to be representative of the irradiation conditions for a fuel assembly in an underwater interim storage situation. The data acquired enabled an alteration mechanism to be established, characterized by uranium (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) release mainly controlled by solubility of studtite over the long-term. The massive precipitation of this phase was observed for the two experiments based on high uranium oversaturation indexes of the solution and the kinetics involved depended on the irradiation conditions. External gamma irradiation accelerated the precipitation kinetics and the uranium concentrations (2.9 × 10{sup −7} mol/l) were lower than for the non-irradiated reference experiment (1.4 × 10{sup −5} mol/l), as the quantity of hydrogen peroxide was higher. Under slightly acidic pH conditions, the formation of an oxidized UO{sub 2+x} phase was not observed on the surface and did not occur in the radiolysis dissolution mechanism of the fuel matrix. The Raman spectroscopy performed on the heterogeneous MOX fuel matrix surface, showed that the fluorite structure of the mainly UO{sub 2} phase surrounding the Pu-enriched aggregates had

  7. Uncertainty Quantification of Calculated Temperatures for the U.S. Capsules in the AGR-2 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lybeck, Nancy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Einerson, Jeffrey J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pham, Binh T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hawkes, Grant L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    A series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) irradiation experiments are being conducted within the Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The main objectives of the fuel experimental campaign are to provide the necessary data on fuel performance to support fuel process development, qualify a fuel design and fabrication process for normal operation and accident conditions, and support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes (PLN-3636). The AGR-2 test was inserted in the B-12 position in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in June 2010 and successfully completed irradiation in October 2013, resulting in irradiation of the TRISO fuel for 559.2 effective full power days (EFPDs) during approximately 3.3 calendar years. The AGR-2 data, including the irradiation data and calculated results, were qualified and stored in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) (Pham and Einerson 2014). To support the U.S. TRISO fuel performance assessment and to provide data for validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, the daily as-run thermal analysis has been performed separately on each of four AGR-2 U.S. capsules for the entire irradiation as discussed in (Hawkes 2014). The ABAQUS code’s finite element-based thermal model predicts the daily average volume-average fuel temperature and peak fuel temperature in each capsule. This thermal model involves complex physical mechanisms (e.g., graphite holder and fuel compact shrinkage) and properties (e.g., conductivity and density). Therefore, the thermal model predictions are affected by uncertainty in input parameters and by incomplete knowledge of the underlying physics leading to modeling assumptions. Therefore, alongside with the deterministic predictions from a set of input thermal conditions, information about prediction uncertainty is instrumental for the ART

  8. CURRENT STATUS OF INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT BY SIPPING SYSTEM OF SPENT FUEL BUNDLES IRRADIATED IN CANDU REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JONG-YOUL PARK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In terms of safety and the efficient management of spent fuel storage, detecting failed fuel is one of the most important tasks in a CANada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU reactor operation. It has been successfully demonstrated that in a CANDU reactor, on-power failed fuel detection and location systems, along with alarm area gamma monitors, can detect and locate defective and suspect fuel bundles before discharging them from the reactor to the spent fuel storage bay. In the reception bay, however, only visual inspection has been used to identify suspect bundles. Gaseous fission product and delayed neutron monitoring systems cannot precisely distinguish failed fuel elements from each fuel bundle. This study reports the use of a sipping system in a CANDU reactor for the integrity assessment of spent fuel bundles. The integrity assessment of spent fuel bundles using this sipping system has shown promise as a nondestructive test for detecting a defective fuel bundle in a CANDU reactor.

  9. Annealing tests of in-pile irradiated oxide coated U-Mo/Al-Si dispersed nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweifel, T.; Valot, Ch.; Pontillon, Y.; Lamontagne, J.; Vermersch, A.; Barrallier, L.; Blay, T.; Petry, W.; Palancher, H.

    2014-09-01

    U-Mo/Al based nuclear fuels have been worldwide considered as a promising high density fuel for the conversion of high flux research reactors from highly enriched uranium to lower enrichment. In this paper, we present the annealing test up to 1800 °C of in-pile irradiated U-Mo/Al-Si fuel plate samples. More than 70% of the fission gases (FGs) are released during two major FG release peaks around 500 °C and 670 °C. Additional characterisations of the samples by XRD, EPMA and SEM suggest that up to 500 °C FGs are released from IDL/matrix interfaces. The second peak at 670 °C representing the main release of FGs originates from the interaction between U-Mo and matrix in the vicinity of the cladding.

  10. AGR-1 Compact 1-3-1 Post-Irradiation Examination Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul Andrew [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-12-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program was established to perform the requisite research and development on tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel to support deployment of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The work continues as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) TRISO Fuel program. The overarching program goal is to provide a baseline fuel qualification data set to support licensing and operation of an HTGR. To achieve these goals, the program includes the elements of fuel fabrication, irradiation, post-irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport (INL 2015). A series of fuel irradiation experiments is being planned and conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These experiments will provide data on fuel performance under irradiation, support fuel process development, qualify the fuel for normal operating conditions, provide irradiated fuel for safety testing, and support the development of fuel performance and fission product transport models. The first of these irradiation tests, designated AGR-1, began in the ATR in December 2006 and ended in November 2009. This experiment was conducted primarily to act as a shakedown test of the multicapsule test train design and provide early data on fuel performance for use in fuel fabrication process development. It also provided samples for post-irradiation safety testing, where fission product retention of the fuel at high temperatures will be experimentally measured. The capsule design and details of the AGR-1 experiment have been presented previously (Grover, Petti, and Maki 2010, Maki 2009).

  11. First elevated-temperature performance testing of coated particle fuel compacts from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles A. Baldwin; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva; Paul A. Demkowicz

    2014-05-01

    In the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, 72 coated-particle fuel compacts were taken to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures. This paper discusses the first post-irradiation test of these mixed uranium oxide/uranium carbide fuel compacts at elevated temperature to examine the fuel performance under a simulated depressurized conduction cooldown event. A compact was heated for 400 h at 1600 degrees C. Release of 85Kr was monitored throughout the furnace test as an indicator of coating failure, while other fission product releases from the compact were periodically measured by capturing them on exchangeable, water-cooled deposition cups. No coating failure was detected during the furnace test, and this result was verified by subsequent electrolytic deconsolidation and acid leaching of the compact, which showed that all SiC layers were still intact. However, the deposition cups recovered significant quantities of silver, europium, and strontium. Based on comparison of calculated compact inventories at the end of irradiation versus analysis of these fission products released to the deposition cups and furnace internals, the minimum estimated fractional losses from the compact during the furnace test were 1.9 x 10-2 for silver, 1.4 x 10-3 for europium, and 1.1 x 10-5 for strontium. Other post-irradiation examination of AGR-1 compacts indicates that similar fractions of europium and silver may have already been released by the intact coated particles during irradiation, and it is therefore likely that the detected fission products released from the compact in this 1600 degrees C furnace test were from residual fission products in the matrix. Gamma analysis of coated particles deconsolidated from the compact after the heating test revealed that silver content within each particle varied considerably; a result that is probably not related to the furnace test, because it has also been observed in other as-irradiated AGR-1 compacts. X

  12. First elevated-temperature performance testing of coated particle fuel compacts from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, Charles A., E-mail: baldwinca@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6295 (United States); Hunn, John D.; Morris, Robert N.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Silva, Chinthaka M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6295 (United States); Demkowicz, Paul A. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83414 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    In the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, 72 coated-particle fuel compacts were taken to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures. This paper discusses the first post-irradiation test of these mixed uranium oxide/uranium carbide fuel compacts at elevated temperature to examine the fuel performance under a simulated depressurized conduction cooldown event. A compact was heated for 400 h at 1600 °C. Release of {sup 85}Kr was monitored throughout the furnace test as an indicator of coating failure, while other fission product releases from the compact were periodically measured by capturing them on exchangeable, water-cooled deposition cups. No coating failure was detected during the furnace test, and this result was verified by subsequent electrolytic deconsolidation and acid leaching of the compact, which showed that all SiC layers were still intact. However, the deposition cups recovered significant quantities of silver, europium, and strontium. Based on comparison of calculated compact inventories at the end of irradiation versus analysis of these fission products released to the deposition cups and furnace internals, the minimum estimated fractional losses from the compact during the furnace test were 1.9 × 10{sup −2} for silver, 1.4 × 10{sup −3} for europium, and 1.1 × 10{sup −5} for strontium. Other post-irradiation examination of AGR-1 compacts indicates that similar fractions of europium and silver may have already been released by the intact coated particles during irradiation, and it is therefore likely that the detected fission products released from the compact in this 1600 °C furnace test were from residual fission products in the matrix. Gamma analysis of coated particles deconsolidated from the compact after the heating test revealed that silver content within each particle varied considerably; a result that is probably not related to the furnace test, because it has also been observed in other as-irradiated

  13. Post-irradiation Examination of the AGR-1 Experiment: Plans and Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Demkowicz

    2001-10-01

    Abstract – The AGR-1 irradiation experiment contains seventy-two individual cylindrical fuel compacts (25 mm long x 12.5 mm diameter) each containing approximately 4100 TRISO-coated uranium oxycarbide fuel particles. The experiment accumulated 620 effective full power days in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory with peak burnups exceeding 19% FIMA. An extensive post-irradiation examination campaign will be performed on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature accident testing. PIE experiments will include dimensional measurements of fuel and irradiated graphite, burnup measurements, assessment of fission metals release during irradiation, evaluation of coating integrity using the leach-burn-leach technique, microscopic examination of kernel and coating microstructures, and accident testing of the fuel in helium at temperatures up to 1800°C. Activities completed to date include opening of the irradiated capsules, measurement of fuel dimensions, and gamma spectrometry of selected fuel compacts.

  14. Fundamental Studies of Irradiation-Induced Defect Formation and Fission Product Dynamics in Oxide Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James

    2012-12-19

    The objective of this research program is to address major nuclear fuels performance issues for the design and use of oxide-type fuels in the current and advanced nuclear reactor applications. Fuel performance is a major issue for extending fuel burn-up which has the added advantage of reducing the used fuel waste stream. It will also be a significant issue with respect to developing advanced fuel cycle processes where it may be possible to incorporate minor actinides in various fuel forms so that they can be 'burned' rather than join the used fuel waste stream. The potential to fission or transmute minor actinides and certain long-lived fission product isotopes would transform the high level waste storage strategy by removing the need to consider fuel storage on the millennium time scale.

  15. STEM-EDS analysis of fission products in neutron-irradiated TRISO fuel particles from AGR-1 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leng, B. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Thorium Molten Salts Reactor Center, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Shanghai, 201800 (China); Rooyen, I.J. van, E-mail: Isabella.vanrooyen@inl.gov [Fuel Design and Development Department, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Wu, Y.Q. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725-2090 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Szlufarska, I.; Sridharan, K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Historic and recent post-irradiation-examination from the German AVR and Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Project have shown that 110 m Ag is released from intact tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. Although TRISO fuel particle research has been performed over the last few decades, little is known about how metallic fission products are transported through the SiC layer, and it was not until March 2013 that Ag was first identified in the SiC layer of a neutron-irradiated TRISO fuel particle. The existence of Pd- and Ag-rich grain boundary precipitates, triple junction precipitates, and Pd nano-sized intragranular precipitates in neutron-irradiated TRISO particle coatings was investigated using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy analysis to obtain more information on the chemical composition of the fission product precipitates. A U-rich fission product honeycomb shape precipitate network was found near a micron-sized precipitate in a SiC grain about ∼5 μm from the SiC-inner pyrolytic carbon interlayer, indicating a possible intragranular transport path for uranium. A single Ag-Pd nano-sized precipitate was found inside a SiC grain, and this is the first research showing such finding in irradiated SiC. This finding may possibly suggest a possible Pd-assisted intragranular transport mechanism for Ag and may be related to void or dislocation networks inside SiC grains. Preliminary semi-quantitative analysis indicated the micron-sized precipitates to be Pd{sub 2}Si{sub 2}U with carbon existing inside these precipitates. However, the results of such analysis for nano-sized precipitates may be influenced by the SiC matrix. The results reported in this paper confirm the co-existence of Cd with Ag in triple points reported previously. - Highlights: • First research data in neutron irradiated TRISO coated particles showing a Ag-Pd nano-sized precipitate inside a SiC grain. • Intragranular Ag Pd

  16. Irradiation testing of internally pressurized and/or graphite coated Zircaloy-4 clad fuel rods in the NRX Reactor (AWBA Development Program). [LWBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, R.C.; Sherman, J.

    1978-11-01

    Irradiation tests on 0.612 inch O.D. by 117-inch long Zircaloy-4 clad fuel rods were performed to assess the effects on fuel rod performance of (1) internal helium pre-pressurization to 500 psi as fabricated, (2) the presence of a graphite barrier coating on the inside cladding surface, and (3) combined pre-pressurization and graphite coating. Periodic dimensional examinations were performed on the test rods, and the results were compared with data obtained from two previously irradiated test rods--both unpressurized and uncoated and one intentionally defected. These comparisons indicate that both pre-pressurization and graphite coating can substantially improve fuel element performance capability.

  17. Thermochemical prediction of chemical form distributions of fission products in LWR oxide fuels irradiated to high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Kouki; Furuya, Hirotaka [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-09-01

    Based on the result of micro-gamma scanning of a fuel pin irradiated to high burnup in a commercial PWR, the radial distribution of chemical forms of fission products (FPs) in LWR fuel pins was theoretically predicted by a thermochemical computer code SOLGASMIX-PV. The absolute amounts of fission products generated in the fuel was calculated by ORIGEN-2 code, and the radial distributions of temperature and oxygen potential were calculated by taking the neutron depression and oxygen redistribution in the fuel into account. A fuel pellet was radially divided into 51 sections and chemical forms of FPs were calculated in each section. In addition, the effects of linear heat rating (LHR) and average O/U ratio on radial distribution of chemical form were evaluated. It was found that approximately 13 mole% of the total amount of Cs compounds exists as CsI and virtually remaining fraction as Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} under the operation condition of LHR below 400 W/cm. On the other hand, when LHR is beyond 400 W/cm under the transient operation condition, its distribution did not change so much from the one under normal operation condition. (author)

  18. Effects of fuel particle size and fission-fragment-enhanced irradiation creep on the in-pile behavior in CERCER composite pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunmei; Ding, Shurong; Zhang, Xunchao; Wang, Canglong; Yang, Lei

    2016-12-01

    The micro-scale finite element models for CERCER pellets with different-sized fuel particles are developed. With consideration of a grain-scale mechanistic irradiation swelling model in the fuel particles and the irradiation creep in the matrix, numerical simulations are performed to explore the effects of the particle size and the fission-fragment-enhanced irradiation creep on the thermo-mechanical behavior of CERCER pellets. The enhanced irradiation creep effect is applied in the 10 μm-thick fission fragment damage matrix layer surrounding the fuel particles. The obtained results indicate that (1) lower maximum temperature occurs in the cases with smaller-sized particles, and the effects of particle size on the mechanical behavior in pellets are intricate; (2) the first principal stress and radial axial stress remain compressive in the fission fragment damage layer at higher burnup, thus the mechanism of radial cracking found in the experiment can be better explained.

  19. Measurement of Ballooning Gap Size of Irradiated Fuels Using Neutron Radiography Transfer Method and HV Image Filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Cheul Muu; Kim, Tae Joo; Oh, Hwa Suk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joon Cheol [Seonam University, Namwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    A transfer method of neutron radiography was developed to measure the size of the end plug and a gap of an intact K102L-2, the irradiated fuel of a ballooned K174L-3, a ballooned and ruptured K98L-3. A typical irradiation time of 25 min. was determined to obtain a film density of between 2 and 3 of SR X-ray film with neutrons of 1.5x10{sup 11}n{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. To validate and calibrate the results, a RISO fuel standard sample, Cd plate and ASTM-BPI/SI were used. An activated latent image formed in the 100 {mu}m Dy foil was subsequently transferred in a dark room for more than 8 hours to the SR film which is a maximum of three half-lives. Due to the L/D ratio an unsharpness of 9.82-14{mu}m and a magnification of 1.0003 were given. After digitizing an image of SR film, the ballooning gap of the plug was discernible by an H/V filter of image processing. The gap size of the ballooned element, K174L-3, is equal to or greater than 1.2 mm. The development of a transfer method played a pivotal role in developing high burn-up of Wolsung and PWR nuclear fuel type.

  20. Capsule endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miguel Mu(n)oz-Navas

    2009-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a simple, safe, non-invasive, reliable technique, well accepted and tolerated by the patients, which allows complete exploration of the small intestine. The advent of CE in 2000 has dramatically changed the diagnosis and management of many diseases of the small intestine, such as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, Crohn's disease, small bowel tumors, polyposis syndromes, etc. CE has become the gold standard for the diagnosis of most diseases of the small bowel. Lately this technique has also been used for esophageal and colonic diseases.

  1. Three-component U-Pu-Th fuel for plutonium irradiation in heavy water reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peel Ross

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses concepts for three-component fuel bundles containing plutonium, uranium and thorium for use in pressurised heavy water reactors, and cases for and against implementation of such a nuclear energy system in the United Kingdom. Heavy water reactors are used extensively in Canada, and are deploying within India and China, whilst the UK is considering the use of heavy water reactors to manage its plutonium inventory of 140 tonnes. The UK heavy water reactor proposal uses a mixed oxide (MOX fuel of plutonium in depleted uranium, within the enhanced CANDU-6 (EC-6 reactor. This work proposes an alternative heterogeneous fuel concept based on the same reactor and CANFLEX fuel bundle, with eight large-diameter fuel elements loaded with natural thorium oxide and 35 small-diameter fuel elements loaded with a MOX of plutonium and reprocessed uranium stocks from UK MAGNOX and AGR reactors. Indicative neutronic calculations suggest that such a fuel would be neutronically feasible. A similar MOX may alternatively be fabricated from reprocessed <5% enriched light water reactor fuel, such as the fuel of the AREVA EPR reactor, to consume newly produced plutonium from reprocessing, similar to the DUPIC (direct use of PWR fuel in CANDU process.

  2. Inert matrix fuel performance during the first two irradiation cycles in a test reactor: comparison with modelling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Ch.; Kasemeyer, U.

    2003-06-01

    In the inert matrix fuel (IMF) type investigated at Paul Scherrer Institut, plutonium is dissolved in the yttrium stabilised zirconium oxide (YSZ), a highly radiation resistant cubic phase with additions of erbium as burnable poison for reactivity control. A first irradiation experiment of YSZ based IMF is ongoing in the OECD Material Test Reactor in Halden together with mixed oxide fuel. The results of the first two cycles for IMF to a burnup of some 105 kW d cm -3 are presented and the modelling results in comparison with the experimental results are shown. A first approximation for a simple swelling model for this YSZ based IMF can be given. Possible fission gas release mechanisms are briefly discussed. The implications of the modelling results are discussed.

  3. Corrigendum to "Coupled thermochemical, isotopic evolution and heat transfer simulations in highly irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, M. H. A.; Banfield, J.; Clarno, K.; Simunovic, S.; Besmann, T. M.; Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.

    2016-09-01

    Figs. 7-9 in "Coupled thermochemical, isotopic evolution and heat transfer simulations in highly irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel" [1] have a consistent error corresponding to the relative proportions of iodine. Reported concentrations of iodine in the original manuscript are approximately ten times higher than expected, and are comparable in atomic proportions to cesium. One would expect that the amount of cesium would be about one order of magnitude greater than iodine based on the difference in fission yields of 235U and 239Pu. A practical consequence of this error would affect the predicted quantity and chemical composition of iodine on the fuel surface, which is related to iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking [2].

  4. Preliminary Results of an On-Line, Multi-Spectrometer Fission Product Monitoring System to Support Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Testing and Qualification in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John B. Walter; Mark W. Drigert

    2007-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 (AGR-1) experiment is the first experiment in a series of eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments scheduled for placement in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The experiment began irradiation in the ATR with a cycle that reached full power on December 26, 2006 and will continue irradiation for about 2.5 years. During this time six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The goals of the irradiation experiment is to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. This paper presents the preliminary test details of the fuel performance, as measured by the control and acquisition software.

  5. Analysis of irradiated U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel microstructures using automated image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, R.; King, J.; Buesch, C.; Keiser, D. D.; Williams, W.; Miller, B. D.; Schulthess, J.

    2016-07-01

    The High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development (HPPRFD) program is responsible for developing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel substitutes for high performance reactors fueled with highly enriched uranium (HEU) that have not yet been converted to LEU. The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel system was selected for this effort. In this study, fission gas pore segmentation was performed on U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel samples at three separate fission densities using an automated image processing interface developed in MATLAB. Pore size distributions were attained that showed both expected and unexpected fission gas behavior. In general, it proved challenging to identify any dominant trends when comparing fission bubble data across samples from different fuel plates due to varying compositions and fabrication techniques. The results exhibited fair agreement with the fission density vs. porosity correlation developed by the Russian reactor conversion program.

  6. Electron probe microanalysis of a METAPHIX UPuZr metallic alloy fuel irradiated to 7.0 at.% burn-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brémier, S.; Inagaki, K.; Capriotti, L.; Poeml, P.; Ogata, T.; Ohta, H.; Rondinella, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The METAPHIX project is a collaboration between CRIEPI and JRC-ITU investigating safety and performance of a closed fuel cycle option based on fast reactor metal alloy fuels containing Minor Actinides (MA). The aim of the project is to investigate the behaviour of this type of fuel and demonstrate the transmutation of MA under irradiation. A UPuZr metallic fuel sample irradiated to a burn-up of 7 at.% was examined by electron probe microanalysis. The fuel sample was extensively characterised qualitatively and quantitatively using elemental X-ray imaging and point analysis techniques. The analyses reveal a significant redistribution of the fuel components along the fuel radius highlighting a nearly complete depletion of Zr in the central part of the fuel. Numerous rare earth and fission products secondary phases are present in various compositions. Fuel cladding chemical interaction was observed with creation of a number of intermediary layers affecting a cladding depth of 15-20 μm and migration of cladding elements to the fuel.

  7. The reprocessing of irradiated fuels by halides and their compounds; Le traitement des combustibles irradies par les halogenes et leurs composes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeois, M.; Faugeras, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A brief description is given of the experiments leading to the choice of the process volatilization of fluorides by gas phase attack. The chemical process is described for certain current types of clad Fuels: the aluminium or the zirconium cladding is first volatilized as chloride by attack with gaseous hydrogen chloride. The uranium is then transformed into volatile hexafluoride by attack with fluorine. These reactions are carried out consecutively in the same reactor in the presence of a fluidized bed of alumina which facilitates heat exchange. The experiments have been carried out in quantities from 100 gms to several kilograms of fuel, first without activity, and then with tracers. A description is given of the laboratory research which was carried out simultaneously on the separation of uranium and plutonium fluorides. Finally, an apparatus is described which is intended to test the process on irradiated fuel at an activity level of several thousands of curies of fission products. (authors) [French] On rappelle brievement les experimentations qui nous ont permis de decider du procede adopte volatilisation des fluorures par attaque en phase gazeuse. On decrit le processus chimique pour certains types courants de combustibles Gaines: dans un premier stade, l'aluminium ou le zirconium est volatilise sous forme de chlorure par action de l'acide chlorhydrique. Ensuite, l'uranium est transforme en hexafluorure volatil par action du fluor. Ces operations se font successivement dans un meme reacteur, en presence d'un lit fluidise d'alumine qui a pour but de faciliter les echanges thermiques. L'experimentation a ete conduite sur des quantites allant de 100 g a plusieurs kg de combustibles, en inactif, puis avec des traceurs. On decrit les etudes de laboratoire menees parallelement sur la separation des fluorures d'uranium et de plutonium. Enfin, on decrit une installation en construction destinee a experimenter le procede sur

  8. KüFA safety testing of HTR fuel pebbles irradiated in the High Flux Reactor in Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O., E-mail: oliver.seeger@rwth-aachen.de [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laurie, M., E-mail: mathias.laurie@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Abjani, A. El; Ejton, J.; Boudaud, D.; Freis, D.; Carbol, P.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fütterer, M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Energy and Transport (IET), Nuclear Reactor Integrity Assessment and Knowledge Management Unit, PO Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Allelein, H.-J. [Lehrstuhl für Reaktorsicherheit und -technik an der RWTH Aachen, Kackertstraße 9, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    The Cold Finger Apparatus (KühlFinger-Apparatur—KüFA) in operation at JRC-ITU is designed to experimentally scrutinize the effects of Depressurization LOss of Forced Circulation (D-LOFC) accident scenarios on irradiated High Temperature Reactor (HTR) fuel pebbles. Up to 1600 °C, the reference maximum temperature for these accidents, high-quality German HTR fuel pebbles have already demonstrated a small fission product release. This paper discusses and compares the releases obtained from KüFA-testing the pebbles HFR-K5/3 and HFR-EU1/3, which were both irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten. We present the time-dependent fractional release of the volatile fission product {sup 137}Cs as well as the fission gas {sup 85}Kr for both pebbles. For HFR-EU1/3 the isotopes {sup 134}Cs and {sup 154}Eu as well as the shorter-lived {sup 110m}Ag have also been measured. A detailed description of the experimental setup and its accuracy is given. The data for the recently tested pebbles is discussed in the context of previous results.

  9. CONTRIBUTION OF HANARO IRRADIATION TECHNOLOGIES TO NATIONAL NUCLEAR R&D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KEE NAM CHOO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available HANARO is a multipurpose research reactor located at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI. Since the commencement of its operation in 1995, various neutron irradiation facilities, such as rabbit irradiation facilities, fuel test loop (FTL facilities, capsule irradiation facilities, and neutron transmutation doping (NTD facilities, have been developed and actively utilized for various nuclear material irradiation tests requested by users from research institutes, universities, and industries. Most irradiation tests have been related to national R&D relevant to present nuclear power reactors such as the ageing management and safety evaluation of the components. Based on the accumulated experience as well as the sophisticated requirements of users, HANARO has recently supported national R&D projects relevant to new nuclear systems including the System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART, research reactors, and future nuclear systems. This paper documents the current state and utilization of irradiation facilities in HANARO, and summarizes ongoing research efforts to deploy advanced irradiation technology.

  10. First results of the irradiation program of inert matrices, targets and fuels for minor actinides transmutation in fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnerot, Jean-Marc; Ferroud-Plattet, Marie-Pierre; Lamontagne, Jerome [CEA Cadarache, Nuclear Energy Direction, Saint-Paul les Durance Cedex, 13108 (France); Warin, Dominique [CEA Valrho, Nuclear Energy Direction, DRCP, Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex, 30207 (France); Gosmain, Lionel [CEA Saclay, Nuclear Energy Direction, DMN, Gif sur Yvette, 91190 (France)

    2008-07-01

    A comprehensive irradiation program was started in France in 1992 to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the transmutation of minor actinides in current and future nuclear reactors, by means of inert support targets or dedicated fuels. The first step of the program (MATINA program) consisted in the irradiation of various inert materials intended as support matrix for transmutation targets, in the fast reactor Phenix, to select the best candidates. These inert materials included as well oxide and nitride ceramics - MgO, MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} and TiN - as refractory metals - W, Nb, Cr and V- and were irradiated under fast neutron flux at temperatures ranged between 650 and 1040 deg. C. The results show that in comparison to MgO, MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} inert matrices irradiated alone, the composite pellets containing UO{sub 2} particles, showed very different behaviors under irradiation. The swelling of MgO pellets is enhanced in the presence of fissile material whereas it is lowered for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-UO{sub 2} pellets. MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}-UO{sub 2} pellets remained stable. The second step of the program aimed at testing the behavior of inert support targets containing americium. A new experiment ECRIX H involving composite pellets with an MgO matrix and AmO{sub 2-x} particles was performed in Phenix and completed in 2006. A rather low elongation of the pellet stack was observed and no significant diameter deformation of cladding was detected after irradiation. The analysis of the filling gas of the pin after puncturing, revealed that respectively 28% and 5% of the He and Xe+Kr created under irradiation were released in the expanding volume of the pin. ECRIX H, which is the first experiment on Am base target in Phenix, will undoubtedly represent a very important step in the general design approach about inert matrix support targets once the complete results should be available by the end of

  11. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. J. van Rooyen,; T. M. Lillo; Y. Q. WU; P.A. Demkowicz; L. Scott; D.M. Scates; E. L. Reber; J. H. Jackson; J. A. Smith; D.L. Cottle; B.H. Rabin; M.R. Tonks; S.B. Biner; Y. Zhang; R.L. Williamson; S.R. Novascone; B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; D.R. Gaston; C.J. Permann; D. Anders; S.L. Hayes; P.C. Millett; D. Andersson; C. Stanek; R. Ali; S.L. Garrett; J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; J. Palmer; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; G. Kohse; P. Ramuhali; H.T. Chien; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; D.W. Nigg; G. Imel; J. T. Harris

    2014-04-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • The first identification of silver and palladium migrating through the SiC layer in TRISO fuel • A description of irradiation assisted stress corrosion testing capabilities that support commercial light water reactor life extension • Results of high-temperature safety testing on coated particle fuels irradiated in the ATR • New methods for testing the integrity of irradiated plate-type reactor fuel • Description of a 'Smart Fuel' concept that wirelessly provides real time information about changes in nuclear fuel properties and operating conditions • Development and testing of ultrasonic transducers and real-time flux sensors for use inside reactor cores, and • An example of a capsule irradiation test. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps to spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at INL, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  12. BASICS OF COMPOUNDING: Capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Loyd V

    2016-01-01

    Capsules have been used for administering medications to patients more than a century and have an important role in drug delivery. When a primary care provider prescribes a tablet, the choice is usually, but not always, limited to commercially available products. A capsule, however, can be prepared extemporaneously, which provides dosing flexibility for the primary care provider and the pharmacist. This article discusses the definitions/types of capsules, their applications, composition, preparation, capsule sizes, the encapsulation process, capsule cleaning, physiochemical considerations, quality control in the preparation of capsules, packaging/storage, stability, and patient counseling to determine the proper capsule size. Also, provided are sample formulations.

  13. Calculation Simulation of Equivalent Irradiation Swelling for Dispersion Nuclear Fuel%弥散核燃料等效辐照肿胀计算模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡维; 赵云妹; 龚辛; 丁淑蓉; 霍永忠

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion nuclear fuel was regarded as a kind of special particle compos‐ites .Assuming that the fuel particles are periodically distributed in the dispersion nucle‐ar fuel meat ,the finite element model to calculate its equivalent irradiation swelling was developed with the method of computational micro‐mechanics .Considering irradiation swelling in the fuel particles and the irradiation hardening effect in the metal matrix ,the stress update algorithms were established respectively for the fuel particles and metal matrix .The corresponding user subroutines were programmed ,and the finite element simulation of equivalent irradiation swelling for the fuel meat was performed in Abaqus . The effects of the particle size and volume fraction on the equivalent irradiation swelling were investigated ,and the fitting formula of equivalent irradiation swelling was obtained .The results indicate that the main factors to influence equivalent irradiation swelling of the fuel meat are the irradiation swelling and volume fraction of fuel particles .%本文将弥散核燃料芯体看作一种特殊的颗粒复合材料,利用细观计算力学的方法,假设燃料颗粒在芯体中周期性分布,建立了对芯体等效辐照肿胀进行计算模拟的有限元模型。考虑颗粒的辐照肿胀和基体材料的辐照硬化效应,分别建立了燃料颗粒和基体材料的应力更新算法,编制了用户材料子程序,在A baqus软件中实现了芯体等效辐照肿胀的有限元模拟。计算分析了颗粒大小和体积含量对芯体等效辐照肿胀的影响,并得到了等效辐照肿胀的拟合公式。研究结果表明,影响芯体等效辐照肿胀的主要因素是颗粒的辐照肿胀和体积含量。

  14. Preparation and characterization of mono-sheet bipolar membranes by pre-irradiation grafting method for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yingjie; Fang, Jun; Fu, Tao; Zhou, Huili; Wang, Xin; Deng, Zixiang; Zhao, Jinbao

    2016-09-01

    A new method for the preparation of the mono-sheet bipolar membrane applied to fuel cells was developed based on the pre-irradiation grafting technology. A series of bipolar membranes were successfully prepared by simultaneously grafting of styrene onto one side of the poly(ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) base film and 1-vinylimidazole onto the opposite side, followed by the sulfonation and alkylation, respectively. The chemical structures and microstructures of the prepared membranes were investigated by ATR-FTIR and SEM-EDS. The TGA measurements demonstrated the prepared bipolar membranes have reasonable thermal stability. The ion exchange capacity, water uptake and ionic conductivity of the membranes were also characterized. The H2/O2 single fuel cells using these membranes were evaluated and revealed a maximum power density of 107 mW cm-2 at 35 °C with unhumidified hydrogen and oxygen. The preliminary performances suggested the great prospect of these membranes in application of bipolar membrane fuel cells.

  15. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 x 1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below

  16. Potential value of Cs-137 capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomster, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Bruno, G.A.; Hazelton, R.F.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Lezberg, A.J.; Tingey, G.L.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    We determined the value of Cs-137 compared to Co-60 as a source for the irradiation of fruit (apples and cherries), pork and medical supplies. Cs-137, in the WESF capsule form, had a value of approximately $0.40/Ci as a substitute for Co-60 priced at approximately $1.00/Ci. The comparison was based on the available curies emitted from the surface of each capsule. We developed preliminary designs for fourteen irradiation facilities; seven were based on Co-60 and seven were based on Cs-137. These designs provided the basis for estimating capital and operating costs which, in turn, provided the basis for determining the value of Cs-137 relative to Co-60 in these applications. We evaluated the effect of the size of the irradiation facility on the value of Cs-137. The cost of irradiation is low compared to the value of the product. Irradiation of apples for disinfestation costs $.01 to .02 per pound. Irradiation for trichina-safe pork costs $.02 per pound. Irradiation of medical supplies for sterilization costs $.07 to .12 per pound. The cost of the irradiation source, either Co-60 or Cs-137, contributed only a minor amount to the total cost of irradiation, about 5% for the fruit and hog cases and about 20% for the medical supply cases. We analyzed the sensitivity of the irradiation costs and Cs-137 value to several key assumptions.

  17. 78 FR 31821 - Physical Protection of Shipments of Irradiated Reactor Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ...: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: NUREG; issuance. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing Revision 2 of NUREG-0561, ``Physical Protection of Shipments of Irradiated Reactor... individuals granted unescorted access to SNF during transportation. DATES: Revision 2 of NUREG-0561...

  18. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in an Average Power Position (I-24) in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M . Ryskamp; R. C. Howard; R. C. Pedersen; S. T. Khericha

    1998-10-01

    The Fissile Material Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan details a series of test irradiations designed to investigate the use of weapons-grade plutonium in MOX fuel for light water reactors (LWR) (Cowell 1996a, Cowell 1997a, Thoms 1997a). Commercial MOX fuel has been successfully used in overseas reactors for many years; however, weapons-derived test fuel contains small amounts of gallium (about 2 parts per million). A concern exists that the gallium may migrate out of the fuel and into the clad, inducing embrittlement. For preliminary out-of-pile experiments, Wilson (1997) states that intermetallic compound formation is the principal interaction mechanism between zircaloy cladding and gallium. This interaction is very limited by the low mass of gallium, so problems are not expected with the zircaloy cladding, but an in-pile experiment is needed to confirm the out-of-pile experiments. Ryskamp (1998) provides an overview of this experiment and its documentation. The purpose of this Experiment Safety Assurance Package (ESAP) is to demonstrate the safe irradiation and handling of the mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) Fuel Average Power Test (APT) experiment as required by Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) 3.9.1 (LMITCO 1998). This ESAP addresses the specific operation of the MOX Fuel APT experiment with respect to the operating envelope for irradiation established by the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO 1997a). Experiment handling activities are discussed herein.

  19. Transient fuel behavior of preirradiated PWR fuels under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishiro, Toshio; Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Ishijima, Kiyomi; Shiba, Koreyuki

    1992-06-01

    Since 1975, extensive studies on transient fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions have been continued in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. A new experimental program with preirradiated LWR fuel rods as test samples has recently been started. In this program, transient behavior and failure initiation have been studied with 14 × 14 type PWR fuel rods preirradiated to a burnup of 20 to 42 MWd/kgU. The test fuel rods contained in a capsule filled with the coolant water were subjected to a pulse irradiation in the NSRR to simulate a prompt power surge in an RIA. The effects of preirradiation on the transient fission gas release, pellet-cladding mechanical interaction and fuel failure were clearly observed through the transient in-core measurements and postirradiation examination.

  20. Analysis Of Wetted-Foam ICF Capsule Perormance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R.; Olson, R.; Zylstra, A.; Haines, B.; Yi, A.; Bradley, P.; Yin, L.; Leeper, R.; Kline, J.

    2016-10-01

    The performance of wetted-foam ICF capsules is investigated with the RAGE Eulerian radiation-hydrodynamics computer code. We are developing an experimental platform on NIF that employs a wetted foam liquid DT fuel layer ICF capsules. By varying the capsule temperature, the vapor density in the capsule can be prescribed, and the hot spot convergence ratio (CR) of the capsule implosion can be controlled. This allows us to investigate the fidelity of RAGE in modeling of capsule implosions as the value of CR is varied. In the NIF experiments, CR can be varied from 12 to 25. This presentation will cover simulations with RAGE of three NIF shots performed in 2016; a DD and a DT liquid fuel shot with CR =14 and a DT shot with CR =16. It will also discuss analysis of future experiments. This work was performed under auspices of the U. S. DOE by LANL.

  1. Fuel irradiation research of Japan at OECD Halden Reactor Project. Achievement of joint researches between JAERI and other organizations in the period from 1994 to 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Jinichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kinoshita, Motoyasu [and others

    1998-01-01

    JAERI has performed cooperative researches with many Japanese agencies and companies by means of the Halden Boiling Heavy Water Reactor (HBWR) which is located at Halden in Norway. These cooperative researches are carried out based on the contracts of the cooperative researches, which are revised every three years, in accordance with the renewal of the participation of JAERI to the OECD Halden Reactor Project. This report summaries the objectives, contents and the outlines of the achievements of the cooperative researches during the three years from 1994 January to 1996 December. During the period, ten cooperative researches had been carried out, and two of them had finished during the period and other eight researches has been continued to the next three year period. There are many research items, and most of them are irradiation test researches of advanced fuel and cladding concerned with the high burnup utilization of LWR fuel or MOX fuel irradiation researches to prepare for the introduction of Plutonium utilization in LWRs. The researches of fuel irradiation usually take long time because of the characteristics of these kind of research work, and three years are usually not enough to obtain some achievements from the irradiation tests. Therefore, eight tests have been continued after the three year period. In this report, the achievements of the continued researches to the next three year period are not final one but a kind of progress report. (author)

  2. Fuel irradiation research of Japan at halden reactor. Achievement of cooperative researches between JAERI and several organizations in the period from 1997 to 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-11-01

    JAERI has performed cooperative researches with several Japanese agencies and companies by means of the Halden Boiling Heavy Water Reactor (HBWR) which is located at Halden in Norway. These researches are carried out based on the contracts of the cooperative researches, which are revised every three years, in accordance with the renewal of the participation of JAERI to the OECD Halden Reactor Project. This report summaries the objectives, contents and the outlines of the achievements of the cooperative researches during the three years from 1997 January to 1999 December. During the period, nine cooperative researches had been carried out. Two of them had been completed and other seven researches has been continued to the next three years period. Most of them are irradiation test researches of advanced fuel and cladding in order to prepare the higher burnup utilization and introduction of LWR fuel and MOX fuel in LWRs of Japan. The researches of fuel irradiation usually take long time for preparing test and irradiation, then three years are usually not enough to obtain some achievements from the irradiation tests. Therefore, seven tests have been continued to the next three year period. In this report, the achievements of the continued researches to the next period are not final one but a kind of progress report. (author)

  3. A study of fuel failure behavior in high burnup HTGR fuel. Analysis by STRESS3 and STAPLE codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, David G.; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Ueta, Shouhei; Sumita, Junya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2001-05-01

    In current high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), Tri-isotropic coated fuel particles are employed as fuel. In safety design of the HTGR fuels, it is important to retain fission products within particles so that their release to primary coolant does not exceed an acceptable level. From this point of view, the basic design criteria for the fuel are to minimize the failure fraction of as-fabricated fuel coating layers and to prevent significant additional fuel failures during operation. This report attempts to model fuel behavior in irradiation tests using the U.K. codes STRESS3 and STAPLE. Test results in 91F-1A and HRB-22 capsules irradiation tests, which were carried out at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor of JAERI and at the High Flux Isotope Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, respectively, were employed in the calculation. The maximum burnup and fast neutron fluence were about 10%FIMA and 3 x 10{sup 25} m{sup -2}, respectively. The fuel for the irradiation tests was called high burnup fuel, whose target burnup and fast neutron fluence were higher than those of the first-loading fuel of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor. The calculation results demonstrated that if only mean fracture stress values of PyC and SiC are used in the calculation it is not possible to predict any particle failures, by which is meant when all three load bearing layers have failed. By contrast, when statistical variations in the fracture stresses and particle specifications are taken into account, as is done in the STAPLE code, failures can be predicted. In the HRB-22 irradiation test, it was concluded that the first two particles which had failed were defective in some way, but that the third and fourth failures can be accounted for by the pressure vessel model. In the 91F-1A irradiation test, the result showed that 1 or 2 particles had failed towards the end of irradiation in the upper capsule and no particles failed in the lower capsule. (author)

  4. Processing of irradiated, enriched uranium fuels at the Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyder, M L; Perkins, W C; Thompson, M C; Burney, G A; Russell, E R; Holcomb, H P; Landon, L F

    1979-04-01

    Uranium fuels containing /sup 235/U at enrichments from 1.1% to 94% are processed and recovered, along with neptunium and plutonium byproducts. The fuels to be processed are dissolved in nitric acid. Aluminum-clad fuels are disssolved using a mercury catalyst to give a solution rich in aluminum. Fuels clad in more resistant materials are dissolved in an electrolytic dissolver. The resulting solutions are subjected to head-end treatment, including clarification and adjustment of acid and uranium concentration before being fed to solvent extraction. Uranium, neptunium, and plutonium are separated from fission products and from one another by multistage countercurrent solvent extraction with dilute tri-n-butyl phosphate in kerosene. Nitric acid is used as the salting agent in addition to aluminum or other metal nitrates present in the feed solution. Nuclear safety is maintained through conservative process design and the use of monitoring devices as secondary controls. The enriched uranium is recovered as a dilute solution and shipped off-site for further processing. Neptunium is concentrated and sent to HB-Line for recovery from solution. The relatively small quantities of plutonium present are normally discarded in aqueous waste, unless the content of /sup 238/Pu is high enough to make its recovery desirable. Most of the /sup 238/Pu can be recovered by batch extraction of the waste solution, purified by counter-current solvent extraction, and converted to oxide in HB-Line. By modifying the flowsheet, /sup 239/Pu can be recovered from low-enriched uranium in the extraction cycle; neptunium is then not recovered. The solvent is subjected to an alkaline wash before reuse to remove degraded solvent and fission products. The aqueous waste is concentrated and partially deacidified by evaporation before being neutralized and sent to the waste tanks; nitric acid from the overheads is recovered for reuse.

  5. Characterization of Irradiated Metal Waste from the Pyrometallurgical Treatment of Used EBR-II Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.R. Westphal; K.C. Marsden; W.M. McCartin; S.M. Frank; D.D. Keiser, Jr.; T.S. Yoo; D. Vaden; D.G. Cummings; K.J. Bateman; J. J. Giglio; T. P. O' Holleran; P. A. Hahn; M. N. Patterson

    2013-03-01

    As part of the pyrometallurgical treatment of used Experimental Breeder Reactor-II fuel, a metal waste stream is generated consisting primarily of cladding hulls laden with fission products noble to the electrorefining process. Consolidation by melting at high temperature [1873 K (1600 degrees C)] has been developed to sequester the noble metal fission products (Zr, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Te, and Pd) which remain in the iron-based cladding hulls. Zirconium from the uranium fuel alloy (U-10Zr) is also deposited on the hulls and forms Fe-Zr intermetallics which incorporate the noble metals as well as residual actinides during processing. Hence, Zr has been chosen as the primary indicator for consistency of the metal waste. Recently, the first production-scale metal waste ingot was generated and sampled to monitor Zr content for Fe-Zr intermetallic phase formation and validation of processing conditions. Chemical assay of the metal waste ingot revealed a homogeneous distribution of the noble metal fission products as well as the primary fuel constituents U and Zr. Microstructural characterization of the ingot confirmed the immobilization of the noble metals in the Fe-Zr intermetallic phase.

  6. Mechanistic approach for nitride fuel evolution and fission product release under irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgodvorov, A. P.; Ozrin, V. D.

    2017-01-01

    A model for describing uranium-plutonium mixed nitride fuel pellet burning was developed. Except fission products generating, the model includes impurities of oxygen and carbon. Nitrogen behaviour in nitride fuel was analysed and the nitrogen chemical potential in solid solution with uranium-plutonium nitride was constructed. The chemical program module was tested with the help of thermodynamic equilibrium phase distribution calculation. Results were compared with analogous data in literature, quite good agreement was achieved, especially for uranium sesquinitride, metallic species and some oxides. Calculation of a process of nitride fuel burning was also conducted. Used mechanistic approaches for fission product evolution give the opportunity to find fission gas release fractions and also volumes of intergranular secondary phases. Calculations present that the most massive secondary phases are the oxide and metallic phases. Oxide phase contain approximately 1 % wt of substance over all time of burning with slightly increasing of content. Metallic phase has considerable rising of mass and by the last stage of burning it contains about 0.6 % wt of substance. Intermetallic phase has less increasing rate than metallic phase and include from 0.1 to 0.2 % wt over all time of burning. The highest element fractions of released gaseous fission products correspond to caesium and iodide.

  7. Depletion analysis and sensitivity study of PHENIX fuel-irradiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, D.; Kallfelz, J.M.; White, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental results are in the form of various U and Pu atom density ratios (R/sub E/) and burnup (BU) values. The results were for samples irradiated during the first three cycles in the central zone of PHENIX. The time-dependent sensitivity study was performed with the depletion generalized perturbation code DEPTH-CHARGE, to investigate the sensitivity of R/sub E/ to cross sections and to absolute flux level changes. The depletion analysis was performed using ENDS/B-IV data, an (R-Z) model, and the VENTURE Code system. 2 tables.

  8. Swelling of U(Mo)-Al(Si) dispersion fuel under irradiation - Non-destructive analyses of the LEONIDAS E-FUTURE plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berghe, S.; Parthoens, Y.; Charollais, F.; Kim, Y. S.; Leenaers, A.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V.; Lemoine, P.; Jarousse, C.; Guyon, H.; Wachs, D.; Keiser, D., Jr.; Robinson, A.; Stevens, J.; Hofman, G.

    2012-11-01

    In the framework of the elimination of High-Enriched Uranium (HEU) from the civil circuit, the search for an appropriate fuel to replace the high-enriched research reactor fuel in those reactors that currently still require it for their operation has led to the development of a U-7 wt.%Mo alloy based dispersion fuel with an Al-Si matrix. The European LEONIDAS program, joining SCK•CEN, ILL, CEA and AREVA-CERCA, is aimed at the qualification of such a fuel for the use in high power conditions. The first experiment of the program, designated E-FUTURE, was performed to select the appropriate matrix Si concentration and fuel plate post-production heat treatment parameters for further qualification. It consisted of the irradiation of four distinct (4% and 6% Si, 3 different heat treatments) full size, flat fuel plates in the BR2 reactor. The irradiation conditions were relatively severe: 470 W/cm2 peak BOL power, with a ˜70% 235U peak burnup.

  9. Integrated Recycling Test Fuel Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.S. Fielding; K.H. Kim; B. Grover; J. Smith; J. King; K. Wendt; D. Chapman; L. Zirker

    2013-03-01

    The Integrated Recycling Test is a collaborative irradiation test that will electrochemically recycle used light water reactor fuel into metallic fuel feedstock. The feedstock will be fabricated into a metallic fast reactor type fuel that will be irradiation tested in a drop in capsule test in the Advanced Test Reactor on the Idaho National Laboratory site. This paper will summarize the fuel fabrication activities and design efforts. Casting development will include developing a casting process and system. The closure welding system will be based on the gas tungsten arc burst welding process. The settler/bonder system has been designed to be a simple system which provides heating and controllable impact energy to ensure wetting between the fuel and cladding. The final major pieces of equipment to be designed are the weld and sodium bond inspection system. Both x-radiography and ultrasonic inspection techniques have been examine experimentally and found to be feasible, however the final remote system has not been designed. Conceptual designs for radiography and an ultrasonic system have been made.

  10. Ultra-Deep Adsorptive Desulfurization of Light-Irradiated Diesel Fuel over Supported TiO2-CeO2 Adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoxing; Chen, Yongsheng; Fujii, Mamoru; Song, Chunshan [SCUT-China; (Penn)

    2014-02-13

    This study investigates ultra-deep adsorptive desulfurization (ADS) from light-irradiated diesel fuel over supported TiO2–CeO2 adsorbents. A 30-fold higher desulfurization capacity of 95 mL of fuel per gram of adsorbent (mL-F/g-sorb) or 1.143 mg of sulfur per gram of adsorbent (mg-S/g-sorb) was achieved from light-irradiated fuel over the original low-sulfur fuel containing about 15 ppm by weight (ppmw) of sulfur. The sulfur species on spent TiO2–CeO2/MCM-48 adsorbent was identified by sulfur K-edge XANES as sulfones and the adsorption selectivity to different compounds tested in a model fuel decreases in the order of indole > dibenzothiophenesulfone → dibenzothiophene > 4-methyldibenzothiophene > benzothiophene > 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene > phenanthrene > 2-methylnaphthalene ~ fluorene > naphthalene. The results suggest that during ADS of light-irradiated fuel, the original sulfur species were chemically transformed to sulfones, resulting in the significant increase in desulfurization capacity. For different supports for TiO2–CeO2 oxides, the ADS capacity increases with a decrease in the point of zero charge (PZC) value; for silica-supported TiO2–CeO2 oxides (the lowest PZC value of 2–4) with different surface areas, the ADS capacity increases monotonically with increasing surface area. The supported TiO2–CeO2/MCM-48 adsorbent can be regenerated using oxidative air treatment. The present study provides an attractive new path to achieve ultraclean fuel more effectively.

  11. Esophageal capsule endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ignacio Fernandez-Urien; Cristina Carretero; Raul Armendariz; Miguel Mu(n)oz-Navas

    2008-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is now considered as the first imaging tool for small bowel examination.Recently,new capsule endoscopy applications have been developed,such as esophageal capsule endoscopy and colon capsule endoscopy.Esophageal capsule endoscopy in patients with suspected esophageal disorders is feasible and safe,and could be also an alternative procedure in those patients refusing upper endoscopy.Although large-scale studies are needed to confirm its utility in GERD and cirrhotic patients,current results are encouraging and open a new era in esophageal examination.

  12. Colon capsule endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ignacio Fernandez-Urien; Cristina Carretero; Ana Borda; Miguel Mu(n)oz-Navas

    2008-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy has become the first imaging tool for small bowel examination.Recently,new capsule endoscopy applications have been developed,such as esophageal capsule endoscopy and colon capsule endoscopy.Clinical trials results have shown that colon capsule endoscopy is feasible,accurate and safe in patients suffering from colonic diseases.It could be a good alternative in patients refusing conventional colonoscopy or when it is contraindicated.Upcoming studies are needed to demonstrate its utilty for colon cancer screening and other indications such us ulcerative colitis.Comparative studies including both conventional and virtual colonoscopy are also required.

  13. Separation of actinides from irradiated An–Zr based fuel by electrorefining on solid aluminium cathodes in molten LiCl–KCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souček, P., E-mail: Pavel.Soucek@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Murakami, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Claux, B.; Meier, R.; Malmbeck, R. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tsukada, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Glatz, J.-P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Electrorefining process in molten LiCl-KCl using solid Al electrodes was demonstrated. • High separation factors of actinides over lanthanides were achieved. • Efficient recovery of actinides from irradiated nuclear fuel was achieved. • Uniform, dense and well adhered deposits were obtained and characterised. • Kinetic parameters of actinide–aluminium alloy formation were evaluated. - Abstract: An electrorefining process for metallic spent nuclear fuel treatment is being investigated in ITU. Solid aluminium cathodes are used for homogeneous recovery of all actinides within the process carried out in molten LiCl–KCl eutectic salt at a temperature of 500 °C. As the selectivity, efficiency and performance of solid Al has been already shown using un-irradiated An–Zr alloy based test fuels, the present work was focused on laboratory-scale demonstration of the process using irradiated METAPHIX-1 fuel composed of U{sub 67}–Pu{sub 19}–Zr{sub 10}–MA{sub 2}–RE{sub 2} (wt.%, MA = Np, Am, Cm, RE = Nd, Ce, Gd, Y). Different electrorefining techniques, conditions and cathode geometries were used during the experiment yielding evaluation of separation factors, kinetic parameters of actinide–aluminium alloy formation, process efficiency and macro-structure characterisation of the deposits. The results confirmed an excellent separation and very high efficiency of the electrorefining process using solid Al cathodes.

  14. Simulation of transient heat transfer in MACSTOR/KN-400 module storing irradiated CANDU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabourin, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Lee, K.-H.; Yoon, J.-H.; Choi, B.-I.; Lee, H.-Y.; Song, M.-J. [KHNP, Nuclear Environment Technology Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP), in collaboration with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), are developing a new module for the dry storage of spent fuel from the four CANDU 6 nuclear reactors at the Wolsong site in South Korea, the MACSTOR/KN-400. The simulation of transient conditions for AECL's spent fuel dry storage systems, presented in this paper, has not been performed before and is considered a major achievement of the present work. In a fist step, CATHENA was compared to MACSTOR-200 temperature measurements and the accuracy of the results were very good. In a second step, CATHENA was applied to the MACSTOR/KN-400. Four cases were performed for the MACSTOR/KN-400: Off-normal cases in summer and winter and reduced air flow cases in summer and winter. The maximum local concrete temperatures were predicted to be 63{sup o}C for the off-normal case and 65{sup o}C in the reduced air flow case. The maximum temperature gradients in the concrete are predicted to be 28{sup o}C for the off-normal case and 30{sup o}C in the reduced air flow case, incorporating a 3{sup o}C uncertainty. This paper shows that the maximum temperature for the module is expected to meet the temperature limitations of appropriate standards. (author)

  15. Fission Product Inventory and Burnup Evaluation of the AGR-2 Irradiation by Gamma Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Stempien, John Dennis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Demkowicz, Paul Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Gamma spectrometry has been used to evaluate the burnup and fission product inventory of different components from the US Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program's second TRISO-coated particle fuel irradiation test (AGR-2). TRISO fuel in this irradiation included both uranium carbide / uranium oxide (UCO) kernels and uranium oxide (UO2) kernels. Four of the 6 capsules contained fuel from the US Advanced Gas Reactor program, and only those capsules will be discussed in this work. The inventories of gamma-emitting fission products from the fuel compacts, graphite compact holders, graphite spacers and test capsule shell were evaluated. These data were used to measure the fractional release of fission products such as Cs-137, Cs-134, Eu-154, Ce-144, and Ag-110m from the compacts. The fraction of Ag-110m retained in the compacts ranged from 1.8% to full retention. Additionally, the activities of the radioactive cesium isotopes (Cs-134 and Cs-137) have been used to evaluate the burnup of all US TRISO fuel compacts in the irradiation. The experimental burnup evaluations compare favorably with burnups predicted from physics simulations. Predicted burnups for UCO compacts range from 7.26 to 13.15 % fission per initial metal atom (FIMA) and 9.01 to 10.69 % FIMA for UO2 compacts. Measured burnup ranged from 7.3 to 13.1 % FIMA for UCO compacts and 8.5 to 10.6 % FIMA for UO2 compacts. Results from gamma emission computed tomography performed on compacts and graphite holders that reveal the distribution of different fission products in a component will also be discussed. Gamma tomography of graphite holders was also used to locate the position of TRISO fuel particles suspected of having silicon carbide layer failures that lead to in-pile cesium release.

  16. Fission Product Inventory and Burnup Evaluation of the AGR-2 Irradiation by Gamma Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Stempien, John D.

    2016-11-01

    Gamma spectrometry has been used to evaluate the burnup and fission product inventory of different components from the US Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program's second TRISO-coated particle fuel irradiation test (AGR-2). TRISO fuel in this irradiation included both uranium carbide / uranium oxide (UCO) kernels and uranium oxide (UO2) kernels. Four of the 6 capsules contained fuel from the US Advanced Gas Reactor program, and only those capsules will be discussed in this work. The inventories of gamma-emitting fission products from the fuel compacts, graphite compact holders, graphite spacers and test capsule shell were evaluated. These data were used to measure the fractional release of fission products such as Cs-137, Cs-134, Eu-154, Ce-144, and Ag-110m from the compacts. The fraction of Ag-110m retained in the compacts ranged from 1.8% to full retention. Additionally, the activities of the radioactive cesium isotopes (Cs-134 and Cs-137) have been used to evaluate the burnup of all US TRISO fuel compacts in the irradiation. The experimental burnup evaluations compare favorably with burnups predicted from physics simulations. Predicted burnups for UCO compacts range from 7.26 to 13.15 % fission per initial metal atom (FIMA) and 9.01 to 10.69 % FIMA for UO2 compacts. Measured burnup ranged from 7.3 to 13.1 % FIMA for UCO compacts and 8.5 to 10.6 % FIMA for UO2 compacts. Results from gamma emission computed tomography performed on compacts and graphite holders that reveal the distribution of different fission products in a component will also be discussed. Gamma tomography of graphite holders was also used to locate the position of TRISO fuel particles suspected of having silicon carbide layer failures that lead to in-pile cesium release.

  17. Chemical states of fission products in irradiated (U 0.3Pu 0.7)C 1+ x fuel at high burn-ups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Renu; Venugopal, V.

    2006-12-01

    The chemical states of fission products have been theoretically determined for the irradiated carbide fuel of Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam, India, at different burn-ups. The SOLGASMIX-PV computer code was used to determine the equilibrium chemical composition of the fuel. The system was assumed to be composed of a gaseous phase at one atmosphere pressure, and various solid phases. The distribution of elements in these phases and their chemical states at different temperatures were calculated as a function of burn-up. The FBTR fuel, (U 0.3Pu 0.7)C 1+ x, was loaded with C/M values in the range, 1.03-1.06. The present calculations indicated that even for the lowest starting C/M of 1.03 in the FBTR fuel, the liquid metal phase of (U, Pu), should not appear at a burn-up as high as 150 GWd/t.

  18. Selective adsorption of thiophenic compounds from fuel over TiO2/SiO2 under UV-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Guang; Ye, Feiyan; Wu, Luoming; Ren, Xiaoling; Xiao, Jing; Li, Zhong; Wang, Haihui

    2015-12-30

    This study investigates selective adsorption of thiophenic compounds from fuel over TiO2/SiO2 under UV-irradiation. The TiO2/SiO2 adsorbents were prepared and then characterized by N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Adsorption isotherms, selectivity and kinetics of TiO2/SiO2 were measured in a UV built-in batch reactor. It was concluded that (a) with the employment of UV-irradiation, high organosulfur uptake of 5.12 mg/g was achieved on the optimized 0.3TiO2/0.7SiO2 adsorbent at low sulfur concentration of 15 ppmw-S, and its adsorption selectivity over naphthalene was up to 325.5; (b) highly dispersed TiO2 served as the photocatalytic sites for DBT oxidation, while SiO2 acted as the selective adsorption sites for the corresponding oxidized DBT using TiO2 as a promoter, the two types of active sites worked cooperatively to achieve the high adsorption selectivity of TiO2/SiO2; (c) The kinetic rate-determining step for the UV photocatalysis-assisted adsorptive desulfurization (PADS) over TiO2/SiO2 was DBT oxidation; (d) consecutive adsorption-regeneration cycles suggested that the 0.3TiO2/0.7SiO2 adsorbent can be regenerated by acetonitrile washing followed with oxidative air treatment. This work demonstrated an effective PADS approach to greatly enhance adsorption capacity and selectivity of thiophenic compounds at low concentrations for deep desulfurization under ambient conditions.

  19. Carbon 14 distribution in irradiated BWR fuel cladding and released carbon 14 after aqueous immersion of 6.5 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuragi, T. [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, Tsukishima 1-15-7, Chuo City, Tokyo, 104-0052 (Japan); Yamashita, Y.; Akagi, M.; Takahashi, R. [TOSHIBA Corporation, Ukishima Cho 4-1, Kawasaki Ward, Kawasaki, 210-0862 (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Spent fuel cladding which is highly activated and strongly contaminated is expected to be disposed of in an underground repository. A typical activation product in the activated metal waste is carbon 14 ({sup 14}C), which is mainly generated by the {sup 14}N(n,p){sup 14}C reaction and produces a significant exposure dose due to the large inventory, long half-life (5730 years), rapid release rate, and the speciation and consequent migration parameters. In the preliminary Japanese safety case, the release of radionuclides from the metal matrix is regarded as the corrosion-related congruent release, and the cladding oxide layer is regarded as a source of instant release fraction (IRF). In the present work, specific activity of {sup 14}C was measured using an irradiated BWR fuel cladding (Zircaloy-2, average rod burnup of 41.6 GWd/tU) which has an external oxide film having a thickness of 25.3 μm. The {sup 14}C specific activity of the base metal was 1.49*10{sup 4} Bq/g, which in the corresponding burnup is comparable to values in the existing literature, which were obtained from various irradiated claddings. Although the specific activity in oxide was 2.8 times the base metal activity due to the additive generation by the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction, the {sup 14}C abundance in oxide was less than 10% of total inventory. A static leaching test using the cladding tube was carried out in an air-tight vessel filled with a deoxygenated dilute NaOH solution (pH of 12.5) at room temperature. After 6.5 years, {sup 14}C was found in each leachate fraction of gas phase and dissolved organics and inorganics, the total of which was less than 0.01% of the {sup 14}C inventory of the immersed cladding tube. A simple calculation based on the congruent release with Zircaloy corrosion has suggested that the 96.7% of released {sup 14}C was from the external oxide layer and 3.3% was from the base Zircaloy metal. However, both the {sup 14}C abundance and the low leaching rate

  20. Symposium on the reprocessing of irradiated fuels. Book 3, Session V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1958-12-31

    Book three of this conference has a single-focused session V entitled Engineering and Economics, with 16 papers. The session is concerned with several phases of chemical reprocessing of fuels which are of a general nature. Hot labs, radiochemical analytical facilities, and high level development cells are described. Dissolution equipment, contactors, flow generation, measurement, and control equipment, samplers, connectors, carriers, valves, filters, and hydroclones are described and discussed. Papers are included on: radiation safety, chemical safety, radiochemical plant operating experience in the U.S., and heavy element isotopic buildup. The general economics of solvent extraction processing is discussed, and capital and operating costs for several U. S. plants given. The Atomic Energy Commission's chemical processing programs and administration are evaluated and the services offered and charges therefore are listed.

  1. ThO2-based pellet fuels - their properties, methods of fabrication, and irradiation performance: a critical assessment of the state of the technology and recommendations for further work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, P.E.; Griffin, C.W.; Hsieh, K.A.; Matthews, R.B.; White, G.D.

    1979-09-01

    This critical assessment of the ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ pellet fuel technology was conducted in support of the Fuels Refabrication and Development Program (FRAD). Included in this critical review are the following areas: powder preparation; pellet fabrication; fuel chemical, physical, and mechanical properties; and fuel irradiation performance. The authors identify (1) areas where data are either deficient or lacking and (2) requirements for additional development and experimental work.

  2. Two-Dimensional Mapping of the Calculated Fission Power for the Full-Size Fuel Plate Experiment Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, G. S.; Lillo, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA) Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program assigned to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) the responsibility of developing and demonstrating high uranium density research reactor fuel forms to enable the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) in research and test reactors around the world. A series of full-size fuel plate experiments have been proposed for irradiation testing in the center flux trap (CFT) position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). These full-size fuel plate tests are designated as the AFIP tests. The AFIP nominal fuel zone is rectangular in shape having a designed length of 21.5-in (54.61-cm), width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), and uniform thickness of 0.014-in (0.03556-cm). This gives a nominal fuel zone volume of 0.482 in3 (7.89 cm3) per fuel plate. The AFIP test assembly has two test positions. Each test position is designed to hold 2 full-size plates, for a total of 4 full-size plates per test assembly. The AFIP test plates will be irradiated at a peak surface heat flux of about 350 W/cm2 and discharged at a peak U-235 burn-up of about 70 at.%. Based on limited irradiation testing of the monolithic (U-10Mo) fuel form, it is desirable to keep the peak fuel temperature below 250°C to achieve this, it will be necessary to keep plate heat fluxes below 500 W/cm2. Due to the heavy U-235 loading and a plate width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), the neutron self-shielding will increase the local-to-average-ratio (L2AR) fission power near the sides of the fuel plates. To demonstrate that the AFIP experiment will meet the ATR safety requirements, a very detailed 2-dimensional (2D) Y-Z fission power profile was evaluated in order to best predict the fuel plate temperature distribution. The ability to accurately predict fuel plate power and burnup are essential to both the design of the AFIP tests as well as evaluation of the irradiated fuel performance. To support this need, a detailed MCNP Y

  3. Characterization and heading of irradiated fuels and their chemical analogs; Caracterizacion y lixiviacion de combustibles nucleares irradiados y de sus analogos quimicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, J. A. [Ciemat.Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    This work presents results of leaching experiments under deionized water and under synthetic granite at room temperature in air using spent fuel (UO{sub 2} and MOX LWR fuels) and the chemical analogues, natural UO{sub 2} and SIMFUEL. The experimental conditions and procedure for irradiated and non-irradiated materials were kept similar as much as possible. Also dissolution behaviour studies of preoxidised LWR UO{sub 2} and MOX spent fuel up to different on the oxidation degree. For both fuel types, UO{sub 2} and MOX, the fission products considered showed a fractional release normalised to uranium higher than 1, due to either the larger inventory at preferential leaching zones, such as, grain boundaries or to the inherent higher solubility of some of these elements. In contrast to fission products, the fractional release of PU from the UO{sub 2} fuel was not affected by the oxidation level. Finally a thermodynamic study of the experimental leaching results obtained in this work was performed. (Author)

  4. Development of capsule design support subprograms for 3-dimensional temperature calculation using FEM Code NISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobita, Masahiro; Matsui, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Prediction of irradiation temperature is one of the important issues in the design of the capsule for irradiation test. Many kinds of capsules with complex structure have been designed for recent irradiation requests, and three-dimensional (3D) temperature calculation becomes inevitable for the evaluation of irradiation temperature. For such 3D calculation, however, many works are usually needed for input data preparation, and a lot of time and resources are necessary for parametric studies in the design. To improve such situation, JAERI introduced 3D-FEM (finite element method) code NISA (Numerically Integrated elements for System Analysis) and developed several subprograms, which enabled to support input preparation works in the capsule design. The 3D temperature calculation of the capsule are able to carried out in much easier way by the help of the subprograms, and specific features in the irradiation tests such as non-uniform gamma heating in the capsule, becomes to be considered. (author)

  5. Irradiation rigs in material testing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozenblum, F.; Gonnier, C.; Bignan, G. [CEA, Research Centers of Saclay and Cadarache (France)

    2011-07-01

    Osiris is a research reactor with a thermal power of 70 MW. It is a light-water reactor, open-core pool type, the principal aim of which is to carry out tests and irradiate structural materials and fuel elements of nuclear power plants under a high flux of neutrons, and to produce radioisotopes. Osiris operates around 200 days a year, in cycles of varying lengths from 3 to 4 weeks. A shutdown of about 10 days between two cycles allows reloading the core with fuel. Mainly 2 types of irradiation device are present: capsules for materials irradiation (CHOUCA and IRMA devices) and fuels irradiation loops (GRIFFONOS and ISABELLE). Although Osiris is still providing experiments of very good quality, it is facing obsolescence due to its ageing. Osiris is planned to be shut down during next decade. Consequently, it has been decided to launch the construction of the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) in Cadarache. JHR is a water cooled reactor which provides the necessary flexibility and accessibility to manage several highly instrumented experiments, reproducing different reactor environments (water, gas or liquid metal loops), generating transient regimes (key for safety). The JHR facility includes the reactor building, including core, cooling system and the experimental bunkers connected to the core through pool wall penetrations and the auxiliary building, including pools and hot cells necessary for the experimental irradiation process. JHR core is optimised to produce high fast neutron flux to study structural material ageing and high thermal neutrons flux for fuel experiments. The conception of this first fleet of devices integrates the operational experience accumulated by the existing MTR and specifically the Osiris one

  6. Influence of SiC grain boundary character on fission product transport in irradiated TRISO fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, T. M.; van Rooyen, I. J.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the fission product precipitates at silicon carbide grain boundaries from an irradiated TRISO particle were identified and correlated with the associated grain boundary characteristics. Precession electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope provided the crystallographic information needed to identify grain boundary misorientation and boundary type (i.e., low angle, random high angle or coincident site lattice (CSL)-related). The silicon carbide layer was found to be composed mainly of twin boundaries and small fractions of random high angle and low angle grain boundaries. Most fission products were found at random, high-angle grain boundaries, with small fractions at low-angle and CSL-related grain boundaries. Palladium (Pd) was found at all types of grain boundaries while Pd-uranium and Pd-silver precipitates were only associated with CSL-related and random, high-angle grain boundaries. Precipitates containing only Ag were found only at random, high-angle grain boundaries, but not at low angle or CSL-related grain boundaries.

  7. The Thermal-hydraulic Performance Test Report for the Non-instrumented Irradiation Test Rig of Annular Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Kang Hee; Shin, Chang Hwan

    2008-09-15

    This report presents the results of pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test for the non-instrumented rig using the irradiation test in HANARO of the double cooled annular fuel which were designed and fabricated by KAERI. From the out-pile thermal hydraulic tests, corresponding to the pressure drop of 200 kPa is measured to be about 9.72 kg/sec. Vibration frequency for the non-instrumented rig ranges from 5.0 to 10.7 kg/s. RMS(Root Mean Square) displacement for non-instrumented rig is less than 11.73 m, and the maximum displacement is less than 54.87m. The flow rate for endurance test were 10.5 kg/s, which was 110% of 9.72 kg/s. And the endurance test was carried out for 3 days. The test results found not to the wear and satisfied to the limits of pressure drop, flow rate, vibration and wear in the non-instrumented rig. This test was performed at the FIVPET facility.

  8. Symposium on the reprocessing of irradiated fuels. Book 2, Session IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1958-12-31

    Book two of this conference has a single-focused session IV entitled Nonaqueous Processing, with 8 papers. The session deals with fluoride volatility processes and pyrometallurgical or pyrochemical processes. The latter involves either an oxide drossing or molten metal extraction or fused salt extraction technique and results in only partial decontamination. Fluoride volatility processes appear to be especially favorable for recovery of enriched uranium and decontamination factors of 10/sup 7/ to 10/sup 8/ would be achieved by simpler means than those employed in solvent extraction. Data from lab research on the BrF/sub 3/ process and the ClF/sub 3/ process are given and discussed and pilot plant experience is described, all in connection with natural uranium or slightly enriched uranium processing. Fluoride volatility processes for enriched or high alloy fuels are described step by step. The economic and engineering considerations of both types of nonaqueous processing are treated separately and as fully as present knowledge allows. A comprehensive review of the chemistry of pyrometallurgical processes is included.

  9. Disposal of irradiated fuel elements from German research reactors. Status and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thamm, G. [Central Research Reactor and Nuclear Operations Division, Research Centre Juelich, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    There will be a quantity of highly radioactive spent nuclear fuel (snf) from German research reactors amounting to about 9.1 t by the end of the next decade, which has to be disposed of. About 4.1 t of this quantity are intended to be returned to the USA. The remaining approximately 5 t can be loaded into approximately 30 CASTOR-2 casks and will be stored in a central German dry interim store for about 30 to 50 years (first step of the domestic disposal concept). Of course, snf arising from the operation of research reactors beyond 2010 has to be disposed of in the same way (3 MTR-2 casks every two years for BER-II and FRM-II). It is expected that snf from the zero-power facilities probably will be recycled for reusing the uranium. Due to the amendment of the German Atomic Energy Act intended by the new Federal German Government, the interim dry storage of snf from power reactors in central storage facilities like Ahaus or Gorleben will be stopped and the power reactors have to store snf at their own sites. Although the amendment only concerns nuclear power reactors, it could not be excluded that snf from research reactors, too, cannot be stored at Ahaus or Gorleben at present. (author)

  10. Self-doped Ti(3+)-TiO2 as a photocatalyst for the reduction of CO2 into a hydrocarbon fuel under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasan, Koroush; Zuo, Fan; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Pingyun

    2015-08-28

    Self-doped TiO2 shows visible light photocatalytic activity, while commercial TiO2 (P25) is only UV responsive. The incorporation of Ti(3+) into TiO2 structures narrows the band gap (2.90 eV), leading to significantly increased photocatalytic activity for the reduction of CO2 into a renewable hydrocarbon fuel (CH4) in the presence of water vapour under visible light irradiation.

  11. Report on the possibilities of long-term storage of irradiated nuclear fuels; Rapport sur les possibilites d'entreposage a long terme de combustibles nucleaires irradies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report aims at giving a legislative aspect to the many rules that govern the activities of the back-end of the fuel cycle in France. These activities concern the unloading of spent nuclear fuels, their reprocessing, storage, recycling and definitive disposal. The following points are reviewed and commented: the management of non-immediately reprocessed fuels (historical reasons of the 'all wastes reprocessing' initial choice, evolution of the economic and political context, the future reprocessing or the definitive disposal of spent fuels in excess); the inevitable long-term storage of part of the spent fuels (quantities and required properties of long-term stored fuels, the eventuality of a definitive disposal of spent fuels); the criteria that long-term storage facilities must fulfill (confinement measures, reversibility, surveillance and control during the whole duration of the storage); storage concept to be retained (increase of storage pools capacity, long-term storage in pools of reprocessing plants, centralized storage in pools, surface dry-storage on power plant sites, reversible underground storage, subsurface storage and storage/disposal in galleries, surface dry-storage facilities); the preliminary studies for the creation of long-term storage facilities (public information, management by a public French organization, clarifying of the conditions of international circulation of spent fuels); problems linked with the presence of foreign spent fuels in France (downstream of the reprocessing cycle, foreign plutonium and wastes re-shipment); conclusions and recommendations. (J.S.)

  12. NIF capsule performance modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Weber S.; Callahan D.; Cerjan C.; Edwards M.; Haan S.; Hicks D.; Jones O.; Kyrala G.; Meezan N.; Olson R; Robey H.; Spears B.; Springer P.; Town R.

    2013-01-01

    Post-shot modeling of NIF capsule implosions was performed in order to validate our physical and numerical models. Cryogenic layered target implosions and experiments with surrogate targets produce an abundance of capsule performance data including implosion velocity, remaining ablator mass, times of peak x-ray and neutron emission, core image size, core symmetry, neutron yield, and x-ray spectra. We have attempted to match the integrated data set with capsule-only simulations by adjusting th...

  13. Advanced Electron Microscopy and Micro analytical technique development and application for Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles from the AGR-1 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rooyen, Isabella Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lillo, Thomas Martin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wen, Haiming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wright, Karen Elizabeth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Madden, James Wayne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Aguiar, Jeffery Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A series of up to seven irradiation experiments are planned for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Quantification Program, with irradiation completed at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the first experiment (i.e., AGR-1) in November 2009 for an effective 620 full power days. The objective of the AGR-1 experiment was primarily to provide lessons learned on the multi-capsule test train design and to provide early data on fuel performance for use in fuel fabrication process development and post-irradiation safety testing data at high temperatures. This report describes the advanced microscopy and micro-analysis results on selected AGR-1 coated particles.

  14. Standard test method for determining the content of cesium-137 in irradiated nuclear fuels by high-resolution gamma-ray spectral analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the number of atoms of 137Cs in aqueous solutions of irradiated uranium and plutonium nuclear fuel. When combined with a method for determining the initial number of fissile atoms in the fuel, the results of this analysis allows atom percent fission (burn-up) to be calculated (1). The determination of atom percent fission, uranium and plutonium concentrations, and isotopic abundances are covered in Test Methods E 267 and E 321. 1.2 137Cs is not suitable as a fission monitor for samples that may have lost cesium during reactor operation. For example, a large temperature gradient enhances 137Cs migration from the fuel region to cooler regions such as the radial fuel-clad gap, or, to a lesser extent, towards the axial fuel end. 1.3 A nonuniform 137Cs distribution should alert the analyst to the potential loss of the fission product nuclide. The 137Cs distribution may be ascertained by an axial gamma-ray scan of the fuel element to be assayed. In a mixed-oxide fu...

  15. Irradiation analysis, production test IP-672, HAPO 238, irradiation of impacted UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} fuel rod bundles in C reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, J.H.

    1964-09-14

    The loss of flow is considered as far as the flow to the inlet hydraulic connector, inlet plugging and water shutoff time. A mockup revealed no vibration of the fuel element bundles and at the low temperatures present there should be no problem of corrosion. Efforts to assure safety with plutonium in the fuel elements are noted. (GHH)

  16. Examination of the chemical composition of irradiated zirconium based fuel claddings at the metal/oxide interface by TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhassani, S.; Bart, G.; Jakob, A.

    2010-04-01

    Detailed post-irradiation examinations have been performed at PSI on three fuel rods with differing cladding materials revealing different corrosion behaviour. The rods had been irradiated for 3-5 cycles at Gösgen nuclear power plant (pressurised water reactor), Switzerland. As zirconium corrosion is proceeding at the metal/oxide interface, extended micro-structural analyses were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), expecting to possibly reveal phenomena explaining the varying corrosion resistance. This paper reports on the distribution of oxygen at the metal/oxide interface examined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in TEM, while other micro-structural investigations have been published earlier [1]. In order to get some statistical confidence in the analyses, three neighbouring TEM samples of each cladding variant were studied. The oxygen concentration profiles of the three alloys (i.e. low-tin Zircaloy-4, Zr2.5%Nb and extra low-tin (Sn 0.56%)) both in the oxide and metal close to the metal/oxide interface are compared. The results of the examinations show the composition of the oxide in the vicinity of the interface to be sub-stoichiometric for all three materials, indicating an oxide layer adjacent to the interface, with diffusion-controlled access of oxygen to the metal/oxide interface. The metallic parts show highest oxygen concentrations at the metal/oxide interface which are reduced towards the bulk metal, pointing towards the expected second diffusion-controlled process leading to α-Zr (O). Based on the experimental results values for the diffusion coefficients in the range of 0.8-6.0 × 10 -20 m 2 s -1 are estimated for the oxygen dissolution process, the diffusion coefficient in Zircaloy-4 being six times higher than for the other two less corroding alloys. This finding is in contradiction with the present assumptions about the corrosion mechanism, and confirms the expected but not so far reported diffusion controlled

  17. Fabrication and Pre-irradiation Characterization of a Minor Actinide and Rare Earth Containing Fast Reactor Fuel Experiment for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy A. Hyde

    2012-06-01

    The United States Department of Energy, seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter lived fission products, thereby decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and reducing the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. This transmutation of the long lived actinides plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium can be accomplished by first separating them from spent Light Water Reactor fuel using a pyro-metalurgical process, then reprocessing them into new fuel with fresh uranium additions, and then transmuted to short lived nuclides in a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. An important component of the technology is developing actinide-bearing fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium isotopes that meet the stringent requirements of reactor fuels and materials.

  18. DIONISIO 2.0: New version of the code for simulating a whole nuclear fuel rod under extended irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soba, Alejandro, E-mail: soba@cnea.gov.ar; Denis, Alicia

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A new version of the DIONISIO code is developed. • DIONISIO is devoted to simulating the behavior of a nuclear fuel rod in operation. • The formerly two-dimensional simulation of a pellet-cladding segment is now extended to the whole rod length. • An acceptable and more realistic agreement with experimental data is obtained. • The prediction range of our code is extended up to average burnup of 60 MWd/kgU. - Abstract: The version 2.0 of the DIONISIO code, that incorporates diverse new aspects, has been recently developed. One of them is referred to the code architecture that allows taking into account the axial variation of the conditions external to the rod. With this purpose, the rod is divided into a number of axial segments. In each one the program considers the system formed by a pellet and the corresponding cladding portion and solves the numerous phenomena that take place under the local conditions of linear power and coolant temperature, which are given as input parameters. To do this a bi-dimensional domain in the r–z plane is considered where cylindrical symmetry and also symmetry with respect to the pellet mid-plane are assumed. The results obtained for this representative system are assumed valid for the complete segment. The program thus produces in each rod section the values of the temperature, stress, strain, among others as outputs, as functions of the local coordinates r and z. Then, the general rod parameters (internal rod pressure, amount of fission gas released, pellet stack elongation, etc.) are evaluated. Moreover, new calculation tools designed to extend the application range of the code to high burnup, which were reported elsewhere, have also been incorporated to DIONISIO 2.0 in recent times. With these improvements, the code results are compared with some 33 experiments compiled in the IFPE data base, that cover more than 380 fuel rods irradiated up to average burnup levels of 40–60 MWd/kgU. The results of these

  19. Analysis of fission gas release-to-birth ratio data from the AGR irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einerson, Jeffrey J., E-mail: jeffrey.einerson@inl.gov; Pham, Binh T.; Scates, Dawn M.; Maki, John T.; Petti, David A.

    2016-09-15

    A series of advanced gas reactor (AGR) irradiation tests is being conducted in the advanced test reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in support of development and qualification of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel used in the High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). Each AGR test consists of multiple independent capsules containing fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel shell. These capsules are instrumented with thermocouples (TC) embedded in the graphite enabling temperature control. For AGR-1, the first US irradiation of modern TRISO fuel completed in 2009, there were no particle failures detected. For AGR-2, a few exposed kernels existed in the fuel compacts based upon quality control data. For the AGR-3/4 experiment, particle failures in all capsules were expected because of the use of designed-to-fail (DTF) fuel particles whose kernels are identical to the driver fuel kernels and whose coatings are designed to fail under irradiation. The release-rate-to-birth-rate ratio (R/B) for each of krypton and xenon isotopes is calculated from release rates measured by the germanium detectors used in the AGR fission product monitoring (FPM) system installed downstream from each irradiated capsule. Birth rates are calculated based on the fission power in the experiment and fission product generation models. Thus, this R/B is a measure of the ability of fuel particle coating layers and compact matrix to retain fission gas atoms preventing their release into the sweep gas flow. The major factors that govern gaseous diffusion and release processes are found to be fuel material diffusion coefficient, temperature, and isotopic decay constant. To compare the release behavior among the AGR capsules and historic experiments, the R/B per failed particle is used. HTGR designers use this parameter in their fission product behavior models. For the U.S. TRISO fuel, a regression analysis is performed to establish functional relationships

  20. Neutronics, steady-state, and transient analyses for the Poland MARIA reactor for irradiation testing of LEU lead test fuel assemblies from CERCA : ANL independent verification results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-06-07

    The MARIA reactor at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) in Swierk (30 km SE of Warsaw) in the Republic of Poland is considering conversion from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies (FA). The FA design in MARIA is rather unique; a suitable LEU FA has never been designed or tested. IAE has contracted with CERCA (the fuel supply portion of AREVA in France) to supply 2 lead test assemblies (LTA). The LTAs will be irradiated in MARIA to burnup level of at least 40% for both LTAs and to 60% for one LTA. IAE may decide to purchase additional LEU FAs for a full core conversion after the test irradiation. The Reactor Safety Committee within IAE and the National Atomic Energy Agency in Poland (PAA) must approve the LTA irradiation process. The approval will be based, in part, on IAE submitting revisions to portions of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) which are affected by the insertion of the LTAs. (A similar process will be required for the full core conversion to LEU fuel.) The analysis required was established during working meetings between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and IAE staff during August 2006, subsequent email correspondence, and subsequent staff visits. The analysis needs to consider the current high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and 4 core configurations containing 1 and 2 LEU LTAs in various core positions. Calculations have been performed at ANL in support of the LTA irradiation. These calculations are summarized in this report and include criticality, burn-up, neutronics parameters, steady-state thermal hydraulics, and postulated transients. These calculations have been performed at the request of the IAE staff, who are performing similar calculations to be used in their SAR amendment submittal to the PAA. The ANL analysis has been performed independently from that being performed by IAE and should only be used as one step in the verification process.

  1. 3D Printed Programmable Release Capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Maneesh K; Meng, Fanben; Johnson, Blake N; Kong, Yong Lin; Tian, Limei; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Masters, Nina; Singamaneni, Srikanth; McAlpine, Michael C

    2015-08-12

    The development of methods for achieving precise spatiotemporal control over chemical and biomolecular gradients could enable significant advances in areas such as synthetic tissue engineering, biotic-abiotic interfaces, and bionanotechnology. Living organisms guide tissue development through highly orchestrated gradients of biomolecules that direct cell growth, migration, and differentiation. While numerous methods have been developed to manipulate and implement biomolecular gradients, integrating gradients into multiplexed, three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains a critical challenge. Here we present a method to 3D print stimuli-responsive core/shell capsules for programmable release of multiplexed gradients within hydrogel matrices. These capsules are composed of an aqueous core, which can be formulated to maintain the activity of payload biomolecules, and a poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA, an FDA approved polymer) shell. Importantly, the shell can be loaded with plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs), which permits selective rupturing of the capsule when irradiated with a laser wavelength specifically determined by the lengths of the nanorods. This precise control over space, time, and selectivity allows for the ability to pattern 2D and 3D multiplexed arrays of enzyme-loaded capsules along with tunable laser-triggered rupture and release of active enzymes into a hydrogel ambient. The advantages of this 3D printing-based method include (1) highly monodisperse capsules, (2) efficient encapsulation of biomolecular payloads, (3) precise spatial patterning of capsule arrays, (4) "on the fly" programmable reconfiguration of gradients, and (5) versatility for incorporation in hierarchical architectures. Indeed, 3D printing of programmable release capsules may represent a powerful new tool to enable spatiotemporal control over biomolecular gradients.

  2. AGR-3/4 Irradiation Test Train Disassembly and Component Metrology First Look Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John Dennis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Francine Joyce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Winston, Philip Lon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The AGR-3/4 experiment was designed to study fission product transport within graphitic matrix material and nuclear-grade graphite. To this end, this experiment consisted of 12 capsules, each fueled with 4 compacts containing UCO TRISO particles as driver fuel and 20 UCO designed-to-fail (DTF) fuel particles in each compact. The DTF fuel was fabricated with a thin pyrocarbon layer which was intended to fail during irradiation and provide a source of fission products. These fission products could then migrate through the compact and into the surrounding concentric rings of graphitic matrix material and/or nuclear graphite. Through post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the rings (including physical sampling and gamma scanning) fission product concentration profiles within the rings can be determined. These data can be used to elucidate fission product transport parameters (e.g. diffusion coefficients within the test materials) which will be used to inform and refine models of fission product transport. After irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) had been completed in April 2014, the AGR-3/4 experiment was shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) for inspection, disassembly, and metrology. The AGR-3/4 test train was received at MFC in two separate shipments between February and April 2015. Visual examinations of the test train exterior did not indicate dimensional distortion, and only two small discolored areas were observed at the bottom of Capsules 8 and 9. No corresponding discoloration was found on the inside of these capsules, however. Prior to disassembly, the two test train sections were subject to analysis via the Precision Gamma Scanner (PGS), which did not indicate that any gross fuel relocation had occurred. A series of specialized tools (including clamps, cutters, and drills) had been designed and fabricated in order to carry out test train disassembly and recovery of capsule components (graphite

  3. AGR-3/4 Irradiation Test Train Disassembly and Component Metrology First Look Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John Dennis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Francine Joyce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Winston, Philip Lon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The AGR-3/4 experiment was designed to study fission product transport within graphitic matrix material and nuclear-grade graphite. To this end, this experiment consisted of 12 capsules, each fueled with 4 compacts containing UCO TRISO particles as driver fuel and 20 UCO designed-to-fail (DTF) fuel particles in each compact. The DTF fuel was fabricated with a thin pyrocarbon layer which was intended to fail during irradiation and provide a source of fission products. These fission products could then migrate through the compact and into the surrounding concentric rings of graphitic matrix material and/or nuclear graphite. Through post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the rings (including physical sampling and gamma scanning) fission product concentration profiles within the rings can be determined. These data can be used to elucidate fission product transport parameters (e.g. diffusion coefficients within the test materials) which will be used to inform and refine models of fission product transport. After irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) had been completed in April 2014, the AGR-3/4 experiment was shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) for inspection, disassembly, and metrology. The AGR-3/4 test train was received at MFC in two separate shipments between February and April 2015. Visual examinations of the test train exterior did not indicate dimensional distortion, and only two small discolored areas were observed at the bottom of Capsules 8 and 9. No corresponding discoloration was found on the inside of these capsules, however. Prior to disassembly, the two test train sections were subject to analysis via the Precision Gamma Scanner (PGS), which did not indicate that any gross fuel relocation had occurred. A series of specialized tools (including clamps, cutters, and drills) had been designed and fabricated in order to carry out test train disassembly and recovery of capsule components (graphite

  4. Radionuclides release from re-irradiated fuel under high temperature and pressure conditions. Gamma-ray measurements of VEGA-5 test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, Akihide; Kudo, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Takehiko; Kanazawa, Toru; Kiuchi, Toshio; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The VEGA (Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release) program is being performed at JAERI to clarify mechanisms of radionuclides release from irradiated fuel during severe accidents and to improve source term predictability. The fifth VEGA-5 test was conducted in January 2002 to confirm the reproducibility of decrease in cesium release under elevated pressure that was observed in the VEGA-2 test and to investigate the release behavior of short-life radionuclides. The PWR fuel of 47 GWd/tU after about 8.2 years of cooling was re-irradiated at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) for 8 hours before the heat-up test. After that, the two pellets of 10.9 g without cladding were heated up to about 2,900 K at 1.0 MPa under the inert He condition. The experiment reconfirmed the decrease in cesium release rate under the elevated pressure. The release data on short-life radionuclides such as Ru-103, Ba-140 and Xe-133 that have never been observed in the previous VEGA tests without re-irradiation was obtained using the {gamma} ray measurement. (author)

  5. Neutronic, thermal-hydraulics and accident analysis calculations for an irradiation device to be used in the qualification process of dispersion fuels in the IEA-R1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingos, Douglas Borges; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Umbehaun, Pedro Ernesto; Silva, Jose Eduardo Rosa da; Conti, Thadeu das Neves; Yamaguchi, Mitsuo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: douglasborgesdomingos@yahoo.com.br

    2009-07-01

    Neutronic, thermal-hydraulics and accident analysis calculations were developed to estimate the safety of an irradiation device placed in the IEA-R1 reactor core. The irradiation device will be used to receive miniplates of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al e U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuels, LEU type (19.9% of {sup 235}U), with uranium densities of, respectively, 3.0 gU/cm{sup 3} and 4.8gU/cm{sup 3}. The fuel miniplates will be irradiated to nominal {sup 235}U burnup levels of 50% and 80%, in order to qualify the above high-density dispersion fuels to be used in the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor, now in the conception phase. For the neutronic calculation, the computer code CITATION was utilized. The computer code FLOW was used to calculate the coolant flow rate in the irradiation device, allowing the determination of the fuel miniplate temperatures with the computer model MTRCR-IEA-R1. A postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) was analyzed with the computer codes LOSS and TEMPLOCA, allowing the calculation of the fuel miniplate temperatures after the reactor pool draining. The calculations showed that the irradiation of the fuel miniplates will happen without any adverse consequence in the IEA-R1 reactor. (author)

  6. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHWINKENDORF, K.N.

    2006-05-12

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements. The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprising two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with ''green'' (fresh) fuel and one with spent fuel. Both the green and spent fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, 3 green fuel and 4 spent fuel loading configurations were considered to serve as benchmark models. However, shortcomings in experimental data failed to meet the high standards for a benchmark problem. Nevertheless, the data provided by these subcritical measurements can

  7. The MARINE experiment: Irradiation of sphere-pac fuel and pellets of UO{sub 2−x} for americium breeding blanket concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agata, E., E-mail: elio.dagata@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Hania, P.R. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, P.O. Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Freis, D.; Somers, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bejaoui, S. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, DEN/DEC, F-13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Charpin, F.F.; Baas, P.J.; Okel, R.A.F.; Til, S. van [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, P.O. Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Lapetite, J.-M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Delage, F. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, DEN/DEC, F-13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • MARINE is designed to check the behaviour of MABB sphere-pac concept. • MABB sphere-pac are compared with MABB pellet. • Swelling and helium release behaviour will be the main output of the experiment. • An experiment to check sphere-pac MADF fuel behaviour has been already performed. - Abstract: Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is therefore an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and heat production of waste packages to be stored in a repository. The MARINE irradiation experiment is the latest of a series of European experiments on americium transmutation (e.g. EFTTRA-T4, EFTTRA-T4bis, HELIOS, MARIOS, SPHERE) performed in the High Flux Reactor (HFR). The MARINE experiment is developed and carried out in the framework of the collaborative research project PELGRIMM of the EURATOM 7th Framework Programme (FP7). During the past years of experimental works in the field of transmutation and tests of innovative nuclear fuels, the release or trapping of helium as well as swelling have been shown to be the key issues for the design of such kind of fuel both as drivers and even more for Am-bearing blanket targets (due to the higher Am contents). The main objective of the MARINE experiment is to study the in-pile behaviour of uranium oxide fuel containing 13% of americium and to compare the behaviour of sphere-pac versus pellet fuel, in particular the role of microstructure and temperature on fission gas release and He on fuel swelling. The MARINE experiment will be irradiated in 2016 in the HFR in Petten (The Netherlands) and is expected to be completed in spring 2017. This paper discusses the rationale and objective of the MARINE experiment and provides a general description of its design for which some innovative features have been adopted.

  8. A connection between mix and adiabat in ICF capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Yi, Sunghuan (Austin); Batha, Steven

    2016-10-01

    We study the relationship between instability induced mix, preheat and the adiabat of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel in fusion capsule experiments. Our studies show that hydrodynamic instability not only directly affects the implosion, hot spot shape and mix, but also affects the thermodynamics of the capsule, such as, the adiabat of the DT fuel, and, in turn, affects the energy partition between the pusher shell (cold DT) and the hot spot. It was found that the adiabat of the DT fuel is sensitive to the amount of mix caused by Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the material interfaces due to its exponential dependence on the fuel entropy. An upper limit of mix allowed maintaining a low adiabat of DT fuel is derived. Additionally we demonstrated that the use of a high adiabat for the DT fuel in theoretical analysis and with the aid of 1D code simulations could explain some aspects of the 3D effects and mix in the capsule experiments. Furthermore, from the observed neutron images and our physics model, we could infer the adiabat of the DT fuel in the capsule and determine the possible amount of mix in the hot spot (LA-UR-16-24880). This work was conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  9. Recent view to the results of pulse tests in the IGR reactor with high burn-up fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmolov, V.; Yegorova, L. [Russian Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-03-01

    Testing of 43 fuel elements (13 fuel elements with high burn-up fuel, 10 fuel elements with preirradiated cladding and fresh fuel, and 20 non-irradiated fuel elements) was carried out in the IGR pulse reactor with a half width of the reactor power pulse of about 0.7 sec. Tests were conducted in capsules with no coolant flow and with standard initial conditions in the capsule of 20{degrees}C and 0.2 MPa. Two types of coolant were used: water and air. One purpose of the test program was to determine the thresholds and mechanisms of fuel rod failure under RIA conditions for VVER fuel rods over their entire exposure range, from zero to high burn-up. These failure thresholds are often used in safety analyses. The tests and analyses were designed to reveal the influence on fuel rod failure of (1) the mechanical properties of the cladding, (2) the pellet-to-cladding gap, (3) fuel burn-up, (4) fuel-to-coolant heat transfer, and other parameters. The resulting data base can also be used for validation of computer codes used for analyzing fuel rod behavior. Three types of test specimens were used in the tests, and diagrams of these specimens are shown in Fig. 1. {open_quotes}Type-C{close_quotes} specimens were re-fabricated from commercial fuel rods of the VVER-1000 type that had been subjected to many power cycles of operation in the Novovoronezh Nuclear Power Plant (NV NPP). {open_quotes}Type-D{close_quotes} specimens were fabricated from the same commercial fuel rods used above, but the high burn-up oxide fuel was removed from the cladding and was replaced with fresh oxide fuel pellets. {open_quotes}Type-D{close_quotes} specimens thus provided a means of separating the effects of the cladding and the oxide fuel pellets and were used to examine cladding effects only.

  10. PLUTON: Three-group neutronic code for burnup analysis of isotope generation and depletion in highly irradiated LWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemehov, Sergei E; Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    PLUTON is a three-group neutronic code analyzing, as functions of time and burnup, the change of radial profiles, together with average values, of power density, burnup, concentration of trans-uranium elements, plutonium buildup, depletion of fissile elements, and fission product generation in water reactor fuel rod with standard UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, inhomogeneous MOX, and UO{sub 2}-ThO{sub 2}. The PLUTON code, which has been designed to be run on Windows PC, has adopted a theoretical shape function of neutron attenuation in pellet, which enables users to perform a very fast and accurate calculation easily. The present code includes the irradiation conditions of the Halden Reactor which gives verification data for the code. The total list of trans-uranium elements included in the calculations consists of {sub 92}U{sup 233-239}, {sub 93}Np{sup 237-239}, {sub 94}Pu{sup 238-243}, {sub 95}Am{sup 241-244} (including isomers), and {sub 96}Cm{sup 242-245}. Poisoning fission products are represented by {sub 54}Xe{sup 131,133,135}, {sub 48}Cd{sup 113}, {sub 62}Sm{sup 149,151,152}, {sub 64}Gd{sup 154-160}, {sub 63}Eu{sup 153,155}, {sub 36}Kr{sup 83,85}, {sub 42}Mo{sup 95}, {sub 43}Tc{sup 99}, {sub 45}Rh{sup 103}, {sub 47}Ag{sup 109}, {sub 53}I{sup 127,129,131}, {sub 55}Cs{sup 133}, {sub 57}La{sup 139}, {sub 59}Pr{sup 141}, {sub 60}Nd{sup 143-150}, {sub 61}Pm{sup 147}. Fission gases and volatiles included in the code are {sub 36}Kr{sup 83-86}, {sub 54}Xe{sup 129-136}, {sub 52}Te{sup 125-130}, {sub 53}I{sup 127-131}, {sub 55}Cs{sup 133-137}, and {sub 56}Ba{sup 135-140}. Verification has been performed up to 83 GWd/tU, and a satisfactory agreement has been obtained. (author)

  11. Hollow microporous organic capsules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Buyi; Yang, Xinjia; Xia, Lingling; Majeed, Muhammad Irfan; Tan, Bien

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of hollow microporous organic capsules (HMOCs) could be very useful because of their hollow and porous morphology, which combines the advantages of both microporous organic polymers and non-porous nanocapsules...

  12. Engineering Stable Hollow Capsules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ Scientists at the CAS Institute of Chemistry have been succeeded in fabricating stable hollow capsules by extending covalent layer-by-layer self-assembly(CSA)technique from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional systems.

  13. Scope and dissolution studies and characterization of irradiated nuclear fuel in Atalante Hot Cell Facilities (abstract and presentation slides)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dancausse, Jean-Philippe; Reynier Tronche, Nathalie; Ferlay, Gilles; Herlet, Nathalie; Eysseric, Cathrine; Esbelin, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Since 1999, several studies on nuclear fuels were realised in C11/C12 Atalante Hot Cell. This paper presents firstly an overview of the apparatus used for fuel dissolution and characterisation like reactor design, gas trapping flask and solid/liquid separation. Then, the general methodology is described as a function of fuel, temperature, reagents, showing for each step, the reachable experimental data: Dissolution rate, chemical and radiochemical fuel composition including volatile LLRN, insoluble mass, composition, morphology, cladding chemical, radiochemical and physical characterisation using SIMS (made in Cadarache/LECA facilities), MEB. To conclude, some of the obtained results on 129I and 14C composition of oxide fuels, rate of dissolution and first results on dissolution studies of RERTR UMo fuel will be detailed. (Author)

  14. Design and operation of gamma scan and fission gas sampling systems for characterization of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, C.A.; Thornhill, R.E.; Mellinger, G.B.

    1989-09-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is to acquire and characterize spent fuels used in waste form testing related to nuclear waste disposal. The initial steps in the characterization of a fuel rod consist of gamma scanning the rod and sampling the gas contained in the fuel rod (referred to as fission gas sampling). The gamma scan and fission gas sampling systems used by the MCC are adaptable to a wide range of fuel types and have been successfully used to characterize both boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods. This report describes the design and operation of systems used to gamma scan and fission gas sample full-length PWR and BWR fuel rods. 1 ref., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Capsule contraction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut COŞKUN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Capsule contraction syndrome occurs after fibrous metaplasia of lens proteins that leads to capsular bag contraction. Excessive front capsular wrinkling is seen in capsule contraction syndrome and there is an imbalance between powers supplying capsular integrity. This situation leads to zonular weakness. Capsule contraction syndrome is associated with pseudoexfoliation, older age, uveitis, pars planitis and myotonic muscular dystrophy. In order to decrease the risk of capsule contraction syndrome, front capsulerhexis area should be open as 5.5-6 mm diameter and a curysoft intraocular lens should be used. In order to prevent lens epithelial proliferation and metaplasia, lens epithelial cells at inferior surface of front capsule should be aspirated carefully. If postoperative capsular contraction detected, front capsulotomy should be performed by Nd-YAG laser at postoperative 2 to 3 weeks. In patients that Nd-YAG laser is unsuccessful, capsular tension should be decreased by surgical microincisions. In present study, we evaluated etiology, prevention and management of capsule contraction syndrome in the light of actual literature knowledge.

  16. Review of Transient Fuel Test Results at Sandia National Laboratories and the Potential for Future Fast Reactor Fuel Transient Testing in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Kelly, John; Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reactor driven transient tests of fast reactor fuels may be required to support the development and certification of new fuels for Fast Reactors. The results of the transient fuel tests will likely be needed to support licensing and to provide validation data to support the safety case for a variety of proposed fast fuel types and reactors. In general reactor driven transient tests are used to identify basic phenomenology during reactor transients and to determine the fuel performance limits and margins to failure during design basis accidents such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and reactivity insertion accidents. This paper provides a summary description of the previous Sandia Fuel Disruption and Transient Axial Relocation tests that were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission almost 25 years ago. These tests consisted of a number of capsule tests and flowing gas tests that used fission heating to disrupt fresh and irradiated MOX fuel. The behavior of the fuel disruption, the generation of aerosols and the melting and relocation of fuel and cladding was recorded on high speed cinematography. This paper will present videos of the fuel disruption that was observed in these tests which reveal stark differences in fuel behavior between fresh and irradiated fuel. Even though these tests were performed over 25 years ago, their results are still relevant to today's reactor designs. These types of transient tests are again being considered by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership because of the need to perform tests on metal fuels and transuranic fuels. Because the Annular Core Research Reactor is the only transient test facility available within the US, a brief summary of Sandia's continued capability to perform these tests in the ACRR will also be provided. (authors)

  17. Results of Uranium Dioxide-Tungsten Irradiation Test and Post-Test Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. F.; Debogdan, C. E.; Diianni, D. C.

    1973-01-01

    A uranium dioxide (UO2) fueled capsule was fabricated and irradiated in the NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility. The capsule consisted of two bulk UO2 specimens clad with chemically vapor deposited tungsten (CVD W) 0.762 and 0.1016 cm (0.030-and 0.040-in.) thick, respectively. The second specimen with 0.1016-cm (0.040-in.) thick cladding was irradiated at temperature for 2607 hours, corresponding to an average burnup of 1.516 x 10 to the 20th power fissions/cu cm. Postirradiation examination showed distortion in the bottom end cap, failure of the weld joint, and fracture of the central vent tube. Diametral growth was 1.3 percent. No evidence of gross interaction between CVD tungsten or arc-cast tungsten cladding and the UO2 fuel was observed. Some of the fission gases passed from the fuel cavity to the gas surrounding the fuel specimen via the vent tube and possibly the end-cap weld failure. Whether the UO2 loss rates through the vent tube were within acceptable limits could not be determined in view of the end-cap weld failure.

  18. Self-doped Ti3+-TiO2 as a photocatalyst for the reduction of CO2 into a hydrocarbon fuel under visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasan, Koroush; Zuo, Fan; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Pingyun

    2015-08-01

    Self-doped TiO2 shows visible light photocatalytic activity, while commercial TiO2 (P25) is only UV responsive. The incorporation of Ti3+ into TiO2 structures narrows the band gap (2.90 eV), leading to significantly increased photocatalytic activity for the reduction of CO2 into a renewable hydrocarbon fuel (CH4) in the presence of water vapour under visible light irradiation.Self-doped TiO2 shows visible light photocatalytic activity, while commercial TiO2 (P25) is only UV responsive. The incorporation of Ti3+ into TiO2 structures narrows the band gap (2.90 eV), leading to significantly increased photocatalytic activity for the reduction of CO2 into a renewable hydrocarbon fuel (CH4) in the presence of water vapour under visible light irradiation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, XPS, XRD and SEM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02974k

  19. Heterogeneous UO2 fuel irradiated up to a high burn-up: Investigation of the HBS and of fission product releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noirot, J.; Lamontagne, J.; Nakae, N.; Kitagawa, T.; Kosaka, Y.; Tverberg, T.

    2013-11-01

    A UO2 fuel with a heterogeneous distribution of 235U was irradiated up to a high burn-up in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR). The last 100 days of irradiation were performed with an increased level of linear power. The effect of the heterogeneous fissile isotope distribution on the formation of the HBS was studied free of the possible influence of Pu which exists in heterogeneous MOX fuels. The HBS formed in 235U-rich agglomerates and its main characteristics were very similar to those of the HBS formed in Pu-rich agglomerates of heterogeneous MOX fuels. The maximum local contents of Nd and Xe before HBS formation were studied in this fuel. In addition to a Pu effect that promotes the HBS phenomenon, comparison with previous results for heterogeneous MOX fuels showed that the local fission product concentration was not the only parameter that has to be taken into consideration. It appears that the local actinide depletion by fission and/or the energy locally deposited through electronic interactions in the fission fragment recoils also have an effect on the HBS formation threshold. Moreover, a major release of fission gases from the peripheral 235U-rich agglomerates of HBS bubbles and a Cs radial movement are also evidenced in this heterogeneous UO2. Cs deposits on the peripheral grain boundaries, including the HBS grain boundaries, are considered to reveal the release paths. SUP>235U-rich agglomerates, SUP>235U-poor areas, an intermediate phase with intermediate 235U concentrations. Short fuel rods were fabricated with these pellets. The main characteristics of these fuel rods are shown in Table 1.These rods were irradiated to high burn-ups in the IFA-609/626 of the HBWR and then one was irradiated in the IFA-702 for 100 days. Fig. 2 shows the irradiation history of this fuel. The final average burn-up of the rod was 69 GWd/tU. Due to the flux differences along the rod, however, the average burn-up of the cross section examined was 63 GWd/tU. This fuel

  20. Influence of plutonium contents in MOX fuel on destructive forces at fuel failure in the NSRR experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Jinichi; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takehiko; Kanazawa, Toru; Sasajima, Hideo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    In order to confirm safety margins of the Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel use in LWRs, pulse irradiation tests are planned in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) with the MOX fuel with plutonium content up to 12.8%. Impacts of the higher plutonium contents on safety of the reactivity-initiated-accident (RIA) tests are examined in terms of generation of destructive forces to threat the integrity of test capsules. Pressure pulses would be generated at fuel rod failure by releases of high pressure gases. The strength of the pressure pulses, therefore, depends on rod internal - external pressure difference, which is independent to plutonium content of the fuel. The other destructive forces, water hammer, would be generated by thermal interaction between fuel fragments and coolant water. Heat flux from the fragments to the water was calculated taking account of changes in thermal properties of MOX fuels at higher plutonium contents. The results showed that the heat transfer from the MOX fuel would be slightly smaller than that from UO{sub 2} fuel fragments at similar size in a short period to cause the water hammer. Therefore, the destructive forces were not expected to increase in the new tests with higher plutonium content MOX fuels. (author)

  1. Status of DOE/JAERI collaborative program phase II and phase III capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, J.E.; Lenox, K.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ioka, I.

    1996-04-01

    During this reporting period, the HFIR-MFE-RB-200J-1 spectrally tailored capsules were disassembled and the individual specimens recovered, sorted, and identified. Tensile testing and irradiation creep measurements will be performed during the next reporting period.

  2. Microstructural characterization of an irradiated RERTR-6 U-7Mo/AA4043 alloy dispersion fuel plate specimen blister-tested to a final temperature of 500 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Gan, Jian; Miller, Brandon D.; Robinson, Adam B.; Madden, James W.; Ross Finlay, M.; Moore, Glenn; Medvedev, Pavel; Meyer, Mitch

    2017-05-01

    The Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program, in the past called the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, is developing low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels for application in research and test reactors. U-Mo alloy dispersion fuel is one type being developed. Blister testing has been performed on different fuel plate samples to determine the margin to failure for fuel plates irradiated to different fission densities. Microstructural characterization was performed using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy on a sample taken from a U-7Mo/AA4043 matrix dispersion fuel plate irradiated in the RERTR-6 experiment that was blister-tested up to a final temperature of 500 °C. The results indicated that two types of grain/cell boundaries were observed in the U-7Mo fuel particles, one with a relatively low Mo content and fission gas bubbles and a second type enriched in Si, due to interdiffusion from the Si-containing matrix, with little evidence of fission gas bubbles. With respect to the behavior of the major fission gas Xe, a significant amount of the Xe was still observed within the U-7Mo fuel particle, along with microns into the AA4043 matrix. For the fuel/matrix interaction layers that form during fabrication and then grow during irradiation, they change from the as-irradiated amorphous structure to one that is crystalline after blister testing. In the AA4043 matrix, the original Si-rich precipitates, which are typically observed in as-irradiated U-Mo dispersion fuel, get consumed due to interdiffusion with the U-7Mo fuel particles during the blister test. Finally, the fission gas bubbles that were originally around 3 nm in diameter and resided on a fission gas superlattice (FGS) in the intragranular regions of as-irradiated U-7Mo fuel grew in size (up to ∼20 nm diameter) during blister testing and, in many areas, are no longer organized as a superlattice.

  3. NIF capsule performance modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-shot modeling of NIF capsule implosions was performed in order to validate our physical and numerical models. Cryogenic layered target implosions and experiments with surrogate targets produce an abundance of capsule performance data including implosion velocity, remaining ablator mass, times of peak x-ray and neutron emission, core image size, core symmetry, neutron yield, and x-ray spectra. We have attempted to match the integrated data set with capsule-only simulations by adjusting the drive and other physics parameters within expected uncertainties. The simulations include interface roughness, time-dependent symmetry, and a model of mix. We were able to match many of the measured performance parameters for a selection of shots.

  4. Results of irradiation of (U0.55Pu0.45)N and (U0.4Pu0.6)N fuels in BOR-60 up to ˜12 at.% burn-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozkin, B. D.; Stepennova, N. M.; Fedorov, Yu. Ye.; Shishkov, M. G.; Kryukov, F. N.; Kuzmin, S. V.; Nikitin, O. N.; Belyaeva, A. V.; Zabudko, L. M.

    2013-09-01

    In the article presented are the results of post-irradiation tests of helium bonded fuel pins with mixed mononitride fuel (U0.55Pu0.45)N and (U0.4Pu0.6)N having 85% density irradiated in BOR-60 reactor. Achieved maximum burn-up was, respectively, equal to 9.4 and 12.1 at.% with max linear heat rates 41.9 and 54.5 kW/m. Maximum irradiation dose was 43 dpa. No damage of claddings made of ChS-68 steel (20% cold worked) was observed, and ductility margin existed. Maximum depth of cladding corrosion was within 15 μm. Swelling rates of (U0.4Pu0.6)N and (U0.55Pu0.45)N were, respectively, ˜1.1% and ˜0.68% per 1 at.%. Gas release rate did not exceed 19.3% and 19%. Pattern of porosity distribution in the fuel influenced fuel swelling and gas release rates. Plutonium and uranium are uniformly distributed in the fuel, local minimum values of their content being caused by pores and cracks in the pellets. The observable peaks in content distribution are probably connected with the local formation of isolated phases (e.g. Mo, Pd) while the minimum values refer to fuel pores and cracks. Xenon and cesium tend to migrate from the hot sections of fuel, and therefore their min content is observed in the central section of the fuel pellets. Phase composition of the fuel was determined with X-ray diffractometer. The X-ray patterns of metallographic specimens were obtained by the scanning method (the step was 0.02°, the step exposition was equal to 2 s). From the X-ray diffraction analysis data, it follows that the nitrides of both fuel types have the single-phase structure with an FCC lattice (see Table 6).

  5. Simulation of the heat transfer of a irradiated fuel storage container with code CFD STAR- CCM+; Simulacion de la transferencia de calor de un contenedor de almacenamiento de combustible irradiado con el codigo CFD STAR-CCM+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera matalla, J. E.; Hernandez Gomez, J.; Riverala Gurruchaga, J.

    2012-07-01

    Irradiated fuel has become an object of interest in the industry by the importance of ensuring its safety during long periods of storage time. New containers, stores, methods and codes will be used to ensure a suitable cooling and residual heat removal, and secure the safety of fuel elements in dry storage. The codes CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) have great potential to help in design of containers and stores, improving thermal-hydraulic performance and the extraction of heat generated.

  6. U3Si2-Al弥散型燃料的辐照肿胀研究%Study on the Irradiation Swelling of U3Si2-Al Dispersion Fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢忠虎; 应诗浩

    2001-01-01

    The dominant modeling mechanisms on irradiation swelling ofU3Si2-A- dispersion fuel are introduced.The core of dispersion fuel is looked to as micro-fuel elements of continuous matrix.The formation processes of gas bubbles in the fuel phase are described through the behavior mechanisms of fission gases.The swelling in the fuel phase causes the interaction between fuel particles and metal matrix,and the metal matrix can restrain the irradiation swelling of fuel particles.The developed code can predict irradiation-swelling values according to the parameters of fuel elements and irradiation conditions,and the predicted values are in agreement with the measured results.%介绍了U3Si2-A-弥散型燃料的辐照肿胀机理。将弥散型燃料的芯体视为连续基体中的微型燃料元件,应用裂变气体的行为机理描述燃料相中的气泡形成过程。研究结果表明:燃料相的肿胀引起燃料颗粒和金属基体之间的力学相互作用,金属基体能抑制燃料颗粒的辐照肿胀。在一定辐照条件下,本模型对燃料元件辐照肿胀的预测值与测量值相符。

  7. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 3, Site team reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    A self assessment was conducted of those Hanford facilities that are utilized to store Reactor Irradiated Nuclear Material, (RINM). The objective of the assessment is to identify the Hanford inventories of RINM and the ES & H concerns associated with such storage. The assessment was performed as proscribed by the Project Plan issued by the DOE Spent Fuel Working Group. The Project Plan is the plan of execution intended to complete the Secretary`s request for information relevant to the inventories and vulnerabilities of DOE storage of spent nuclear fuel. The Hanford RINM inventory, the facilities involved and the nature of the fuel stored are summarized. This table succinctly reveals the variety of the Hanford facilities involved, the variety of the types of RINM involved, and the wide range of the quantities of material involved in Hanford`s RINM storage circumstances. ES & H concerns are defined as those circumstances that have the potential, now or in the future, to lead to a criticality event, to a worker radiation exposure event, to an environmental release event, or to public announcements of such circumstances and the sensationalized reporting of the inherent risks.

  8. A Study on the High Temperature Irradiation Test Possibility for the HANARO Outer Core Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Cho, M. S.; Choo, K. N.; Shin, Y. T.; Sohn, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Kim, B. G

    2008-01-15

    1. Information on the neutron flux levels and the gamma heat of the concerned test holes, which have been produced from a series of nuclear analysis and tests performed at KAERI since 1993, were collected and analyzed to develop the nuclear data for the concerned test holes of HANARO and to develop the new design concepts of a capsule for the high temperature irradiation devices. 2. From the literature survey and analysis about the system design characteristics of the new concepts of irradiation devices in the ATR and MIT reactor, U.S. and the JHR reactor, France, which are helpful in understanding the key issues for the on-going R and D programmes related to a SFR and a VHTR, the most important parameters for the design of high temperature irradiation devices are identified as the neutron spectrum, the heat generation density, the fuel and cladding temperature, and the coolant chemistry. 3. From the thermal analysis of a capsule by using a finite element program ANSYS, high temperature test possibility at the OR and IP holes of HANARO was investigated based on the data collected from a literature survey. The OR holes are recommended for the tests of the SFR and VHTR nuclear materials. The IP holes could be applicable for an intermediate temperature irradiation of the SWR and LMR materials. 4. A thermal analysis for the development of a capsule with a new configuration was also performed. The size of the center hole, which is located at the thermal media of a capsule, did not cause specimen temperature changes. The temperature differences are found to be less than 2%. The introduction of an additional gap in the thermal media was able to contribute to an increase in the specimen temperature by up to 27-90 %.

  9. DISSOLUTION OF IRRADIATED MURR FUEL ASSEMBLIES EFFECT OF INCREASED PURGE RATE AND CATALYST CONCENTRATION ON THE BATCH SIZE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyser, E.

    2010-07-22

    Flowsheets for the dissolution of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel have been proposed using 0.002 M mercuric nitrate catalyst in 5 to 6 M nitric acid. Previous calculations for flammable gas control during the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel have been extended to cover a range of dissolver purge rates from 40 to 55 scfm. A range of dissolver solution volumes from 12000 to 15000 liters were considered for the large H-Canyon dissolver (6.4D). Depending on the purge rate, anywhere from four to six bundles of MURR fuel can be initially charged to the dissolver (6.4D). For successive charges where the dissolver solution already contains 0.002 M mercury catalyst and the dissolved aluminum from five bundles of MURR fuel, five to nine bundles of additional fuel can be charged depending on the purge rate and the dissolver solution volume. Similar calculations have been performed for the small H-Canyon dissolver (6.1D) for solution volumes that ranged from 6000 to 7500 liters and purge rates from 40 to 55 scfm. The limitations on the initial charge are four to six bundles depending on the purge rate. The aluminum from four bundles of fuel in an initial charge will allow nine to ten bundles in the second charge to 6.1D depending on the purge rate and dissolver solution volume. Solubility or criticality limitations will restrict the second charge on the small dissolver. The concentration of aluminum from previous charges will slow the dissolution rate to extend the cycle time of repeated charges of fuel. Calculations have been performed to allow a second catalyst addition (up to 0.004 M total catalyst) to reduce the cycle time (as necessary) based on the aluminum concentration and the purge rate.

  10. Wireless capsule endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Mata; J Llach; JM Bordas

    2008-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy is a new technique that allows complete exploration of the small bowel without external wires. Its role has been analyzed in many small bowel diseases such as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, Crohn's disease and gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes with promising results. Studies on other pathologies (I.e. Small bowel tumour, celiac disease) are under evaluation to define the role of this technique.

  11. Probabilistic methods for the simulation of fuel particles behavior under irradiation; Apport des methodes probabilistes dans la simulation du comportement sous irradiation du combustible a particules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannamela, C

    2007-09-15

    This work is devoted to the evaluation of mathematical expectations in the context of structural reliability. We seek a failure probability estimate (that we assume low), taking into account the uncertainty of influential parameters of the System. Our goal is to reach a good compromise between the accuracy of the estimate and the associated computational cost. This approach is used to estimate the failure probability of fuel particles from a HTR-type nuclear reactor. This estimate is obtain by means of costly numerical simulations. We consider different probabilistic methods to tackle the problem. First, we consider a variance reducing Monte Carlo method: importance sampling. For the parametric case, we propose adaptive algorithms in order to build a series of probability densities that will eventually converge to optimal importance density. We then present several estimates of the mathematical expectation based on this series of densities. Next, we consider a multi-level method using Monte Carlo Markov Chain algorithm. Finally, we turn our attention to the related problem of quantile estimation (non extreme) of physical output from a large-scale numerical code. We propose a controlled stratification method. The random input parameters are sampled in specific regions obtained from surrogate of the response. The estimation of the quantile is then computed from this sample. (author)

  12. Capsule illumination uniformity illuminated by direct laser-driven irradiation from several tens of directions%甚多束激光直接驱动靶面辐照均匀性研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓学伟; 周维; 袁强; 代万俊; 胡东霞; 朱启华; 景峰

    2015-01-01

    Capsule illumination uniformity obtained by direct driving lasers from several tens of directions is studied system-atically. The best polar angles of the three focal spot rings on the capsule are determined to be 22.4◦, 47.7◦, and 73.6◦by a spherical-harmonic mode analysis and a numerical simulation. Based on the configuration of indirect laser driven facility, we have optimized the beam re-directions and the focal spot distributions for polar direct drive, which smooth successfully the illumination distribution on the capsule. Laser driven inertial confinement fusion is an important way to achieve controllable nuclear fusion for human be-ings, which includes two laser-driven schemes—directly driving and indirectly driving scheme. Since the indirect driving scheme considerably relaxes the strict requirements for laser performance and decreases the engineering difficulties, the main laser facilities around the world have adopted the indirect driving scheme, such as the National Ignition Facility in the U. S., the Laser Megajoule in France, and the SG series laser drivers in China. Meanwhile, scientists keep developing the key technologies for directly driving and have made great progress. For example, the fast ignition and shock ignition are two new methods to achieve fusion ignition in the direct driving scheme, which attracted lots of attention in the past few years. However, the main laser drivers for inertial confinement fusion research are configured as indirect drivers, which are not suitable for direct driving experiments. So a compromising suggestion was proposed that by redirecting the lasers, changing the laser energy distributions, designing new type of targets, and so on, a radiation field which is very close to a direct driving radiation field can be simulated in a laser facility that is configured as an indirect driver. This is the so called polar direct drive method that provides a feasible way for primary researches on direct driving

  13. Characterization program, management and isotopic inventory calculation, radiological and fuel thermal irradiated in nuclear power Cofrentes; Programa Caracterizacion Gestion y calculo del inventario isotopico, radiologico y termico del combustible irradiado en la Central Nuclear de Cofrentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albendea, M.; Diego, J. L. de; Urrea, M.

    2012-07-01

    Characterization is a very detailed and user-friendly program takes into account the history of irradiation individualized and real all the fuel, even taking into account the interim periods are periods of discharge and recharge cycles and which have not been used.

  14. Production Cycle for Large Scale Fission Mo-99 Separation by the Processing of Irradiated LEU Uranium Silicide Fuel Element Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Hadi Ali Sameh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uranium silicide fuels proved over decades their exceptional qualification for the operation of higher flux material testing reactors with LEU elements. The application of such fuels as target materials, particularly for the large scale fission Mo-99 producers, offers an efficient and economical solution for the related facilities. The realization of such aim demands the introduction of a suitable dissolution process for the applied U3Si2 compound. Excellent results are achieved by the oxidizing dissolution of the fuel meat in hydrofluoric acid at room temperature. The resulting solution is directly behind added to an over stoichiometric amount of potassium hydroxide solution. Uranium and the bulk of fission products are precipitated together with the transuranium compounds. The filtrate contains the molybdenum and the soluble fission product species. It is further treated similar to the in-full scale proven process. The generated off gas stream is handled also as experienced before after passing through KOH washing solution. The generated alkaline fluoride containing waste solution is noncorrosive. Nevertheless fluoride can be selectively bonded as in soluble CaF2 by addition of a mixture of solid calcium hydroxide calcium carbonate to the sand cement mixture used for waste solidification. The generated elevated amounts of LEU remnants can be recycled and retargeted. The related technology permits the minimization of the generated fuel waste, saving environment, and improving processing economy.

  15. A model to describe the anisotropic viscoplastic mechanical behavior of fresh and irradiated Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings under RIA loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Saux, M.; Besson, J.; Carassou, S.; Poussard, C.; Averty, X.

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents a unified phenomenological model to describe the anisotropic viscoplastic mechanical behavior of cold-worked stress relieved (CWSR) Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings submitted to reactivity initiated accident (RIA) loading conditions. The model relies on a multiplicative viscoplastic formulation and reproduces strain hardening, strain rate sensitivity and plastic anisotropy of the material. It includes temperature, fluence and irradiation conditions dependences within RIA typical ranges. Model parameters have been tuned using axial tensile, hoop tensile and closed-end internal pressurization tests results essentially obtained from the PROMETRA program, dedicated to the study of zirconium alloys under RIA loading conditions. Once calibrated, the model provides a reliable description of the mechanical behavior of the fresh and irradiated (fluence up to 10×1025 nm or burnup up to 64 GWd/tU) material within large temperature (from 20 °C up to 1100 °C) and strain rate ranges (from 3×10-4 s up to 5 s), representative of the RIA spectrum. Finally, the model is used for the finite element analysis of the hoop tensile tests performed within the PROMETRA program.

  16. AGC-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Bratton

    2006-05-01

    The Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC) irradiation test program supports the acquisition of irradiated graphite performance data to assist in the selection of the technology to be used for the VHTR. Six irradiations are planned to investigate compressive creep in graphite subjected to a neutron field and obtain irradiated mechanical properties of vibrationally molded, extruded, and iso-molded graphites for comparison. The experiments will be conducted at three temperatures: 600, 900, and 1200°C. At each temperature, two different capsules will be irradiated to different fluence levels, the first from 0.5 to 4 dpa and the second from 4 to 7 dpa. AGC-1 is the first of the six capsules designed for ATR and will focus on the prismatic fluence range.

  17. Positron annihilation spectroscopy study of lattice defects in non-irradiated doped and un-doped fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chollet Mélanie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fission gas behavior within the fuel structure plays a major role for the safety of nuclear fuels during operation in the nuclear power plant. Fission gas distribution and retention is determined by both, micro- and lattice-structure of the fuel matrix. The ADOPT (Advanced Doped Pellet Technology fuel, containing chromium and aluminum additives, shows larger grain sizes than standard (undoped UO2 fuel, enhancing the fission gas retention properties of the matrix. However, the additions of such trivalent cations shall also induce defects in the lattice. In this study, we investigated the microstructure of such doped fuels as well as a reference standard UO2 by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS. Although this technique is particularly sensitive to lattice point defects in materials, a wider application in the UO2 research is still missing. The PAS-lifetime components were measured in the hotlab facility of PSI using a 22Na source sandwiched between two 500-μm-thin sample discs. The values of lifetime at the center and the rim of both samples, examined to check at the radial homogeneity of the pellets, are not significantly different. The mean lifetimes were found to be longer in the ADOPT material, 220 ps, than in standard UO2, 190 ps, which indicates a larger presence of additional defects, presumably generated by the dopants. While two-component decomposition (bulk + one defect component could be performed for the standard material, only one lifetime component was found in the doped material. The absence of the bulk component in the ADOPT sample refers to a saturated positron trapping (i.e., all positrons are trapped at defects. In order to associate a type of lattice defect to each PAS component, interpretation of the PAS experimental observations was conducted with respect to existing experimental and modeling studies. This work has shown the efficiency of PAS to detect lattice point defects in UO2 produced by Cr and Al oxides

  18. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stupay KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive criteria for diagnosis make evaluating treatment modalities difficult. Many treatment methods have been reported, most with some success, but few have been proved to alter the natural course of this disease. Most afflicted patients will achieve acceptable shoulder function without surgery. Those who remain debilitated after 8–12 months are reasonable candidates for invasive treatments. Here, the various treatment methods and the data to support their use are reviewed. Keywords: frozen shoulder, stiff shoulder, periarthritis, painful shoulder 

  19. Capsule-train stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryngelson, Spencer H.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2016-07-01

    Elastic capsules flowing in small enough tubes, such as red blood cells in capillaries, are well known to line up into regular single-file trains. The stability of such trains in somewhat wider channels, where this organization is not observed, is studied in a two-dimensional model system that includes full coupling between the viscous flow and suspended capsules. A diverse set of linearly amplifying disturbances, both long-time asymptotic (modal) and transient (nonmodal) perturbations, is identified and analyzed. These have a range of amplification rates and their corresponding forms are wavelike, typically dominated by one of five principal perturbation classes: longitudinal and transverse translations, tilts, and symmetric and asymmetric shape distortions. Finite-amplitude transiently amplifying perturbations are shown to provide a mechanism that can bypass slower asymptotic modal linear growth and precipitate the onset of nonlinear effects. Direct numerical simulations are used to verify the linear analysis and track the subsequent transition of the regular capsule trains into an apparently chaotic flow.

  20. Dry Process Fuel Performance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Song, K. C.; Moon, J. S. and others

    2005-04-15

    The objective of the project is to establish the performance evaluation system of DUPIC fuel during the Phase II R and D. In order to fulfil this objectives, irradiation test of DUPIC fuel was carried out in HANARO using the non-instrumented and SPND-instrumented rig. Also, the analysis on the in-reactor behavior analysis of DUPIC fuel, out-pile test using simulated DUPIC fuel as well as performance and integrity assessment in a commercial reactor were performed during this Phase. The R and D results of the Phase II are summarized as follows : - Performance evaluation of DUPIC fuel via irradiation test in HANARO - Post irradiation examination of irradiated fuel and performance analysis - Development of DUPIC fuel performance code (modified ELESTRES) considering material properties of DUPIC fuel - Irradiation behavior and integrity assessment under the design power envelope of DUPIC fuel - Foundamental technology development of thermal/mechanical performance evaluation using ANSYS (FEM package)

  1. JOYO-1 Irradiation Test Campaign Technical Close-out, For Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Borges

    2006-01-31

    The JOYO-1 irradiation testing was designed to screen the irradiation performance of candidate cladding, structural and reflector materials in support of space reactor development. The JOYO-1 designation refers to the first of four planned irradiation tests in the JOYO reactor. Limited irradiated material performance data for the candidate materials exists for the expected Prometheus-1 duration, fluences and temperatures. Materials of interest include fuel element cladding and core materials (refractory metal alloys and silicon carbide (Sic)), vessel and plant structural materials (refractory metal alloys and nickel-base superalloys), and control and reflector materials (BeO). Key issues to be evaluated were long term microstructure and material property stability. The JOYO-1 test campaign was initiated to irradiate a matrix of specimens at prototypical temperatures and fluences anticipated for the Prometheus-1 reactor [Reference (1)]. Enclosures 1 through 9 describe the specimen and temperature monitors/dosimetry fabrication efforts, capsule design, disposition of structural material irradiation rigs, and plans for post-irradiation examination. These enclosures provide a detailed overview of Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) progress in specific areas; however, efforts were in various states of completion at the termination of NRPCT involvement with and restructuring of Project Prometheus.

  2. Cells for the examination of irradiated plutonium fuel elements - two years operation - may 1961/may 1963 (1963); Cellules pour examen d'elements combustibles au plutonium irradies - deux ans d'exploitation - mai 1961/mai 1963 (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentin, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    Within the framework of the 'Rapsodie' fast reactor program, prototype plutonium fuel elements are irradiated and then examined in an {alpha} {beta} {gamma} laboratory at Saclay. This laboratory consists of five in line cells and a lead enclosure microscope. Each cell contains an {alpha} sealed removable box 4 ft 3 in. high, 4 ft 11 in. wide and 5 ft 1 in. deep, fitted with one or two magnetic transmission indirect manipulators. The boxes are contained in an {beta} {gamma} shielded enclosure whose front face is constructed of cast iron panels 21-2/3 in. thick. Nitrogen circulating in a closed loop forms the atmosphere of the boxes. This laboratory is essentially intended for metallurgical research. The functions of the various cells are as follows: transferring and packing, cutting, density measurement and cathodic etching, storage and metallography. Work on radioactive materials began in April 1961. Operational incidents have always been of a material nature only. (author) [French] Dans le cadre du projet de reacteur rapide Rapsodie, des elements combustibles prototypes au plutonium sont, apres irradiation, examines a Saclay dans un laboratoire {alpha} {beta} {gamma}. Celui-ci comprend cinq cellules en ligne et une enceinte en plomb contenant un microscope telecommande. Chaque cellule est constituee d'un caisson etanche (1, 3 m x 1, 5 m x 1, 56m) equipee d'un ou deux manipulateurs indirects a transmissions magnetiques. Les caissons sont places, dans une enceinte {beta} {gamma} dont la face avant est formee de blocs en fonte ayant 55 cm d'epaisseur. L'atmosphere des caissons est de l'azote, circulant en circuit ferme. Ce laboratoire est destine essentiellement a des recherches metallurgiques. Les fonctions des differentes cellules sont: conditionnement et transferts, tronconnage, mesure de densite et polissage ionique, stockage, metallographie. Le travail sur materiaux radioactifs a commence en avril 1961. Les incidents d

  3. New In-pile Instrumentation to Support Fuel Cycle Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rempe; H. MacLean; R. Schley; D. Hurley; J. Daw; S. Taylor; J. Smith; J. Svoboda; D. Kotter; D. Knudson; M. Guers; S. C. Wilkins

    2011-01-01

    New and enhanced nuclear fuels are a key enabler for new and improved reactor technologies. For example, the goals of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) will not be met without irradiations successfully demonstrating the safety and reliability of new fuels. Likewise, fuel reliability has become paramount in ensuring the competitiveness of nuclear power plants. Recently, the Office of Nuclear Energy in the Department of Energy (DOE-NE) launched a new direction in fuel research and development that emphasizes an approach relying on first principle models to develop optimized fuel designs that offer significant improvements over current fuels. To facilitate this approach, high fidelity, real-time, data are essential for characterizing the performance of new fuels during irradiation testing. A three-year strategic research program is proposed for developing the required test vehicles with sensors of unprecedented accuracy and resolution for obtaining the data needed to characterize three-dimensional changes in fuel microstructure during irradiation testing. When implemented, this strategy will yield test capsule designs that are instrumented with new sensor technologies for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and other irradiation locations for the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FC R&D) program. Prior laboratory testing, and as needed, irradiation testing, of these sensors will have been completed to give sufficient confidence that the irradiation tests will yield the required data. Obtaining these sensors must draw upon the expertise of a wide-range of organizations not currently supporting nuclear fuels research. This document defines this strategic program and provides the necessary background information related to fuel irradiation testing, desired parameters for detection, and an overview of currently available in-pile instrumentation. In addition, candidate sensor technologies are identified in this document, and a list of proposed criteria for ranking

  4. GEN IV: Carbide Fuel Elaboration for the 'Futurix Concepts' experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaudez, Stephane; Riglet-Martial, Chantal; Paret, Laurent; Abonneau, Eric [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (C.E.A.), Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    In order to collect information on the behaviour of the future GFR (Gas Fast Reactor) fuel under fast neutron irradiation, an experimental irradiation program, called 'Futurix-concepts' has been launched at the CEA. The considered concept is a composite material made of a fissile fuel embedded in an inert ceramic matrix. Fissile fuel pellets are made of UPuN or UPuC while ceramics are SiC for the carbide fuel and TiN for the nitride fuel. This paper focuses on the description of the carbide composite fabrication. The UPuC pellets are manufactured using a metallurgical powder process. Fabrication and handling of the fuels are carried out in glove boxes under a nitrogen atmosphere. Carbide fuel is synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction under vacuum of a mixture of actinide oxide and graphitic carbon up to 1550 deg. C. After ball milling, the UPuC powder is pressed to create hexagonal or spherical compacts. They are then sintered up to 1750 deg. C in order to obtain a density of 85 % of the theoretical one. The sintered pellets are inserted into an inert and tight capsule of SiC. In order to control the gap between the fuel and the matrix precisely, the pellets are abraded. The inert matrix is then filled with the pellets and the whole system is sealed by a BRASiC{sup R} process at high temperature under a helium atmosphere. Fabrication of the sample to be irradiated was done in 2006 and the irradiation began in May 2007 in the Phenix reactor. This presentation will detail and discuss the results obtained during this fabrication phase. (authors)

  5. Synthesis report on the relevant diffusion coefficients of fission products and helium in spent nuclear fuels; Rapport de synthese sur les coefficients de diffusion des produits de fission et de l'helium dans le combustible irradie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovera, P.; Ferry, C.; Poinssot, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DPC), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Johnson, L. [Nagra, Baden (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    This document corresponds to the deliverable D2 of the Work Package 1 of the 'Spent Fuel Stability under repository conditions' (SFS) European project. It constitutes a synthesis report on relevant diffusion coefficients of fission products and helium in spent nuclear fuels at high and low temperatures. Coefficients corresponding to thermally activated diffusion were reviewed from literature data for O, U (self-diffusion coefficients), fission gases and other fission products. Data showed that thermal diffusion was irrelevant at temperatures expected in repository conditions. The occurrence of diffusion enhanced by alpha self-irradiation was studied through different theoretical approaches. A 'best estimate' value of the alpha self-irradiation diffusion coefficient, D (m{sup 2}.s{sup -1}), is proposed. It is extrapolated from enhanced diffusion under irradiation observed in reactor and would be proportional to the volume alpha activity in the spent nuclear fuel, A{sub v} (Bq.m{sup -3}) as: D/A{sub v} {approx_equal} 2.10{sup -41} (m{sup 5})The migration of stable Pb in Oklo's uraninites was studied in order to validate the proposed diffusion coefficient. The obtained value is one order of magnitude higher than the theoretical proposed value. As for He behaviour in spent nuclear fuel, a few data are today available in open literature. The document will be completed as soon as new experimental results are available. (authors)

  6. Capsule endoscopy in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy is an attractive and patient- friendly tool that provides high quality images of the small bowel. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is the primary and most evaluated indication to capsule endoscopy; however, indications are expanding and a small number of preliminary reports have been presented concerning the role of video capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The purpose of this review is to update the current knowledge and to hypothesize on future perspectives of the use of video capsule endoscopy in patients with celiac disease.

  7. Optimal Design of Capsule Transporting Pipeline carrying Spherical Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asim, Taimoor; Mishra, Rakesh; Ubbi, Kuldip

    2012-05-01

    A capsule pipeline transports material or cargo in capsules propelled by fluid flowing through a pipeline. The cargo may either be contained in capsules (such as wheat enclosed inside sealed cylindrical containers), or may itself be the capsules (such as coal compressed into the shape of a cylinder or sphere). As the concept of capsule transportation is relatively new, the capsule pipelines need to be designed optimally for commercial viability. An optimal design of such a pipeline would have minimum pressure drop due to the presence of the solid medium in the pipeline, which corresponds to minimum head loss and hence minimum pumping power required to drive the capsules and the transporting fluid. The total cost for the manufacturing and maintenance of such pipelines is yet another important variable that needs to be considered for the widespread commercial acceptance of capsule transporting pipelines. To address this, the optimisation technique presented here is based on the least-cost principle. Pressure drop relationships have been incorporated to calculate the pumping requirements for the system. The maintenance and manufacturing costs have been computed separately to analyse their effects on the optimisation process. A design example has been included to show the usage of the model presented. The results indicate that for a specific throughput, there exists an optimum diameter of the pipeline for which the total cost for the piping system is at its minimum.

  8. Experimental data report for test TS-2; Reactivity initiated accident test in NSRR with pre-irradiated BWR fuel rod

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    本報告書は、1990年2月に実施した照射済BWR燃料を用いた2回目の反応度事故模擬実験であるTS-2について実験データをまとめたものである。TS-2実験に使用した試験燃料は初期濃縮度2.79%であり、敦賀1号炉で照射されたBWR7times7型燃料棒を短尺化したものである。短尺化に供した実用燃料のバンドル平均燃焼度は21.3Gwd/tであった。NSRRにおける照射実験は、大気圧、室温の静止水冷却条件下で行い、発熱量は72pm5cal/g・fuel(ピークエンタルピ66pm5cal/g・fuel)を与えた。その結果燃料破損は生じなかった。実験条件、実験方法、パルス照射時の燃料の過渡挙動及び照射後検査の結果をまとめて示した。...

  9. Experimental data report for test TS-1; Reactivity initiated accident test in NSRR with pre-irradiated BWR fuel rod

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    本報告書は、1989年10月に実施した照射済BWR燃料を用いた最初の反応度事故模擬実験であるTS-1について、実験データをまとめたものである。TS-1実験に使用した試験燃料は、初期濃縮度2.79%であり、敦賀1号炉で照射されたBWR7times7型燃料棒を短尺化したものである。短尺化に供した実用燃料のバンドル平均燃焼度は21.3GWd/tであった。NSRRにおける照射実験は、新たに開発した専用の2重カプセルを用い、大気圧・室温の静止水冷却条件下で行い、発熱量61cal/g・fuel(ピークエンタルピ55cal/g・fuel)を与えた。その結果、燃料破損は生じなかった。実験条件、実験方法、燃料燃焼度の測定結果、パルス照射時の燃料の過渡挙動及び照射後検査の結果をまとめて示した。...

  10. IN-PILE INSTRUMENTATION TO SUPPORT FUEL CYCLE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT - FY12 STATUS REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. . Rempe; J. Daw; D. Knudson; R. Schley

    2012-09-01

    As part of the FCRD program objective to emphasize science-based, goal-oriented research, a strategic research program is underway to develop new sensors that can be used to obtain the high fidelity, real-time, data required for characterizing the performance of new fuels during irradiation testing. The overarching goal of this initiative is to develop new test vehicles with new sensors of unprecedented accuracy and resolution that can obtain the required data. Prior laboratory testing and, as needed, irradiation testing of sensors in these capsules will be completed as part of this initiative to give sufficient confidence that the irradiation tests will yield the required data. This report documents FY12 progress in this initiative.

  11. Thermohydraulic study of a MTR fuel element aimed at the construction of an irradiation facility; Estudo termohidraulico de um elemento combustivel tipo MTR visando a construcao de um dispositivo de irradiacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coragem, Helio Boemer de Oliveira

    1980-07-01

    A thermohydraulic study of MTR fuel element is presented as a basic requirement for the development of an irradiation facility for testing fuel elements. A computer code named 'Thermo' has been developed for this purpose, which can stimulate different working conditions, such as, cooling, power elements and neutron flux, performing all pertinent thermohydraulic calculations. Thermocouples were used to measure the temperature gradients of the cooling fluid throughout the IEAR-1 reactor core. All experimental data are in good agreement with the theoretical model applied in this work. Finally, a draft of the proposed facility and its safety system is presented. (author)

  12. Final Report for the 1st Surveillance Test of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (CAPSULE 2) of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai (and others)

    2006-12-15

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 1st surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejon after the capsule was transported from Ulchin site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Ulchin unit 3 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsule 2 is 4.674E 18n/cm{sup 2}. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.920 for the 1st testing and the calculational uncertainty,7.0% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 3.913E 18n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 6th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 16 and 32EFPY would reach 9.249E 18 and 1.834E 19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Ulchin unit 3 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life.

  13. Final Report for the 1st Surveillance Test of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (Capsule 2) of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai (and others)

    2007-04-15

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 1st surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Daejon after the capsule was transported from Ulchin site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Ulchin Unit 4 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsule 2 is 4.306E+18n/cm{sup 2}. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.918 for the 1st testing and the calculational uncertainty,7.0% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 3.615E+18n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 6th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 16 and 32EFPY would reach 8.478E+18 and 1.673E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Ulchin Unit 4 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life.

  14. Magnetism in metal-organic capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, Jerry L.; Brechin, Euan K; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Inglis, Ross; Jones, Leigh F.; Mossine, Andrew; Paterson, Martin J.; Power, Nicholas P.; Teat, Simon J.

    2010-01-07

    Nickel and cobalt seamed metal-organic capsules have been isolated and studied using structural, magnetic and computational approaches. Antiferromagnetic exchange in the Ni capsule results from coordination environments enforced by the capsule framework.

  15. Magnetism in metal-organic capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, Jerry L.; Brechin, Euan K; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Inglis, Ross; Jones, Leigh F.; Mossine, Andrew; Paterson, Martin J.; Power, Nicholas P.; Teat, Simon J.

    2010-01-07

    Nickel and cobalt seamed metal-organic capsules have been isolated and studied using structural, magnetic and computational approaches. Antiferromagnetic exchange in the Ni capsule results from coordination environments enforced by the capsule framework.

  16. Theranostic Multilayer Capsules for Ultrasound Imaging and Guided Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Ratnayaka, Sithira; Alford, Aaron; Kozlovskaya, Veronika; Liu, Fei; Xue, Bing; Hoyt, Kenneth; Kharlampieva, Eugenia

    2017-03-28

    Despite the accessibility of ultrasound, the clinical potential of ultrasound-active theranostic agents has not been fully realized because it requires combining sufficient imaging contrast, high encapsulation efficiency, and ultrasound-triggered release in one entity. We report on theranostic polymer microcapsules composed of hydrogen-bonded multilayers of tannic acid and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) that produce high imaging contrast and deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin upon low-power diagnostic or high-power therapeutic ultrasound irradiation. These capsules exhibit excellent imaging contrast in both brightness and harmonic modes and show prolonged contrast over six months, unlike commercially available microbubbles. We also demonstrate low-dose gradual and high-dose fast release of doxorubicin from the capsules by diagnostic (∼100 mW/cm(2)) and therapeutic (>10 W/cm(2)) ultrasound irradiation, respectively. We show that the imaging contrast of the capsules can be controlled by varying the number of layers, polymer type (relatively rigid tannic acid versus more flexible poly(methacrylic acid)), and polymer molecular weight. In vitro studies demonstrate that 50% doxorubicin release from ultrasound-treated capsules induces 97% cytotoxicity to MCF-7 human cancer cells, while no cytotoxicity is found without the treatment. Considering the strong ultrasound imaging contrast, high encapsulation efficiency, biocompatibility, and tunable drug release, these microcapsules can be used as theranostic agents for ultrasound-guided chemotherapy.

  17. Acceptance Test Data for the AGR-5/6/7 Irradiation Test Fuel Composite Defective IPyC Fraction and Pyrocarbon Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmreich, Grant W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skitt, Darren J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dyer, John A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schumacher, Austin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Coated particle composite J52R-16-98005 was produced by Babcock and Wilcox Technologies (BWXT) as fuel for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program’s AGR-5/6/7 irradiation test in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This composite was comprised of four coated particle fuel batches J52O-16-93165B (26%), 93168B (26%), 93169B (24%), and 93170B (24%), chosen based on the Quality Control (QC) data acquired for each individual candidate AGR-5/6/7 batch. Each batch was coated in a 150-mm-diameter production-scale fluidized-bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace. Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coatings were deposited on 425-μm-nominal-diameter spherical kernels from BWXT Lot J52R-16-69317 containing a mixture of 15.5%-enriched uranium carbide and uranium oxide (UCO). The TRISO coatings consisted of four consecutive CVD layers: a ~50% dense carbon buffer layer with 100-μm-nominal thickness, a dense inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness, a silicon carbide (SiC) layer with 35-μm-nominal thickness, and a dense outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness. The TRISO-coated particle batches were sieved to upgrade the particles by removing over-sized and under-sized material, and the upgraded batches were designated by appending the letter A to the end of the batch number (e.g., 93165A). Secondary upgrading by sieving was performed on the A-designated batches to remove particles with missing or very-thin buffer layers that were identified during previous analysis of the individual batches for defective IPyC, as reported in the acceptance test data report for the AGR-5/6/7 production batches [Hunn et al. 2017]. The additionally-upgraded batches were designated by appending the letter B to the end of the batch number (e.g., 93165B).

  18. Design modification and stress analysis of bottom structure for the instrumented capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, M. H.; Kang, Y. H.; Joo, K. N.; Oh, J. M.; Joe, M. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Jeo, Y. G. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    The bottom structure of the instrumented capsule, which is used for the irradiation test in the HANARO incore, plays an important role to support the capsule main structure within the hexagonal flow tube. This paper is described the design modification and stress analysis results to obtain the structural integrity of bottom structure for the instrumented capsule. The capsule's bottom guide structure consisted of three guide pins before, but it is modified as one block structure to obtain an efficient flow of coolant water and a stabilized shape structurally. The structural integrity of the bottom structure is estimated by the stress calculation of components such as welding parts, bolts and neck parts of the rod tip due to the force applied by handling tool. The tensile and shear stresses are calculated by using a mechanical formulas, and a finite element model development is planned to be performed for more complex assembly of the capsule bottom structure.

  19. Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachs, Daniel M.

    2012-12-01

    The United States has established that transient irradiation testing is needed to support advanced light water reactors fuel development. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated an effort to reestablish this capability. Restart of the Transient Testing Reactor (TREAT) facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is being considered for this purpose. This effort would also include the development of specialized test vehicles to support stagnant capsule and flowing loop tests as well as the enhancement of postirradiation examination capabilities and remote device assembly capabilities at the Hot Fuel Examination Facility. It is anticipated that the capability will be available to support testing by 2018, as required to meet the DOE goals for the development of accident-tolerant LWR fuel designs.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of oxide type fluorite with controlled porosity to study the mechanical behaviour of the fuel irradiated in storage conditions; Fabricacion y caracterizacion de oxidos tipo fluorita con porosidad controlada para estudiar el comportamiento mecanico del combustible irradiado en condiciones de almacenamiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, S.; Borjas, S.; Gutierrez, L.; Bonales, L. J.; Rodriguez, N.; Cobo, J. M.; Torres, Y.; Cobos, J.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this research is to get pills with distribution of porosity to simulate mechanical properties in the irradiated fuel resulting from own burnt of the material to produce the release of fission gases. (Author)

  1. Simulations of indirectly driven gas-filled capsules at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Eder, D. C.; Pino, J. E.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Remington, B. A.; Rowley, D. P.; Yeamans, C. B.; Tipton, R. E.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Divol, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    Gas-filled capsules imploded with indirect drive on the National Ignition Facility have been employed as symmetry surrogates for cryogenic-layered ignition capsules and to explore interfacial mix. Plastic capsules containing deuterated layers and filled with tritium gas provide a direct measure of mix of ablator into the gas fuel. Other plastic capsules have employed DT or D{sup 3}He gas fill. We present the results of two-dimensional simulations of gas-filled capsule implosions with known degradation sources represented as in modeling of inertial confinement fusion ignition designs; these are time-dependent drive asymmetry, the capsule support tent, roughness at material interfaces, and prescribed gas-ablator interface mix. Unlike the case of cryogenic-layered implosions, many observables of gas-filled implosions are in reasonable agreement with predictions of these simulations. Yields of TT and DT neutrons as well as other x-ray and nuclear diagnostics are matched for CD-layered implosions. Yields of DT-filled capsules are over-predicted by factors of 1.4–2, while D{sup 3}He capsule yields are matched, as well as other metrics for both capsule types.

  2. The Design and Safety Review for a Creep Capsule With Four Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, M. S.; Seo, C. G.; Choi, M. H.; Choo, K. N.; Sohn, J. M.; Kang, Y. H.; Kim, B. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    To review the safety in the irradiation test of a creep capsule with 4 specimens, the design analysis for the incore creep test in the normal and abnormal operation condition was performed. In the normal operation condition, the reactivity effect was estimated and the analysis on the stress and temperature was performed. In the abnormal operation condition, the effect exerted on the capsule body by a leakage or breakage of the stress loading unit was analyzed.

  3. The health physics of installations for decladding irradiated fuels or for handling radio-elements at Marcoule; La radioprotection des installations de degainage des combustibles irradies et des radio-elements a Marcoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassany, J.; Guillermin, P.; Mallet, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule, 30 - Chusclan (France)

    1966-07-01

    Radiation protection practices for handling reactor fuel elements are described. Elements of considerable specific radioactivity are handled under water. A study was made of water filtration and of ventilation in the building. The installations are divided up into zones depending on the radioactive risks, and the radiation level atmospheric contamination are the object of a systematic control at various points. A description is gi