WorldWideScience

Sample records for fuel element performance

  1. Nuclear fuel elements design, fabrication and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Frost, Brian R T

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Elements: Design, Fabrication and Performance is concerned with the design, fabrication, and performance of nuclear fuel elements, with emphasis on fast reactor fuel elements. Topics range from fuel types and the irradiation behavior of fuels to cladding and duct materials, fuel element design and modeling, fuel element performance testing and qualification, and the performance of water reactor fuels. Fast reactor fuel elements, research and test reactor fuel elements, and unconventional fuel elements are also covered. This volume consists of 12 chapters and begins with an overvie

  2. Licos, a fuel performance code for innovative fuel elements or experimental devices design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfer, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.helfer@cea.fr; Bejaoui, Syriac, E-mail: syriac.bejaoui@cea.fr; Michel, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.michel@cea.fr

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The Licos fuel performance code is introduced. • Advanced features, such as dependency algorithm and kriging are described. • First results on three dimensional modelling of the SFR fuel pin are given. • Application to the DIAMINO design computations is discussed. - Abstract: This paper provides an overview of the Licos fuel performance code which has been developed for several years within the platform pleiades, co-developed by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and its industrial partners Électricité de France (EDF) and AREVA. CEA engineers have been using Licos to back multidimensional thermo-mechanical studies on innovative fuel elements design and experimental device pre-and post-irradiation computations. Studies made with Licos thus encompass a wide range of situations, including most nuclear systems used or studied in France in recent years (PWR, SFR or GFR), normal and off-normal operating conditions, and a large selection of materials (either for fuel, absorber, coolant and cladding). The aim of this paper is to give some insights about some innovative features in the design of Licos (dependency management, kriging, mfront, etc.). We also present two studies that demonstrate the flexibility of this code. The first one shows how Licos can be combined with the Germinal monodimensional fuel performance code to demonstrate the interest of a three dimensional modelling of the fuel relocation phenomenon in the Sodium Fast Reactor fuel pin. The second one describes how Licos was used to model the DIAMINO experiment.

  3. Thermionic Fuel Element performance: TFE Verification Program. Final test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full power life of 7 years. A TFE was designed that met the reliability and lifetime requirements for a 2 MW(e) conceptual reactor design. Analysis showed that this TFE could be used over the range of 0.5 to 5 megawatts. This was used as the basis for designing components for test and evaluation. The demonstration of a 7-year component lifetime capability was through the combined use of analytical models and accelerated, confirmatory tests in a fast test reactor. Iterative testing was performed in which the results of one test series led to evolutionary improvements in the next test specimens. The TFE components underwent screening and initial development testing in ex-reactor tests. Several design and materials options were considered for each component. As screening tests permitted, down selection occurred to very specific designs and materials. In parallel with ex-reactor testing, and fast reactor component testing, components were integrated into a TFE and tested in the TRIGA test reactor at GA. Realtime testing of partial length TFEs was used to test support, alignment and interconnective TFE components, and to verify TFE performance in-reactor with integral cesium reservoirs. Realtime testing was also used to verify the relation between TFE performance and fueled emitter swelling, to test the durability of intercell insulation, to check temperature distributions, and to verify the adequacy over time of the fission gas venting channels. Predictions of TFE lifetime rested primarily on the accelerated component testing results, as correlated and extended to realtime by the use of analytical models.

  4. TRISO-Fuel Element Performance Modeling for the Hybrid LIFE Engine with Pu Fuel Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMange, P; Marian, J; Caro, M; Caro, A

    2010-02-18

    A TRISO-coated fuel thermo-mechanical performance study is performed for the hybrid LIFE engine to test the viability of TRISO particles to achieve ultra-high burnup of a weapons-grade Pu blanket. Our methodology includes full elastic anisotropy, time and temperature varying material properties for all TRISO layers, and a procedure to remap the elastic solutions in order to achieve fast fluences up to 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2} (E > 0.18 MeV). In order to model fast fluences in the range of {approx} 7 {approx} 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2}, for which no data exist, careful scalings and extrapolations of the known TRISO material properties are carried out under a number of potential scenarios. A number of findings can be extracted from our study. First, failure of the internal pyrolytic carbon (PyC) layer occurs within the first two months of operation. Then, the particles behave as BISO-coated particles, with the internal pressure being withstood directly by the SiC layer. Later, after 1.6 years, the remaining PyC crumbles due to void swelling and the fuel particle becomes a single-SiC-layer particle. Unrestrained by the PyC layers, and at the temperatures and fluences in the LIFE engine, the SiC layer maintains reasonably-low tensile stresses until the end-of-life. Second, the PyC creep constant, K, has a striking influence on the fuel performance of TRISO-coated particles, whose stresses scale almost inversely proportional to K. Obtaining more reliable measurements, especially at higher fluences, is an imperative for the fidelity of our models. Finally, varying the geometry of the TRISO-coated fuel particles results in little differences in the scope of fuel performance. The mechanical integrity of 2-cm graphite pebbles that act as fuel matrix has also been studied and it is concluded that they can reliable serve the entire LIFE burnup cycle without failure.

  5. SNTP program fuel element design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Lewis A.; Ales, Matthew W.

    1993-06-01

    The SNTP program is evaluating the feasibility of utilizing a particle bed reactor to develop a high-performance nuclear thermal rocket engine. The optimum fuel element arrangement depends on the power level desired and the intended application. The key components of the fuel element have been developed and are being tested.

  6. Nuclear fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadowcroft, Ronald Ross; Bain, Alastair Stewart

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element wherein a tubular cladding of zirconium or a zirconium alloy has a fission gas plenum chamber which is held against collapse by the loops of a spacer in the form of a tube which has been deformed inwardly at three equally spaced, circumferential positions to provide three loops. A heat resistant disc of, say, graphite separates nuclear fuel pellets within the cladding from the plenum chamber. The spacer is of zirconium or a zirconium alloy.

  7. Fuel Element Technical Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burley, H.H. [ed.

    1956-08-01

    It is the purpose of the Fuel Element Technical Manual to Provide a single document describing the fabrication processes used in the manufacture of the fuel element as well as the technical bases for these processes. The manual will be instrumental in the indoctrination of personnel new to the field and will provide a single data reference for all personnel involved in the design or manufacture of the fuel element. The material contained in this manual was assembled by members of the Engineering Department and the Manufacturing Department at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation between the dates October, 1955 and June, 1956. Arrangement of the manual. The manual is divided into six parts: Part I--introduction; Part II--technical bases; Part III--process; Part IV--plant and equipment; Part V--process control and improvement; and VI--safety.

  8. Disposition of Unirradiated Sodium Bonded EBR-II Driver Fuel Elements and HEU Scrap: Work Performed for FY 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen A Moore

    2007-04-01

    Specific surplus high enriched uranium (HEU) materials at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) will be transferred to a designated off-site receiving facility. The DOE High Enriched Uranium Disposition Program Office (HDPO) will determine which materials, if any, will be prepared and transferred to an off-site facility for processing and eventual fabrication of fuel for nuclear reactors. These surplus HEU materials include approximately 7200 kg unirradiated sodium-bonded EBR-II driver fuel elements, and nearly 800 kg of HEU casting scrap from the process which formed various sodium-bonded fuels (including the EBR-II driver elements). Before the driver fuel can be packaged for shipment, the fuel elements will require removal of the sodium bond. The HEU scrap will also require repackaging in preparation for off-site transport. Preliminary work on this task was authorized by BWXT Y-12 on Nov 6, 2006 and performed in three areas: • Facility Modifications • Safety Documentation • Project Management

  9. Modeling of the heat transfer performance of plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shurong; Huo, Yongzhong; Yan, XiaoQing

    2009-08-01

    Considering the mutual actions between fuel particles and the metal matrix, the three-dimensional finite element models are developed to simulate the heat transfer behaviors of dispersion nuclear fuel plates. The research results indicate that the temperatures of the fuel plate might rise more distinctly with considering the particle swelling and the degraded surface heat transfer coefficients with increasing burnup; the local heating phenomenon within the particles appears when their thermal conductivities are too low. With rise of the surface heat transfer coefficients, the temperatures within the fuel plate decrease; the temperatures of the fuel plate are sensitive to the variations of the heat transfer coefficients whose values are lower, but their effects are weakened and slight when the heat transfer coefficients increase and reach a certain extent. Increasing the heat generation rate leads to elevating the internal temperatures. The temperatures and the maximum temperature differences within the plate increase along with the particle volume fractions. The surface thermal flux goes up along with particle volume fractions and heat generation rates, but the effects of surface heat transfer coefficients are not evident.

  10. Thermionic fuel element technology status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J. W.; Horner, M. W.; Yang, L.

    1985-01-01

    The results of research, conducted between the mid-1960s and 1973, on the multiconverter thermionic fuel elements (TFEs) that comprise the reactor core of an SP-100 thermionic reactor system are presented. Fueled-emitter technology, insulator technology and cell and TFE assembly technology of the prototypical TFEs which were tested in-pile and out-of-pile during these years are described. The proto-TFEs have demonstrated reproducible performance within 5 percent and no premature failures within the 1.5 yr of operation (with projected 3-yr lifetimes). The two primary life-limiting factors had been identified as thermionic emitter dimensional increase due to interactions with the fuel and electrical insulator structural damage from fast neutrons. Multiple options for extending TFE lifetimes to 7 yr or longer are available and will be investigated in the 1984-1985 SP-100 program for resolution of critical technology issues. Design diagrams and test graphs are included.

  11. Vented nuclear fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Leonard N.; Kaznoff, Alexis I.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear fuel cell for use in a thermionic nuclear reactor in which a small conduit extends from the outside surface of the emitter to the center of the fuel mass of the emitter body to permit escape of volatile and gaseous fission products collected in the center thereof by virtue of molecular migration of the gases to the hotter region of the fuel.

  12. Fuel elements of thermionic converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, R.L. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Systems Assessment Dept.; Gontar, A.S.; Nelidov, M.V.; Nikolaev, Yu.V.; Schulepov, L.N. [RI SIA Lutch, Podolsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-01-01

    Work on thermionic nuclear power systems has been performed in Russia within the framework of the TOPAZ reactor program since the early 1960s. In the TOPAZ in-core thermionic convertor reactor design, the fuel element`s cladding is also the thermionic convertor`s emitter. Deformation of the emitter can lead to short-circuiting and is the primary cause of premature TRC failure. Such deformation can be the result of fuel swelling, thermocycling, or increased unilateral pressure on the emitter due to the release of gaseous fission products. Much of the work on TRCs has concentrated on preventing or mitigating emitter deformation by improving the following materials and structures: nuclear fuel; emitter materials; electrical insulators; moderator and reflector materials; and gas-exhaust device. In addition, considerable effort has been directed toward the development of experimental techniques that accurately mimic operational conditions and toward the creation of analytical and numerical models that allow operational conditions and behavior to be predicted without the expense and time demands of in-pile tests. New and modified materials and structures for the cores of thermionic NPSs and new fabrication processes for the materials have ensured the possibility of creating thermionic NPSs for a wide range of powers, from tens to several hundreds of kilowatts, with life spans of 5 to 10 years.

  13. Fuel elements of thermionic converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, R.L. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Systems Assessment Dept.; Gontar, A.S.; Nelidov, M.V.; Nikolaev, Yu.V.; Schulepov, L.N. [RI SIA Lutch, Podolsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-01-01

    Work on thermionic nuclear power systems has been performed in Russia within the framework of the TOPAZ reactor program since the early 1960s. In the TOPAZ in-core thermionic convertor reactor design, the fuel element`s cladding is also the thermionic convertor`s emitter. Deformation of the emitter can lead to short-circuiting and is the primary cause of premature TRC failure. Such deformation can be the result of fuel swelling, thermocycling, or increased unilateral pressure on the emitter due to the release of gaseous fission products. Much of the work on TRCs has concentrated on preventing or mitigating emitter deformation by improving the following materials and structures: nuclear fuel; emitter materials; electrical insulators; moderator and reflector materials; and gas-exhaust device. In addition, considerable effort has been directed toward the development of experimental techniques that accurately mimic operational conditions and toward the creation of analytical and numerical models that allow operational conditions and behavior to be predicted without the expense and time demands of in-pile tests. New and modified materials and structures for the cores of thermionic NPSs and new fabrication processes for the materials have ensured the possibility of creating thermionic NPSs for a wide range of powers, from tens to several hundreds of kilowatts, with life spans of 5 to 10 years.

  14. REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

    1963-01-15

    This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

  15. MRT fuel element inspection at Dounreay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J.

    1997-08-01

    To ensure that their production and inspection processes are performed in an acceptable manner, ie. auditable and traceable, the MTR Fuel Element Fabrication Plant at Dounreay operates to a documented quality system. This quality system, together with the fuel element manufacturing and inspection operations, has been independently certified to ISO9002-1987, EN29002-1987 and BS5750:Pt2:1987 by Lloyd`s Register Quality Assurance Limited (LRQA). This certification also provides dual accreditation to the relevant German, Dutch and Australian certification bodies. This paper briefly describes the quality system, together with the various inspection stages involved in the manufacture of MTR fuel elements at Dounreay.

  16. Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    The book presented is designed to function both as a text for first-year graduate courses in nuclear materials and as a reference for workers involved in the materials design and performance aspects of nuclear power plants. The contents are arranged under the following chapter headings: statistical thermodynamics, thermal properties of solids, crystal structures, cohesive energy of solids, chemical equilibrium, point defects in solids, diffusion in solids, dislocations and grain boundaries, equation of state of UO/sub 2/, fuel element thermal performance, fuel chemistry, behavior of solid fission products in oxide fuel elements, swelling due to fission gases, pore migration and fuel restructuring kinetics, fission gas release, mechanical properties of UO/sub 2/, radiation damage, radiation effects in metals, interaction of sodium and stainless steel, modeling of the structural behavior of fuel elements and assemblies. (DG)

  17. Protected Nuclear Fuel Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, J. H.; Schumar, J. F.

    1962-12-01

    A stainless steel-clad actinide metal fuel rod for use in fast reactors is reported. In order to prevert cladding failures due to alloy formation between the actinide metal and the stainless steel, a mesh-like sleeve of expanded metal is interposed between them, the sleeve metal being of niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, tungsten, zirconium, or vanadium. Liquid alkali metal is added as a heat transfer agent. (AEC)

  18. Compact Fuel Element Environment Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. E.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse (I(sub sp)) and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Conventional, storable propellants produce average I(sub sp). Nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) capable of high I(sub sp) thrust have been proposed. NTR employs heat produced by fission reaction to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen, which is then forced through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3,000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements that employ high melting point metals, ceramics, or a combination (cermet) as a structural matrix into which the nuclear fuel is distributed. It is not necessary to include fissile material in test samples intended to explore high-temperature hydrogen exposure of the structural support matrices. A small-scale test bed designed to heat fuel element samples via noncontact radio frequency heating and expose samples to hydrogen for typical mission durations has been developed to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without employing fissile material. This Technical Memorandum details the test bed design and results of testing conducted to date.

  19. Low cost, lightweight fuel cell elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    New fuel cell elements for use in liquid feed fuel cells are provided. The elements including biplates and endplates are low in cost, light in weight, and allow high efficiency operation. Electrically conductive elements are also a part of the fuel cell elements.

  20. Structural analysis of reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of fuel-element modeling is presented that traces the development of codes for the prediction of light-water-reactor and fast-breeder-reactor fuel-element performance. It is concluded that although the mathematical analysis is now far advanced, the development and incorporation of mechanistic constitutive equations has not kept pace. The resultant reliance on empirical correlations severely limits the physical insight that can be gained from code extrapolations. Current efforts include modeling of alternate fuel systems, analysis of local fuel-cladding interactions, and development of a predictive capability for off-normal behavior. Future work should help remedy the current constitutive deficiencies and should include the development of deterministic failure criteria for use in design.

  1. HTGR Fuel performance basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamasundar, B.I.; Stansfield, O.M.; Jensen, D.D.

    1982-05-01

    The safety characteristics of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) during normal and accident conditions are determined in part by HTGR fuel performance. During normal operation, less than 0.1% fuel failure occurs, primarily from defective particles. This low fuel failure fraction limits circulating activity to acceptable levels. During severe accidents, the radiological consequence is influenced by high-temperature fuel particle behavior. An empirical fuel failure model, supported by recent experimental data, is presented. The onset of significant fuel particle failure occurs at temperatures in excess of 1600/sup 0/C, and complete fuel failure occurs at 2660/sup 0/C. This indicates that the fuel is more retentive at higher temperatures than previously assumed. The more retentive nature of the fuel coupled with the high thermal capacitance of the core results in slow release of fission products from the core during severe accidents.

  2. A high temperature fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekido, A.; Nakai, M.; Ninomiya, Y.

    1982-12-21

    A solid electrolyte which conducts electricity with heating by oxygen ions and operates at a temperature of 1,000C is used in the element. The cathode, besides the ionic conductivity in oxygen, has an electron conductivity. The anode has electron conductivity. Substances such as Bi203, into which oxides of alkaline earth metals are added, are used for making the cathode. The electrolyte consists of ZrO2 and Y2O3, to which CaO is added. WC, to which an H2 type fuel is fed, serves as the anode. The element has a long service life.

  3. HTGR spent fuel composition and fuel element block flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, C.J.; Holder, N.D.; Pierce, V.H.; Robertson, M.W.

    1976-07-01

    The High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) utilizes the thorium-uranium fuel cycle. Fully enriched uranium fissile material and thorium fertile material are used in the initial reactor core and for makeup fuel in the recycle core loadings. Bred /sup 233/U and unburned /sup 235/U fissile materials are recovered from spent fuel elements, refabricated into recycle fuel elements, and used as part of the recycle core loading along with the makeup fuel elements. A typical HTGR employs a 4-yr fuel cycle with approximately one-fourth of the core discharged and reloaded annually. The fuel element composition, including heavy metals, impurity nuclides, fission products, and activation products, has been calculated for discharged spent fuel elements and for reload fresh fuel and recycle fuel elements for each cycle over the life of a typical HTGR. Fuel element compositions are presented for the conditions of equilibrium recycle. Data describing compositions for individual reloads throughout the reactor life are available in a detailed volume upon request. Fuel element block flow data have been compiled based on a forecast HTGR market. Annual block flows are presented for each type of fuel element discharged from the reactors for reprocessing and for refabrication.

  4. Nuclear reactor fuel element. Kernreaktorbrennelement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippert, H.J.

    1985-03-28

    The fuel element box for a BWR is situated with a corner bolt on the inside in one corner of its top on the top side of the top plate. This corner bolt is screwed down with a bolt with a corner part which is provided with leaf springs outside on two sides, where the bolt has a smaller diameter and an expansion shank. The bolt is held captive to the bolt head on the top and the holder on the bottom of the corner part. The holder is a locknut. If the expansion forces are too great, the bolt can only break at the expansion shank.

  5. Automatic inspection for remotely manufactured fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reifman, J.; Vitela, J.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gibbs, K.S.; Benedict, R.W. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Two classification techniques, standard control charts and artificial neural networks, are studied as a means for automating the visual inspection of the welding of end plugs onto the top of remotely manufactured reprocessed nuclear fuel element jackets. Classificatory data are obtained through measurements performed on pre- and post-weld images captured with a remote camera and processed by an off-the-shelf vision system. The two classification methods are applied in the classification of 167 dummy stainless steel (HT9) fuel jackets yielding comparable results.

  6. Visual examinations of K east fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitner, A.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-03

    Selected fuel elements stored in both ``good fuel`` and ``bad fuel`` canisters in K East Basin were extracted and visually examined full length for damage. Lower end damage in the ``bad fuel`` canisters was found to be more severe than expected based on top end appearances. Lower end damage for the ``good fuel`` canisters, however, was less than expected based on top end observations. Since about half of the fuel in K East Basin is contained in ``good fuel`` canisters based on top end assessments, the fraction of fuel projected to be intact with respect to IPS processing considerations remains at 50% based on these examination results.

  7. Progress of the DUPIC Fuel Compatibility Analysis (IV) - Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Ryu, Ho Jin; Roh, Gyu Hong; Jeong, Chang Joon; Park, Chang Je; Song, Kee Chan; Lee, Jung Won

    2005-10-15

    This study describes the mechanical compatibility of the direct use of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel, when it is loaded into a CANDU reactor. The mechanical compatibility can be assessed for the fuel management, primary heat transport system, fuel channel, and the fuel handling system in the reactor core by both the experimental and analytic methods. Because the physical dimensions of the DUPIC fuel bundle adopt the CANDU flexible (CANFLEX) fuel bundle design which has already been demonstrated for a commercial use in CANDU reactors, the experimental compatibility analyses focused on the generation of material property data and the irradiation tests of the DUPIC fuel, which are used for the computational analysis. The intermediate results of the mechanical compatibility analysis have shown that the integrity of the DUPIC fuel is mostly maintained under the high power and high burnup conditions even though some material properties like the thermal conductivity is a little lower compared to the uranium fuel. However it is required to slightly change the current DUPIC fuel design to accommodate the high internal pressure of the fuel element. It is also strongly recommended to perform more irradiation tests of the DUPIC fuel to accumulate a database for the demonstration of the DUPIC fuel performance in the CANDU reactor.

  8. Dry Process Fuel Performance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Song, K. C.; Moon, J. S. and others

    2005-04-15

    The objective of the project is to establish the performance evaluation system of DUPIC fuel during the Phase II R and D. In order to fulfil this objectives, irradiation test of DUPIC fuel was carried out in HANARO using the non-instrumented and SPND-instrumented rig. Also, the analysis on the in-reactor behavior analysis of DUPIC fuel, out-pile test using simulated DUPIC fuel as well as performance and integrity assessment in a commercial reactor were performed during this Phase. The R and D results of the Phase II are summarized as follows : - Performance evaluation of DUPIC fuel via irradiation test in HANARO - Post irradiation examination of irradiated fuel and performance analysis - Development of DUPIC fuel performance code (modified ELESTRES) considering material properties of DUPIC fuel - Irradiation behavior and integrity assessment under the design power envelope of DUPIC fuel - Foundamental technology development of thermal/mechanical performance evaluation using ANSYS (FEM package)

  9. Dual-radial cell thermionic fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Charles W.

    A dual-radial cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) has been proposed and partially evaluated. The cell has the capacity to produce considerably more power per gram of fuel than does a single-cell TFE, with a total electrical power in a fast reactor system of several hundred kWs, conservatively operated.

  10. Visual examinations of K west fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitner, A.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-03

    Over 250 fuel assemblies stored in sealed canisters in the K West Basin were extracted and visually examined for damage. Substantial damage was expected based on high cesium levels previously measured in water samples taken from these canisters. About 11% of the inner elements and 45% of the outer elements were found to be failed in these examinations. Canisters that had cesium levels of I curie or more generally had multiple instances of major fuel damage.

  11. Design and Testing of Prototypic Elements Containing Monolithic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; M.K. Meyer; D.M. Wachs

    2011-10-01

    The US fuel development team has performed numerous irradiation tests on small to medium sized specimens containing low enriched uranium fuel designs. The team is now focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum Base Monolithic Design and has entered the next generation of testing with the design and irradiation of prototypic elements which contain this fuel. The designs of fuel elements containing monolithic fuel, such as AFIP-7 (which is currently under irradiation) and RERTR-FE (which is currently under fabrication), are appropriate progressions relative to the technology life cycle. The culmination of this testing program will occur with the design, fabrication, and irradiation of demonstration products to include the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiments. Future plans show that design, fabrication, and testing activities will apply the rigor needed for a demonstration campaign.

  12. Simulation on reactor TRIGA Puspati core kinetics fueled with thorium (Th) based fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Abdul Aziz; Pauzi, Anas Muhamad; Rahman, Shaik Mohmmed Haikhal Abdul; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Muhammad; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    In confronting global energy requirement and the search for better technologies, there is a real case for widening the range of potential variations in the design of nuclear power plants. Smaller and simpler reactors are attractive, provided they can meet safety and security standards and non-proliferation issues. On fuel cycle aspect, thorium fuel cycles produce much less plutonium and other radioactive transuranic elements than uranium fuel cycles. Although not fissile itself, Th-232 will absorb slow neutrons to produce uranium-233 (233U), which is fissile. By introducing Thorium, the numbers of highly enriched uranium fuel element can be reduced while maintaining the core neutronic performance. This paper describes the core kinetic of a small research reactor core like TRIGA fueled with a Th filled fuel element matrix using a general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code.

  13. Simulation on reactor TRIGA Puspati core kinetics fueled with thorium (Th) based fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, Abdul Aziz, E-mail: azizM@uniten.edu.my; Rahman, Shaik Mohmmed Haikhal Abdul [Universiti Tenaga Nasional. Jalan Ikram-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Pauzi, Anas Muhamad, E-mail: anas@uniten.edu.my; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Muhammad; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Idris, Faridah Mohamad [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    In confronting global energy requirement and the search for better technologies, there is a real case for widening the range of potential variations in the design of nuclear power plants. Smaller and simpler reactors are attractive, provided they can meet safety and security standards and non-proliferation issues. On fuel cycle aspect, thorium fuel cycles produce much less plutonium and other radioactive transuranic elements than uranium fuel cycles. Although not fissile itself, Th-232 will absorb slow neutrons to produce uranium-233 ({sup 233}U), which is fissile. By introducing Thorium, the numbers of highly enriched uranium fuel element can be reduced while maintaining the core neutronic performance. This paper describes the core kinetic of a small research reactor core like TRIGA fueled with a Th filled fuel element matrix using a general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code.

  14. Use of silicide fuel in the Ford Nuclear Reactor - to lengthen fuel element lifetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Burn, R.R.; Lee, J.C. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Phoenix Memorial Lab.

    1995-12-31

    Based on economic considerations, it has been proposed to increase the lifetime of LEU fuel elements in the Ford Nuclear Reactor by raising the {sup 235}U plate loading from 9.3 grams in aluminide (UAl{sub x}) fuel to 12.5 grams in silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) fuel. For a representative core configuration, preliminary neutronic depletion and steady state thermal hydraulic calculations have been performed to investigate core characteristics during the transition from an all-aluminide to an all-silicide core. This paper discusses motivations for this fuel element upgrade, results from the calculations, and conclusions.

  15. Failed MTR Fuel Element Detect in a Sipping Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeituni, C.A.; Terremoto, L.A.A.; da Silva, J.E.R.

    2004-10-06

    This work describes sipping tests performed on Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements of the IEA-R1 research reactor, in order to find out which one failed in the core during a routine operation. Radioactive iodine isotopes {sup 131}I and {sup 133}I, employed as failure monitors, were detected in samples corresponding to the failed fuel element. The specific activity of each sample, as well as the average leaking rate, were measured for {sup 137}Cs. The nuclear fuels U{sub 3}O{sub 8} - Al dispersion and U - Al alloy were compared concerning their measured average leaking rates of {sup 137}Cs.

  16. Nuclear fuel elements having a composite cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Gerald M.; Cowan, II, Robert L.; Davies, John H.

    1983-09-20

    An improved nuclear fuel element is disclosed for use in the core of nuclear reactors. The improved nuclear fuel element has a composite cladding of an outer portion forming a substrate having on the inside surface a metal layer selected from the group consisting of copper, nickel, iron and alloys of the foregoing with a gap between the composite cladding and the core of nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel element comprises a container of the elongated composite cladding, a central core of a body of nuclear fuel material disposed in and partially filling the container and forming an internal cavity in the container, an enclosure integrally secured and sealed at each end of said container and a nuclear fuel material retaining means positioned in the cavity. The metal layer of the composite cladding prevents perforations or failures in the cladding substrate from stress corrosion cracking or from fuel pellet-cladding interaction or both. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy.

  17. HTGR fuel element structural design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloway, R.; Gorholt, W.; Ho, F.; Vollman, R.; Yu, H.

    1986-09-01

    The structural design of the large HTGR prismatic core fuel elements involve the interaction of four engineering disciplines: nuclear physics, thermo-hydraulics, structural and material science. Fuel element stress analysis techniques and the development of structural criteria are discussed in the context of an overview of the entire design process. The core of the proposed 2240 MW(t) HTGR is described as an example where the design process was used. Probabalistic stress analysis techniques coupled with probabalistic risk analysis (PRA) to develop structural criteria to account for uncertainty are described. The PRA provides a means for ensuring that the proposed structural criteria are consistent with plant investment and safety risk goals. The evaluation of cracked fuel elements removed from the Fort St. Vrain reactor in the USA is discussed in the context of stress analysis uncertainty and structural criteria development.

  18. Operational limitations of light water reactors relating to fuel performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, H S

    1976-07-01

    General aspects of fuel performance for typical Boiling and Pressurized Water Reactors are presented. Emphasis is placed on fuel failures in order to make clear important operational limitations. A discussion of fuel element designs is first given to provide the background information for the subsequent discussion of several fuel failure modes that have been identified. Fuel failure experiences through December 31, 1974, are summarized. The operational limitations that are required to mitigate the effects of fuel failures are discussed.

  19. Operational limitations of light water reactors relating to fuel performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, H S

    1976-07-01

    General aspects of fuel performance for typical Boiling and Pressurized Water Reactors are presented. Emphasis is placed on fuel failures in order to make clear important operational limitations. A discussion of fuel element designs is first given to provide the background information for the subsequent discussion of several fuel failure modes that have been identified. Fuel failure experiences through December 31, 1974, are summarized. The operational limitations that are required to mitigate the effects of fuel failures are discussed.

  20. Weld Joint Design for SFR Metallic Fuel Element Closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Won; Kim, Soo Sung; Woo, Yoon Myeng; Kim, Hyung Tae; Kim, Ki Hwan; Yoon, Kyung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) system is among the six systems selected for Gen-IV promising systems and expected to become available for commercial introduction around 2030. In Korea, the R and D on SFR has been begun since 1997, as one of the national long-term nuclear R and D programs. The international collaborative research is under way on fuel developments within Advanced Fuel Project for Gen-IV SFR with the closed fuel cycle of full actinide recycling, while TRU bearing metallic fuel, U-TRU-Zr alloy fuel, was selected and is being developed. For the fabrication of SFR metallic fuel elements, the endplug welding is a crucial process. The sealing of endplug to cladding tube should be hermetically perfect to prevent a leakage of fission gases and to maintain a good reactor performance. In this study, the joint designs for endplug welding were investigated. For the irradiation test of SFR metallic fuel element, the TIG welding technique was adopted and the welding joint design was developed based on the welding conditions and parameters established. In order to make SFR metallic fuel elements, the weld joint design was developed based on the TIG welding technique.

  1. Design and in-core fuel management of reload fuel elements for reactors made by other manufacturers. Auslegung und Einsatzplanung von Nachlade-Brennelementen fuer Reaktoren anderer Hersteller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufert, A.; Urban, P.

    1990-12-01

    By the end of 1990 Siemens had performed fuel element designs and in-core fuel management for 94 operating cycles in 27 pressurized and boiling water reactors of other manufacturers. Together with the client different fuel element designs are developed and proof is furnished of the reactor physics compatibility of different fuel elements from various producers, and of plant safety. (DG).

  2. Research Development of MOX Fuel Element Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Qi-fa; YANG; Ting-gui; SHANG; Gai-bin; YIN; Bang-yue; ZHOU; Guo-liang; LI; Qiang; JIANG; Bao-jun

    2015-01-01

    The project of"MOX Fuel Element Research"led by China Institute of Atomic Energy,404Company Ltd.and CNPE Zhengzhou Branch are members of the project research team.The research task of 2015had been accomplished successfully,and the research productions of this year build up a basis for the future research,also

  3. Liquid fuel injection elements for rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, George B., Jr. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Thrust chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines include three principal components. One of these components is an injector which contains a plurality of injection elements to meter the flow of propellants at a predetermined rate, and fuel to oxidizer mixture ratio, to introduce the mixture into the combustion chamber, and to cause them to be atomized within the combustion chamber so that even combustion takes place. Evolving from these injectors are tube injectors. These tube injectors have injection elements for injecting the oxidizer into the combustion chamber. The oxidizer and fuel must be metered at predetermined rates and mixture ratios in order to mix them within the combustion chamber so that combustion takes place smoothly and completely. Hence tube injectors are subject to improvement. An injection element for a liquid propellant rocket engine of the bipropellant type is provided which includes tangential fuel metering orifices, and a plurality of oxidizer tube injection elements whose injection tubes are also provided with tangential oxidizer entry slots and internal reed valves.

  4. Post irradiation examination of HANARO nucler mini-element fuel (metallographic and density test)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Ok; Hong, K. P.; Park, D. G.; Choo, Y. S.; Baik, S. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, H. C.; Jung, Y. H

    2001-05-01

    The post irradiation examination of a HANARO mini-element nuclear fuel, KH96C-004, was done in June 6, 2000. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the in-core performance and reliability of mini-element nuclear fuel for HANARO developed by the project ''The Nuclear Fuel Material Development of Research Reactor''. And, in order to examine the performance of mini-element nuclear fuel in normal output condition, the post irradiation examination of a nuclear fuel bundle composed by 6 mini nuclear fuel rods and 12 dummy fuel rods was performed. Based on these examination results, the safety and reliability of HANARO fuel and the basic data on the design of HANARO nuclear fuel can be ensured and obtained,.

  5. Some parametric flow analyses of a particle bed fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobranich, D.

    1993-05-01

    Parametric calculations are performed, using the SAFSIM computer program, to investigate the fluid mechanics and heat transfer performance of a particle bed fuel element. Both steady-state and transient calculations are included, addressing such issues as flow stability, reduced thrust operation, transpiration drag, coolant conductivity enhancement, flow maldistributions, decay heat removal, flow perturbations, and pulse cooling. The calculations demonstrate the dependence of the predicted results on the modeling assumptions and thus provide guidance as to where further experimental and computational investigations are needed. The calculations also demonstrate that both flow instability and flow maldistribution in the fuel element are important phenomena. Furthermore, results are encouraging that geometric design changes to the element can significantly reduce problems related to these phenomena, allowing improved performance over a wide range of element power densities and flow rates. Such design changes will help to maximize the operational efficiency of space propulsion reactors employing particle bed fuel element technology. Finally, the results demonstrate that SAFSIM is a valuable engineering tool for performing quick and inexpensive parametric simulations addressing complex flow problems.

  6. Induction Heating Model of Cermet Fuel Element Environmental Test (CFEET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carlos F.; Bradley, D. E.; Cavender, D. P.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Trent, D.; Stewart, E.

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) are capable of producing a high specific impulse by employing heat produced by a fission reactor to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements due to large thermal gradients; therefore, high-melting-point ceramics-metallic matrix composites (cermets) are one of the fuels under consideration as part of the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Advance Exploration System (AES) technology project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of testing and analytical modeling is to determine their ability to survive and maintain thermal performance in a prototypical NTR reactor environment of exposure to hydrogen at very high temperatures and obtain data to assess the properties of the non-nuclear support materials. The fission process and the resulting heating performance are well known and do not require that active fissile material to be integrated in this testing. A small-scale test bed; Compact Fuel Element Environmental Tester (CFEET), designed to heat fuel element samples via induction heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed at MSFC to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without utilizing fissile material. This paper details the analytical approach to help design and optimize the test bed using COMSOL Multiphysics for predicting thermal gradients induced by electromagnetic heating (Induction heating) and Thermal Desktop for radiation calculations.

  7. Modeling and Simulation of a Nuclear Fuel Element Test Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert P.; Emrich, William

    2011-01-01

    "The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator" test section closely simulates the internal operating conditions of a thermal nuclear rocket. The purpose of testing is to determine the ideal fuel rod characteristics for optimum thermal heat transfer to their hydrogen cooling/working fluid while still maintaining fuel rod structural integrity. Working fluid exhaust temperatures of up to 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit can be encountered. The exhaust gas is rendered inert and massively reduced in temperature for analysis using a combination of water cooling channels and cool N2 gas injectors in the H2-N2 mixer portion of the test section. An extensive thermal fluid analysis was performed in support of the engineering design of the H2-N2 mixer in order to determine the maximum "mass flow rate"-"operating temperature" curve of the fuel elements hydrogen exhaust gas based on the test facilities available cooling N2 mass flow rate as the limiting factor.

  8. Fuel burnup calculation of a research reactor plate element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nadia Rodrigues dos; Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: nadiasam@gmail.com, E-mail: zrlima@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This work consists in simulating the burnup of two different plate type fuel elements, where one is the benchmark MTR of the IAEA, which is made of an alloy of uranium and aluminum, while the other belonging to a typical multipurpose reactor is composed of an alloy of uranium and silicon. The simulation is performed using the WIMSD-5B computer code, which makes use of deterministic methods for solving neutron transport. In developing this task, fuel element equivalent cells were calculated representing each of the reactors to obtain the initial concentrations of each isotope constituent element of the fuel cell and the thicknesses corresponding to each region of the cell, since this information is part of the input data. The compared values of the k∞ showed a similar behavior for the case of the MTR calculated with the WIMSD-5B and EPRI-CELL codes. Relating the graphs of the concentrations in the burnup of both reactors, there are aspects very similar to each isotope selected. The application WIMSD-5B code to calculate isotopic concentrations and burnup of the fuel element, proved to be satisfactory for the fulfillment of the objective of this work. (author)

  9. A GUIDE TO FUEL PERFORMANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITZKE,W.

    2004-08-01

    Heating oil, as its name implies, is intended for end use heating consumption as its primary application. But its identity in reference name and actual chemical properties may vary based on a number of factors. By name, heating oil is sometimes referred to as gas oil, diesel, No. 2 distillate (middle distillate), or light heating oil. Kerosene, also used as a burner fuel, is a No. 1 distillate. Due to the higher heat content and competitive price in most markets, No. 2 heating oil is primarily used in modern, pressure-atomized burners. Using No. 1 oil for heating has the advantages of better cold-flow properties, lower emissions, and better storage properties. Because it is not nearly as abundant in supply, it is often markedly more expensive than No. 2 heating oil. Given the advanced, low-firing rate burners in use today, the objective is for the fuel to be compatible and achieve combustion performance at the highest achievable efficiency of the heating systems--with minimal service requirements. Among the Oil heat industry's top priorities are improving reliability and reducing service costs associated with fuel performance. Poor fuel quality, fuel degradation, and contamination can cause burner shut-downs resulting in ''no-heat'' calls. Many of these unscheduled service calls are preventable with routine inspection of the fuel and the tank. This manual focuses on No. 2 heating oil--its performance, properties, sampling and testing. Its purpose is to provide the marketer, service manager and technician with the proper guidelines for inspecting the product, maintaining good fuel quality, and the best practices for proper storage. Up-to-date information is also provided on commercially available fuel additives, their appropriate use and limitations.

  10. Low Cost Nuclear Thermal Rocket Cermet Fuel Element Environment Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. E.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.

    2011-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames.1,2 Conventional storable propellants produce average specific impulse. Nuclear thermal rockets capable of producing high specific impulse are proposed. Nuclear thermal rockets employ heat produced by fission reaction to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen, which is then forced through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000 K), and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited.3 The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements that employ high-melting-point metals, ceramics, or a combination (cermet) as a structural matrix into which the nuclear fuel is distributed. The purpose of the testing is to obtain data to assess the properties of the non-nuclear support materials, as-fabricated, and determine their ability to survive and maintain thermal performance in a prototypical NTR reactor environment of exposure to hydrogen at very high temperatures. The fission process of the planned fissile material and the resulting heating performance is well known and does not therefore require that active fissile material be integrated in this testing. A small-scale test bed designed to heat fuel element samples via non-contact radio frequency heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without employing fissile material. This paper details the test bed design and results of testing conducted to date.

  11. Study of fuel element characteristic of SM and SMP (SM-PRIMA) fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinov, A.V.; Kuprienko, V.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; Makhin, V.M.; Tuchnin, L.M.; Tsykanov, V.A. [Research Institute of Atomic Reactors, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation)

    1999-07-01

    The paper discusses the techniques and results of reactor tests and post-reactor investigations of the SM reactor fuel elements and fuel elements developed in the process of designing the specialized PRIMA test reactor with the SM reactor fuel elements used as a prototype and which are referred to as the SMP fuel elements. The behavior of fuel elements under normal operating conditions and under deviation from normal operating conditions was studied to verify the calculation techniques, to check the calculation results during preparation of the SM reactor safety substantiation report and to estimate the possibility of using such fuel elements in other projects. During tests of fuel rods under deviation from normal operating conditions their advantages were shown over fuel elements, the components of which were produced using the Al-based alloys. (author)

  12. Multidisciplinary Simulation of Graphite-Composite and Cermet Fuel Elements for NTP Point of Departure Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mark E.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the expected performance of two Nuclear Thermal Propulsion fuel types. High fidelity, fluid/thermal/structural + neutronic simulations help predict the performance of graphite-composite and cermet fuel types from point of departure engine designs from the Nuclear Thermal Propulsion project. Materials and nuclear reactivity issues are reviewed for each fuel type. Thermal/structural simulations predict thermal stresses in the fuel and thermal expansion mis-match stresses in the coatings. Fluid/thermal/structural/neutronic simulations provide predictions for full fuel elements. Although NTP engines will utilize many existing chemical engine components and technologies, nuclear fuel elements are a less developed engine component and introduce design uncertainty. Consequently, these fuel element simulations provide important insights into NTP engine performance.

  13. Criticality safety evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor enhanced low enriched uranium fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-19

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) convert program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a low enriched uranium (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic GTRI fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. GTRI Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) elements based on the ATR-Standard Size elements (all plates fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). While a specific ELF element design will eventually be provided for detailed analyses and in-core testing, this criticality safety evaluation (CSE) is intended to evaluate a hypothetical ELF element design for criticality safety purposes. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements from which controls have been derived. This CSE documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the hypothetical ELF fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and whether the existing HEU ATR element controls bound the ELF element. The initial calculations presented in this CSE analyzed the original ELF design, now referred to as Mod 0.1. In addition as part of a fuel meat thickness optimization effort for reactor performance other designs have been evaluated. As of early 2014 the most current conceptual designs are Mk1A and Mk1B that were previously referred to as conceptual designs Mod 0.10 and Mod 0.11, respectively. Revision 1 evaluates the reactivity of the ATR HEU Mark IV elements for a comparison with the Mark VII elements.

  14. Criticality safety evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor enhanced low enriched uranium fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-19

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) convert program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a low enriched uranium (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic GTRI fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. GTRI Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) elements based on the ATR-Standard Size elements (all plates fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). While a specific ELF element design will eventually be provided for detailed analyses and in-core testing, this criticality safety evaluation (CSE) is intended to evaluate a hypothetical ELF element design for criticality safety purposes. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements from which controls have been derived. This CSE documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the hypothetical ELF fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and whether the existing HEU ATR element controls bound the ELF element. The initial calculations presented in this CSE analyzed the original ELF design, now referred to as Mod 0.1. In addition, as part of a fuel meat thickness optimization effort for reactor performance, other designs have been evaluated. As of early 2014 the most current conceptual designs are Mk1A and Mk1B, that were previously referred to as conceptual designs Mod 0.10 and Mod 0.11, respectively. Revision 1 evaluates the reactivity of the ATR HEU Mark IV elements for a comparison with the Mark VII elements.

  15. Fuel element concept for long life high power nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, G. E.; Rom, F. E.

    1969-01-01

    Nuclear reactor fuel elements have burnups that are an order of magnitude higher than can currently be achieved by conventional design practice. Elements have greater time integrated power producing capacity per unit volume. Element design concept capitalizes on known design principles and observed behavior of nuclear fuel.

  16. Pumped lithium loop test to evaluate advanced refractory metal alloys and simulated nuclear fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburf, G. P.; Hoffman, E. E.; Smith, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The performance was determined of refractory metal alloys and uranium nitride fuel element specimens in flowing 1900F (1083C) lithium. The results demonstrate the suitability of the selected materials to perform satisfactorily from a chemical compatibility standpoint.

  17. Preliminary Nuclear Analysis for the HANARO Fuel Element with Burnable Absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chul Gyo; Kim, So Young; In, Won Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Burnable absorber is used for reducing reactivity swing and power peaking in high performance research reactors. Development of the HANARO fuel element with burnable absorber was started in the U-Mo fuel development program at HANARO, but detailed full core analysis was not performed because the current HANARO fuel management system is uncertain to analysis the HANARO core with burnable absorber. A sophisticated reactor physics system is required to analysis the core. The McCARD code was selected and the detailed McCARD core models, in which the basic HANARO core model was developed by one of the McCARD developers, are used in this study. The development of nuclear fuel requires a long time and correct developing direction especially by the nuclear analysis. This paper presents a preliminary nuclear analysis to promote the fuel development. Based on the developed fuel, the further nuclear analysis will improve reactor performance and safety. Basic nuclear analysis for the HANARO and the AHR were performed for getting the proper fuel elements with burnable absorber. Addition of 0.3 - 0.4% Cd to the fuel meat is promising for the current HANARO fuel element. Small addition of burnable absorber may not change any fuel characteristics of the HANARO fuel element, but various basic tests and irradiation tests at the HANARO core are required.

  18. Subcritical Noise Analysis Measurements with Fresh and Spent Research Reactor Fuels Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Kryter, R.C.; Miller, V.C.

    1999-02-01

    The verification of the subcriticality is of utmost importance for the safe transportation and storage of nuclear reactor fuels. Transportation containers and storage facilities are designed such that nuclear fuels remain in a subcritical state. Such designs often involve excess conservatism because of the lack of relevant experimental data to verify the accuracy of Monte Carlo codes used in nuclear criticality safety analyses. A joint experimental research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., and the University of Missouri was initiated to obtain measured quantities that could be directly related to the subcriticality of simple arrays of Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) fuel elements. A series of measurement were performed to assess the reactivity of materials such as BORAL, stainless steel, aluminum, and lead that are typically used in the construction of shipping casks. These materials were positioned between the fuel elements. In addition, a limited number of measurements were performed with configurations of fresh and spent (irradiated) fuel elements to ascertain the reactivity of the spent fuel elements. In these experiments, fresh fuel elements were replaced by spent fuel elements such that the subcritical reactivity change could be measured. The results of these measurements were used by Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions to determine the subcriticality of MURR fuel elements isolated by absorbing materials. The measurements were interpreted using the MCNP-DSP Monte Carlo code to obtain the subcritical neutron multiplication factor k(sub eff), and the bias in K(sub eff) that are used in criticality safety analyses.

  19. Safety assessment for the CANFLEX-NU fuel bundles with respect to the 37-element fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, H. C.; Lim, H. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    The KAERI and AECL have jointly developed an advanced CANDU fuel, called CANFLEX-NU fuel bundle. CANFLEX 43-element bundle has some improved features of increased operating margin and enhanced safety compared to the existing 37-element bundle. Since CANFLEX fuel bundle is designed to be compatible with the CANDU-6 reactor design, the behaviour in the thermalhydraulic system will be nearly identical with 37-element bundle. But due to different element design and linear element power distribution between the two bundles, it is expected that CANFLEX fuel behaviour would be different from the behaviour of the 37-element fuel. Therefore, safety assessments on the design basis accidents which result if fuel failures are performed. For all accidents selected, it is observed that the loading of CANFLEX bundle in an existing CANDU-6 reactor would not worsen the reactor safety. It is also predicted that fission product release for CANFLEX fuel bundle generally is lower than that for 37-element bundle. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  20. Fuel performance annual report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Wu, S. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology)

    1992-06-01

    This annual report, the twelfth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1989 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related US Nuclear Regulatory Commission evaluations are included.

  1. Fuel performance annual report for 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.J.; Wu, S.

    1988-03-01

    This annual report, the ninth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1986 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission evaluations are included. 550 refs., 12 figs., 31 tabs.

  2. Fuel cell elements with improved water handling capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Lee, Albany (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    New fuel cell components for use in liquid feed fuel cell systems are provided. The components include biplates and endplates, having a hydrophilic surface and allow high efficiency operation. Conductive elements and a wicking device also form a part of the fuel cell components of the invention.

  3. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated MTR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, L.A.A. E-mail: laaterre@net.ipen.br; Zeituni, C.A.; Perrotta, J.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da

    2000-08-11

    The availability of burnup data is an important requirement in any systematic approach to the enhancement of safety, economics and performance of a nuclear research reactor. This work presents the theory and experimental techniques applied to determine, by means of nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the burnup of Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the IEA-R1 research reactor. Burnup measurements, based on analysis of spectra that result from collimation and detection of gamma-rays emitted in the decay of radioactive fission products, were performed at the reactor pool area. The measuring system consists of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector together with suitable fast electronics and an on-line microcomputer data acquisition module. In order to achieve absolute burnup values, the detection set (collimator tube+HPGe detector) was previously calibrated in efficiency. The obtained burnup values are compared with ones provided by reactor physics calculations, for three kinds of MTR fuel elements with different cooling times, initial enrichment grades and total number of fuel plates. Both values show good agreement within the experimental error limits.

  4. Dry process fuel performance technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Kim, K. W.; Kim, B. K. (and others)

    2006-06-15

    The objective of the project is to establish the performance evaluation system of DUPIC fuel during the Phase III R and D. In order to fulfil this objectives, property model development of DUPIC fuel and irradiation test was carried out in Hanaro using the instrumented rig. Also, the analysis on the in-reactor behavior analysis of DUPIC fuel, out-pile test using simulated DUPIC fuel as well as performance and integrity assessment in a commercial reactor were performed during this Phase. The R and D results of the Phase III are summarized as follows: Fabrication process establishment of simulated DUPIC fuel for property measurement, Property model development for the DUPIC fuel, Performance evaluation of DUPIC fuel via irradiation test in Hanaro, Post irradiation examination of irradiated fuel and performance analysis, Development of DUPIC fuel performance code (KAOS)

  5. Preliminary Studies of New Water Removal Element in Purification Applications of Diesel Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijun Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To effectively and efficiently remove water contamination dispersed in petrodiesel fuels, a new water removal element with both coalescence and separation features is studied in this paper. The unique droplet coalescence and separation mechanism occurring in the new water removal element is proposed. The conceptual design of this filter element is presented and the basic features of FCP filtration systems are briefly introduced. A laboratory test stand and fuel analysis procedure are described. The results from preliminary water removal tests with number 2 petrodiesel fuel demonstrate the filtration performance of the new water removal element. For example, within one single fuel flow pass through FCP filtration system equipped with the new water removal element and running at 2 GPM flow rate, the water content in 80°F, number 2 petrodiesel fuel stream can be reduced from up to 40,000 ppm upstream to 64.8 ppm or less downstream.

  6. Thermal analysis of IRT-T reactor fuel elements

    OpenAIRE

    Naymushin, Artem Georgievich; Chertkov, Yuri Borisovich; Lebedev, Ivan Igorevich; Anikin, Mikhail Nikolaevich

    2015-01-01

    The article describes the method and results of thermo-physical calculations of IRT-T reactor core. Heat fluxes, temperatures of cladding, fuel meat and coolant were calculated for height of core, azimuth directions of FA and each fuel elements in FA. Average calculated values of uniformity factor of energy release distribution for height of fuel assemblies were shown in this research. Onset nucleate boiling temperature and ONB-ratio were calculated. Shows that temperature regimes of fuel ele...

  7. Thorium fuel performance assessment in HTRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allelein, H.-J. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Kania, M.J.; Nabielek, H. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Verfondern, K., E-mail: k.verfondern@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    Thorium as a nuclear fuel is receiving renewed interest, because of its widespread availability and the good irradiation performance of Th and mixed (Th,U) oxide compounds as fuels in nuclear power systems. Early HTR development employed thorium together with high-enriched uranium. After 1980, most HTR fuel systems switched to low-enriched uranium. After completing fuel development for AVR and THTR with BISO coated particles, the German program expanded efforts on a new program utilizing thorium and high-enriched uranium TRISO coated particles for advanced HTR concepts for process heat applications (PNP) and direct-cycle electricity production (HHT). The combination of LTI inner and outer pyrocarbon layers surrounding a strong, stable SiC layer greatly improved manufacturing conditions and the subsequent contamination and defective particle fractions in production fuel elements. In addition, this combination provided improved mechanical strength and a higher degree of solid fission product retention, not known previously with HTI-BISO coatings. The improved performance of the HEU (Th,U)O{sub 2} TRISO fuel system was successfully demonstrated in three primary areas of development: manufacturing, irradiation testing under normal operating conditions, and accident simulation testing. In terms of demonstrating performance for advanced HTR applications, the experimental failure statistic from manufacture and irradiation testing are significantly below the coated particle requirements specified for PNP and HHT designs at the time. Covering a range to 1300 °C in normal operations and 1600 °C in accidents, with burnups up to 13% FIMA and fast fluences to 8 × 10{sup 25} m{sup −2} (E > 16 fJ), the results exceed the design limits on manufacturing and operational requirements for the German HTR Modul concept, which were: <6.5 × 10{sup −5} for manufacturing; <2 × 10{sup −4} for normal operating conditions; and <5 × 10{sup −4} for accident conditions. These

  8. CHF Enhancement of Advanced 37-Element Fuel Bundles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Hwan Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A standard 37-element fuel bundle (37S fuel bundle has been used in commercial CANDU reactors for over 40 years as a reference fuel bundle. Most CHF of a 37S fuel bundle have occurred at the elements arranged in the inner pitch circle for high flows and at the elements arranged in the outer pitch circle for low flows. It should be noted that a 37S fuel bundle has a relatively small flow area and high flow resistance at the peripheral subchannels of its center element compared to the other subchannels. The configuration of a fuel bundle is one of the important factors affecting the local CHF occurrence. Considering the CHF characteristics of a 37S fuel bundle in terms of CHF enhancement, there can be two approaches to enlarge the flow areas of the peripheral subchannels of a center element in order to enhance CHF of a 37S fuel bundle. To increase the center subchannel areas, one approach is the reduction of the diameter of a center element, and the other is an increase of the inner pitch circle. The former can increase the total flow area of a fuel bundle and redistributes the power density of all fuel elements as well as the CHF. On the other hand, the latter can reduce the gap between the elements located in the middle and inner pitch circles owing to the increasing inner pitch circle. This can also affect the enthalpy redistribution of the fuel bundle and finally enhance CHF or dry-out power. In this study, the above two approaches, which are proposed to enlarge the flow areas of the center subchannels, were considered to investigate the impact of the flow area changes of the center subchannels on the CHF enhancement as well as the thermal characteristics by applying a subchannel analysis method.

  9. IN-CELL visual examinations of K east fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitner, A.L.; Pyecha, T.D., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    Nine outer fuel elements were recovered from the K East Basin and transferred to a hot cell for examination. Extensive testing planned for these elements will support the process design for the Integrated Process Strategy (IPS), with emphasis on drying and conditioning behavior. Visual examinations of the fuel elements confirmed that they are appropriate to meet testing objectives to provide design guidance for IPS processing parameters.

  10. The Ca element effect on the enhancement performance of Sr2Fe1.5Mo0.5O6-δ perovskite as cathode for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jinshuo; Chen, Wenjun; Wang, Wenyi; Wang, Zhenhua; Sun, Wang; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Kening

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the partial substitution of atomic elements from the A site of a perovskite is investigated in order to develop cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Herein, Sr2-xCaxFe1.5Mo0.5O6-δ (SCFM), compounds were investigated by characterizing structural properties, chemical compatibility, electrical properties, electrochemical performance and stability. Thermal expansion coefficients were found to decrease when increasing the Ca content. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis suggests that Ca doping significantly affects the Fe2+/Fe3+ and Mo6+/Mo5+ ratios. For a doping level of x = 0.4, the sample showed the lowest interface polarization (Rp), the highest conductivity and a maximum power density of 1.26 W cm-2 at 800 °C. These results suggest that SCFM cathode materials are excellent candidates for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells applications.

  11. Repurposing an irradiated instrumented TRIGA fuel element for regular use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Paulo F.; Souza, Luiz C.A., E-mail: pfo@cdtn.br, E-mail: lcas@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    TRIGA IPR-R1 is a research reactor also used for training and radioisotope production, located at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear da Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (Nuclear Technology Development Centre, Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission - CDTN/CNEN). Its first criticality occurred in November 1960. All original fuel elements were aluminum-clad. In 1971 nine new fuel elements, stainless steel-clad were acquired. One of them was an instrumented fuel element (IFE), equipped with 3 thermocouples. The IFE was introduced into the core only on August 2004, and remained there until July 2007. It was removed from the core after the severing of contacts between the thermocouples and their extension cables. After an unsuccessful attempt to recover electrical access to the thermocouples the IFE was transferred from the reactor pool to an auxiliary spent fuel storage well, with water, in the reactor room. In December 2011 the IFE was transferred to an identical well, dry, where it remains so far. This work is a proposal for recovery of this instrumented fuel element, by removing the cable guide rod and adaptation of a superior terminal plug similar to conventional fuel elements. This will enable its handling through the same tool used for regular fuel elements and its return to the reactor core. This is a delicate intervention in terms of radiological protection, and will require special care to minimize the exposure of operators. (author)

  12. Inspection of state of spent fuel elements stored in RA reactor spent fuel storage pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aden, V.G.; Bulkin, S.Yu.; Sokolov, A.V. [Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Matausek, M.V.; Vukadin, Z. [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Science, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1999-07-01

    About five thousand spent fuel elements from RA reactor have been stored for over 30 years in sealed aluminum barrels in the spent fuel storage pool. This way of storage does not provide complete information about the state of spent fuel elements or the medium inside the barrels, like pressure or radioactivity. The technology has recently been developed and the equipment has been manufactured to inspect the state of the spent fuel and to reduce eventual internal pressure inside the aluminum barrels. Based on the results of this inspection, a procedure will be proposed for transferring spent fuel to a more reliable storage facility. (author)

  13. High performance rolling element bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursey, Jr., Roger W. (Inventor); Olinger, Jr., John B. (Inventor); Owen, Samuel S. (Inventor); Poole, William E. (Inventor); Haluck, David A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A high performance rolling element bearing (5) which is particularly suitable for use in a cryogenically cooled environment, comprises a composite cage (45) formed from glass fibers disposed in a solid lubricant matrix of a fluorocarbon polymer. The cage includes inserts (50) formed from a mixture of a soft metal and a solid lubricant such as a fluorocarbon polymer.

  14. Research on Measuring Technology for In-pile Fuel Element Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The tested fuel assembly for In-pile test for PWR fuel element with instrumentation consisted of 4instrumented fuel elements and total 12 sets of transducers. Double claddings are adopted to raise fueltemperature. Two fuel elements each have 2 thermocouples for measuring separately the fuel centerlinetemperature and the cladding surface temperature. The other two elements have membrane type oressure

  15. Technology Status of Thermionic Fuel Elements for Space Nuclear Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J. W.; Yang, L.

    1984-01-01

    Thermionic reactor power systems are discussed with respect to their suitability for space missions. The technology status of thermionic emitters and sheath insulator assemblies is described along with testing of the thermionic fuel elements.

  16. Non-destructive control of cladding thickness of fuel elements for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlov, Y.; Zhukov, Y.; Chashchin, S

    1997-07-01

    The control method of fuel elements for research reactors by means of measuring beta particles back scattering made it possible to perform complete automatic non-destructive control of internal and external claddings at our plant. This control gives high guarantees of the fuel element correspondence to the requirements. The method can be used to control the three-layer items of different geometry, including plates. (author)

  17. A simple gamma spectrometry method for evaluating the burnup of MTR-type HEU fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makmal, T.; Aviv, O.; Gilad, E.

    2016-10-01

    A simple method for the evaluation of the burnup of a materials testing reactor (MTR) fuel element by gamma spectrometry is presented. The method was applied to a highly enriched uranium MTR nuclear fuel element that was irradiated in a 5 MW pool-type research reactor for a total period of 34 years. The experimental approach is based on in-situ measurements of the MTR fuel element in the reactor pool by a portable high-purity germanium detector located in a gamma cell. To corroborate the method, analytical calculations (based on the irradiation history of the fuel element) and computer simulations using a dedicated fuel cycle burnup code ORIGEN2 were performed. The burnup of the MTR fuel element was found to be 52.4±8.8%, which is in good agreement with the analytical calculations and the computer simulations. The method presented here is suitable for research reactors with either a regular or an irregular irradiation regime and for reactors with limited infrastructure and/or resources. In addition, its simplicity and the enhanced safety it confers may render this method suitable for IAEA inspectors in fuel element burnup assessments during on-site inspections.

  18. A method for limitation of probability of accumulation of fuel elements claddings damage in WWER

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey N. Pelykh; Mark V. Nikolsky; S. D. Ryabchikov

    2014-01-01

    The aim is to reduce the probability of accumulation of fuel elements claddings damage by developing a method to control the properties of the fuel elements on stages of design and operation of WWER. An averaged over the fuel assembly WWER-1000 fuel element is considered. The probability of depressurization of fuel elements claddings is found. The ability to predict the reliability of claddings by controlling the factors that determine the properties of the fuel elements is proved. The expedi...

  19. Triaxial Swirl Injector Element for Liquid-Fueled Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muss, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    A triaxial injector is a single bi-propellant injection element located at the center of the injector body. The injector element consists of three nested, hydraulic swirl injectors. A small portion of the total fuel is injected through the central hydraulic injector, all of the oxidizer is injected through the middle concentric hydraulic swirl injector, and the balance of the fuel is injected through an outer concentric injection system. The configuration has been shown to provide good flame stabilization and the desired fuel-rich wall boundary condition. The injector design is well suited for preburner applications. Preburner injectors operate at extreme oxygen-to-fuel mass ratios, either very rich or very lean. The goal of a preburner is to create a uniform drive gas for the turbomachinery, while carefully controlling the temperature so as not to stress or damage turbine blades. The triaxial injector concept permits the lean propellant to be sandwiched between two layers of the rich propellant, while the hydraulic atomization characteristics of the swirl injectors promote interpropellant mixing and, ultimately, good combustion efficiency. This innovation is suited to a wide range of liquid oxidizer and liquid fuels, including hydrogen, methane, and kerosene. Prototype testing with the triaxial swirl injector demonstrated excellent injector and combustion chamber thermal compatibility and good combustion performance, both at levels far superior to a pintle injector. Initial testing with the prototype injector demonstrated over 96-percent combustion efficiency. The design showed excellent high -frequency combustion stability characteristics with oxygen and kerosene propellants. Unlike the more conventional pintle injector, there is not a large bluff body that must be cooled. The absence of a protruding center body enhances the thermal durability of the triaxial swirl injector. The hydraulic atomization characteristics of the innovation allow the design to be

  20. Uranium density reduction on fuel element side plates assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Ilka A. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, Delvonei A.; Domingos, Douglas B.; Umbehaun, Pedro E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    During operation of IEA-R1 research reactor, located at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN - CNEN/SP, an abnormal oxidation on some fuel elements was noted. It was also verified, among the possible causes of the problem, that the most likely one was insufficient cooling of the elements in the core. One of the propositions to solve or minimize the problem is to reduce uranium density on fuel elements side plates. In this paper, the influence of this change on neutronic and thermal hydraulic parameters for IEA-R1 reactor is verified by simulations with the codes HAMMER and CITATION. Results are presented and discussed. (author)

  1. Highest average burnups achieved by MTR fuel elements of the IEA-R1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damy, Margaret A.; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Silva, Jose E.R.; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Castanheira, Myrthes; Teodoro, Celso A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear (CEN)]. E-mail: madamy@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Different nuclear fuels were employed in the manufacture of plate type at IPEN , usually designated as Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements. These fuel elements were used at the IEA-R1 research reactor. This work describes the main characteristics of these nuclear fuels, emphasizing the highest average burn up achieved by these fuel elements. (author)

  2. Irradiation and performance evaluation of DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ki Kwang; Yang, M. S.; Song, K. C. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The objectives of the project is to establish the performance evaluation system for the experimental verification of DUPIC fuel. The scope and content for successful accomplishment of the phase 1 objectives is established as follows : irradiation test of DUPIC fuel at HANARO using a noninstrument capsule, study on the characteristics of DUPIC pellets, development of the analysis technology on the thermal behaviour of DUPIC fuel, basic design of a instrument capsule. The R and D results of the phase 1 are summarized as follows : - Performance analysis technology development of DUPIC fuel by model development for DUPIC fuel, review on the extendability of code(FEMAXI-IV, FRAPCON-3, ELESTRESS). - Study on physical properties of DUPIC fuel by design and fabrication of the equipment for measuring the thermal property. - HANARO irradiation test of simulated DUPIC fuel by the noninstrument capsule development. - PIE and result analysis.

  3. Attempt to produce silicide fuel elements in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soentono, S. (Nuclear Fuel Element Centre, BATAN Kawasan PUSPIPTEK, Serpong (Indonesia)); Suripto, A. (Nuclear Fuel Element Centre, BATAN Kawasan PUSPIPTEK, Serpong (Indonesia))

    1991-01-01

    After the successful experiment to produce U[sub 3]Si[sub 2] powder and U[sub 3]Si[sub 2]-Al fuel plates using depleted U and Si of semiconductor quality, silicide fuel was synthesized using <20% enriched U metal and silicon chips employing production train of UAl[sub x]-Al available at the Fuel Element Production Installation (FEPI) at Serpong, Indonesia. Two full-size U[sub 3]Si[sub 2]-Al fuel elements, having similar specifications to the ones of U[sub 3]O[sub 8]-Al for the RSG-GAS (formerly known as MPR-30), have been produced at the FEPI. All quality controls required have been imposed to the feeds, intermediate, as well as final products throughout the production processes of the two fuel elements. The current results show that these fuel elements are qualified from fabrication point of view, therefore it is expected that they will be permitted to be tested in the RSG-GAS, sometime by the end of 1989, for normal ([proportional to]50%) and above normal burn-up. (orig.)

  4. Distribution of fission products in Peach Bottom HTGR fuel element E11-07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichner, R.P.; Dyer, F.F.; Martin, W.J.; Bate, L.C.

    1977-04-01

    This is the second in a projected series of six post-irradiation examinations of Peach Bottom High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor driver fuel elements. Element E11-07, the subject of this report, received an equivalent of 701 full-power days of irradiation prior to scheduled withdrawal. The examination procedures emphasized the determination of fission product distributions in the graphite portions of the fuel element. Continuous axial scans indicated a /sup 137/Cs inventory of 17 Ci in the graphite sleeve and 8.3 Ci in the spine at the time of element withdrawal from the core. In addition, the nuclides /sup 134/Cs, /sup 110m/Ag, /sup 60/Co, and /sup 154/Eu were found in the graphite portions of the fuel element in significant amounts. Radial distributions of these nuclides plus the distribution of the beta emitters /sup 3/H, /sup 14/C, and /sup 90/Sr were obtained at six axial locations, four within the fueled region and one each above and below. The radial dissection was accomplished by use of a manipulator-operated lathe in a hot cell. These profiles reveal an increased degree of penetration of /sup 134/Cs, relative to /sup 137/Cs, evidently due to a longer time spent as xenon precursor. In addition to fission product distribution, the appearance of the element components was recorded photographically, fuel compact and graphite dimensions were recorded at numerous locations, and metallographic examinations of the fuel were performed.

  5. New Mechanical Model for the Transmutation Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory K. Miller

    2008-04-01

    A new mechanical model has been developed for implementation into the TRU fuel performance code. The new model differs from the existing FRAPCON 3 model, which it is intended to replace, in that it will include structural deformations (elasticity, plasticity, and creep) of the fuel. Also, the plasticity algorithm is based on the “plastic strain–total strain” approach, which should allow for more rapid and assured convergence. The model treats three situations relative to interaction between the fuel and cladding: (1) an open gap between the fuel and cladding, such that there is no contact, (2) contact between the fuel and cladding where the contact pressure is below a threshold value, such that axial slippage occurs at the interface, and (3) contact between the fuel and cladding where the contact pressure is above a threshold value, such that axial slippage is prevented at the interface. The first stage of development of the model included only the fuel. In this stage, results obtained from the model were compared with those obtained from finite element analysis using ABAQUS on a problem involving elastic, plastic, and thermal strains. Results from the two analyses showed essentially exact agreement through both loading and unloading of the fuel. After the cladding and fuel/clad contact were added, the model demonstrated expected behavior through all potential phases of fuel/clad interaction, and convergence was achieved without difficulty in all plastic analysis performed. The code is currently in stand alone form. Prior to implementation into the TRU fuel performance code, creep strains will have to be added to the model. The model will also have to be verified against an ABAQUS analysis that involves contact between the fuel and cladding.

  6. Core analysis during transition from 37-element fuel to CANFLEX-NU fuel in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    An 1200-day time-dependent fuel-management for the transition from 37-element fuel to CANFLEX-NU fuel in a CANDU 6 reactor has been simulated to show the compatibility of the CANFLEX-NU fuel with the reactor operation. The simulation calculations were carried out with the RFSP code, provided by cell averaged fuel properties obtained from the POWDERPUFS-V code. The refueling scheme for both fuels was an eight bundle shift at a time. The simulation results show that the maximum channel and bundle powers were maintained below the license limit of the CANDU 6. This indicates that the CANFLEX-NU fuel bundle is compatible with the CANDU 6 reactor operation during the transition period. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  7. The manufacture of LEU fuel elements at Dounreay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J.

    1997-08-01

    Two LEU test elements are being manufactured at Dounreay for test irradiation in the HFR at Petten, The Netherlands. This paper describes the installation of equipment and the development of the fabrication and inspection techniques necessary for the manufacture of LEU fuel plates. The author`s experience in overcoming the technical problems of stray fuel particles, dog-boning, uranium homogeneity and the measurement of uranium distribution is also described.

  8. Research Progress About Gas-Exhaust-Device for Fuel Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG; Wu-ye

    2012-01-01

    <正>UO2-x stack applied in the fuel element has a form of a cylinder with a central hole, where temperature field characterized by high temperature and high gradient is formed due to irradiation. Then nearly all of the gaseous fission products (GFPs) can release into central cavity. However, uranium oxide will evaporate form the fuel stack’s inner surface because of its high temperature (about 1 800-2 000 ℃),

  9. Analysis of the ATR fuel element swaging process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richins, W.D.; Miller, G.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a detailed evaluation of the swaging process used to connect fuel plates to side plates in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel elements. The swaging is a mechanical process that begins with fitting a fuel plate into grooves in the side plates. Once a fuel plate is positioned, a lip on each of two side plate grooves is pressed into the fuel plate using swaging wheels to form the joints. Each connection must have a specified strength (measured in terms, of a pullout force capacity) to assure that these joints do not fail during reactor operation. The purpose of this study is to analyze the swaging process and associated procedural controls, and to provide recommendations to assure that the manufacturing process produces swaged connections that meet the minimum strength requirement. The current fuel element manufacturer, Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) of Lynchburg, Virginia, follows established procedures that include quality inspections and process controls in swaging these connections. The procedures have been approved by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies and are designed to assure repeatability of the process and structural integrity of each joint. Prior to July 1994, ATR fuel elements were placed in the Hydraulic Test Facility (HTF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (AGNAIL), Test Reactor Area (TRA) for application of Boehmite (an aluminum oxide) film and for checking structural integrity before placement of the elements into the ATR. The results presented in this report demonstrate that the pullout strength of the swaged connections is assured by the current manufacturing process (with several recommended enhancements) without the need for- testing each element in the HTF.

  10. Low Cost Nuclear Thermal Rocket Cermet Fuel Element Environment Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, David E.; Mireles, Omar R.; Hickman, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse (Isp) and relatively high thrust in order to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Conventional, storable propellants produce average Isp. Nuclear thermal rockets (NTR) capable of high Isp thrust have been proposed. NTR employs heat produced by fission reaction to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen which is then forced through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements is limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements which employ high-melting-point metals, ceramics or a combination (cermet) as a structural matrix into which the nuclear fuel is distributed. It is not necessary to include fissile material in test samples intended to explore high temperature hydrogen exposure of the structural support matrices. A small-scale test bed designed to heat fuel element samples via non-contact RF heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without employing fissile material. This paper details the test bed design and results of testing conducted to date.

  11. Thermalhydraulics of advanced 37-element fuel bundle in crept pressure tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Joo Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A CANDU-6 reactor, which has 380 fuel channels of a pressure tube type, is suffering from aging or creep of the pressure tubes. Most of the aging effects for the CANDU primary heat transport system were originated from the horizontal crept pressure tubes. As the operating years of a CANDU reactor proceed, a pressure tube experiences high neutron irradiation damage under high temperature and pressure. The crept pressure tube can deteriorate the Critical Heat Flux (CHF of a fuel channel and finally worsen the reactor operating performance and thermal margin. Recently, the modification of the central subchannel area with increasing inner pitch length of a standard 37-element fuel bundle was proposed and studied in terms of the dryout power enhancement for the uncrept pressure tube since a standard 37-element fuel bundle has a relatively small flow area and high flow resistance at the central region. This study introduced a subchannel analysis for the crept pressure tubes loaded with the inner pitch length modification of a standard 37-element fuel bundle. In addition, the subchannel characteristics were investigated according to the flow area change of the center subchannels for the crept pressure tubes. Also, it was discussed how much the crept pressure tubes affected the thermalhydraulic characteristics of the fuel channel as well as the dryout power for the modification of a standard 37-element fuel bundle.

  12. Enhanced Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Element for the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, M. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); DeHart, M. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morrell, S. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jamison, R. K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nef, E. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nigg, D. W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Under the current US Department of Energy (DOE) policy and planning scenario, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its associated critical facility (ATRC) will be reconfigured to operate on low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This effort has produced a conceptual design for an Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) element. This fuel features monolithic U-10Mo fuel foils and aluminum cladding separated by a thin zirconium barrier. As with previous iterations of the ELF design, radial power peaking is managed using different U-10Mo foil thicknesses in different plates of the element. The lead fuel element design, ELF Mk1A, features only three fuel meat thicknesses, a reduction from the previous iterations meant to simplify manufacturing. Evaluation of the ELF Mk1A fuel design against reactor performance requirements is ongoing, as are investigations of the impact of manufacturing uncertainty on safety margins. The element design has been evaluated in what are expected to be the most demanding design basis accident scenarios and has met all initial thermal-hydraulic criteria.

  13. EFFECT OF FUEL IMPURITIES ON FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE AND DURABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H.

    2010-09-28

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device that produces electricity during the combination of hydrogen and oxygen to produce water. Proton exchange membranes fuel cells are favored for portable applications as well as stationary ones due to their high power density, low operating temperature, and low corrosion of components. In real life operation, the use of pure fuel and oxidant gases results in an impractical system. A more realistic and cost efficient approach is the use of air as an oxidant gas and hydrogen from hydrogen carriers (i.e., ammonia, hydrocarbons, hydrides). However, trace impurities arising from different hydrogen sources and production increases the degradation of the fuel cell. These impurities include carbon monoxide, ammonia, sulfur, hydrocarbons, and halogen compounds. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has set maximum limits for trace impurities in the hydrogen stream; however fuel cell data is needed to validate the assumption that at those levels the impurities will cause no degradation. This report summarizes the effect of selected contaminants tested at SRNL at ISO levels. Runs at ISO proposed concentration levels show that model hydrocarbon compound such as tetrahydrofuran can cause serious degradation. However, the degradation is only temporary as when the impurity is removed from the hydrogen stream the performance completely recovers. Other molecules at the ISO concentration levels such as ammonia don't show effects on the fuel cell performance. On the other hand carbon monoxide and perchloroethylene shows major degradation and the system can only be recovered by following recovery procedures.

  14. The OSU Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility: Standard Fuel Element Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade R. Marcum; Brian G. Woods; Ann Marie Phillips; Richard G. Ambrosek; James D. Wiest; Daniel M. Wachs

    2001-10-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are currently collaborating on a test program which entails hydro-mechanical testing of a generic plate type fuel element, or standard fuel element (SFE), for the purpose of qualitatively demonstrating mechanical integrity of uranium-molybdenum monolithic plates as compared to that of uranium aluminum dispersion, and aluminum fuel plates due to hydraulic forces. This test program supports ongoing work conducted for/by the fuel development program and will take place at OSU in the Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility (HMFTF). Discussion of a preliminary test matrix, SFE design, measurement and instrumentation techniques, and facility description are detailed in this paper.

  15. Alternate-Fueled Combustor-Sector Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Anna E.; Saxena, Nikita T.; Shouse, Dale T.; Neuroth, Craig; Hendricks, Robert C.; Lynch, Amy; Frayne, Charles W.; Stutrud, Jeffrey S.; Corporan, Edwin; Hankins, Terry

    2013-01-01

    In order to realize alternative fueling for military and commercial use, the industry has set forth guidelines that must be met by each fuel. These aviation fueling requirements are outlined in MIL-DTL-83133F(2008) or ASTM D 7566 Annex (2011) standards, and are classified as "drop-in" fuel replacements. This report provides combustor performance data for synthetic-paraffinic-kerosene- (SPK-) type (Fischer-Tropsch (FT)) fuel and blends with JP-8+100, relative to JP-8+100 as baseline fueling. Data were taken at various nominal inlet conditions: 75 psia (0.52 MPa) at 500 degF (533 K), 125 psia (0.86 MPa) at 625 degF (603 K), 175 psia (1.21 MPa) at 725 degF (658 K), and 225 psia (1.55 MPa) at 790 degF (694 K). Combustor performance analysis assessments were made for the change in flame temperatures, combustor efficiency, wall temperatures, and exhaust plane temperatures at 3, 4, and 5 percent combustor pressure drop (DP) for fuel:air ratios (F/A) ranging from 0.010 to 0.025. Significant general trends show lower liner temperatures and higher flame and combustor outlet temperatures with increases in FT fueling relative to JP-8+100 fueling. The latter affects both turbine efficiency and blade and vane lives.

  16. Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wigeland; J. Cahalan

    2009-09-01

    Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance R. Wigeland , Idaho National Laboratory J. Cahalan, Argonne National Laboratory The sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor is currently being evaluated for the efficient transmutation of the highly-hazardous, long-lived, transuranic elements that are present in spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental choices that will be made is the selection of the fuel type for the fast reactor, whether oxide, metal, carbide, nitride, etc. It is likely that a decision on the fuel type will need to be made before many of the related technologies and facilities can be selected, from fuel fabrication to spent fuel reprocessing. A decision on fuel type should consider all impacts on the fast reactor system, including safety. Past work has demonstrated that the choice of fuel type may have a significant impact on the severity of consequences arising from accidents, especially for severe accidents of low probability. In this paper, the response of sodium-cooled fast reactors is discussed for both oxide and metal fuel types, highlighting the similarities and differences in reactor response and accident consequences. Any fast reactor facility must be designed to be able to successfully prevent, mitigate, or accommodate all consequences of potential events, including accidents. This is typically accomplished by using multiple barriers to the release of radiation, including the cladding on the fuel, the intact primary cooling system, and most visibly the reactor containment building. More recently, this has also included the use of ‘inherent safety’ concepts to reduce or eliminate the potential for serious damage in some cases. Past experience with oxide and metal fuel has demonstrated that both fuel types are suitable for use as fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, safety analyses for these two fuel types have also shown that there can be substantial differences in accident consequences due to the neutronic and

  17. Performance tests for integral reactor nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Dong-Seong; Yim, Jeong-Sik; Lee, Chong-Tak; Kim, Han-Soo; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Oh, Je-Yong

    2006-02-15

    An integral type reactor SMART plans to utilize metallic Zr-U fuel which is Zr-based alloy with 34{approx}38 wt% U. In order to verify the technologies for the design and manufacturing of the fuel and get a license, performance tests were carried out. Experimental Fuel Assembly (EFA) manufactured in KAERI is being successfully irradiated in the MIR reactor of RIAR from September 4 2004, and it has achieved burnup of 0.21 g/cc as of January 25 2006. Thermal properties of irradiated Zr-U fuel were measured. Up to the phase transformation temperature, thermal diffusivity increased linearly in proportion to temperature. However its dependence on the burnup was not significant. RIA tests with 4 unirradiated Zr-U fuel rods were performed in Kurchatov Institute to establish a safety criterion. In the case of the un-irradiated Zr-U fuel, the energy deposition during the control rod ejection accident should be less than 172 cal/g to prevent the failure accompanying fuel fragmentation and dispersal. Finally the irradiation tests of fuel rods have been performed at HANARO. The HITE-2 test was successfully completed up to a burnup of 0.31 g/cc. The HITE-3 test began in February 2004 and will be continued up to a target burnup of 0.6 g/cc.

  18. Thermodynamic properties of the DUPIC fuel and its performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Heon; Kim, Hee Moon [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    This study describes thermodynamic properties of DUPIC fuel and performance. In initial state, DUPIC fuel which contains fissile materials is different from general nuclear fuel. So this study analyzed oxygen potential, thermal conductivity and specific heat of the DUPIC fuel.

  19. Transmutation Fuel Performance Code Thermal Model Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory K. Miller; Pavel G. Medvedev

    2007-09-01

    FRAPCON fuel performance code is being modified to be able to model performance of the nuclear fuels of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). The present report documents the effort for verification of the FRAPCON thermal model. It was found that, with minor modifications, FRAPCON thermal model temperature calculation agrees with that of the commercial software ABAQUS (Version 6.4-4). This report outlines the methodology of the verification, code input, and calculation results.

  20. Vibration behavior of fuel-element vibration suppressors for the advanced power reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D. W.; Fiero, I. B.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary shock and vibration tests were performed on vibration suppressors for the advanced power reactor for space application. These suppressors position the fuel pellets in a pin type fuel element. The test determined the effect of varying axial clearance on the behavior of the suppressors when subjected to shock and vibratory loading. The full-size suppressor was tested in a mockup model of fuel and clad which required scaling of test conditions. The test data were correlated with theoretical predictions for suppressor failure. Good agreement was obtained. The maximum difference with damping neglected was about 30 percent. Neglecting damping would result in a conservative design.

  1. Nuclear reactor fuel element with vanadium getter on cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carl E.; Carroll, Kenneth G.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element is described which has an outer cladding, a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material and a layer of vanadium as an oxygen getter on the inner surface of the cladding. The vanadium reacts with oxygen released by the fissionable material during irradiation of the core to prevent the oxygen from reacting with and corroding the cladding. Also described is a method for coating the inner surface of small diameter tubes of cladding with a layer of vanadium.

  2. Burnup measurements on spent fuel elements of the RP-10 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela Mora, Mariano; Gallardo Padilla, Alberto; Palomino, Jose Luis Castro, E-mail: mvela@ipen.gob.p [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN/Peru), Lima (Peru). Grupo de Calculo, Analisis y Seguridad de Reactores; Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac, E-mail: laaterre@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the measurement, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, of the average burnup attained by Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the RP-10 research reactor. Measurements were performed at the reactor storage pool area using {sup 137}Cs as the only burnup monitor, even for spent fuel elements with cooling times much shorter than two years. The experimental apparatus was previously calibrated in efficiency to obtain absolute average burnup values, which were compared against corresponding ones furnished by reactor physics calculations. The mean deviation between both values amounts to 6%. (author)

  3. ZrC COATING ON FUEL ELEMENT CLADDING ZIRCALOY-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etty Mutiara

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available ZrC COATING ON FUEL ELEMENT ZIRCALOY-2 CLADDING. The intensive researchs on high discharge burn-up of Light Water Reactor (LWR fuel element were performed due to the extension of fuel element’s utility life. One of these researches was allowing for alteration of the existing zirconium-based clad system through coating. This technique is supposed to improve the corrosion resistance of cladding without changing the dimension of fuel cladding. In current research, the ZrC film was coated on the zircaloy-2 cladding surface by dipping process of zircaloy-2 specimens in colloidal graphite at room temperature. The dip-coated specimens then undergone heating process at 700oC, 900oC and 1100oC respectively in Argon gas atmosphere for 1 hour. The microstructure and crystal structure of the coated cladding were characterized by optical microscope and XRD respectively. The optical microscope showed the growth of the grains with increasing temperature. XRD examination on the specimens revealed that the ZrC crystal structure on the cladding surface occurred only at 1100oC, but it did not appear at 700oC and 900oC. It can be concluded that dipping process of specimen in colloidal graphite with subsequent heating at 1100oC provided ZrC film coated on zircaloy-2 cladding. The heating process at this temperature allowed carbon atoms to diffuse into zircaloy surface to form ZrC film. PELAPISAN ZrC PADA KELONGSONG ELEMEN BAKAR NUKLIR ZIRKALOI-2. Riset yang intensif pada elemen bakar reaktor berpendingin air dengan fraksi bakar tinggi terus dilakukan dalam rangka memperpanjang umur operasi elemen bakar. Salah satu riset tersebut berupa proses untuk mengubah kelongsong berbasis zirkonium yang ada saat ini dengan cara pelapisan. Cara ini diharapkan akan memperbaiki ketahanan korosi kelongsong tanpa mengubah dimensi kelongsong tersebut. Pada riset ini, lapisan tipis ZrC dilapiskan pada permukaan kelongsong zirkaloi-2 melalui proses pencelupan (dipping spesimen

  4. Fuel performance annual report for 1990. Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preble, E.A.; Painter, C.L.; Alvis, J.A.; Berting, F.M.; Beyer, C.E.; Payne, G.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wu, S.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1993-11-01

    This annual report, the thirteenth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1990 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience and trends, fuel problems high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided . References to additional, more detailed information, and related NRC evaluations are included where appropriate.

  5. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing High Flux Isotope Reactor fuel elements - 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, R.W.; Morin, R.A.

    1999-12-01

    The original fabrication procedures written in 1968 delineated the manufacturing procedures at that time. Since 1968, there have been a number of procedural changes. This rewrite of the fabrication procedures incorporates these changes. The entire fuel core of this reactor is made up of two fuel elements. Each element consists of one annular array of fuel plates. These annuli are identified as the inner and outer fuel elements, since one fits inside the other. The inner element consists of 171 identical fuel plates, and the outer element contains 369 identical fuel plates differing slightly from those in the inner element. Both sets of fuel plates contain U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder as the fuel, dispersed in an aluminum powder matrix and clad with aluminum. Procedures for manufacturing and inspection of the fuel elements are described and illustrated.

  6. Accelerator-driven transmutation of spent fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venneri, Francesco; Williamson, Mark A.; Li, Ning

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method is described for transmuting higher actinides, plutonium and selected fission products in a liquid-fuel subcritical assembly. Uranium may also be enriched, thereby providing new fuel for use in conventional nuclear power plants. An accelerator provides the additional neutrons required to perform the processes. The size of the accelerator needed to complete fuel cycle closure depends on the neutron efficiency of the supported reactors and on the neutron spectrum of the actinide transmutation apparatus. Treatment of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWRs) using uranium-based fuel will require the largest accelerator power, whereas neutron-efficient high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) or CANDU reactors will require the smallest accelerator power, especially if thorium is introduced into the newly generated fuel according to the teachings of the present invention. Fast spectrum actinide transmutation apparatus (based on liquid-metal fuel) will take full advantage of the accelerator-produced source neutrons and provide maximum utilization of the actinide-generated fission neutrons. However, near-thermal transmutation apparatus will require lower standing

  7. Method for measuring recovery of catalytic elements from fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Lawrence [Edison, NJ; Matlin, Ramail [Berkeley, NJ

    2011-03-08

    A method is provided for measuring the concentration of a catalytic clement in a fuel cell powder. The method includes depositing on a porous substrate at least one layer of a powder mixture comprising the fuel cell powder and an internal standard material, ablating a sample of the powder mixture using a laser, and vaporizing the sample using an inductively coupled plasma. A normalized concentration of catalytic element in the sample is determined by quantifying the intensity of a first signal correlated to the amount of catalytic element in the sample, quantifying the intensity of a second signal correlated to the amount of internal standard material in the sample, and using a ratio of the first signal intensity to the second signal intensity to cancel out the effects of sample size.

  8. Countercurrent flow limited (CCFL) heat flux in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggles, A.E.

    1990-10-12

    The countercurrent flow (CCF) performance in the fuel element region of the HFIR is examined experimentally and theoretically. The fuel element consists of two concentric annuli filled with aluminum clad fuel plates of 1.27 mm thickness separated by 1.27 mm flow channels. The plates are curved as they go radially outward to accomplish constant flow channel width and constant metal-to-coolant ratio. A full-scale HFIR fuel element mock-up is studied in an adiabatic air-water CCF experiment. A review of CCF models for narrow channels is presented along with the treatment of CCFs in system of parallel channels. The experimental results are related to the existing models and a mechanistic model for the annular'' CCF in a narrow channel is developed that captures the data trends well. The results of the experiment are used to calculate the CCFL heat flux of the HFIR fuel assembly. It was determined that the HFIR fuel assembly can reject 0.62 Mw of thermal power in the CCFL situation. 31 refs., 17 figs.

  9. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine, reusable thrust chamber program. Task 6: Data dump hot fuel element investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurick, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of reusable thrust chambers for the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine was conducted. Tests were conducted using subscale injector hot-fire procedures for the injector configurations designed for a regenerative cooled engine. The effect of operating conditions and fuel temperature on combustion chamber performance was determined. Specific objectives of the evaluation were to examine the optimum like-doublet element geometry for operation at conditions consistent with a fuel regeneratively cooled engine (hot fuel, 200 to 250 F) and the sensitivity of the triplet injector element to hot fuels.

  10. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR EXAMINING FUEL ELEMENTS FOR LEAKAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.R.; Echo, M.W.; Doe, C.B.

    1963-12-31

    A process and a device for the continuous monitoring of fuel elements while in use in a liquid-metal-cooled, argonblanketed nuclear reactor are presented. A fraction of the argon gas is withdrawn, contacted with a negative electrical charge for attraction of any alkali metal formed from argon by neutron reaction, and recycled into the reactor. The electrical charge is introduced into water, and the water is examined for radioactive alkali metals. (AEC)

  11. The element technology of clean fuel alcohol plant construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.S; Lee, D.S. [Sam-Sung Engineering Technical Institute (Korea, Republic of); Choi, C.Y [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    The fuel alcohol has been highlighted as a clean energy among new renewable energy sources. However, the production of the fuel alcohol has following problems; (i)bulk distillate remains is generated and (ii) benzene to be used as a entertainer in the azeotropic distillation causes the environmental problem. Thus, we started this research on the ground of preserving the cleanness in the production of fuel alcohol, a clean energy. We examined the schemes of replacing the azotropic distillation column which causes the problems with MSDP(Molecular Sieve Dehydration Process) system using adsorption technology and of treating the bulk distillate remains to be generated as by-products. In addition, we need to develop the continuous yea station technology for the continuous operation of fuel alcohol plant as a side goal. Thus, we try to develop a continuous ethanol fermentation process by high-density cell culture from tapioca, a industrial substrate, using cohesive yeast. For this purpose, we intend to examine the problem of tapioca, a industrial substrate, where a solid is existed and develop a new process which can solve the problem. Ultimately, the object of this project is to develop each element technology for the construction of fuel alcohol plant and obtain the ability to design the whole plant. (author) 54 refs., 143 figs., 34 tabs.

  12. Improvements in the fabrication of HTR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braehler, Georg, E-mail: georg.braehler@nukemtechnologies.de [NUKEM Technologies GmbH, Industriestrasse 13, 63755 Alzenau (Germany); Hartung, Markus [NUKEM Technologies GmbH, Industriestrasse 13, 63755 Alzenau (Germany); Fachinger, Johannes; Grosse, Karl-Heinz [FNAG Furnaces Nuclear Applications Grenoble S.A.S., Wilhelm-Rohn Strasse 35, 63450 Hanau (Germany); Seemann, Richard [ALD Vacuum Technologies GmbH, Wilhelm-Rohn Strasse 35, 63450 Hanau (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    The application of High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Technology in the course of the continuously increasing world wide demand on energy is taken more and more under serious consideration in the power supply strategy of various countries. Especially for the emerging nations the HTR Technology has become of special interest because of its inherent safety feature and due to the alternative possibilities of applications, e.g. in the production of liquid hydrocarbons or the alternative application in H{sub 2} generation. The HTR fuel in its various forms (spheres or prismatic fuel blocks) is based on small fuel kernels of about 500 {mu}m in diameter. Each of these uranium oxide or carbide kernels are coated with several layers of pyrocarbon (PyC) as well as an additional silicon carbide (SiC) layer. While the inner pyrocarbon layer is porous and capable to absorb gaseous fission products, the dense outer PyC layer forms the barrier against fission product release. The SiC layer improves the mechanical strengths of this barrier and considerably increases the retention capacity for solid fission products that tent to diffuse at these temperatures. Especially the high quality German LEU TRISO spherical fuel based on the NUKEM design, has demonstrated the best fission product release rate, particular at high temperatures. The {approx}10% enriched uranium triple-coated particles are embedded in a moulded graphite sphere. A fuel sphere consists of approximately 9 g of uranium (some 15,000 particles) and has a diameter of 60 mm. As the unique safety features, especially the inherent safety of the HTR is based on the fuel design, this paper shall reflect the complexity but also developments and economical aspects of the fabrication processes for HTR fuel elements.

  13. Plan and safety analysis on the high power irradiation test program of full length fuel element for Hanaro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.S.; Kim, C.K.; Park, H.D.; Kim, K.H.; Park, J.M.; Lee, D.B.; Kim, J.D.; Ko, Y.M.; Jang, S.J.; Ahn, H.S.; Woo, Y.M.; Kim, E.S.; Kim, H.R.; Chae, H.T.; Lee, C.S

    1999-06-01

    The advanced research reactor fuel development project has been carried out for a localization of HANARO nuclear fuels. The design and fabrication technologies of the localized fuel are almost developed, and the quality assurance procedure and assessment criteria were established. The characteristics of the fuel fabricated in KAERI were investigated through out-pile test. In order to verify the localized fuel performance, irradiation test plan of the developed fuel has been worked out. It consists of 3 stages. The 1st stage is normal power irradiation test and the final burn-up of the test fuel was supposed to be 85 at%. The fuel has been successfully irradiated until now and will be unloaded in June. The 2nd irradiation test will be done to confirm the fuel performance and to get the in-pile data under the high neutron flux level. This test fuel is identical with the 36-element fuel assembly. After the 1st and 2nd irradiation tests are completed with acceptable results, the 3rd irradiation test of final stage will be carried out as a demonstration. In this report, the results of the 1st irradiation test is introduced. Then the objectives, schedule and test condition, the design documents of fuel elements and bundle, the methods of fabrication, out-pile test results, post-irradiation examination scheme, calculation of linear power distribution, and safety analysis results for the 2nd irradiation test bundle are described. (author). 2 refs., 14 tabs., 12 figs.

  14. A novel microbial fuel cell sensor with biocathode sensing element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong; Liang, Peng; Liu, Panpan; Wang, Donglin; Miao, Bo; Huang, Xia

    2017-03-02

    The traditional microbial fuel cell (MFC) sensor with bioanode as sensing element delivers limited sensitivity to toxicity monitoring, restricted application to only anaerobic and organic rich water body, and increased potential fault warning to the combined shock of organic matter/toxicity. In this study, the biocathode for oxygen reduction reaction was employed for the first time as the sensing element in MFC sensor for toxicity monitoring. The results shown that the sensitivity of MFC sensor with biocathode sensing element (7.4±2.0 to 67.5±4.0mA%(-1)cm(-2)) was much greater than that showed by bioanode sensing element (3.4±1.5 to 5.5±0.7mA%(-1)cm(-2)). The biocathode sensing element achieved the lowest detection limit reported to date using MFC sensor for formaldehyde detection (0.0005%), while the bioanode was more applicable for higher concentration (>0.0025%). There was a quicker response of biocathode sensing element with the increase of conductivity and dissolved oxygen (DO). The biocathode sensing element made the MFC sensor directly applied to clean water body monitoring, e.g., drinking water and reclaimed water, without the amending of background organic matter, and it also decreased the warning failure when challenged by a combined shock of organic matter/toxicity.

  15. Review of Rover fuel element protective coating development at Los Alamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Terry C.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) entered the nuclear propulsion field in 1955 and began work on all aspects of a nuclear propulsion program with a target exhaust temperature of about 2750 K. A very extensive chemical vapor deposition coating technology for preventing catastrophic corrosion of reactor core components by the high temperature, high pressure hydrogen propellant gas was developed. Over the 17-year term of the program, more than 50,000 fuel elements were coated and evaluated. Advances in performance were achieved only through closely coupled interaction between the developing fuel element fabrication and protective coating technologies. The endurance of fuel elements in high temperature, high pressure hydrogen environment increased from several minutes at 2000 K exit gas temperature to 2 hours at 2440 K exit gas temperature in a reactor test and 10 hours at 2350 K exit gas temperature in a hot gas test. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the rationale for selection of coating materials used (NbC and ZrC), identify critical fuel element-coat interactions that had to be modified to increase system performance, and review the evolution of protective coating technology.

  16. PETER loop. Multifunctional test facility for thermal hydraulic investigations of PWR fuel elements; PETER Loop. Multifunktionsversuchstand zur thermohydraulischen Untersuchung von DWR Brennelementen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganzmann, I.; Hille, D.; Staude, U. [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany). Materials, Fluid-Structure Interaction, Plant Life Management NTCM-G

    2009-07-01

    The reliable fuel element behavior during the complete fuel cycle is one of the fundamental prerequisites of a safe and efficient nuclear power plant operation. The fuel element behavior with respect to pressure drop and vibration impact cannot be simulated by means of fluid-structure interaction codes. Therefore it is necessary to perform tests using fuel element mock-ups (1:1). AREVA NP has constructed the test facility PETER (PWR fuel element tests in Erlangen) loop. The modular construction allows maximum flexibility for any type of fuel elements. Modern measuring instrumentation for flow, pressure and vibration characterization allows the analysis of cause and consequences of thermal hydraulic phenomena. PETER loop is the standard test facility for the qualification of dynamic fuel element behavior in flowing fluid and is used for failure mode analysis.

  17. Discrete element method study of fuel relocation and dispersal during loss-of-coolant accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govers, K.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-09-01

    The fuel fragmentation, relocation and dispersal (FFRD) during LOCA transients today retain the attention of the nuclear safety community. The fine fragmentation observed at high burnup may, indeed, affect the Emergency Core Cooling System performance: accumulation of fuel debris in the cladding ballooned zone leads to a redistribution of the temperature profile, while dispersal of debris might lead to coolant blockage or to debris circulation through the primary circuit. This work presents a contribution, by discrete element method, towards a mechanistic description of the various stages of FFRD. The fuel fragments are described as a set of interacting particles, behaving as a granular medium. The model shows qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental observations, such as the packing efficiency in the balloon, which is shown to stabilize at about 55%. The model is then applied to study fuel dispersal, for which experimental parametric studies are both difficult and expensive.

  18. Study on the high-precision laser welding technology of nuclear fuel elements processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Sung; Yang, M. S.; Kim, W. K.; Lee, D. Y

    2001-01-01

    The proper welding method for appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements is considered important in respect to the soundness of weldments and the improvement of the performance of nuclear fuels during the operation in reactor. The probability of welding defects of the appendage parts is mostly apt to occur and it is connected directly with the safty and life prediction of the nuclear reactor in operation. Recently there has been studied all over the world to develope welding technology by laser in nuclear fuel processing, and the appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristics of the laser welded specimens and make some samples for the appendage of bearing pads of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. This study will be also provide the basic data for the fabrications of the appendage of bearing pads and spacers. Especially the laser welding is supposed to be used in the practical application such as precise materials manufacturing fields. In this respect this technology is not only a basic advanced technology with wide applications but also likely to be used for the development of directly applicable technologies for industries, with high potential benefits derived in the view point of economy and industry.

  19. An Expert System to Analyze Homogeneity in Fuel Element Plates for Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolosa, S.C.; Marajofsky, A.

    2004-10-06

    In the manufacturing control of Fuel Element Plates for Research Reactors, one of the problems to be addressed is how to determine the U-density homogeneity in a fuel plate and how to obtain qualitative and quantitative information in order to establish acceptance or rejection criteria for such, as well as carrying out the quality follow-up. This paper is aimed at developing computing software which implements an Unsupervised Competitive Learning Neural Network for the acknowledgment of regions belonging to a digitalized gray scale image. This program is applied to x-ray images. These images are generated when the x-ray beams go through a fuel plate of approximately 60 cm x 8 cm x 0.1 cm thick. A Nuclear Fuel Element for Research Reactors usually consists of 18 to 22 of these plates, positioned in parallel, in an arrangement of 8 x 7 cm. Carrying out the inspection of the digitalized x-ray image, the neural network detects regions with different luminous densities corresponding to U-densities in the fuel plate. This is used in quality control to detect failures and verify acceptance criteria depending on the homogeneity of the plate. This modality of inspection is important as it allows the performance of non-destructive measurements and the automatic generation of the map of U-relative densities of the fuel plate.

  20. Low-enriched fuel particle performance review. [UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, F.; Nabielek, H.; Yang, L.

    1978-08-01

    The available data on low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel particles were reviewed under the United States-Federal Republic of Germany Agreement. The most influential factors controlling the irradiation performance of LEU fuel particles were found to be plutonium transport, fission product transport, fuel particle mechanical performance, and fuel particle chemical performance.

  1. Recapturing Graphite-Based Fuel Element Technology for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trammell, Michael P [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    ORNL is currently recapturing graphite based fuel forms for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). This effort involves research and development on materials selection, extrusion, and coating processes to produce fuel elements representative of historical ROVER and NERVA fuel. Initially, lab scale specimens were fabricated using surrogate oxides to develop processing parameters that could be applied to full length NTP fuel elements. Progress toward understanding the effect of these processing parameters on surrogate fuel microstructure is presented.

  2. Assessment of SFR fuel pin performance codes under advanced fuel for minor actinide transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouineau, V.; Lainet, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pelletier, M. [French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission - CEA, CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Di Marcello, V.; Van Uffelen, P.; Walker, C. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D- 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is, therefore, an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and residual power packages as well as the repository area. In the SUPERFACT Experiment four different oxide fuels containing high and low concentrations of {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am, representing the homogeneous and heterogeneous in-pile recycling concepts, were irradiated in the PHENIX reactor. The behavior of advanced fuel materials with minor actinide needs to be fully characterized, understood and modeled in order to optimize the design of this kind of fuel elements and to evaluate its performances. This paper assesses the current predictability of fuel performance codes TRANSURANUS and GERMINAL V2 on the basis of post irradiation examinations of the SUPERFACT experiment for pins with low minor actinide content. Their predictions have been compared to measured data in terms of geometrical changes of fuel and cladding, fission gases behavior and actinide and fission product distributions. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results, although improvements are also pointed out for further studies, especially if larger content of minor actinide will be taken into account in the codes. (authors)

  3. Design of Production Test IP-262-A-11-FP -- Evaluation of projection fuel elements for use in ribbed process tubes -- Demonstration loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, W.H.; Hall, R.E.

    1959-06-29

    For several years, a major category of fuel element failures has been the side corrosion type, characterized by localized accelerated fuel element jacket corrosion. Since it has been demonstrated {sup 1} that misalignment of fuel elements in a process tube will produce flow patterns and accelerated corrosion, termed ``hot spots``, failure to align the fuel elements in process tubes is considered a contributing factor in the production of side corrosion failures. Preliminary testing of both self-supporting and ``bumper`` fuel elements is underway. Data on the self-supporting fuel elements have demonstrated that the bridge-rail projections have sufficient support strength, do not of themselves create a corrosion problem and in actuality probably eliminate any hot-spot areas. Although one tube of bumper fuel elements in KW Reactor {sup 3} has been discharged, data are not as yet available. Potentially, the most sever corrosion conditions exist during the summer months when reactor inlet temperatures are high. It is desirable then, provided bumper fuel elements limit hot- spot corrosion, to evaluate the bumper concept for large scale use possibly by the summer of 1960. To accomplish this, a demonstration loading of the bumper type fuel elements must be underway by about July, 1959. The purpose of this report is to present the design of a test to evaluate the fabrication process and irradiation performance of fuel elements having projections, which may prevent misalignment in ribbed process tubes and meet the aforementioned goals.

  4. Validation of the BISON 3D Fuel Performance Code: Temperature Comparisons for Concentrically and Eccentrically Located Fuel Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Hales; D. M. Perez; R. L. Williamson; S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer

    2013-03-01

    BISON is a modern finite-element based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (USA) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behaviour and is used to analyse either 2D axisymmetric or 3D geometries. BISON has been applied to a variety of fuel forms including LWR fuel rods, TRISO-coated fuel particles, and metallic fuel in both rod and plate geometries. Code validation is currently in progress, principally by comparison to instrumented LWR fuel rods. Halden IFA experiments constitute a large percentage of the current BISON validation base. The validation emphasis here is centreline temperatures at the beginning of fuel life, with comparisons made to seven rods from the IFA-431 and 432 assemblies. The principal focus is IFA-431 Rod 4, which included concentric and eccentrically located fuel pellets. This experiment provides an opportunity to explore 3D thermomechanical behaviour and assess the 3D simulation capabilities of BISON. Analysis results agree with experimental results showing lower fuel centreline temperatures for eccentric fuel with the peak temperature shifted from the centreline. The comparison confirms with modern 3D analysis tools that the measured temperature difference between concentric and eccentric pellets is not an artefact and provides a quantitative explanation for the difference.

  5. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHWINKENDORF, K.N.

    2006-05-12

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements. The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprising two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with ''green'' (fresh) fuel and one with spent fuel. Both the green and spent fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, 3 green fuel and 4 spent fuel loading configurations were considered to serve as benchmark models. However, shortcomings in experimental data failed to meet the high standards for a benchmark problem. Nevertheless, the data provided by these subcritical measurements can

  6. Oxide fuel element and blanket element development programs. Quarterly progress report, January-February-March, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Fuel pin profilometry of some 9% burnup F20-F5 pins showed small diameter increases at the fuel-insulator interface at the top of the core. Neither these secondary peaks nor the larger diameter increases near the core midplane exhibited any relationship to the local presence of once-molten fuel in any F20 fuel pin. Augmented safety analysis computations for experiment AB-1 (additional transients suggested by HEDL) showed that cumulative damage fractions from the additional transients were in every case less than 10/sup -4/. Mechanical tests have been performed that confirm previous computations for the removal end plugs to be used in a characterizer subassembly for AB-1. The resulting pin removal forces are well within the design envelope.

  7. Modelling of LOCA Tests with the BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    BISON is a modern finite-element based, multidimensional nuclear fuel performance code that is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (USA). Recent advances of BISON include the extension of the code to the analysis of LWR fuel rod behaviour during loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). In this work, BISON models for the phenomena relevant to LWR cladding behaviour during LOCAs are described, followed by presentation of code results for the simulation of LOCA tests. Analysed experiments include separate effects tests of cladding ballooning and burst, as well as the Halden IFA-650.2 fuel rod test. Two-dimensional modelling of the experiments is performed, and calculations are compared to available experimental data. Comparisons include cladding burst pressure and temperature in separate effects tests, as well as the evolution of fuel rod inner pressure during ballooning and time to cladding burst. Furthermore, BISON three-dimensional simulations of separate effects tests are performed, which demonstrate the capability to reproduce the effect of azimuthal temperature variations in the cladding. The work has been carried out in the frame of the collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and Halden Reactor Project, and the IAEA Coordinated Research Project FUMAC.

  8. Demonstration tests for HTGR fuel elements and core components with test sections in HENDEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Hino, Ryutaro; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1995-03-01

    In the fuel stack test section (T{sub 1}) of the Helium Engineering Demonstration Loop (HENDEL), thermal and hydraulic performances of helium gas flows through a fuel rod channel and a fuel stack have been investigated for the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) core thermal design. The test data showed that the turbulent characteristics appearing in the Reynolds number above 2000: no typical behavior in the transition zone, and friction factors and heat transfer coefficients in the fuel channel were found to be higher than those in a smooth annular channel. Heat transfer behavior of gas flow in a fuel element channel with blockage and cross-flow through a gap between upper and lower fuel elements stacked was revealed using the mock-up models. On the other hand, demonstration tests have been performed to verify thermal and hydraulic characteristics and structural integrity related to the core bottom structure using a full-scale test facility named as the in-core structure test section (T{sub 2}). The sealing performance test revealed that the leakage of low-temperature helium gas through gaps between the permanent reflector blocks to the core was very low level compared with the HTTR design value and no change of the leakage flow rate were observed after a long term operation. The heat transfer tests including thermal transient at shutdown of gas circulators verified good insulating performance of core insulation structures in the core bottom structure and the hot gas duct; the temperature of the metal portion of these structure was below the design value. Examination of the thermal mixing characteristics indicated that the mixing of the hot helium gas started at a hot plenum and finished completely at downstream of the outlet hot gas duct. The present results obtained from these demonstration tests have been practically applied to the detailed design works and licensing procedures of the HTTR. (J.P.N.) 92 refs.

  9. Analytical assessment for stress corrosion fatigue of CANDU fuel elements under load following conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horhoianu, Grigore; Ionescu, Drags; Pauna, Eduard [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania). Nuclear Fuel Engineering Lab.

    2012-03-15

    When nuclear power reactors are operated in a load following (LF) mode, the nuclear fuel may be subjected to step changes in power on weekly, daily, or even hourly basis, depending on the grid's needs. Two load following tests performed in TRIGA Research Reactor of Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti were simulated with finite elements computer codes in order to evaluate Stress Corrosion Fatigue (SCF) of the sheath arising from expansion and contraction of the pellets in the corrosive environment. The 3D finite element analyses show that the cyclic strains give highly multiaxial stresses in the sheath at ridge region. This paper summarizes the results of the analytical assessment for SCF and their relation to CANDU fuel performance in LF tests conditions. (orig.)

  10. Corrosion studies in fuel element reprocessing environments containing nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavers, J A; White, R R; Berry, W E; Griess, J C

    1982-04-01

    Nitric acid is universally used in aqueous fuel element reprocessing plants; however, in the processing scheme being developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, some of the equipment will be exposed to nitric acid under conditions not previously encountered in fuel element reprocessing plants. A previous report presented corrosion data obtained in hyperazeotropic nitric acid and in concentrated magnesium nitrate solutions used in its preparation. The results presented in this report are concerned with the following: (1) corrosion of titanium in nitric acid; (2) corrosion of nickel-base alloys in a nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution; (3) the formation of Cr(VI), which enhances corrosion, in nitric acid solutions; and (4) corrosion of mechanical pipe connectors in nitric acid. The results show that the corrosion rate of titanium increased with the refreshment rate of boiling nitric acid, but the effect diminished rapidly as the temperature decreased. The addition of iodic acid inhibited attack. Also, up to 200 ppM of fluoride in 70% HNO/sub 3/ had no major effect on the corrosion of either titanium or tantalum. In boiling 8 M HNO/sub 3/-0.05 M HF, Inconel 671 was more resistant than Inconel 690, but both alloys experienced end-grain attack. In the case of Inconel 671, heat treatment was very important; annealed and quenched material was much more resistant than furnace-cooled material.The rate of oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) increased significantly as the nitric acid concentration increased, and certain forms of ruthenium in the solution seemed to accelerate the rate of formation. Mechanical connectors of T-304L stainless steel experienced end-grain attack on the exposed pipe ends, and seal rings of both stainless steel and a titanium alloy (6% Al-4% V) underwent heavy attack in boiling 8 M HNO/sub 3/.

  11. Sipping test on a failed MTR fuel element; Teste de sipping em um elemento combustivel tipo placa falhado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac; Zeituni, Carlos Alberto; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Perrotta, Jose Augusto; Silva, Jose Eduardo Rosa da [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    This work describes sipping tests performed on MTR fuel elements of the IEA-R1 research reactor, in order to determinate which one failed in the core during a routine operation of the reactor. radioactive iodine isotopes {sup 131} I and {sup 133} I, employed as failure indicators, were detected in samples corresponding to the fuel element IEA-156. The specific activity of each sample, as well as the average leaking rate, were measured for {sup 137} Cs. The nuclear fuels U{sub 3} O{sub 8} - Al dispersion and U - Al alloy were compared concerning their measured average leaking rates of {sup 137} Cs. (author)

  12. High energy-density liquid rocket fuel performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel performance database of liquid hydrocarbons and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuels was compiled using engine parametrics from the Space Transportation Engine Program as a baseline. Propellant performance parameters are introduced. General hydrocarbon fuel performance trends are discussed with respect to hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and heat of formation. Aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is discussed with respect to aluminum metal loading. Hydrocarbon and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is presented with respect to fuel density, specific impulse and propellant density specific impulse.

  13. High-quality thorium TRISO fuel performance in HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Nabielek, Heinz; Kania, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    Thorium as a nuclear fuel has received renewed interest, because of its widespread availability and the good irradiation performance of Th and mixed (Th,U) oxide compounds as fuels in nuclear power systems. Early HTGR development employed thorium together with high-enriched uranium (HEU). After 1980, HTGR fuel systems switched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). After completing fuel development for the AVR and the THTR with BISO coated particles, the German program expanded its efforts utilizing thorium and HEU TRISO coated particles in advanced HTGR concepts for process heat applications (PNP) and direct-cycle electricity production (HHT). The combination of a low-temperature isotropic (LTI) inner and outer pyrocarbon layers surrounding a strong, stable SiC layer greatly improved manufacturing conditions and the subsequent contamination and defective particle fractions in production fuel elements. In addition, this combination provided improved mechanical strength and a higher degree of solid fission product retention, not known previously with high-temperature isotropic (HTI) BISO coatings. The improved performance of the HEU (Th, U)O{sub 2} TRISO fuel system was successfully demonstrated in three primary areas of development: manufacturing, irradiation testing under normal operating conditions, and accident simulation testing. In terms of demonstrating performance for advanced HTGR applications, the experimental failure statistic from manufacture and irradiation testing are significantly below the coated particle requirements specified for PNP and HHT designs at the time. Covering a range to 1300 C in normal operations and 1600 C in accidents, with burnups to 13% FIMA and fast fluences to 8 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E> 16 fJ), the performance results exceed the design limits on manufacturing and operational requirements for the German HTR-Modul concept, which are 6.5 x 10{sup -5} for manufacturing, 2 x 10{sup -4} for normal operating conditions, and 5 x 10{sup -4

  14. Characterization of spent fuel elements stored at IEA-R1 research reactor based on visual inspections and sipping tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jose Eduardo Rosa da; Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac; Teodoro, Celso Antonio; Castanheira, Myrthes; Lucki, Georgi; Damy, Margaret de Almeida; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: jersilva@ipen.br

    2005-07-01

    Aluminum spent nuclear fuels are susceptible to corrosion attack, or mechanical damage from improper handling, while in pool reactor storage. Storage practices have been modified to reduce the potential for damage, based on recommendations presented at second WS on Spent Fuel Characterization, promoted by IAEA. In this work, we present the inspection program proposed to the IEA-R1 stored spent fuel elements, in order to provide information on the physical condition during the interim storage time under wet condition at the reactor pool. The inspection program is based on non-destructive tests results (visual inspection and sipping tests) already periodically performed to exam the IEA-R1 stored spent fuel and fuel elements from the core reactor. To record the available information and examination results it was elaborated a document in the format of a catalogue containing the proposed inspection program for the IEA-R1 stored spent fuel, the description of the visual inspection and sipping tests systems, a compilation of information and images result from the tests performed for all stored standard spent fuel element and, in annexes, copies of the reference documents. That document constitutes an important step of the effective implementation of the referred IEA-R1 spent fuel inspection program and can be used to address regulatory and operational needs for the demonstration, for example, of safe storage throughout the pool storage period. (author)

  15. Development of an Integrated Performance Model for TRISO-Coated Gas Reactor Particle Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Miller, Gregory Kent; Martin, David George; Maki, John Thomas

    2005-05-01

    The success of gas reactors depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. The understanding and evaluation of this fuel requires development of an integrated mechanistic fuel performance model that fully describes the mechanical and physico-chemical behavior of the fuel particle under irradiation. Such a model, called PARFUME (PARticle Fuel ModEl), is being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. PARFUME is based on multi-dimensional finite element modeling of TRISO-coated gas reactor fuel. The goal is to represent all potential failure mechanisms and to incorporate the statistical nature of the fuel. The model is currently focused on carbide, oxide nd oxycarbide uranium fuel kernels, while the coating layers are the classical IPyC/SiC/OPyC. This paper reviews the current status of the mechanical aspects of the model and presents results of calculations for irradiations from the New Production Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor program.

  16. Study on the effect of the CANFLEX-NU fuel element bowing on the critical heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, Ho Chun; Cho, Moon Sung; Jeon, Ji Su

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the CANFLEX-NU fuel element bowing on the critical heat flux is reviewed and analyzed, which is requested by KINS as the Government design licensing condition for the use of the fuel bundles in CANDU power reactors. The effect of the gap between two adjacent fuel elements on the critical heat flux and onset-of-dryout power is studied. The reduction of the width of a single inter-rod gap from its nominal size to the minimum manufacture allowance of 1 mm has a negligible effects on the thermal-hydraulic performance of the bundle for the given set of boundary conditions applied to the CANFLEX-43 element bundle in an uncrept channel. As expected, the in-reactor irradiation test results show that there are no evidence of the element bow problems on the bundle performance.

  17. Development of breached pin performance analysis code SAFFRON (System of Analyzing Failed Fuel under Reactor Operation by Numerical method)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukai, Shigeharu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1995-03-01

    On the assumption of fuel pin failure, the breached pin performance analysis code SAFFRON was developed to evaluate the fuel pin behavior in relation to the delayed neutron signal response during operational mode beyond the cladding failure. Following characteristic behavior in breached fuel pin is modeled in 3-dimensional finite element method : pellet swelling by fuel-sodium reaction, fuel temperature change, and resultant cladding breach extension and delayed neutron precursors release into coolant. Particularly, practical algorithm of numerical procedure in finite element method was originally developed in order to solve the 3-dimensional non-linear contact problem between the swollen pellet due to fuel-sodium reaction and breached cladding. (author).

  18. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Fuel Element Testing in the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    To satisfy the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) testing milestone, a graphite composite fuel element using a uranium simulant was received from the Oakridge National Lab and tested in the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) at various operating conditions. The nominal operating conditions required to satisfy the milestone consisted of running the fuel element for a few minutes at a temperature of at least 2000 K with flowing hydrogen. This milestone test was successfully accomplished without incident.

  19. DUPIC fuel irradiation test and performance evaluation; the performance analysis of pellet-cladding contact fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K. I.; Kim, H. M.; Yang, K. B.; Choi, S. J. [Suwon University, Whasung (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    Thermal and mechanical models were reviewed, and selected for the analysis of nuclear fuel performance in reactor. 2 dimensional FEM software was developed. Thermal models-gap conductances, thermal conductivity of pellets, fission gas release, temperature distribution-were set and packaged into a software. Both thermal and mechanical models were interrelated to each other, and the final results, fuel performance during irradiation is obtained by iteration calculation. Also, the contact phenomena between pellet and cladding was analysed by mechanical computer software which was developed during this work. dimensional FEM program was developed which estimate the mechanical behavior and the thermal behaviors of nuclear fuel during irradiation. Since there is a importance during the mechanical deformation analysis in describing pellet-cladding contact phenomena, simplified 2 dimensional calculation method is used after the contact. The estimation of thermal fuel behavior during irradiation was compared with the results of other. 8 refs., 17 figs. (Author)

  20. Effects of mixing system and pilot fuel quality on diesel-biogas dual fuel engine performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Iván Darío; Arrieta, Andrés Amell; Cadavid, Francisco Javier

    2009-12-01

    This paper describes results obtained from CI engine performance running on dual fuel mode at fixed engine speed and four loads, varying the mixing system and pilot fuel quality, associated with fuel composition and cetane number. The experiments were carried out on a power generation diesel engine at 1500 m above sea level, with simulated biogas (60% CH(4)-40% CO(2)) as primary fuel, and diesel and palm oil biodiesel as pilot fuels. Dual fuel engine performance using a naturally aspirated mixing system and diesel as pilot fuel was compared with engine performance attained with a supercharged mixing system and biodiesel as pilot fuel. For all loads evaluated, was possible to achieve full diesel substitution using biogas and biodiesel as power sources. Using the supercharged mixing system combined with biodiesel as pilot fuel, thermal efficiency and substitution of pilot fuel were increased, whereas methane and carbon monoxide emissions were reduced.

  1. Research on the interfacial behaviors of plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiming; Yan, Xiaoqing; Ding, Shurong; Huo, Yongzhong

    2010-04-01

    The three-dimensional constitutive relations are constructed, respectively, for the fuel particles, the metal matrix and the cladding of dispersion nuclear fuel elements, allowing for the effects of large deformation and thermal-elastoplasticity. According to the constitutive relations, the method of modeling their irradiation behaviors in ABAQUS is developed and validated. Numerical simulations of the interfacial performances between the fuel meat and the cladding are implemented with the developed finite element models for different micro-structures of the fuel meat. The research results indicate that: (1) the interfacial tensile stresses and shear stresses for some cases will increase with burnup, but the relative stresses will decrease with burnup for some micro-structures; (2) at the lower burnups, the interfacial stresses increase with the particle sizes and the particle volume fractions; however, it is not the case at the higher burnups; (3) the particle distribution characteristics distinctly affect the interfacial stresses, and the face-centered cubic case has the best interfacial performance of the three considered cases.

  2. Development of high performance hybrid rocket fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaseck, Christopher R.

    . In order to examine paraffin/additive combustion in a motor environment, I conducted experiments on well characterized aluminum based additives. In particular, I investigate the influence of aluminum, unpassivated aluminum, milled aluminum/polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and aluminum hydride on the performance of paraffin fuels for hybrid rocket propulsion. I use an optically accessible combustor to examine the performance of the fuel mixtures in terms of characteristic velocity efficiency and regression rate. Each combustor test consumes a 12.7 cm long, 1.9 cm diameter fuel strand under 160 kg/m 2s of oxygen at up to 1.4 MPa. The experimental results indicate that the addition of 5 wt.% 30 mum or 80 nm aluminum to paraffin increases the regression rate by approximately 15% compared to neat paraffin grains. At higher aluminum concentrations and nano-scale particles sizes, the increased melt layer viscosity causes slower regression. Alane and Al/PTFE at 12.5 wt.% increase the regression of paraffin by 21% and 32% respectively. Finally, an aging study indicates that paraffin can protect air and moisture sensitive particles from oxidation. The opposed burner and aluminum/paraffin hybrid rocket experiments show that additives can alter bulk fuel properties, such as viscosity, that regulate entrainment. The general effect of melt layer properties on the entrainment and regression rate of paraffin is not well understood. Improved understanding of how solid additives affect the properties and regression of paraffin is essential to maximize performance. In this document I investigate the effect of melt layer properties on paraffin regression using inert additives. Tests are performed in the optical cylindrical combustor at ˜1 MPa under a gaseous oxygen mass flux of ˜160 kg/m2s. The experiments indicate that the regression rate is proportional to mu0.08rho 0.38kappa0.82. In addition, I explore how to predict fuel viscosity, thermal conductivity, and density prior to testing

  3. Fuels Performance: Navigating the Intersection of Fuels and Combustion (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-12-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the only national laboratory dedicated 100% to renewable energy and energy efficiency, recognize that engine and infrastructure compatibility can make or break the impact of even the most promising fuel. NREL and its industry partners navigate the intersection of fuel chemistry, ignition kinetics, combustion, and emissions, with innovative approaches to engines and fuels that meet drivers' expectations, while minimizing petroleum use and GHGs.

  4. Proceedings of the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting - WRFPM / Top Fuel 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-15

    SFEN, ENS, SNR, ANS, AESJ, CNS KNS, IAEA and NEA are jointly organizing the 2009 International Water Reactor Fuel Performance / TopFuel 2009 Meeting following the 2008 KNS Water Reactor Performance Meeting held during October 19-23, 2008 in Seoul, Korea. This meeting is held annually on a tri-annual rotational basis in Europe, USA and Asia. In 2009, this meeting will be held in Paris, September 6-10, 2009 in coordination with the Global 2009 Conference at the same date and place. That would lead to a common opening session, some common technical presentations, a common exhibition and common social events. The technical scope of the meeting includes all aspects of nuclear fuel from fuel rod to core design as well as manufacturing, performance in commercial and test reactors or on-going and future developments and trends. Emphasis will be placed on fuel reliability in the general context of nuclear 'Renaissance' and recycling perspective. The meeting includes selectively front and/or back end issues that impact fuel designs and performance. In this frame, the conference track devoted to 'Concepts for transportation and interim storage of spent fuels and conditioned waste' will be shared with 'GLOBAL' conference. Technical Tracks: - 1. Fuel Performance, Reliability and Operational Experience: Fuel operating experience and performance; experience with high burn-up fuels; water side corrosion; stress corrosion cracking; MOX fuel performance; post irradiation data on lead fuel assemblies; radiation effects; water chemistry and corrosion counter-measures. - 2. Transient Fuel Behaviour and Safety Related Issues: Transient fuel behavior and criteria (RIA, LOCA, ATWS, Ramp tests..). Fuel safety-related issues such as PCI (pellet cladding interaction), transient fission gas releases and cladding bursting/ballooning during transient events - Advances in fuel performance modeling and core reload methodology, small and large-scale fuel testing

  5. Multi-Dimensional Simulation of LWR Fuel Behavior in the BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, R. L.; Capps, N. A.; Liu, W.; Rashid, Y. R.; Wirth, B. D.

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear fuel operates in an extreme environment that induces complex multiphysics phenomena occurring over distances ranging from inter-atomic spacing to meters, and times scales ranging from microseconds to years. To simulate this behavior requires a wide variety of material models that are often complex and nonlinear. The recently developed BISON code represents a powerful fuel performance simulation tool based on its material and physical behavior capabilities, finite-element versatility of spatial representation, and use of parallel computing. The code can operate in full three dimensional (3D) mode, as well as in reduced two dimensional (2D) modes, e.g., axisymmetric radial-axial (R-Z) or plane radial-circumferential (R-θ), to suit the application and to allow treatment of global and local effects. A BISON case study was used to illustrate analysis of Pellet Clad Mechanical Interaction failures from manufacturing defects using combined 2D and 3D analyses. The analysis involved commercial fuel rods and demonstrated successful computation of metrics of interest to fuel failures, including cladding peak hoop stress and strain energy density. In comparison with a failure threshold derived from power ramp tests, results corroborate industry analyses of the root cause of the pellet-clad interaction failures and illustrate the importance of modeling 3D local effects around fuel pellet defects, which can produce complex effects including cold spots in the cladding, stress concentrations, and hot spots in the fuel that can lead to enhanced cladding degradation such as hydriding, oxidation, CRUD formation, and stress corrosion cracking.

  6. Multi-Dimensional Simulation of LWR Fuel Behavior in the BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, R. L.; Capps, N. A.; Liu, W.; Rashid, Y. R.; Wirth, B. D.

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear fuel operates in an extreme environment that induces complex multiphysics phenomena occurring over distances ranging from inter-atomic spacing to meters, and times scales ranging from microseconds to years. To simulate this behavior requires a wide variety of material models that are often complex and nonlinear. The recently developed BISON code represents a powerful fuel performance simulation tool based on its material and physical behavior capabilities, finite-element versatility of spatial representation, and use of parallel computing. The code can operate in full three dimensional (3D) mode, as well as in reduced two dimensional (2D) modes, e.g., axisymmetric radial-axial ( R- Z) or plane radial-circumferential ( R- θ), to suit the application and to allow treatment of global and local effects. A BISON case study was used to illustrate analysis of Pellet Clad Mechanical Interaction failures from manufacturing defects using combined 2D and 3D analyses. The analysis involved commercial fuel rods and demonstrated successful computation of metrics of interest to fuel failures, including cladding peak hoop stress and strain energy density. In comparison with a failure threshold derived from power ramp tests, results corroborate industry analyses of the root cause of the pellet-clad interaction failures and illustrate the importance of modeling 3D local effects around fuel pellet defects, which can produce complex effects including cold spots in the cladding, stress concentrations, and hot spots in the fuel that can lead to enhanced cladding degradation such as hydriding, oxidation, CRUD formation, and stress corrosion cracking.

  7. Fuel performance annual report for 1991. Volume 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, C.L.; Alvis, J.M.; Beyer, C.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Marion, A.L. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Payne, G.A. [Northwest Coll. and Univ. Association for Science, Richland, WA (United States); Kendrick, E.D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-08-01

    This report is the fourteenth in a series that provides a compilation of information regarding commercial nuclear fuel performance. The series of annual reports were developed as a result of interest expressed by the public, advising bodies, and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for public availability of information pertaining to commercial nuclear fuel performance. During 1991, the nuclear industry`s focus regarding fuel continued to be on extending burnup while maintaining fuel rod reliability. Utilities realize that high-burnup fuel reduces the amount of generated spent fuel, reduces fuel costs, reduces operational and maintenance costs, and improves plant capacity factors by extending operating cycles. Brief summaries of fuel operating experience, fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, high-burnup experience, problem areas, and items of general significance are provided.

  8. Overview of the BISON Multidimensional Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer; D. M. Perez; G. Pastore; R. C. Martineau

    2013-10-01

    BISON is a modern multidimensional multiphysics finite-element based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (USA) since 2009. A brief background is provided on the code’s computational framework (MOOSE), governing equations, and material and behavioral models. Ongoing code verification and validation work is outlined, and comparative results are provided for select validation cases. Recent applications are discussed, including specific description of two applications where 3D treatment is important. A summary of future code development and validation activities is given. Numerous references to published work are provided where interested readers can find more complete information.

  9. Fuel element development committee: Annual report from the General Electric Company, Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.; Minor, J.E.; Stringer, J.T.

    1964-08-14

    A summary of HAPO activities is given to include separate sections on the N-Reactor and other current production reactors. Specific programs and fuel performance for current production reactor fuels is discussed. Also, the production status, fuel performance, development program and process technology for N-Reactor fuels is presented.

  10. A comparison of mechanical algorithms of fuel performance code systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C. J.; Park, J. H.; Kang, K. H.; Ryu, H. J.; Moon, J. S.; Jeong, I. H.; Lee, C. Y.; Song, K. C

    2003-11-01

    The goal of fuel rod performance evaluation is to identify the robustness of fuel rod with cladding material during fuel irradiation. Computer simulation of fuel rod performance becomes important to develop new nuclear systems. To construct the computing code system for fuel rod performance, we compared several algorithms of existing fuel rod performance code systems and summarized the details and tips as a preliminary work. Among several code systems, FRAPCON, FEMAXI for LWR, ELESTRES for CANDU reactor, and LIFE for fast reactor are reviewed. The computational algorithms related to mechanical interaction of the fuel rod are compared including methodologies and subroutines. This work will be utilized to develop the computing code system for dry process fuel rod performance.

  11. Business cycles and the financial performance of fuel cell companies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques, I.; Sadorsky, P. [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Schulich School of Business

    2005-07-01

    Fuel cells are expected to play a major role in a hydrogen powered world. They will provide power to homes, modes of transportation and appliances. Hydrogen is the most abundant element in nature, but it must be extracted in order to be usable. It can be produced from oil, natural gas and coal or from renewable sources such as biomass, thermal or nuclear reactions. Fuel cells running on hydrogen extracted from non renewable resources have an efficiency of 30 per cent, which is twice as efficient as an internal combustion engine. The greatest barrier to mass commercialization is the cost of making hydrogen-powered auto engines. Also, an infrastructure must be developed to refill hydrogen cars. One solution is to build a hydrogen highway using the existing natural gas grid to produce hydrogen and sell it at existing filling stations. The cost of building 12,000 refueling pumps in urban areas which will provide access to 70 per cent of America's population is estimated at $10 to $15 billion. This paper described the vector autoregression (VAR) model which empirically examines the relationship between financial performance of fuel cell companies and business cycles. It was used to measure how sensitive the financial performance of fuel cell companies are to changes in macroeconomic activity. A four variable VAR model was developed to examine the relationship between stock prices, oil prices and interest rates. It was shown that the stock prices of fuel cell companies are affected by shocks to technology stock prices and oil prices, with the former having a longer lasting impact. These results add to the growing literature that oil price movements are not as important as once thought. 15 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  12. Calibration of the Failed-Fuel-Element Detection Systems in the Aagesta Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strindehag, O.

    1966-06-15

    Results from a calibration of the systems for detection of fuel element ruptures in the Aagesta reactor are presented. The calibration was carried out by means of foils of zirconium-uranium alloy which were placed in a special fuel assembly. The release of fission products from these foils is due mainly to recoil and can be accurately calculated. Before the foils were used in the reactor their corrosion behaviour in high temperature water was investigated. The results obtained with the precipitator systems for bulk detection and localization are in good agreement with the expected performance. The sensitivity of these systems was found to be high enough for detection and localization of small defects of pin-hole type ({nu} = 10{sup -8}/s ). The general performance of the systems was satisfactory during the calibration tests, although a few adjustments are desirable. A bulk detecting system for monitoring of activities in the moderator, in which the {gamma}-radiation from coolant samples is measured directly after an ion exchanger, showed lower sensitivity than expected from calculations. It seems that the sensitivity of the latter system has to be improved to admit the detection of small defects. In the ion exchanger system, and to some extent in the precipitator systems, the background from A{sup 41} in the coolant limits the sensitivity. The calibration technique utilized seems to be of great advantage when investigating the performance of failed-fuel-element detection systems.

  13. Adobe Photoshop Elements 10 unleash the hidden performance of Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Galer, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Master the most powerful photo editing tools and techniques that Elements has to offer! Using step-by-step projects, Mark Galer will have you creating stunning images in no time at all. Whether you want to create impressive, seamless montages, optimize your photos for perfect print quality, or simply enhance your images for maximum impact, Maximum Performance will give you the skills and know-how you need to create professional quality results. Featured projects teach you how to work with multilayered 16 bit/channel files, as well as convert to black and white using Adobe Camera Raw, create

  14. Diffractive elements performance in chromatic confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, J; Duque, D; Alean, A; Toledo, M [Grupo de Optica y EspectroscopIa, Centro de Ciencia Basica, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana. Medellin (Colombia); Meneses, J [Laboratorio de Optica y Tratamiento de Senales, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Gharbi, T, E-mail: jgarzonr10@une.net.co [Laboratoire d' Optique P. M. Duffieux, UMR-6603 CNR/Universite de Franche-Comte. 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besancon Cedex (France)

    2011-01-01

    The Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry and biomedicine because of its depth discrimination capability. Subsequent to this technique has been developed in recent years Chromatic Confocal Microscopy. This method retains the same principle of confocal and offers the added advantage of removing the axial movement of the moving system. This advantage is usually accomplished with an optical element that generates a longitudinal chromatic aberration and a coding system that relates the axial position of each point of the sample with the wavelength that is focused on each. The present paper shows the performance of compact chromatic confocal microscope when some different diffractive elements are used for generation of longitudinal chromatic aberration. Diffractive elements, according to the process and manufacturing parameters, may have different diffraction efficiency and focus a specific wavelength in a specific focal position. The performance assessment is carried out with various light sources which exhibit an incoherent behaviour and a broad spectral width.

  15. Post-irradiation data on fuel elements from KER Loop 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, E.C.

    1963-01-10

    Fourteen NAE1 fuel elements were discharged from KER Loop-4, after irradiation to an average exposure of 1250 MWD, at prototype N-Reactor coolant temperature and pressure. The elements were disassembled and measured in the KE fuel examination facility. This report includes all measurements, except the profilometer data.

  16. Advancements in the behavioral modeling of fuel elements and related structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.C.; Montgomery, R.O.; Rashid, Y.R.; Head, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); ANATECH Research Corp., San Diego, CA (USA); Royal Naval Coll., Greenwich (UK))

    1989-01-01

    An important aspect of the design and analysis of nuclear reactors is the ability to predict the behavior of fuel elements in the adverse environment of a reactor system. By understanding the thermomechanical behavior of the different materials which constitute a nuclear fuel element, analysis and predictions can be made regarding the integrity and reliability of fuel element designs. The SMiRT conference series, through the division on fuel elements and the post-conference seminars on fuel element modeling, provided technical forums for the international participation in the exchange of knowledge concerning the thermomechanical modeling of fuel elements. This paper discusses the technical advances in the behavioral modeling of fuel elements presented at the SMiRT conference series since its inception in 1971. Progress in the areas of material properties and constitutive relationships, modeling methodologies, and integral modeling approaches was reviewed and is summarized in light of their impact on the thermomechanical modeling of nuclear fuel elements. 34 refs., 5 tabs.

  17. Ground test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion engines and fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G. C.; Beck, D. F.; Harmon, C. D.; Shipers, L. R.

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and design issues of a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion engines and fuel elements being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program.

  18. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TOFFER, H.

    2006-07-18

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Fuel that had experienced a neutron environment in a reactor is known as spent, exposed, or irradiated fuel. In contrast fuel that has not yet been placed in a reactor is known as green, unexposed, or unirradiated fuel. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled (References 1 and 2) and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements (Reference 3). The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprised of two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with unirradiated fuel and one with irradiated fuel. Both the unirradiated and irradiated fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, three (3) green fuel

  19. Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-31

    distribution unlimited Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis Matthew...Technical Note 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 04 January 2016 - 31 July 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on...Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  20. Fatigue analysis of CANFLEX-NU fuel elements subjected to power-cyclic loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Ki Seob; Suk, Ho Chun

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the fatigue analysis of the CANDU advanced fuel, so-called CANFLEX-NU, subjected to power-cyclic loads more than 1,000. The CANFLEX-NU bundle is composed of 43 elements with natural uranium fuel. As a result, the CANFLEX-NU fuel elements will maintain good integrity under the condition of 1,500 power-cycles. (author). 4 refs., 19 figs.

  1. Release to the Gas Phase of Inorganic Elements during Wood Combustion. Part 2: Influence of Fuel Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    Combustion of wood for heat and power production may cause problems such as ash deposition, corrosion, and harmful emissions of gases and particulate matter. These problems are all directly related to the release of inorganic elements (in particular Cl, S, K, Na, Zn, and Pb) from the fuel...... to the gas phase. The aims of this study are to obtain quantitative data on the release of inorganic elements during wood combustion and to investigate the influence of fuel composition. Quantitative release data were obtained by pyrolyzing and subsequently combusting small samples of wood (~30 g) at various...... temperatures in the range of 500–1150 °C in a laboratory-scale tube reactor and by performing mass balance calculations based on the weight measurements and chemical analyses of the wood fuels and the residual ash samples. Four wood fuels with different ash contents and inorganic compositions were investigated...

  2. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  3. Formation of intermetallic compound at interface between rare earth elements and ferritic-martensitic steel by fuel cladding chemical interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Hwan Kim; Byoung Oon Lee; Chan Bock Lee; Seung Hyun Jee; Young Soo Yoon

    2012-01-01

    The intermetallic compounds formation at interface between rare earth elements and clad material were investigated to demonstrate the effects of rare earth elements on fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) behavior.Mischmetal (70Ce-30La) and Nd were prepared as rare earth elements.Diffusion couple testing was performed on the rare earth elements and cladding (9Cr2W steel) near the operation temperature of(sodium-cooled fast reactor) SFR fuel.The performance of a diffusion barrier consisting of Zr and V metallic foil against the rare earth elements was also evaluated.Our results showed that Ce and Nd in the rare earth elements and Fe in the clad material interdiffused and reacted to form intermetallic species according to the parabolic rate law,describing the migration of the rare earth element.The diffusion of Fe limited the reaction progress such that the entire process was governed by the cubic rate law.Rare earth materials could be used as a surrogate for high burnup metallic fuels,and the performance of the barrier material was demonstrated to be effective.

  4. Nonuniform Oxidation on the Surface of Fuel Element in HTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The graphite oxidation of fuel element has obtained high attention in air ingress accident analysis of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR. The shape function, defined as the relationship between the maximum and the average of the oxidation, is an important factor to estimate the consequence of the accident. There are no detailed studies on the shape function currently except two experiments several decades ago. With the development of computer technology, CFD method is used in the numerical experiment about graphite oxidation in pebble bed of HTR in this paper. Structured packed beds are used in the calculation instead of random packed beds. The result shows the nonuniform distribution of oxidation on the sphere surface and the shape function in the condition of air ingress accident. Furthermore, the sensitive factors of shape function, such as temperature and Re number, are discussed in detail and the relationship between the shape function and sensitive factors is explained. According to the results in this paper, the shape function ranges from 1.05 to 4.7 under the condition of temperature varying from 600°C to 1200°C and Re varying from 16 to 1600.

  5. Information on the evolution of severe LWR fuel element damage obtained in the CORA program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanz, G.; Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Schumacher, G.; Sepold, L.

    1992-06-01

    In the CORA program a series of out-of-pile experiments on LWR severe accidental situations is being performed, in which test bundles of LWR typical components and arrangements (PWR, BWR) are exposed to temperature transients up to about 2400°C under flowing steam. The individual features of the facility, the test conduct, and the evaluation will be presented. In the frame of the international cooperation in severe fuel damage (SFD) programs the CORA tests are contributing confirmatory and complementary informations to the results from the limited number of in-pile tests. The identification of basic phenomena of the fuel element destruction, observed as a function of temperature, is supported by separate-effects test results. Most important mechanisms are the steam oxidation of the Zircaloy cladding, which determines the temperature escalation, the chemical interaction between UO 2 fuel and cladding, which dominates fuel liquefaction, relocation and resulting blockage formation, as well as chemical interactions with Inconel spacer grids and absorber units ((Ag, In, Cd) alloy or B 4C), which are leading to extensive low-temperature melt formation around 1200°C. Interrelations between those basic phenomena, resulting for example in cladding deformation ("flowering") and the dramatic hydrogen formation in response to the fast cooling of a hot bundle by cold water ("quenching") are determining the evolution paths of fuel element destruction, which are to be identified. A further important task is the abstraction from mechanistic and microstructural details in order to get a rough classification of damage regimes (temperature and extent), a practicable analytical treatment of the materials behaviour, and a basis for decisions in accident mitigation and management procedures.

  6. Studies on production planning of IPEN fuel-element plant in order to meet RMB demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negro, Miguel L.M.; Saliba-Silva, Adonis M.; Durazzo, Michelangelo, E-mail: mlnegro@ipen.br, E-mail: saliba@ipen.br, E-mail: mdurazzo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The plant of the Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) will have to change its current laboratorial production level to an industrial level in order to meet the fuel demand of RMB and of IEA-R1. CCN's production process is based on the hydrolysis of UF6, which is not a frequent production route for nuclear fuel. The optimization of the production capacity of such a production route is a new field of studies. Two different approaches from the area of Operations Research (OR) were used in this paper. The first one was the PERT/CPM technique and the second one was the creation of a mathematical linear model for minimization of the production time. PERT/CPM's results reflect the current situation and disclose which production activities may not be critical. The results of the second approach show a new average time of 3.57 days to produce one Fuel Element and set the need of inventory. The mathematical model is dynamic, so that it issues better results if performed monthly. CCN's management team will therefore have a clearer view of the process times and production and inventory levels. That may help to shape the decisions that need to be taken for the enlargement of the plant's production capacity. (author)

  7. Single-element coaxial injector for rocket fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, L. L.

    1969-01-01

    Improved injector for oxygen difluoride and diborane has better mixing characteristics and is able to project fuel onto the wall of the combustion chamber for better cooling. It produces an essentially conical, diverging, continuous sheet of propellant mixture formed by similarly shaped and continuously impinging sheets of fuel and oxidant.

  8. Development of the manufacture and process for DUPIC fuel elements; development of the quality evaluation techniques for end cap welds of DUPIC fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Tae; Choi, Myong Seon; Yang, Hyun Tae; Kim, Dong Gyun; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Jin Ho [Yeungnam University, Kyongsan (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this research is to set up the quality evaluation techniques for end cap welds of DUPIC fuel element. High temperature corrosion test and the SCC test for Zircaloy-4 were performed, and also the possibility of the ultrasonic test technique was verified for the quality evaluation and control of the laser welds in the DUPIC fuel rod end cap. From the evaluation of corrosion properties with measuring the weight gain and observing oxide film of the specimen that had been in the circumstance of steam(400 .deg. C, 1,500 psi) by max. 70 days later, the weight gain of the welded specimens was larger than original tube and the weight increasing rate increased with the exposed days. For the Development of techniques for ultrasonic test, semi-auto ultrasonic test system has been made based on immersion pulse-echo technique using spherically concentrated ultrasonic beam. Subsequently, developed ultrasonic test technique is quite sensible to shape of welds in the inside and outside of tube as well as crack, undercut and expulsion, and also this ultrasonic test, together with metallurgical fracture test, has good reliance as enough to be used for control method of welding process. 43 refs., 47 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  9. 77 FR 16868 - Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... COMMISSION Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test...-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test Reactors,'' is temporarily identified... verifying the quality of plate-type uranium-aluminum fuel elements used in research and test reactors (RTRs...

  10. 78 FR 33132 - Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... COMMISSION Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test... Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test Reactors.'' This guide... plate-type uranium-aluminum fuel elements used in research and test reactors (RTRs). ADDRESSES: Please...

  11. 10 CFR Appendix O to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant... Appendix O to Part 110—Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority Note: Nuclear fuel elements are manufactured from source or...

  12. 3D laser inspection of fuel assembly grid spacers for nuclear reactors based on diffractive optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finogenov, L. V.; Lemeshko, Yu A.; Zav'yalov, P. S.; Chugui, Yu V.

    2007-06-01

    Ensuring the safety and high operation reliability of nuclear reactors takes 100% inspection of geometrical parameters of fuel assemblies, which include the grid spacers performed as a cellular structure with fuel elements. The required grid spacer geometry of assembly in the transverse and longitudinal cross sections is extremely important for maintaining the necessary heat regime. A universal method for 3D grid spacer inspection using a diffractive optical element (DOE), which generates as the structural illumination a multiple-ring pattern on the inner surface of a grid spacer cell, is investigated. Using some DOEs one can inspect the nomenclature of all produced grids. A special objective has been developed for forming the inner surface cell image. The problems of diffractive elements synthesis, projecting optics calculation, adjusting methods as well as calibration of the experimental measuring system are considered. The algorithms for image processing for different constructive elements of grids (cell, channel hole, outer grid spacer rim) and the experimental results are presented.

  13. Intercode Advanced Fuels and Cladding Comparison Using BISON, FRAPCON, and FEMAXI Fuel Performance Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Aaren

    As part of the Department of Energy's Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) campaign, new cladding designs and fuel types are being studied in order to help make nuclear energy a safer and more affordable source for power. This study focuses on the implementation and analysis of the SiC cladding and UN, UC, and U3Si2 fuels into three specific nuclear fuel performance codes: BISON, FRAPCON, and FEMAXI. These fuels boast a higher thermal conductivity and uranium density than traditional UO2 fuel which could help lead to longer times in a reactor environment. The SiC cladding has been studied for its reduced production of hydrogen gas during an accident scenario, however the SiC cladding is a known brittle and unyielding material that may fracture during PCMI (Pellet Cladding Mechanical Interaction). This work focuses on steady-state operation with advanced fuel and cladding combinations. By implementing and performing analysis work with these materials, it is possible to better understand some of the mechanical interactions that could be seen as limiting factors. In addition to the analysis of the materials themselves, a further analysis is done on the effects of using a fuel creep model in combination with the SiC cladding. While fuel creep is commonly ignored in the traditional UO2 fuel and Zircaloy cladding systems, fuel creep can be a significant factor in PCMI with SiC.

  14. What happens inside a fuel cell? Developing an experimental functional map of fuel cell performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Daniel J L; Kucernak, Anthony R; Aguiar, Patricia; Atkins, Stephen C; Brandon, Nigel P; Clague, Ralph; Cohen, Lesley F; Hinds, Gareth; Kalyvas, Christos; Offer, Gregory J; Ladewig, Bradley; Maher, Robert; Marquis, Andrew; Shearing, Paul; Vasileiadis, Nikos; Vesovic, Velisa

    2010-09-10

    Fuel cell performance is determined by the complex interplay of mass transport, energy transfer and electrochemical processes. The convolution of these processes leads to spatial heterogeneity in the way that fuel cells perform, particularly due to reactant consumption, water management and the design of fluid-flow plates. It is therefore unlikely that any bulk measurement made on a fuel cell will accurately represent performance at all parts of the cell. The ability to make spatially resolved measurements in a fuel cell provides one of the most useful ways in which to monitor and optimise performance. This Minireview explores a range of in situ techniques being used to study fuel cells and describes the use of novel experimental techniques that the authors have used to develop an 'experimental functional map' of fuel cell performance. These techniques include the mapping of current density, electrochemical impedance, electrolyte conductivity, contact resistance and CO poisoning distribution within working PEFCs, as well as mapping the flow of reactant in gas channels using laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). For the high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), temperature mapping, reference electrode placement and the use of Raman spectroscopy are described along with methods to map the microstructural features of electrodes. The combination of these techniques, applied across a range of fuel cell operating conditions, allows a unique picture of the internal workings of fuel cells to be obtained and have been used to validate both numerical and analytical models.

  15. Plant Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems Fed by Alternative Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Different plant design for several fuel types such as natural gas, methanol, ethanol, DME, ammonia and pure hydrogen are presented and analysed. Anode recirculation which is an important issue in SOFC plants are also explored and studied. It is shown that depending on type of the fuel whether fuel...... recirculation is needed or not and if so then what would be the effect of anode recycling on plant efficiency. A single study with similar conditions and prerequisites will thus reveal the importance of fuel recirculation on plant performance with alternative fuels. It is also shown that increasing anode...... recycle increases plant efficiency only if fuel utilization factor is low. Other important issues such as why plant efficiency is lower when it is fed with hydrogen or biogas compared to when it is fed by other fuels such as methanol, ethanol, DME and ammonia will also be discussed and explained...

  16. Novel proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes to improve performance of reversible fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tim Matthew

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells react fuel and oxidant to directly and efficiently produce electrical power, without the need for combustion, heat engines, or motor-generators. Additionally, PEM fuel cell systems emit zero to virtually zero criteria pollutants and have the ability to reduce CO2 emissions due to their efficient operation, including the production or processing of fuel. A reversible fuel cell (RFC) is one particular application for a PEM fuel cell. In this application the fuel cell is coupled with an electrolyzer and a hydrogen storage tank to complete a system that can store and release electrical energy. These devices can be highly tailored to specific energy storage applications, potentially surpassing the performance of current and future secondary battery technology. Like all PEM applications, RFCs currently suffer from performance and cost limitations. One approach to address these limitations is to improve the cathode performance by engineering more optimal catalyst layer geometry as compared to the microscopically random structure traditionally used. Ideal configurations are examined and computer modeling shows promising performance improvements are possible. Several novel manufacturing methods are used to build and test small PEM fuel cells with novel electrodes. Additionally, a complete, dynamic model of an RFC system is constructed and the performance is simulated using both traditional and novel cathode structures. This work concludes that PEM fuel cell microstructures can be tailored to optimize performance based on design operating conditions. Computer modeling results indicate that novel electrode microstructures can improve fuel cell performance, while experimental results show similar performance gains that bolster the theoretical predictions. A dynamic system model predicts that novel PEM fuel cell electrode structures may enable RFC systems to be more competitive with traditional energy storage technology options.

  17. Douglas United Nuclear, Inc. report to the Working Committee of the Fuel Element Development Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stringer, J.T.

    1966-05-04

    This document provides the report to the working committee of the fuel element development committee for small and K reactor production fuels. Topics discussed are: Uranium core production data; uranium specification; future planning -- five year R&D program; thoria development; heat treating; UO{sub 2} irradiation; and alternate process development.

  18. Experimental investigation of fuel evaporation in the vaporizing elements of combustion chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezhba, I.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of the experimental apparatus and the methods used in the investigation of the degree of fuel (kerosene) evaporation in two types of vaporizing elements in combustion chambers. The results are presented as dependences of the degree of fuel evaporation on the factors which characterize the functioning of the vaporizing elements: the air surplus coefficient, the velocity of flow and temperature of the air at the entrance to the vaporizing element and the temperature of the wall of the vaporizing element.

  19. The reliability of untempered end plug welds on HT9-clad IFR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D C; Porter, D L

    1987-02-01

    Welding generally leaves residual stresses in transformed weld zones, which can initiate cracks from flaws already present in the weld zones. When HT9 cools from welding temperatures, a martensite phase forms in the weld fusion zone and heat-affected zone. Because this martensite phase is hard and brittle, it is particularly susceptible to cracking aggravated by residual stresses. This causes concern over the use of untempered welds on HT9-clad fuel elements. To determine if residual stresses present in end-plug weld zones would affect fuel pin performance, HT9 capsules with prototypic TIG- and CD-welded end plugs (in the tempered and as-welded conditions) were pressurized to failure at room temperature, 550{sup 0}C, and 600{sup 0}C. None of the capsules failed in a weld zone. To determine the effects of reactor operating temperatures on untempered welds, prototypic TIG welds were tempered at reactor bulk sodium temperature and an expected sodium outlet temperature for various lengths of time. Subsequent tensile and burst tests of these specimens proved that any embrittling effects that may have been induced in these welds were of no consequence. Hardness tests on longitudinal sections of welds indicated the amount of tempering a weld will receive inreactor after relatively short lengths of time. The pressure burst tests proved that untemperted welds on HT9-clad fuel elements are as reliable as tempered welds; any residual stresses in untempered weld zones were of no consequence. The tempering test showed that welds used in the as-welded condition will sufficiently temper in 7 days at 550{sup 0}C, but will not, sufficiently temper in 7 days at bulk sodium temperature. A comparison of the structure of laser welds to those of CD and TIG welds indicated that untempered laser welds will perform and temper in a manner similar to the TIG welds tested in this effort.

  20. Alternate-Fueled Combustor-Sector Performance: Part A: Combustor Performance Part B: Combustor Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouse, D. T.; Neuroth, C.; Henricks, R. C.; Lynch, A.; Frayne, C.; Stutrud, J. S.; Corporan, E.; Hankins, T.

    2010-01-01

    Alternate aviation fuels for military or commercial use are required to satisfy MIL-DTL-83133F(2008) or ASTM D 7566 (2010) standards, respectively, and are classified as drop-in fuel replacements. To satisfy legacy issues, blends to 50% alternate fuel with petroleum fuels are certified individually on the basis of feedstock. Adherence to alternate fuels and fuel blends requires smart fueling systems or advanced fuel-flexible systems, including combustors and engines without significant sacrifice in performance or emissions requirements. This paper provides preliminary performance (Part A) and emissions and particulates (Part B) combustor sector data for synthetic-parafinic-kerosene- (SPK-) type fuel and blends with JP-8+100 relative to JP-8+100 as baseline fueling.

  1. Performance optimization of a PEM hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadiq Al-Baghdadi, Maher A.R. [Fuel Cell Research Center, International Energy and Environment Foundation, Al-Najaf, P.O.Box 39 (Iraq)

    2013-07-01

    The objective was to develop a semi-empirical model that would simulate the performance of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells without extensive calculations. A fuel cell mathematical module has been designed and constructed to determine the performance of a PEM fuel cell. The influence of some operating parameters on the performance of PEM fuel cell has been investigated using pure hydrogen on the anode side and oxygen on the cathode side. The present model can be used to investigate the influence of process variables for design optimization of fuel cells, stacks, and complete fuel cell power system. The possible mechanisms of the parameter effects and their interrelationships are discussed. In order to assess the validity of the developed model a real PEM fuel cell system has been used to generate experimental data. The comparison shows good agreements between the modelling results and the experimental data. The model is shown a very useful for estimating the performance of PEM fuel cell stacks and optimization of fuel cell system integration and operation.

  2. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Charles A. Baldwin; Philip L. Winston; Jason M. Harp; Scott A. Ploger; Tyler Gerczak; Isabella J. van Rooyen; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva

    2014-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.5% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel–including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures–was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocrabon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1×10 4 to 5×10 4 for 154Eu and 8×10 7 to 3×10 5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs release from compacts was <3×10 6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98×105 experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs release in two capsules to approximately 10 5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that released cesium during irradiation, where SiC corrosion was found adjacent to IPyC cracks. Palladium, silver, and uranium were found in the SiC layer of irradiated particles, and characterization

  3. Multiphysics Modeling of a Single Channel in a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Grooved Ring Fuel Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J., Jr.; Barkett, Laura A.; Mathias, Adam D.; Cassibry, Jason T.

    2013-01-01

    In the past, fuel rods have been used in nuclear propulsion applications. A new fuel element concept that reduces weight and increases efficiency uses a stack of grooved discs. Each fuel element is a flat disc with a hole on the interior and grooves across the top. Many grooved ring fuel elements for use in nuclear thermal propulsion systems have been modeled, and a single flow channel for each design has been analyzed. For increased efficiency, a fuel element with a higher surface-area-to-volume ratio is ideal. When grooves are shallower, i.e., they have a lower surface area, the results show that the exit temperature is higher. By coupling the physics of turbulence with those of heat transfer, the effects on the cooler gas flowing through the grooves of the thermally excited solid can be predicted. Parametric studies were done to show how a pressure drop across the axial length of the channels will affect the exit temperatures of the gas. Geometric optimization was done to show the behaviors that result from the manipulation of various parameters. Temperature profiles of the solid and gas showed that more structural optimization is needed to produce the desired results. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, Fuel Element, Heat Transfer, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Coupled Physics Computations, Finite Element Analysis

  4. Effects of coal-derived trace species on performance of molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The Carbonate Fuel Cell is a very promising option for highly efficient generation of electricity from many fuels. If coal-gas is to be used, the interactions of coal-derived impurities on various fuel cell components need to be understood. Thus the effects on Carbonate Fuel Cell performance due to ten different coal-derived contaminants viz., NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, HC{ell}, H{sub 2}Se, AsH{sub 3}, Zn, Pb, Cd, Sn, and Hg, have been studied at Energy Research Corporation. Both experimental and theoretical evaluations were performed, which have led to mechanistic insights and initial estimation of qualitative tolerance levels for each species individually and in combination with other species. The focus of this study was to investigate possible coal-gas contaminant effects on the anode side of the Carbonate Fuel Cell, using both out-of-cell thermogravimetric analysis by isothermal TGA, and fuel cell testing in bench-scale cells. Separate experiments detailing performance decay in these cells with high levels of ammonia contamination (1 vol %) and with trace levels of Cd, Hg, and Sn, have indicated that, on the whole, these elements do not affect carbonate fuel cell performance. However, some performance decay may result when a number of the other six species are present, singly or simultaneously, as contaminants in fuel gas. In all cases, tolerance levels have been estimated for each of the 10 species and preliminary models have been developed for six of them. At this stage the models are limited to isothermal, benchscale (300 cm{sup 2} size) single cells. The information obtained is expected to assist in the development of coal-gas cleanup systems, while the contaminant performance effects data will provide useful basic information for modeling fuel cell endurance in conjunction with integrated gasifier/fuel-cell systems (IGFC).

  5. Effects of coal-derived trace species on performance of molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The Carbonate Fuel Cell is a very promising option for highly efficient generation of electricity from many fuels. If coal-gas is to be used, the interactions of coal-derived impurities on various fuel cell components need to be understood. Thus the effects on Carbonate Fuel Cell performance due to ten different coal-derived contaminants viz., NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, HC{ell}, H{sub 2}Se, AsH{sub 3}, Zn, Pb, Cd, Sn, and Hg, have been studied at Energy Research Corporation. Both experimental and theoretical evaluations were performed, which have led to mechanistic insights and initial estimation of qualitative tolerance levels for each species individually and in combination with other species. The focus of this study was to investigate possible coal-gas contaminant effects on the anode side of the Carbonate Fuel Cell, using both out-of-cell thermogravimetric analysis by isothermal TGA, and fuel cell testing in bench-scale cells. Separate experiments detailing performance decay in these cells with high levels of ammonia contamination (1 vol %) and with trace levels of Cd, Hg, and Sn, have indicated that, on the whole, these elements do not affect carbonate fuel cell performance. However, some performance decay may result when a number of the other six species are present, singly or simultaneously, as contaminants in fuel gas. In all cases, tolerance levels have been estimated for each of the 10 species and preliminary models have been developed for six of them. At this stage the models are limited to isothermal, benchscale (300 cm{sup 2} size) single cells. The information obtained is expected to assist in the development of coal-gas cleanup systems, while the contaminant performance effects data will provide useful basic information for modeling fuel cell endurance in conjunction with integrated gasifier/fuel-cell systems (IGFC).

  6. Flow rate and humidification effects on a PEM fuel cell performance and operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvelioglu, Galip H.; Stenger, Harvey G.

    A new algorithm is presented to integrate component balances along polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) channels to obtain three-dimensional results from a detailed two-dimensional finite element model. The analysis studies the cell performance at various hydrogen flow rates, air flow rates and humidification levels. This analysis shows that hydrogen and air flow rates and their relative humidity are critical to current density, membrane dry-out, and electrode flooding. Uniform current densities along the channels are known to be critical for thermal management and fuel cell life. This approach, of integrating a detailed two-dimensional across-the-channel model, is a promising method for fuel cell design due to its low computational cost compared to three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics models, its applicability to a wide range of fuel cell designs, and its ease of extending to fuel cell stack models.

  7. Neutronics and Fuel Performance Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Fuel under Normal Operation Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Wu; Piyush Sabharwall; Jason Hales

    2014-07-01

    This report details the analysis of neutronics and fuel performance analysis for enhanced accident tolerance fuel, with Monte Carlo reactor physics code Serpent and INL’s fuel performance code BISON, respectively. The purpose is to evaluate two of the most promising candidate materials, FeCrAl and Silicon Carbide (SiC), as the fuel cladding under normal operating conditions. Substantial neutron penalty is identified when FeCrAl is used as monolithic cladding for current oxide fuel. From the reactor physics standpoint, application of the FeCrAl alloy as coating layer on surface of zircaloy cladding is possible without increasing fuel enrichment. Meanwhile, SiC brings extra reactivity and the neutron penalty is of no concern. Application of either FeCrAl or SiC could be favorable from the fuel performance standpoint. Detailed comparison between monolithic cladding and hybrid cladding (cladding + coating) is discussed. Hybrid cladding is more practical based on the economics evaluation during the transition from current UO2/zircaloy to Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) system. However, a few issues remain to be resolved, such as the creep behavior of FeCrAl, coating spallation, inter diffusion with zirconium, etc. For SiC, its high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, low thermal neutron absorption cross section, irradiation stability (minimal swelling) make it an excellent candidate materials for future nuclear fuel/cladding system.

  8. Manufacturing of 37-element fuel bundles for PHWR 540 - new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, U.K.; Sastry, V.S.; Banerjee, P.K.; Rao, G.V.S.H.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. Atomic Energy, Government of India, Hyderabad (India)

    2003-07-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), established in early seventies, is a major industrial unit of Department of Atomic Energy. NFC is responsible for the supply of fuel bundles to all the 220 MWe PHWRs presently in operation. For supplying fuel bundles for the forthcoming 540 MWe PHWRs, NEC is dovetailing 37-element fuel bundle manufacturing facilities in the existing plants. In tune with the philosophy of self-reliance, emphasis is given to technology upgradation, higher customer satisfaction and application of modern quality control techniques. With the experience gained over the years in manufacturing 19-element fuel bundles, NEC has introduced resistance welding of appendages on fuel tubes prior to loading of UO{sub 2} pellets, use of bio-degradable cleaning agents, simple diagnostic tools for checking the equipment condition, on line monitoring of variables, built-in process control methods and total productive maintenance concepts in the new manufacturing facility. Simple material handling systems have been contemplated for handling of the fuel bundles. This paper highlights the flow-sheet adopted for the process, design features of critical equipment and the methodology for fabricating the 37-element fuel bundles, 'RIGHT FIRST TIME'. (author)

  9. BEAM 1.7: development for modelling fuel element and bundle buckling strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, G.; Xu, S.; Xu, Z.; Paul, U.K. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes BEAM, an AECL developed computer program, used to assess mechanical integrity of CANDU fuel bundles. The BEAM code has been developed to satisfy the need for buckling strength analysis of fuel bundles. Buckling refers to the phenomenon where a compressive axial load is large enough that a small lateral load can cause large lateral deflections. The buckling strength refers to the critical compressive axial load at which lateral instability is reached. The buckling strength analysis has practical significance for the design of fuel bundles, where the buckling strength of a fuel element/bundle is assessed so that the conditions leading to bundle jamming in the pressure tube are excluded. This paper presents the development and qualification of the BEAM code, with emphasis on the theoretical background and code implementation of the newly developed fuel element/bundle buckling strength model. (author)

  10. Atomic scale simulations for improved CRUD and fuel performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-06

    A more mechanistic description of fuel performance codes can be achieved by deriving models and parameters from atomistic scale simulations rather than fitting models empirically to experimental data. The same argument applies to modeling deposition of corrosion products on fuel rods (CRUD). Here are some results from publications in 2016 carried out using the CASL allocation at LANL.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-COST MANUFACTURING PROCESSES FOR PLANAR, MULTILAYER SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Harlan Anderson; Tim Armstrong; Michael Cobb; Kirby Meacham; James Stephan; Russell Bennett; Bob Remick; Chuck Sishtla; Scott Barnett; John Lannutti

    2004-06-12

    This report summarizes the results of a four-year project, entitled, ''Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'', jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the State of Ohio, and by project participants. The project was led by NexTech Materials, Ltd., with subcontracting support provided by University of Missouri-Rolla, Michael A. Cobb & Co., Advanced Materials Technologies, Inc., Edison Materials Technology Center, Gas Technology Institute, Northwestern University, and The Ohio State University. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, though not formally a subcontractor on the program, supported the effort with separate DOE funding. The objective of the program was to develop advanced manufacturing technologies for making solid oxide fuel cell components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. The program was carried out in three phases. In the Phase I effort, several manufacturing approaches were considered and subjected to detailed assessments of manufacturability and development risk. Estimated manufacturing costs for 5-kW stacks were in the range of $139/kW to $179/kW. The risk assessment identified a number of technical issues that would need to be considered during development. Phase II development work focused on development of planar solid oxide fuel cell elements, using a number of ceramic manufacturing methods, including tape casting, colloidal-spray deposition, screen printing, spin-coating, and sintering. Several processes were successfully established for fabrication of anode-supported, thin-film electrolyte cells, with performance levels at or near the state-of-the-art. The work in Phase III involved scale-up of cell manufacturing methods, development of non-destructive evaluation methods, and comprehensive electrical and electrochemical testing of solid oxide fuel cell materials and components.

  12. Non-destructive-Testing of Nuclear Fuel Element by Means of Neutron Imaging Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fuel element is the key component of nuclear reactor. People have to make strictly testing of the element to make sure the reactor operating safely. Neutron imaging is one of Non-destructive-Testing (NDT) techniques, which are very important techniques for

  13. Burn-up and Operation Time of Fuel Elements Produced in IPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondin, Julio Benedito Marin; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the developed work along the operational and reliability tests of fuel elements produced in the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research, IPEN-CNEN/SP, from the 1980's. The study analyzed the U-235 burn evolution and the element remain in the research reactor IEA-R1. The fuel elements are of the type MTR (Material Testing Reactor), the standard with 18 plates and a 12-plate control, with a nominal mean enrichment of 20%.

  14. Sipping test update device for fuel elements cladding inspections in IPR-r1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.R.; Mesquita, A.Z.; Andrade, E.P.D.; Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: rrr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br, E-mail: edson@cdtn.br, E-mail: maritzargual@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    It is in progress at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN (Nuclear Technology Development Center), a research project that aims to investigate possible leaks in the fuel elements of the TRIGA reactor, located in this research center. This paper presents the final form of sipping test device for TRIGA reactor, and results of the first experiments setup. Mechanical support strength tests were made by knotting device on the crane, charged with water from the conventional water supply, and tests outside the reactor pool with the use of new non-irradiated fuel elements encapsulated in stainless steel, and available safe stored in this unit. It is expected that tests with graphite elements from reactor pool are done soon after and also the test experiment with the first fuel elements in service positioned in the B ring (central ring) of the reactor core in the coming months. (author)

  15. Development of fuel performance and thermal hydraulic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Youn Ho; Song, K. N.; Kim, H. K. and others

    2000-03-01

    Space grid in LWR fuel assembly is a key structural component to support fuel rods and to enhance heat transfer from fuel rod to the coolant. Therefore, the original spacer grid has been developed. In addition, new phenomena in fuel behavior occurs at the high burnup, so that models to analyze those new phenomena were developed. Results of this project can be summarized as follows. - Seven different spacer grid candidates have been invented and submitted for domestic and US patents. Spacer grid test specimen(3x3 array and 5x5 array) were fabricated for each candidate and the mechanical tests were performed. - Basic technologies in the mechanical and thermal hydraulic behavior in the spacer grid development are studied and relevant test facilities were established - Fuel performance analysis models and programs were developed for the high burnup pellet and cladding, and fuel performance data base were compiled - Procedures of fuel characterization and in-/out of-pile tests were prepared - Conceptual design of fuel rod for integral PWR was carried out. (author)

  16. Analytical Solution of Fick's Law of the TRISO-Coated Fuel Particles and Fuel Elements in Pebble-Bed High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jian-Zhu; FANG Chao; SUN Li-Feng

    2011-01-01

    T wo kinds of approaches are built to solve the fission products diffusion models (Fick's equation) based on sphere fuel particles and sphere fuel elements exactly. Two models for homogenous TRISO-coated fuel particles and fuel elements used in pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors are presented, respectively. The analytica,solution of Fick's equation for fission products diffusion in fuel particles is derived by variables separation.In the fuel element system, a modification of the diffusion coefficient from D to D/r is made to characterize the difference of diffusion rates in distinct areas and it is shown that the Laplace and Hankel transformations are effective as the diffusion coefficient in Fick's equation is dependant on the radius of the fuel element. Both the solutions are useful for the prediction of the fission product behaviors and could be programmed in the corresponding engineering calculations.%@@ Two kinds of approaches are built to solve the fission products diffusion models(Fick's equation) based on sphere fuel particles and sphere fuel elements exactly.Two models for homogenous TRISO-coated fuel particles and fuel elements used in pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors are presented,respectively.The analytical solution of Fick's equation for fission products diffusion in fuel particles is derived by variables separation.In the fuel element system,a modification of the diffusion coefficient from D to D/r is made to characterize the difference of diffusion rates in distinct areas and it is shown that the Laplace and Hankel transformations are effective as the diffusion coefficient in Fick's equation is dependant on the radius of the fuel element.Both the solutions are useful for the prediction of the fission product behaviors and could be programmed in the corresponding engineering calculations.

  17. Chemical Gradients in Crud on Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. L. Porter; D. E. Janney

    2007-04-01

    Crud (radioactive corrosion products formed inside nuclear reactors is a major problem in commercial power-producing nuclear reactors. Although there are numerous studies of simulated (non-radioactive) crud, characteristics of crud from actual reactors are rarely studied. This study reports scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies of fragments of crud from a commercially operating boiling water reactor. Chemical analyses in the SEM indicated that the crud closest to the outer surfaces of the fuel pins in some areas had Fe:Zn ratios close to 2:1, which decreased away from the fuel pin in some of the fragments. In combination with transmission electron microsope analyses (published elsewhere), these results suggest that the innermost layer of crud in some areas may consist of franklinite (ZnFe2O4, also called zinc spinel), while outer layers in these areas may be predominantly iron oxides.

  18. Wind-Aided Firespread Across Arrays of Discrete Fuel Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    Ph.D. thesis, Department of Chemical Engineering. Fredericton , Canada: University of New Brunswick. Fang, J. B., and Steward, F. R. 1969 Flame spread... Fredericton , Canada: University of New Brunswick. Steward, F. R., and Tennankore, K. N. 1981 The measurement of the burning rate of an individual dowel in a...1973 Flame spread through uniform fuel matrices. Report, Fire Science Center. Fredericton , Canada: University of New Brunswick. Steward, F. R

  19. The upgrade and conversion of the ET-RR-1 research reactor using plate type fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashoub, N. [Reactor Physics Dept., Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Saleh, H.G. [Faculty of Girls for Arts and Education, Ain-Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt)

    2001-11-01

    The ET-RR-1 research reactor has been operated at 2 MW since 1961 using EK-10 fuel elements with 10% enriched uranium. The reactor has been used for nuclear applied research and isotope production. In order to upgrade the reactor power to a reasonable limit facing up-to-date uses, core conversion by a new type of fuel element available is necessary. Two fuel elements in plate type are suggested in this study to be used in the ET-RR-1 reactor core rather than the utilized ones. The first element has a dimension of 8 x 8 x 50 cm and consists of 19.7% enriched uranium, which is typical for that utilized in the ET-RR-2 reactor, but with a different length. The other element is proposed with a dimension of 7 x 7 x 50 cm and has the same uranium enrichment. To accomplish safety requirements for these fuel elements, thermal-hydraulic evaluation has been carried out using the PARET code. To reach a core conversion of the ET-RR-1 reactor with the above two types of fuel elements, neutronic calculations have been performed using WIMSD4, DIXY2 and EREBUS codes. Some important nuclear parameters needed in the physical design of the reactor were calculated and included in this study. (orig.) [German] Der ET-RR-1 Forschungsreaktor wird seit 1961 unter Verwendung von EK-10 Brennelementen mit einer Leistung von 2 MW betrieben. Der Reaktor wird in der angewandten Forschung und zur Isotopenherstellung eingesetzt. Um die Reaktorleistung im Hinblick auf eine zeitgemaesse Nutzung der Anlage in einem vernuenftigen Mass zu erhoehen, ist eine Umwandlung des Kerns durch Verwendung neuartiger Brennelemente noetig. In der vorliegenden Untersuchung wird vorgeschlagen, anstelle der z. Z. verwendeten Elemente zwei neue, plattenfoermige Brennelemente zu verwenden. Das erste Element hat eine Groesse von 8 x 8 x 50 cm und besteht aus 19,7% angereichertem Uran, was den im ET-RR-2 Reaktor verwendeten Elementen entspricht, allerdings mit einer anderen Groesse. Das zweite Element hat die gleiche

  20. Method for recovering catalytic elements from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, Lawrence [Edison, NJ; Matlin, Ramail [Berkeley Heights, NJ; Heinz, Robert [Ludwigshafen, DE

    2012-06-26

    A method for recovering catalytic elements from a fuel cell membrane electrode assembly is provided. The method includes converting the membrane electrode assembly into a particulate material, wetting the particulate material, forming a slurry comprising the wetted particulate material and an acid leachate adapted to dissolve at least one of the catalytic elements into a soluble catalytic element salt, separating the slurry into a depleted particulate material and a supernatant containing the catalytic element salt, and washing the depleted particulate material to remove any catalytic element salt retained within pores in the depleted particulate material.

  1. Fuel Cycle Performance of Thermal Spectrum Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrall, Andrew [ORNL; Todosow, Michael [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    2016-01-01

    Small modular reactors may offer potential benefits, such as enhanced operational flexibility. However, it is vital to understand the holistic impact of small modular reactors on the nuclear fuel cycle and fuel cycle performance. The focus of this paper is on the fuel cycle impacts of light water small modular reactors in a once-through fuel cycle with low-enriched uranium fuel. A key objective of this paper is to describe preliminary reactor core physics and fuel cycle analyses conducted in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Options Campaign. Challenges with small modular reactors include: increased neutron leakage, fewer assemblies in the core (and therefore fewer degrees of freedom in the core design), complex enrichment and burnable absorber loadings, full power operation with inserted control rods, the potential for frequent load-following operation, and shortened core height. Each of these will impact the achievable discharge burn-up in the reactor and the fuel cycle performance. This paper summarizes the results of an expert elicitation focused on developing a list of the factors relevant to small modular reactor fuel, core, and operation that will impact fuel cycle performance. Preliminary scoping analyses were performed using a regulatory-grade reactor core simulator. The hypothetical light water small modular reactor considered in these preliminary scoping studies is a cartridge type one-batch core with 4.9% enrichment. Some core parameters, such as the size of the reactor and general assembly layout, are similar to an example small modular reactor concept from industry. The high-level issues identified and preliminary scoping calculations in this paper are intended to inform on potential fuel cycle impacts of one-batch thermal spectrum SMRs. In particular, this paper highlights the impact of increased neutron leakage and reduced number of batches on the achievable burn-up of the reactor. Fuel cycle performance

  2. Transfer of elements relevant to nuclear fuel cycle from soil to boreal plants and animals in experimental meso- and microcosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S., E-mail: tiina.tuovinen@uef.fi [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Kasurinen, Anne; Häikiö, Elina [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Tervahauta, Arja [Department of Biology, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box FI-70211, Kuopio (Finland); Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2016-01-01

    Uranium (U), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and zinc (Zn) occur naturally in soil but their radioactive isotopes can also be released into the environment during the nuclear fuel cycle. The transfer of these elements was studied in three different trophic levels in experimental mesocosms containing downy birch (Betula pubescens), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and Scandinavian small-reed (Calamagrostis purpurea ssp. Phragmitoides) as producers, snails (Arianta arbostorum) as herbivores, and earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) as decomposers. To determine more precisely whether the element uptake of snails is mainly via their food (birch leaves) or both via soil and food, a separate microcosm experiment was also performed. The element uptake of snails did not generally depend on the presence of soil, indicating that the main uptake route was food, except for U, where soil contact was important for uptake when soil U concentration was high. Transfer of elements from soil to plants was not linear, i.e. it was not correctly described by constant concentration ratios (CR) commonly applied in radioecological modeling. Similar nonlinear transfer was found for the invertebrate animals included in this study: elements other than U were taken up more efficiently when element concentration in soil or food was low. - Highlights: • We studied transfer of elements in boreal food chain using meso- and microcosms. • Elements related to nuclear fuel cycle and mining were examined. • Higher uptake at lower soil concentrations was observed for primary producers. • Snails took up elements mainly from food but for U also soil was an element source. • Non-linear transfer of essential elements was observed for herbivore and decomposer.

  3. Internal flow measurements of the SSME fuel preburner injector element using real time neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, John T.; Elam, Sandy; Koblish, Ted; Lee, Phil; Mcauliffe, Dave

    1990-01-01

    Due to observations of unsteady flow in the Space Shuttle Main Engine fuel preburner injector element, several flow studies have been performed. Real time neutron radiography tests were recently completed. This technique provided real time images of MiL-c-7024 and Freon-22 flow through an aluminum liquid oxygen post model at three back pressures (0, 150, and 545 psig) and pressure drops up to 1000 psid. Separated flow appeared only while operating at back pressures of 0 and 150 psig. The behavior of separated flow was similar to that observed for water in a 3x acrylic model of the LOX post. On the average, separated flow appeared to reattach near the exit of the post when the ratio of pressure drop to supply pressure was about 0.75.

  4. Standard laboratory hydraulic pressure drop characteristics of various solid and I&E fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, E.D.; Horn, G.R.

    1958-01-20

    The purpose of this report is to present a set of standard pressure-drop curves for various fuel elements in process tubes of Hanford reactors. The flow and pressures within a process tube assembly under normal conditions are dependent to a large extent on the magnitude of the pressure drop across the fuel elements. The knowledge of this pressure drop is important in determination of existing thermal conditions within the process tubes and in predicting conditions for new fuel element designs or changes in operating conditions. The pressure-flow relations for the different Hanford fuel element-process tube assemblies have all been determined at one time or another in the 189-D Hydraulics Laboratory but the data had never been collected into a single report. Such a report is presented now in the interest of establishing a set of ``standard curves`` as determined by laboratory investigations. It must be recognized that the pressure drops of fuel elements in actual process tubes in the reactors may be slightly different than those reported here. The data presented here were obtained in new process tubes while reactor process tubes are usually either corroded or filmed, depending on their past history.

  5. What Happens Inside a Fuel Cell? Developing an Experimental Functional Map of Fuel Cell Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Brett, Daniel J. L.

    2010-08-20

    Fuel cell performance is determined by the complex interplay of mass transport, energy transfer and electrochemical processes. The convolution of these processes leads to spatial heterogeneity in the way that fuel cells perform, particularly due to reactant consumption, water management and the design of fluid-flow plates. It is therefore unlikely that any bulk measurement made on a fuel cell will accurately represent performance at all parts of the cell. The ability to make spatially resolved measurements in a fuel cell provides one of the most useful ways in which to monitor and optimise performance. This Minireview explores a range of in situ techniques being used to study fuel cells and describes the use of novel experimental techniques that the authors have used to develop an \\'experimental functional map\\' of fuel cell performance. These techniques include the mapping of current density, electrochemical impedance, electrolyte conductivity, contact resistance and CO poisoning distribution within working PEFCs, as well as mapping the flow of reactant in gas channels using laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). For the high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), temperature mapping, reference electrode placement and the use of Raman spectroscopy are described along with methods to map the microstructural features of electrodes. The combination of these techniques, applied across a range of fuel cell operating conditions, allows a unique picture of the internal workings of fuel cells to be obtained and have been used to validate both numerical and analytical models. © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH& Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. GEH-4-63, 64: Proposal for irradiation of production brazed Zircaloy-2 clad fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tverberg, J.C.

    1961-05-18

    A brazed end closure is currently being used on prototypical NPR fuel elements. The production closure will use a braze alloy composed of 5% Be + 95% Zry-2 to braze the Zircaloy-2 cap to the jacket and to the metallic uranium core. A similar MTR test, a GEH-4-57, 58, used a braze alloy of the composition 4% Be + 12% Fe + 84% Zry-2 which melts at a lower temperature. In this previous test, element GEH-4-57 failed through a cladding defect located at the base of the braze heat affected zone. Because of this failure it would be desirable to subject a fuel element, which had been subjected to more severe brazing conditions, to the same conditions as GEH-4-57, 58. For this reason the thermal conditions of this test essentially match those of GEH-4-57, 58. This irradiation test consists of two identical fuel elements. The fuel material is normal metallic uranium, Zircaloy-2 clad of the tubular geometry, NPR inner size. The fuel was coextruded at Hanford by General Electric`s Fuels Preparation Department. Each element is 10.8 inches in length with flat Zircaloy-2 end caps brazed to the jacket and uranium core with the 5 Be + 95 Zry-2 brazing alloy, then TIG welded to further insure closure integrity. The elements ar 1.254 inches OD and 0.439 inches ID. For hydraulic purposes a 0.343 inch diamater flow restrictor has been fitted into the central flow channel of both elements.

  7. Performance and Exhaust Emissions in a Natural-Gas Fueled Dual-Fuel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioji, Masahiro; Ishiyama, Takuji; Ikegami, Makoto; Mitani, Shinichi; Shibata, Hiroaki

    In order to establish the optimum fueling in a natural gas fueled dual fuel engine, experiments were done for some operational parameters on the engine performances and the exhaust emissions. The results show that the pilot fuel quantity should be increased and its injection timing should be advanced to suppress unburned hydrocarbon emission in the middle and low output range, while the quantity should be reduced and the timing retarded to avoid onset of knock at high loads. Unburned hydrocarbon emission and thermal efficiency are improved by avoiding too lean natural gas mixture by restricting intake charge air. However, the improvement is limited because the ignition of pilot fuel deteriorates with excessive throttling. It is concluded that an adequate combination of throttle control and equivalence ratio ensures low hydrocarbon emission and the thermal efficiency comparable to diesel operation.

  8. Advanced Ceramics for Use as Fuel Element Materials in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Peter G.; Allen, Lee R.; Shapiro, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    With the recent start (October 2011) of the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Program, there is renewed interest in developing advanced ceramics for use as fuel element materials in nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems. Three classes of fuel element materials are being considered under the NCPS Program: (a) graphite composites - consisting of coated graphite elements containing uranium carbide (or mixed carbide), (b) cermets (ceramic/metallic composites) - consisting of refractory metal elements containing uranium oxide, and (c) advanced carbides consisting of ceramic elements fabricated from uranium carbide and one or more refractory metal carbides [1]. The current development effort aims to advance the technology originally developed and demonstrated under Project Rover (1955-1973) for the NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) [2].

  9. Metal-Element Compounds of Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium as Pyrotechnic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-04

    1-11 1 METAL-ELEMENT COMPOUNDS OF TITANIUM, ZIRCONIUM , AND HAFNIUM AS PYROTECHNIC FUELS Anthony P. Shaw,* Rajendra K. Sadangi, Jay C...have started to explore the pyrotechnic properties of other inorganic compounds, particularly those of titanium, zirconium , and hafnium. The...The group 4 metals—titanium, zirconium , and hafnium—are potent pyrotechnic fuels. However, the metals themselves are often pyrophoric as fine

  10. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  11. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  12. Review: Circulation of Inorganic Elements in Combustion of Alternative Fuels in Cement Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortada Mut, Maria del Mar; Nørskov, Linda Kaare; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming;

    2015-01-01

    Cement production is an energy-intensive process, which traditionally has been dependent on fossil fuels. However, the use of alternative fuels, i.e., selected waste, biomass, and byproducts with recoverable calorific value, is constantly increasing. Combustion of these fuels is more challenging......, compared to fossil fuels, because of a lack of experience and different chemical and physical properties. When complete oxidation Of fuels in the calciner and main burner is not achieved, they burn in direct contact with the bed material of the rotary kiln, causing local reducing conditions and increasing...... the internal circulation of S, Cl, Na, and K. Compounds containing these elements, such as alkali salts, evaporate when exposed to high temperatures and subsequently condense in colder parts of the plant. The transformation of the volatile inorganic species at different locations in the cement plant...

  13. Sipping machine control system new design to perform integrity of nuclear fuel test in Cofrentes power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, M., E-mail: mpalomo@iqn.upv.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain); Urrea, M., E-mail: Matias.urrea@iberdrola.es [C.N.Cofrentes - Iberdrola Generacion S.A., Cofrentes, Valencia (Spain); Curiel, M., E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.com [LAINSA Grupo Dominguis, Valencia (Spain); Arnaldos, A., E-mail: a.arnaldos@titaniast.com [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Grupo Dominguis, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    This paper we present is related to SIPPING machine control system new design to perform integrity of nuclear fuel test. This test is a non destructive technique used for evaluating the radiated nuclear fuel coating structural integrity. It is based on the radioactive emission detection of fission elements in the reactor cooling system, using the fuel inspection equipment (SIPPING). SIPPING equipment consists of one simultaneous test bell-shaped vessel of eight fuel elements, and another one for individual element test, a control workstation and some accessories (cables, thermocouples, hoses). SIPPING inspection is carried out by means of fuel element vessel. Through air injection, water flows around the element and heat evacuation is reduced, so fuel elements temperature increases. Those elements with faults shall expelled fission components dissolved in water and/or as a gas component. The project aim is the SIPPING system control design and software based on LabVIEW, for control, monitoring and documentation of the SIPPING Test. This project shall give a major functionality to the system and, at the same time, shall facilitate the user a friendlier and interactive environment allowing: to substitute the present work platform with a real-time electronic system based on cRIO and a control software ad-hoc designed for SIPPING system; to equip new system of a major redundancy for data storage, minimising loss probability of the same. (author)

  14. Sipping machine control system new design to perform integrity of nuclear fuel test in Cofrentes power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curiel, M. [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales SAU, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain); Palomo, M. J. [ISIRYM, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, Valencia (Spain); Urrea, M. [Iberdrola Generacion S. A., Central Nuclear Cofrentes, Carretera Almansa Requena s/n, 04662 Cofrentes, Valencia (Spain); Vaquer, J., E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.co [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    This paper related to Sipping machine control system new design to perform integrity of nuclear fuel test. This test is a non destructive technique used for evaluating the radiated nuclear fuel coating structural integrity. It is based on the radioactive emission detection of fission elements in the reactor cooling system, using the fuel inspection equipment Sipping. The equipment consists of one simultaneous test bell-shaped vessel of eight fuel elements, and another one for individual element test, a control workstation and some accessories (cables, thermocouples, hoses). Sipping inspection is carried out by means of fuel element vessel. Through air injection, water flows around the element and heat evacuation is reduced, so fuel elements temperature increases. Those elements with faults shall expelled fission components dissolved in water and/or as a gas component. The project aim is the Sipping system control design and software based on LabVIEWTM, for control, monitoring and documentation of the Sipping test. This project shall give a major functionality to the system and, at the same time, shall facilitate the user a friendlier and interactive environment allowing: 1) To substitute the present work platform with a real-time electronic system based on cRIO and a control software ad-hoc designed for Sipping system. 2) To equip new system of a major redundancy for data storage, minimising loss probability of the same. (Author)

  15. Characterizing high-temperature deformation of internally heated nuclear fuel element simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, A.I.; Fong, R.W.L.; Leitch, B.W.; Nitheanandan, T.; Williams, A., E-mail: alexander.belov@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    The sag behaviour of a simulated nuclear fuel element during high-temperature transients has been investigated in an experiment utilizing an internal indirect heating method. The major motivation of the experiment was to improve understanding of the dominant mechanisms underlying the element thermo-mechanical response under loss-of-coolant accident conditions and to obtain accurate experimental data to support development of 3-D computational fuel element models. The experiment was conducted using an electrically heated CANDU fuel element simulator. Three consecutive thermal cycles with peak temperatures up to ≈1000 {sup o}C were applied to the element. The element sag deflections and sheath temperatures were measured. On heating up to 600 {sup o}C, only minor lateral deflections of the element were observed. Further heating to above 700 {sup o}C resulted in an element multi-rate creep and significant permanent bow. Post-test visual and X-ray examinations revealed a pronounced necking of the sheath at the pellet-to-pellet interface locations. A wall thickness reduction was detected in the necked region that is interpreted as a sheath longitudinal strain localization effect. The sheath cross-sectioning showed signs of a 'hard' pellet-cladding interaction due to the applied cycles. A 3-D model of the experiment was generated using the ANSYS finite element code. As a fully coupled thermal mechanical simulation is computationally expensive, it was deemed sufficient to use the measured sheath temperatures as a boundary condition, and thus an uncoupled mechanical simulation only was conducted. The ANSYS simulation results match the experiment sag observations well up to the point at which the fuel element started cooling down. (author)

  16. Comparison of Material Behavior of Matrix Graphite for HTGR Fuel Elements upon Irradiation: A literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The fuel elements for the HTGRs (i.e., spherical fuel element in pebble-bed type core design and fuel compact in prismatic core design) consists of coated fuel particles dispersed and bonded in a closely packed array within a carbonaceous matrix. This matrix is generally made by mixing fully graphitized natural and needle- or pitchcoke originated powders admixed with a binder material (pitch or phenolic resin), The resulting resinated graphite powder mixture, when compacted, may influence a number of material properties as well as its behavior under neutron irradiation during reactor operation. In the fabrication routes of these two different fuel element forms, different consolidation methods are employed; a quasi-isostatic pressing method is generally adopted to make pebbles while fuel compacts are fabricated by uni-axial pressing mode. The result showed that the hardness values obtained from the two directions showed an anisotropic behavior: The values obtained from the perpendicular section showed much higher micro hardness (176.6±10.5MPa in average) than from the parallel section ((125.6±MPa in average). This anisotropic behavior was concluded to be related to the microstructure of the matrix graphite. This may imply that the uni-axial pressing method to make compacts influence the microstructure of the matrix and hence the material properties of the matrix graphite.

  17. Design and performance of a prototype fuel cell powered vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, P.A.; Chamberlin, C.E. [Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) is now engaged in the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project. The Project involves a consortium which includes the City of Palm Desert, SERC, the U.S. Department of Energy, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and Sandia and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Its goal to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community will be accomplished by producing a fleet of fuel cell vehicles, installing a refueling infrastructure utilizing hydrogen generated from solar and wind power, and developing and staffing a fuel cell service and diagnostic center. We will describe details of the project and performance goals for the fuel cell vehicles and associated peripheral systems. In the past year during the first stage in the project, SERC has designed and built a prototype fuel cell powered personal utility vehicle (PUV). These steps included: (1) Designing, building, and testing a 4.0 kW proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell as a power plant for the PUV. (2) Designing, building and testing peripherals including the air delivery, fuel storage/delivery, refueling, water circulation, cooling, and electrical systems. (3) Devising a control algorithm for the fuel cell power plant in the PUV. (4) Designing and building a test bench in which running conditions in the PUV could be simulated and the fuel cell and its peripheral systems tested. (5) Installing an onboard computer and associated electronics into the PUV (6) Assembling and road testing the PUV.

  18. Design and performance of a prototype fuel cell powered vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, P.A.; Chamberlin, C.E. [Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) is now engaged in the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project. The Project involves a consortium which includes the City of Palm Desert, SERC, the U.S. Department of Energy, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and Sandia and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Its goal to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community will be accomplished by producing a fleet of fuel cell vehicles, installing a refueling infrastructure utilizing hydrogen generated from solar and wind power, and developing and staffing a fuel cell service and diagnostic center. We will describe details of the project and performance goals for the fuel cell vehicles and associated peripheral systems. In the past year during the first stage in the project, SERC has designed and built a prototype fuel cell powered personal utility vehicle (PUV). These steps included: (1) Designing, building, and testing a 4.0 kW proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell as a power plant for the PUV. (2) Designing, building and testing peripherals including the air delivery, fuel storage/delivery, refueling, water circulation, cooling, and electrical systems. (3) Devising a control algorithm for the fuel cell power plant in the PUV. (4) Designing and building a test bench in which running conditions in the PUV could be simulated and the fuel cell and its peripheral systems tested. (5) Installing an onboard computer and associated electronics into the PUV (6) Assembling and road testing the PUV.

  19. Clad thickness variation N-Reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E.A.

    1966-05-12

    The current specifications for the cladding on {open_quotes}N{close_quotes} fuels were established early in the course of process development and were predicted on several basic considerations. Among these were: (a) a desire to provide an adequate safety factor in cladding thickness to insure against corrosion penetration and rupture from uranium swelling stresses; (b) an apprehension that the striations in the zircaloy cladding of the U/zircaloy interface and on the exterior surface might serve as stress-raisers, leading to untimely failures of the jacket; and (c) then existing process capability - the need to maintain a specified ratio between zircaloy and uranium in the billet assembly to effect satisfactory coextrusion. It now appears appropriate to review these specifications in an effort to determine whether some of them may be revised, with attendant gains in economy and/or operating smoothness.

  20. Costs of head-end incineration with respect to Kr separation in the reprocessing of HTR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnert-Wiemer, H.; Boehnert, R.

    1976-07-15

    The C-incinerations and the Kr-separations during head-end incineration in the reprocessing of HTR fuel elements are described. The costs for constructing an operating a head-end incineration of reprocessing capacities with 5,000 to 50,000 MW(e)-HTR power have been determined. The cost estimates are divided into investment and operating costs, further after the fraction of the N/sub 2/-content in the incineration exhaust gas, which strongly affects costs. It appears that, in the case of Kr-separation from the incineration exhaust gas, the investment costs as well as the operating costs of the head-end for N/sub 2/-containing exhaust gas are considerably greater than those for gas without N/sub 2/. The C-incineration of the graphite of the HTR fuel elements should therefore only be performed with influx gas that is free of N/sub 2/.

  1. Program ELM: A tool for rapid thermal-hydraulic analysis of solid-core nuclear rocket fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, James T.

    1992-01-01

    This report reviews the state of the art of thermal-hydraulic analysis codes and presents a new code, Program ELM, for analysis of fuel elements. ELM is a concise computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in a nuclear thermal rocket reactor with axial coolant passages. The program was developed as a tool to swiftly evaluate various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations generated for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition which have been used in previous programs. Thus, a consistent comparison of these correlations was performed, as well as a comparison with data from the NRX reactor experiments from the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) project. This report describes the ELM Program algorithm, input/output, and validation efforts and provides a listing of the code.

  2. Gel-sphere-pac fuel for thermal reactors: assessment of fabrication technology and irradiation performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, R.L. Norman, R.E.; Notz, K.J. (comps.)

    1979-11-01

    Recent interest in proliferation-resistant fuel cycles for light-water reactors has focused attention on spiked plutonium and /sup 233/U-Th fuels, requiring remote refabrication. The gel-sphere-pac process for fabricating metal-clad fuel elements has drawn special attention because it involves fewer steps. Gel-sphere-pac fabrication technology involves two major areas: the preparation of fuel spheres of high density and loading these spheres into rods in an efficiently packed geometry. Gel sphere preparation involves three major steps: preparation of a sol or of a special solution (broth), gelation of droplets of sol or broth to give semirigid spheres of controlled size, and drying and sintering these spheres to a high density. Gelation may be accomplished by water extraction (suitable only for sols) or ammonia gelation (suitable for both sols and broths but used almost exclusively with broths). Ammonia gelation can be accomplished either externally, via ammonia gas and ammonium hydroxide, or internally via an added ammonia generator such as hexamethylenetetramine. Sphere-pac fuel rod fabrication involves controlled blending and metering of three sizes of spheres into the rod and packing by low- to medium-energy vibration to achieve about 88% smear density; these sizes have diametral ratios of about 40:10:1 and are blended in size fraction amounts of about 60% coarse, 18% medium, and 22% fine. Irradiation test results indicate that sphere-pac fuel performs at least as well as pellet fuel, and may in fact offer an advantage in significantly reducing mechanical and chemical interaction between the fuel and cladding. The normal feed for gel sphere preparation, heavy metal nitrate solution, is the usual product of fuel reprocessing, so that fabrication of gel spheres performs all the functions performed by both conversion and pellet fabrication in the case of pellet technology.

  3. Theoretical performance of hydrogen-bromine rechargeable SPE fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinell, Robert F.; Fritts, S. D.

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model was formulated to describe the performance of a hydrogen-bromine fuel cell. Porous electrode theory was applied to the carbon felt flow-by electrode and was coupled to theory describing the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) system. Parametric studies using the numerical solution to this model were performed to determine the effect of kinetic, mass transfer, and design parameters on the performance of the fuel cell. The results indicate that the cell performance is most sensitive to the transport properties of the SPE membrane. The model was also shown to be a useful tool for scale-up studies.

  4. Nerva Fuel Element Development Program Summary Report - July 1966 through June 1972 Extrusion Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, J. M.

    1973-09-21

    This part of the completion report pertaining to the NERVA graphite fuel element program covers data collected during the extrusion studies. The physical properties of the fuel element reached the following values: coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) - 7.0 x 10-6/o C (25 - l,OOOo C); modulus of elasticity - 1.5 x lo6 psi; flexural strength - - 8,000 psi; ultimate strain to failure - 5,500 pidin; good thermal stress resistance. Matrices were produced which could be vapor coated with crack-free films of zirconium carbide. The CTE of the matrix was almost equal to the CTE of the zirconium carbide coating.

  5. Influence of the fuel and dosage on the performance of double-compartment microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Y; Fernandez-Marchante, C M; Lobato, J; Cañizares, P; Rodrigo, M A

    2016-08-01

    This manuscript focuses on the evaluation of the use of different types and dosages of fuels in the performance of double-compartment microbial fuel cell equipped with carbon felt electrodes and cationic membrane. Five types of fuels (ethanol, glycerol, acetate, propionate and fructose) have been tested for the same organic load (5,000 mg L(-1) measured as COD) and for one of them (acetate), the range of dosages between 500 and 20,000 mg L(-1) of COD was also studied. Results demonstrate that production of electricity depends strongly on the fuel used. Carboxylic acids are much more efficient than alcohols or fructose for the same organic load and within the range 500-5,000 mg L(-1) of acetate the production of electricity increases linearly with the amount of acetate fed but over these concentrations a change in the population composition may explain a worse performance.

  6. Experimental approach and modelling of the mechanical behaviour of graphite fuel elements subjected to compression pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forquin, P.

    2010-06-01

    Among the activities led by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) relative to the future nuclear systems, the improvement of recycling of fuel elements and their components is a major issue. One of the studied systems by the GIF is the graphite-moderated high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). The fuel elements are composed of fuel roads half-inch in diameter named compacts. The compacts contain spherical particles made of actinide kernels about 500 m in diameter coated with three layers of carbon and silicon carbide, each about 50 m thick, dispersed in a graphite matrix. Recycling of compacts requires first a separation of triso-particles from the graphite matrix and secondly, the separation of the triso-coating from the kernels. This aim may be achieved by using pulsed currents: the compacts are placed within a cell filled by water and exposed to high voltage between 200 - 500 kV and discharge currents from 10 to 20 kA during short laps of time (about 2 µs) [1-2]. This repeated treatment leads to a progressive fragmentation of the graphite matrix and a disassembly of the compacts. In order to improve understanding of the fragmentation properties of compacts a series of quasi-static and dynamic experiments have been conducted with similar cylindrical samples containing 10% (volume fraction) of SiC particles coated in a graphite matrix. First, quasi-static compression tests have been performed to identify the mechanical behaviour of the material at low strain-rates (Fig.1). The experiments reveal a complex elasto-visco-plastic behaviour before a brittle failure. The mechanical response is characterised by a low yield stress (about 1 MPa), a strong strain-hardening in the loading phase and marked hysteresis-loops during unloading-reloading stages. Brittle failure is observed for axial stress about 13 MPa. In parallel, a series of flexural tests have been performed with the aim to characterise the quasi-static tensile strength of the particulate

  7. Experimental approach and modelling of the mechanical behaviour of graphite fuel elements subjected to compression pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forquin P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the activities led by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF relative to the future nuclear systems, the improvement of recycling of fuel elements and their components is a major issue. One of the studied systems by the GIF is the graphite-moderated high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR. The fuel elements are composed of fuel roads half-inch in diameter named compacts. The compacts contain spherical particles made of actinide kernels about 500 m in diameter coated with three layers of carbon and silicon carbide, each about 50 m thick, dispersed in a graphite matrix. Recycling of compacts requires first a separation of triso-particles from the graphite matrix and secondly, the separation of the triso-coating from the kernels. This aim may be achieved by using pulsed currents: the compacts are placed within a cell filled by water and exposed to high voltage between 200 – 500 kV and discharge currents from 10 to 20 kA during short laps of time (about 2 µs [1-2]. This repeated treatment leads to a progressive fragmentation of the graphite matrix and a disassembly of the compacts. In order to improve understanding of the fragmentation properties of compacts a series of quasi-static and dynamic experiments have been conducted with similar cylindrical samples containing 10% (volume fraction of SiC particles coated in a graphite matrix. First, quasi-static compression tests have been performed to identify the mechanical behaviour of the material at low strain-rates (Fig.1. The experiments reveal a complex elasto-visco-plastic behaviour before a brittle failure. The mechanical response is characterised by a low yield stress (about 1 MPa, a strong strain-hardening in the loading phase and marked hysteresis-loops during unloading-reloading stages. Brittle failure is observed for axial stress about 13 MPa. In parallel, a series of flexural tests have been performed with the aim to characterise the quasi-static tensile strength of the

  8. A mono-dimensional nuclear fuel performance analysis code, PUMA, development from a coupled approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, J. S.; Lee, B. O.; Lee, C. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Yacout, A. M. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Multidimensional-multi-physical phenomena in nuclear fuels are treated as a set of mono-dimensional-coupled problems which encompass heat, displacement, fuel constituent redistribution, and fission gas release. Rather than uncoupling these coupled equations as in conventional fuel performance analysis codes, efforts are put into to obtain fully coupled solutions by relying on the recent advances of numerical analysis. Through this approach, a new SFR metal fuel performance analysis code, called PUMA (Performance of Uranium Metal fuel rod Analysis code) is under development. Although coupling between temperature and fuel constituent was made easily, the coupling between the mechanical equilibrium equation and a set of stiff kinetics equations for fission gas release is accomplished by introducing one-level Newton scheme through backward differentiation formula. Displacement equations from 1D finite element formulation of the mechanical equilibrium equation are solved simultaneously with stress equation, creep equation, swelling equation, and FGR equations. Calculations was made successfully such that the swelling and the hydrostatic pressure are interrelated each other. (authors)

  9. Thermal breeder fuel enrichment zoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capossela, Harry J.; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Luce, Robert G.; McCoy, Daniel F.; Merriman, Floyd C.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the performance of a thermal breeder reactor having regions of higher than average moderator concentration are disclosed. The fuel modules of the reactor core contain at least two different types of fuel elements, a high enrichment fuel element and a low enrichment fuel element. The two types of fuel elements are arranged in the fuel module with the low enrichment fuel elements located between the high moderator regions and the high enrichment fuel elements. Preferably, shim rods made of a fertile material are provided in selective regions for controlling the reactivity of the reactor by movement of the shim rods into and out of the reactor core. The moderation of neutrons adjacent the high enrichment fuel elements is preferably minimized as by reducing the spacing of the high enrichment fuel elements and/or using a moderator having a reduced moderating effect.

  10. Software Design Document for the AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Cochran, Bill [ORNL

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the design of the AMP nuclear fuel performance code. It provides an overview of the decomposition into separable components, an overview of what those components will do, and the strategic basis for the design. The primary components of a computational physics code include a user interface, physics packages, material properties, mathematics solvers, and computational infrastructure. Some capability from established off-the-shelf (OTS) packages will be leveraged in the development of AMP, but the primary physics components will be entirely new. The material properties required by these physics operators include many highly non-linear properties, which will be replicated from FRAPCON and LIFE where applicable, as well as some computationally-intensive operations, such as gap conductance, which depends upon the plenum pressure. Because there is extensive capability in off-the-shelf leadership class computational solvers, AMP will leverage the Trilinos, PETSc, and SUNDIALS packages. The computational infrastructure includes a build system, mesh database, and other building blocks of a computational physics package. The user interface will be developed through a collaborative effort with the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Capability Transfer program element as much as possible and will be discussed in detail in a future document.

  11. Development of Out-pile Test Technology for Fuel Assembly Performance Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Tae Hyun; In, W. K.; Oh, D. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2007-03-15

    Out-pile tests with full scale fuel assembly are to verify the design and to evaluate the performance of the final products. HTL for the hydraulic tests and FAMeCT for mechanical/structural tests were constructed in this project. The maximum operating conditions of HTL are 30 bar, 320 .deg. C, and 500 m3/hr. This facility can perform the pressure drop test, fuel assembly uplift test, and flow induced vibration test. FAMeCT can perform the bending and vibration tests. The verification of the developed facilities were carried out by comparing the reference data of the fuel assembly which was obtained at the Westinghouse Co. The compared data showed a good coincidence within uncertainties. FRETONUS was developed for high temperature and high pressure fretting wear simulator and performance test. A performance test was conducted for 500 hours to check the integrity, endurance, data acquisition capability of the simulator. The technology of turbulent flow analysis and finite element analysis by computation was developed. From the establishments of out-pile test facilities for full scale fuel assembly, the domestic infrastructure for PWR fuel development has been greatly upgraded.

  12. Molybdenum-99-producing 37-element fuel bundle neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to a standard CANDU fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichita, E., E-mail: Eleodor.Nichita@uoit.ca; Haroon, J., E-mail: Jawad.Haroon@uoit.ca

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A 37-element fuel bundle modified for {sup 99}Mo production in CANDU reactors is presented. • The modified bundle is neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to the standard bundle. • The modified bundle satisfies all safety criteria satisfied by the standard bundle. - Abstract: {sup 99m}Tc, the most commonly used radioisotope in diagnostic nuclear medicine, results from the radioactive decay of {sup 99}Mo which is currently being produced at various research reactors around the globe. In this study, the potential use of CANDU power reactors for the production of {sup 99}Mo is investigated. A modified 37-element fuel bundle, suitable for the production of {sup 99}Mo in existing CANDU-type reactors is proposed. The new bundle is specifically designed to be neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to the standard 37-element CANDU fuel bundle in normal, steady-state operation and, at the same time, be able to produce significant quantities of {sup 99}Mo when irradiated in a CANDU reactor. The proposed bundle design uses fuel pins consisting of a depleted-uranium centre surrounded by a thin layer of low-enriched uranium. The new molybdenum-producing bundle is analyzed using the lattice transport code DRAGON and the diffusion code DONJON. The proposed design is shown to produce 4081 six-day Curies of {sup 99}Mo activity per bundle when irradiated in the peak-power channel of a CANDU core, while maintaining the necessary reactivity and power rating limits. The calculated {sup 99}Mo yield corresponds to approximately one third of the world weekly demand. A production rate of ∼3 bundles per week can meet the global demand of {sup 99}Mo.

  13. Performance Modelling of Timber Facade Elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surmeli-Anac, A.N.

    2013-01-01

    Windows and doors are essential elements of buildings. These seemingly simple components have become increasingly complex over the last decades. They have to fulfil an increased number of functions which ask for contradictory solutions and need to comply with more and more severe requirements.

  14. Yalina booster subcritical assembly performance with low enriched uranium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry, E-mail: alby@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The YALINA Booster facility is a subcritical assembly located in Minsk, Belarus. The facility has special features that result in fast and thermal neutron spectra in different zones. The fast zone of the assembly uses a lead matrix and uranium fuels with different enrichments: 90% and 36%, 36%, or 21%. The thermal zone of the assembly contains 10% enriched uranium fuel in a polyethylene matrix. This study discusses the performance of the three YALINA Booster configurations with the different fuel enrichments. In order to maintain the same subcriticality level in the three configurations, the number of fuel rods in the thermal zone is increased as the uranium fuel enrichment in the fast zone is decreased. The maximum number of fuel rods that can be loaded in the thermal zone is about 1185. Consequently, the neutron multiplication of the configuration with 21% enriched uranium fuel in the fast zone is enhanced by changing the position of the boron carbide and the natural uranium absorber rods, located between the fast and the thermal zones, to form an annular rather than a square arrangement. (author)

  15. Influence of Fuel Injection on Gasoline Engine Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-zheng Ma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Because of the most common method of preparing the fuel-air mixture for gasoline-fueled engines is port fuel injection (PFI. For reducing the wall-film entering the cylinder in liquid phase, the phenomena of wall-film entering the cylinder in liquid phase should be at minimum lever or be avoided. So the first thing for learning the wall-film is to detect the way of the wall-film entering the cylinder. Therefore, the way of the wall-film enter the cylinder in liquid phase is detected by changing the temperature of the wall-film location and time for wall-film evaporated. Then the way is validated by experiment test bed and it is improved that the way is feasible. At the end the influence of injection timing and fuel ratio on engine performance is studied based on the test bed.The results show that regardless of the expansion stroke or the intake stroke fuel injection the injection timing delay will decrese the engine power and  make emission deterioration meanwhile the twice fuel injection can improve the fuel film evaporation resulting of high-speed airflow of intake charge.

  16. Novel high-performance element in the electromagnetic finite-element method--node-edge element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Xinqing; Peng Zhen

    2008-01-01

    It is known in the computational electromagnetics (CEM) that the node element has a relative well-conditioned matrix,but suffers from the spurious solution problem; whereas the edge element has no spurious solutions,but usually produces an ill-conditioned matrix.Particularly,when the mesh is over dense,the iterative solution of the matrix equation from edge element converges very slowly.Based on the node element and edge element,a node-edge element is presented,which has no spurious solutions and better-conditioned matrix.Numerical experiments demonstrate that the proposed node-edge element is more efficient than now-widely used edge element.

  17. Development of numerical methodology for stress analysis in fuel element nozzles; Desenvolvimento de metodologia numerica para analise de tensoes nos bocais de elementos combustiveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrilho, Leo A.; Dotto, Rosvita M. [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil SA, Resende, RJ (Brazil); Gouvea, Jayme P. de [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    Calculations of stresses and deformations of the bottom end piece of fuel elements of Angra-2 were performed with finite element method for the load case handling, zero load cold and full power operation, considering the same load of the actual and well established methodology, but applying shell elements instead of solid. The obtained results show that the application of this element is conservative and shall be used in future mechanical analysis of design alterations of this component when performed by the INB engineering group. (author)

  18. Transposable elements and small RNAs: Genomic fuel for species diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Federico G; McGuire, Liam P; Counterman, Brian A; Ray, David A

    2015-01-01

    While transposable elements (TE) have long been suspected of involvement in species diversification, identifying specific roles has been difficult. We recently found evidence of TE-derived regulatory RNAs in a species-rich family of bats. The TE-derived small RNAs are temporally associated with the burst of species diversification, suggesting that they may have been involved in the processes that led to the diversification. In this commentary, we expand on the ideas that were briefly touched upon in that manuscript. Specifically, we suggest avenues of research that may help to identify the roles that TEs may play in perturbing regulatory pathways. Such research endeavors may serve to inform evolutionary biologists of the ways that TEs have influenced the genomic and taxonomic diversity around us.

  19. Saccadic search performance: the effect of element spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaskamp, Björn N S; Over, Eelco A B; Hooge, Ignace Th C

    2005-11-01

    In a saccadic search task, we investigated whether spacing between elements affects search performance. Since it has been suggested in the literature that element spacing can affect the eye movement strategy in several ways, its effects on search time per element are hard to predict. In the first experiment, we varied the element spacing (3.4 degrees -7.1 degrees distance between elements) and target-distracter similarity. As expected, search time per element increased with target-distracter similarity. Decreasing element spacing decreased the search time per element. However, this effect was surprisingly small in comparison to the effect of varying target-distracter similarity. In a second experiment, we elaborated on this finding and decreased element spacing even further (between 0.8 degrees and 3.2 degrees). Here, we did not find an effect on search time per element for element spacings from 3.2 degrees to spacings as small as 1.5 degrees . It was only at distances smaller than 1.5 degrees that search time per element increased with decreasing element spacing. In order to explain the remarkable finding that search time per element was not affected for such a wide range of element spacings, we propose that irrespective of the spacing crowding kept the number of elements processed per fixation more or less constant.

  20. Volatile Elements Retention During Injection Casting of Metallic Fuel Slug for a Recycling Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kuk, Seoung-Woo; Keum, Chang-Woon; Lee, Jung-Won; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The as-cast fuels prepared by injection casting were sound and the internal integrities were found to be satisfactory through gamma-ray radiography. U and Zr were uniform throughout the matrix of the slug, and the impurities, i.e., oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen, satisfied the specification of the total impurities of less than 2000 ppm. The losses of the volatile Mn were effectively controlled using argon over pressures, and dynamic pumping for a period of time before injection showed no detrimental effect on the Mn loss by vaporization. This result suggests that volatile minor actinide-bearing fuels for SFRs can be prepared by improved injection methods. A practical process of metallic fuel fabrication for an SFR needs to be cost efficient, suitable for remote operation, and capable of mass production while reducing the amount of radioactive waste. Injection casting was chosen as the most promising technique, and this technique has been applied to fuel slug fabrication for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) driver and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel pins. Because of the simplistic nature of the process and equipment, compared to other processes examined, this process has been successfully used in a remote operation environment for fueling of the EBR-II reactor. In this study, several injection casting methods were applied in order to prepare metallic fuel for an fast reactor that control the transport of volatile elements during fuel melting and casting. Mn was selected as a surrogate alloy since it possesses a total vapor pressure equivalent to that of a volatile minor actinide-bearing fuel. U.10Zr and U.10Zr.5Mn (wt%) metallic fuels were injection cast under various casting conditions and their soundness was characterized.

  1. Fuel-element failures in Hanford single-pass reactors 1944--1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1993-07-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. To estimate the doses, the staff of the Source Terms Task use operating information from historical documents to approximate the radioactive emissions. One source of radioactive emissions to the Columbia River came from leaks in the aluminum cladding of the uranium metal fuel elements in single-pass reactors. The purpose of this letter report is to provide photocopies of the documents that recorded these failures. The data from these documents will be used by the Source Terms Task to determine the contribution of single-pass reactor fuel-element failures to the radioactivity of the reactor effluent from 1944 through 1971. Each referenced fuel-element failure occurring in the Hanford single-pass reactors is addressed. The first recorded failure was in 1948, the last in 1970. No records of fuel-element failures were found in documents prior to 1948. Data on the approximately 2000 failures which occurred during the 28 years (1944--1971) of Hanford single-pass reactor operations are provided in this report.

  2. Aerothermal modeling program, Phase 2, Element C: Fuel injector-air swirl characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, A. A.; Mongia, H. C.; Mcdonnel, V. G.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1987-01-01

    The main objectives of the NASA sponsored Aerothermal Modeling Program, Phase 2, Element C, are to collect benchmark quality data to quantify the fuel spray interaction with the turbulent swirling flows and to validate current and advanced two phase flow models. The technical tasks involved in this effort are discussed.

  3. Dissolution performance of plutonium nitride based fuel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aneheim, E.; Hedberg, M. [Nuclear Chemistry, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 4, Gothenburg, SE41296 (Sweden)

    2016-07-01

    Nitride fuels have been regarded as one viable fuel option for Generation IV reactors due to their positive features compared to oxides. To be able to close the fuel cycle and follow the Generation IV concept, nitrides must, however, demonstrate their ability to be reprocessed. This means that the dissolution performance of actinide based nitrides has to be thoroughly investigated and assessed. As the zirconium stabilized nitrides show even better potential as fuel material than does the pure actinide containing nitrides, investigations on the dissolution behavior of both PuN and (Pu,Zr)N has been undertaken. If possible it is desirable to perform the fuel dissolutions using nitric acid. This, as most reprocessing strategies using solvent-solvent extraction are based on a nitride containing aqueous matrix. (Pu,Zr)N/C microspheres were produced using internal gelation. The spheres dissolution performance was investigated using nitric acid with and without additions of HF and Ag(II). In addition PuN fuel pellets were produced from powder and their dissolution performance were also assessed in a nitric acid based setting. It appears that both PuN and (Pu,Zr)N/C fuel material can be completely dissolved in nitric acid of high concentration with the use of catalytic amounts of HF. The amount of HF added strongly affects dissolution kinetics of (Pu, Zr)N and the presence of HF affects the 2 solutes differently, possibly due to inhomogeneity o the initial material. Large additions of Ag(II) can also be used to facilitate the dissolution of (Pu,Zr)N in nitric acid. PuN can be dissolved by pure nitric acid of high concentration at room temperature while (Pu, Zr)N is unaffected under similar conditions. At elevated temperature (reflux), (Pu,Zr)N can, however, also be dissolved by concentrated pure nitric acid.

  4. Fully Coupled Modeling of Burnup-Dependent (U1- y , Pu y )O2- x Mixed Oxide Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Zhou, Wenzhong; Zhou, Wei

    2016-03-01

    During the fast reactor nuclear fuel fission reaction, fission gases accumulate and form pores with the increase of fuel burnup, which decreases the fuel thermal conductivity, leading to overheating of the fuel element. The diffusion of plutonium and oxygen with high temperature gradient is also one of the important fuel performance concerns as it will affect the fuel material properties, power distribution, and overall performance of the fuel pin. In order to investigate these important issues, the (U1- y Pu y )O2- x fuel pellet is studied by fully coupling thermal transport, deformation, oxygen diffusion, fission gas release and swelling, and plutonium redistribution to evaluate the effects on each other with burnup-dependent models, accounting for the evolution of fuel porosity. The approach was developed using self-defined multiphysics models based on the framework of COMSOL Multiphysics to manage the nonlinearities associated with fast reactor mixed oxide fuel performance analysis. The modeling results showed a consistent fuel performance comparable with the previous results. Burnup degrades the fuel thermal conductivity, resulting in a significant fuel temperature increase. The fission gas release increased rapidly first and then steadily with the burnup increase. The fuel porosity increased dramatically at the beginning of the burnup and then kept constant as the fission gas released to the fuel free volume, causing the fuel temperature to increase. Another important finding is that the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen affects greatly not only the fuel properties, for example, thermal conductivity, but also the fuel performance, for example, temperature distribution, porosity evolution, grain size growth, fission gas release, deformation, and plutonium redistribution. Special attention needs to be paid to the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen in fuel fabrication. Plutonium content will also affect the fuel material properties and performance

  5. Burnup determination of a fuel element concerning different cooling times; Seguimiento del quemado de un elemento combustible, para diferentes tiempos de enfriamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriquez, C.; Navarro, G.; Pereda, C.; Mutis, O. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile). Dept. de Aplicaciones Nucleares. Unidad de Reactores; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Zeituni, Carlos A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    In this work we report a complete set of measurements and some relevant results regarding the burnup process of a fuel element containing low enriched nuclear fuel. This fuel element was fabricated at the Plant of Fuel Elements of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN). Measurements were carried out using gamma-ray spectroscopy and the absolute burnup of the fuel element was determined. (author)

  6. Intelligent Control for Improvements in PEM Fuel Cell Flow Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathan G Williams; Guoping Liu; Senchun Chai; David Rees

    2008-01-01

    The performance of fuel cells and the vehicle applications they are embedded into depends on a delicate balance of the correct temperature, humidity, reactant pressure, purity and flow rate. This paper successfully investigates the problem related to flow control with implementation on a single cell membrane electrode assembly (MEA). This paper presents a systematic approach for performing system identification using recursive least squares identification to account for the non-linear parameters of the fuel cell. Then, it presents a fuzzy controller with a simplified rule base validated against real time results with the existing flow controller which calculates the flow required from the stoichiometry value.

  7. Shielding Performance Measurements of Spent Fuel Transportation Container

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Hong-chao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The safety supervision of radioactive material transportation package has been further stressed and implemented. The shielding performance measurements of spent fuel transport container is the important content of supervision. However, some of the problems and difficulties reflected in practice need to be solved, such as the neutron dose rate on the surface of package is too difficult to measure exactly, the monitoring results are not always reliable, etc. The monitoring results using different spectrometers were compared and the simulation results of MCNP runs were considered. An improvement was provided to the shielding performance measurements technique and management of spent fuel transport.

  8. Development of TUF-ELOCA - a software tool for integrated single-channel thermal-hydraulic and fuel element analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, A.I.; Wu, E.; Yousef, W.W.; Pascoe, J. [Nuclear Safety Solutions Ltd., Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Parlatan, Y. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kwee, M. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The TUF-ELOCA tool couples the TUF and ELOCA codes to enable an integrated thermal-hydraulic and fuel element analysis for a single channel during transient conditions. The coupled architecture is based on TUF as the parent process controlling multiple ELOCA executions that simulate the fuel elements behaviour and is scalable to different fuel channel designs. The coupling ensures a proper feedback between the coolant conditions and fuel elements response, eliminates model duplications, and constitutes an improvement from the prediction accuracy point of view. The communication interfaces are based on PVM and allow parallelization of the fuel element simulations. Developmental testing results are presented showing realistic predictions for the fuel channel behaviour during a transient. (author)

  9. Fueling Performance: Ketones Enter the Mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Brendan; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2016-09-13

    Ketone body metabolites serve as alternative energy substrates during prolonged fasting, calorie restriction, or reduced carbohydrate (CHO) availability. Using a ketone ester supplement, Cox et al. (2016) demonstrate that acute nutritional ketosis alters substrate utilization patterns during exercise, reduces lactate production, and improves time-trial performance in elite cyclists.

  10. Final report on accident tolerant fuel performance analysis of APMT-Steel Clad/UO₂ fuel and APMT-Steel Clad/UN-U₃Si₅ fuel concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-12

    In FY2014 our group completed and documented analysis of new Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) concepts using BISON. We have modeled the viability of moving from Zircaloy to stainless steel cladding in traditional light water reactors (LWRs). We have explored the reactivity penalty of this change using the MCNP-based burnup code Monteburns, while attempting to minimize this penalty by increasing the fuel pellet radius and decreasing the cladding thickness. Fuel performance simulations using BISON have also been performed to quantify changes to structural integrity resulting from thinner stainless steel claddings. We account for thermal and irradiation creep, fission gas swelling, thermal swelling and fuel relocation in the models for both Zircaloy and stainless steel claddings. Additional models that account for the lower oxidation stainless steel APMT are also invoked where available. Irradiation data for HT9 is used as a fallback in the absence of appropriate models. In this study the isotopic vectors within each natural element are varied to assess potential reactivity gains if advanced enrichment capabilities were levied towards cladding technologies. Recommendations on cladding thicknesses for a robust cladding as well as the constitutive components of a less penalizing composition are provided. In the first section (section 1-3), we present results accepted for publication in the 2014 TOPFUEL conference regarding the APMT/UO₂ ATF concept (J. Galloway & C. Unal, Accident Tolerant and Neutronically Favorable LWR Cladding, Proceedings of WRFPM 2014, Sendai, Japan, Paper No.1000050). Next we discuss our preliminary findings from the thermo-mechanical analysis of UN-U₃Si₅ fuel with APMT clad. In this analysis we used models developed from limited data that need to be updated when the irradiation data from ATF-1 test is available. Initial results indicate a swelling rate less than 1.5% is needed to prevent excessive clad stress.

  11. Performance, emission and economic assessment of clove stem oil-diesel blended fuels as alternative fuels for diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbarawa, Makame [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2008-05-15

    In this study the performance, emission and economic evaluation of using the clove stem oil (CSO)-diesel blended fuels as alternative fuels for diesel engine have been carried out. Experiments were performed to evaluate the impact of the CSO-diesel blended fuels on the engine performance and emissions. The societal life cycle cost (LCC) was chosen as an important indicator for comparing alternative fuel operating modes. The LCC using the pure diesel fuel, 25% CSO and 50% CSO-diesel blended fuels in diesel engine are analysed. These costs include the vehicle first cost, fuel cost and exhaust emissions cost. A complete macroeconomic assessment of the effect of introducing the CSO-diesel blended fuels to the diesel engine is not included in the study. Engine tests show that performance parameters of the CSO-diesel blended fuels do not differ greatly from those of the pure diesel fuel. Slight power losses, combined with an increase in fuel consumption, were experienced with the CSO-diesel blended fuels. This is due to the low heating value of the CSO-diesel blended fuels. Emissions of CO and HC are low for the CSO-diesel blended fuels. NO{sub x} emissions were increased remarkably when the engine was fuelled with the 50% CSO-diesel blended fuel operation mode. A remarkable reduction in the exhaust smoke emissions can be achieved when operating on the CSO-diesel blended fuels. Based on the LCC analysis, the CSO-diesel blended fuels would not be competitive with the pure diesel fuel, even though the environmental impact of emission is valued monetarily. This is due to the high price of the CSO. (author)

  12. A New Innovative Spherical Cermet Nuclear Fuel Element to Achieve an Ultra-Long Core Life for use in Grid-Appropriate LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senor, David J.; Painter, Chad L.; Geelhood, Ken J.; Wootan, David W.; Meriwether, George H.; Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.; Matson, Dean W.; Abrego, Celestino P.

    2007-12-01

    Spherical cermet fuel elements are proposed for use in the Atoms For Peace Reactor (AFPR-100) concept. AFPR-100 is a small-scale, inherently safe, proliferation-resistant reactor that would be ideal for deployment to nations with emerging economies that decide to select nuclear power for the generation of carbon-free electricity. The basic concept of the AFPR core is a water-cooled fixed particle bed, randomly packed with spherical fuel elements. The flow of coolant within the particle bed is at such a low rate that the bed does not fluidize. This report summarizes an approach to fuel fabrication, results associated with fuel performance modeling, core neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses demonstrating a ~20 year core life, and a conclusion that the proliferation resistance of the AFPR reactor concept is high.

  13. Variational formulation of high performance finite elements: Parametrized variational principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Militello, Carmello

    1991-01-01

    High performance elements are simple finite elements constructed to deliver engineering accuracy with coarse arbitrary grids. This is part of a series on the variational basis of high-performance elements, with emphasis on those constructed with the free formulation (FF) and assumed natural strain (ANS) methods. Parametrized variational principles that provide a foundation for the FF and ANS methods, as well as for a combination of both are presented.

  14. Test design description Volume 2, Part 1. IFR-1 metal fuel irradiation test (AK-181) element as-built data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodds, N. E.

    1986-06-01

    The IFR-1 Test, designated as the AK-181 Test Assembly, will be the first irradiation test of wire wrapped, sodium-bonded metallic fuel elements in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The test is part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuels program conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the Innovative Reactor Concepts Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). One subassembly, containing 169 fuel elements, will be irradiated for 600 full power days to achieve 10 at.% burnup. Three metal fuel alloys (U-10Zr, U-8Pu-10Zr) will be irradiated in D9 cladding tubes. The metal fuel elements have a fuel-smeared density of 75% and each contains five slugs. The enriched zone contains three slugs and is 36-in. long. One 6.5-in. long depleted uranium axial blanket slug (DU-10Zr) was loaded at each end of the enriched zone. the fuel elements were fabricated at ANL-W and delivered to Westinghouse-Hanford for wirewrapping and assembly into the test article. This Test Design Description contains relevant data on compositions, densities, dimensions and weights for the cast fuel slugs and completed fuel elements. The elements conform to the requirements in MG-22, "Users` Guide for the Irradiation of Experiments in the FTR."

  15. Fuel composition optimization in a 78-element fuel bundle for use in a pressure tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, D.W.; Novog, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    A 78-element fuel bundle containing a plutonium-thorium fuel mixture has been proposed for a Generation IV pressure tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor. In this work, using a lattice cell model created with the code DRAGON,the lattice pitch, fuel composition (fraction of PuO{sub 2} in ThO{sub 2}) and radial enrichment profile of the 78-element bundle is optimized using a merit function and a metaheuristic search algorithm.The merit function is designed such that the optimal fuel maximizes fuel utilization while minimizing peak element ratings and coolant void reactivity. A radial enrichment profile of 10 wt%, 11 wt% and 20 wt% PuO{sub 2} (inner to outer ring) with a lattice pitch of 25.0 cm was found to provide the optimal merit score based on the aforementioned criteria. (author)

  16. Performance evaluation and post-irradiation examination of a novel LWR fuel composed of U0.17ZrH1.6 fuel pellets bonded to Zircaloy-2 cladding by lead bismuth eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balooch, Mehdi; Olander, Donald R.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Hosemann, Peter; Casella, Andrew M.; Senor, David J.; Buck, Edgar C.

    2017-04-01

    A novel light water reactor fuel has been designed and fabricated at the University of California, Berkeley; irradiated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor; and examined within the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This fuel consists of U0.17ZrH1.6 fuel pellets core-drilled from TRIGA reactor fuel elements that are clad in Zircaloy-2 and bonded with lead-bismuth eutectic. The performance evaluation and post irradiation examination of this fuel are presented here.

  17. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of FeCrAl cladding with updated properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-30

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, suitability for normal operation must also be demonstrated. This research is focused on modeling the integral thermo-mechanical performance of FeCrAl cladded fuel during normal reactor operation. Preliminary analysis has been performed to assess FeCrAl alloys (namely Alkrothal 720 and APMT) as a suitable fuel cladding replacement for Zr-alloys, using the MOOSE-based, finite-element fuel performance code BISON and the best available thermal-mechanical and irradiation-induced constitutive properties. These simulations identify the effects of the mechanical-stress and irradiation response of FeCrAl and provide a comparison with Zr-alloys. In comparing these clad materials, fuel rods have been simulated for normal reactor operation and simple steady-state operation. Normal reactor operating conditions target the cladding performance over the rod lifetime (~4 cycles) for the highest-power rod in the highest-power fuel assembly under reactor power maneuvering. The power histories and axial temperature profiles input into BISON were generated from a neutronics study on full-core reactivity equivalence for FeCrAl using the 3D full core simulator NESTLE. Evolution of the FeCrAl cladding behavior over time is evaluated by using steady-state operating conditions such as a simple axial power profile, a constant cladding surface temperature, and a constant fuel power history. The fuel rod designs and

  18. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of FeCrAl cladding with updated properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-30

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, suitability for normal operation must also be demonstrated. This research is focused on modeling the integral thermo-mechanical performance of FeCrAl-cladded fuel during normal reactor operation. Preliminary analysis has been performed to assess FeCrAl alloys (namely Alkrothal 720 and APMT) as a suitable fuel cladding replacement for Zr-alloys, using the MOOSE-based, finite-element fuel performance code BISON and the best available thermal-mechanical and irradiation-induced constitutive properties. These simulations identify the effects of the mechanical-stress and irradiation response of FeCrAl, and provide a comparison with Zr-alloys. In comparing these clad materials, fuel rods have been simulated for normal reactor operation and simple steady-state operation. Normal reactor operating conditions target the cladding performance over the rod lifetime (~4 cycles) for the highest-power rod in the highest-power fuel assembly under reactor power maneuvering. The power histories and axial temperature profiles input into BISON were generated from a neutronics study on full-core reactivity equivalence for FeCrAl using the 3D full core simulator NESTLE. Evolution of the FeCrAl cladding behavior over time is evaluated by using steady-state operating conditions such as a simple axial power profile, a constant cladding surface temperature, and a constant fuel power history. The fuel rod designs and

  19. Solid Polymer Fuel Cells. Electrode and membrane performance studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller-Holst, S.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis studies aspects of fuel cell preparation and performance. The emphasis is placed on preparation and analysis of low platinum-loading solid polymer fuel cell (SPEC) electrodes. A test station was built and used to test cells within a wide range of real operating conditions, 40-150{sup o}C and 1-10 bar. Preparation and assembling equipment for single SPFCs was designed and built, and a new technique of spraying the catalyst layer directly onto the membrane was successfully demonstrated. Low Pt-loading electrodes (0.1 mg Pt/cm{sup 2}) prepared by the new technique exhibited high degree of catalyst utilization. The performance of single cells holding these electrodes is comparable to state-of-the-art SPFCs. Potential losses in single cell performance are ascribed to irreversibilities by analysing the efficiency of the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell by means of the second law of thermodynamics. The water management in membranes is discussed for a model system and the results are relevant to fuel cell preparation and performance. The new spray deposition technique should be commercially interesting as it involves few steps as well as techniques that are adequate for larger scale production. 115 refs., 43 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Solid Polymer Fuel Cells. Electrode and membrane performance studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller-Holst, S.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis studies aspects of fuel cell preparation and performance. The emphasis is placed on preparation and analysis of low platinum-loading solid polymer fuel cell (SPEC) electrodes. A test station was built and used to test cells within a wide range of real operating conditions, 40-150{sup o}C and 1-10 bar. Preparation and assembling equipment for single SPFCs was designed and built, and a new technique of spraying the catalyst layer directly onto the membrane was successfully demonstrated. Low Pt-loading electrodes (0.1 mg Pt/cm{sup 2}) prepared by the new technique exhibited high degree of catalyst utilization. The performance of single cells holding these electrodes is comparable to state-of-the-art SPFCs. Potential losses in single cell performance are ascribed to irreversibilities by analysing the efficiency of the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell by means of the second law of thermodynamics. The water management in membranes is discussed for a model system and the results are relevant to fuel cell preparation and performance. The new spray deposition technique should be commercially interesting as it involves few steps as well as techniques that are adequate for larger scale production. 115 refs., 43 figs., 18 tabs.

  1. High-performance alkaline polymer electrolyte for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jing; Lu, Shanfu; Li, Yan; Huang, Aibin; Zhuang, Lin; Lu, Juntao [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Hubei Key Lab. of Electrochemical Power Sources, Wuhan University (China)

    2010-01-22

    Although the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has made great progress in recent decades, its commercialization has been hindered by a number of factors, among which is the total dependence on Pt-based catalysts. Alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells (APEFCs) have been increasingly recognized as a solution to overcome the dependence on noble metal catalysts. In principle, APEFCs combine the advantages of and alkaline fuel cell (AFC) and a PEMFC: there is no need for noble metal catalysts and they are free of carbonate precipitates that would break the waterproofing in the AFC cathode. However, the performance of most alkaline polyelectrolytes can still not fulfill the requirement of fuel cell operations. In the present work, detailed information about the synthesis and physicochemical properties of the quaternary ammonia polysulfone (QAPS), a high-performance alkaline polymer electrolyte that has been successfully applied in the authors' previous work to demonstrate an APEFC completely free from noble metal catalysts (S. Lu, J. Pan, A. Huang, L. Zhuang, J. Lu, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2008, 105, 20611), is reported. Monitored by NMR analysis, the synthetic process of QAPS is seen to be simple and efficient. The chemical and thermal stability, as well as the mechanical strength of the synthetic QAPS membrane, are outstanding in comparison to commercial anion-exchange membranes. The ionic conductivity of QAPS at room temperature is measured to be on the order of 10{sup -2} S cm{sup -1}. Such good mechanical and conducting performances can be attributed to the superior microstructure of the polyelectrolyte, which features interconnected ionic channels in tens of nanometers diameter, as revealed by HRTEM observations. The electrochemical behavior at the Pt/QAPS interface reveals the strong alkaline nature of this polyelectrolyte, and the preliminary fuel cell test verifies the feasibility of QAPS for fuel cell applications. (Abstract Copyright [2010

  2. Prediction of the thermal behavior of a particle spherical fuel element using GITT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessoa, C.V. [Brazilian Army, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Science and Technology. Technological Center of the Army]. E-mail: pessoapen@gmail.com; Oliveira, Claudio L. de [Engineering Military Institute, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Science and Technology]. E-mail: d7luiz@ime.eb.br; Jian, Su [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: sujian@con.ufrj.br

    2008-07-01

    In this work, the transient and steady state heat conduction in a spherical fuel element of a pebble-bed high temperature were studied. This pebble element is composed by a particulate region with spherical inclusions, the fuel UO{sub 2} particles, dispersed in a graphite matrix. A convective heat transfer by helium occurs on the outer surface of the fuel element. The two-energy equation model for the case of pure conduction was applied to this particulate spherical element, generating two macroscopic temperatures, respectively, of the inclusions and of the matrix. The transient analysis was carried out by using the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT) that requires low computational efforts and allows a fast evaluation of the two macroscopic transient temperatures of the particulate region. The solution by GITT leads to a system of ordinary differential equations with the unknown transformed potentials. The mechanical properties (thermal conductivity and specific heat) of the materials were supposed not to depend on the temperature and to be uniform in each region. (author)

  3. Chemical thermodynamics of complex systems: fission product behavior in LWR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohli, R.

    1981-03-01

    A detailed thermodynamic assessment has been made of the chemical reactions of fission products in LWR fuel rods. Using recent thermodynamic data and the in-reactor oxygen potential and temperature range of LWRs, equilibrium thermodynamic calculations were performed for the most plausible reactions of the fission products. The emphasis in this model is on the chemistry of cesium and rubidium and their reactions with the fuel, other fission products, and the zircaloy cladding. The model predictions are discussed for their implications in fuel-cladding interactions.

  4. BISON and MARMOT Development for Modeling Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williamson, Richard L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Medvedev, Pavel G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    BISON and MARMOT are two codes under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for engineering scale and lower length scale fuel performance modeling. It is desired to add capabilities for fast reactor applications to these codes. The fast reactor fuel types under consideration are metal (U-Pu-Zr) and oxide (MOX). The cladding types of interest include 316SS, D9, and HT9. The purpose of this report is to outline the proposed plans for code development and provide an overview of the models added to the BISON and MARMOT codes for fast reactor fuel behavior. A brief overview of preliminary discussions on the formation of a bilateral agreement between the Idaho National Laboratory and the National Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom is presented.

  5. Assessment of MARMOT. A Mesoscale Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, M. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Y. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, X. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fromm, B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yu, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Teague, M. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andersson, D. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    MARMOT is the mesoscale fuel performance code under development as part of the US DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Program. In this report, we provide a high level summary of MARMOT, its capabilities, and its current state of validation. The purpose of MARMOT is to predict the coevolution of microstructure and material properties of nuclear fuel and cladding. It accomplished this using the phase field method coupled to solid mechanics and heat conduction. MARMOT is based on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE), and much of its basic capability in the areas of the phase field method, mechanics, and heat conduction come directly from MOOSE modules. However, additional capability specific to fuel and cladding is available in MARMOT. While some validation of MARMOT has been completed in the areas of fission gas behavior and grain growth, much more validation needs to be conducted. However, new mesoscale data needs to be obtained in order to complete this validation.

  6. High performance internal reforming unit for high temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiwen; Venkataraman, Ramakrishnan; Novacco, Lawrence J.

    2008-10-07

    A fuel reformer having an enclosure with first and second opposing surfaces, a sidewall connecting the first and second opposing surfaces and an inlet port and an outlet port in the sidewall. A plate assembly supporting a catalyst and baffles are also disposed in the enclosure. A main baffle extends into the enclosure from a point of the sidewall between the inlet and outlet ports. The main baffle cooperates with the enclosure and the plate assembly to establish a path for the flow of fuel gas through the reformer from the inlet port to the outlet port. At least a first directing baffle extends in the enclosure from one of the sidewall and the main baffle and cooperates with the plate assembly and the enclosure to alter the gas flow path. Desired graded catalyst loading pattern has been defined for optimized thermal management for the internal reforming high temperature fuel cells so as to achieve high cell performance.

  7. PWR fuel performance and burnup extension in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokote, M. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Kondo, Y.; Abeta, S.

    1996-10-01

    Japanese utilities and fuel manufacturers have expanded much of their resources and efforts to maintain a reliable supply of PWR fuel for Japan. In the early 1970s, since the level of knowledge and experience of using fuel was less than now, some problems were encountered. However, their causes were investigated and countermeasures implemented, the design improved and quality control enhanced. The results can already be seen by significantly improved performance of the PWR plants now in operation, frequency of problems was quickly reduced. Since fuel reliability has been improved, the emphasis has shifted to improving economics by increasing burnup and using uranium resources effectively. The maximum discharged burnup was previously limited to 39 GWd/t and STEP1 burnup extension to 48 GWd/t has been gradually developed, while STEP2 burnup extension to 55 GWd/t is started to be demonstrated from 1996. Because resources in Japan are scarce, a policy was selected of conserving and making effective use of these resources by recycling the uranium and plutonium recovered from reactors. Consequently, significant work is being done on the development of MOX fuel and utilization of recovered uranium. (author)

  8. Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Merrill; Melissa Teague; Robert Youngblood; Larry Ott; Kevin Robb; Michael Todosow; Chris Stanek; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Billone; Robert Montgomery; Nicholas Brown; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2014-02-01

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. As a result, continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) initiated an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Development program. The complex multiphysics behavior of LWR nuclear fuel makes defining specific material or design improvements difficult; as such, establishing qualitative attributes is critical to guide the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. This report summarizes a common set of technical evaluation metrics to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs. As used herein, “metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. Furthermore, this report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to assess the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed for lead test rod or lead test assembly

  9. Predictive Bias and Sensitivity in NRC Fuel Performance Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geelhood, Kenneth J.; Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.; Lanning, Donald D.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2009-10-01

    The latest versions of the fuel performance codes, FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN were examined to determine if the codes are intrinsically conservative. Each individual model and type of code prediction was examined and compared to the data that was used to develop the model. In addition, a brief literature search was performed to determine if more recent data have become available since the original model development for model comparison.

  10. Fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements: Defining role of out-of-plane residual shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh, R.; Kohli, D.; Sinha, V. P.; Prasad, G. J.; Samajdar, I.

    2014-02-01

    Bond strength and microstructural developments were investigated during fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements. The study involved roll bonding of aluminum-aluminum (case A) and aluminum-aluminum + yttria (Y2O3) dispersion (case B). Case B approximated aluminum-uranium silicide (U3Si2) 'fuel-meat' in an actual plate fuel. Samples after different stages of fabrication, hot and cold rolling, were investigated through peel and pull tests, micro-hardness, residual stresses, electron and micro-focus X-ray diffraction. Measurements revealed a clear drop in bond strength during cold rolling: an observation unique to case B. This was related to significant increase in 'out-of-plane' residual shear stresses near the clad/dispersion interface, and not from visible signatures of microstructural heterogeneities.

  11. Transfer of elements relevant to nuclear fuel cycle from soil to boreal plants and animals in experimental meso- and microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S; Kasurinen, Anne; Häikiö, Elina; Tervahauta, Arja; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Uranium (U), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and zinc (Zn) occur naturally in soil but their radioactive isotopes can also be released into the environment during the nuclear fuel cycle. The transfer of these elements was studied in three different trophic levels in experimental mesocosms containing downy birch (Betula pubescens), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and Scandinavian small-reed (Calamagrostis purpurea ssp. Phragmitoides) as producers, snails (Arianta arbostorum) as herbivores, and earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) as decomposers. To determine more precisely whether the element uptake of snails is mainly via their food (birch leaves) or both via soil and food, a separate microcosm experiment was also performed. The element uptake of snails did not generally depend on the presence of soil, indicating that the main uptake route was food, except for U, where soil contact was important for uptake when soil U concentration was high. Transfer of elements from soil to plants was not linear, i.e. it was not correctly described by constant concentration ratios (CR) commonly applied in radioecological modeling. Similar nonlinear transfer was found for the invertebrate animals included in this study: elements other than U were taken up more efficiently when element concentration in soil or food was low.

  12. Game elements improve performance in a working memory training task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ninaus

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of game elements in a non-game context is currently used in a vast range of different domains. However, research on game elements’ effects in cognitive tasks is still sparse. Thus, in this study we implemented three game elements, namely, progress bar, level indicator, and a thematic setting, in a working memory training task. We evaluated the impact of game elements on user performance and perceived state of flow when compared to a conventional version of the task. Participants interacting with game elements showed higher scores in the working memory training task than participants from a control group who completed the working memory training task without the game elements. Moreover, game elements facilitated the individuals’ performance closer to their maximum working memory capacity. Finally, the perceived flow did not differ between the two groups, which indicates that game elements can induce better performance without changing the perception of being “in the zone”, that is without an increase in anxiety or boredom. This empirical study indicates that certain game elements can improve the performance and efficiency in a working memory task by increasing users’ ability and willingness to train at their optimal performance level. 

  13. Fusion option to dispose of spent nuclear fuel and transuranic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.

    2000-02-10

    The fusion option is examined to solve the disposition problems of the spent nuclear fuel and the transuranic elements. The analysis of this report shows that the top rated solution, the elimination of the transuranic elements and the long-lived fission products, can be achieved in a fusion reactor. A 167 MW of fusion power from a D-T plasma for sixty years with an availability factor of 0.75 can transmute all the transuranic elements and the long-lived fission products of the 70,000 tons of the US inventory of spent nuclear fuel generated up to the year 2015. The operating time can be reduced to thirty years with use of 334 MW of fusion power, a system study is needed to define the optimum time. In addition, the fusion solution eliminates the need for a geological repository site, which is a major advantage. Meanwhile, such utilization of the fusion power will provide an excellent opportunity to develop fusion energy for the future. Fusion blankets with a liquid carrier for the transuranic elements can achieve a transmutation rate for the transuranic elements up to 80 kg/MW.y of fusion power with k{sub eff} of 0.98. In addition, the liquid blankets have several advantages relative to the other blanket options. The energy from this transmutation is utilized to produce revenue for the system. Molten salt (Flibe) and lithium-lead eutectic are identified as the most promising liquids for this application, both materials are under development for future fusion blanket concepts. The Flibe molten salt with transuranic elements was developed and used successfully as nuclear fuel for the molten salt breeder reactor in the 1960's.

  14. Fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements: Defining role of stress relief annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, D.; Rakesh, R.; Sinha, V. P.; Prasad, G. J.; Samajdar, I.

    2014-04-01

    This study involved fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements. Uranium silicide of actual fuel elements was replaced with yttria. The fabrication stages were otherwise identical. The final cold rolled and/or straightened plates, without stress relief, showed an inverse relationship between bond strength and out of plane residual shear stress (τ13). Stress relief of τ13 was conducted over a range of temperatures/times (200-500 °C and 15-240 min) and led to corresponding improvements in bond strength. Fastest τ13 relief was obtained through 300 °C annealing. Elimination of microscopic shear bands, through recovery and partial recrystallization, was clearly the most effective mechanism of relieving τ13.

  15. Game elements improve performance in a working memory training task

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Ninaus; Gonçalo Pereira; René Stefitz; Rui Prada; Ana Paiva; Christa Neuper; Guilherme Wood

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of game elements in a non-game context is currently used in a vast range of different domains. However, research on game elements’ effects in cognitive tasks is still sparse. Thus, in this study we implemented three game elements, namely, progress bar, level indicator, and a thematic setting, in a working memory training task. We evaluated the impact of game elements on user performance and perceived state of flow when compared to a conventional version of the task. Participan...

  16. Atrium and HTP fuel elements for the U. S. market. Atrium- und HTP-Brennelemente fuer den US-Markt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, J.N. (Siemens Power Corp. Nuclear Div., Engineering and Manufacturing Facility, Richland, WA (United States)); Krebs, W.D. (Technik Brennelemente und Reaktorkern, Siemens AG Bereich Energieerzeugung (KWU), Erlangen (Germany))

    1994-07-01

    The international acitivities of Siemens in the nuclear fuel sector are the responsibility of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Unit of the Power Generation Division (KWU) in Germany, the Nuclear Dividion of Siemens Power Corporation (SPC) in the Unites States, and the German Siemens subsidiaries, ANF GmbH (fuel element fabrication) in Lingen and NRG - Nuklearrohr Gesellschaft mbH (cladding tube production) in Duisburg. The requirements of the U.S. market for light water reactor fuel elements are met by products from the European market. (orig.)

  17. Reduced Toxicity Fuel Satellite Propulsion System Including Catalytic Decomposing Element with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A reduced toxicity fuel satellite propulsion system including a reduced toxicity propellant supply for consumption in an axial class thruster and an ACS class thruster. The system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to the ACS decomposing element of an ACS thruster. The ACS decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot propulsive gases. In addition the system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to an axial decomposing element of the axial thruster. The axial decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot gases. The system further includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying a second propellant to a combustion chamber of the axial thruster, whereby the hot gases and the second propellant auto-ignite and begin the combustion process for producing thrust.

  18. Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2014-02-01

    Research and development (R&D) activities on advanced, higher performance Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels have been ongoing for the last few years. Following the unfortunate March 2011 events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, the R&D shifted toward enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs. Qualitative attributes for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance, such as improved reaction kinetics with steam resulting in slower hydrogen generation rate, provide guidance for the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. A common set of technical metrics should be established to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs on a more quantitative basis. “Metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. This report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to evaluate the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed toward qualification.

  19. Study of PEM fuel cell performance by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asghari, Saeed; Mokmeli, Ali; Samavati, Mahrokh [Isfahan Engineering Research Center, 7th kilometer of Imam Khomeini ave., P.O. Box 81395-619, Isfahan (Iran)

    2010-09-15

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is a suitable and powerful diagnostic testing method for fuel cells because it is non-destructive and provides useful information about fuel cell performance and its components. This paper presents the diagnostic testing results of a 120 W single cell and a 480 W PEM fuel cell short stack by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The effects of clamping torque, non-uniform assembly pressure and operating temperature on the single cell impedance spectrum were studied. Optimal clamping torque of the single cell was determined by inspection of variations of high frequency and mass transport resistances with the clamping torque. The results of the electrochemical impedance analysis show that the non-uniform assembly pressure can deteriorate the fuel cell performance by increasing the ohmic resistance and the mass transport limitation. Break-in procedure of the short stack was monitored and it is indicated that the ohmic resistance as well as the charge transfer resistance decrease to specified values as the break-in process proceeds. The effect of output current on the impedance plots of the short stack was also investigated. (author)

  20. Comparison of Theoretical Models and Finite Element Simulation of ZrO{sub 2}-based Composites for Inert Matrix Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, Vivek [Indian Institute of Technology-Kanpur, Kanpur (India); Mistarihi, Qusai M.; Ryu, Ho Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The improvement of thermal properties of ZrO{sub 2} has been investigated in many ways to enhance the performance of inert matrix fuel (IMF). Inert matrix fuel is a useful concept to burn transuranic elements (TRU) without increasing extra plutonium. The addition of reinforcements with a high thermal conductivity has been proposed in the previous studies. Molybdenum and silicon carbide are good candidate materials for the reinforcement because of their high thermal conductivities and low neutron absorption cross sections. Recently, ZrO{sub 2}-based composites reinforced with Mo-wire mesh or carbon foam were fabricated by spark plasma sintering. When the effects of the structures of reinforcements were compared, interconnected structures provided more enhanced thermal conductivity than discrete structures. The effective thermal conductivity of composite materials with various reinforcement structures can be calculated by using the finite element analyses. The finite element analyses presented a good agreement with theoretical models in estimating the effects of the reinforcement on the thermal conductivities of discrete Mo reinforced ZrO{sub 2} nanocomposites. It is found that the effects of interconnected thermal reinforcements on the effective thermal conductivity can be estimated by using the percolation model.

  1. Laguna Verde BWRs operational experience: steady-state fuel performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas V, G. F.; Bravo S, J. M. [Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmington, 28401 North Carolina (United States); Casillas, J. L., E-mail: gabriel.cuevas-vivas@gnf.co [General Electric Hitachi Nuclear Energy, 1989 Little Orchard St. Romm 239, San Jose, 95125 California (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The two BWR at Laguna Verde nuclear power station are finishing 21 and 15 years of continuous successful operation as of 2010. During Unit 1 and 2 commercial operations only Ge/GNF fuel designs have been employed; fuel lattice designs 8 x 8 and 10 x 10 were used at the reactor, with an original licensed thermal power (OLTP: 1931 MWt) and the reactor's first power up-rates of 5%. GNF fuel will be also used for the second EPU to reach 120% of OLTP in the near future. Thermal and gamma traversing in-core probes (Tip) are used for power monitoring purposes along with the Ge (now GNF-A) core monitoring system, 3-dimensional Monicore{sup TM}. GNF-A has also participated by preparing the core management plan that is regularly fine-tuned in collaboration with Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE owner of the Laguna Verde reactors). For determination of thermal margins and eigenvalue prediction, GNF-A employs the NRC-licensed steady-state core simulator PANAC11. Tip comparisons are routinely used to adapt power distributions for a better thermal margin calculation. Over the years, several challenges have appeared in the near and long term fuel management planning such as increasing cycle length, optimization of the thermal margins, rated power increase, etc. Each challenge has been successfully overcome via operational strategy, code improvements and better fuel designs. This paper summarizes Laguna Verde Unit 1 and 2 steady-state performance from initial commercial operation, with a discussion of the nuclear and thermal-hydraulic design features, as well as of the operational strategies that set and interesting benchmark for future fuel applications, code development and operation of the BWRs. (Author)

  2. Verification and Validation of the BISON Fuel Performance Code for PCMI Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Gardner, Russell James [Idaho National Laboratory; Perez, Danielle Marie [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-06-01

    BISON is a modern finite element-based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behavior and has been used to analyze a variety of fuel forms in 1D spherical, 2D axisymmetric, or 3D geometries. A brief overview of BISON’s computational framework, governing equations, and general material and behavioral models is provided. BISON code and solution verification procedures are described. Validation for application to light water reactor (LWR) PCMI problems is assessed by comparing predicted and measured rod diameter following base irradiation and power ramps. Results indicate a tendency to overpredict clad diameter reduction early in life, when clad creepdown dominates, and more significantly overpredict the diameter increase late in life, when fuel expansion controls the mechanical response. Initial rod diameter comparisons have led to consideration of additional separate effects experiments to better understand and predict clad and fuel mechanical behavior. Results from this study are being used to define priorities for ongoing code development and validation activities.

  3. Preliminary Investigation for Engine Performance by Using Tire-Derived Pyrolysis Oil-Diesel Blended Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofiqul, Islam M.; Haniu, Hiroyuki; Alam, Beg R.; Takai, Kazunori

    In the first phase of the present study, the pyrolysis oil derived from light automotive tire waste has been characterized including fuel properties, elemental analyses, FT-IR, 1H-NMR, GC-MS and distillation. The studies on the oil show that it can be used as liquid fuel with a gross calorific value (GCV) of 42.00 MJ/kg and empirical formula of CH1.27O0.025N0.006. In the second phase of the investigation, the performance of a diesel engine was studied blending the pyrolysis oil with diesel fuel in different ratios. The experimental results show that the bsfc of pyrolysis oil-diesel blended fuels slightly increases and hence the brake thermal efficiency decreases compared to those of neat diesel. The pyrolysis oil-diesel blends show lower carbon monoxide (CO) emission but higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions than those of neat diesel. However, NOx emissions with pyrolysis oil-diesel blended fuels reduced when EGR was applied.

  4. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Tsvetkov, Pavel [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  5. Mechanical performance of integrally bonded copper coatings for the long term disposal of used nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, Christopher H., E-mail: cboyle@nwmo.ca [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, 22 St. Clair Ave East, Toronto (Canada); Meguid, Shaker A. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • A novel Used Fuel Container with an integrally bonded copper coating is proposed. • Two developed coating processes successfully produced prototype container components. • We created a validated finite element model to predict coating structural performance. • Mechanical testing confirms coating suitably for repository use. - Abstract: The preferred method for disposal of used nuclear fuel is underground emplacement in a Deep Geological Repository (DGR). Many countries have light water reactor fuels which require large Used Fuel Container or Canister (UFC) designs weighing up to 25 ton for containment. In contrast, Canada exclusively uses heavy water reactor fuel, which is substantially smaller. This has led the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) to create a novel UFC, which uses standard pressure vessel grade steel for structural containment and a thick, integrally bonded copper coating applied to the exterior surface for corrosion protection. Currently, the coating is applied using two different methods: electrodeposition and gas dynamic cold spray. This novel copper coating needs to be fully validated to ensure adequate mechanical strength and chemical resistance for use under repository conditions. Detailed mechanical and corrosion testing programs were undertaken. Mechanical tests indicated that adhesion strengths exceeded 45 MPa and tensile properties were comparable to wrought copper. A Finite Element Model (FEM) of the copper–steel composite was created and validated using three point bend tests. This model accurately predicts the response of the composite, including large deformation and debonding failure mechanisms. Now validated, this model will be used to assess the performance of the coating on the full-scale UFC under simulated DGR loading conditions.

  6. Direct formic acid microfluidic fuel cell design and performance evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Zuria, A.; Dector, A.; Cuevas-Muñiz, F. M.; Esquivel, J. P.; Sabaté, N.; Ledesma-García, J.; Arriaga, L. G.; Chávez-Ramírez, A. U.

    2014-12-01

    This work reports the evolution of design, fabrication and testing of direct formic acid microfluidic fuel cells (DFAμFFC), the architecture and channel dimensions are miniaturized from a thousand to few cents of micrometers. Three generations of DFAμFFCs are presented, from the initial Y-shape configuration made by a hot pressing technique; evolving into a novel miniaturized fuel cell based on microfabrication technology using SU-8 photoresist as core material; to the last air-breathing μFFC with enhanced performance and built with low cost materials and processes. The three devices were evaluated in acidic media in the presence of formic acid as fuel and oxygen/air as oxidant. Commercial Pt/C (30 wt. % E-TEK) and Pd/C XC-72 (20 wt. %, E-TEK) were used as cathode and anode electrodes respectively. The air-breathing μFFC generation, delivered up to 27.3 mW cm-2 for at least 30 min, which is a competitive power density value at the lowest fuel flow of 200 μL min-1 reported to date.

  7. Current Capabilities of the Fuel Performance Modeling Code PARFUME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. K. Miller; D. A. Petti; J. T. Maki; D. L. Knudson

    2004-09-01

    The success of gas reactors depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. A fuel performance modeling code (called PARFUME), which simulates the mechanical and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation, is under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Among current capabilities in the code are: 1) various options for calculating CO production and fission product gas release, 2) a thermal model that calculates a time-dependent temperature profile through a pebble bed sphere or a prismatic block core, as well as through the layers of each analyzed particle, 3) simulation of multi-dimensional particle behavior associated with cracking in the IPyC layer, partial debonding of the IPyC from the SiC, particle asphericity, kernel migration, and thinning of the SiC caused by interaction of fission products with the SiC, 4) two independent methods for determining particle failure probabilities, 5) a model for calculating release-to-birth (R/B) ratios of gaseous fission products, that accounts for particle failures and uranium contamination in the fuel matrix, and 6) the evaluation of an accident condition, where a particle experiences a sudden change in temperature following a period of normal irradiation. This paper presents an overview of the code.

  8. Phase characteristics of rare earth elements in metallic fuel for a sodium-cooled fast reactor by injection casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Seoung Woo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Jong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Oh, Seok Jin; Park, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Chan Bock; Youn, Young-Sang; Kim, Jong-Yun

    2017-04-01

    Uranium-zirconium-rare earth (U-Zr-RE) fuel slugs for a sodium-cooled fast reactor were manufactured using a modified injection casting method, and investigated with respect to their uniformity, distribution, composition, and phase behavior according to RE content. Nd, Ce, Pr, and La were chosen as four representative lanthanide elements because they are considered to be major RE components of fuel ingots after pyroprocessing. Immiscible layers were found on the top layers of the melt-residue commensurate with higher fuel slug RE content. Scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) data showed that RE elements in the melt-residue were distributed uniformly throughout the fuel slugs. RE element agglomeration did not contaminate the fuel slugs but strongly affected the RE content of the slugs.

  9. Studies on disintegrating spherical fuel elements of high temperature gas-cooled reactor by a electrochemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lifang; Wen, Mingfen; Chen, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Spherical fuel elements of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor were disintegrated through a electrochemical method with NaNO3 as electrolyte. The X-ray diffraction spectra and total carbon contents of the graphite fragments were determined, and the results agreed with those from simulated fuel elements. After conducting the characterization analysis and the leaching experiment of coated fuel particles, the uranium concentrations of leaching solutions and spent electrolyte were found to be at background levels. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the improved electrochemical method with NaNO3 as electrolyte in disintegrating the unirradiated fuel elements without any damage to the coated fuel particles. Moreover, the method avoided unexpected radioactivity contamination to the graphite matrix and spent electrolyte.

  10. Performance optimization and microbiological analysis of microbial fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajun WANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the operation performance of microbial fuel cells, improved the degradation rate of nitrate and the power output of microbial fuel cell, a typical single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell (AC-MFC is inoculated and operated with urban sewage treatment plant clarifier sludge as inoculum source and sodium nitrate as electron acceptor. It is successfully started by synthetic wastewater containing a phosphate buffered nutrient solution (PBS, 50 mmol/L and sodium acetate (1 g/L. After successful starting, the four factors of carbon source, C/N, nitrate concentration and temperature are considered to optimize the operation performance of MFC. The test result shows that the operation performance of MFC is best under the conditions of anhydrous sodium acetate as carbon source, C/N of 5∶1, 200 mg/L nitrate concentration and at 30 ℃, and the degradation rate of nitrate reaches more than 90% and the voltage of MFC is 0.462 V. After 6 cycles of operation, the voltage and power density of MFC reaches 0.62 V and 4.53 W /m2. AC impedance analysis indicates that the MFC resistance is 130 Ω. Scanning electron microscopy of electrode surface illustrates that the number of microbial species are significantly increased. The results indicate that MFC can be an effective technology for nitrate contained wastewater treatment and energy production.

  11. Summary compilation of shell element performance versus formulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinstein, Martin Wilhelm; Hales, Jason Dean (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Breivik, Nicole L.; Key, Samuel W. (FMA Development, LLC, Great Falls, MT)

    2011-07-01

    This document compares the finite element shell formulations in the Sierra Solid Mechanics code. These are finite elements either currently in the Sierra simulation codes Presto and Adagio, or expected to be added to them in time. The list of elements are divided into traditional two-dimensional, plane stress shell finite elements, and three-dimensional solid finite elements that contain either modifications or additional terms designed to represent the bending stiffness expected to be found in shell formulations. These particular finite elements are formulated for finite deformation and inelastic material response, and, as such, are not based on some of the elegant formulations that can be found in an elastic, infinitesimal finite element setting. Each shell element is subjected to a series of 12 verification and validation test problems. The underlying purpose of the tests here is to identify the quality of both the spatially discrete finite element gradient operator and the spatially discrete finite element divergence operator. If the derivation of the finite element is proper, the discrete divergence operator is the transpose of the discrete gradient operator. An overall summary is provided from which one can rank, at least in an average sense, how well the individual formulations can be expected to perform in applications encountered year in and year out. A letter grade has been assigned albeit sometimes subjectively for each shell element and each test problem result. The number of A's, B's, C's, et cetera assigned have been totaled, and a grade point average (GPA) has been computed, based on a 4.0-system. These grades, combined with a comparison between the test problems and the application problem, can be used to guide an analyst to select the element with the best shell formulation.

  12. Electrolyser and fuel cells, key elements for energy and life support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockstahler, Klaus; Funke, Helmut; Lucas, Joachim

    Both, Electrolyser and Fuel Cells are key elements for regenerative energy and life support systems. Electrolyser technology is originally intended for oxygen production in manned space habitats and in submarines, through splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. Fuel cells serve for energy production through the reaction, triggered in the presence of an electrolyte, between a fuel and an oxidant. Now combining both technologies i.e. electrolyser and fuel cell makes it a Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFCS). In charge mode, i.e. with energy supplied e.g. by solar cells, the electrolyser splits water into hydrogen and oxygen being stored in tanks. In discharge mode, when power is needed but no energy is available, the stored gases are converted in the fuel cell to generate electricity under the formation of water that is stored in tanks. Rerouting the water to the electrolyser makes it a closed-loop i.e. regenerative process. Different electrolyser and fuel cell technologies are being evolved. At Astrium emphasis is put on the development of an RFCS comprised of Fixed Alkaline Electrolyser (FAE) and Fuel Cell (AFC) as such technology offers a high electrical efficiency and thus reduced system weight, which is important in space applications. With increasing power demand and increasing discharge time an RFCS proves to be superior to batteries. Since the early technology development multiple design refinements were done at Astrium, funded by the European Space Agency ESA and the German National Agency DLR as well as based on company internal R and T funding. Today a complete RFCS energy system breadboard is established and the operational behavior of the system is being tested. In parallel the electrolyser itself is subject to design refinement and testing in terms of oxygen production in manned space habitats. In addition essential features and components for process monitoring and control are being developed. The present results and achievements and the dedicated

  13. ACR fuel storage analysis: finite element heat transfer analysis of dry storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khair, K.; Baset, S.; Millard, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Over the past decade Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has designed and licensed air-cooled concrete structures used as above ground dry storage containers (MACSTOR) to store irradiated nuclear fuel from CANDU plants. A typical MACSTOR 200 module is designed to store 12,000 bundles in 20 storage cylinders. MACSTOR 200 modules are in operation at Gentilly-2 in Canada and at Cernavoda in Romania. The MACSTOR module is cooled passively by natural convection and by conduction through the concrete walls and roof. Currently AECL is designing the Advanced Candu Reactor (ACR) with CANFLEX slightly enriched uranium fuel to be used. AECL has initiated a study to explore the possibility of storing the irradiated nuclear fuel from ACR in MACSTOR modules. This included work to consider ways of minimizing footprint both in the spent fuel storage bay and in the dry storage area. The commercial finite element code ANSYS has been used in this study. The FE model is used to complete simulations with the higher heat source using the same concrete structural dimensions to assess the feasibility of using the MACSTOR design for storing the ACR irradiated fuel. This paper presents the results of the analysis. The results are used to confirm the possibility of using, with minimal changes to the design of the storage baskets and the structure, the proven design of the MACSTOR 200 containment to store the ACR fuel bundles with higher enrichment and burnup. This has thus allowed us to confirm conceptual feasibility and move on to investigation of optimization. (author)

  14. Support vector machine to predict diesel engine performance and emission parameters fueled with nano-particles additive to diesel fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, M.; Najafi, G.; Ghobadian, B.; Mamat, R.; Noor, M. M.; Moosavian, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the use of adaptive Support Vector Machine (SVM) to predict the performance parameters and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine operating on nanodiesel blended fuels. In order to predict the engine parameters, the whole experimental data were randomly divided into training and testing data. For SVM modelling, different values for radial basis function (RBF) kernel width and penalty parameters (C) were considered and the optimum values were then found. The results demonstrate that SVM is capable of predicting the diesel engine performance and emissions. In the experimental step, Carbon nano tubes (CNT) (40, 80 and 120 ppm) and nano silver particles (40, 80 and 120 ppm) with nanostructure were prepared and added as additive to the diesel fuel. Six cylinders, four-stroke diesel engine was fuelled with these new blended fuels and operated at different engine speeds. Experimental test results indicated the fact that adding nano particles to diesel fuel, increased diesel engine power and torque output. For nano-diesel it was found that the brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) was decreased compared to the net diesel fuel. The results proved that with increase of nano particles concentrations (from 40 ppm to 120 ppm) in diesel fuel, CO2 emission increased. CO emission in diesel fuel with nano-particles was lower significantly compared to pure diesel fuel. UHC emission with silver nano-diesel blended fuel decreased while with fuels that contains CNT nano particles increased. The trend of NOx emission was inverse compared to the UHC emission. With adding nano particles to the blended fuels, NOx increased compared to the net diesel fuel. The tests revealed that silver & CNT nano particles can be used as additive in diesel fuel to improve complete combustion of the fuel and reduce the exhaust emissions significantly.

  15. Evaluating the performance of microbial fuel cells powering electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewan, Alim; Beyenal, Haluk [Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Center for Environmental, Sediment and Aquatic Research, Pullman, WA (United States); Donovan, Conrad; Heo, Deukhyoun [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99163-2710 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is capable of powering an electronic device if we store the energy in an external storage device, such as a capacitor, and dispense that energy intermittently in bursts of high-power when needed. Therefore its performance needs to be evaluated using an energy-storing device such as a capacitor which can be charged and discharged rather than other evaluation techniques, such as continuous energy dissipation through a resistor. In this study, we develop a method of testing microbial fuel cell performance based on storing energy in a capacitor. When a capacitor is connected to a MFC it acts like a variable resistor and stores energy from the MFC at a variable rate. In practice the application of this method to testing microbial fuel cells is very challenging and time consuming; therefore we have custom-designed a microbial fuel cell tester (MFCT). The MFCT evaluates the performance of a MFC as a power source. It uses a capacitor as an energy storing device and waits until a desired amount of energy is stored then discharges the capacitor. The entire process is controlled using an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) board controlled by a custom-written computer program. The utility of our method and the MFCT is demonstrated using a laboratory microbial fuel cell (LMFC) and a sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC). We determine (1) how frequently a MFC can charge a capacitor, (2) which electrode is current-limiting, (3) what capacitor value will allow the maximum harvested energy from a MFC, which is called the ''optimum charging capacitor value,'' and (4) what capacitor charging potential will harvest the maximum energy from a MFC, which is called the ''optimum charging potential.'' Using a LMFC we find that (1) the time needed to charge a 3-F capacitor from 0 to 500 mV is 108 min, (2) the optimum charging capacitor value is 3 F, and (3) the optimum charging potential is 300 mV. Using a SMFC we find that (1

  16. ANALYSING THE POSIBILITY OF FUEL FILTER ELEMENTS OPERATING EFFECTIVINESS EVALUATION WITH X-RAY FLUORESCENSE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Lvovich Nemchikov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The author dwells upon the problems of the technical condition of refueling complexes equipment continuous monitoring, which is an important factor in ensuring the safety and regularity of flights. The article deals with the results of the research into the composition and concentration of mechanical impurities from different layers of the regular filter EFB-15/120-104 0615 production number of NGOs "Unit", which has been removed from the supply line TC-1 aviation fuel tank farm from the State Reserve in the refueling tank farm "Vnukovo" and the filter control of Velcon company brand the CDF 230F, which is removed from the tanker, in order to assess their performance and service life prediction using X-ray fluorescence method.Illustrative and graphic research results are given, which allow to assess the effectiveness of the used filters. The assessment measuring of the found elements concentrations in different areas of the test sample: 4sm2 area, 1 cm2 and 0.25 cm2, cut from a cardboard filter area is made. The author determined that the average total Fe concentration on the filter was 8.3 g / m providing the fact that due to the operator information the filter pumped 2,020 m3 or 1,582 tons of fuel. There is also made the estimation of the total amount of Fe, detained in filter, which is 1313 g. It should be noted, according to the appearance and the detected concentration of Fe, its capacity has not been fully exhausted. This allows to receive additional information on the real filter resource, and to use it for solving the problems of filter mod- ernization.The studies have shown the possibility to estimate the amount and composition of impurities, which allows to be sure that this work is promising and possible to be integrated into the practical events to ensure the safe operation of civil aircraft. The publication aims to draw the attention of operators and regulatory authorities to the possibility of using the proposed method to provide a

  17. FSV experience in support of the GT-MHR reactor physics, fuel performance, and graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, A.M.; McEachern, D.; Hanson, D.L.; Vollman, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) power plant was the most recent operating graphite-moderated, helium-cooled nuclear power plant in the United States. Many similarities exist between the FSV design and the current design of the GT-MHR. Both designs use graphite as the basic building blocks of the core, as structural material, in the reflectors, and as a neutron moderator. Both designs use hexagonal fuel elements containing cylindrical fuel rods with coated fuel particles. Helium is the coolant and the power densities vary by less than 5%. Since material and geometric properties of the GT-MHR core am very similar to the FSV core, it is logical to draw upon the FSV experience in support of the GT-MHR design. In the Physics area, testing at FSV during the first three cycles of operation has confirmed that the calculational models used for the core design were very successful in predicting the core nuclear performance from initial cold criticality through power operation and refueling. There was excellent agreement between predicted and measured initial core criticality and control rod positions during startup. Measured axial flux distributions were within 5% of the predicted value at the peak. The isothermal temperature coefficient at zero power was in agreement within 3%, and even the calculated temperature defect over the whole operating range for cycle 3 was within 8% of the measured defect. In the Fuel Performance area, fuel particle coating performance, and fission gas release predictions and an overall plateout analysis were performed for decommissioning purposes. A comparison between predicted and measured fission gas release histories of Kr-85m and Xe-138 and a similar comparison with specific circulator plateout data indicated good agreement between prediction and measured data. Only I-131 plateout data was overpredicted, while Cs-137 data was underpredicted.

  18. Performance of a Yeast-mediated Biological Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip To

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae present in common Baker’s yeast was used in a microbial fuel cell in which glucose was the carbon source. Methylene blue was used as the electronophore in the anode compartment, while potassium ferricyanide and methylene blue were tested as electron acceptors in the cathode compartment. Microbes in a mediator-free environment were used as the control. The experiment was performed in both open and closed circuit configurations under different loads ranging from 100 kΩ to 400Ω. The eukaryotic S. cerevisiae-based fuel cell showed improved performance when methylene blue and ferricyanide were used as electron mediators, rendering a maximum power generation of 146.71±7.7 mW/m3. The fuel cell generated a maximum open circuit voltage of 383.6±1.5 mV and recorded a maximum efficiency of 28±1.8 % under 100 kΩ of external load.

  19. A Review of the Application and Performance of Carbon Nanotubes in Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chong Luo; Hui Xie; Qin Wang; Geng Luo; Chao Liu

    2015-01-01

    The fuel cell has the nature of high energy conversion efficiency and low pollutant emission. Carbon nanotubes used for fuel cells can decrease the needs of noble metals which are used for catalyst and improve the performance of fuel cells. The application of carbon nanotubes in fuel cells is summarized and discussed. The following aspects ...

  20. 76 FR 3587 - Standards of Performance for Fossil-Fuel-Fired, Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 60 RIN 2060-AQ46 Standards of Performance for Fossil-Fuel-Fired, Electric Utility... 221112 Fossil fuel-fired electric utility steam generating units. Federal Government 22112 Fossil fuel... government 22112 Fossil fuel-fired electric utility steam generating units owned by municipalities. 921150...

  1. Microstructured Electrolyte Membranes to Improve Fuel Cell Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xue

    Fuel cells, with the advantages of high efficiency, low greenhouse gas emission, and long lifetime are a promising technology for both portable power and stationary power sources. The development of efficient electrolyte membranes with high ionic conductivity, good mechanical durability and dense structure at low cost remains a challenge to the commercialization of fuel cells. This thesis focuses on exploring novel composite polymer membranes and ceramic electrolytes with the microstructure engineered to improve performance in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), respectively. Polymer/particle composite membranes hold promise to meet the demands of DMFCs at lower cost. The structure of composite membranes was controlled by aligning proton conducting particles across the membrane thickness under an applied electric field. The field-induced structural changes caused the membranes to display an enhanced water uptake, proton conductivity, and methanol permeability in comparison to membranes prepared without an applied field. Although both methanol permeability and proton conductivity are enhanced by the applied field, the permeability increase is relatively lower than the proton conductivity improvement, which results in enhanced proton/methanol selectivity and improved DMFC performance. Apatite ceramics are a new class of fast ion conductors being studied as alternative SOFC electrolytes in the intermediate temperature range. An electrochemical/hydrothermal deposition method was developed to grow fully dense apatite membranes containing well-developed crystals with c-axis alignment to promote ion conductivity. Hydroxyapatite seed crystals were first deposited onto a metal substrate electrochemically. Subsequent ion substitution during the hydrothermal growth process promoted the formation of dense, fully crystalline films with microstructure optimal for ion transport. The deposition parameters were systematically investigated, such as

  2. FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION FOR STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF U7MO DISPERSION FUEL PLATES VIA FLUID-THERMAL-STRUCTURAL INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakan Ozaltun; Herman Shen; Pavel Madvedev

    2010-11-01

    This article presents numerical simulation of dispersion fuel mini plates via fluid–thermal–structural interaction performed by commercial finite element solver COMSOL Multiphysics to identify initial mechanical response under actual operating conditions. Since fuel particles are dispersed in Aluminum matrix, and temperatures during the fabrication process reach to the melting temperature of the Aluminum matrix, stress/strain characteristics of the domain cannot be reproduced by using simplified models and assumptions. Therefore, fabrication induced stresses were considered and simulated via image based modeling techniques with the consideration of the high temperature material data. In order to identify the residuals over the U7Mo particles and the Aluminum matrix, a representative SEM image was employed to construct a microstructure based thermo-elasto-plastic FE model. Once residuals and plastic strains were identified in micro-scale, solution was used as initial condition for subsequent multiphysics simulations at the continuum level. Furthermore, since solid, thermal and fluid properties are temperature dependent and temperature field is a function of the velocity field of the coolant, coupled multiphysics simulations were considered. First, velocity and pressure fields of the coolant were computed via fluidstructural interaction. Computed solution for velocity fields were used to identify the temperature distribution on the coolant and on the fuel plate via fluid-thermal interaction. Finally, temperature fields and residual stresses were used to obtain the stress field of the plates via fluid-thermal-structural interaction.

  3. Experimental evaluation of thermal ratcheting behavior in UO2 fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of thermal cycling of UO2 at high temperatures has been experimentally evaluated to determine the rates of distortion of UO2/clad fuel elements. Two capsules were rested in the 1500 C range, one with a 50 C thermal cycle, the other with a 100 C thermal cycle. It was observed that eight hours at the lower cycle temperature produced sufficient UO2 redistribution to cause clad distortion. The amount of distortion produced by the 100 C cycle was less than double that produced by the 50 C, indicating smaller thermal cycles would result in clad distortion. An incubation period was observed to occur before the onset of distortion with cycling similar to fuel swelling observed in-pile at these temperatures.

  4. Fuel element failure detection experiments, evaluation of the experiments at KNK II/1 (Intermediate Report)

    CERN Document Server

    Bruetsch, D

    1983-01-01

    In the frame of the fuel element failure detection experiments at KNK II with its first core the measurement devices of INTERATOM were taken into operation in August 1981 and were in operation almost continuously. Since the start-up until the end of the first KNK II core operation plugs with different fuel test areas were inserted in order to test the efficiency of the different measuring devices. The experimental results determined during this test phase and the gained experiences are described in this report and valuated. All three measuring techniques (Xenon adsorption line XAS, gas-chromatograph GC and precipitator PIT) could fulfil the expectations concerning their susceptibility. For XAS and GC the nuclide specific sensitivities as determined during the preliminary tests could be confirmed. For PIT the influences of different parameters on the signal yield could be determined. The sensitivity of the device could not be measured due to a missing reference measuring point.

  5. MR-6 type fuel elements cooling in natural convection conditions after the reactor shut down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pytel, K.; Bykowski, W.; Moldysz, A. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock Swierk (Poland)

    2002-07-01

    Natural cooling conditions of the nuclear fuel in the channel type reactor after its shut down are commonly determined with relatively high uncertainty. This is not only to he lack of adequate measurements of thermal parameters i.e. the residual power generation, the coolant flow and temperatures, but also due to indeterminate model of convection mechanism. The numerical simulation of natural convection in multitube fuel assembly in the fuel channel leads to various convection modes including evidently chaotic behaviour. To determine the real cooling conditions in the MARIA research reactor a series of experiments has been performed with fuel assembly equipped with a set of thermocouples. After some forced cooling period (the shortest was half an hour after the reactor shut down) the reactor was left with the only natural convection. Two completely different cooling modes have been observed. The MARIA core consists of series of individual fuel channel and so called bypasses, maintaining the hydraulic properties of the fuel channel, connected in parallel. Initially, the convection cells were established trough few so-called bypasses providing a very effective mode of cooling. In this mode the flow charts were identical to those existing in forced cooling mode. After certain period the system switched on the second cooling mode with natural circulation within the individual fuel cells. Higher temperatures and temperature fluctuations were characteristic for this mode approaching 30 deg in amplitude. In almost all the cases the system was switching few times between modes, but eventually remained in the second mode. The switching times were not regular and the process has a chaotic behaviour. (author)

  6. Fusion solution to dispose of spent nuclear fuel, transuranic elements, and highly enriched uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Yousry E-mail: gohar@anl.gov

    2001-11-01

    The disposal of the nuclear spent fuel, the transuranic elements, and the highly enriched uranium represents a major problem under investigation by the international scientific community to identify the most promising solutions. The investigation of this paper focused on achieving the top rated solution for the problem, the elimination goal, which requires complete elimination for the transuranic elements or the highly enriched uranium, and the long-lived fission products. To achieve this goal, fusion blankets with liquid carrier, molten salts or liquid metal eutectics, for the transuranic elements and the uranium isotopes are utilized. The generated energy from the fusion blankets is used to provide revenue for the system. The long-lived fission products are fabricated into fission product targets for transmutation utilizing the neutron leakage from the fusion blankets. This paper investigated the fusion blanket designs for small fusion devices and the system requirements for such application. The results show that 334 MW of fusion power from D-T plasma for 30 years with an availability factor of 0.75 can dispose of the 70,000 tons of the U.S. inventory of spent nuclear fuel generated up to the year 2015. In addition, this fusion solution eliminates the need for a geological repository site, which is a major advantage. Meanwhile, such utilization of the fusion power will provide an excellent opportunity to develop fusion energy for the future.

  7. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur from Coal-Derived Fuel Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Todd H.; Berry, David A.; Lyons, K. David; Beer, Stephen K.; Monahan, Michael J.

    2001-11-06

    The development of low cost, highly efficient, desulfurization technology with integrated sulfur recovery remains a principle barrier issue for Vision 21 integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation plants. In this plan, the U. S. Department of Energy will construct ultra-clean, modular, co-production IGCC power plants each with chemical products tailored to meet the demands of specific regional markets. The catalysts employed in these co-production modules, for example water-gas-shift and Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, are readily poisoned by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a sulfur contaminant, present in the coal-derived fuel gases. To prevent poisoning of these catalysts, the removal of H{sub 2}S down to the parts-per-billion level is necessary. Historically, research into the purification of coal-derived fuel gases has focused on dry technologies that offer the prospect of higher combined cycle efficiencies as well as improved thermal integration with co-production modules. Primarily, these concepts rely on a highly selective process separation step to remove low concentrations of H{sub 2}S present in the fuel gases and produce a concentrated stream of sulfur bearing effluent. This effluent must then undergo further processing to be converted to its final form, usually elemental sulfur. Ultimately, desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases may cost as much as 15% of the total fixed capital investment (Chen et al., 1992). It is, therefore, desirable to develop new technology that can accomplish H{sub 2}S separation and direct conversion to elemental sulfur more efficiently and with a lower initial fixed capital investment.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of a PWR fuel element using zircaloy and silicon carbide claddings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Rochkhudson B. de; Cardoso, Fabiano; Salome, Jean A.D.; Pereira, Claubia; Fortini, Angela, E-mail: rochkhudson@ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The alloy composed of zirconium has been used effectively for over 50 years in claddings of nuclear fuel, especially for PWR type reactors. However, to increase fuel enrichment with the aim of raising the burning and maintaining the safety of nuclear plants is of great relevance the study of new materials that can replace safely and efficiently zircaloy cladding. Among several proposed material, silicon carbide (SiC) has a potential to replace zircaloy as fuel cladding material due to its high-temperature tolerance, chemical stability and low neutron affinity. In this paper, the goal is to expand the study with silicon carbide cladding, checking its behavior when submitted to an environment with boron, burnable poison rods, and temperature variations. Sensitivity calculation and the impact in multiplication factor to both claddings, zircaloy and silicon carbide, were performed during the burnup. The neutronic analysis was made using the SCALE 6.0 (Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation) code. (author)

  9. Simulation of irradiation hardening of Zircaloy within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yijie; Wang, Qiming; Cui, Yi; Huo, Yongzhong; Ding, Shurong

    2011-06-01

    Within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements, the metal matrix and cladding attacked continuously by fast neutrons undergo irradiation hardening, which might have remarkable effects upon the mechanical behaviors within fuel elements. In this paper, with the irradiation hardening effect of metal materials mainly considered together with irradiation growth effect of the cladding, the three-dimensional large-deformation constitutive relations for the metal matrix and cladding are developed. The method of virtual temperature increase in the previous studies is further developed to model the irradiation swelling of fuel particles; the method of anisotropic thermal expansion is introduced to model irradiation growth of the cladding; and a method of multi-step-temperature loading is proposed to simulate the coupling features of irradiation-induced swelling of the fuel particles together with irradiation growth of the cladding. Above all, based on the developed relationship between irradiation growth at certain burnup and the loaded virtual temperatures, with considering that certain burnup corresponds to certain fast neutron fluence, the time-dependent constitutive relation due to irradiation hardening effect is replaced by the virtual-temperature-dependent one which is introduced into the commercial software to simulate the irradiation hardening effects of the matrix and cladding. Numerical simulations of the irradiation-induced mechanical behaviors are implemented with the finite element method in consideration of the micro-structure of the fuel meat. The obtained results indicate that when the irradiation hardening effects are introduced into the constitutive relations of the metal matrix and cladding: (1) higher maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the matrix exist with the equivalent plastic strains remaining almost the same at lower burnups; (2) the maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the cladding are enhanced while the maximum equivalent

  10. Analysis performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubin, A. N. A.; Bahrom, M. H.; Azri, M.; Ibrahim, Z.; Rahim, N. A.; Raihan, S. R. S.

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has gained much attention to the technology of renewable energy due to its mechanically ideal and zero emission power source. PEMFC performance reflects from the surroundings such as temperature and pressure. This paper presents an analysis of the performance of the PEMFC by developing the mathematical thermodynamic modelling using Matlab/Simulink. Apart from that, the differential equation of the thermodynamic model of the PEMFC is used to explain the contribution of heat to the performance of the output voltage of the PEMFC. On the other hand, the partial pressure equation of the hydrogen is included in the PEMFC mathematical modeling to study the PEMFC voltage behaviour related to the input variable input hydrogen pressure. The efficiency of the model is 33.8% which calculated by applying the energy conversion device equations on the thermal efficiency. PEMFC’s voltage output performance is increased by increasing the hydrogen input pressure and temperature.

  11. A reformer performance model for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, S. S.; Saif, Y. A.; Fellner, J. P.

    A performance model for a reformer, consisting of the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO), high- and low-temperature water-gas shift (HTWGS and LTWGS), and preferential oxidation (PROX) reactors, has been formulated. The model predicts the composition and temperature of the hydrogen-rich reformed fuel-gas mixture needed for the fuel cell applications. The mathematical model equations, based on the principles of classical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics, were implemented into a computer program. The resulting software was employed to calculate the chemical species molar flow rates and the gas mixture stream temperature for the steady-state operation of the reformer. Typical computed results, such as the gas mixture temperature at the CPO reactor exit and the profiles of the fractional conversion of carbon monoxide, temperature, and mole fractions of the chemical species as a function of the catalyst weight in the HTWGS, LTWGS, and PROX reactors, are here presented at the carbon-to-oxygen atom ratio (C/O) of 1 for the feed mixture of n-decane (fuel) and dry air (oxidant).

  12. Evaluation of plate type fuel elements by eddy current test method; Avaliacao de combustiveis nucleares tipo placa pelo metodo de correntes parasitas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frade, Rangel Teixeira

    2015-07-01

    Plate type fuel elements are used in MTR research nuclear reactors. The fuel plates are manufactured by assembling a briquette containing the fissile material inserted in a frame, with metal plates in both sides of the set, to act as a cladding. This set is rolled under controlled conditions in order to obtain the fuel plate. In Brazil, this type of fuel is manufactured by IPEN and used in the IEA-R1 reactor. After fabrication of three batches of fuel plates, 24 plates, one of them is taken, in order to verify the thickness of the cladding. For this purpose, the plate is sectioned and the thickness measurements are carried out by using optical microscopy. This procedure implies in damage of the plate, with the consequent cost. Besides, the process of sample preparation for optical microscopy analysis is time consuming, it is necessary an infrastructure for handling radioactive materials and there is a generation of radioactive residues during the process. The objective of this study was verify the applicability of eddy current test method for nondestructive measurement of cladding thickness in plate type nuclear fuels, enabling the inspection of all manufactured fuel plates. For this purpose, reference standards, representative of the cladding of the fuel plates, were manufactured using thermomechanical processing conditions similar to those used for plates manufacturing. Due to no availability of fuel plates for performing the experiments, the presence of the plate’s core was simulated using materials with different electrical conductivities, fixed to the thickness reference standards. Probes of eddy current testing were designed and manufactured. They showed high sensitivity to thickness variations, being able to separate small thickness changes. The sensitivity was higher in tests performed on the reference standards and samples without the presence of the materials simulating the core. For examination of the cladding with influence of materials simulating the

  13. Elemental characterization of particulate matter emitted from biomass burning: Wind tunnel derived source profiles for herbaceous and wood fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turn, S. Q.; Jenkins, B. M.; Chow, J. C.; Pritchett, L. C.; Campbell, D.; Cahill, T.; Whalen, S. A.

    1997-02-01

    Particulate matter emitted from wind tunnel simulations of biomass burning for five herbaceous crop residues (rice, wheat and barley straws, corn stover, and sugar cane trash) and four wood fuels (walnut and almond prunings and ponderosa pine and Douglas fir slash) was collected and analyzed for major elements and water soluble species. Primary constituents of the particulate matter were C, K, Cl, and S. Carbon accounted for roughly 50% of the herbaceous fuel PM and about 70% for the wood fuels. For the herbaceous fuels, particulate matter from rice straw in the size range below 10 μm aerodynamic diameter (PM10) had the highest concentrations of both K (24%) and Cl, (17%) and barley straw PM10 contained the highest sulfur content (4%). K, Cl, and S were present in the PM of the wood fuels at reduced levels with maximum concentrations of 6.5% (almond prunings), 3% (walnut prunings), and 2% (almond prunings), respectively. Analysis of water soluble species indicated that ionic forms of K, Cl, and S made up the majority of these elements from all fuels. Element balances showed K, Cl, S, and N to have the highest recovery factors (fraction of fuel element found in the particulate matter) in the PM of the elements analyzed. In general, chlorine was the most efficiently recovered element for the herbaceous fuels (10 to 35%), whereas sulfur recovery was greatest for the wood fuels (25 to 45%). Unique potassium to elemental carbon ratios of 0.20 and 0.95 were computed for particulate matter (PM10 K/C(e)) from herbaceous and wood fuels, respectively. Similarly, in the size class below 2.5 μm, high-temperature elemental carbon to bromine (PM2.5 C(eht)/Br) ratios of ˜7.5, 43, and 150 were found for the herbaceous fuels, orchard prunings, and forest slash, respectively. The molar ratios of particulate phase bromine to gas phase CO2 (PM10 Br/CO2) are of the same order of magnitude as gas phase CH3Br/CO2 reported by others.

  14. STAT, GAPS, STRAIN, DRWDIM: a system of computer codes for analyzing HTGR fuel test element metrology data. User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurwein, J.J.

    1977-08-01

    A system of computer codes has been developed to statistically reduce Peach Bottom fuel test element metrology data and to compare the material strains and fuel rod-fuel hole gaps computed from these data with HTGR design code predictions. The codes included in this system are STAT, STRAIN, GAPS, and DRWDIM. STAT statistically evaluates test element metrology data yielding fuel rod, fuel body, and sleeve irradiation-induced strains; fuel rod anisotropy; and additional data characterizing each analyzed fuel element. STRAIN compares test element fuel rod and fuel body irradiation-induced strains computed from metrology data with the corresponding design code predictions. GAPS compares test element fuel rod, fuel hole heat transfer gaps computed from metrology data with the corresponding design code predictions. DRWDIM plots the measured and predicted gaps and strains. Although specifically developed to expedite the analysis of Peach Bottom fuel test elements, this system can be applied, without extensive modification, to the analysis of Fort St. Vrain or other HTGR-type fuel test elements.

  15. PEM fuel cell stack performance using dilute hydrogen mixture. Implications on electrochemical engine system performance and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inbody, M.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Tafoya, J.I. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Onboard fuel processing to generate a hydrogen-rich fuel for PEM fuel cells is being considered as an alternative to stored hydrogen fuel for transportation applications. If successful, this approach, contrasted to operating with onboard hydrogen, utilizes the existing fuels infrastructure and provides required vehicle range. One attractive, commercial liquid fuels option is steam reforming of methanol. However, expanding the liquid methanol infrastructure will take both time and capital. Consequently technology is also being developed to utilize existing transportation fuels, such as gasoline or diesel, to power PEM fuel cell systems. Steam reforming of methanol generates a mixture with a dry gas composition of 75% hydrogen and 25% carbon dioxide. Steam reforming, autothermal reforming, and partial oxidation reforming of C{sub 2} and larger hydrocarbons produces a mixture with a more dilute hydrogen concentration (65%-40%) along with carbon dioxide ({approx}20%) and nitrogen ({approx}10%-40%). Performance of PEM fuel cell stacks on these dilute hydrogen mixtures will affect the overall electrochemical engine system design as well as the overall efficiency. The Los Alamos Fuel Cell Stack Test facility was used to access the performance of a PEM Fuel cell stack over the range of gas compositions chosen to replicate anode feeds from various fuel processing options for hydrocarbon and alcohol fuels. The focus of the experiments was on the anode performance with dilute hydrogen mixtures with carbon dioxide and nitrogen diluents. Performance with other anode feed contaminants, such as carbon monoxide, are not reported here.

  16. Irradiation behavior of modified high-performance nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungwirth, Rainer

    2011-11-03

    To overcome the problem of UMo/Al fuel swelling, four different possibilities have been identified: (i) the modification of the Al matrix by adding diffusion limiting elements (ii) the insertion of a diffusion barrier at the interface UMo-Al (iii) further alloying the UMo with a third element to stabilize the γ-UMo phase (iv) a combination of means (i)-(iii). In consequence, 20 different UMoX/AlY (X=Si, Ti, Mg, Bi, with and without oxidation layer; Y=Nb, Ti, Pt) samples have been examined before and after irradiation with Iodine at 80MeV. First it has been shown, that a protective oxidation layer on the UMo grains does not prevent the formation of a interdiffusion layer. In contrast, additions to the Al matrix can be reduced to the self-acting formation of a protective layer at the UMo/Al interface. Additions to the UMo to stabilize the γ-UMo upon heating are of minor importance since irradiation reverses the phase decomposition of UMo.

  17. Prognosis and comparison of performances of composite CERCER and CERMET fuels dedicated to transmutation of TRU in an EFIT ADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, V.; Uyttenhove, W.; Thetford, R.; Maschek, W.

    2011-07-01

    The neutronic and thermomechanical performances of two composite fuel systems: CERCER with (Pu,Np,Am,Cm)O 2-x fuel particles in ceramic MgO matrix and CERMET with metallic Mo matrix, selected for transmutation of minor actinides in the European Facility for Industrial Transmutation (EFIT), were analysed aiming at their optimisation. The ALEPH burnup code system, based on MNCPX and ORIGEN codes and JEFF3.1 nuclear data library, and the modern version of the fuel rod performance code TRAFIC were used for this analysis. Because experimental data on the properties of the mixed minor-actinide oxides are scarce, and the in-reactor behaviour of the T91 steel chosen as cladding, as well as of the corrosion protective layer, is still not well-known, a set of "best estimates" provided the properties used in the code. The obtained results indicate that both fuel candidates, CERCER and CERMET, can satisfy the fuel design and safety criteria of EFIT. The residence time for both types of fuel elements can reach about 5 years with the reactivity swing within ±1000 pcm, and about 22% of the loaded MA is transmuted during this period. However, the fuel centreline temperature in the hottest CERCER fuel rod is close to the temperature above which MgO matrix becomes chemically instable. Moreover, a weak PCMI can appear in about 3 years of operation. The CERMET fuel can provide larger safety margins: the fuel temperature is more than 1000 K below the permitted level of 2380 K and the pellet-cladding gap remains open until the end of operation.

  18. Performance evaluation of large U-Mo particle dispersed fuel irradiated in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Oh, Seok Jin; Jang, Se Jung; Yu, Byung Ok; Lee, Choong Seong; Seo, Chul Gyo; Chae, Hee Taek; Kim, Chang Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel is being developed as advanced fuel for research reactors. Irradiation behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel has been studied to evaluate its fuel performance. One of the performance limiting factors is a chemical interaction between the U-Mo particle and the Al matrix because the thermal conductivity of fuel meat is decreased with the interaction layer growth. In order to overcome the interaction problem, large-sized U-Mo particles were fabricated by controlling the centrifugal atomization conditions. The fuel performance behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel was estimated by using empirical models formulated based on the microstructural analyses of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) on U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel irradiated in HANARO reactor. Temperature histories of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel during irradiation tests were estimated by considering the effect of an interaction layer growth on the thermal conductivity of the fuel meat. When the fuel performances of the dispersion fuel rods containing U-Mo particles with various sizes were compared, fuel temperature was decreased as the average U-Mo particles with various sizes were compared, fuel temperature was decreased as the average U-Mo particle size was increases. It was found that the dispersion of a larger U-Mo particle was effective for mitigating the thermal degradation which is associated with an interaction layer growth.

  19. Performance assessment of natural gas and biogas fueled molten carbonate fuel cells in carbon capture configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barelli, Linda; Bidini, Gianni; Campanari, Stefano; Discepoli, Gabriele; Spinelli, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The ability of MCFCs as carbon dioxide concentrator is an alternative solution among the carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies to reduce the CO2 emission of an existing plant, providing energy instead of implying penalties. Moreover, the fuel flexibility exhibited by MCFCs increases the interest on such a solution. This paper provides the performance characterization of MCFCs operated in CCS configuration and fed with either natural gas or biogas. Experimental results are referred to a base CCS unit constituted by a MCFC stack fed from a reformer and integrated with an oxycombustor. A comparative analysis is carried out to evaluate the effect of fuel composition on energy efficiency and CO2 capture performance. A higher CO2 removal ability is revealed for the natural feeding case, bringing to a significant reduction in MCFC total area (-11.5%) and to an increase in produced net power (+13%). Moreover, the separated CO2 results in 89% (natural gas) and 86.5% (biogas) of the CO2 globally delivered by the CCS base unit. Further investigation will be carried out to provide a comprehensive assessment of the different solutions eco-efficiency considering also the biogas source and availability.

  20. Alternate-Fueled Combustor-Sector Performance. Parts A and B; (A) Combustor Performance; (B) Combustor Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouse, D. T.; Hendricks, R. C.; Lynch, A.; Frayne, C. W.; Stutrud, J. S.; Corporan, E.; Hankins, T.

    2012-01-01

    Alternate aviation fuels for military or commercial use are required to satisfy MIL-DTL-83133F(2008) or ASTM D 7566 (2010) standards, respectively, and are classified as "drop-in" fuel replacements. To satisfy legacy issues, blends to 50% alternate fuel with petroleum fuels are certified individually on the basis of processing and assumed to be feedstock agnostic. Adherence to alternate fuels and fuel blends requires "smart fueling systems" or advanced fuel-flexible systems, including combustors and engines, without significant sacrifice in performance or emissions requirements. This paper provides preliminary performance (Part A) and emissions and particulates (Part B) combustor sector data. The data are for nominal inlet conditions at 225 psia and 800 F (1.551 MPa and 700 K), for synthetic-paraffinic-kerosene- (SPK-) type (Fisher-Tropsch (FT)) fuel and blends with JP-8+100 relative to JP-8+100 as baseline fueling. Assessments are made of the change in combustor efficiency, wall temperatures, emissions, and luminosity with SPK of 0%, 50%, and 100% fueling composition at 3% combustor pressure drop. The performance results (Part A) indicate no quantifiable differences in combustor efficiency, a general trend to lower liner and higher core flow temperatures with increased FT fuel blends. In general, emissions data (Part B) show little differences, but with percent increase in FT-SPK-type fueling, particulate emissions and wall temperatures are less than with baseline JP-8. High-speed photography illustrates both luminosity and combustor dynamic flame characteristics.

  1. Performance of fuel cell for energy supply of passive house

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, G.; Felseghi, R. A.; Rǎboacǎ, S. M.; Aşchilean, I.; Mureşan, D.; Naghiu, G.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen technology and passive house represent two concepts with a remarkable role for the efficiency and decarbonisation of energy systems in the residential buildings area. Through design and functionality, the passive house can make maximum use of all available energy resources. One of the solutions to supply energy of these types of buildings is the fuel cell, using this technology integrated into a system for generating electricity from renewable primary sources, which take the function of backup power (energy reserve) to cover peak load and meteorological intermittents. In this paper is presented the results of the case study that provide an analysis of the energy, environmental and financial performances regarding energy supply of passive house by power generation systems with fuel cell fed with electrolytic hydrogen produced by harnessing renewable energy sources available. Hybrid systems have been configured and operate in various conditions of use for five differentiated locations according to the main areas of solar irradiation from the Romanian map. Global performance of hybrid systems is directly influenced by the availability of renewable primary energy sources - particular geo-climatic characteristics of the building emplacement.

  2. Performance of fuel cell for energy supply of passive house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, G.; Felseghi, R. A., E-mail: Raluca.FELSEGHI@insta.utcluj.ro; Mureşan, D.; Naghiu, G. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Building Services Engineering Department, Bd. December 21, no. 128-130, 400600, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Răboacă, S. M. [National R& D Institute for Cryogenic and Isotopic Technologies, str. Uzinei, no. 4, Rm. Vălcea, 240050 (Romania); Aşchilean, I. [SC ACI Cluj SA, Avenue Dorobanţilor, no. 70, 400609, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen technology and passive house represent two concepts with a remarkable role for the efficiency and decarbonisation of energy systems in the residential buildings area. Through design and functionality, the passive house can make maximum use of all available energy resources. One of the solutions to supply energy of these types of buildings is the fuel cell, using this technology integrated into a system for generating electricity from renewable primary sources, which take the function of backup power (energy reserve) to cover peak load and meteorological intermittents. In this paper is presented the results of the case study that provide an analysis of the energy, environmental and financial performances regarding energy supply of passive house by power generation systems with fuel cell fed with electrolytic hydrogen produced by harnessing renewable energy sources available. Hybrid systems have been configured and operate in various conditions of use for five differentiated locations according to the main areas of solar irradiation from the Romanian map. Global performance of hybrid systems is directly influenced by the availability of renewable primary energy sources - particular geo-climatic characteristics of the building emplacement.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell performance under severe operating conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Søren; Hendriksen, P.V.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2006-01-01

    The performance and degradation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) were studied under severe operating conditions. The cells studied were manufactured in a small series by ECN, in the framework of the EU funded CORE-SOFC project. The cells were of the anode-supported type with a double layer LSM...... cathode. They were operated at 750 °C or 850 °C in hydrogen with 5% or 50% water at current densities ranging from 0.25 A cm–2 to 1 A cm–2 for periods of 300 hours or more. The area specific cell resistance, corrected for fuel utilisation, ranged between 0.20 Ω cm2 and 0.34 Ω cm2 at 850 °C and 520 m......V, and between 0.51 Ω cm2 and 0.92 Ω cm2 at 750 °C and 520 mV. The degradation of cell performance was found to be low (ranging from 0 to 8%/1,000 hours) at regular operating conditions. Voltage degradation rates of 20 to 40%/1,000 hours were observed under severe operating conditions, depending on the test...

  4. Fuel performance improvement program. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1978. [LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouthamel, C.E. (comp.)

    1978-07-01

    The Fuel Performance Improvement Program has as its objective the identification and demonstration of fuel concepts with improved power ramp performance. Improved fuels are being sought to allow reduction or elimination of fuel related operating guidelines on nuclear power plants such that the fuel may be power maneuvered within the rates allowed by the system technical specifications. The program contains a combination of out-of-reactor studies, in-reactor experiments and in-reactor demonstrations. Fuel concepts initially being considered include annular pellets, cladding internally coated with graphite and packed-particle fuels. The performance capability of each concept will be compared to a reference fuel of contemporary pellet design by irradiations in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor. Fuel design and process development is being completed and fuel rod fabrication will begin for the Halden test rods and for the first series of in-reactor experiments. The in-reactor demonstrations are being performed in the Big Rock Point reactor to show that the concepts pose no undue risk to commercial operation. Additional concepts may be considered as the result of a state-of-the-technology review of fuel-cladding interaction and assessment of fuel concepts and the out-of-reactor studies. The results of the program will be used to establish the technical bases for design of fuels with improved power ramp performance.

  5. The prediction of transducer element performance from in air measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    A technique has been developed which accurately predicts the performance of underwater acoustic arrays prior to array construction. The technique is based upon the measurement of lumped-parameter equivalent circuit values for each element in the array, and is accurate in predicting the array transmit, receive and beam pattern response. The measurement procedure determines the shunt electrical and motional circuit elements from electrical imittance measurements. The electromechanical transformation ratio is derived from in-air measurements of the radiating face velocity and the input current to the transducer at resonance. The equivalent circuit values of a group of Tonpilz-type transducers were measured, and the self and mutual interaction acoustic loadings for a specific array geometry were calculated. The response of the elements was then predicted for water-loaded array conditions. Based on the predictions, a selection scheme was developed which minimized the effects of inter-element variability on array performance. The measured transmitting, receiving and beam pattern characteristics of a test array, built using the selected elements, were compared to predictions made before the array was built. The results indicated that the technique is accurate over a wide frequency range.

  6. Design Elements and Electrical Performance of a Bifacial BIPV Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Gu Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bifacial BIPV systems have great potential when applied to buildings given their use of a glass-to-glass structure. However, the performance of bifacial solar cells depends on a variety of design factors. Therefore, in order to apply bifacial solar cells to buildings, a bifacial PV module performance analysis should be carried out, including consideration of the various design elements and reflecting a wide range of installation conditions. This study focuses on the performance of a bifacial BIPV module applied to a building envelope. The results here show that the design elements of reflectivity and the transparent space ratio have the greatest impact on performance levels. The distance between the module and the wall had less of an impact on performance. The bifacial BIPV module produced output up to 30% greater than the output of monofacial PV modules, depending on the design elements. Bifacial BIPV modules themselves should have transparent space ratios of at least 30%. When a dark color is used on the external wall with reflectivity of 50% or less, bifacial BIPV modules with transparent space ratios of 40% and above should be used. In order to achieve higher performance through the installation of bifacial BIPV modules, design conditions which facilitate reflectivity exceeding 50% and a transparent space ratio which exceeds 30% must be met.

  7. Improved lumped models for transient combined convective and radiative cooling of a two-layer spherical fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alice Cunha da; Su, Jian, E-mail: alicecs@poli.ufrj.br, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a fourth generation thermal nuclear reactor, graphite-moderated and helium cooled. The HTGRs have important characteristics making essential the study of these reactors, as well as its fuel element. Examples of these are: high thermal efficiency,low operating costs and construction, passive safety attributes that allow implication of the respective plants. The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a HTGR with spherical fuel elements that named the reactor. This fuel element is composed by a particulate region with spherical inclusions, the fuel UO2 particles, dispersed in a graphite matrix and a convective heat transfer by Helium happens on the outer surface of the fuel element. In this work, the transient heat conduction in a spherical fuel element of a pebble-bed high temperature reactor was studied in a transient situation of combined convective and radiative cooling. Improved lumped parameter model was developed for the transient heat conduction in the two-layer composite sphere subjected to combined convective and radiative cooling. The improved lumped model was obtained through two-point Hermite approximations for integrals. Transient combined convective and radiative cooling of the two-layer spherical fuel element was analyzed to illustrate the applicability of the proposed lumped model, with respect to die rent values of the Biot number, the radiation-conduction parameter, the dimensionless thermal contact resistance, the dimensionless inner diameter and coating thickness, and the dimensionless thermal conductivity. It was shown by comparison with numerical solution of the original distributed parameter model that the improved lumped model, with H2,1/H1,1/H0,0 approximation yielded significant improvement of average temperature prediction over the classical lumped model. (author)

  8. Enhanced thermal conductivity oxide nuclear fuels by co-sintering with BeO: II. Fuel performance and neutronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Kevin; Mays, Claude

    2008-04-01

    The fuel rod performance and neutronics of enhanced thermal conductivity oxide (ECO) nuclear fuel with BeO have been compared to those of standard UO 2 fuel. The standards of comparison were that the ECO fuel should have the same infinite neutron-multiplication factor kinf at end of life and provide the same energy extraction per fuel assembly over its lifetime. The BeO displaces some uranium, so equivalence with standard UO 2 fuel was obtained by increasing the burnup and slightly increasing the enrichment. The COPERNIC fuel rod performance code was adapted to account for the effect of BeO on thermal properties. The materials considered were standard UO 2, UO 2 with 4.0 vol.% BeO, and UO 2 with 9.6 vol.% BeO. The smaller amount of BeO was assumed to provide increases in thermal conductivity of 0, 5, or 10%, whereas the larger amount was assumed to provide an increase of 50%. A significant improvement in performance was seen, as evidenced by reduced temperatures, internal rod pressures, and fission gas release, even with modest (5-10%) increases in thermal conductivity. The benefits increased monotonically with increasing thermal conductivity. Improvements in LOCA initialization performance were also seen. A neutronic calculation considered a transition from standard UO 2 fuel to ECO fuel. The calculation indicated that only a small increase in enrichment is required to maintain the kinf at end of life. The smallness of the change was attributed to the neutron-multiplication reaction of Be with fast neutrons and the moderating effect of BeO. Adoption of ECO fuel was predicted to provide a net reduction in uranium cost. Requirements for industrial hygiene were found to be comparable to those for processing of UO 2.

  9. Performance evaluation of large U-Mo particle dispersed fuel irradiated in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Oh, Seok Jin; Jang, Se Jung; Yu, Byung Ok; Lee, Choong Seong; Seo, Chul Gyo; Chae, Hee Taek; Kim, Chang Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel is being developed as advanced fuel for research reactors. Irradiation behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel has been studied to evaluate its fuel performance. One of the performance limiting factors is a chemical interaction between the U-Mo particle and the Al matrix because the thermal conductivity of fuel meat is decreased with the interaction layer growth. In order to overcome the interaction problem, large-sized U-Mo particles were fabricated by controlling the centrifugal atomization conditions. The fuel performance behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel was estimated by using empirical models formulated based on the microstructural analyses of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) on U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel irradiated in HANARO reactor. Temperature histories of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel during tests were estimated by considering the effect of an interaction layer growth on the thermal conductivity of the fuel meat. When the fuel performances of the dispersion fuel rods containing U-Mo particles were compared, fuel temperature was decreased as the average U-Mo particle size was increased. It was found that the dispersion of a larger U-Mo particle was effective for mitigating the thermal degradation which is associated with an interaction layer growth.

  10. Performance of nickel-based oxygen carrier produced using renewable fuel aloe vera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afandi, NF; Devaraj, D.; Manap, A.; Ibrahim, N.

    2017-04-01

    Consuming and burning of fuel mainly fossil fuel has gradually increased in this upcoming era due to high-energy demand and causes the global warming. One of the most effective ways to reduce the greenhouse gases is by capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) during the combustion process. Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is one of the most effective methods to capture the CO2 without the need of an energy intensive air separation unit. This method uses oxygen carrier to provide O2 that can react with fuel to form CO2 and H2O. This research focuses on synthesizing NiO/NiAl2O4 as an oxygen carrier due to its properties that can withstand high temperature during CLC application. The NiO/NiAl2O4 powder was synthesized using solution combustion method with plant extract renewable fuel, aloe vera as the fuel. In order to optimize the performance of the particles that can be used in CLC application, various calcination temperatures were varied at 600°C, 800°C, 1050°C and 1300°C. The phase and morphology of obtained powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Field Emission Microscopy (FESEM) respectively together with the powder elements. In CLC application, high reactivity can be achieved by using smaller particle size of oxygen carrier. This research succeeded in producing nano-structured powder with high crystalline structure at temperature 1050°C which is suitable to be used in CLC application.

  11. Effects of different chemical additives on biodiesel fuel properties and engine performance. A comparison review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Obed Majeed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel fuel can be used as an alternative to mineral diesel, its blend up to 20% used as a commercial fuel for the existing diesel engine in many countries. However, at high blending ratio, the fuel properties are worsening. The feasibility of pure biodiesel and blended fuel at high blending ratio using different chemical additives has been reviewed in this study. The results obtained by different researchers were analysed to evaluate the fuel properties trend and engine performance and emissions with different chemical additives. It found that, variety of chemical additives can be utilised with biodiesel fuel to improve the fuel properties. Furthermore, the chemical additives usage in biodiesel is inseparable both for improving the cold flow properties and for better engine performance and emission control. Therefore, research is needed to develop biodiesel specific additives that can be adopted to improve the fuel properties and achieve best engine performance at lower exhaust emission effects.

  12. An experimental assessment on the influence of high octane fuels on biofuel based dual fuel engine performance, emission, and combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masimalai Senthilkumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study on the effect of different high octane fuels (such as eucalyptus oil, ethanol, and methanol on engine’s performance behaviour of a biofuel based dual fuel engine. A single cylinder Diesel engine was modified and tested under dual fuel mode of operation. Initially the engine was run using neat diesel, neat mahua oil as fuels. In the second phase, the engine was operated in dual fuel mode by using a specially designed variable jet carburettor to supply the high octane fuels. Engine trials were made at 100% and 40% loads (power outputs with varying amounts of high octane fuels up-to the maximum possible limit. The performance and emission characteristics of the engine were obtained and analysed. Results indicated significant improvement in brake thermal efficiency simultaneous reduction in smoke and NO emissions in dual fuel operation with all the inducted fuels. At 100% load the brake thermal efficiency increased from 25.6% to a maximum of 32.3, 30.5, and 28.4%, respectively, with eucalyptus oil, ethanol, and methanol as primary fuels. Smoke was reduced drastically from 78% with neat mahua oil a minimum of 41, 48, and 53%, respectively, with eucalyptus oil, ethanol, and methanol at the maximum efficiency point. The optimal energy share for the best engine behaviour was found to be 44.6, 27.3, and 23.2%, respectively, for eucalyptus oil, ethanol, and methanol at 100% load. Among the primary fuels tested, eucalyptus oil showed the maximum brake thermal efficiency, minimum smoke and NO emissions and maximum energy replacement for the optimal operation of the engine.

  13. Performance assessment of a spiral methanol to hydrogen fuel processor for fuel cell applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Foad Mehri; Majid Taghizadeh

    2012-01-01

    A novel design of plate-type microchannel reactor has been developed for fuel cell-grade hydrogen production.Commercial Cu/Zn/Al2O3 was used as catalyst for the reforming reaction,and its effectiveness was evaluated on the mole fraction of products,methanol conversion,hydrogen yield and the amount of carbon monoxide under various operating conditions.Subsequently,0.5 wt% Ru/Al2O3 as methanation catalyst was prepared by impregnation method and coupled with MSR step to evaluate the capability of methanol processor for CO reduction.Based on the experimental results,the optimum conditions were obtained as feed flow rate of 5 mL/h and temperature of 250℃,leading to a low CO selectivity and high H2 yield.The designed reformer with catalyst coated layer was compared with the conventional packed bed reformer at the same operating conditions.The constructed fuel processor had a good performance and excellent capability for on-board hydrogen production.

  14. Performance evaluation of open core gasifier on multi-fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhoi, P.R.; Singh, R.N.; Sharma, A.M.; Patel, S.R. [Thermo Chemical Conversion Division, Sardar Patel Renewable Energy Research Institute (SPRERI), Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, Gujarat (India)

    2006-06-15

    Sardar Patel renewable energy research institute (SPRERI) has designed and developed open core, throat-less, down draft gasifier and installed it at the institute. The gasifier was designed for loose agricultural residues like groundnut shells. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the gasifier on multi-fuels such as babul wood (Prosopis juliflora), groundnut shell briquettes, groundnut shell, mixture of wood (Prosopis juliflora) and groundnut shell in the ratio of 1:1 and cashew nut shell. The gasifier performance was evaluated in terms of fuel consumption rate, calorific value of producer gas and gasification efficiency. Gasification efficiency of babul wood (Prosopis juliflora), groundnut shell briquettes, groundnut shell, mixture of Prosopis juliflora and groundnut shell in the ratio of 1:1 and cashew nut shell were 72%, 66%, 70%, 64%, 70%, respectively. Study revealed that babul wood (Prosopis juliflora), groundnut shell briquettes, groundnut shell, mixture of wood (Prosopis juliflora) and groundnut shell in the ratio of 1:1 and cashew nut shell were satisfactorily gasified in open core down draft gasifier. The study also showed that there was flow problem with groundnut shell. (author)

  15. Spatial proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance under bromomethane poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetenko, Tatyana V.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; St-Pierre, Jean

    2017-02-01

    The poisoning effects of 5 ppm CH3Br in the air on the spatial performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) were studied using a segmented cell system. The presence of CH3Br caused performance loss from 0.650 to 0.335 V at 1 A cm-2 accompanied by local current density redistribution. The observed behavior was explained by possible bromomethane hydrolysis with the formation of Br-. Bromide and bromomethane negatively affected the oxygen reduction efficiency over a wide range of potentials because of their adsorption on Pt, which was confirmed by XPS. Moreover, the PEMFC exposure to CH3Br led to a decrease in the anode and cathode electrochemical surface area (∼52-57%) due to the growth of Pt particles through agglomeration and Ostwald ripening. The PEMFC did not restore its performance after stopping bromomethane introduction to the air stream. However, the H2/N2 purge of the anode/cathode and CV scans almost completely recovered the cell performance. The observed final loss of ∼50 mV was due to an increased activation overpotential. PEMFC exposure to CH3Br should be limited to concentrations much less than 5 ppm due to serious performance loss and lack of self-recovery.

  16. Elemental balance of SRF production process: solid recovered fuel produced from municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Oinas, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    In the production of solid recovered fuel (SRF), certain waste components have excessive influence on the quality of product. The proportion of rubber, plastic (hard) and certain textiles was found to be critical as to the elemental quality of SRF. The mass flow of rubber, plastic (hard) and textiles (to certain extent, especially synthetic textile) components from input waste stream into the output streams of SRF production was found to play the decisive role in defining the elemental quality of SRF. This paper presents the mass flow of polluting and potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in SRF production. The SRF was produced from municipal solid waste (MSW) through mechanical treatment (MT). The results showed that of the total input chlorine content to process, 55% was found in the SRF and 30% in reject material. Of the total input arsenic content, 30% was found in the SRF and 45% in fine fraction. In case of cadmium, lead and mercury, of their total input content to the process, 62%, 38% and 30%, respectively, was found in the SRF. Among the components of MSW, rubber material was identified as potential source of chlorine, containing 8.0 wt.% of chlorine. Plastic (hard) and textile components contained 1.6 and 1.1. wt.% of chlorine, respectively. Plastic (hard) contained higher lead and cadmium content compared with other waste components, i.e. 500 mg kg(-1) and 9.0 mg kg(-1), respectively.

  17. Development of numerical methodology for determination of natural frequencies of fuel elements; Desenvolvimento de metodologia numerica para determinacao de frequencias naturais de elementos combustiveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrilho, Leo A.; Dotto, Rosvita M. [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil SA, Resende, RJ (Brazil); Gouvea, Jayme P. de [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    The analysis of the effects of postulated accidents on the structure of the fuel assemblies is done by INB through a bidimensional model resolved by a finite element program and considering an average lateral stiffness obtained experimentally. In order to to develop an equivalent ANSYS model with the capability of guide-thimble stress analysis during normal operation vibrations, one modal analysis on a tridimensional model is performed as a first step, considering the average lateral stiffness as obtained numerically from the models with and without sliding of the fuel rods on the spacers. Natural frequencies are presented to the sixth mode together with the relative most external guide-thimble stresses at the first mode, which is the base for a future analysis of absolute stresses on fuel assembly during vibration. (author)

  18. SIEX: a correlated code for the prediction of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuel thermal performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutt, D.S.; Baker, R.B.

    1974-01-01

    The SIEX computer program is a steady state heat transfer code developed to provide thermal performance calculations for a mixed-oxide fuel element in a fast neutron environment. Fuel restructuring, fuel-cladding heat conduction and fission gas release are modeled to provide assessment of the temperatures. Modeling emphasis has been placed on correlations to measurable quantities from EBR-II irradiation tests and the inclusion of these correlations in a physically based computational scheme. SIEX is completely modular in construction allowing the user options for material properties and correlated models. Required code input is limited to geometric and environmental parameters, with a ``consistant`` set of material properties and correlated models provided by the code. The development of physically based correlations to model certain of the phenomana has resulted in a computer program which provides reliable estimates of thermal performance characteristics, yet requires a small amount of core storage and computer running time.

  19. Preparation for shipment of spent TRIGA fuel elements from the research reactor of the Medical University of Hannover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, Gabriele; Cordes, Harro [Medical University of Hannover, D-30625 Hannover (Germany); Ebbinghaus, Kurt; Haferkamp, Dirk [NOELL-KRC, D-97064 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    In the early seventies a research reactor of type TRIGA Mark I was installed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) for the production of isotopes with short decay times for medical use. Since new production methods have been developed, the reactor has become obsolete and the MHH decided to decommission it. Probably in the second quarter of 1999 all 76 spent TRIGA fuel elements will be shipped to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), USA, in one cask of type GNS 16. Due to technical reasons within the MHH a special Mobile Transfer System, which is being developed by the company Noell-KRC, will be used for reloading the fuel elements and transferring them from the reactor to the cask GNS 16. A description of the main components of this system as well as the process for transferring the fuel elements follows. (author)

  20. Applying Advanced Neutron Transport Calculations for Improving Fuel Performance Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botazzoli, P.; Luzzi, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, Nuclear Engineering Division - CeSNEF, Milano (Italy); Schubert, A.; Van Uffelen, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Haeck, W. [Institute de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2009-06-15

    depletion code with any version of MCNP or MCNPX for reaction rate calculation. By means of a new efficient approach to Monte Carlo burn-up implemented into VESTA (the multi-group binning approach), the speed and accuracy of any burn-up and activation calculation has been drastically improved to an optimal level. One of the MOX configurations (with a Pu content of 5.6%) and the 3.5% enriched UO{sub 2} have been selected to be simulated by means of the VESTA code both considering the ENDF/B VII.0 and the JEFF 3.1 libraries. Considering the concentrations and the cross sections computed by VESTA, an overestimation in the TRANSURANUS formula can be noticed at the end of the irradiation history due to the fact that only the main fissile isotopes are considered, but at high burn-ups (especially for the MOX fuels), also the fissions of {sup 242m}Am and {sup 245}Cm play a non-negligible role thanks to their high fission cross sections. Including these isotopes the agreement is satisfactory. As a second step, in order to check the correctness of the implemented models, the fission and capture cross sections computed by VESTA have been fitted as a function of burn-up and implemented in the TRANSURANUS code. The results of the TRANSURANUS code have been compared with VESTA. The agreement of the predictions of all the considered isotopes is good, and the overestimation of the Helium production has been eliminated. Two conclusions can be drawn from the present analysis: - The ENDF/B VII.0 library as well as the ORIGEN fission yield database does not consider the ternary fission yield. Hence the results obtained by VESTA with the ENDF/B VII.0 library or with the ORIGEN fission yield database have to be corrected adding the ternary fission contribution. - The set of nuclides selected in TUBRNP are sufficient for a satisfactory description of the nuclide concentrations. As a final step, a sensitivity analysis has been performed by means of the Taguchi method. In particular, the effect of

  1. Progress performance report of clean uses of fossil fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, Jr., Lee T.; Boggess, Ronald J.; Carson, Ronald J.; Falkenberg, Virginia P.; Flanagan, Patrick; Hettinger, Jr., William P.; Kimel, Kris; Kupchella, Charles E.; Magid, Lee J.; McLaughlin, Barbara; Royster, Wimberly C.; Streepey, Judi L.; Wells, James H.; Stencel, John; Derbyshire, Frank J.; Hanley, Thomas R.; Magid, Lee J.; McEllistrem, Marc T.; Riley, John T.; Steffen, Joseph M.

    1992-01-01

    A one-year USDOE/EPSCOR Traineeship Grant, entitled Clean Uses of Fossil Fuels.'' was awarded to the Kentucky EPSCoR Committee in September 1991 and administered through the the DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee. Ten Traineeships were awarded to doctoral students who are enrolled or accepted into Graduate Programs at either the University of Kentucky or the University of Louisville. The disciplines of these students include Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Geological Sciences, and Physics. The methods used for a statewide proposal solicitation and to award the Traineeships are presented. The review panel and Kentucky DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee involved in awarding the Traineeships are described. A summary of the proposed research to be performed within these awards is presented, along with a description of the qualifications of the faculty and students who proposed projects. Future efforts to increase participation in Traineeship proposals for the succeeding funding period are outlined.

  2. Progress performance report of clean uses of fossil fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    A one-year USDOE/EPSCOR Traineeship Grant, entitled ``Clean Uses of Fossil Fuels.`` was awarded to the Kentucky EPSCoR Committee in September 1991 and administered through the the DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee. Ten Traineeships were awarded to doctoral students who are enrolled or accepted into Graduate Programs at either the University of Kentucky or the University of Louisville. The disciplines of these students include Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Geological Sciences, and Physics. The methods used for a statewide proposal solicitation and to award the Traineeships are presented. The review panel and Kentucky DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee involved in awarding the Traineeships are described. A summary of the proposed research to be performed within these awards is presented, along with a description of the qualifications of the faculty and students who proposed projects. Future efforts to increase participation in Traineeship proposals for the succeeding funding period are outlined.

  3. Performance of the Salt Bridge Based Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksudur R. Khan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Electricity generation from readily biodegradable organic substrates accompanied by decolorization of azo dye was investigated using a Microbial fuel cell (MFC. Biodegradation was the dominant mechanism of the dye removal, and glucose was the optimal substrate for Red Cibacron-2G (RC decolorization. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the MFC.  As compared to traditional anaerobic technology higher decolorization efficiency was achieved by MFC. Effect of initial dye concentration and external resistance on power generation were studied. Polarization experiments were also directed to find the maximum power density. Maximum Power density of 100mW/m2 (1.04A/m2 was recorded at optimum operating conditions.

  4. Performance of denitrifying microbial fuel cell with biocathode over nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao eHuimin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cell (MFC with nitrite as an electron acceptor in cathode provided a new technology for nitrogen removal and electricity production simultaneously. The influences of influent nitrite concentration and external resistance on the performance of denitrifying MFC were investigated. The optimal effectiveness were obtained with the maximum total nitrogen (TN removal rate of 54.80±0.01 g m-3 d-1. It would be rather desirable for the TN removal than electricity generation at lower external resistance. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis suggested that Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum, accounting for 35.72%. Thiobacillus and Afipia might benefit to nitrite removal. The presence of nitrifying Devosia indicated that nitrite was oxidized to nitrate via a biochemical mechanism in the cathode. Ignavibacterium and Anaerolineaceae was found in the cathode as a heterotrophic bacterium with sodium acetate as substrate, which illustrated that sodium acetate in anode was likely permeated through proton exchange membrane to the cathode .

  5. Multiscale Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estep, Donald [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); El-Azab, Anter [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Pernice, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Peterson, John W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Polyakov, Peter [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Tavener, Simon [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Xiu, Dongbin [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2017-03-23

    In this project, we will address the challenges associated with constructing high fidelity multiscale models of nuclear fuel performance. We (*) propose a novel approach for coupling mesoscale and macroscale models, (*) devise efficient numerical methods for simulating the coupled system, and (*) devise and analyze effective numerical approaches for error and uncertainty quantification for the coupled multiscale system. As an integral part of the project, we will carry out analysis of the effects of upscaling and downscaling, investigate efficient methods for stochastic sensitivity analysis of the individual macroscale and mesoscale models, and carry out a posteriori error analysis for computed results. We will pursue development and implementation of solutions in software used at Idaho National Laboratories on models of interest to the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program.

  6. Thermohydraulic study of a MTR fuel element aimed at the construction of an irradiation facility; Estudo termohidraulico de um elemento combustivel tipo MTR visando a construcao de um dispositivo de irradiacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coragem, Helio Boemer de Oliveira

    1980-07-01

    A thermohydraulic study of MTR fuel element is presented as a basic requirement for the development of an irradiation facility for testing fuel elements. A computer code named 'Thermo' has been developed for this purpose, which can stimulate different working conditions, such as, cooling, power elements and neutron flux, performing all pertinent thermohydraulic calculations. Thermocouples were used to measure the temperature gradients of the cooling fluid throughout the IEAR-1 reactor core. All experimental data are in good agreement with the theoretical model applied in this work. Finally, a draft of the proposed facility and its safety system is presented. (author)

  7. 76 FR 3517 - Standards of Performance for Fossil-Fuel-Fired, Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 60 RIN 2060-AQ46 Standards of Performance for Fossil-Fuel-Fired, Electric Utility... limited to, the following: Category NAICS \\1\\ Examples of regulated entities Industry 221112 Fossil fuel-fired electric utility steam generating units. Federal Government 22112 Fossil fuel-fired electric...

  8. Phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system performance model and computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkasab, K. A.; Lu, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program was developed for analyzing the performance of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant systems. Energy mass and electrochemical analysis in the reformer, the shaft converters, the heat exchangers, and the fuel cell stack were combined to develop a mathematical model for the power plant for both atmospheric and pressurized conditions, and for several commercial fuels.

  9. The Manufacture of W-UO2 Fuel Elements for NTP Using the Hot Isostatic Pressing Consolidation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, Jeramie; Hickman, Robert; Mireles, Omar

    2012-01-01

    NTP is attractive for space exploration because: (1) Higher Isp than traditional chemical rockets (2)Shorter trip times (3) Reduced propellant mass (4) Increased payload. Lack of qualified fuel material is a key risk (cost, schedule, and performance). Development of stable fuel form is a critical path, long lead activity. Goals of this project are: Mature CERMET and Graphite based fuel materials and Develop and demonstrate critical technologies and capabilities.

  10. Fuel injection and mixing systems having piezoelectric elements and methods of using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chien-Pei [Clive, IA; Short, John [Norwalk, IA; Klemm, Jim [Des Moines, IA; Abbott, Royce [Des Moines, IA; Overman, Nick [West Des Moines, IA; Pack, Spencer [Urbandale, IA; Winebrenner, Audra [Des Moines, IA

    2011-12-13

    A fuel injection and mixing system is provided that is suitable for use with various types of fuel reformers. Preferably, the system includes a piezoelectric injector for delivering atomized fuel, a gas swirler, such as a steam swirler and/or an air swirler, a mixing chamber and a flow mixing device. The system utilizes ultrasonic vibrations to achieve fuel atomization. The fuel injection and mixing system can be used with a variety of fuel reformers and fuel cells, such as SOFC fuel cells.

  11. Engineering high performance intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin Soo

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are an efficient, fuel flexible energy conversion device, capable of operating on fuels ranging from natural gas to gasoline, diesel, and biofuels, as well as hydrogen. However, to this point the marketability of SOFCs has been limited by their high operating temperatures. Achieving high power at intermediate temperatures (IT, 500 -- 700 °C) would be a significant breakthrough, as low temperature operation would result in better stability and allow for a broader range of material options for the SOFC components as well as the balance of plant, such as stainless steel interconnects (which are only viable at open circuit potential (OCP) by more than 0.1 V resulting in a 140 % increase in power. Further investigations into this molecular AFL showed that a multilayered AFL can further reduce the ASR and increase the maximum power density. Secondly, the potential use of Sm0.075Nd0.075Ce0.85O 2-delta as an electrolyte has been investigated. The current-voltage (I-V) performance of the cell exhibits a maximum power density reaching 1.38 W/cm2 with an area specific resistance (ASR) of 0.087 Ocm 2 at 650 °C with 90 sccm of air and wet hydrogen. Also, the high OCP achieved at 500 °C (0.96 V) as well as the high performance confirmed the viability of Sm0.075Nd0.075Ce0.85 O2-delta as an alternative electrolyte material. The cathode used for this study was La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe 0.8O3 (LSCF) -- Gd0.1Ce0.9O 2 (GDC) composite. Finally, Er0.8Bi1.2O3 (ESB)/GDC bilayered electrolyte combined with recently developed ESB/Bi2Ru2O7 (BRO) composite cathodes was tested. In this work a maximum power density of 2 W/cm2 was achieved at 650 °C with the help of the novel AFL and tapecast anode supports. This is the highest power yet achieved in the IT range and I believe redefines the expectation level for maximum power under IT-SOFC operating conditions.

  12. On diversity performance of two-element coupling element based antenna structure for mobile terminal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Hadi, Azremi Abdullah; Toivanen, Juha; Laitinen, Tommi

    2010-01-01

    fading. The main challenge of antenna diversity in practical application is the integration of multiple antennas on a small ground plane. Two-element antenna structure based on coupling element antenna concept for diversity application has been studied in previous work and it has shown to be feasible......In wireless communication systems, multipath interference has a significant impact on system design and performance. Fast fading is caused by the coherent summation of one or more echoes from many reflection points reaching the receive antenna. Antenna diversity can be used to mitigate multipath...... for low frequency diversity application with stable and low envelope correlation across wide frequency range. The studied structure has been tuned to be operating at 1600 MHz for measurement evaluation purpose. This paper presents an analysis of diversity performance of the structure in terms...

  13. Research on graphite powders used for HTR-PM fuel elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hongsheng; LIANG Tongxiang; ZHANG Jie; LI Ziqiang; TANG Chunhe

    2006-01-01

    Different batches of natural graphite powders and electrographite powders were characterized by impurity, degree of graphitization, particle size distribution, specific surface area, and shape characteristics. The graphite balls consist of proper mix-ratio of natural graphite, electrographite and phenolic resin were manufactured and characterized by thermal conductivity, anisotropy of thermal expansion, crush strength, and drop strength. Results show that some types of graphite powders possess very high purity, degree of graphitization, and sound size distribution and apparent density, which can serve for matrix graphite of HTR-PM. The graphite balls manufactured with reasonable mix-ratio of graphite powders and process method show very good properties. It is indicated that the properties of graphite balls can meet the design criterion of HTR-PM. We can provide a powerful candidate material for the future manufacture of HTR-PM fuel elements.

  14. Stochastic finite element applications in rigid pavement performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attoh-Okine, Nii O.

    1999-05-01

    Rigid pavement structures have uncertainties and variability in their structural layers and components. These variations and uncertainties are seldomly included in performance assessment and evaluation in pavement systems. This paper proposes to use Stochastic Finite Element Method (SFEM) in rigid pavement faulting and load transfer efficiency. The SFEM uses random parameters, as stochastic process namely random fields. These random fields are characterized, quantitatively by spatial functions of statistical moment like the mean, variance and covariance.

  15. Evaluation of the thermal-mechanic performance of fuel rods MOX in fuel assemblies 10 x 10; Evaluacion del desempeno termo-mecanico barras combustibles MOX en ensambles combustible 10 x 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H., E-mail: hector.hernandez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    In the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico) , we have been working in proposals of fuel assemblies that bear to the reduction of the plutonium inventories that exist a global level, plutonium coming from the dismantlement of the nuclear weapons as of the one used as fuel inside the reactors in operation at the present time. For this reason besides carrying out the evaluation of the neutron performance is necessary to realize the evaluation of the thermal-mechanic behavior of the rods that compose a fuel assembly with the purpose of determining if under the operation conditions to those that are subjected the fuel does not surpass the limit established and this causes a failure in the fuel element. In this sense when carrying out the analysis of an fuel element of mixed oxides in an arrangement 10 x 10 is observed that under the established operation conditions for the proposed cycle values that surpass the limit established for fuel failure are not presented, therefore the proposed assembly can be used as reload element in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  16. Experimental Investigation of Vibratory Stresses in a Concentric-Ring Direct-Air-Cycle Nuclear Fuel Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarito, Patrick T.

    1957-01-01

    Preliminary tests made by the General Electric Company indicated that aerodynamic loads might cause large enough distortions in the thin sheet-metal rings of a nuclear fuel element to result in structural failure. The magnitude of the distortions in a test fuel element was determined from strains measured with airflow conditions simulating those expected during engine operation. The measured vibratory strains were low enough to indicate the improbability of failure by fatigue. A conservative estimate of the radial deflection that accompanied peak strains in the outer ring was +0.0006 inch.

  17. Performance of low smeared density sodium-cooled fast reactor metal fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D. L.; Chichester, H. J. M.; Medvedev, P. G.; Hayes, S. L.; Teague, M. C.

    2015-10-01

    An experiment was performed in the Experimental Breeder Rector-II (EBR-II) in the 1990s to show that metallic fast reactor fuel could be used in reactors with a single, once-through core. To prove the long duration, high burnup, high neutron exposure capability an experiment where the fuel pin was designed with a very large fission gas plenum and very low fuel smeared density (SD). The experiment, X496, operated to only 8.3 at.% burnup because the EBR-II reactor was scheduled for shut-down at that time. Many of the examinations of the fuel pins only funded recently with the resurgence of reactor designs using very high-burnup fuel. The results showed that, despite the low smeared density of 59% the fuel swelled radially to contact the cladding, fission gas release appeared to be slightly higher than demonstrated in conventional 75%SD fuel tests and axial growth was about the same as 75% SD fuel. There were axial positions in some of the fuel pins which showed evidence of fuel restructuring and an absence of fission products with low melting points and gaseous precursors (Cs and Rb). A model to investigate whether these areas may have overheated due to a loss of bond sodium indicates that it is a possible explanation for the fuel restructuring and something to be considered for fuel performance modeling of low SD fuel.

  18. Final Report - Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent Molter

    2012-08-18

    This program is focused on the experimental determination of the effects of key hydrogen side impurities on the performance of PEM fuel cells. Experimental data has been leveraged to create mathematical models that predict the performance of PEM fuel cells that are exposed to specific impurity streams. These models are validated through laboratory experimentation and utilized to develop novel technologies for mitigating the effects of contamination on fuel cell performance. Results are publicly disseminated through papers, conference presentations, and other means.

  19. Research on Precaution and Detection Technology for Flow Blockage of Plate-type Fuel Element in Research Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING; Li; QIAO; Ya-xin; ZHANG; Nian-peng; LUO; Bei-bei; HUA; Xiao; JIA; Shu-jie; YAN; Hui-yang

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to offer the technical support for safety operation and management of research reactors using plate-type fuel assemblies in China,which is performed from analysis of precaution measures for flow blockage and detection methods of accidents.Study shows that most accidents were induced by in-core foreign objects and the swelling of fuel

  20. High Performance Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) for Space Energy Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Billings, Keith J.; Kisor, Adam; Bennett, William R.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Burke, Kenneth; Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative fuel cells provide a pathway to energy storage system development that are game changers for NASA missions. The fuel cell/ electrolysis MEA performance requirements 0.92 V/ 1.44 V at 200 mA/cm2 can be met. Fuel Cell MEAs have been incorporated into advanced NFT stacks. Electrolyzer stack development in progress. Fuel Cell MEA performance is a strong function of membrane selection, membrane selection will be driven by durability requirements. Electrolyzer MEA performance is catalysts driven, catalyst selection will be driven by durability requirements. Round Trip Efficiency, based on a cell performance, is approximately 65%.

  1. Constituent Redistribution in U-Zr Metallic Fuel Using the Advanced Fuel Performance Code BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Matthews, Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Previous work done by Galloway, et. al. on EBR-II ternary (U-Pu-Zr) fuel constituent redistribution yielded accurate simulation data for the limited data sets of Zr redistribution. The data sets included EPMA scans of two different irradiated rods. First, T179, which was irradiated to 1.9 at% burnup, was analyzed. Second, DP16, which was irradiated to 11 at% burnup, was analyzed. One set of parameters that most accurately represented the zirconium profiles for both experiments was determined. Since the binary fuel (U-Zr) has previously been used as the driver fuel for sodium fast reactors (SFR) as well as being the likely driver fuel if a new SFR is constructed, this same process has been initiated on the binary fuel form. From limited binary EPMA scans as well as other fuel characterization techniques, it has been observed that zirconium redistribution also occurs in the binary fuel, albeit at a reduced rate compared to observation in the ternary fuel, as noted by Kim et. al. While the rate of redistribution has been observed to be slower, numerous metallographs of U-Zr fuel show distinct zone formations.

  2. Effect of carbon coating on scuffing performance in diesel fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajayi, O. O.; Alzoubi, M. F.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    2000-06-29

    Low-sulfur and low-aromatic diesel fuels are being introduced in order to reduce various types of emissions in diesel engines to levels in compliance with current and impending US federal regulations. The low lubricity of these fuels, however, poses major reliability and durability problems for fuel injection components that depend on diesel fuel for their lubrication. In the present study, the authors evaluated the scuff resistance of surfaces in regular diesel fuel containing 500 ppm sulfur and in Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel fuel containing no sulfur or aromatics. Tests were conducted with the high frequency reciprocating test rig (HFRR) using 52100 steel balls and H-13 tool-steel flats with and without Argonne's special carbon coatings. Test results showed that the sulfur-containing fuels provide about 20% higher scuffing resistance than does fuel without sulfur. Use of the carbon coating on the flat increased scuffing resistance in both regular and synthetic fuels by about ten times, as measured by the contact severity index at scuffing. Scuffing failure in tests conducted with coated surfaces did not occur until the coating had been removed by the two distinct mechanisms of spalling and wear.

  3. Determination of a Jet Fuel Metal Deactivator by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY Paul C. Hayes, Jr. Fuels Branch...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side if necessary and identify by block number) High Performance Liquid Chromatography absorbance...SYMBOL HPLC High Performance Liquid Chromatography P-4 jet propulsion fuel, wide-boiling range, conforming to MIL-T-5624L MDA metal deactivator,

  4. Preparation, characterisation, engine performance and emission characteristics of coconut oil based hybrid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pranil J.; Singh, Anirudh [Division of Physics, School of Engineering and Physics, Faculty of Science, Technology and Environment, University of the South Pacific, 325 Fletcher Road, Suva (Fiji); Khurma, Jagjit [Division of Chemistry, School of Biological, Chemical and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Technology and Environment, University of the South Pacific, Suva (Fiji)

    2010-09-15

    In this study, hybrid fuels consisting of coconut oil, aqueous ethanol and a surfactant (butan-1-ol) were prepared and tested as a fuel in a direct injection diesel engine. After determining fuel properties such as the density, viscosity and gross calorific values of these fuels, they were used to run a diesel engine. The engine performance and exhaust emissions were investigated and compared with that of diesel. The experimental results show that the efficiency of the hybrid fuels is comparable to that of diesel. As the viscosity of the hybrid fuels decreased and approached that of diesel, the efficiency increased progressively towards that of diesel. The exhaust emissions were lower than those for diesel, except carbon monoxide emissions, which increased. Hence, it is concluded that these hybrid fuels can be used successfully as an alternative fuel in diesel engines without any modifications. Their completely renewable nature ensures that they are environmentally friendly with regard to their emissions characteristics. (author)

  5. Investigation of Performance Analysis and Emission Characteristics of Waste Plastic Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, M.; Ramasubramanian, S.; Pugazhenthi, R.; Sivaganesan

    2017-03-01

    Today the world is confronted with the twin crisis of fossil fuel depletion and stringent emission norms, because of the environmental awareness. The disposal and degradation of waste plastic is a major issue and scarcities of fuel were major focus area of the researchers. In this virtue the waste plastic fuel extraction makes more attention to the researchers. In this research work focused to find the performance of the waste plastic fuel and compared to diesel. The waste plastic fuel extract from thermal cracking method this process the polymer chains were breakdown into useful lower molecular weight compounds and it becomes plastic pyrolysis it can be utilized as a fuel. The properties of the waste plastic fuel is obtained by various testing process and which is analyze and compare with the fossil fuel diesel. It is found that almost it has similar properties to the diesel and almost all properties of the pyrolysis is closer to that of diesel. The characteristics of the pyrolysis were tested in the engine test bed. The pyrolysis / waste plastic fuel can be directly used in diesel engines over the entire load spectrum smoothly without any major modification. The performance of the waste plastic fuel / pyrolysis is evidenced that it is one of the best alternative fuel as well as the waste plastic can be converted into a useful fuel

  6. Comparative Performance of Direct Injection Diesel Engines Fueled Using Compressed Natural Gas and Diesel Fuel Based on GT-POWER Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is investigated the application of compressed natural gas (CNG as an alternative fuel and its performance effect in the diesel engines using GT-POWER computational simulation. The CNG as an alternative fuel for four stroke diesel engine modeling was developed from the real diesel engine using GT-POWER computational model with measure all of engine components size. The computational model will be running on mono CNG fuel and mono diesel fuel to simulate and investigate the engine performance effect on the difference fuel. Output of the model simulation shown the effect of diesel engine fueled by CNG performance effect were simulated in any engine speeds parameters.

  7. Performance Degradation Tests of Phosphoric Acid Doped PBI Membrane Based High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela

    2014-01-01

    Degradation tests of two phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI membrane based HT-PEM fuel cells were reported in this paper to investigate the effects of start/stop and the presence of methanol in the fuel to the performance degradation. Continuous tests with H2 and simulated reformate which was composed...... of H2, water steam and methanol as the fuel were performed on both single cells. 12-h-startup/12-h-shutdown dynamic tests were performed on the first single cell with pure dry H2 as the fuel and on the second single cell with simulated reformate as the fuel. Along with the tests electrochemical...... techniques such as polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to study the degradation mechanisms of the fuel cells. Both single cells showed an increase in the performance in the H2 continuous tests, because of a decrease in the ORR kinetic resistance probably due...

  8. Selection of optimal sensors for predicting performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lei; Jackson, Lisa

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, sensor selection algorithms are investigated based on a sensitivity analysis, and the capability of optimal sensors in predicting PEM fuel cell performance is also studied using test data. The fuel cell model is developed for generating the sensitivity matrix relating sensor measurements and fuel cell health parameters. From the sensitivity matrix, two sensor selection approaches, including the largest gap method, and exhaustive brute force searching technique, are applied to find the optimal sensors providing reliable predictions. Based on the results, a sensor selection approach considering both sensor sensitivity and noise resistance is proposed to find the optimal sensor set with minimum size. Furthermore, the performance of the optimal sensor set is studied to predict fuel cell performance using test data from a PEM fuel cell system. Results demonstrate that with optimal sensors, the performance of PEM fuel cell can be predicted with good quality.

  9. HEISHI: A fuel performance model for space nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, M.F.

    1994-08-01

    HEISHI is a Fortran computer model designed to aid in analysis, prediction, and optimization of fuel characteristics for use in Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP). Calculational results include fission product release rate, fuel failure fraction, mode of fuel failure, stress-strain state, and fuel material morphology. HEISHI contains models for decay chain calculations of retained and released fission products, based on an input power history and release coefficients. Decay chain parameters such as direct fission yield, decay rates, and branching fractions are obtained from a database. HEISHI also contains models for stress-strain behavior of multilayered fuel particles with creep and differential thermal expansion effects, transient particle temperature profile, grain growth, and fuel particle failure fraction. Grain growth is treated as a function of temperature; the failure fraction depends on the coating tensile strength, which in turn is a function of grain size. The HEISHI code is intended for use in analysis of coated fuel particles for use in particle bed reactors; however, much of the code is geometry-independent and applicable to fuel geometries other than spherical.

  10. Mesocarbon microbead based graphite for spherical fuel element to inhibit the infiltration of liquid fluoride salt in molten salt reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yajuan; Zhang, Junpeng; Lin, Jun; Xu, Liujun; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Hongxia; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Haitao; Li, Ziwei; Zhu, Zhiyong; Guo, Quangui

    2017-07-01

    Mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB) and quasi-isostatic pressing method were used to prepare MCMB based graphite (MG) for spherical fuel element to inhibit the infiltration of liquid fluoride salt in molten salt reactor (MSR). Characteristics of mercury infiltration and molten salt infiltration in MG were investigated and compared with A3-3 (graphite for spherical fuel element in high temperature gas cooled reactor) to identify the infiltration behaviors. The results indicated that MG had a low porosity about 14%, and an average pore diameter of 96 nm. Fluoride salt occupation of A3-3 (average pore diameter was 760 nm) was 10 wt% under 6.5 atm, whereas salt gain did not infiltrate in MG even up to 6.5 atm. It demonstrated that MG could inhibit the infiltration of liquid fluoride salt effectively. Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of MG lies in 6.01 × 10-6 K-1 (α∥) and 6.15 × 10-6 K-1 (α⊥) at the temperature range of 25-700 °C. The anisotropy factor of MG calculated by CTE maintained below 1.02, which could meet the requirement of the spherical fuel element (below 1.30). The constant isotropic property of MG is beneficial for the integrity and safety of the graphite used in the spherical fuel element for a MSR.

  11. Numerical investigation of Prandtl number effect on heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics of a nuclear fuel element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Abdul Razak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics of liquid metal coolants (such as Sodium, Sodium potassium, Bismuth, Lead, and Lead–bismuth flowing over a nuclear fuel element having non-uniform internal energy generation numerically using finite difference method. The Full Navier Stokes Equations governing the flow were converted into stream function-Vorticity form and solved simultaneously along with energy equation using central finite difference scheme. For the two dimensional steady state heat conduction and Stream-Function Equation, the discretization was done in the form suitable to solve using ‘Line-by-Line Gauss-Seidel’ solution technique whereas the discretization of Vorticity transport and energy equations were done using Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI scheme. After discretization the systems of equations were solved using ‘Thomas Algorithm’. The complete task was done by writing a computer code. The results were obtained in the form of variation of Maximum temperature in the fuel element (hot spots and its location, mean coolant temperature at the exit .The parameters considered for the study were  aspect ratio of fuel element, Ar, conduction-convection parameter Ncc, total energy generation parameter Qt, and flow Reynolds number ReH. The results obtained can be used to minimize the Maximum temperature in the fuel element (hot spots.

  12. Experimental study of water flow in nuclear fuel elements; Estudo experimental do escoamento de agua em elementos combustiveis nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Lorena Escriche, E-mail: ler@cdtn.br [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rezende, Hugo Cesar; Mattos, Joao Roberto Loureiro de; Barros Filho, Jose Afonso; Santos, Andre Augusto Campagnole dos, E-mail: hcr@cdtn.br, E-mail: jrmattos@cdtn.br, E-mail: jabf@cdtn.br, E-mail: aacs@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This work aims to develop an experimental methodology for investigating the water flow through rod bundles after spacer grids of nuclear fuel elements of PWR type reactors. Speed profiles, with the device LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), and the pressure drop between two sockets located before and after the spacer grid, using pressure transducers were measured.

  13. Supplemental specifications of laboratory hot press process -- For CV size self-supported I&E fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, C.A.; Schweikhardt, G.M.

    1964-06-01

    Some refinements have been introduced into the hot press canning of internally and externally cooled fuel elements. This report outlines the specifications for the process including these refinements. Specifications cover components, dies, and punches, furnace condition, nickel plating, component cleaning, component assembly, sizing, hot pressing and inspection.

  14. Specifications: Laboratory hot press process for {open_quotes}C{close_quotes}size I & E fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tverberg, J.C.

    1959-09-25

    Hot press canning of internally and externally cooled fuel elements has been developed to a point where the process is feasible. Complete specifications have been written for the process covering component, dies and punches, furnace construction, nickel plating, component cleaning, component assembly, sizing, hot pressing and inspection. Drawings covering each major item are included.

  15. Finite-element procedure for calculating the three-dimensional inelastic bowing of fuel rods (AWBA development program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, S E

    1982-05-01

    An incremental finite element procedure is developed for calculating the in-pile lateral bowing of nuclear fuel rods. The fuel rod is modeled as a viscoelastic beam whose material properties are derived as perturbations of the results of an axisymmetric stress analysis of the fuel rod. The effects which are taken into account in calculating the rod's lateral bowing include: (a) lateral, axial, and rotational motions and forces at the rod supports, (b) transverse gradients of temperature, fast-neutron flux, and fissioning rate, and (c) cladding circumferential wall thickness variation. The procedure developed in this report could be used to form the basis for a computer program to calculate the time-dependent bowing as a function of the fuel rod's operational and environmental history.

  16. Accumulation of Elements in Salix and Other Species Used in Vegetation Filters with Focus on Wood Fuel Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Anneli

    2007-07-01

    Woody or herbaceous perennials used as vegetation filters for treatment of different types of wastes can be suitable for production of solid biofuels when their above ground harvestable biomass yield is sufficiently high and when biomass contains appropriate concentrations of minerals with regard to fuel combustion processes. The concentrations of nitrogen (N), potassium (K) and heavy metals (especially Zn and Cd) in fuel should be low and calcium (Ca) concentrations high to avoid technical problems and environmentally harmful emissions during combustion. Since soil supplementation with essential elements improves biomass yield, a conflict might arise between yield and quality aims. There are various possibilities to influence fuel quality during the growing phase of the life cycle of perennial biomass crops. This study assessed the suitability of two deciduous woody perennials (Salix and Populus) and two summer green herbaceous perennials (Phragmites and Urtica) for phytoremediation in terms of growth and nutrient allocation patterns. Salix and Populus proved suitable as vegetation filters when nutrients were available to plants in near-optimal proportions, but when unbalanced nutrient solutions (wastewater) were applied, stem biomass fraction was strongly reduced. Phragmites was more tolerant to wastewater treatment in terms of plant biomass production and nutrient allocation patterns, so if the N:P ratio of the wastewater is suboptimal, a vegetation filter using Phragmites could be considered. In further studies, a method was developed to determine the proportions of nutrient-rich bark in coppiced Salix, while heavy metal phytoextraction capacity was assessed in two Salix vegetation filters. The relevance of proportion of bark on wood fuel quality and element removal from vegetation filters was also investigated. The concentrations of the elements studied in harvestable Salix shoot biomass were higher, meaning lower wood fuel quality, in plantations where

  17. Computer simulation of the behaviour and performance of a CANDU fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, A.C. [Comison Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)

    1997-07-01

    At the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA) the BACO code (for 'BArra COmbustible', fuel rod) was developed. It allows the simulation of the thermo-mechanical performance of a cylindrical fuel rod in a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The standard present version of the code (2.30), is a powerful tool for a relatively easy and complete evaluation of fuel behaviour predictions. Input parameters and, therefore, output ones may include statistical dispersion. As a demonstration of BACO capabilities we include a review of CANDU fuel applications, and the calculation and a parametric analysis of a characteristic CANDU fuel. (author)

  18. Numerical Simulation of Dynamic Performance of the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于立军; 袁俊琪; 曾广益; 姜秀民

    2004-01-01

    A three dimension of dynamic mathematical model of the molten carbonate fuel cell is established,in which the heat generation, mass transfer and electrochemical characteristics are described. The performance of the fuel cell including the distributions of the temperature and the velocity is predicted numerically. Then the experimental data including the output performance of the fuel cell generation system and the temperature distributions are compared. The numerical results are in agreement with the experiment results.

  19. Assessing performance and validating finite element simulations using probabilistic knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolin, Ronald M.; Rodriguez, E. A. (Edward A.)

    2002-01-01

    Two probabilistic approaches for assessing performance are presented. The first approach assesses probability of failure by simultaneously modeling all likely events. The probability each event causes failure along with the event's likelihood of occurrence contribute to the overall probability of failure. The second assessment method is based on stochastic sampling using an influence diagram. Latin-hypercube sampling is used to stochastically assess events. The overall probability of failure is taken as the maximum probability of failure of all the events. The Likelihood of Occurrence simulation suggests failure does not occur while the Stochastic Sampling approach predicts failure. The Likelihood of Occurrence results are used to validate finite element predictions.

  20. Performance Evaluation of a High Bandwidth Liquid Fuel Modulation Valve for Active Combustion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saus, Joseph R.; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, a characterization rig was designed and constructed for the purpose of evaluating high bandwidth liquid fuel modulation devices to determine their suitability for active combustion control research. Incorporated into the rig s design are features that approximate conditions similar to those that would be encountered by a candidate device if it were installed on an actual combustion research rig. The characterized dynamic performance measures obtained through testing in the rig are planned to be accurate indicators of expected performance in an actual combustion testing environment. To evaluate how well the characterization rig predicts fuel modulator dynamic performance, characterization rig data was compared with performance data for a fuel modulator candidate when the candidate was in operation during combustion testing. Specifically, the nominal and off-nominal performance data for a magnetostrictive-actuated proportional fuel modulation valve is described. Valve performance data were collected with the characterization rig configured to emulate two different combustion rig fuel feed systems. Fuel mass flows and pressures, fuel feed line lengths, and fuel injector orifice size was approximated in the characterization rig. Valve performance data were also collected with the valve modulating the fuel into the two combustor rigs. Comparison of the predicted and actual valve performance data show that when the valve is operated near its design condition the characterization rig can appropriately predict the installed performance of the valve. Improvements to the characterization rig and accompanying modeling activities are underway to more accurately predict performance, especially for the devices under development to modulate fuel into the much smaller fuel injectors anticipated in future lean-burning low-emissions aircraft engine combustors.

  1. Energy accumulation and improved performance in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Melhuish, Chris [Intelligent Autonomous Systems Laboratory, CEMS Faculty, University of the West of England, Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Greenman, John [Microbiology Research Laboratory, Applied Sciences Faculty, University of the West of England, Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Hart, John [School of Human and Analytical Sciences, Applied Sciences Faculty, University of the West of England, Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-18

    The mechanisms for electron transfer from the microorganisms found in anaerobic sludge to the anode electrode in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been investigated. In doing so, both the energy accumulation and improved performance were observed as a result of the addition of exogenous Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Treatment of anaerobic sludge by centrifugation and washing can provide samples devoid of sulphide/sulphate. Addition of exogenous sulphate can give matched samples of S-deplete and S-replete suspensions. When these are compared in an experimental MFC, the power output of the S-deplete is only 20% that of the S-replete system. Moreover, repeat washing of the anodic chamber to remove suspended cells (leaving only cells attached to the electrode) and addition of buffer substrate gives MFC that produce an output between 10 and 20% that of control. We conclude that anaerobic sludge MFCs are a hybrid incorporating both natural mediator and anodophillic properties. We have also shown that disconnected MFC (open circuit) continue to produce sulphide and when reconnected gives an initial burst of power output demonstrating accumulator-type activity. (author)

  2. Perform Thermodynamics Measurements on Fuel Cycle Case Study Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Leigh R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This document was prepared to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M3FT-14IN0304022, “Perform Thermodynamics Measurements on Fuel Cycle Case Study Systems.” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics FCR&D work package. This document reports preliminary work in support of determining the thermodynamic parameters for the ALSEP process. The ALSEP process is a mixed extractant system comprised of a cation exchanger 2-ethylhexyl-phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]) and a neutral solvating extractant N,N,N’,N’-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA). The extractant combination produces complex organic phase chemistry that is challenging for traditional measurement techniques. To neutralize the complexity, temperature dependent solvent extraction experiments were conducted with neat TODGA and scaled down concentrations of the ALSEP formulation to determine the enthalpies of extraction for the two conditions. A full set of thermodynamic data for Eu, Am, and Cm extraction by TODGA from 3.0 M HNO3 is reported. These data are compared to previous extraction results from a 1.0 M HNO3 aqueous medium, and a short discussion of the mixed HEH[EHP]/TODGA system results is offered.

  3. A review of TRISO-coated particle nuclear fuel performance models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bing; LIANG Tongxiang; TANG Chunhe

    2006-01-01

    The success of high temperature gas cooled reactor depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. The understanding and evaluation of this fuel requires the development of an integrated mechanistic fuel performance model that fully describes the mechanical and physicochemical behavior of the fuel particle under irradiation. In this paper, a review of the analytical capability of some of the existing computer codes for coated particle fuel was performed. These existing models and codes include FZJ model, JAERI model, Stress3 model, ATLAS model, PARFUME model and TIMCOAT model. The theoretic model, methodology, calculation parameters and benchmark of these codes were classified. Based on the failure mechanism of coated particle, the advantage and limits of the models were compared and discussed. The calculated results of the coated particles for China HTR-10 by using some existing code are shown. Finally, problems and challenges in fuel performance modeling were listed.

  4. Effect of time-varying humidity on the performance of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noorani, Shamsuddin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan-Dearborn (United States); Shamim, Tariq [Mechanical Engineering, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (United Arab Emirates)], E-mail: tshamim@masdar.ac.ae

    2011-07-01

    In the energy sector, fuel cells constitute a promising solution for the future due to their energy-efficient and environment-friendly characteristics. However, the performance of fuel cells is very much affected by the humidification level of the reactants, particularly in hot regions. The aim of this paper is to develop a better understanding of the effect of driving conditions on the performance of fuel cells. A macroscopic single-fuel-cell-based, one dimensional, isothermal model was used on a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell to carry out a computational study of the impact of humidity conditions which vary over time. It was found that the variation of humidity has a significant effect on water distribution but a much lower impact on power and current densities. This paper provided useful information on fuel cells' performance under varying conditions which could be used to improve their design for mobile applications.

  5. Applying Thermodynamics to Fossil Fuels: Heats of Combustion from Elemental Compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, William G.; Davenport, Derek A.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed are the calculations of heats of combustions of some selected fossil fuel compounds such as some foreign shale oils and United States coals. Heating values for coal- and petroleum-derived fuel oils are also presented. (HM)

  6. Applying Thermodynamics to Fossil Fuels: Heats of Combustion from Elemental Compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, William G.; Davenport, Derek A.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed are the calculations of heats of combustions of some selected fossil fuel compounds such as some foreign shale oils and United States coals. Heating values for coal- and petroleum-derived fuel oils are also presented. (HM)

  7. Evaluation of safety, performance and emissions of synthetic fuel blends in a Cessna Citation II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, T.A.; Melkert, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Prior to being used in aviation, alternative fuels have to be tested thoroughly to ensure safe operation. At Delft University of Technology, a test programme was performed to evaluate the safety, performance and emissions of synthetic fuel blends. During test preparations, compatibility of the synth

  8. FRAPCON-3: Modifications to fuel rod material properties and performance models for high-burnup application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    This volume describes the fuel rod material and performance models that were updated for the FRAPCON-3 steady-state fuel rod performance code. The property and performance models were changed to account for behavior at extended burnup levels up to 65 Gwd/MTU. The property and performance models updated were the fission gas release, fuel thermal conductivity, fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, solid-solid contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion and hydriding, cladding mechanical properties, and cladding axial growth. Each updated property and model was compared to well characterized data up to high burnup levels. The installation of these properties and models in the FRAPCON-3 code along with input instructions are provided in Volume 2 of this report and Volume 3 provides a code assessment based on comparison to integral performance data. The updated FRAPCON-3 code is intended to replace the earlier codes FRAPCON-2 and GAPCON-THERMAL-2. 94 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Break-in and Performance Issues on a single cell PBI-based PEM Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk

    and the current drawn from the fuel cell are of great importance. One must therefore choose the point of operation carefully in order for the fuel cell to fulfil the requirements for lifetime perform-ance of the system. Break-in of fuel cells is often done in scientific experiments to improve the performance...... of the fuel cell, even though break-in of a fuel cell implemented in a commercial application would most likely not be feasible. In the present work a commercially available PBI-based high temperature MEA is subject to a break-in procedure, as specified by the manufacturer. The cell was operated at 160 °C...... at the active sites of the electrodes causing a more sluggish perform-ance. Moreover, preliminary data is given on a long term degradation study, using Electrochemical Im-pedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurements to analyze the degradation at high current densities (0.8 A/cm2)....

  10. Quantification of the Relationship between Surrogate Fuel Structure and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    cycloperoxy-5-yl (BICYC5.O2) and bicyclo[2,2,1]hexene peroxy (C2O2H221) radicals . The latter route leads to the formation of vinyl ketene and the formyl ...3089 selection of stable molecule and radicals . The adopted calculation method for the determination of such data is outlined in Appendix 1...chemistry of aromatic fuel components used in surrogate fuels and the importance of the cyclopentadi- enyl radical in poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH

  11. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport- Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Fuel Performance Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Harold [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Ken [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bignell, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flores, Gregg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wang, Jy-An [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sanborn, Scott [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spears, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klymyshyn, Nick [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This document addresses Oak Ridge National Laboratory milestone M2FT-13OR0822015 Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Nuclear Fuel Performance Characterization. This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies that have been performed. Finally, discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this initiative are provided.

  12. Fuel performance improvement program. Quarterly/annual progress report, October 1977--September 1978. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouthamel, C.E. (comp.)

    1978-10-01

    This quarterly/annual report reviews and summarizes the activities performed in support of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP) during Fiscal Year 1978 with emphasis on those activities that transpired during the quarter ending September 30, 1978. Significant progress has been made in achieving the primary objectives of the program, i.e., to demonstrate commercially viable fuel concepts with improved fuel - cladding interaction (FCI) behavior. This includes out-of-reactor experiments to support the fuel concepts being evaluated, initiation of instrumented test rod experiments in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), and fabrication of the first series of demonstration rods for irradiation in the Big Rock Point Reactor (BRPR).

  13. Solid amine-boranes as high performance hypergolic hybrid rocket fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil, Mark A.

    Hypergolic hybrid rockets have the potential of providing systems that are simple, reliable, have high performance, and allow for energy management. Such a propulsion system can be applied to fields that need a single tactical motor with flexible mission requirements of either high speed to target or extended loitering. They also provide the possibility for alternative fast response dynamic altitude control systems if ignition delays are sufficiently short. Amines are the traditional fuel of choice when selecting a hypergolic combination as these tend to react readily with both nitric acid and dinitrogen tertroxide based oxidizers. It has been found that the addition of a borane adduct to an amine fuel tends to reduce the ignition delay by up to an order of magnitude with white fuming nitric acid (WFNA). The borane addition has resulted in fuels with very short ignition delays between 2-10 ms - the fastest times for an amine based fuel reacting with nitric acid based oxidizers. The incorporation of these amine-boranes, specifically ethylenediamine bisborane (EDBB), into various fuel binders has also been found to result in ignition delays between 3-10 ms - the fastest times again for amine based fuels. It was found that the addition of a borane to an amine increased theoretical performance of the amine resulting in high performance fuels. The amine-borane/fuel binder combinations also produced higher theoretical performance values than previously used hypergolic hybrid rockets. Some of the theoretical values are on par or higher than the current toxic liquid hypergolic fuels, making amine boranes an attractive replacement. The higher performing amine-borane/fuel binder combinations also have higher performance values than the traditional rocket fuels, excluding liquid hydrogen. Thus, amine-borane based fuels have the potential to influence various area in the rocket field. An EDBB/ferrocene/epoxy fuel was tested in a hypergolic hybrid with pure nitric acid as the

  14. On-line elemental analysis of fossil fuel process streams by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, W.P.

    1995-06-01

    METC is continuing development of a real-time, multi-element plasma based spectrometer system for application to high temperature and high pressure fossil fuel process streams. Two versions are under consideration for development. One is an Inductively Coupled Plasma system that has been described previously, and the other is a high power microwave system. The ICP torch operates on a mixture of argon and helium with a conventional annular swirl flow plasma gas, no auxiliary gas, and a conventional sample stream injection through the base of the plasma plume. A new, demountable torch design comprising three ceramic sections allows bolts passing the length of the torch to compress a double O-ring seal. This improves the reliability of the torch. The microwave system will use the same data acquisition and reduction components as the ICP system; only the plasma source itself is different. It will operate with a 750-Watt, 2.45 gigahertz microwave generator. The plasma discharge will be contained within a narrow quartz tube one quarter wavelength from a shorted waveguide termination. The plasma source will be observed via fiber optics and a battery of computer controlled monochromators. To extract more information from the raw spectral data, a neural net computer program is being developed. This program will calculate analyte concentrations from data that includes analyte and interferant spectral emission intensity. Matrix effects and spectral overlaps can be treated more effectively by this method than by conventional spectral analysis.

  15. IMPACT OF OXYGENATED FUEL ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehman, Andre L.

    2000-08-20

    As evidenced by recent lawsuits brought against operators of large diesel truck fleets [1] and by the Consent Decree brought against the heavy-duty diesel manufacturers [2], the environmental and health effects of diesel engine emissions continue to be a significant concern. Reduction of diesel engine emissions has traditionally been achieved through a combination of fuel system, combustion chamber, and engine control modifications [3]. Catalytic aftertreatment has become common on modern diesel vehicles, with the predominant device being the diesel oxidation catalytic converter [3]. To enable advanced after-treatment devices and to directly reduce emissions, significant recent interest has focused on reformulation of diesel fuel, particularly the reduction of sulfur content. The EPA has man-dated that diesel fuel will have only 15 ppm sulfur content by 2007, with current diesel specifications requiring around 300 ppm [4]. Reduction of sulfur will permit sulfur-sensitive aftertreatment devices, continuously regenerating particulate traps, NOx control catalysts, and plasma assisted catalysts to be implemented on diesel vehicles [4]. Another method of reformulating diesel fuel to reduce emissions is to incorporate oxygen in the fuel, as was done in the reformulation of gasoline. The use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in reformulated gasoline has resulted in contamination of water resources across the country [5]. Nonetheless, by relying on the lessons learned from MTBE, oxygenation of diesel fuel may be accomplished without compromising water quality. Oxygenation of diesel fuel offers the possibility of reducing particulate matter emissions significantly, even for the current fleet of diesel vehicles. The mechanism by which oxygen content leads to particulate matter reductions is still under debate, but recent evidence shows clearly that ''smokeless'' engine operation is possible when the oxygen content of diesel fuel reaches roughly 38% by

  16. Review: Circulation of Inorganic Elements in Combustion of Alternative Fuels in Cement Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortada Mut, Maria del Mar; Nørskov, Linda Kaare; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Cement production is an energy-intensive process, which traditionally has been dependent on fossil fuels. However, the use of alternative fuels, i.e., selected waste, biomass, and byproducts with recoverable calorific value, is constantly increasing. Combustion of these fuels is more challenging......, compared to fossil fuels, because of a lack of experience and different chemical and physical properties. When complete oxidation Of fuels in the calciner and main burner is not achieved, they burn in direct contact with the bed material of the rotary kiln, causing local reducing conditions and increasing...

  17. Coupled analysis of core thermal hydraulics and fuel performance to evaluate a thermally induced fuel failure in an SFR subassembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Rock; Chang, Doo Soo; Kim, Sang Ji [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    A limiting factor analysis in a core thermal design is highly important to assure the safe and reliable operation of a reactor system. In a sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR), the coolant thermal conductivity is about hundreds of times larger than the thermal conductivity of water. Moreover, the coolant boiling temperature in an SFR is around 900 .deg. C, which is much higher than that of the water coolant in a PWR. Considering typical operating temperatures, an SFR has about a 300 .deg. C thermal margin to its boiling point. Therefore, instead of DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) in a PWR, the core thermal design of SFRs requires assuring proper fuel performance and safety, where the design limits are highly related to the temperature distribution and material behavior under various operating conditions. Typical limiting factors in SFRs are the thermal component of the plastic hoop strain, radial primary hoop stress, and cumulative damage factor during normal operation. However, the previous fuel performance codes only evaluate a single fuel pin performance, which neglects the radial peaking factors and reveals too conservative results. In this work, the multi physics analysis is performed using both thermalhydraulic and fuel performance codes.

  18. Elastic analysis of thermal gradient bowing in rod-type fuel elements subjected to axial thrust (LWBR Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, J.B.

    1968-01-01

    Thermal radient bowing of rod type fuel elements can be analyzed in terms of the deflections of a precurved beam. The fundamental aspects of an analysis of axially compressed multispan beams are given. Elasticity of supports in both axial and transverse directions is considered; the technique is applicable to problems in which the axial thrust depends on the transverse deflection as well as problems with prescribed axial thrust. The formulas presented constitute the theory for a computer program of broad applicability, not only in the analysis of fuel rod bowing, but also to almost any multispan beam, particularly when the effects of axial loads cannot be neglected. 17 references. (NSA 22: 22866)

  19. Performance of AGR-1 high-temperature reactor fuel during post-irradiation heating tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Robert N., E-mail: morrisrn@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Baldwin, Charles A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Demkowicz, Paul A. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Reber, Edward L. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • High-temperature safety tests were performed on 14 irradiated HTGR fuel compacts. • Significant krypton release was detected in only one of the safety tests. • Cesium retention by intact SiC was excellent, even up to 1800 °C. • Release of Ag, Eu, and Sr was dominated by previous release during irradiation. • Silver exhibited the highest fractional release. - Abstract: The fission product retention of irradiated low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts from the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor 1 (AGR-1) experiment has been evaluated at temperatures of 1600–1800 °C during post-irradiation safety tests. Fourteen compacts (a total of ∼58,000 particles) with a burnup ranging from 13.4% to 19.1% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) have been tested using dedicated furnace systems at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The release of fission products {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 85}Kr was monitored while heating the fuel specimens in flowing helium. The behavior of silver, europium, and strontium appears to be dominated by inventory that was originally released through intact SiC coating layers during irradiation, but was retained in the compact at the end of irradiation and subsequently released during the safety tests. However, at a test temperature of 1800 °C, the data suggest that release of these elements through intact coatings may become significant after ∼100 h. Cesium was very well retained by intact SiC layers, with a fractional release <5 × 10{sup −6} after 300 h at 1600 °C or 100 h at 1800 °C. However, it was rapidly released from individual particles if the SiC layer failed, and therefore the overall cesium release fraction was dominated by the SiC defect and failure fractions in the fuel compacts. No complete TRISO coating layer failures were observed after 300 h at 1600 or 1700 °C, and {sup

  20. Thermal performances and melting risk assessment in a LMFBR fuel pin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettraino, F.; Cacciabue, P. C.; Brunelli, F.

    1985-02-01

    A reliable evaluation of fuel temperature is a key safety requirement in the design of the fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor, especially in the case of a LMFBR whose efficient operation requires high thermal performance fuel. The physico-chemical properties such as density, oxygen to metal ratio and thermal conductivity of a typical LMFBR mixed-oxide fuel, which are known to change in a remarkable way under irradiation, strongly affect the temperature profile within the fuel pellet. A statistical analysis of the temperature values in the fuel of the Italian Fast Reactor PEC, has been performed by means of the RSM code (Response Surface Methodology) coupled to a Monte-Carlo Technique (MUP code), in order to demonstrate that the melting risk is substantially negligible.

  1. A Review of the Application and Performance of Carbon Nanotubes in Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fuel cell has the nature of high energy conversion efficiency and low pollutant emission. Carbon nanotubes used for fuel cells can decrease the needs of noble metals which are used for catalyst and improve the performance of fuel cells. The application of carbon nanotubes in fuel cells is summarized and discussed. The following aspects are described in this paper: the method used to reduce the platinum, the effect of carbon nanotubes on the fuel cell, improving the performance of fuel cell catalysts, the interaction between catalyst and carbon nanotube support, and the synthetic conditions of carbon nanotube supported catalyst. We summarize some of the results of previous studies and raise expectations for the microscopic state study of carbon nanotubes in the future.

  2. The coupling of the neutron transport application RATTLESNAKE to the nuclear fuels performance application BISON under the MOOSE framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleicher, Frederick N.; Williamson, Richard L.; Ortensi, Javier; Wang, Yaqi; Spencer, Benjamin W.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Hales, Jason D.; Martineau, Richard C.

    2014-10-01

    The MOOSE neutron transport application RATTLESNAKE was coupled to the fuels performance application BISON to provide a higher fidelity tool for fuel performance simulation. This project is motivated by the desire to couple a high fidelity core analysis program (based on the self-adjoint angular flux equations) to a high fidelity fuel performance program, both of which can simulate on unstructured meshes. RATTLESNAKE solves self-adjoint angular flux transport equation and provides a sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux with resonance treatment during burnup or a fast transient. BISON solves the coupled thermomechanical equations for the fuel on a sub-millimeter scale. Both applications are able to solve their respective systems on aligned and unaligned unstructured finite element meshes. The power density and local burnup was transferred from RATTLESNAKE to BISON with the MOOSE Multiapp transfer system. Multiple depletion cases were run with one-way data transfer from RATTLESNAKE to BISON. The eigenvalues are shown to agree well with values obtained from the lattice physics code DRAGON. The one-way data transfer of power density is shown to agree with the power density obtained from an internal Lassman-style model in BISON.

  3. Fission product release model for failed plate-type fuel element and storage under water; Modelo para liberacao de produtos de fissao por placa combustivel falhada e armazenada sob agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, L.A.A.; Zeituni, C.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da; Castanheira, M.; Lucki, G.; Silva, A.T. e; Teodoro, C.A.; Damy, M. de A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: laaterre@ipen.br

    2005-07-01

    Plate-type fuel elements burned-up inside the core of nuclear research reactors are stored mainly under deionized water of storage pools. When cladding failure occurs in such elements, radioactive fission products are released into the storage pool water. This work proposes a model to describe the release mechanism considering the diffusion through a postulated small cylindrical failure. As a consequence, an analytical expression is obtained for the activity released into the water as a function of the total storage time of a failed fuel plate. The proposed model reproduces the linear increasing of {sup 137}Cs specific activity observed in sipping tests already performed on failed plate-type fuel elements. (author)

  4. Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Conference Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 10 June 2016 - 27 July 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on...The Johns Hopkins University Energetics Research Group (JHU/ERG), Columbia, MD and University of Washington, Seattle, WA 14. ABSTRACT Ensuring fuel ...is a common requirement for aircraft, rockets, and hypersonic vehicles. The Aerospace Fuels Quality Test and Model Development (AFQTMoDev) project

  5. Improving the performance of dual fuel engines running on natural gas/LPG by using pilot fuel derived from jojoba seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selim, Mohamed Y.E. [Mechanical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, UAE University, Jimmi, Al-Ain, P.O. Box 17555, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Radwan, M.S.; Saleh, H.E. [Mechanical Power Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering at Mattaria, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2008-06-15

    The use of jojoba methyl ester as a pilot fuel was investigated for almost the first time as a way to improve the performance of dual fuel engine running on natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) at part load. The dual fuel engine used was Ricardo E6 variable compression diesel engine and it used either compressed natural gas (CNG) or LPG as the main fuel and jojoba methyl ester as a pilot fuel. Diesel fuel was used as a reference fuel for the dual fuel engine results. During the experimental tests, the following have been measured: engine efficiency in terms of specific fuel consumption, brake power output, combustion noise in terms of maximum pressure rise rate and maximum pressure, exhaust emissions in terms of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, knocking limits in terms of maximum torque at onset of knocking, and cyclic variability data of 100 engine cycles in terms of maximum pressure and its pressure rise rate average and standard deviation. The tests examined the following engine parameters: gaseous fuel type, engine speed and load, pilot fuel injection timing, pilot fuel mass and compression ratio. Results showed that using the jojoba fuel with its improved properties has improved the dual fuel engine performance, reduced the combustion noise, extended knocking limits and reduced the cyclic variability of the combustion. (author)

  6. Enhanced Performance of Membraneless Sodium Percarbonate Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gowdhamamoorthi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the continuous flow operation of membraneless sodium percarbonate fuel cell (MLSPCFC using acid/alkaline bipolar electrolyte. In the acid/alkaline bipolar electrolyte, percarbonate works both as an oxidant as well as reductant. Sodium percarbonate affords hydrogen peroxide in aqueous medium. The cell converts the energy released by H2O2 decomposition with H+ and OH− ions into electricity and produces water and oxygen. At room temperature, the laminar flow based microfluidic membraneless fuel cell can reach a maximum power density of 28 mW/cm2 with the molar ratio of [Percarbonate]/[NaOH] = 1 as fuel and [Percarbonate]/[H2SO4] = 2 as oxidant. The paper reports for the first time the use of sodium percarbonate as the oxidant and reductant. The developed fuel cell emits no CO2 and features no proton exchange membrane, inexpensive catalysts, and simple planar structure, which enables high design flexibility and easy integration of the microscale fuel cell into actual microfluidic systems and portable power applications.

  7. Experimental Study on Effects of Fuel Injection on Scramjet Combustor Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xianyu; Li Xiaoshan; Ding Meng; Liu Weidong; Wang Zhenguo

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of fuel injection distribution on the scramjet combustor performance, there are conducted three sets of test on a hydrocarbon fueled direct-connect scramjet test facility. The results of Test A; whose fuel injection is carried out with injectors located on the top-wall and the bottom-wall, show that the fuel injection with an appropriate close-front and centralized distribution would be of much help to optimize combustor performances. The results of Test B, whose fuel injection is performed at the optimal injection locations found in Test A, with a given equivalence ratio and different injection proportions for each injector, show that this injection mode is of little benefit to improve combustor performances. The results of Test C with a circumferential fuel injection distribution displaies the possibility of ameliorating combustor performance. By analyzing the effects of injection location parameters on combustor performances on the base of the data of Test C, it is clear that the injector location has strong coupled influences on combustor performances. In addition, an inner-force synthesis specific impulse is used to reduce the errors caused by the disturbance of fuel supply and working state of air heater while assessing combustor performances.

  8. Hydraulic demand characteristics of self-supported C-IV-N and K-I-N I&E fuel elements in a zirconium C-Reactor tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, E.D.

    1960-01-13

    This report discusses the isothermal hydraulic demand characteristics were determined by laboratory experiment for full charges of self-supported I&E fuel elements in a zirconium process tube. Pressure drop, flow rate data, and the calculations of annulus-to-hole flow ratio are presented. For self-supported fuel elements, pressure drop does not vary with temperature as much as it dies for non-self-supported furl elements.

  9. Separator Characteristics for Increasing Performance of Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2009-11-01

    Two challenges for improving the performance of air cathode, single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) include increasing Coulombic efficiency (CE) and decreasing internal resistance. Nonbiodegradable glass fiber separators between the two electrodes were shown to increase power and CE, compared to cloth separators (J-cloth) that were degraded over time. MFCtestswereconductedusing glass fibermatswith thicknesses of 1.0mm (GF1) or 0.4 mm (GF0.4), a cation exchange membrane (CEM), and a J-cloth (JC), using reactors with different configurations. Higher power densities were obtained with either GF1 (46 ± 4 W/m3) or JC (46 ± 1 W/m3) in MFCs with a 2 cm electrode spacing, when the separator was placed against the cathode (S-configuration), rather than MFCs with GF0.4 (36 ± 1 W/m3) or CEM (14 ± 1 W/m3). Power was increased to 70 ± 2 W/m3 by placing the electrodes on either side of the GF1 separator (single separator electrode assembly, SSEA) and further to 150 ± 6 W/m3 using two sets of electrodes spaced 2 cm a part (double separator electrode assembly, DSEA). Reducing the DSEA electrode spacing to 0.3 cm increased power to 696 ± 26 W/m3 as a result of a decrease in the ohmic resistance from 5.9 to 2.2 Ω. The main advantages of a GF1 separator compared to JC were an improvement in the CE from 40% to 81% (S-configuration), compared to only 20-40% for JC under similar conditions, and the fact that GF1 was not biodegradable. The high CE for the GF1 separator was attributed to a low oxygen mass transfer coefficient (ko ) 5.0 x 10-5 cm/s). The GF1 andJCmaterials differed in the amount of biomass that accumulated on the separator and its biodegradability, which affected long-term power production and oxygen transport. These results show that materials and mass transfer properties of separators are important factors for improving power densities, CE, and long-term performance of MFCs. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  10. Study on the requirement for the fuel test loop performance in the HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Hark Rho

    2000-06-01

    The requirement of the FTL (Fuel Test Loop) performance were investigated to reaffirm the technical feasibility of the FTL facility which is in consideration to install at the HANARO. LH hole in the reflector region and OR3 in the outer core region are considered as candidate sites for the IPS (In-Pile Section) for the analysis purpose. The achievable linear power at test fuel pin(s) and neutron flux levels at the cladding are analyzed in the IPS, which accommodates CANDU or PWR test fuel. The enrichment of test fuels is assumed as natural uranium for CANDU and 3.5% or 5% for PWR. The test fuel configuration is bundle or 7-pin in LH hole but 1-pin in OR site. For the CANDU test fuel, the target linear power of 60kW/m can not be achieved for all cases. For the PWR test fuel, the target linear power of 40kW/m is obtained at fuels located in the direction of the core for only the case of 5% bundle irradiation. From a sensitivity study, the linear power at test fuel is expected to increase at least 30% of the present results if the core bumup effect, optimization of the ratio of fuel-to-moderator number density, etc., are considered in the detail design. Thus, the linear power for PWR fuel is expected to reach the target value, and that for CANDU fuel will reach the target value if enriched fuel is used. The fast neutron flux at the test fuel cladding is estimated for most cases to be lower than one-third of the target value of 10{sup 1}4 n/cm{sup 2}-sec and expected not to reach the target value.

  11. Stiffness evaluation of the welded connection between guide thimbles and the spacer grids 16 X 16 fuel assemblies types, using the finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schettino, Carlos Frederico Mattos; Sakamiti, Guilherme Pennachin; Gaspar Junior, Joao Carlos Aguiar, E-mail: carlosschettino@inb.gov.br, E-mail: guilhermesakamiti@inb.gov.br, E-mail: joaojunior@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Producao Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    The present work aims to evaluate, structurally, the increase in the number of spot welds to properly join the guide thimbles and the spacer grids in 16 x 16 fuel assemblies. This new and improved process can provide more stiffness to the whole structure, since the number of spots raised from four to eight. A 3-D geometric model of a guide thimble section was generated in the program SOLIDWORKS. After that, the geometric model was imported to ANSYS program, where the finite element model was built, considering the guide thimble geometry assembled with the spacer grid and the welded connections. Boundaries conditions were implemented in the model in order to simulate the correct physical behavior due to the operation of the fuel assembly inside the reactor. The analysis covered specific loads and displacements acting on the entire structure. The method used to develop this finite element analysis was a linear static simulation that performing a single connection between a spacer grid cell and a guide thimble section. Hence four models was evaluated, differing on the spot weld number in the spacer grid and guide thimble connection. The rotational stiffness results of each model were compared. The results acquired from four and eight spot weld were validated with physical test results.The behavior of the structure under the acting force/displacement and the related results of the analysis, mainly the stiffness, were satisfied. The results of this analysis were used to prove that the increasing of the spot welds number is an improvement in the dimensional stability when submitted to loads and displacements required on the fuel assembly design. This analysis aid to get more information of extreme importance such as, the pursuance to develop better manufacturing process and to improve the fuel assembly performance due to the increasing of the burn-up. (author)

  12. Low-Temperature Additive Performance in Jet A Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    20% recovered, °C 189 189 189 191 191 190 50% recovered, °C 211 211 211 210 210 211 90% recovered, °C 250 249 250 240 241 242 EP , °C ≤300 267...chain n-alkanes) which are known to increase the bulk viscosity and nucleate fuel solidification as the temperature is reduced. However, the LT...studies with the LT additive. The LT additive clearly prevented the viscosity transition of the bulk fuel. However, following nucleation and growth

  13. Long Term Performance Study of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Fed with Alcohol Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleuterio Mora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of alcohol blends in direct alcohol fuel cells may be a more environmentally friendly and less toxic alternative to the use of methanol alone in direct methanol fuel cells. This paper assesses the behaviour of a direct methanol fuel cell fed with aqueous methanol, aqueous ethanol and aqueous methanol/ethanol blends in a long term experimental study followed by modelling of polarization curves. Fuel cell performance is seen to decrease as the ethanol content rises, and subsequent operation with aqueous methanol only partly reverts this loss of performance. It seems that the difference in the oxidation rate of these alcohols may not be the only factor affecting fuel cell performance.

  14. Influence of Spacer Grid Outer Strap on Fuel Assembly Thermal Hydraulic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The outer strap as a typical structure of a spacer grid enhances the mechanical strength, decreases hang-up susceptibility, and also influences thermal hydraulic performance, for example, pressure loss, mixing performance, and flow distribution. In the present study, a typical grid spacer with different outer strap designs is adopted to investigate the influence of outer strap design on fuel assembly thermal hydraulic performance by using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD code, ANSYS CFX, and a subchannel analysis code, FLICA. To simulate the outer straps’ influence between fuel assemblies downstream, four quarter-bundles from neighboring fuel assemblies are constructed to form the computational domain. The results show that the outer strap design has a major impact on cross-flow between fuel assemblies and temperature distribution within the fuel assembly.

  15. Fuel Performance Calculations for FeCrAl Cladding in BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Sweet, Ryan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Maldonado, G. Ivan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study expands upon previous neutronics analyses of the reactivity impact of alternate cladding concepts in boiling water reactor (BWR) cores and directs focus toward contrasting fuel performance characteristics of FeCrAl cladding against those of traditional Zircaloy. Using neutronics results from a modern version of the 3D nodal simulator NESTLE, linear power histories were generated and supplied to the BISON-CASL code for fuel performance evaluations. BISON-CASL (formerly Peregrine) expands on material libraries implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and the MOOSE framework by providing proprietary material data. By creating material libraries for Zircaloy and FeCrAl cladding, the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod (e.g., strains, centerline fuel temperature, and time to gap closure) were investigated and contrasted.

  16. The study of stability, combustion characteristics and performance of water in diesel emulsion fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syafiq Zulkifli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A single cylinder diesel engine study of water in diesel emulsions was conducted to investigate the stability effect of emulsion fuel on three different fuel blends and the water emulsification effect on the engine performance. Emulsified fuels contained 2% of surfactant including Span 80 Tween 80 and tested 10 HLB number. The blends also varied of 5%, 10% and 15% of water in diesel ratios namely as BSW5, BSW10 and BSW15. The fuel blends performance was tested using a single cylinder, direct injection diesel engine, operating at 1860 rpm. The results on stability reveal that high shear homogenizer yields more stability on emulsion fuel than mechanical stirrer and ultrasonic water bath. The engine performance results show that the ignition delay and peak pressure increase with the increment of water percentage up to 15%. However, the results indicate the increment of water percentage is also shows a significant decrease in engine power.

  17. Effects of hydrogen sulfide in fuel gas on SOFC stack performance with nickel containing anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavurucu Schubert, Sena

    2012-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) can use wide varieties of fuels such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, alcohols as well as synthesis gases from natural gas, biogas and petroleum. Using such a wide range of fuels introduces the risk of unwanted impurities, which can affect the function of the SOFC. One of the known impurities is sulfur which is a well known catalyst poison. This work deals with the effect of H{sub 2}S containing fuel gas on SOFC stack performance as well as regeneration processes and their underlying mechanisms.

  18. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Performance as Telecommunications Backup Power in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Working in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and industry project partners, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) acts as the central data repository for the data collected from real-world operation of fuel cell backup power systems. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) co-funding awarded through DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office, more than 1,300 fuel cell units were deployed over a three-plus-year period in stationary, material handling equipment, auxiliary power, and backup power applications. This surpassed a Fuel Cell Technologies Office ARRA objective to spur commercialization of an early market technology by installing 1,000 fuel cell units across several different applications, including backup power. By December 2013, 852 backup power units out of 1,330 fuel cell units deployed were providing backup service, mainly for telecommunications towers. For 136 of the fuel cell backup units, project participants provided detailed operational data to the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center for analysis by NREL's technology validation team. NREL analyzed operational data collected from these government co-funded demonstration projects to characterize key fuel cell backup power performance metrics, including reliability and operation trends, and to highlight the business case for using fuel cells in these early market applications. NREL's analyses include these critical metrics, along with deployment, U.S. grid outage statistics, and infrastructure operation.

  19. Effect of CeO2 Addition on Hybrid Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ippolito, Davide; Deleebeeck, Lisa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2017-01-01

    The effect of CeO2 infiltration into the anode or CeO2 mixed with the carbon-fuel on the performance of a Hybrid Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (HDCFC) was studied through the use of polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The use CeO2 in both ways helped to increase the cell...

  20. Effect of CeO2 Infiltration on Hybrid Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ippolito, Davide; Deleebeeck, Lisa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2014-01-01

    The effect of CeO2 infiltration into the anode or CeO2 mixed with the carbon-fuel on the performance of a Hybrid Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (HDCFC) was studied through the use of polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The use CeO2 in both ways helped to increase the cell...

  1. Performance of an IDI Engine Fueled with Fatty Acid Methyl Esters Formulated from Cotton Seeds Oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluates the performance of an indirect injection (IDI) diesel engine fueled with cottonseed biodiesel while assessing the IDI engine multi-fuel capability. Millions of tons of cotton seeds are available in the southeast of the USA every year and they contain oils that can be transesteri...

  2. Portland clinker production with carbonatite waste and tire-derived fuel: crystallochemistry of minor and trace elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. R. D. Andrade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results on the composition of Portland clinkers produced with non-conventional raw-materials and fuels, focusing on the distribution of selected trace elements. Clinkers produced with three different fuel compositions were sampled in an industrial plant, where all other parameters were kept unchanged. The fuels have chemical fingerprints, which are sulfur for petroleum coke and zinc for TDF (tire-derived fuel. Presence of carbonatite in the raw materials is indicated by high amounts of strontium and phosphorous. Electron microprobe data was used to determine occupation of structural site of both C3S and C2S, and the distribution of trace elements among clinker phases. Phosphorous occurs in similar proportions in C3S and C2S; while considering its modal abundance, C3S is its main reservoir in the clinker. Sulfur is preferentially partitioned toward C2S compared to C3S. Strontium substitutes for Ca2+ mainly in C2S and in non-silicatic phases, compared to C3S.

  3. [Effects of fuel properties on the performance of a typical Euro IV diesel engine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-miao; Wang, Jian-xin; Shuai, Shi-jin

    2008-09-01

    With the purpose of establishing diesel fuel standard for China National 4th Emission Standard, as one part of Beijing "Auto-Oil" programme, engine performance test has been done on a typical Euro IV diesel engine using eight diesel fuels with different fuel properties. Test results show that, fuel properties has little effect on power, fuel consumption, and in-cylinder combustion process of tested Euro IV diesel engine; sulfate in PM and gaseous SO2 emissions increase linearly with diesel sulfur content increase; cetane number increase cause BSFC and PM reduce and NOx increase; T90 decrease cause NOx reduce while PM shows trend of reduce. Prediction equations of tested Euro IV diesel engine's ESC cycle NOx and PM emissions before SCR response to diesel fuel sulfur content, cetane number, T90 and aromatics have been obtained using linear regression method on the base of test results.

  4. Computer simulation of diffractive optical element (DOE) performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, Jacques F.; Venturino, Jean-Claude; Gouedard, Yannick

    2004-02-01

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE), also known as computer generated holograms (CGH), can transform an illuminating laser beam into a specified intensity distribution by diffraction rather than refraction or reflection. These are widely used in coherent light systems with beam shaping purposes, as an alignment tool or as a structured light generator. The diffractive surface is split into an array of sub-wavelength depth cells. Each of these locally transforms the beam by phase adaptation. Based on the work of the LSP lab from the University of Strasbourg, France, we have developed a unique industry-oriented tool. It allows the user first to optimize a DOE using the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. This part can manage sources from the simple plane wave to high order Gaussian modes or complex maps defined beams and objective patterns based on BMP images. A simulation part permits then to test the performance of the DOE with regard to system parameters, dealing with the beam, the DOE itself and the system organization. This will meet the needs of people concerned by tolerancing issues. Focusing on the industrial problem of beam shaping, we will present the whole DOE design sequence, starting from the generation of a DOE up to the study of the sensitivity of its performance according to the variation of several parameters of the system. For example, we will show the influence of the position of the beam on diffraction efficiency. This unique feature formerly neglected in industrial design process will lead the way to production quality improvement.

  5. Development of novel extractants for the recycle system of transuranium elements from nuclear fuel-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Masahiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-03-01

    Novel bi-functional extractants which have two organophosphorus moieties in the molecular structure were designed and synthesized for the recycle system of transuranium elements using liquid-liquid extraction. The separation efficiency and extraction ability of the newly synthesized extractants were investigated for rare earth metals. The new extractants have an high extractability to the rare earth metals compared with that of commercially available phosphorus extractants. The obtained results suggest that the extraction and separation abilities are highly sensitive to the molecular structure of the spacer connecting the two functional phosphorus groups. The results of thermodynamic analysis for extraction equilibrium indicate that the entropy effect on the extraction is one of the key factors to enhance the selectivity in the rare earth extractions. Furthermore, a computer analysis was carried out to evaluate the extraction properties for the extraction of rare earth metals by the bi-functional extractants. It is demonstrated that the new concept to connect some functional moieties with a spacer is very useful and is a promising method to develop new extractants for the treatment of nuclear fuel. We have proposed a novel molecular imprinting technique for the treatment of waste nuclear solutions. A surface-imprinting resin was prepared by an emulsion polymerization using a novel organophosphorus extractant as a host monomer for rare earth metals. The host monomer which has amphiphilic nature forms a complex with a rare earth metal ion at the interface, and the complex remains as it is. After the matrix is polymerized, the coordination structure is `imprinted` at the resin interface. The imprinted resins exhibited a high adsorption selectivity to the target Dy ion. We believe that the novel imprint techniques will be useful for the treatment of nuclear waste water. (J.P.N.)

  6. Comparative Performance of Direct Injection Diesel Engines Fueled Using Compressed Natural Gas and Diesel Fuel Based on GT-POWER Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Semin; Abdul R. Ismail; Rosli A. Bakar

    2008-01-01

    The paper is investigated the application of compressed natural gas (CNG) as an alternative fuel and its performance effect in the diesel engines using GT-POWER computational simulation. The CNG as an alternative fuel for four stroke diesel engine modeling was developed from the real diesel engine using GT-POWER computational model with measure all of engine components size. The computational model will be running on mono CNG fuel and mono diesel fuel to simulate and investigate the engine pe...

  7. Microbial Fuel Cell Performance with a Pressurized Cathode Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) power densities are often constrained by the oxygen reduction reaction rate on the cathode electrode. One important factor for this is the normally low solubility of oxygen in the aqueous cathode solution creating mass transport limitations, which hinder oxygen reduction a...

  8. Atomization and Combustion Performance of Antimisting Kerosene and Jet Fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    stirring in an industrial food blender. It should be noted here that degradation of fuel samples for the combustion tests (which were carried out later...Excess motion may induce gelation in the filter. 5. Tilt apparatus to diagonal and pour the reference Jet A slowly down side of tube. 6. Once tube is

  9. Nuclear fuel performance in embalse NPP, design optimizations and manufacturing improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, L.A.; Casario, J.A.; Valesi, J.; Olezza, R. [Unidad Proyectos Especiales Suministros Nucleares, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1997-07-01

    Fuel performance in Embalse Nuclear Power Plant since the beginning of the operation of the commercial fuel manufacturing plant has been encouraging. Failure rates because of manufacturing flaws during the last 3 years is discussed. The total manufacturing failure rate is strongly affected by some 'defect excursions'. The first part of this paper presents the evolution of the failure rate and describes the most important excursions. Despite the good performance of the fuel, new trends in the energy market require more economic fuels. Domestic fuel design optimizations towards this objective are discussed. These changes are mainly referred to an increment of the uranium content in the fuel. Another design changes that are directed to reduce the fuel manufacturing cost are also described. This modifications are in progress and under a qualification program. New manufacturing equipments have been incorporated to reduce the cost of the fuel and to increase the fuel reliability. Some of them have been completely qualified and are fully operational. (author)

  10. Solid-fuel household cook stoves: Characterization of performance and emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jetter, James J. [Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (E305-03), Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Kariher, Peter [ARCADIS Geraghty and Miller, Inc., P.O. Box 13109, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    In this study, 14 solid-fuel household cook stove and fuel combinations, including 10 stoves and four fuels, were tested for performance and pollutant emissions using a WBT (Water Boiling Test) protocol. Results from the testing showed that some stoves currently used in the field have improved fuel efficiency and lower pollutant emissions compared with traditional cooking methods. Stoves with smaller-mass components exposed to the heat of fuel combustion tended to take lesser time to boil, have better fuel efficiency, and lower pollutant emissions. The challenge is to design stoves with smaller-mass components that also have acceptable durability, affordable cost, and meet user needs. Results from this study provide stove performance and emissions information to practitioners disseminating stove technology in the field. This information may be useful for improving the design of existing stoves and for developing new stove designs. Comparison of results between laboratories shows that results can be replicated between labs when the same stove and fuel are tested using the WBT protocol. Recommendations were provided to improve the ability to replicate results between labs. Implications of better solid-fuel cook stoves are improved human health, reduced fuel use, reduced deforestation, and reduced global climate change. (author)

  11. Hybrid Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Performance with Anode Current Collector Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the current collector on the performance of a hybrid direct carbon fuel cell (HDCFC), consisting of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a molten carbonate-carbon slurry in contact with the anode, has been investigated using current-voltage curves. Four different anode current...... collectors were studied: Au, Ni, Ag, and Pt. It was shown that the performance of the direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) is dependent on the current collector materials, Ni and Pt giving the best performance, due to their catalytic activity. Gold is suggested to be the best material as an inert current collector...

  12. Key Differences in the Fabrication, Irradiation, and Safety Testing of U.S. and German TRISO-coated Particle Fuel and Their Implications on Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Maki, John Thomas; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hobbins, Richard Redfield

    2002-06-01

    High temperature gas reactor technology is achieving a renaissance around the world. This technology relies on high quality production and performance of coated particle fuel. Historically, the irradiation performance of TRISO-coated gas reactor particle fuel in Germany has been superior to that in the United States. German fuel generally displayed in-pile gas release values that were three orders of magnitude lower than U.S. fuel. Thus, we have critically examined the TRISO-coated fuel fabrication processes in the U.S. and Germany and the associated irradiation database with a goal of understanding why the German fuel behaves acceptably, why the U.S. fuel has not faired as well, and what process/ production parameters impart the reliable performance to this fuel form. The postirradiation examination results are also reviewed to identify failure mechanisms that may be the cause of the poorer U.S. irradiation performance. This comparison will help determine the roles that particle fuel process/product attributes and irradiation conditions (burnup, fast neutron fluence, temperature, and degree of acceleration) have on the behavior of the fuel during irradiation and provide a more quantitative linkage between acceptable processing parameters, as-fabricated fuel properties and subsequent in-reactor performance.

  13. Key Differences in the Fabrication, Irradiation, and Safety Testing of U.S. and German TRISO-coated Particle Fuel and Their Implications on Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Maki, John Thomas; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hobbins, Richard Redfield

    2002-06-01

    High temperature gas reactor technology is achieving a renaissance around the world. This technology relies on high quality production and performance of coated particle fuel. Historically, the irradiation performance of TRISO-coated gas reactor particle fuel in Germany has been superior to that in the United States. German fuel generally displayed in-pile gas release values that were three orders of magnitude lower than U.S. fuel. Thus, we have critically examined the TRISO-coated fuel fabrication processes in the U.S. and Germany and the associated irradiation database with a goal of understanding why the German fuel behaves acceptably, why the U.S. fuel has not faired as well, and what process/ production parameters impart the reliable performance to this fuel form. The postirradiation examination results are also reviewed to identify failure mechanisms that may be the cause of the poorer U.S. irradiation performance. This comparison will help determine the roles that particle fuel process/product attributes and irradiation conditions (burnup, fast neutron fluence, temperature, and degree of acceleration) have on the behavior of the fuel during irradiation and provide a more quantitative linkage between acceptable processing parameters, as-fabricated fuel properties and subsequent in-reactor performance.

  14. Investigation of the effects of renewable diesel fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions

    KAUST Repository

    Ogunkoya, Dolanimi

    2015-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate renewable fuels in a compression-ignition internal combustion engine. The focus of this study was the effect of newly developed renewable fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions. Eight fuels were investigated, and they include diesel, jet fuel, a traditional biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester: FAME), and five next generation biofuels. These five fuels were derived using a two-step process: hydrolysis of the oil into fatty acids (if necessary) and then a thermo-catalytic process to remove the oxygen via a decarboxylation reaction. The fuels included a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (DCFA), a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids with varying amounts of H2 used during the deoxygenation process (DCFAH), a continuous deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (CDCFA), fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid (DLA), and a third reaction to isomerize the products of the deoxygenated canola derived fatty acid alkanes (IPCF). Diesel, jet fuel, and biodiesel (FAME) have been used as benchmarks for comparing with the newer renewable fuels. The results of the experiments show slightly lower mechanical efficiency but better brake specific fuel consumption for the new renewable fuels. Results from combustion show shorter ignition delays for most of the renewable (deoxygenated) fuels with the exception of fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid. Combustion results also show lower peak in-cylinder pressures, reduced rate of increase in cylinder pressure, and lower heat release rates for the renewable fuels. Emission results show an increase in hydrocarbon emissions for renewable deoxygenated fuels, but a general decrease in all other emissions including NOx, greenhouse gases, and soot. Results also demonstrate that isomers of the alkanes resulting from the deoxygenation of the canola derived fatty acids could be a potential replacement to conventional fossil diesel and biodiesel based on the

  15. A Multi-Dimensional Heat Transfer Model of a Tie-Tube and Hexagonal Fuel Element for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, C. F.; Mireles, O. R.; Stewart, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Space Capable Cryogenic Thermal Engine (SCCTE) effort considers a nuclear thermal rocket design based around a Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) design fission reactor. The reactor core is comprised of bundled hexagonal fuel elements that directly heat hydrogen for expansion in a thrust chamber and hexagonal tie-tubes that house zirconium hydride moderator mass for the purpose of thermalizing fast neutrons resulting from fission events. Created 3D steady state Hex fuel rod model with 1D flow channels. Hand Calculation were used to set up initial conditions for fluid flow. The Hex Fuel rod uses 1D flow paths to model the channels using empirical correlations for heat transfer in a pipe. Created a 2-D axisymmetric transient to steady state model using the CFD turbulent flow and Heat Transfer module in COMSOL. This model was developed to find and understand the hydrogen flow that might effect the thermal gradients axially and at the end of the tie tube where the flow turns and enters an annulus. The Hex fuel rod and Tie tube models were made based on requirements given to us by CSNR and the SCCTE team. The models helped simplify and understand the physics and assumptions. Using pipe correlations reduced the complexity of the 3-D fuel rod model and is numerically more stable and computationally more time-efficient compared to the CFD approach. The 2-D axisymmetric tie tube model can be used as a reference "Virtual test model" for comparing and improving 3-D Models.

  16. U.S. Department of Energy-Funded Performance Validation of Fuel Cell Material Handling Equipment (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

    2013-11-01

    This webinar presentation to the UK Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association summarizes how the U.S. Department of Energy is enabling early fuel cell markets; describes objectives of the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center; and presents performance status of fuel cell material handling equipment.

  17. Summary report on the fuel performance modeling of the AFC-2A, 2B irradiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavel G. Medvedev

    2013-09-01

    The primary objective of this work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to determine the fuel and cladding temperature history during irradiation of the AFC-2A, 2B transmutation metallic fuel alloy irradiation experiments containing transuranic and rare earth elements. Addition of the rare earth elements intends to simulate potential fission product carry-over from pyro-metallurgical reprocessing. Post irradiation examination of the AFC-2A, 2B rodlets revealed breaches in the rodlets and fuel melting which was attributed to the release of the fission gas into the helium gap between the rodlet cladding and the capsule which houses six individually encapsulated rodlets. This release is not anticipated during nominal operation of the AFC irradiation vehicle that features a double encapsulated design in which sodium bonded metallic fuel is separated from the ATR coolant by the cladding and the capsule walls. The modeling effort is focused on assessing effects of this unanticipated event on the fuel and cladding temperature with an objective to compare calculated results with the temperature limits of the fuel and the cladding.

  18. Study of Effect of Diesel Fuel Energy Rate in Duel Fuel on Performance of Compression Ignition Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Maan Janan Basheer

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of diesel fuel percentage on the combustion processes in compression ignition engine using dual fuel (diesel and LPG). The brake thermal efficiency increased with the increase of diesel fuel rate at low loads, and decreased when load increased. To get sufficient operation in engine fueled with dual fuel, it required sufficient flow rate of diesel fuel, if the engine fueled with insufficient diesel fuel erratic operation with miss fire cycles presen...

  19. Assessment of stainless steel 348 fuel rod performance against literature available data using TRANSURANUS code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovedi Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early pressurized water reactors were originally designed to operate using stainless steel as cladding material, but during their lifetime this material was replaced by zirconium-based alloys. However, after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the problems related to the zirconium-based alloys due to the hydrogen production and explosion under severe accident brought the importance to assess different materials. In this sense, initiatives as ATF (Accident Tolerant Fuel program are considering different material as fuel cladding and, one candidate is iron-based alloy. In order to assess the fuel performance of fuel rods manufactured using iron-based alloy as cladding material, it was necessary to select a specific stainless steel (type 348 and modify properly conventional fuel performance codes developed in the last decades. Then, 348 stainless steel mechanical and physics properties were introduced in the TRANSURANUS code. The aim of this paper is to present the obtained results concerning the verification of the modified TRANSURANUS code version against data collected from the open literature, related to reactors which operated using stainless steel as cladding. Considering that some data were not available, some assumptions had to be made. Important differences related to the conventional fuel rods were taken into account. Obtained results regarding the cladding behavior are in agreement with available information. This constitutes an evidence of the modified TRANSURANUS code capabilities to perform fuel rod investigation of fuel rods manufactured using 348 stainless steel as cladding material.

  20. Aqueous processing of U-10Mo scrap for high performance research reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youker, Amanda J.; Stepinski, Dominique C.; Maggos, Laura E.; Bakel, Allen J.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2012-08-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Conversion program, which is part of the US government's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), supports the conversion of civilian use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel and targets. The reason for conversion is to eliminate the use of any material that may pose a threat to the United States or other foreign countries. High performance research reactors (HPRRs) cannot make the conversion to a standard LEU fuel because they require a more dense fuel to meet their performance requirements. As a result, a more dense fuel consisting of a monolithic uranium-molybdenum alloy containing 10% (w/w) Mo with Al cladding and a Zr bonding-layer is being considered. Significant losses are expected in the fabrication of this fuel, so a means to recycle the scrap pieces is needed. Argonne National Laboratory has developed an aqueous-processing flowsheet for scrap recovery in the fuel fabrication process for high-density LEU-monolithic fuel based on data found in the literature. Experiments have been performed to investigate dissolution conditions for solutions containing approximately 20 g-U/L and 50 g-U/L with and without Fe(NO3)3. HNO3 and HF concentrations have been optimized for timely dissolution of the fuel scrap and prevention of the formation of the U-Zr2 intermetallic, explosive complex, while meeting the requirements needed for further processing.

  1. The effect of fuel form on trace element emissions in an industrial-scale coal fired boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.F.; Wincek, R.T.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Coal Utilization Lab.

    1998-12-31

    Eleven of the fourteen inorganic hazardous air pollutants identified in Title 3 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 are present in the flue gas of pulverized coal-fired boilers. The designated elements include: antimony (Sb), beryllium (Be), chlorine (Cl), cobalt (Co), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), fluorine (F), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), and phosphorus (P). Determining the risk of these elements in the environment is difficult at best. However, regulating their emission into the environment has some scientific basis and merit. Approximately 137.5 tons of mercury were emitted in the US by combustion sources in 1994--1995, with coal-fired utility boilers accounting for 37.4% (or 51.6 tons) of the total. Control of trace element emissions from coal-fired utility boilers requires an understanding of the manner in which they occur in coal, their behavior during and after combustion and their form in the stack gas. The multimedia behavior of trace elements during combustion can be traced to their volatility within the combustion and post-combustion environment. The temperature distribution within the combustion system, the mechanism of char and ash formation (e.g. duration of char burnout and char and cenosphere morphology) and the combustion efficiency determine the partitioning of trace elements during combustion. These factors can be affected by the form in which a fuel is fired, e.g., pulverized coal (PC) versus coal-water slurry fuel (CWSF). This paper presents preliminary results of emissions testing aimed at determining the effect of fuel form on the penetration and partitioning of trace elements in an industrial-scale boiler. The tests were conducted on a 2 MMBtu/hr research boiler, in which Middle Kittanning Seam coal (hvA bituminous) from Jefferson County, Pennsylvania was burned in pulverized form and as a CWSF. The tests were conducted in accordance with the procedure outlined in EPA Methods 5 and 29

  2. Numerical Study on the Performance Characteristics of Hydrogen Fueled Port Injection Internal Combustion Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosli A. Bakar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was focused on the engine performance of single cylinder hydrogen fueled port injection internal combustion engine. GT-Power was utilized to develop the model for port injection engine. One dimensional gas dynamics was represented the flow and heat transfer in the components of the engine model. The governing equations were introduced first, followed by the performance parameters and model description. Air-fuel ratio was varied from stoichiometric limit to a lean limit and the rotational speed varied from 2500 to 4500 rpm while the injector location was considered fixed in the midway of the intake port. The effects of air fuel ratio, crank angle and engine speed are presented in this study. From the acquired results show that the air-fuel ratio and engine speed were greatly influence on the performance of hydrogen fueled engine. It was shown that decreases the Brake Mean Effective Pressure (BMEP and brake thermal efficiency with increases of the engine speed and air-fuel ratio however the increase the Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC with increases the speed and air-fuel ratio. The cylinder temperature increases with increases of engine speed however temperature decreases with increases of air-fuel ratio. The pressure fluctuations increased substantially with increases of speed at intake port however rise of pressure at the end of the exhaust stroke lead to reverse flow into the cylinder past exhaust valve. The fluctuation amplitude responded to the engine speed in case of exhaust pressure were given less than the intake pressure. The volumetric efficiency increased with increases of engine speed and equivalent ratio. The volumetric efficiency of the hydrogen engines with port injection is a serious problem and reduces the overall performance of the engine. This emphasized the ability of retrofitting the traditional engines with hydrogen fuel with minor modifications.

  3. Matrix element method for high performance computing platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasseau, G.; Chamont, D.; Beaudette, F.; Bianchini, L.; Davignon, O.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Strebler, T.

    2015-12-01

    Lot of efforts have been devoted by ATLAS and CMS teams to improve the quality of LHC events analysis with the Matrix Element Method (MEM). Up to now, very few implementations try to face up the huge computing resources required by this method. We propose here a highly parallel version, combining MPI and OpenCL, which makes the MEM exploitation reachable for the whole CMS datasets with a moderate cost. In the article, we describe the status of two software projects under development, one focused on physics and one focused on computing. We also showcase their preliminary performance obtained with classical multi-core processors, CUDA accelerators and MIC co-processors. This let us extrapolate that with the help of 6 high-end accelerators, we should be able to reprocess the whole LHC run 1 within 10 days, and that we have a satisfying metric for the upcoming run 2. The future work will consist in finalizing a single merged system including all the physics and all the parallelism infrastructure, thus optimizing implementation for best hardware platforms.

  4. Performance of hybrid ball bearings in oil and jet fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Stephen M.; Pfaffenberger, Eugene E.

    1992-07-01

    A 308-size hybrid ball bearing, with ceramic balls and steel rings, was tested using a diester oil and gas turbine fuel as lubricants at several speeds and loads. Heat generation data from this test work was then correlated with the heat generation model from a widely used computer code. The ability of this hybrid split inner ring bearing design to endure thrust reversals, which are expected in many turbine applications, was demonstrated. Finally, the bearing was successfully endurance tested in JP-10 fuel for 25 hours at 7560 N axial load and 36,000 rpm. This work has successfully demonstrated the technology necessary to use fuel-lubricated hybrid bearings in limited-life gas turbine engine applications such as missiles, drones, and other unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). In addition, it has provided guidance for use in designing such bearing systems. As a result, the benefits of removing the conventional oil lubricant system, i.e., design simplification and reduced maintenance, can be realized.

  5. Determining the elemental composition of fuels by bomb calorimetry and the inverse correlation of HHV with elemental composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Niels; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a method to obtain a simplified elemental analysis of an organic sample in which oxygen, nitrogen, and sulphur are lumped. The method uses a bomb calorimeter, water, and ash measurements combined with a numerical procedure based on a generalised equation for predicting highe...

  6. Evaluation of plasma jet ignition for improved performance of alternate fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J. F.; Golenko, Z.; McIlwain, M. E.

    1982-08-01

    Alcohols, such as ethanol and methanol, are potential substitutes for gasolines during periods of fuel shortages. The pure alcohols have been reported to cause performance and starting problems when used to fuel internal combustion engines. This study characterized how three modes of ignition, OEM magneto, high energy conventional spark (CI) and plasma jet ignition (PJI) influenced the engine combustion properties of ethanol, methanol and gasoline alcohol blends. Specific combustion properties examined in these measurement were burning velocity and lean limit. In addition, the engine performance was determined for 30% alcohol gasoline containing blends. These engine performance measurements determined brake power, brake specific fuel consumption and brake emissions of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons. The findings of this study suggest that high energy ignition systems, such as plasma jet ignition, will improve both fuel combustion properties and engine performance.

  7. Improving dynamic performance of proton-exchange membrane fuel cell system using time delay control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Bae [Mechanical Engineering Department, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea)

    2010-10-01

    Transient behaviour is a key parameter for the vehicular application of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The goal of this presentation is to construct better control technology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell. The PEM fuel cell model comprises a compressor, an injection pump, a humidifier, a cooler, inlet and outlet manifolds, and a membrane-electrode assembly. The model includes the dynamic states of current, voltage, relative humidity, stoichiometry of air and hydrogen, cathode and anode pressures, cathode and anode mass flow rates, and power. Anode recirculation is also included with the injection pump, as well as anode purging, for preventing anode flooding. A steady-state, isothermal analytical fuel cell model is constructed to analyze the mass transfer and water transportation in the membrane. In order to prevent the starvation of air and flooding in a PEM fuel cell, time delay control is suggested to regulate the optimum stoichiometry of oxygen and hydrogen, even when there are dynamical fluctuations of the required PEM fuel cell power. To prove the dynamical performance improvement of the present method, feed-forward control and Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control with a state estimator are compared. Matlab/Simulink simulation is performed to validate the proposed methodology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell system. (author)

  8. Improving dynamic performance of proton-exchange membrane fuel cell system using time delay control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Bae

    Transient behaviour is a key parameter for the vehicular application of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The goal of this presentation is to construct better control technology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell. The PEM fuel cell model comprises a compressor, an injection pump, a humidifier, a cooler, inlet and outlet manifolds, and a membrane-electrode assembly. The model includes the dynamic states of current, voltage, relative humidity, stoichiometry of air and hydrogen, cathode and anode pressures, cathode and anode mass flow rates, and power. Anode recirculation is also included with the injection pump, as well as anode purging, for preventing anode flooding. A steady-state, isothermal analytical fuel cell model is constructed to analyze the mass transfer and water transportation in the membrane. In order to prevent the starvation of air and flooding in a PEM fuel cell, time delay control is suggested to regulate the optimum stoichiometry of oxygen and hydrogen, even when there are dynamical fluctuations of the required PEM fuel cell power. To prove the dynamical performance improvement of the present method, feed-forward control and Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control with a state estimator are compared. Matlab/Simulink simulation is performed to validate the proposed methodology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell system.

  9. Study on the Use of Hydride Fuel in High-Performance Light Water Reactor Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haileyesus Tsige-Tamirat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydride fuels have features which could make their use attractive in future advanced power reactors. The potential benefit of use of hydride fuel in HPLWR without introducing significant modification in the current core design concept of the high-performance light water reactor (HPLWR has been evaluated. Neutronics and thermal hydraulic analyses were performed for a single assembly model of HPLWR with oxide and hydride fuels. The hydride assembly shows higher moderation with softer neutron spectrum and slightly more uniform axial power distribution. It achieves a cycle length of 18 months with sufficient excess reactivity. At Beginning of Cycle the fuel temperature coefficient of the hydride assembly is higher whereas the moderator and void coefficients are lower. The thermal hydraulic results show that the achievable fuel temperature in the hydride assembly is well below the design limits. The potential benefits of the use of hydride fuel in the current design of the HPLWR with the achieved improvements in the core neutronics characteristics are not sufficient to justify the replacement of the oxide fuel. Therefore for a final evaluation of the use of hydride fuels in HPLWR concepts additional studies which include modification of subassembly and core layout designs are required.

  10. The performance of 3500 MWth homogeneous and heterogeneous metal fueled core designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turski, R.; Yang, Shi-tien

    1987-11-01

    Performance parameters are calculated for a representative 3500 MWth homogeneous and a heterogeneous metal fueled reactor design. The equilibrium cycle neutronic characteristics, safety coefficients, control system requirements, and control rod worths are evaluated. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics for both configurations are also compared. The heavy metal fuel loading requirements and neutronic performance characteristics are also evaluated for the uranium startup option. 14 refs., 14 figs., 20 tabs.

  11. Performance evaluation of a liquid tin anode solid oxide fuel cell operating under hydrogen, argon and coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Sanchit; LaBarbera, Mark; Fedkin, Mark V.; Lvov, Serguei N.; Abernathy, Harry; Gerdes, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    A liquid tin anode solid oxide fuel cell is constructed and investigated under different operating conditions. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is used to reflect the effect of fuel feed as the EIS spectra changes significantly on switching the fuel from argon to hydrogen. A cathode symmetric cell is used to separate the impedance from the two electrodes, and the results indicate that a major contribution to the charge-transfer and mass-transfer impedance arises from the anode. The OCP of 0.841 V for the cell operating under argon as a metal-air battery indicates the formation of a SnO2 layer at the electrolyte/anode interface. The increase in the OCP to 1.1 V for the hydrogen fueled cell shows that H2 reduces the SnO2 film effectively. The effective diffusion coefficients are calculated using the Warburg element in the equivalent circuit model for the experimental EIS data, and the values of 1.9 10-3 cm2 s-1 at 700 °C, 2.3 10-3 cm2 s-1 at 800 °C and 3.5 10-3 cm2 s-1 at 900 °C indicate the system was influenced by diffusion of hydrogen in the system. Further, the performance degradation over time is attributed to the irreversible conversion of Sn to SnO2 resulting from galvanic polarization.

  12. Investigation of Product Performance of Al-Metal Matrix Composites Brake Disc using Finite Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatchurrohman, N.; Marini, C. D.; Suraya, S.; Iqbal, AKM Asif

    2016-02-01

    The increasing demand of fuel efficiency and light weight components in automobile sectors have led to the development of advanced material parts with improved performance. A specific class of MMCs which has gained a lot of attention due to its potential is aluminium metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs). Product performance investigation of Al- MMCs is presented in this article, where an Al-MMCs brake disc is analyzed using finite element analysis. The objective is to identify the potentiality of replacing the conventional iron brake disc with Al-MMCs brake disc. The simulation results suggested that the MMCs brake disc provided better thermal and mechanical performance as compared to the conventional cast iron brake disc. Although, the Al-MMCs brake disc dissipated higher maximum temperature compared to cast iron brake disc's maximum temperature. The Al-MMCs brake disc showed a well distributed temperature than the cast iron brake disc. The high temperature developed at the ring of the disc and heat was dissipated in circumferential direction. Moreover, better thermal dissipation and conduction at brake disc rotor surface played a major influence on the stress. As a comparison, the maximum stress and strain of Al-MMCs brake disc was lower than that induced on the cast iron brake disc.

  13. Safe conditioning of waste for final disposal. Vitrification of spent used fuel elements; Sichere Konditionierung zur Endlagerung. Verglasung von abgebrannten Brennelementen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niessen, Stefan; Blanc, Eric [Areva GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    The strategy for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Germany requires an interim storage over a longer period. The used fuel assemblies are stored in dry storage casks. An alternative method for storage is the conditioning of the fuel elements. This technology is proven on an industrial scale and is carried out at the La Hague plant. The know-how is currently available for both, the operators as well as in industry and science in Germany.

  14. Capacity of the equipment family SICOM to inspect fuel elements; Capacidad de los equipos familia SICOM para inspeccionar elementos de combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Siguero, A.; Sola, A.

    2013-07-01

    To check the status where the fuel assemblies are after has been operating in the core of nuclear plants, inspections have been conducted to carry out an improvement in the behavior of alloys used in pods of fuel, the control of corrosion of these pods because of heat, reducing the transfer of heat due to the oxide and with the support of visual inspections monitor the physical integrity of the fuel elements.

  15. New approaches to improve the performance of the PEM based fuel cell power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woojin

    Fuel cells are expected to play an important role in future power generation. However, significant technical challenges remain and the commercial breakthrough of fuel cells is hindered by the high price of fuel cell components. As is well known, the fuel cells do not provide the robust source characteristics required to effectively follow the load during significant load steps and they have limited overload-handling capability. Further, the performance of the fuel cell is significantly degraded when the CO (Carbon Monoxide) is contained in the hydrogen fuel. In this thesis several new approaches to improve the performance of PEM based fuel cell power systems are discussed. In the first section an impedance model of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack (PEMFCS) is first proposed. This equivalent circuit model of the fuel cell stack is derived by a frequency response analysis (FRA) technique to evaluate the effects of the ripple current generated by the power-conditioning unit. Experimental results are presented to show the effects of the ripple currents. In the second section, a fuel cell powered UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply) system is proposed. In this approach, two PEM Fuel Cell modules along with suitable DC/DC and DC/AC power electronic converter modules are employed. A Supercapacitor module is also employed to compensate for instantaneous power fluctuations including overload and to overcome the slow dynamics of the fuel processor such as reformers. A complete design example for a 1-kVA system is presented. In the third section, an advanced power converter topology is proposed to significantly improve the CO tolerance on PEM based fuel cell power systems. An additional two-stage dc-dc converter with a supercapacitor module is connected to the fuel cell to draw a low frequency (0.5Hz) pulsating current of the specific amplitude (20-30[A]) from the fuel cell stack. CO on the catalyst surface can be electro-oxidized by using this technique, and

  16. Porous Carbon Materials for Elements in Low-Temperature Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wlodarczyk R.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The porosity, distribution of pores, shape of pores and specific surface area of carbon materials were investigated. The study of sintered graphite and commercial carbon materials used in low-temperature fuel cells (Graphite Grade FU, Toray Teflon Treated was compared. The study covered measurements of density, microstructural examinations and wettability (contact angle of carbon materials. The main criterion adopted for choosing a particular material for components of fuel cells is their corrosion resistance under operating conditions of hydrogen fuel cells. In order to determine resistance to corrosion in the environment of operation of fuel cells, potentiokinetic curves were registered for synthetic solution 0.1M H2SO4+ 2 ppmF-at 80°C.

  17. ANALYSING THE POSIBILITY OF FUEL FILTER ELEMENTS OPERATING EFFECTIVINESS EVALUATION WITH X-RAY FLUORESCENSE METHOD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mikhail Lvovich Nemchikov; Alexander Nicolaevich Kozlov; Konstantin Igorevich Gryadunov; Anton Mihailovich Meleshnikov

    2017-01-01

    ... of NGOs "Unit", which has been removed from the supply line TC-1 aviation fuel tank farm from the State Reserve in the refueling tank farm "Vnukovo" and the filter control of Velcon company brand...

  18. Utilization of plutonium in a high temperature gas-cooled reactor with spherical fuel elements; Nutzung von Plutonium im Kugelhaufen-Hochtemperaturreaktor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorochev, M.

    1998-09-01

    This thesis deals with the use of reactor and weapon grade plutonium in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTR) with spherical fuel elements. As an example, a 350 MW{sub th} MODUL type reactor is investigated in detail. The purpose of the study was to find the possibilities and limits of using plutonium effectively in a Pebble Bed HTR. Fuel cycles were optimized with respect to different goals under the condition that safety requirements must be strictly fulfilled. A compromise between opposite optimization criteria (e.g., higher destruction rate or smaller residual amount of plutonium in the spent fuel) was achieved. Calculational studies of plutonium cycles in a Pebble Red Reactor were performed using the VSOP Code. The results show that a Pebble Red Reactor potentially provides for extremely high burnup of plutonium. The high burnup was achieved by separate loading of the plutonium in feed and of uranium in breed type fuel elements. Both fuel element types undergo different numbers of passes through the reactor until the intended burnup is achieved. Two reference cases are derived from a parametric study, one for the use of reactor grade plutonium with uranium, and another one for weapon grade plutonium with thorium as the breed material. Both reference cycles prove that the HTR-350 Module reactor offers a good concept for the destruction of both plutonium grades. (orig.) [Deutsch] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird der Einsatz von Waffen- und Reaktorplutonium in Hochtemperaturreaktoren mit kugelfoermigen Brennelementen behandelt. Als Anwendungsbeispiel wird eine modulare Anlage mit einer Leistung von 350 MW{sub th} im Detail untersucht. Das Ziel der Arbeit bestand darin, die Moeglichkeiten und Grenzen fuer einen effektiven Abbrand von Plutonium in Kugelhaufenreaktoren kennenzulernen. Unter Wahrung hoher Sicherheitsansprueche wurden Brennstoffkreislaeufe identifiziert, welche fuer unterschiedliche Zielvorgaben optimiert wurden. Schliesslich wurde ein Kompromiss

  19. The Influence of Distance and Atmospheric Elements on the Concentration of Odour from Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaini Sakawi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Odour is an environmental element that occurs as varieties of aroma, either pleasant or otherwise to its immediate community. The various sources of odour pollution may come from either natural or of human activities. Odour concentration may change due to environmental factors such as atmosphere, topography, distance and mitigation efforts. This study describes a study on the influence of distance and athmospheric elements on concentration of odour generated by the Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF operations. The distribution of odour concentration was measured using Odour concentration meter XP-329 III series per its distance from the RDF operations. The results indicated that distance factors did influence the odour concentration. Results at test stations of distances farther from the RDF showed incrementally higher distribution of odour concentration compared to those nearer to the RDF. In addition, athmosperic elements like temperatures, humidity, wind speed and directions also evidenlty linked to the distribution of odour concentration.

  20. Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Douglas C.; Porter, Douglas L.; Hayes, Steven L.; Hill, Robert N.

    1997-12-01

    A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr-Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu-Zr-Hf or a combination of both.

  1. Optimization of gap sizes for the high performance of annular nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Doo; Kwon, Soon Bum; Cho, Hui Jeong; Kim, Seong Su [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Solid-type nuclear fuels have been used for nuclear reactors for a long time. Many countries are currently developing annular fuels to improve the efficiency of nuclear fuels. The thermoelastic-plastic-creep analyses of solid- and annular-type rods were conducted under the same conditions. The temperature and stress of the solid- and annular-type rods were compared on the basis of gap size. In this study, we examined the advantages and disadvantages of annular-type fuel regarding the temperature and stress of the pellet and cladding. The inner and outer gaps between the pellet and cladding play important roles in the temperature and stress distributions of fuel systems. Therefore, the optimization of gaps in fuel systems was conducted for a low temperature under certain stress conditions. hermoelasticplastic-creep analyses were conducted by using an in-house thermoelastic-plastic-creep finite element analysis program in Visual FORTRAN with the effective stress function algorithm. Nonlinear iterative stress analyses were conducted by nonlinear iterative temperature analyses; that is, a quasi-fully coupled algorithm was applied to this procedure. In this study, the thermoelastic-plastic-creep analysis of pressurized water reactor annular fuels was conducted to determine the contacting tendency of the inner-outer gaps between the annular fuel pellets and cladding, as well as to optimize the gap sizes by using the commercial package PIAnO for efficient heat transfer at certain stress levels. Most analyses were conducted until the gaps disappeared. However, certain analyses lasted for 1582 days, after which the fuels were replaced.

  2. Fabrication and electrochemical performance of solid oxide fuel cell components by atmospheric and suspension plasma spray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Wei-sheng; YANG Yun-zhen; ZHANG Hai-ou; WANG Gui-lan

    2009-01-01

    The theory of functionally graded material (FGM) was applied in the fabrication process of PEN (Positive- Electrolyte-Negative),the core component of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC).To enhance its electrochemical performance,the functionally graded PEN of planar SOFC was prepared by atmospheric plasma spray (APS).The cross-sectional SEM micrograph and element energy spectrum of the resultant PEN were analyzed.Its interface resistance was also compared with that without the graded layers to investigate the electrochemical performance enhanced by the functionally graded layers.Moreover,a new process,suspension plasma spray (SPS) was applied to preparing the SOFC electrolyte.Higher densification of the coating by SPS,1.61%,is observed,which is helpful to effectively improve its electrical conductivity.The grain size of the electrolyte coating fabricated by SPS is also smaller than that by APS,which is more favourable to obtain the dense electrolyte coatings.To sum up,all mentioned above can prove that the hybrid process of APS and SPS could be a better approach to fabricate the PEN of SOFC stacks,in which APS is for porous electrodes and SPS for dense electrolyte.

  3. Fully-Coupled Metallic Fuel Performance Simulations using BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-27

    This document is a set of slides intended to accompany a talk at a meeting. The first topic taken up is zirconium redistribution. The rod edge Zr increase is evidently due to the Soret term and temperature gradient. Then metallic fission gas release modeling is considered. Based on a GRSIS/FEAST model, the approach of generating fission gas in the fuel matrix is described. A sensitivity study on parameters is presented, including sodium bond & diffusion coefficient sensitivity along with dt sensitivity. Finally, results of some coupled simulations are shown, with ideas about future work.

  4. Demonstration of Uncertainty Quantification and Sensitivity Analysis for PWR Fuel Performance with BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Ladd, Jacob; Zhao, Haihua; Zou, Ling; Burns, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    BISON is an advanced fuels performance code being developed at Idaho National Laboratory and is the code of choice for fuels performance by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Program. An approach to uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis with BISON was developed and a new toolkit was created. A PWR fuel rod model was developed and simulated by BISON, and uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis were performed with eighteen uncertain input parameters. The maximum fuel temperature and gap conductance were selected as the figures of merit (FOM). Pearson, Spearman, and partial correlation coefficients were considered for all of the figures of merit in sensitivity analysis.

  5. INFLUENCE OF FUEL TEMPERATURE ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE OPERATING WITH BIODIESEL BLEND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafidah Rahim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study of the effect of temperature on diesel engine performance using a 5% biodiesel blend. A one-dimensional numerical analysis is used to simulate the four-cylinder diesel engine. The diesel engine simulation is used to study the characteristics of engine performance when the engine is operating with a fuel blend as an alternative fuel. The simulations are conducted at full load conditions where the temperature varies from 300 to 500 K. The results show that the maximum brake power and brake torque reduction was 1.39% and 1.13%, respectively for an engine operating with a fuel blend. It is shown that the insignificant different due to the small gap between energy content values. A decrease in the lower heating value caused an increase in the brake specific fuel consumption and thus, a reduction in the brake thermal efficiency of the engine performance at full load.

  6. A review on the performance and modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucetta, A., E-mail: abirboucetta@yahoo.fr; Ghodbane, H., E-mail: h.ghodbane@mselab.org; Bahri, M., E-mail: m.bahri@mselab.org [Department of Electrical Engineering, MSE Laboratory, Mohamed khider Biskra University (Algeria); Ayad, M. Y., E-mail: ayadmy@gmail.com [R& D, Industrial Hybrid Vehicle Applications (France)

    2016-07-25

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC), are energy efficient and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional energy conversion for various applications in stationary power plants, portable power device and transportation. PEM fuel cells provide low operating temperature and high-energy efficiency with near zero emission. A PEM fuel cell is a multiple distinct parts device and a series of mass, energy, transport through gas channels, electric current transport through membrane electrode assembly and electrochemical reactions at the triple-phase boundaries. These processes play a decisive role in determining the performance of the Fuel cell, so that studies on the phenomena of gas flows and the performance modelling are made deeply. This paper gives a comprehensive overview of the state of the art on the Study of the phenomena of gas flow and performance modelling of PEMFC.

  7. A review on the performance and modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucetta, A.; Ghodbane, H.; Ayad, M. Y.; Bahri, M.

    2016-07-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC), are energy efficient and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional energy conversion for various applications in stationary power plants, portable power device and transportation. PEM fuel cells provide low operating temperature and high-energy efficiency with near zero emission. A PEM fuel cell is a multiple distinct parts device and a series of mass, energy, transport through gas channels, electric current transport through membrane electrode assembly and electrochemical reactions at the triple-phase boundaries. These processes play a decisive role in determining the performance of the Fuel cell, so that studies on the phenomena of gas flows and the performance modelling are made deeply. This paper gives a comprehensive overview of the state of the art on the Study of the phenomena of gas flow and performance modelling of PEMFC.

  8. High-performance liquid-catalyst fuel cell for direct biomass-into-electricity conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Mu, Wei; Deng, Yulin

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we report high-performance fuel cells that are catalyzed solely by polyoxometalate (POM) solution without any solid metal or metal oxide. The novel design of the liquid-catalyst fuel cells (LCFC) changes the traditional gas-solid-surface heterogeneous reactions to liquid-catalysis reactions. With this design, raw biomasses, such as cellulose, starch, and even grass or wood powders can be directly converted into electricity. The power densities of the fuel cell with switchgrass (dry powder) and bush allamanda (freshly collected) are 44 mW cm(-2) and 51 mW cm(-2) respectively. For the cellulose-based biomass fuel cell, the power density is almost 3000 times higher than that of cellulose-based microbial fuel cells. Unlike noble-metal catalysts, POMs are tolerant to most organic and inorganic contaminants. Therefore, almost any raw biomass can be used directly to produce electricity without prior purification.

  9. Dual-fuel natural gas/diesel engines: Technology, performance, and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S. H.; Weaver, C. S.

    1994-11-01

    An investigation of current dual-fuel natural gas/diesel engine design, performance, and emissions was conducted. The most pressing technological problems associated with dual-fuel engine use were identified along with potential solutions. It was concluded that dual-fuel engines can achieve low NO(sub x) and particulate emissions while retaining fuel-efficiency and BMEP levels comparable to those of diesel engines. The investigation also examined the potential economic impact of dual-fuel engines in diesel-electric locomotives, marine vessels, farm equipment, construction, mining, and industrial equipment, and stand-alone electricity generation systems. Recommendations for further additional funding to support research, development, and demonstration in these applications were then presented.

  10. The Effect of H2S on the Performance of SOFCs using Methane Containing Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens Foldager Bregnballe; Hagen, Anke

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the interest for using biogas derived from biomass as fuel in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) has increased. To maximise the biogas to electrical energy output, it is important to study the effects of the main biogas components (CH4 and CO2), minor ones and traces (e.g. H2S...... performance was monitored with electric measurements and impedance spectroscopy. At OCV 2–24 ppm H2S were added to the fuel in 24 h intervals. The reforming activity of the Ni-containing anode decreased rapidly when H2S was added to the fuel. This ultimately resulted in a lower production of fuel (H2 and CO......) from CH4. Applying 1 A cm–2 current load, a maximum concentration of 7 ppm H2S was acceptable for a 24 h period....

  11. Production Cycle for Large Scale Fission Mo-99 Separation by the Processing of Irradiated LEU Uranium Silicide Fuel Element Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Hadi Ali Sameh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uranium silicide fuels proved over decades their exceptional qualification for the operation of higher flux material testing reactors with LEU elements. The application of such fuels as target materials, particularly for the large scale fission Mo-99 producers, offers an efficient and economical solution for the related facilities. The realization of such aim demands the introduction of a suitable dissolution process for the applied U3Si2 compound. Excellent results are achieved by the oxidizing dissolution of the fuel meat in hydrofluoric acid at room temperature. The resulting solution is directly behind added to an over stoichiometric amount of potassium hydroxide solution. Uranium and the bulk of fission products are precipitated together with the transuranium compounds. The filtrate contains the molybdenum and the soluble fission product species. It is further treated similar to the in-full scale proven process. The generated off gas stream is handled also as experienced before after passing through KOH washing solution. The generated alkaline fluoride containing waste solution is noncorrosive. Nevertheless fluoride can be selectively bonded as in soluble CaF2 by addition of a mixture of solid calcium hydroxide calcium carbonate to the sand cement mixture used for waste solidification. The generated elevated amounts of LEU remnants can be recycled and retargeted. The related technology permits the minimization of the generated fuel waste, saving environment, and improving processing economy.

  12. Diesel fuel component contribution to engine emissions and performance. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erwin, J.; Ryan, T.W. III; Moulton, D.S. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Contemporary diesel fuel is a blend of several refinery streams chosen to meet specifications. The need to increase yield of transportation fuel from crude oil has resulted in converting increased proportions of residual oil to lighter products. This conversion is accomplished by thermal, catalytic, and hydrocracking of high molecular weight materials rich in aromatic compounds. The current efforts to reformulate California diesel fuel for reduced emissions from existing engines is an example of another driving force affecting refining practice: regulations designed to reduce exhaust emissions. Although derived from petroleum crude oil, reformulated diesel fuel is an alternative to current specification-grade diesel fuel, and this alternative presents opportunities and questions to be resolved by fuel and engine research. Various concerned parties have argued that regulations for fuel reformulation have not been based on an adequate data base. Despite numerous studies, much ambiguity remains about the relationship of exhaust parameters to fuel composition, particularly for diesel fuel. In an effort to gather pertinent data, the automobile industry and the oil refiners have joined forces in the Air Quality Improvement Research Program (AUTO/OIL) to address this question for gasoline. The objective of that work is to define the relationship between gasoline composition and the magnitude and composition of the exhaust emissions. The results of the AUTO/OEL program will also be used, along with other data bases, to define the EPA {open_quotes}complex model{close_quotes} for reformulated gasolines. Valuable insights have been gained for compression ignition engines in the Coordinating Research Council`s VE-1 program, but no program similar to AUTO/OIL has been started for diesel fuel reformulation. A more detailed understanding of the fuel/performance relationship is a readily apparent need.

  13. The comparison of engine performance and exhaust emission characteristics of sesame oil-diesel fuel mixture with diesel fuel in a direct injection diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altun, Sehmus [Technical Education Faculty, Automotive Division, Batman University, Batman (Turkey); Bulut, Huesamettin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osmanbey Campus, Harran University, 63100 Sanliurfa (Turkey); Oener, Cengiz [Technical Education Faculty, Automotive Division, Firat University, Elazig (Turkey)

    2008-08-15

    The use of vegetable oils as a fuel in diesel engines causes some problems due to their high viscosity compared with conventional diesel fuel. Various techniques and methods are used to solve the problems resulting from high viscosity. One of these techniques is fuel blending. In this study, a blend of 50% sesame oil and 50% diesel fuel was used as an alternative fuel in a direct injection diesel engine. Engine performance and exhaust emissions were investigated and compared with the ordinary diesel fuel in a diesel engine. The experimental results show that the engine power and torque of the mixture of sesame oil-diesel fuel are close to the values obtained from diesel fuel and the amounts of exhaust emissions are lower than those of diesel fuel. Hence, it is seen that blend of sesame oil and diesel fuel can be used as an alternative fuel successfully in a diesel engine without any modification and also it is an environmental friendly fuel in terms of emission parameters. (author)

  14. Investigation of the photovoltaic cell/ thermoelectric element hybrid system performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotfas, D. T.; Cotfas, P. A.; Machidon, O. M.; Ciobanu, D.

    2016-06-01

    The PV/TEG hybrid system, consisting of the photovoltaic cells and thermoelectric element, is presented in the paper. The dependence of the PV/TEG hybrid system parameters on the illumination levels and the temperature is analysed. The maxim power values of the photovoltaic cell, of the thermoelectric element and of the PV/TEG system are calculated and a comparison between them is presented and analysed. An economic analysis is also presented.

  15. Prediction and optimization of fuel cell performance using a multi-objective genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Marques Hobold, Ramesh K. Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The attention that is currently being given to the emission of pollutant gases in the atmosphere has made the fuel cell (FC, an energy conversion device that cleanly converts chemical energy into electrical energy, a good alternative to other technologies that still use carbon-based fuels. The temperature plays an important role on the efficiency of an FC as it influences directly the humidity of the membrane, the reversible thermodynamic potential and the partial pressure of water; therefore the thermal control of the fuel cell is the focus of this paper. We present models for both high and low temperature fuel cells based on the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC and the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. A thermodynamic analysis is performed on the cells and the methods of controlling their temperature are discussed. The cell parameters are optimized for both high and low temperatures using a Java-based multi-objective genetic algorithm, which makes use of the logic of the biological theory of evolution to classify individual parameters based on a fitness function in order to maximize the power of the fuel cell. Applications to high and low temperature fuel cells are discussed.

  16. Characterization and fuel cell performance analysis of polyvinylalcohol-mordenite mixed-matrix membranes for direct methanol fuel cell use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uctug, Fehmi Goerkem, E-mail: gorkem.uctug@bahcesehir.edu.t [University of Manchester, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Holmes, Stuart M. [University of Manchester, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > We investigated the availability of PVA-mordenite membranes for DMFC use. > We measured the methanol permeability of PVA-mordenite membranes via pervaporation. > We did the fuel cell testing of these membranes, which had not been done before. > We showed that PVA-mordenite membranes have poorer DMFC performance than Nafion. > Membrane performance can be improved by increasing the proton conductivity of PVA. - Abstract: Polyvinylalcohol-mordenite (PVA-MOR) mixed matrix membranes were synthesized for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) use. For the structural and the morphological characterization, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis methods were used. Zeolite distribution within the polymer matrix was found to be homogeneous. An impedance spectroscope was used to measure the proton conductivity. In order to obtain information about methanol permeation characteristics, swelling tests and a series of pervaporation experiments were carried out. 60-40 wt% PVA-MOR membranes were found to give the optimum transport properties. Proton conductivity of these membranes was found to be slightly lower than that of Nafion117{sup TM} whereas their methanol permeability was at least two orders of magnitude lower than Nafion117{sup TM}. DMFC performance of the PVA-MOR membranes was also measured. The inferior DMFC performance of PVA-MOR membranes was linked to drying in the fuel cell medium and the consequent proton conductivity loss. Their performance was improved by adding a dilute solution of sulfuric acid into the feed methanol solution. Future studies on the improvement of the proton conductivity of PVA-MOR membranes, especially via sulfonation of the polymer matrix, can overcome the low-performance problem associated with insufficient proton conductivity.

  17. Development of Nano-Sulfide Sorbent for Efficient Removal of Elemental Mercury from Coal Combustion Fuel Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailong; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Jun; Li, Liqing; Shih, Kaimin

    2016-09-06

    The surface area of zinc sulfide (ZnS) was successfully enlarged using nanostructure particles synthesized by a liquid-phase precipitation method. The ZnS with the highest surface area (named Nano-ZnS) of 196.1 m(2)·g(-1) was then used to remove gas-phase elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from simulated coal combustion fuel gas at relatively high temperatures (140 to 260 °C). The Nano-ZnS exhibited far greater Hg(0) adsorption capacity than the conventional bulk ZnS sorbent due to the abundance of surface sulfur sites, which have a high binding affinity for Hg(0). Hg(0) was first physically adsorbed on the sorbent surface and then reacted with the adjacent surface sulfur to form the most stable mercury compound, HgS, which was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and a temperature-programmed desorption test. At the optimal temperature of 180 °C, the equilibrium Hg(0) adsorption capacity of the Nano-ZnS (inlet Hg(0) concentration of 65.0 μg·m(-3)) was greater than 497.84 μg·g(-1). Compared with several commercial activated carbons used exclusively for gas-phase mercury removal, the Nano-ZnS was superior in both Hg(0) adsorption capacity and adsorption rate. With this excellent Hg(0) removal performance, noncarbon Nano-ZnS may prove to be an advantageous alternative to activated carbon for Hg(0) removal in power plants equipped with particulate matter control devices, while also offering a means of reusing fly ash as a valuable resource, for example as a concrete additive.

  18. Partitioning behavior of trace elements during pilot-scale combustion of pulverized coal and coal-water slurry fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodelman; Pisupati; Miller; Scaroni

    2000-05-29

    Release pathways for inorganic hazardous air pollutants (IHAPs) from a pilot-scale, down-fired combustor (DFC) when firing pulverized coal (PC) and coal-water slurry fuel (CWSF) were identified and quantified to demonstrate the effect of fuel form on IHAP partitioning, enrichment and emissions. The baghouse capturing efficiency for each element was calculated to determine the effectiveness of IHAP emission control. Most of the IHAPs were enriched in the fly ash and depleted in the bottom ash. Mercury was found to be enriched in the flue gas, and preferentially emitted in the vapor phase. When firing CWSF, more IHAPs were partitioned in the bottom ash than when firing PC. Significant reduction of Hg emissions during CWSF combustion was also observed.

  19. Performance and specific emissions contours throughout the operating range of hydrogen-fueled compression ignition engine with diesel and RME pilot fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Imran

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the performance and emissions contours of a hydrogen dual fueled compression ignition (CI engine with two pilot fuels (diesel and rapeseed methyl ester, and compares the performance and emissions iso-contours of diesel and rapeseed methyl ester (RME single fueling with diesel and RME piloted hydrogen dual fueling throughout the engines operating speed and power range. The collected data have been used to produce iso-contours of thermal efficiency, volumetric efficiency, specific oxides of nitrogen (NOX, specific hydrocarbons (HC and specific carbon dioxide (CO2 on a power-speed plane. The performance and emission maps are experimentally investigated, compared, and critically discussed. Apart from medium loads at lower and medium speeds with diesel piloted hydrogen combustion, dual fueling produced lower thermal efficiency everywhere across the map. For diesel and RME single fueling the maximum specific NOX emissions are centered at the mid speed, mid power region. Hydrogen dual fueling produced higher specific NOX with both pilot fuels as compared to their respective single fueling operations. The range, location and trends of specific NOX varied significantly when compared to single fueling cases. The volumetric efficiency is discussed in detail with the implications of manifold injection of hydrogen analyzed with the conclusions drawn.

  20. Experimental study and comparison of various designs of gas flow fields to PEM fuel cells and cell stack performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong eLiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a significant number of experimental tests to PEM fuel cells were conducted to investigate the effect of gas flow fields on fuel cell performance. Graphite plates with various flow field or flow channel designs, from literature survey and also novel designs by the authors, were used for the PEM fuel cell assembly. The fabricated fuel cells all have an effective membrane area of 23.5 cm2. The results showed that the serpentine flow channel design is still favorable, giving the best single fuel cell performance amongst all the studied flow channel designs. A novel symmetric serpentine flow field was proposed for relatively large size fuel cell application. Four fuel cell stacks each including four cells were assembled using different designs of serpentine flow channels. The output power performances of fuel cell stacks were compared and the novel symmetric serpentine flow field design is recommended for its very good performance.

  1. Experimental test plan: USDOE/JAERI collaborative program for the coated particle fuel performance test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kania, M.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Fukuda, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1989-12-01

    This document describes the coated-particle fuel performance test agreed to under Annex 2 of the arrangement between the US Department of Energy and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute on cooperation in research and development regarding high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The test will evaluate the behavior of reference fuel compacts containing coated-particle fuels fabricated according to the specifications for the US Modular HTGR and the Japanese High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) concepts. Two experimental capsules, HRB-21 and HRB-22, are being tested. Capsule HRB-21 contains only US reference fuel, and HRB-22 contains only JAERI reference fuel. Both capsules will be irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Capsule HRB-21 will be operated at a mean volumetric fuel temperature of 975{degrees}C and will achieve a peak fissile burnup of 26% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) and a fast fluence of {le}4.5 {times} 10{sup 25} neutrons/m{sup 2}. Capsule HRB-22 will be operated at a mean centerline fuel temperature of 1250 to 1300{degrees}C and will achieve a peak fissile burnup of 5.5% FIMA and a fast fluence of 1.7 {times} 10{sup 25} neutrons/m{sup 2}. Performance of the fuels during irradiation will be closely monitored using on-line fission gas surveillance. Following irradiation, both capsules will undergo detailed examinations and core heatup simulation testing. Results from in-reactor monitoring and postirradiation testing will be analyzed to comparatively assess US and Japanese coated-particle fuel performance. 3 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. In-Field Performance Testing of the Fork Detector for Quantitative Spent Fuel Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, Ian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Jianwei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); De Baere, P. [European Commission (Luxembourg). DG Energy, Directorate Nuclear Safeguards; Vaccaro, S. [European Commission (Luxembourg). DG Energy, Directorate Nuclear Safeguards; Schwalbach, P. [European Commission (Luxembourg). DG Energy, Directorate Nuclear Safeguards; Liljenfeldt, Henrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (Sweden); Tobin, Stephen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Expanding spent fuel dry storage activities worldwide are increasing demands on safeguards authorities that perform inspections. The European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) require measurements to verify declarations when spent fuel is transferred to difficult-to-access locations, such as dry storage casks and the repositories planned in Finland and Sweden. EURATOM makes routine use of the Fork detector to obtain gross gamma and total neutron measurements during spent fuel inspections. Data analysis is performed by modules in the integrated Review and Analysis Program (iRAP) software, developed jointly by EURATOM and the IAEA. Under the framework of the US Department of Energy–EURATOM cooperation agreement, a module for automated Fork detector data analysis has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the ORIGEN code from the SCALE code system and implemented in iRAP. EURATOM and ORNL recently performed measurements on 30 spent fuel assemblies at the Swedish Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), operated by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). The measured assemblies represent a broad range of fuel characteristics. Neutron count rates for 15 measured pressurized water reactor assemblies are predicted with an average relative standard deviation of 4.6%, and gamma signals are predicted on average within 2.6% of the measurement. The 15 measured boiling water reactor assemblies exhibit slightly larger deviations of 5.2% for the gamma signals and 5.7% for the neutron count rates, compared to measurements. These findings suggest that with improved analysis of the measurement data, existing instruments can provide increased verification of operator declarations of the spent fuel and thereby also provide greater ability to confirm integrity of an assembly. These results support the application of the Fork detector as a fully quantitative spent fuel

  3. Final Technical Report, Oct 2004 - Nov. 2006, High Performance Flexible Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Jie; Minh, Nguyen

    2007-02-21

    This report summarizes the work performed for the program entitled “High Performance Flexible Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell” under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-04GO14351 for the U. S. Department of Energy. The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate a single modular stack that generates electricity from a variety of fuels (hydrogen and other fuels such as biomass, distributed natural gas, etc.) and when operated in the reverse mode, produces hydrogen from steam. This project has evaluated and selected baseline cell materials, developed a set of materials for oxygen and hydrogen electrodes, and optimized electrode microstructures for reversible solid oxide fuel cells (RSOFCs); and demonstrated the feasibility and operation of a RSOFC multi-cell stack. A 10-cell reversible SOFC stack was operated over 1000 hours alternating between fuel cell (with hydrogen and methane as fuel) and steam electrolysis modes. The stack ran very successfully with high power density of 480 mW/cm2 at 0.7V and 80% fuel utilization in fuel cell mode and >6 SLPM hydrogen production in steam electrolysis mode using about 1.1 kW electrical power. The hydrogen generation is equivalent to a specific capability of 2.59 Nm3/m2 with electrical energy demand of 3 kWh/Nm3. The performance stability in electrolysis mode was improved vastly during the program with a degradation rate reduction from 8000 to 200 mohm-cm2/1000 hrs. This was accomplished by increasing the activity and improving microstructure of the oxygen electrode. Both cost estimate and technology assessment were conducted. Besides the flexibility running under both fuel cell mode and electrolysis mode, the reversible SOFC system has the potentials for low cost and high efficient hydrogen production through steam electrolysis. The cost for hydrogen production at large scale was estimated at ~$2.7/kg H2, comparing favorably with other electrolysis techology.

  4. Standalone BISON Fuel Performance Results for Watts Bar Unit 1, Cycles 1-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarno, Kevin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pawlowski, Roger [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stimpson, Shane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-07

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is moving forward with more complex multiphysics simulations and increased focus on incorporating fuel performance analysis methods. The coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics capabilities within the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator (VERA-CS) have become relatively stable, and major advances have been made in analysis efforts, including the simulation of twelve cycles of Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 1 (WBN1) operation. While this is a major achievement, the VERA-CS approaches for treating fuel pin heat transfer have well-known limitations that could be eliminated through better integration with the BISON fuel performance code. Several approaches are being implemented to consider fuel performance, including a more direct multiway coupling with Tiamat, as well as a more loosely coupled one-way approach with standalone BISON cases. Fuel performance typically undergoes an independent analysis using a standalone fuel performance code with manually specified input defined from an independent core simulator solution or set of assumptions. This report summarizes the improvements made since the initial milestone to execute BISON from VERA-CS output. Many of these improvements were prompted through tighter collaboration with the BISON development team at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A brief description of WBN1 and some of the VERA-CS data used to simulate it are presented. Data from a small mesh sensitivity study are shown, which helps justify the mesh parameters used in this work. The multi-cycle results are presented, followed by the results for the first three cycles of WBN1 operation, particularly the parameters of interest to pellet-clad interaction (PCI) screening (fuel-clad gap closure, maximum centerline fuel temperature, maximum/minimum clad hoop stress, and cumulative damage index). Once the mechanics of this capability are functioning, future work will target cycles with

  5. Comparison of performance of biodiesels of mahua oil and gingili oil in dual fuel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadar Kapilan N.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an experimental work was carried out to compare the performance of biodiesels made from non edible mahua oil and edible gingili oil in dual fuel engine. A single cylinder diesel engine was modified to work in dual fuel mode and liquefied petroleum gas was used as primary fuel. Biodiesel was prepared by transesterification process and mahua oil methyl ester (MOME and gingili oil methyl ester (GOME were used as pilot fuels. The viscosity of MOME is slightly higher than GOME. The dual fuel engine runs smoothly with MOME and GOME. The test results show that the performance of the MOME is close to GOME, at the pilot fuel quantity of 0.45 kg/h and at the advanced injection timing of 30 deg bTDC. Also it is observed that the smoke, carbon monoxide and unburnt hydro carbon emissions of GOME lower than the MOME. But the GOME results in slightly higher NOx emissions. From the experimental results it is concluded that the biodiesel made from mahua oil can be used as a substitute for diesel in dual fuel engine.

  6. EFFECT OF INJECTION PRESSURE ON PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS OF CNG DIESEL DUAL FUEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.NAGESWARA RAO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A single-cylinder diesel engine has been converted into a dual-fuel engine to operate with natural gas together with a pilot injection of diesel fuel used to ignite the CNG–air charge. The CNG was inducted into the combustion chamber via intake manifold. The engine, operating in dual-fuel mode, has been tested on a wide range of operating conditions spanning different values of engine load at constant speed at different injector opening pressures for the pilot fuel (diesel. For all the tested operating conditions, the effect of CNG and diesel fuel injection pressure, together with the amount of fuel injected during the pilot injection, were analyzed on the engine performance, in terms of brake thermal efficiency and emission levels. An experimental investigation was carried out to find out the effect of injection pressure on performance and emissions of a diesel engine operated with CNG inducted into the engine. Behavior of the dual fuel engine at 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% substitution of CNG with respect to diesel was examined and compared them at different injection pressures

  7. Theoretical performance of hydrogen-bromine rechargeable SPE fuel cell. [Solid Polymer Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinell, R. F.; Fritts, S. D.

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model was formulated to describe the performance of a hydrogen-bromine fuel cell. Porous electrode theory was applied to the carbon felt flow-by electrode and was coupled to theory describing the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) system. Parametric studies using the numerical solution to this model were performed to determine the effect of kinetic, mass transfer, and design parameters on the performance of the fuel cell. The results indicate that the cell performance is most sensitive to the transport properties of the SPE membrane. The model was also shown to be a useful tool for scale-up studies.

  8. Theoretical performance of hydrogen-bromine rechargeable SPE fuel cell. [Solid Polymer Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinell, R. F.; Fritts, S. D.