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Sample records for fuel burnable absorber

  1. Burnable absorber coated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubb, W.; Radford, K.C.; Parks, B.H.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear fuel body which is at least partially covered by a burnable neutron absorber layer is provided with a hydrophobic overcoat generally covering the burnable absorber layer and bonded directly to it. In a method for providing a UO 2 fuel pellet with a zirconium diboride burnable poison layer, the fuel body is provided with an intermediate niobium layer. (author)

  2. Fuel with burnable absorber for RBMK-1500

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivosein, G.

    2002-01-01

    Following the accident at the Chernobyl Unit 4, the priority measures to improve RBMK's safety were developed. Under this program, the measures to reduce the void reactivity coefficient were executed on the stage-by-stage terms: As a result of these measures, the void reactivity coefficient was reduced below +1.0β. But there was decrease in fuel burnup to 14.0/14.5 MW.d/kg (design value ∼21/22 MW.d/kg). High power level of a fresh fuel assembly did not allow to employ fuel with higher enrichment without any compensatory measures. The different types of burnable absorbers were considered to be used. From the results of the anticipated calculations, it was specified that the most efficient power neutron flax flattening between fuel channels could be achieved when erbium was used. Ignalina NPP has used 2.4 % enriched fuel assemblies with burnable absorber since 1995. The fuel burnup has been increased by 60 %. The obtained experimental results are analyzed. (author)

  3. PWR burnable absorber evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciapouti, R.J.; Weader, R.J.; Malone, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relative neurotic efficiency and fuel cycle cost benefits of PWR burnable absorbers. Establishment of reference low-leakage equilibrium in-core fuel management plans for 12-, 18- and 24-month cycles. Review of the fuel management impact of the integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA), erbium and gadolinium. Calculation of the U 3 O 8 , UF 6 , SWU, fuel fabrication, and burnable absorber requirements for the defined fuel management plans. Estimation of fuel cycle costs of each fuel management plan at spot market and long-term market fuel prices. Estimation of the comparative savings of the different burnable absorbers in dollar equivalent per kgU of fabricated fuel. (author)

  4. Benchmark solution of contemporary PWR integral fuel burnable absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stucker, D.L.; Hone, M.J.; Holland, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a closely controlled benchmark solution of the two major contemporary pressurized water reactor integral burnable absorber designs: zirconium diboride (ZrB 2 ) and gadolinia (Gd 2 O 3 ). The comparison is accomplished using self-generating equilibrium cycles with equal energy, equal discharge burnup, and equal safety constraints. The reference plant for this evaluation is a 3411-MW(thermal) Westinghouse four-loop nuclear steam supply system operating with an inlet temperature of 285.9 degrees C, a core coolant mass now rate of 16877.3 kg/s, and coolant pressure of 15.5 MPa. The reactor consists of 193 VANTAGE 5H fuel assemblies that are discharged at a region average burnup of 48.4 GWd/tonne U. Each fuel assembly contains a natural uranium axial blanket 15.24 cm long at the top and the bottom of the fuel rod. The burnable absorber rods are symmetrically radially dispersed within the fuel assembly such that intrabundle power peaking is minimized. The burnable absorber material for both ZrB 2 and Gd 2 O 3 is axially zoned to the central 304.8 cm of the absorber-bearing fuel rods. The fuel management was constrained such that the thermal and safety limitations of F δH q -5 /degrees C were simultaneously achieved. The maximum long-term operating soluble boron concentration was also limited to 446 effective full-power days (EFPDs) including 14 EFPDs of power coastdown were assumed

  5. ASSESSMENT OF BURNABLE ABSORBER FUEL DESIGN BY UWB1 DEPLETION CODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lovecky

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available UWB1 depletion code is being developed as a fast computational tool for the study of burnable absorbers in University of West Bohemia in Pilsen, Czech Republic. Research of fuel depletion aims at development and introduction of advanced types of burnable absorbers in nuclear fuel. Burnable absorbers compensate for the initial excess reactivity and consequently allow for lower power peaking factors and longer fuel cycles with higher fuel enrichments. The paper describes the depletion calculations of CANDU, PWR and SFR nuclear fuel doped with rare earth oxides as burnable absorber. Uniform distribution of burnable absorber in the fuel is assumed. Based on performed depletion calculations, rare earth oxides are divided into two groups, suitable burnable absorbers and poisoning absorbers. Moreover, basic economic comparison is performed based on actual stock prices.

  6. Fuel cycle cost evaluation to burnable absorber and feed assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, S. M.; Lee, D. J.; Choi, H.

    1999-01-01

    The comparative analysis of fuel cycle cost for 16 equilibrium cores was performed to evaluate the fuel cycle cost depending on the combination of four different types of burnable absorbers (BAs) and feed assemblies for 18 month cycle operation of Westinghouse type 3-loop plant using 17*17 Vantage 5H fuel. The BAs considered are IFBA, Gadolinia, Erbia, and WABA and four cases of number of feed assemblies are 56, 60, 64, and 68. The optimal and practical combination of BA and number of feed assemblies is proposed. The optimum equilibrium core loading patterns for 16 cases were generated by using self-generating method and core design characteristics and the fuel cycle cost were evaluated for each loading pattern. The cycle lengths for all the cases were fixed as 480 EPFD to exclude effect of capital cost. Uranium ore cost, conversion cost, enrichment cost, fabrication cost, and back-end cycle cost were considered to evaluate fuel cycle cost. When considering the front-end cycle cost only, with the assumption of 8% discount rate, the 60 feed assemblies with using WABA case shows best result from the economic viewpoint. But the cost differences among the cases of using WABA, IFBA, and Gadolinia were negligible. And it was founded that the major factor for fuel cycle cost is BA price. In view of the core design characteristics, IFBA and Erbia were found to be more flexible than WABA and Gadolinia

  7. Fuel cycle cost evaluation to burnable absorber and feed assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sung Man; Kim, Yun Ho; Shin, Ho Chul

    2001-01-01

    The comparative analysis of fuel cycle cost for 16 equilibrium cores was performed to evaluate the fuel cycle cost depending on the combination of four different types of burnable absorbers (BAs) and feed assemblies for 18 month cycle operation of Westinghouse type 3-loop plant using 17X17 Vantage 5H fuel. The BAs considered are IFBA, Gadolinia, Erbia, and W ABA and four cases of number of feed assemblies are 56, 00, 64, and 68. The optimal and practical combination of BA and number of feed assemblies is proposed. The optimum equilibrium core loading patterns for 16 cases were generated by using self-generating method and core design characteristics and the fuel cycle cost were evaluated for each loading pattern. The cycle lengths for all the cases were fixed as 480 EPFD to exclude effect of capital cost. Uranium ore cost, conversion cost, enrichment cost, fabrication cost, and back-end cycle cost were considered to evaluate fuel cycle cost. When considering the front-end cycle cost only, with the assumption of 8% discount rate, the 60 feed assemblies with using WABA case shows best result from the economic viewpoint. But the cost differences among the cases of using WABA, IFBA, and Gadolinia were negligible. And it was founded that the major factor for fuel cycle cost is BA price. In view of the core design characteristics, IFBA and Erbia were found to be more flexible than WABA and Gadolinia

  8. A model for fuel shuffling and burnable absorbers optimization in low leakage PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaljevski, N.

    1990-01-01

    A nonlinear model for the simultaneous optimization of fuel shuffling and burnable absorbers in PWRs is formulated using the depletion perturbation theory. The sensitivity coefficients are defined in a new way, using a macroscopic burnup model coupled with the explicit burnable absorbers depletion equation. Since first-order perturbation theory is limited to small changes in burnable absorber concentration, the associated control variable is continuous, with a constraint on maximal increment. Fuel shuffling is described by Boolean variables. Thus a special case of a mixed-integer quadratic programming problem is obtained, since the interaction of fuel and absorber optimization is considered. (author)

  9. Nuclear Analysis for Application of Boron Burnable Absorber in the HANARO Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chul Gyo; Choi, Wonwoo; Chae, Hee-Taek [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Keun Ho [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Development of the HANARO fuel element with burnable absorber was started in the U-Mo fuel development program at HANARO, and the first full core analysis was performed last year. In the analysis, cadmium in the form of CdO was considered as the most promising burnable absorber for the current HANARO element. The U-Mo fuel with CdO was successfully irradiated at the HANARO core, but it was found that the thermodynamic stability of CdO is questionable under the higher temperature condition than the current manufacturing environment. Prior to application of CdO, further studies are required. Traditionally, boron has been used as burnable absorber at the high performance research reactors such as ATR, FRM-II, etc. The power density of HANARO is lower than those reactors, and the residual reactivity effect by boron is not negligible in the core. Basic nuclear analysis for application of boron burnable absorber in the HANARO fuel assembly was performed for getting a better fuel element. The residual reactivity effect can be overcome with replacing the reduced fuel rods into the standard rods. This new fuel design provides lower reactivity swing and lower power peaking. To minimize the residual reactivity effect, a concept of heterogeneous burnable poison within the rod is introduced. The heterogeneous cases give us better results and there is an optimum boundary for the burnable absorber region. This neutronics study was limited to the boron burnable absorber in the current silicide HANARO fuel, other studies including manufacturing study are desirable for application of burnable absorber.

  10. Preliminary Nuclear Analysis for the HANARO Fuel Element with Burnable Absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chul Gyo; Kim, So Young; In, Won Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Burnable absorber is used for reducing reactivity swing and power peaking in high performance research reactors. Development of the HANARO fuel element with burnable absorber was started in the U-Mo fuel development program at HANARO, but detailed full core analysis was not performed because the current HANARO fuel management system is uncertain to analysis the HANARO core with burnable absorber. A sophisticated reactor physics system is required to analysis the core. The McCARD code was selected and the detailed McCARD core models, in which the basic HANARO core model was developed by one of the McCARD developers, are used in this study. The development of nuclear fuel requires a long time and correct developing direction especially by the nuclear analysis. This paper presents a preliminary nuclear analysis to promote the fuel development. Based on the developed fuel, the further nuclear analysis will improve reactor performance and safety. Basic nuclear analysis for the HANARO and the AHR were performed for getting the proper fuel elements with burnable absorber. Addition of 0.3 - 0.4% Cd to the fuel meat is promising for the current HANARO fuel element. Small addition of burnable absorber may not change any fuel characteristics of the HANARO fuel element, but various basic tests and irradiation tests at the HANARO core are required.

  11. Nuclear reactor core having nuclear fuel and composite burnable absorber arranged for power peaking and moderator temperature coefficient control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapil, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor core. It comprises a first group of fuel rods containing fissionable material and being free of burnable absorber material; and a second group of fuel rods containing fissionable material and first and second burnable absorber material; the first burnable absorber material being a boron-bearing material which does not contain erbium and the second burnable absorber material being an erbium material; the first and second burnable absorber materials being in the form of an outer coating on the fissionable material, the outer coating being composed of an inner layer of one of the boron-bearing material which does not contain erbium and the erbium material and an outer layer of the other of the boron-bearing material which does not contain erbium and the erbium material

  12. Spectral calculations of WWER-440 fuel assemblies with Gd burnable absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikolas, P.

    2000-01-01

    Paper describes some analyses of WWER-440 FA with Gd burnable absorber (Gd 2 O 3 ). Analyses consist in comparison of FA with and without Gd absorber incl. variants with different Gd absorbers and a methodology of fuel assemblies burnup calculation with the aim of finding of an optimal variant of such a fuel assemblies and a methodology of its calculation. A benchmark burnup comparison of FA with Gd as a continuation of benchmark for FA burnup comparison from 1966 is also proposed. (Authors)

  13. Monte Carlo Depletion Analysis of a PWR Integral Fuel Burnable Absorber by MCNAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, H. J.; Jang, C. S.; Kim, C. H.

    The MCNAP is a personal computer-based continuous energy Monte Carlo (MC) neutronics analysis program written on C++ language. For the purpose of examining its qualification, a comparison of the depletion analysis of three integral burnable fuel assemblies of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) by the MCNAP and deterministic fuel assembly (FA) design vendor codes is presented. It is demonstrated that the continuous energy MC calculation by the MCNAP can provide a very accurate neutronics analysis method for the burnable absorber FA's. It is also demonstrated that the parallel MC computation by adoption of multiple PC's enables one to complete the lifetime depletion analysis of the FA's within the order of hours instead of order of days otherwise.

  14. Burnable neutron absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, K.C.; Carlson, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    This patent deals with the fabrication of pellets for neutron absorber rods. Such a pellet includes a matrix of a refractory material which may be aluminum or zirconium oxide, and a burnable poison distributed throughout the matrix. The neutron absorber material may consist of one or more elements or compounds of the metals boron, gadolinium, samarium, cadmium, europium, hafnium, dysprosium and indium. The method of fabricating pellets of these materials outlined in this patent is designed to produce pores or voids in the pellets that can be used to take up the expansion of the burnable poison and to absorb the helium gas generated. In the practice of this invention a slurry of Al 2 O 3 is produced. A hard binder is added and the slurry and binder are spray dried. This powder is mixed with dry B 4 C powder, forming a homogeneous mixture. This mixture is pressed into green tubes which are then sintered. During sintering the binder volatilizes leaving a ceramic with nearly spherical high-density regions of

  15. Burnable Absorber-Filled Annular UO{sub 2} Fuels for PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahya, Mohd-Syukri; Kim, Yonghee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, ChangKyu [KEPCO EnC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Its central annulus hole also provides an additional plenum for the fission gas release. In fact, annular UO{sub 2} fuels have successfully been used in commercial Russian's nuclear reactors for decades. It was upon this notion that a study was recently performed to re-investigate neutronic characteristics of the annular fuel in a rod-cell lattice. The said study also proposed an innovative integral burnable absorber (BA) concept by loading of a porous BA rod inside central hole of the annular fuel. This current work aims to extend the said investigation by characterizing neutronic performances of the BA-filled annular fuels in standard PWR 17x17 and 16x16 fuel assembly lattices. Preliminary results suggested promising potentials of the novel BA concept in managing the assembly lattice reactivity and power peaking. All calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo Serpent code with ENDF/B7.0 library. This paper demonstrates neutronic feasibilities of the BA-filled annular fuels in standard PWR 17x17 and 16x16 fuel assembly lattices. One notes that the BA-filled annular fuel-loaded lattice display comparable neutronic characteristics to the benchmarked commercial BA designs, especially in terms of reactivity and peaking factor management.

  16. Burnable neutron absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, K.C.; Carlson, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides ceramic processing including sintering schedules which produce annular pellets containing burnable poisons for use in reactor control rods. Typically the powder includes Al 2 O 3 and from 1 to 50 weight percent B 4 C. The Al 2 O 3 and B 4 C, appropriately sized, are milled in a ball mill with liquid to produce a slurry. The slurry is spray dried to produce small spheres of the mixed powder, which is mixed with adequate organic binder and plasticizer and formed into a hollow green body having the shape of a tube. The green body is sintered to produce a ceramic tube from which the pellets are cut. The tube is sintered to size so that the pellets have the required dimensions. It is an important feature of this invention that the powder is formed into the green body by applying isostatic pressure to the powder

  17. Burnable absorber-integrated Guide Thimble (BigT) - 1. Design concepts and neutronic characterization on the fuel assembly benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahya, Mohd-Syukri; Yu, Hwanyeal; Kim, Yonghee

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual designs of a new burnable absorber (BA) for the pressurized water reactor (PWR), which is named 'Burnable absorber-integrated Guide Thimble' (BigT). The BigT integrates BA materials into standard guide thimble in a PWR fuel assembly. Neutronic sensitivities and practical design considerations of the BigT concept are points of highlight in the first half of the paper. Specifically, the BigT concepts are characterized in view of its BA material and spatial self-shielding variations. In addition, the BigT replaceability requirement, bottom-end design specifications and thermal-hydraulic considerations are also deliberated. Meanwhile, much of the second half of the paper is devoted to demonstrate practical viability of the BigT absorbers via comparative evaluations against the conventional BA technologies in representative 17x17 and 16x16 fuel assembly lattices. For the 17x17 lattice evaluations, all three BigT variants are benchmarked against Westinghouse's existing BA technologies, while in the 16x16 assembly analyses, the BigT designs are compared against traditional integral gadolinia-urania rod design. All analyses clearly show that the BigT absorbers perform as well as the commercial BA technologies in terms of reactivity and power peaking management. In addition, it has been shown that sufficiently high control rod worth can be obtained with the BigT absorbers in place. All neutronic simulations were completed using the Monte Carlo Serpent code with ENDF/B-VII.0 library. (author)

  18. Burnable absorbers in CANDU fuel bundle depletion with U{sub W}B{sub 1} code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovecky, M., E-mail: lovecky@rice.zcu.cz [Univ. of West Bohemia, Pilsen (Czech Republic); Skoda, R., E-mail: radek.skoda@fs.cvut.cz [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic); Hussein, M.; Song, J.; Chan, P., E-mail: mohamed.hussein@rmc.ca, E-mail: jae.song@rmc.ca, E-mail: paul.chan@rmc.ca [Royal Military of College of Canada, Kinston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    U{sub W}B{sub 1} nuclear fuel depletion code is being developed by Lovecky et al to conduct burnable neutron-absorber research for fast and thermal reactor designs. The use of neutron absorber in CANDU to gain operating margin was proposed by Chan et al. The development of U{sub W}B{sub 1} and the use of n-absorbers in CANDU were published in 2014. Research and development are still ongoing. This paper describes the simulation of CANDU fuel bundle depletion. The accuracy and the speed of the code are compared to WIMS, Serpent and MCNP6 reference codes. The results show that U{sub W}B{sub 1} is suitable to be used as a depletion code to study the removal of the initial transient and suppression of the plutonium peaks in CANDU fuel reactivity. U{sub W}B{sub 1} code introduces an advantage in the depletion calculation time. (author)

  19. Absorber management using burnable poisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortensen, L.

    1977-06-01

    An investigation of the problem of optimal control carried out by means of a two-dimensional model of a PWR reactor. A solution is found to the problem, and the possibility of achieving optimal control with burnable poisons such as boron, cadmium and gadolinium is discussed. Further, an attempt is made to solve the control problem of BWR, but no final solution is found. (author)

  20. Fuel elements containing burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamber, K.J.; Eaton, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    A burnable poison such as gadolinia is introduced into a nuclear fuel pin by way of thermal insulating pellets which serve to protect end caps from exposure to the intense heat generated by the fuel during irradiation. The pellets may comprise a sintered mixture of aluminia and gadolinia. (author)

  1. Experience in the use of low concentration gadolinia as a PWR fuel burnable absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mildrum, C.M.; Segovia, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    A description is provided of the low concentration gad design being used in the Spanish 3-loop 17 x 17 fueled PWR's. This design uses a relatively small number of high concentration gadolinia fuel rods (6 and 8 w/o Gd2O3) with a large number of low concentration gad rods (2 w/o Gd2O3). The 2 w/o gad rods substitute, in part, the high concentration gad rods, thereby helping reduce the end of cycle reactivity penalty from the residual absorption in the gadolinium. The low concentration gad design is advantageous for long cycles (more than 18 months) and plant up-rating scenarios in that the soluble boron concentration increases that would otherwise result for these situations are avoided. These boron concentration increases could have potentially adverse effects on the plant, since the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) is made less negative, the effectiveness of the boron shutdown safety systems is reduced, and the safety margins are eroded for some accidents, such as for boron dilution events. This paper also reviews the APA nuclear design code system performance for the low concentration gad design. (author)

  2. Selection and evaluation of potential burnable absorbers incorporated into modified TRISO particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, J., E-mail: jwashing@mines.edu; King, J., E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu; Shayer, Z., E-mail: zshayer@mines.edu

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We evaluate possible burnable absorbers for modified TRISO fuels. • We model modified TRISO particle performance in MCNPX. • Modified particles decrease reactivity swing and increase reactor lifetime. • Modified particles generally result in negative thermal feedback. - Abstract: The quadruple isotropic (QUADRISO) particle concept modifies tri-structural-isotropic (TRISO) particles to add a layer of burnable absorber next to the fuel kernel. Previous studies have evaluated QUADRISO fuel particle designs for the transmutation of neptunium and plutonium, as a modification to the plutonium–thorium fuel cycle, and for excess reactivity management. This study screens the available nuclear isotope database to identify potential burnable absorbers for incorporation into modified TRISO fuel particles in a representative Very High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Based on this screening, eleven potential burnable absorbers are tested as QUADRISO burnable absorber layers, in either oxide or carbide forms. The addition of a burnable absorber layer to the TRISO fuel resulted in an increase in reactor operational lifetime in all cases considered in the present work when compared to a reactor with the same excess reactivity without burnable absorbers. The B{sub 4}C, CdO and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} cases resulted in the greatest operational lifetime, for the same initial excess reactivity, and the addition of these burnable absorbers to TRISO fuel particles decreased the magnitude of the excess reactivity change over the reactor lifetime when compared to the unmodified TRISO case. Thermal cross-section effects in QUADRISO particles generally result in excess reactivity decreasing with increasing temperature.

  3. The use of MOX caramel fuel mixed with241Am,242mAm and243Am as burnable absorber actinides for the MTR research reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Ismail; Albarhoum, Mohamad

    2017-07-01

    The MOX (UO 2 &PuO 2 ) caramel fuel mixed with 241 Am, 242m Am and 243 Am as burnable absorber actinides was proposed as a fuel of the MTR-22MW reactor. The MCNP4C code was used to simulate the MTR-22MW reactor and estimate the criticality and the neutronic parameters, and the power peaking factors before and after replacing its original fuel (U 3 O 8 -Al) by the MOX caramel fuel mixed with 241 Am, 242m Am and 243 Am actinides. The obtained results of the criticality, the neutronic parameters, and the power peaking factors for the MOX caramel fuel mixed with 241 Am, 242m Am and 243 Am actinides were compared with the same parameters of the U 3 O 8 -Al original fuel and a maximum difference is -6.18% was found. Additionally, by recycling 2.65% and 2.71% plutonium and 241 Am, 242m Am and 243 Am actinides in the MTR-22MW reactor, the level of 235 U enrichment is reduced from 4.48% to 3% and 2.8%, respectively. This also results in the reduction of the 235 U loading by 32.75% and 37.22% for the 2.65%, the 2.71% plutonium and 241 Am, 242m Am and 243 Am actinides, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Conceptual design of quadriso particles with europium burnable absorber in HTRS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-05-18

    In High Temperature Reactors, burnable absorbers are utilized to manage the excess reactivity at the early stage of the fuel cycle. In this study QUADRISO particles are proposed to manage the initial xcess reactivity of High Temperature Reactors. The QUADRISO concept synergistically couples the decrease of the burnable poison with the decrease of the fissile materials at the fuel particle level. This echanism is set up by introducing a burnable poison layer around the fuel kernel in ordinary TRISO particles or by mixing the burnable poison with any of the TRISO coated layers. At the beginning of life, the nitial excess reactivity is small because some neutrons are absorbed in the burnable poison and they are prevented from entering the fuel kernel. At the end of life, when the absorber is almost depleted, ore eutrons stream into the fuel kernel of QUADRISO particles causing fission reactions. The mechanism has been applied to a prismatic High Temperature Reactor with europium or erbium burnable absorbers, showing a significant reduction in the initial excess reactivity of the core.

  5. Evaluation of the presence of a burnable absorber in an assembly 3x3 type PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez F, M. A.; Del Valle G, E.; Alonso V, G.

    2008-01-01

    In the present work the effect is evaluated that causes the presence of a burnable absorber in an adjustment of rods of 3x3 of a fuel assembly type PWR using CASMO-4 code, when comparing the infinite multiplication factor and some average cross sections by means of codes MCNP-4A, CASMO-3 and HELIOS. For this evaluation two cases are evaluated: first consists of an adjustment of rods of 3x3 full completely of fuel and the second consists of a central rod full with a burnable absorber type wet annular burnable absorber (WABA) and the remaining full fuel rods. In both cases the enrichment of the fissile isotopes is varied, for two types of fuel, MOX degree armament and UO 2 . (Author)

  6. Gripper assembly for inserting and removing burnable absorber rods and thimble plugs in a nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuschke, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes combination with elongated members, each elongated member having a releasable latching structure disposed at one end thereof, each latching structure having at least one latching member adapted to be movable between a latched position in which the latching member is able to releasably engage the adapter plate of the top nozzle of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly and secure an elongated member in a stationary relationship with respect to the adapter plate, and an unlatched position in which the latching member is able to disengage from the adapter plate so that the elongated member can be removed from the fuel assembly, apparatus for inserting and removing the elongated members from the nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising: a frame; first and second plates disposed within the frame, the second plate disposed below and spaced apart from the first plate, at least one of the first and second plates being capable of vertical movement relative to the other; means for moving the frame toward and away from the fuel assembly; means for moving the first and second plates within the frame toward and away from the adapter plate of the top nozzle of the fuel assembly; means for varying the vertical distance between the first and second plates between a first distance and a decreased second distance; means associated with the first and second plates for maintaining the first and second plates in a position whereby the vertical distance between the plates is the second distance

  7. Safe core management with burnable absorbers in WWERs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this TECDOC is to present state of the art information on burnable poisoned fuel during the CRP. It is based on experimental evidence and on the utilization of theoretical models and will help achieve improvements in safety and economy of LWR cores with hexagonal geometries. 149 refs, figs and tabs

  8. Burnable absorber rod releasable latching structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Wilson, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    An elongated nuclear reactivity control member, a releasable latching structure useful for releasably attaching the control member at an end to a top nozzle adapter plate of a nuclear fuel assembly is described comprising: (a) a mounting body including an inner plug portion attached to the end of the control member and an outer end portion disposed axially outward from the inner plug portion and the end of the member; and (b) a spring latch disposed about the mounting body and being attached to the outer end portion. The spring latch has at least one latch finger extending toward the inner plug portion of the body and is movable toward and away from the body between an outer latching position in which the finger is adapted to engage a fuel assembly top nozzle adapter plate and retain the elongated member in a stationary relationship with respect to the adapter plate and an inner unlatching position in which the finger is adapted to disengage from the adapter plate and allow removal of the member from the adapter plate

  9. Report on the evaluation of the tritium producing burnable absorber rod lead test assembly. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the design and fabrication requirements for a tritium-producing burnable absorber rod lead test assembly and evaluates the safety issues associated with tritium-producing burnable absorber rod irradiation on the operation of a commercial light water reactor. The report provides an evaluation of the tritium-producing burnable absorber rod design and concludes that irradiation can be performed within U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations applicable to a commercial pressurized light water reactor

  10. Report on the evaluation of the tritium producing burnable absorber rod lead test assembly. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the design and fabrication requirements for a tritium-producing burnable absorber rod lead test assembly and evaluates the safety issues associated with tritium-producing burnable absorber rod irradiation on the operation of a commercial light water reactor. The report provides an evaluation of the tritium-producing burnable absorber rod design and concludes that irradiation can be performed within U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations applicable to a commercial pressurized light water reactor.

  11. Neutronic analysis of a fuel element with variations in fuel enrichment and burnable poison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Rochkhudson B. de; Martins, Felipe; Velasquez, Carlos E.; Cardoso, Fabiano; Fortini, Angela; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: rochkdefaria@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    In this work, the goal was to evaluate the neutronic behavior during the fuel burnup changing the amount of burnable poison and fuel enrichment. For these analyses, it was used a 17 x 17 PWR fuel element, simulated using the 238 groups library cross-section collapsed from ENDF/BVII.0 and TRITON module of SCALE 6.0 code system. The results confirmed the effective action of the burnable poison in the criticality control, especially at Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) and in the burnup kinetics, because at the end of the fuel cycle there was a minimal residual amount of neutron absorbers ({sup 155}Gd and {sup 157}Gd), as expected. At the end of the cycle, the fuel element was still critical in all simulated situations, indicating the possibility of extending the fuel burn. (author)

  12. New burnable absorber for long-cycle low boron operation of PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Jiwon; Shin, Ho Cheol; Lee, Deokjung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A burnable absorber design for advanced PWRs with a low soluble boron concentration. • The burnable absorber consists of a UO 2 – 157 Gd 2 O 3 rod with a thin layer of Zr 167 Er 2 . • Three verification cases: two kinds of fuel assemblies and an OPR-1000 core. - Abstract: This paper presents a new high performance burnable absorber (BA) design for advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) aiming for a long-cycle operation with a low soluble boron concentration. The new BA consists of a UO 2 – 157 Gd 2 O 3 rod covered with a thin layer of Zr 167 Er 2 . A key feature of this new BA is that enriched isotopes, 157 Gd and 167 Er, are used as absorber materials. Since the high absorption cross section of 157 Gd can reduce the mass fraction of Gd 2 O 3 in UO 2 –Gd 2 O 3 , the thermal margin of fuel rods will increase with higher heat conductivity. Also, the 157 Gd transmutes into 158 Gd by neutron absorption and therefore the residual penalty at the end of cycle (EOC) will decrease. Since 167 Er has a resonance near the thermal neutron energy region, the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) will become more negative and the control rod worth will increase. These advantages of the new BA are demonstrated with three verification cases: a 17 × 17 Westinghouse (WH) type fuel assembly, a 16 × 16 Combustion Engineering (CE) type fuel assembly, and an OPR-1000 equilibrium core.

  13. First results on study of gadolinium as burnable absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbate, Maximo J.; Sbaffoni, Maria M.

    2000-01-01

    Following on with the work included in the 'Burnable absorbers research plan' several experiments were carried out oriented to determine Ga 2 O 3 burn up. Cold tests were performed and samples were irradiated in the RA-3 reactor. In this paper, some calculated values are presented together with their comparisons with experimental ones. The parameters foreseen for performing the experiments were verified and also the predictions on burn up of uranium and gadolinium isotopes concentrations. These results imply that the nuclear data of these isotopes included in the library are satisfactory. Next steps will be to measure other isotopes concentrations, gamma spectrum, and the irradiation of one pellet to determine self shielding effects in order to obtain effective cross sections i.e. for CAREM geometry. (author)

  14. A reduced-boron OPR1000 core based on the BigT burnable absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hwan Yeal; Yahya, Mohd-Syukri; Kim, Yong Hee [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Reducing critical boron concentration in a commercial pressurized water reactor core offers many advantages in view of safety and economics. This paper presents a preliminary investigation of a reduced-boron pressurized water reactor core to achieve a clearly negative moderator temperature coefficient at hot zero power using the newly-proposed 'Burnable absorber-Integrated Guide Thimble' (BigT) absorbers. The reference core is based on a commercial OPR1000 equilibrium configuration. The reduced-boron ORP1000 configuration was determined by simply replacing commercial gadolinia-based burnable absorbers with the optimized BigT-loaded design. The equilibrium cores in this study were directly searched via repetitive Monte Carlo depletion calculations until convergence. The results demonstrate that, with the same fuel management scheme as in the reference core, application of the BigT absorbers can effectively reduce the critical boron concentration at the beginning of cycle by about 65 ppm. More crucially, the analyses indicate promising potential of the reduced-boron OPR1000 core with the BigT absorbers, as its moderator temperature coefficient at the beginning of cycle is clearly more negative and all other vital neutronic parameters are within practical safety limits. All simulations were completed using the Monte Carlo Serpent code with the ENDF/B-VII.0 library.

  15. A Reduced-Boron OPR1000 Core Based on the BigT Burnable Absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwanyeal Yu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Reducing critical boron concentration in a commercial pressurized water reactor core offers many advantages in view of safety and economics. This paper presents a preliminary investigation of a reduced-boron pressurized water reactor core to achieve a clearly negative moderator temperature coefficient at hot zero power using the newly-proposed “Burnable absorber-Integrated Guide Thimble” (BigT absorbers. The reference core is based on a commercial OPR1000 equilibrium configuration. The reduced-boron ORP1000 configuration was determined by simply replacing commercial gadolinia-based burnable absorbers with the optimized BigT-loaded design. The equilibrium cores in this study were directly searched via repetitive Monte Carlo depletion calculations until convergence. The results demonstrate that, with the same fuel management scheme as in the reference core, application of the BigT absorbers can effectively reduce the critical boron concentration at the beginning of cycle by about 65 ppm. More crucially, the analyses indicate promising potential of the reduced-boron OPR1000 core with the BigT absorbers, as its moderator temperature coefficient at the beginning of cycle is clearly more negative and all other vital neutronic parameters are within practical safety limits. All simulations were completed using the Monte Carlo Serpent code with the ENDF/B-VII.0 library.

  16. Generalized pin factor methodology for LWR reload cores with discrete burnable absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hah, C.J.; Hideki Matsumoto; Toshikazu Ida; Lee, C.; Chao, Y.A.

    2005-01-01

    Discrete burnable absorbers are used to suppress excess reactivity as well as peak pin power in an assembly. After the burn-out of absorption material, discrete burnable absorbers are usually removed from assembly guide tubes for the next cycle. For that case, the pin factors with discrete burnable absorbers cannot be used since the assembly configuration is physically changed. The pin factors without discrete burnable absorbers also have noticeable deviation from the actual case because they do not take into account the history effect due to the residence of discrete burnable absorbers for the previous cycle. In this paper, the generalized pin factor (GPF) method is developed to accurately predict pin powers by considering the history effect. The method uses a second-order polynomial function to approximate the history effect which builds up during the residence of burnable absorber material and employs a linear approximation to simulate the decay of the history effect after discrete burnable absorbers are removed. The verification results from Westinghouse Vantage- 5H assemblies with WABAs showed that pin power errors were significantly reduced by using the GPF. (authors)

  17. Analysis of burnable poison in Ford Nuclear Reactor fuel to extend fuel lifetime. Final report, August 1, 1994--September 29, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burn, R.R.; Lee, J.C.

    1996-12-01

    The objective of the project was to establish the feasibility of extending the lifetime of fuel elements for the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) by replacing current aluminide fuel with silicide fuel comprising a heavier uranium loading but with the same fissile enrichment of 19.5 wt% {sup 235}U. The project has focused on fuel designs where burnable absorbers, in the form of B{sub 4}C, are admixed with uranium silicide in fuel plates so that increases in the control reactivity requirements and peak power density, due to the heavier fuel loading, may be minimized. The authors have developed equilibrium cycle models simulating current full-size aluminide core configurations with 43 {approximately} 45 fuel elements. Adequacy of the overall equilibrium cycle approach has been verified through comparison with recent FNR experience in spent fuel discharge rates and simulation of reactor physics characteristics for two representative cycles. Fuel cycle studies have been performed to compare equilibrium cycle characteristics of silicide fuel designs, including burnable absorbers, with current aluminide fuel. These equilibrium cycle studies have established the feasibility of doubling the fuel element lifetime, with minimal perturbations to the control reactivity requirements and peak power density, by judicious additions of burnable absorbers to silicide fuel. Further study will be required to investigate a more practical silicide fuel design, which incorporates burnable absorbers in side plates of each fuel element rather than uniformly mixes them in fuel plates.

  18. Effect of Burnable Absorbers on Inert Matrix Fuel Performance and Transuranic Burnup in a Low Power Density Light-Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Recktenwald

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Zirconium dioxide has received particular attention as a fuel matrix because of its ability to form a solid solution with transuranic elements, natural radiation stability and desirable mechanical properties. However, zirconium dioxide has a lower coefficient of thermal conductivity than uranium dioxide and this presents an obstacle to the deployment of these fuels in commercial reactors. Here we show that axial doping of a zirconium dioxide based fuel with erbium reduces power peaking and fuel temperature. Full core simulations of a modified AP1000 core were done using MCNPX 2.7.0. The inert matrix fuel contained 15 w/o transuranics at its beginning of life and constituted 28% of the assemblies in the core. Axial doping reduced power peaking at startup by more than ~23% in the axial direction and reduced the peak to average power within the core from 1.80 to 1.44. The core was able to remain critical between refueling while running at a simulated 2000 MWth on an 18 month refueling cycle. The results show that the reactor would maintain negative core average reactivity and void coefficients during operation. This type of fuel cycle would reduce the overall production of transuranics in a pressurized water reactor by 86%.

  19. Neutron physical investigations on the use of burnable poisons and gray absorber rods in large pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosche, C.; Katinger, T.; Kollmar, W.; Thieme, K.; Wagner, M.R.

    1977-11-01

    Methods and results of neutron physics calculations are described using burnable poisons and gray absorber rods in large PWR's. Calculated and measured values are compared, the effort for programming has been guessed. (orig.) [de

  20. Self-shielding effects in burnup of Gd used as burnable absorber. Previous studies on its experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbate, Maximo J.; Sbaffoni, Maria M.

    2003-01-01

    Continuing with the domestic 'Burnable Absorbers Research Plan' studies were done to estimate self-shielding effects during Gd 2 O 3 burnup as burnable absorber included in fuel pins of a CAREM geometry. In this way, its burnup was calculated without and with self-shielding. For the second case, were obtained values depending on internal pin radius and the effective one for the homogenized pin. For Gd 157, the burnup corresponding to the first case resulted 52.6 % and of 1.23 % for the effective one. That shows the magnitude of the effects under study. Considering that is necessary to perform one experimental verification, also are presented calculational results for the case to irradiate a pellet containing UO 2 (natural) and 8 wt % of Gd 2 O 3 , as a function of cooling time, that include: measurable isotopes concentrations, expected activities, and photon spectra for conditions able to be compared with bidimensional calculations with self-shielding. The irradiation time was supposed 30 dpp using RA-3 reactor at 10 MW. (author)

  1. A study on the nuclear characteristics of enriched gadolinia burnable absorber rods; the first year (2000) report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Lee, C.C.; Song, J. S.; Cho, B. O.; Joo, H. G.; Park, S. Y.; Kim, H. Y.; Cho, J. Y.; Kim, K. S.

    2001-04-01

    An analysis model using MICBURN-3/CASMO-3 is established for the enriched gadolinia burnable absorber rods. A homogenized cross section editing code, PROLOG, is modified so that it can handle such a fuel assembly that includes two different types of gadolinia rods. Study shows that Gd-155 and Gd-157 are almost same in suppressing the excess reactivity and it is recommended to enrich both odd number isotopes, Gd-155 and Gd-157. It is estimated that the cycle length increases by 2 days if enriched gadolinia rods are used in the commercial nuclear power plant such as YGN-3 of which the cycle length is assumed 2 years. For the advanced integral reactor SMART in which ultra long cycle length and soluble boron-free operation concept is applied, natural gadolinia burnable absorber rods fail to control the excess reactivity. On the other hand, enriched gadolinia rods are successful in controling the excess reactivity. To minimize power peakings, various placements of gadolinia rods are tested. Also initial reactivity holddown and gadolinia burnout time are parametrized with respect to the number of gadolinia rods and gadolinia weight fractions

  2. Neutronic analysis of the JMTR with LEU fuel and burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Yoshiharu; Oyamada, Rokuro; Matos, J.E.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The results of neutronics calculations are presented for the JMTR equilibrium core with LEU silicide fuel, boron and cadmium burnable poisons in the sideplates, and a cycle length of 24 days instead of 11 days with the current HEU fuel. The data indicate that several options are feasible provided that silicide fuels with high uranium densities are successfully demonstrated and licensed (author)

  3. Application of B{sub 4}C/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Burnable Absorber Rod to Control Excess Reactivity of SMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, Boravy; Hah, C. J. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Soluble boron in a nuclear reactor coolant is one of the methods to control excess reactivity of the reactor. However, the use of soluble boron also causes some negative effects such as corrosion, more-positive tendency of Moderator Temperature Coefficient (MTC) and the requirement of Chemical Volume Control System (CVCS). One of the conceptual design features of SMR having been developed in Korea is soluble boron- free reactor to eliminate those drawbacks. Control rods and Burnable Absorber (BA) rods can be other methods than soluble to control excess reactivity. WABA (Wet Annular Burnable Absorber) and PYREX are such type. The other type is IFBA (Integral Fuel Burnable Absorber) in which fuel pellet surface is coated with BA. This paper compares nuclear characteristics of three types of BA as well as SLOBA in terms of k-infinite vs. burnup and explain design basis of SLOBA. This paper also presents the application of SLOBA rods to control long-term excess reactivity of SMR. The SMR loaded with SLOBA rods has been developed for the past few years in Korean. It is named as Bandi-50 with design features of 180 MWth, 37 FAs, fuel assembly height of 200 cm. Soluble-boron-free is one of nuclear design requirements of Bandi-50 and is achieved by controlling excess reactivity of the SMR using BAs and control rods only. To achieve this design requirement, LP is carefully determined in such way that CBC should be as low as possible. Fuel assembly cross-sections are generated by CASMO-3, and core depletion calculations are performed by MASTER.

  4. DESCRIPTION OF THE TRITIUM-PRODUCING BURNABLE ABSORBER ROD FOR THE COMMERCIAL LIGHT WATER REACTOR TTQP-1-015 Rev 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Kimberly A.; Love, Edward F.; Thornhill, Cheryl K.

    2012-02-01

    Tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) used in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tritium Readiness Program are designed to produce tritium when placed in a Westinghouse or Framatome 17x17 fuel assembly and irradiated in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). This document provides an unclassified description of the current design baseline for the TPBARs. This design baseline is currently valid only for Watts Bar reactor production cores. A description of the Lead Use TPBARs will not be covered in the text of the document, but the applicable drawings, specifications and test plan will be included in the appropriate appendices.

  5. The use of boron as burnable poison in anular form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai, L.A.; Sannazzaro, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    It is done a study for an arrangement of rods of fuel and burnable poison (B 10 ) concentrating the absorber in anular form. It is verified that there is an optimum thickness of the ring, which is reached higher effectiveness in compensation of reactivity by burnable poison. The anular form rendes possible another flexibility degree in the dimension of burnable poison. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Neutronic analysis of the JMTR with LEU fuel and burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Yoshiharu; Oyamada, Rokuro; Matos, J.E.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of neutronics calculations are presented for the JMTR equilibrium core with LEU silicide fuel, boron and cadmium burnable poisons in the sideplates, and a cycle length of 24 days instead of 11 days with the current HEU fuel. The data indicate that several options are feasible provided that silicide fuels with high uranium densities are successfully demonstrated and licensed. 2 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Experimental validation of calculation schemes connected with PWR absorbers and burnable poisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klenov, P.

    1995-10-01

    In France 80% of electricity is produced by PWR reactors. For a better exploitation of these reactors a modular computer code Apollo-II has been developed. his code compute the flux transport by discrete ordinate method or by probabilistic collisions on extended configurations such as reactor cells, assemblies or little cores. For validation of this code on mixed oxide fuel lattices with absorbers an experimental program Epicure in the reactor Eole was induced. This thesis is devoted to the validation of the Apollo code according to the results of the Epicure program. 43 refs., 65 figs., 1 append

  8. Study of burnable absorber reactivity worth evaluation method considering the position of burnable absorber rod in a block using VHTRC experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Akino, Fujiyoshi

    1999-09-01

    The calculation accuracy of BP reactivity worth was evaluated using the experimental data of VHTRC cores which contain plural BP rods. As a result, BP reactivity worth was evaluated with about -20% of error by a model of an HTTR nuclear design code system in which all materials in a fuel block distributed homogeneously in the block. The BP reactivity worth was evaluated less than the experimental values systematically. It was conservative calculation model from the viewpoint of excess reactivity evaluation because it evaluated the excess reactivity higher. However, more precise calculation is expected for rationalization of HTGR core design, design for future HTGRs, operation and fuel management of the HTTR. It is considered that the calculation accuracy would be improved considering the position of BP rod in a core. Therefore, new model, in which a fuel block was divided into fine mesh to model the position of BP rods in a block, was developed. The effective cross section set of BP was evaluated by a BP cell model which had the same cross section area of BP region in the core calculation. It became clear that the BP reactivity worth could be evaluated with the error less than 10% using the new model. (author)

  9. Depletion of gadolinium burnable poison in a PWR assembly with high burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Refeat, Riham Mahmoud [Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA), Cairo (Egypt). Safety Engineering Dept.

    2015-12-15

    A tendency to increase the discharge burnup of nuclear fuel for Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has been a characteristic of its operation for many years. It will be able to burn at very high burnup of about 70 GWd/t with UO{sub 2} fuels. The U-235 enrichment must be higher than 5 %, which leads to the necessity of using an extremely efficient burnable poison like Gadolinium oxide. Using gadolinium isotope is significant due to its particular depletion behavior (''Onion-Skin'' effect). In this paper, the MCNPX2.7 code is used to calculate the important neutronic parameters of the next generation fuels of PWR. K-infinity, local peaking factor and fission rate distributions are calculated for a PWR assembly which burn at very high burnup reaching 70 GWd/t. The calculations are performed using the recently released evaluated Gadolinium cross section data. The results obtained are close to those of a LWR next generation fuel benchmark problem. This demonstrates that the calculation scheme used is able to accurately model a PWR assembly that operates at high burnup values.

  10. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. L. Grossbeck J-P.A. Renier Tim Bigelow

    2003-09-30

    Burnable poisons are used in nuclear reactors to produce a more level distribution of power in the reactor core and to reduce to necessity for a large control system. An ideal burnable poison would burn at the same rate as the fuel. In this study, separation of neutron-absorbing isotopes was investigated in order to eliminate isotopes that remain as absorbers at the end of fuel life, thus reducing useful fuel life. The isotopes Gd-157, Dy-164, and Er-167 were found to have desirable properties. These isotopes were separated from naturally occurring elements by means of plasma separation to evaluate feasibility and cost. It was found that pure Gd-157 could save approximately $6 million at the end of four years. However, the cost of separation, using the existing facility, made separation cost- ineffective. Using a magnet with three times the field strength is expected to reduce the cost by a factor of ten, making isotopically separated burnable poisons a favorable method of increasing fuel life in commercial reactors, in particular Generation-IV reactors. The project also investigated various burnable poison configurations, and studied incorporation of metallic burnable poisons into fuel cladding.

  11. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M. L.; Renier, J-P.A.; Bigelow, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Burnable poisons are used in nuclear reactors to produce a more level distribution of power in the reactor core and to reduce to necessity for a large control system. An ideal burnable poison would burn at the same rate as the fuel. In this study, separation of neutron-absorbing isotopes was investigated in order to eliminate isotopes that remain as absorbers at the end of fuel life, thus reducing useful fuel life. The isotopes Gd-157, Dy-164, and Er-167 were found to have desirable properties. These isotopes were separated from naturally occurring elements by means of plasma separation to evaluate feasibility and cost. It was found that pure Gd-157 could save approximately $6 million at the end of four years. However, the cost of separation, using the existing facility, made separation cost- ineffective. Using a magnet with three times the field strength is expected to reduce the cost by a factor of ten, making isotopically separated burnable poisons a favorable method of increasing fuel life in commercial reactors, in particular Generation-IV reactors. The project also investigated various burnable poison configurations, and studied incorporation of metallic burnable poisons into fuel cladding

  12. Burnable poison irradiation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    The topical report describes the irradiation program developed to investigate different burnable poison rod material and designs. The purpose of the report is to present (1) technical support for the irradiation of several test burnable poison rod designs that have not been previously reviewed, and (2) describe the parameters that will be employed in the surveillance program for Combustion Engineering's (CE) standard burnable poison rod for 16 x 16 fuel assemblies. The test burnable poison rods will be placed in a CE reactor using 16 x 16 fuel assemblies, the first such reactor is Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit 2. The irradiation program has four phases. Phase I involves the irradiation of 48 standard burnable poison rods which (1) will be extensively precharacterized prior to irradiation and (2) will undergo interim performance evaluation and detailed post-irradiation examination. Phase II, III, and IV involve irradiation and performance evaluation of a small number of burnable poison rods of different proprietary designs. The report discusses the materials to be used in each phase, the methods of fabricating the rods, and the rods expected behavior in a reactor

  13. Heterogeneous burnable poisons:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiva, Sergio; Agueda, Horacio; Russo, Diego

    1989-01-01

    The use of materials possessing high neutron absorption cross-section commonly known as 'burnable poisons' have its origin in BWR reactors with the purpose of improving the efficiency of the first fuel load. Later on, it was extended to PWR to compensate of initial reactivity without infringing the requirement of maintaining a negative moderator coefficient. The present tendency is to increase the use of solid burnable poisons to extend the fuel cycle life and discharge burnup. There are two concepts for the burnable poisons utilization: 1) heterogeneously distributions in the form of rods, plates, etc. and 2) homogeneous dispersions of burnable poisons in the fuel. The purpose of this work is to present the results of sinterability studies, performed on Al 2 O 3 -B 4 C and Al 2 O 3 -Gd 2 O 3 systems. Experiments were carried on pressing at room temperature mixtures of powders containing up to 5 wt % of B 4 C or Gd 2 O 3 in Al 2 O 3 and subsequently sintering at 1750 deg C in reducing atmosphere. Evaluation of density, porosity and microstructures were done and a comparison with previous experiences is shown. (Author) [es

  14. Study on the metal vapor generator for the production of improved gadolinia burnable poison material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, O. C.; Noh, S. P.; Ko, K. H.; Kim, T. S.; Lim, C. H.; Kim, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    A longer cycle operation of a nuclear fuel is one of the ways to promote the economy of a nuclear power plant. For this purpose, high burn up fuel which has initial higher enrichment is required with higher loading of fuel. As a result, adequate burnable poison material must be used to control peak fuel pin power. Devices to manufacture the improved gadolinia burnable poison are developed. The improved gadolinia contains higher abundance of the preferred thermal neutron absorbers. Devices are composed of metal vapor generator, lasers and ion extractor. In this paper, a metal vapor generator by using electron beam gun is reported

  15. A new fast neutron collar for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low enriched uranium fuel assemblies containing burnable poison rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Louise G.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Schwalbach, Peter; Baere, Paul De; Browne, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Safeguards inspection measurements must be performed in a timely manner in order to detect the diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material. A shorter measurement time can increase the number of items that a nuclear safeguards inspector can reliably measure during a period of access to a nuclear facility. In turn, this improves the reliability of the acquired statistical sample, which is used to inform decisions regarding compliance. Safeguards inspection measurements should also maintain independence from facility operator declarations. Existing neutron collars employ thermal neutron interrogation for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh fuel assemblies. A new fast neutron collar has been developed for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies containing gadolinia (Gd 2 O 3 ) burnable poison rods. The Euratom Fast Collar (EFC) was designed with high neutron detection efficiency to make a fast (Cd) mode measurement viable whilst meeting the high counting precision and short assay time requirements of the Euratom safeguards inspectorate. A fast mode measurement reduces the instrument sensitivity to burnable poison rod content and therefore reduces the applied poison correction, consequently reducing the dependence on the operator declaration of the poison content within an assembly. The EFC non-destructive assay (NDA) of typical modern European pressurized water reactor (PWR) fresh fuel assembly designs have been simulated using Monte Carlo N-particle extended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. Simulations predict that the EFC can achieve 2% relative statistical uncertainty on the doubles neutron counting rate for a fast mode measurement in an assay time of 600 s (10 min) with the available 241 AmLi (α,n) interrogation source strength of 5.7×10 4 s −1 . Furthermore, the calibration range of the new collar has been extended to verify 235 U content in variable PWR fuel designs in the presence of up to

  16. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renier, J.A.

    2002-04-17

    Burnable poisons are used in all modern nuclear reactors to permit higher loading of fuel without the necessity of an overly large control rod system. This not only permits a longer core life but can also be used to level the power distribution. Commercial nuclear reactors commonly use B{sub 4}C in separate non-fueled rods and more recently, zirconium boride coatings on the fuel pellets or gadolinium oxide mixed with the fuel. Although the advantages are great, there are problems with using these materials. Boron, which is an effective neutron absorber, transmutes to lithium and helium upon absorption of a neutron. Helium is insoluble and is eventually released to the interior of the fuel rod, where it produces an internal pressure. When sufficiently high, this pressure stress could cause separation of the cladding from the fuel, causing overly high centerline temperatures. Gadolinium has several very strongly absorbing isotopes, but not all have large cross sections and result in residual burnable poison reactivity worth at the end of the fuel life. Even if the amount of this residual absorber is small and the penalty in operation small, the cost of this penalty, even if only several days, can be very high. The objective of this investigation was to study the performance of single isotopes in order to reduce the residual negative reactivity left over at the end of the fuel cycle. Since the behavior of burnable poisons can be strongly influenced by their configuration, four forms for the absorbers were studied: homogeneously mixed with the fuel, mixed with only the outer one-third of the fuel pellet, coated on the perimeter of the fuel pellets, and alloyed with the cladding. In addition, the numbers of fuel rods containing burnable poison were chosen as 8, 16, 64, and 104. Other configurations were chosen for a few special cases. An enrichment of 4.5 wt% {sup 235}U was chosen for most cases for study in order to achieve a 4-year fuel cycle. A standard pressurized

  17. Neutronic analysis of Gd2O3 as burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecot, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    For the reactors core design, the use of burnable poisons is one of the options for the control of in excess reactivity and the power form factor. As alternative procedures, the absorbing material may be included in pellets of an inert material or in fuel pellets. Besides, a cladding material and the locations of the fuel elements must be chosen for the first case. The CAREM reactor core design foresees the use of gadolinium oxide (Gd 2 O 3 ) as burnable poison. In this work, a comparative study was made, from the neutronic point of view, among the following alternatives for the poisons location: a) Gd 2 O 3 bars supports in alumina (Al 2 O 3 ), sheathed in steel; b) Gd 2 O 3 bars supports in alumina sheathed in Zry-4; c) Gd 2 O 3 in uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel pellets. (Author) [es

  18. Nuclear fuel rod with burnable plate and pellet-clad interaction fix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear fuel rod comprising a metallic tubular cladding containing nuclear fuel pellets, the pellets containing enriched uranium-235. The improvement described here comprises: ceramic wafers, each wafter comprising a sintered mixture of gadolinium oxide and uranium dioxide, the uranium oxide having no more uranium-235 than is present in natural uranium dioxide. Each of the wafers is axially disposed between a major portion of adjacent the nuclear fuel pellets, whereby the wafers freeze out volatile fission products produced by the nuclear fuel and prevent interaction of the fission products with the metallic tubing cladding

  19. Minor actinide transmutation on PWR burnable poison rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wenchao; Liu, Bin; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Tu, Jing; Liu, Fang; Huang, Liming; Fu, Juan; Meng, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Key issues associated with MA transmutation are the appropriate loading pattern. • Commercial PWRs are the only choice to transmute MAs in large scale currently. • Considerable amount of MA can be loaded to PWR without disturbing k eff markedly. • Loading MA to PWR burnable poison rods for transmutation is an optimal loading pattern. - Abstract: Minor actinides are the primary contributors to long term radiotoxicity in spent fuel. The majority of commercial reactors in operation in the world are PWRs, so to study the minor actinide transmutation characteristics in the PWRs and ultimately realize the successful minor actinide transmutation in PWRs are crucial problem in the area of the nuclear waste disposal. The key issues associated with the minor actinide transmutation are the appropriate loading patterns when introducing minor actinides to the PWR core. We study two different minor actinide transmutation materials loading patterns on the PWR burnable poison rods, one is to coat a thin layer of minor actinide in the water gap between the zircaloy cladding and the stainless steel which is filled with water, another one is that minor actinides substitute for burnable poison directly within burnable poison rods. Simulation calculation indicates that the two loading patterns can load approximately equivalent to 5–6 PWR annual minor actinide yields without disturbing the PWR k eff markedly. The PWR k eff can return criticality again by slightly reducing the boric acid concentration in the coolant of PWR or removing some burnable poison rods without coating the minor actinide transmutation materials from PWR core. In other words, loading minor actinide transmutation material to PWR does not consume extra neutron, minor actinide just consumes the neutrons which absorbed by the removed control poisons. Both minor actinide loading patterns are technically feasible; most importantly do not need to modify the configuration of the PWR core and

  20. Rare earths as burnable poison for extended cycles control in electricity generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asou, M.

    1995-01-01

    The search of an optimization of the French electronuclear network operations leads to a necessary optimization of the core performances. All the economic studies performed by the utilities had shown that there is a real gain to minimize shut down periods for refueling. So, increasing the cycle length from 12 to 18 months will present a gain of shut down for a three years operation period. The theoretical burnable absorber will be a fuel admixed material bringing the required initial negative reactivity with a burn-up kinetic well suited to the fuel and allowing the lowest residual penalty as possible. The residual penalty us defined in this case by the non complete burn up of the poison, by the low of fissile material and by the accumulate of residual isotopes or nuclides. Because of the well known use of gadolinium as burnable absorber for BWR's and PWR's operations, the search for the best compromise to optimize all the above stress is pointed towards the rare earths. In the nuclides family, considering criteria such as cross sections, natural abundance and availability only five nuclides can play the role as burnable absorbers, namely: gadolinium, samarium, dysprosium, europium and erbium. The study presented here will show that only gadolinium and erbium will be considered to control the reactivity of the PWR's. (author). 58 refs., 65 figs., 47 tabs

  1. Spider and burnable poison rod combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, G.T.; Schluderberg, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    An improved design of burnable poison rods and associated spiders used in fuel assemblies of pressurized water power reactor cores, is described. The rods are joined to the spider arms in a manner which is proof against the reactor core environment and yet allows the removal of the rods from the spider simply, swiftly and delicately. (U.K.)

  2. Improved Neutronics Treatment of Burnable Poisons for the Prismatic HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Wang; A. A. Bingham; J. Ortensi; C. J. Permann

    2012-10-01

    In prismatic block High Temperature Reactors (HTR), highly absorbing material such a burnable poison (BP) cause local flux depressions and large gradients in the flux across the blocks which can be a challenge to capture accurately with traditional homogenization methods. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the error associated with spatial homogenization, spectral condensation and discretization and to highlight what is needed for improved neutronics treatments of burnable poisons for the prismatic HTR. A new triangular based mesh is designed to separate the BP regions from the fuel assembly. A set of packages including Serpent (Monte Carlo), Xuthos (1storder Sn), Pronghorn (diffusion), INSTANT (Pn) and RattleSnake (2ndorder Sn) is used for this study. The results from the deterministic calculations show that the cross sections generated directly in Serpent are not sufficient to accurately reproduce the reference Monte Carlo solution in all cases. The BP treatment produces good results, but this is mainly due to error cancellation. However, the Super Cell (SC) approach yields cross sections that are consistent with cross sections prepared on an “exact” full core calculation. In addition, very good agreement exists between the various deterministic transport and diffusion codes in both eigenvalue and power distributions. Future research will focus on improving the cross sections and quantifying the error cancellation.

  3. Safety evaluation report related to the Department of Energy's proposal for the irradiation of lead test assemblies containing tritium-producing burnable absorber rods in commercial light-water reactors. Project Number 697

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    The NRC staff has reviewed a report, submitted by DOE to determine whether the use of a commercial light-water reactor (CLWR) to irradiate a limited number of tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) in lead test assemblies (LTAs) raises generic issues involving an unreviewed safety question. The staff has prepared this safety evaluation to address the acceptability of these LTAs in accordance with the provision of 10 CFR 50.59 without NRC licensing action. As summarized in Section 10 of this safety evaluation, the staff has identified issues that require NRC review. The staff has also identified a number of areas in which an individual licensee undertaking irradiation of TPBAR LTAs will have to supplement the information in the DOE report before the staff can determine whether the proposed irradiation is acceptable at a particular facility. The staff concludes that a licensee undertaking irradiation of TPBAR LTAs in a CLWR will have to submit an application for amendment to its facility operating license before inserting the LTAs into the reactor

  4. Neutron Absorbing Ability Variation in Neutron Absorbing Material Caused by the Neutron Irradiation in Spent Fuel Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Hee Dong; Han, Seul Gi; Lee, Sang Dong; Kim, Ki Hong; Ryu, Eag Hyang; Park, Hwa Gyu

    2014-01-01

    In spent fuel storage facility like high density spent fuel storage racks and dry storage casks, spent fuels are stored with neutron absorbing materials installed as a part of those facilities, and they are used for absorbing neutrons emitted from spent fuels. Usually structural material with neutron absorbing material of racks and casks are located around spent fuels, so it is irradiated by neutrons for long time. Neutron absorbing ability could be changed by the variation of nuclide composition in neutron absorbing material caused by the irradiation of neutrons. So, neutron absorbing materials are continuously faced with spent fuels with boric acid solution or inert gas environment. Major nuclides in neutron absorbing material are Al 27 , C 12 , B 11 , B 10 and they are changed to numerous other ones as radioactive decay or neutron absorption reaction. The B 10 content in neutron absorbing material dominates the neutron absorbing ability, so, the variation of nuclide composition including the decrease of B 10 content is the critical factor on neutron absorbing ability. In this study, neutron flux in spent fuel, the activation of neutron absorbing material and the variation of nuclide composition are calculated. And, the minimum neutron flux causing the decrease of B 10 content is calculated in spent fuel storage facility. Finally, the variation of neutron multiplication factor is identified according to the one of B 10 content in neutron absorbing material. The minimum neutron flux to impact the neutron absorbing ability is 10 10 order, however, usual neutron flux from spent fuel is 10 8 order. Therefore, even though neutron absorbing material is irradiated for over 40 years, B 10 content is little decreased, so, initial neutron absorbing ability could be kept continuously

  5. Heterogeneous burnable poisons. Sinterability study in oxidizing atmosphere of alumina-gadolinia and alumina-boron carbide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueda, H.C.; Leiva, S.F.; Russo, D.O.

    1990-01-01

    Solid burnable poisons are used in reactors cooled by pressure light water (PLWR) with the purpose of controlling initial reactivity in the first reactor's core. The burnable poisons may be uniformly mixed with the fuel -known as 'homogeneous' poisons-; or constituting separate elements -known as heterogeneous poisons-. The purpose of this work is to present the results of two sinterability studies, performed on Al 2 O 3 -Gd 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 -B 4 C, where alumina acts as inert matrix, storing the absorbing elements as Gd 2 O 3 or B 4 C. The elements were sintered at an air atmosphere and additives permitting the obtention of a greater density alumina were tested at lower temperatures than the characteristic for this material, in order to determine its compatibility with the materials dealt with herein. (Author) [es

  6. Integrity of neutron-absorbing components of LWR fuel systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

    1991-03-01

    A study of the integrity and behavior of neutron-absorbing components of light-water (LWR) fuel systems was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The components studies include control blades (cruciforms) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and rod cluster control assemblies for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). The results of this study can be useful for understanding the degradation of neutron-absorbing components and for waste management planning and repository design. The report includes examples of the types of degradation, damage, or failures that have been encountered. Conclusions and recommendations are listed. 84 refs

  7. Light Absorbers and Catalysts for Solar to Fuel Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornienko, Nikolay I.

    Increasing fossil fuel consumption and the resulting consequences to the environment has propelled research into means of utilizing alternative, clean energy sources. Solar power is among the most promising of renewable energy sources but must be converted into an energy dense medium such as chemical bonds to render it useful for transport and energy storage. Photoelectrochemistry (PEC), the splitting of water into oxygen and hydrogen fuel or reducing CO 2 to hydrocarbon fuels via sunlight is a promising approach towards this goal. Photoelectrochemical systems are comprised of several components, including light absorbers and catalysts. These parts must all synergistically function in a working device. Therefore, the continual development of each component is crucial for the overall goal. For PEC systems to be practical for large scale use, the must be efficient, stable, and composed of cost effective components. To this end, my work focused on the development of light absorbing and catalyst components of PEC solar to fuel converting systems. In the direction of light absorbers, I focused of utilizing Indium Phosphide (InP) nanowires (NWs) as photocathodes. I first developed synthetic techniques for InP NW solution phase and vapor phase growth. Next, I developed light absorbing photocathodes from my InP NWs towards PEC water splitting cells. I studied cobalt sulfide (CoSx) as an earth abundant catalyst for the reductive hydrogen evolution half reaction. Using in situ spectroscopic techniques, I elucidated the active structure of this catalyst and offered clues to its high activity. In addition to hydrogen evolution catalysts, I established a new generation of earth abundant catalysts for CO2 reduction to CO fuel/chemical feedstock. I first worked with molecularly tunable homogeneous catalysts that exhibited high selectivity for CO2 reduction in non-aqueous media. Next, in order to retain molecular tunability while achieving stability and efficiency in aqueous

  8. Shock absorber for a fuel element storage rack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, M.

    1986-01-01

    The invention describes a shock absorber device for a nuclear fuel element deposited in a sheath provided with a bottom portion comprising centrally a hole of a diameter slightly larger than that of the lower portion of the fuel element, within a fuel storage rack, characterised in that it comprises a non-deformable annulus connected to a collar bearing on a transverse member of the storage rack, by means of a plurality of elastically and/or plastically deformable elements, and in that the non-deformable annulus, coaxial with the sheath, is provided with a central aperture having a diameter substantially equal to that of the hole in the bottom portion of the sheath and serves as a support for the bottom portion of the sheath

  9. Development of gadolinia bearing fuel for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Kazuichiro

    1986-01-01

    In the PWR power plants in Japan, the long-period operation cycle was extended legally to a maximum of 13 months from the conventional about 9 months in fiscal 1980. With this move, as a new type of fuel with burnable-poison-rod function, the development was started of gadolinia-bearing (gadolinium oxide) fuel, gadolinia being contained in the fuel pellets. The basic technology studies were completed in fiscal 1984. Actual irradiation of the fuel in Unit 2 of the Oi Power Station was then started in July 1984, demonstrating validity of the design. Meanwhile, the rapid power-up fest and the fuel center temperature measurement are conducted in an overseas reactor from fiscal 1983. The following are described: functions of the burnable absorber, the need for gadolinia-bearing fuel, experiences with gadolinia-bearing fuel, problems in the design and production of gadolinia-bearing fuel, the development of gadolinia-bearing fuel. (Mori, K.)

  10. Shaft shock absorber tests for a spent fuel canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukkola, T.; Toermaelae, V.P.

    2005-06-01

    The disposal canister for spent nuclear fuel will be transferred by a lift to the repository, which is 500 m deep in the bedrock. Model tests were carried out with the objective to estimate weather feasible shock absorber can be developed against the design accident case where the canister should survive a free fall to the lift shaft. If the velocity of the canister is not controlled by air drag or by any other deceleration means, the impact velocity may reach ultimate speed of 100m/s. The canister would retain its integrity in impact on water when the bottom pit of the lift well is filled with groundwater. However, the canister would hit the pit bottom with high velocity since the water hardly slows down the canister. The impact to the bottom of the pit should be dampened mechanically. The tests demonstrated that 20 m high filling to the bottom pit of the lift well by Light Expanded Clay Aggregate (LECA), gives fair impact absorption to protect the fuel canister. Presence of ground water is not harmful for impact absorption system provided that the ceramic gravel is not floating too high from the pit bottom. Almost ideal impact absorption conditions are met if the water high level does not exceed two thirds of the height of the gravel. Shaping of the bottom head of the cylindrical canister does not give meaningful advantages to the impact absorption system. The flat nose bottom head of the fuel canister gives adequate deceleration properties. (orig.)

  11. Neutron absorbing materials for reactors control; Materiaux absorbants neutroniques pour le pilotage des reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosset, D. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DMN), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Herter, P. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-01-15

    The different reactivity control systems allow to keep the mastery of the fission reaction inside the reactor core at any time: power control, safe shutdown, compensation of fuel burnup. These systems can be of different type: gaseous (like {sup 3}He in some experimental reactors), liquid (borated water in PWRs), and in most cases solid and combined or not with the previous types. In all cases, the constituents comprise neutron absorbing nuclides. The absorbing materials are contained in elementary absorbing elements, named control rods. This article describes the absorbing materials used in the control rods of the main nuclear power plants and also in the burnable poison rods of water cooled reactors. Content: 1 - general considerations about absorbing materials: neutron absorption cross sections, selection criteria of absorbing materials, main uses of absorbers in reactors, supply sources, wastes; 2 - description of the absorbing materials used: silver-indium-cadmium alloy (ICA), boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), dysprosium titanate, hafnium, burnable poisons and rare earths; 3 - conclusion and perspectives. (J.S.)

  12. Rare earths as burnable poison for extended cycles control in electricity generation reactors; Etude des terres rares en tant que poison consommable pour le controle des cycles allonges pour les reacteurs electrogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asou, M.

    1995-05-12

    The search of an optimization of the French electronuclear network operations leads to a necessary optimization of the core performances. All the economic studies performed by the utilities had shown that there is a real gain to minimize shut down periods for refueling. So, increasing the cycle length from 12 to 18 months will present a gain of shut down for a three years operation period. The theoretical burnable absorber will be a fuel admixed material bringing the required initial negative reactivity with a burn-up kinetic well suited to the fuel and allowing the lowest residual penalty as possible. The residual penalty us defined in this case by the non complete burn up of the poison, by the low of fissile material and by the accumulate of residual isotopes or nuclides. Because of the well known use of gadolinium as burnable absorber for BWR`s and PWR`s operations, the search for the best compromise to optimize all the above stress is pointed towards the rare earths. In the nuclides family, considering criteria such as cross sections, natural abundance and availability only five nuclides can play the role as burnable absorbers, namely: gadolinium, samarium, dysprosium, europium and erbium. The study presented here will show that only gadolinium and erbium will be considered to control the reactivity of the PWR`s. (author). 58 refs., 65 figs., 47 tabs.

  13. Reactivity and neutron flux measurements in IPEN/MB-01 reactor with B4C burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fer, Nelson Custodio; Moreira, Joao Manoel Losada

    2000-01-01

    Burnable poison rods, made of B 4 C- Al 2 O 3 pellets with 5.01 mg/cm 3 10 B concentration, have been manufactured for a set of experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 zero-power reactor. Several core parameters which are affected by the burnable poisons rods have been measured. The principal results, for the situation in which the burnable poison rods are located near the absorber rods of a control rod, are they cause a 29% rod worth shadowing, a reduction of 39% in the local void coefficient of reactivity, a reduction of 4.8% in the isothermal temperature coefficient of reactivity, and a reduction of 9% in the thermal neutron flux in the region where the burnable poison rods are located. These experimental results will be used for the validation of burnable poison calculation methods in the CTMSP. (author)

  14. Absorbing device for stationary arrangement in the lattice of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredin, B.; Nylund, O.

    1980-01-01

    The invention refers to an absorbing device for stationary arrangement in the lattice of a BWR in a gap between two bundles of vertical fuel rods. It consists of at least one absorbing plate containing burnable absorbing material. Both lateral surfaces of this plate are directed to one surface each of the bundles mentioned above. According to the invention the absorbing material is contained in channels formed by welding together two adjacent sheet elements, at least one of which being corrugated. The welds will be made at the points where to tops of the waves touch the other sheet element. (orig.) [de

  15. Literature search on Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel and absorber rod fabrication, 1960--1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, C R [comp.

    1977-02-01

    A literature search was conducted to provide information supporting the design of a conceptual Light Water Reactor (LWR) Fuel Fabrication plant. Emphasis was placed on fuel processing and pin bundle fabrication, effects of fuel impurities and microstructure on performance and densification, quality assurance, absorber and poison rod fabrication, and fuel pin welding. All data have been taken from publicly available documents, journals, and books. This work was sponsored by the Finishing Processes-Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Studies program at HEDL.

  16. Literature search on Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel and absorber rod fabrication, 1960--1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample, C.R.

    1977-02-01

    A literature search was conducted to provide information supporting the design of a conceptual Light Water Reactor (LWR) Fuel Fabrication plant. Emphasis was placed on fuel processing and pin bundle fabrication, effects of fuel impurities and microstructure on performance and densification, quality assurance, absorber and poison rod fabrication, and fuel pin welding. All data have been taken from publicly available documents, journals, and books. This work was sponsored by the Finishing Processes-Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Studies program at HEDL

  17. Fuel rod and fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takekawa, Tetsuya.

    1993-01-01

    Burnable poisons are contained in a portion of a pellet constituting a fuel rod. A distribution density of the burnable poison-containing pellets and a concentration of the burnable poisons in the pellet are varied depending on the axial position of the fuel rod. That is, the distribution density of the burnable poison containing-pellets is increased at the central portion of the fuel rod and it is decreased at both ends thereof, and a concentration of the burnable poisons of the burnable poison containing-pellet disposed at the end portions thereof is decreased to less than a concentration of the burnable poison-containing pellet at the central portion. With such a constitution, a central peaking at an early stage of the combustion cycle is decreased. Accordingly, power at the central portion is increased than that in the end portions at the latter half of the cycle, to flatten the power distribution. Further, a burnable poison concentration of the pellets at the end portions is decreased to promote burning of burnable poisons at the end portions which are less burnable relatively, thereby enabling to prevent worsening of neutron economy. (T.M.)

  18. Mitigation of end flux peaking in CANDU fuel bundles using neutron absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, D.; Chan, P.K., E-mail: dylan.pierce@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston ON, (Canada); Shen, W. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa ON, (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    End flux peaking (EFP) is a phenomenon where a region of elevated neutron flux occurs between two adjoining fuel bundles. These peaks lead to an increase in fission rate and therefore greater heat generation. It is known that addition of neutron absorbers into fuel bundles can help mitigate EFP, yet implementation in Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) type reactors using natural uranium fuel has not been pursued. Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP) 6.1 was used to simulate the addition of a small amount of neutron absorbers strategically within the fuel pellets. This paper will present some preliminary results collected thus far. (author)

  19. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles Part III : applications to the plutonium-thorium fuel cycle.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, a plutonium-thorium fuel cycle is investigated including the {sup 233}U production and utilization. A prismatic thermal High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) and the novel concept of quadruple isotropic (QUADRISO) coated particles, designed at the Argonne National Laboratory, have been used for the study. In absorbing QUADRISO particles, a burnable poison layer surrounds the central fuel kernel to flatten the reactivity curve as a function of time. At the beginning of life, the fuel in the QUADRISO particles is hidden from neutrons, since they get absorbed in the burnable poison before they reach the fuel kernel. Only when the burnable poison depletes, neutrons start streaming into the fuel kernel inducing fission reactions and compensating the fuel depletion of ordinary TRISO particles. In fertile QUADRISO particles, the absorber layer is replaced by natural thorium with the purpose of flattening the excess of reactivity by the thorium resonances and producing {sup 233}U. The above configuration has been compared with a configuration where fissile (neptunium-plutonium oxide from Light Water Reactors irradiated fuel) and fertile (natural thorium oxide) fuels are homogeneously mixed in the kernel of ordinary TRISO particles. For the {sup 233}U utilization, the core has been equipped with europium oxide absorbing QUADRISO particles.

  20. Radiation resistance of pyrocarbon-boned fuel and absorbing elements for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurin, V.A.; Konotop, Yu.F.; Odejchuk, N.P.; Shirochenkov, S.D.; Yakovlev, V.K.; Aksenov, N.A.; Kuprienko, V.A.; Lebedev, I.G.; Samsonov, B.V.

    1990-01-01

    In choosing the reactor type, problems of nuclear and radiation safety are outstanding. The analysis of the design and experiments show that HTGR type reactors helium cooled satisfy all the safety requirements. It has been planned in the Soviet Union to construct two HTGR plants, VGR-50 and VG-400. Later it was decided to construct an experimental plant with a low power high temperature reactor (VGM). Spherical uranium-graphite fuel elements with coated fuel particles are supposed to be used in HTGR core. A unique technology for producing spherical pyrocarbon-bound fuel and absorbing elements of monolithic type has been developed. Extended tests were done to to investigate fuel elements behaviour: radiation resistance of coated fuel particles with different types of fuel; influence of the coated fuel particles design on gaseous fission products release; influence of non-sphericity on coated fuel particle performance; dependence of gaseous fission products release from fuel elements on the thickness of fuel-free cans; confining role of pyrocarbon as a factor capable of diminishing the rate of fission products release; radiation resistance of spherical fuel elements during burnup; radiation resistance of spherical absorbing elements to fast neutron fluence and boron burnup

  1. Methods of assembling and disassembling spider and burnable poison rod structures for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, G.T.; Schluderberg, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    A technique is provided for engaging and disengaging burnable poison rods from a spider in a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. A cap on the end of each of the burnable poison rods is provided with a shank or stem that is received in a respective bore formed in the spider. A frangible flange secures the shank and rod to the spider. Pressing the shank in the direction of the bore axis by means, e.g., of a plate ruptures the frangible flange to release the rod from the spider. (author)

  2. Methods of assembling and disassembling spider and burnable poison rod structures for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described of joining burnable poison rods to the spider arms of a pressurised water power reactor fuel assembly which is proof against the reactor core environment but permits these rods to be removed from the spider simply, swiftly and delicately. (U.K.)

  3. Gadolinia experience and design for PWR fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, L. C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe Siemens Power Corporation's (SPC) current experience with the burnable absorber gadolinia in PWR fuel assemblies, including optimized features of SPC's PWR gadolinia designs, and comparisons with other burnable absorbers. Siemens is the world leader in PWR gadolinia experience. More than 5,900 Siemens PWR gadolinia-bearing fuel assemblies have been irradiated. The use of gadolinia-bearing fuel provides significant flexibility in fuel cycle designs, allows for low radial leakage fuel management and extended operating cycles, and reduces BOC (beginning-of-cycle) soluble boron concentrations. The optimized use of an integral burnable neutron absorber is a design feature which provides improved economic performance for PWR fuel assemblies. This paper includes a comparison between three different types of integral burnable absorbers: gadolinia, Zirconium diboride and erbia. Fuel cycle design studies performed by Siemens have shown that the enrichment requirements for 18-24 month fuel cycles utilizing gadolinia or zirconium diboride integral fuel burnable absorbers can be approximately the same. Although a typical gadolinia residual penalty for a cycle design of this length is as low as 0.02-0.03 wt% U-235, the design flexibility of gadolinia allows for very aggressive low-leakage core loading plans which reduces the enrichment requirements for gadolinia-bearing fuel. SPC has optimized its use of gadolinia in PWR fuel cycles. Typically, low (2-4) weight percent Gd 2 O 3 is used for beginning to middle of cycle reactivity hold down as well as soluble boron concentration holddown at BOC. Higher concentrations of Gd 2 O 3 , such as 6 and 8 wt%, are used to control power peaking in assemblies later in the cycle. SPC has developed core strategies that maximize the use of lower gadolinia concentrations which significantly reduces the gadolinia residual reactivity penalty. This optimization includes minimizing the number of rods with

  4. Study of burnable poison in the dupic cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Clarysson A.M. da; Almeida, Michel C.B. de; Faria, Rochkhudson B. de; Moreira, Arthur P.C.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: clarysson@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies confirm the potential of using reprocessed PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) fuels in the CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) reactor fuel cycle. An important proposal is the 'Direct Use of spent PWR fuel In CANDU' (DUPIC) cycle, where spent fuels from a PWR are packaged into a CANDU fuel bundle with only mechanical reprocessing (cut into pieces) but no chemical reprocessing. The fissile contents of the spent fuel from Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) are about 1.5 wt%, which is higher than that of the fuel of CANDU. When this reactor is reload with reprocessed fuel, the reactivity of system will increase and this behavior may affect the safety parameters of reactor. To reduce the initial reactivity, Burnable Poison (BP) can be inserted in the fuel bundle of CANDU. In this way, the present paper evaluates the insertion of the different types of BP considering the DUPIC cycle. The following BPs were evaluated: Boron, Cadmium, Dysprosium, Erbium, Europium, Gadolinium, Hafnium and Samarium. The goal is to verify the neutronic behavior of the fuel bundle at steady state and during the reactor burnup. The SCALE 6.0 (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code was employed to model a standard CANDU-6 fuel element. (author)

  5. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitosi.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel pellets containing burnable poison and fuel pellets not containing burnable poison are used together in burnable poison-incorporated fuel rods which is disposed at the outermost layer of a cluster. Since the burnable poison-incorporated fuel rods are disposed at the outermost layer of the cluster where a neutron flux level is high and, accordingly, the power is high originally, local power peaking can be suppressed and, simultaneously, fuels can be burnt effectively without increasing the fuel concentration in the inner and the intermediate layers than that of the outermost layer. In addition, a problem of lacking a reactor core reactivity at an initial stage is solved by disposing both of the fuel pellets together, even if burnable poisons of high concentration are used. This is because the extent of the lowering of the reactivity due to the burnable poison-incorporated fuels is mainly determined by the surface area thereof and the remaining period of the burnable poison is mainly determined by the concentration thereof. As a result, the burnup degree can be improved without lowering the reactor reactivity so much. (N.H.)

  6. A two-dimensional fuel loading optimization method for the pressurized water reactor burnup cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stillman, J.A.; Chao, Y.A.; Downar, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    A method was developed and reported earlier that determines the optimum fuel and power distributions for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) burnup cycle. The backward diffusion calculation and the corewise Green's function method were used for the core model, which provided analytic derivatives for solving the nonlinear optimization problem using successive linear programming methods. The solution algorithm consisted of a reverse depletion strategy that begins at the end of cycle and solves simultaneously for the optimal fuel and burnable absorber distributions while the core is depleted to the beginning of cycle. These distributions were constrained by a maximum fuel power peaking and by the fuel and burnable absorber depletion characteristics. Additionally, the problem was formulated to consider specific numbers of feed and discharge assemblies by including penalty terms in the objective function. The resulting optimal solutions were shown to minimize the required fissile fuel inventory and burnable absorber lading for several PWR examples. Previously reported solutions were not required to meet some specified fuel batch size; therefore, the optimal solutions did not represent practical PWR problems. The purpose of the work reported in this paper is to investigate the effect of imposing batch size constraints on the optimization problem. Specifically, results are presented here for the case of a core consisting of three equal-sized fuel batches in which an equilibrium condition is imposed on the batch average burnups

  7. Heterogeneous neutron absorbers development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccaccini, Aldo; Agueda, Horacio; Russo, Diego; Perez, Edmundo

    1987-01-01

    The use of solid burnable absorber materials in power light water reactors has increased in the last years, specially due to improvements attained in costs of generated electricity. The present work summarizes the basic studies made on an alumina-gadolinia system, where alumina is the inert matrix and gadolinia acts as burnable poison, and describes the fabrication method of pellets with that material. High density compacts were obtained in the range of concentrations used by cold pressing and sintering at 1600 deg C in inert (Ar) atmosphere. Finally, the results of the irradiation experiences made at RA-6 reactor, located at the Bariloche Atomic Center, are given where variations on negative reactivity caused by introduction of burnable poison rods were measured. The results obtained from these experiences are in good agreement with those coming from calculation codes. (Author)

  8. Urania-gadolinia nuclear fuel physical and irradiation characteristics and material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potts, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of the incorporation of burnable nuclear poisons in BWR fuel for supplementary reactivity control and power shaping has received extensive investigation. It has been determined that the most effective burnable poison system is one provided by a material having a very large neutron absorption cross section loaded in the nuclear fuel in concentrations that make the absorber highly self-shielding. Through the use of a burnable self-shielded absorber, the reactivity control can be approximately linearized and can theoretically provide a matching compensation to the reactivity loss rate due to U-235 depletion and fission product poisoning. The nuclear and material properties of the rare earth oxide Gd 2 O 3 have made it the most promising material compatible with the requirements and objectives of a burnable poison. The purpose of the document presented is to provide a summary of the information presently available on the material properties and characteristics of UO 2 to Gd 2 O 3 nuclear fuel

  9. Use of isotopically modified erbium to improve fuel cycle economics in IRIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franceschini, F.; Petrovic, B.

    2004-01-01

    IRIS is a 335 MWe PWR with integral primary circuit. Its design is compatible with long cycles, up to 4 years. Advanced fuel management techniques are employed to support this objective; among others, novel use of burnable absorbers is considered. Erbium is one absorber that is currently utilized in PWRs. It has several desirable properties, notably, it is a resonant absorber, thus making the reactivity feedback coefficients more negative. However, it also has a non-trivial residual reactivity penalty, due primarily to its isotope 166 Er. This paper examines the improvement in core neutronics and cycle economics that could be achieved if isotopically modified erbium (with reduced 166 Er fraction and increased 167 Er fraction) is employed as burnable absorber, instead of natural erbium, thus eliminating or reducing the reactivity penalty. The core performance with modified erbium absorber remains otherwise similar to that employing natural erbium burnable absorber. The gain in reactivity may be used to extend the cycle, or, the 235 U enrichment may be reduced (for the same cycle length) with a corresponding saving in the uranium enrichment cost. This gain has been employed to estimate the breakeven cost of producing the modified erbium through Laser Isotope Separation (LIS). A model to evaluate LIS economics is being developed and will serve as a basis for further studies. Preliminary analysis indicates that this approach may result in an overall reduction of the fuel cycle cost.(author)

  10. Conceptual Engineering of CARA Fuel Element with Negative Void Coefficient for Atucha II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lestani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimentally validated void reactivity calculations were used to study the feasibility of a change in the design basis of Atucha II Nuclear Power Plant including the Large LOCA event. The use of CARA fuel element with burnable neutronic absorbers and enriched uranium is proposed instead of the original fuel. The void reactivity, refuelling costs, and power peaking factors are analysed at conceptual level to optimize the burnable neutronic absorber, the enrichment grade, and their distribution inside the fuel. This work concludes that, for the considered plant conditions, either a void reactivity coefficient granting no prompt critical excursion on Large LOCA or negative void reactivity is achievable, with advantages on refuelling cost and linear power density.

  11. Nuclear fuel assembly with a shock absorber system especially for seismic shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    Hydraulic system for absorbing impacts imparted to fuel assemblies. Internal buffers that brace the fuel assemblies so as to restrain their longitudinal displacement, rest against mobile spring buffers. Some of these spring buffers have plungers sliding in hollow tubular guide uprights provided with longitudinal slots. The end of each upright is closed by a plate fitted with an orifice. When an earthquake forces the plunger and spring buffer assemblies to move, the water under pressure in the upright guide tubes stop this movement. This water, which gushes from the holes in the plates, enables the displacement to take place at a controlled rate at which the forces applied are absorbed in complete safety. The plungers gradually close up the slots in the guide uprights, thereby progressively reducing the section through which the water inside the guide upright can flow out. The resistance increases progressively and protects the structure of the reactor core [fr

  12. Thermo- and fluid-dynamic studies on fuel rod and absorber bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, H.; Moeller, R.; Tschoeke, H.; Trippe, G.; Weinberg, D.

    1978-01-01

    The operating safety of a nuclear reactor requires a more reliable strength analysis of the core elements subject to high stresses (fuel, breeding and absorber elements). This is among other things in a decisive way dependent on: - the maximum operating temperatures of the core element components, - the temperature gradients, - the rate of temperature variations. The calculation of these quantities as good as possible is the subject of the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic design of core elements and core. (orig.) [de

  13. Evaluation of the in pile performance of boron containing fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Gwanyoon; Sohn, Dongseong

    2012-01-01

    The world rare earth resource are heavily concentrated in certain area and if these natural resources are weaponized by a country, we may confront serious difficulty because rare earth element gadolinium(Gd) is used as burnable poison material in some nuclear power plants (NPP) in Korea. Gd is used as a neutron absorbing material in Gd 2 O 3 form and mixed with UO 2 When boron is used as burnable poison in nuclear fuel, in fuel pellets. The burnable poison mixed in the fuel pellets is called integral burnable absorber (BA) design which differentiates it from the old separate BA design. In the old separate BA design, boron(B) was used in borosilicate glass (PYREX) form and placed in guide tubes. With the development of the concern over the availability of rare earth material Gd, B is considered as a candidate material replacing Gd for the case when the rare earth material is weaponized. However the idea for new boron BA design is integral type because the integral type BA design has several benefits over the separate BA design, such as reduction of radioactive waste, more positions for BA location, etc. 10 B absorbs a neutron and produces helium by the following reaction: 10 B + n → 7 Li + 4 He The helium produced by the nuclear reaction may cause the increase of rod internal pressure and change the gap conductivity if the significant amount of helium gas is released to the gap between the pellet and the cladding. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the in-pile behaviors of B containing pellet. However, few experiment have been carried out so far on the behavior of in-pile produced helium in UO 2 fuel pellets, especially for the cases boron compound is mixed with UO 2 In this paper, we will evaluate the production and the release of helium depending on fuel. 10 B concentration in the fuel

  14. Impact of fuel fabrication and fuel management technologies on uranium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnsberger, P.L.; Stucker, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Uranium utilization in commercial pressurized water reactors is a complex function of original NSSS design, utility energy requirements, fuel assembly design, fuel fabrication materials and fuel fabrication materials and fuel management optimization. Fuel design and fabrication technologies have reacted to the resulting market forcing functions with a combination of design and material changes. The technologies employed have included ever-increasing fuel discharge burnup, non-parasitic structural materials, burnable absorbers, and fissile material core zoning schemes (both in the axial and radial direction). The result of these technological advances has improved uranium utilization by roughly sixty percent from the infancy days of nuclear power to present fuel management. Fuel management optimization technologies have also been developed in recent years which provide fuel utilization improvements due to core loading pattern optimization. This paper describes the development and impact of technology advances upon uranium utilization in modern pressurized water reactors. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs

  15. Review of the status of reactor physics predictive methods for burnable poisons in CAGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edens, D.J.; McEllin, M.

    1983-01-01

    An essential component of the design of Commercial Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor fuel necessary to achieve higher discharge irradiations is the incorporation of burnable poisons. The poisons enable the more highly enriched fuel required to reach higher irradiation to be loaded without increasing the peak channel power. The optimum choice of fuel enrichment and poison loading will be made using reactor physics predictive methods developed by Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories. The paper describes these methods and the evidence available to support them from theoretical comparisons, zero energy experiments, WAGR irradiations, and measurements on operating CAGR's. (author)

  16. Burnup calculation and analysis of burnable poison gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wei

    1989-01-01

    The analysis and calculation of thermal group parameters of gadolinium oxide as burnable poison, and characteristics of energy spectrum with change of burnup are presented. At the same time the theoretical problems of this new type of burnable poison which is used in PWR design is discussed

  17. ABB advanced BWR and PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkrans, S.; Helmersson, S.; Andersson, S.

    1999-01-01

    Fuel designed and fabricated by ABB is now operating in 40 PWRs and BWRs in Europe, the United States and Korea. An excellent fuel reliability track record has been established. High burnups are proven for both BWR and PWR. Thermal margin improving features and advanced burnable absorber concepts enable the utilities to adopt demanding duty cycles to meet new economic objectives. In particular we note the excellent reliability record of ABB PWR fuel equipped with Guardian TM debris filter, proven to meet the -6 rod-cycles fuel failure goal, and the out-standing operating record of the SVEA 10x10 BWR fuel, where ABB is the only vendor to date with multi batch experience to high burnup. ABB is dedicated to maintain high fuel reliability as well as continually improve and develop a broad line of BWR and PWR products. ABB's development and fuel follow-up activities are performed in close co-operation with its customers. (orig.)

  18. Results of trial operation of the WWER advanced fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilchenko, I.; Dragunov, Y.; Mikhalchuk, A.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes results from experimental operation of advanced WWER-1000 fuel assemblies (AFA) at five units in Balakovo NPP. Advanced fuel is developed according to the concept of standard WWER-1000 fuel assembly (jacket-free). The new features includes: 1) zirconium guiding channels (alloy E-635 and E-110) and spacer grids (alloy E-110); 2) integrated burnable absorber gadolinium; 3) extended service life of fuel assemblies (FA) and absorber rods (possibility of repair of FA); 4) improved adoption to reactor conditions. Some results of AFA pilot operation of a three year operation are presented and analyses of effectiveness of improvements are made concerning application of zirconium channels and grids; application of integrated burnable absorbers; extension of FA and absorbing rods service life and FA repairability. These new features of WWER-1000 fuel design allow: 1) to reduce the average fuel enrichment to the 3.77% instead of 4.31% in U-235; 2) to reduce the FA axial load in reactor hot state by 40%,; 3) increasing of fuel operation in reactor to the 30000 effective days with possibility to have a 5-year residence time in the reactor. The design of new generation FA for WWER-440 reactors involves few key changes. Fuel inventory in new fuel design is increased due to elongation of fuel stack and reducing the diameter of the central hole. Vibration stability is enhanced as a result of: no-play junction of the fuel rod with the lower grid; change of SG arrangements; strengthening of the lower grid unit; secure of the central tube in the gap. Water-uranium ration is increased. Introduction of all these kinds of modernization in a 5-year fuel cycle reduces fuel component in the energy cost to the 7%

  19. Utilization of gadolinium burnable poison for reactivity control of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.; Segev, M.

    1985-01-01

    Summarized here is an attempt to utilize gadolinium as a burnable poison for total reactivity control of a PWR core equilibrium cycle, i.e., control without a soluble poison system. In the course of the research, a few design guidelines evolved: 1) gadolinium can be utilized well in the form of a lumped poison rod; 2) the optimal gadolinium rod is an annulus of gadolinium immersed in water; 3) BP rods are inserted into vacant thimble guide tubes; and 4) only fresh fuel assemblies are loaded with BP rods, thus avoiding insertion of the BP clusters into irradiated fuel assemblies

  20. Preliminary LEU fuel cycle analyses for the Belgian BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Fuel cycle calculations have been performed with reference HEU fuel and LEU fuel using Cd wires or boron as burnable absorbers. The 235 U content in the LEU element has increased 20% to 480g compared to the reference HEU element. The number of fuel plates has remained unchanged while the fuel meat thickness has increased to 0.76 mm from 0.51 mm. The LEU meat density is 5.1 Mg U/m 3 . The reference fuel cycle was a 31 element core operating at 56 MW with a 19.8 day cycle length and eight fresh elements loaded per cycle. Comparable fuel cycle characteristics can be achieved using the proposed LEU fuel element with either Cd wires or boron burnable absorbers. The neutron flux for E/sub n/ > 1 eV changes very little (<5%) in LEU relative to HEU cores. Thermal flux reductions are 5 to 10% in non-fueled positions, and 20 to 30% in fuel elements

  1. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domoto, Noboru; Masuda, Hiroyuki

    1989-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel assembly loaded with a plurality of fuel rods, the inside of a fuel rod disposed at a high neutron flux region is divided into an inner region and an outer region, and more burnable poisons are mixed in the inner region than in the outer region. Alternatively, the central portion of a pellet disposed in a high neutron flux region is made hollow, in which burnable poisons are charged. This can prevent neutron infinite multiplication factor from decreasing extremely at the initial burning stage. Further, the burnable poisons are not rapidly burnt completely and local peaking coefficient can be controlled. Accordingly, in a case of suppressing a predetermined excess reactivity by using a fuel rod incorporated with the burnable poison, the fuel economy can be improved more and the reactor core controllability can also be improved as compared with the usual case. (T.M.)

  2. ABB Turbo advanced fuel for application in System 80 family of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karoutas, Z.E.; Dixon, D.J.; Shapiro, N.L.

    1998-01-01

    ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Operations (ABB CE) has developed an Advanced Fuel Design, tailored to the Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) environment. This Advanced Fuel Design called Turbo features a full complement of innovative components, including GUARDIAN debris-resistant spacer grids, Turbo Zircaloy mixing grids to increase thermal margin and grid-to-rod fretting resistance, value-added fuel pellets to increase fuel loading, advanced cladding to increase achievable burnup, and axial blankets and Erbium integral burnable absorbers for improving fuel cycle economics. This paper summarizes the Turbo Fuel Design and its application to a System 80 family type plant. Benefits in fuel reliability, thermal margin, improved fuel cycle economics and burn up capability are compared relative to the current ABB CE standard fuel design. The fuel management design and the associated thermal margin are also evaluated. (author)

  3. Boron nitride - boron hybrid coating on uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide fuel. Final report for the period 1 November 1996 - 1 November 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunduz, G.

    1997-11-01

    The report describes work to develop laboratory-scale technology of the deposition of hybrid boron nitrate-metallic boron coating onto the surface of uranium dioxide ore uranium dioxide - gadolinia dioxide fuel pellets. Methods of chemical vapour deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition were used in the Department of Chemical Engineering of the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey. An excellent adherence of boron onto the boron nitrate layer and boron nitrate layer onto the fuel pellet surface was demonstrated. Fine grain-type structure of boron coating and its excellent adherence are good indices for integrated fuel burnable absorber fuels

  4. IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT: PWR Core Calculations Using MCRAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    PetroviĆ, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT CALCULATIONS * In-Core Fuel Management * Methodological Problems of In-Core Fuel Management * In-Core Fuel Management Analytical Tools * PENN STATE FUEL MANAGEMENT PACKAGE * Penn State Fuel Management Package (PFMP) * Assembly Data Description (ADD) * Linking PSU-LEOPARD and MCRAC: An Example * MULTICYCLE REACTOR ANALYSIS CODE (MCRAC) * Main Features and Options of MCRAC code * Core geometry * Diffusion equations * 1.5-group model * Multicycle neutronic analysis * Multicycle cost analysis * Criticality search * Power-dependent xenon feedback calculations * Control rod and burnable absorber simulation * Search for LP with flat BOC power distribution * Artificial ADD option * Variable dimensioning technique * RBI version of MCRAC code * Programming changes in PC version * Fuel interchange option * MCRAC Input/Output * General input description * Sample input * Sample output * EXPERIENCE WITH MCRAC CODE * CONCLUSIONS * REFERENCES

  5. Fuel assembly for pressure tube type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Toshio.

    1990-01-01

    For providing a effect of burnable poisons without worsening local power peaking, it is effective to dispose conventional fuel rods incorporated with burnable poisons uniformly to the outermost layer of a fuel assembly in which fuel rods are disposed concentrically in a multilayered state. However, since the irradiation is applied to the outermost layer with high neutron fluxes in this case, the burnable poisons are eliminated rapidly and excess reactivity suppression effect does not last sufficiently. Then, according to the present invention, pellets of a dual layer structure comprising a pellet containing burnable poisons disposed at the center and nuclear fuel materials composed of plutonium-uranium mixed oxides or uranium oxides coated therearound are disposed. In view of the above, it is possible to obtain a fuel assembly which does not increase the suppression of excess reactivity at the initial stage and does not promote the elimination of burnable poisons, without lowering the local power peaking. (T.M.)

  6. Precise calculation of neutron-capture reactions contribution in energy release for different types of VVER-1000 fuel assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, Georgy; Bahdanovich, Rynat; Pham, Phu

    2017-09-01

    Precise calculation of energy release in a nuclear reactor is necessary to obtain the correct spatial power distribution and predict characteristics of burned nuclear fuel. In this work, previously developed method for calculation neutron-capture reactions - capture component - contribution in effective energy release in a fuel core of nuclear reactor is discussed. The method was improved and implemented to the different models of VVER-1000 reactor developed for MCU 5 and MCNP 4 computer codes. Different models of equivalent cell and fuel assembly in the beginning of fuel cycle were calculated. These models differ by the geometry, fuel enrichment and presence of burnable absorbers. It is shown, that capture component depends on fuel enrichment and presence of burnable absorbers. Its value varies for different types of hot fuel assemblies from 3.35% to 3.85% of effective energy release. Average capture component contribution in effective energy release for typical serial fresh fuel of VVER-1000 is 3.5%, which is 7 MeV/fission. The method will be used in future to estimate the dependency of capture energy on fuel density, burn-up, etc.

  7. Precise calculation of neutron-capture reactions contribution in energy release for different types of VVER-1000 fuel assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tikhomirov Georgy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Precise calculation of energy release in a nuclear reactor is necessary to obtain the correct spatial power distribution and predict characteristics of burned nuclear fuel. In this work, previously developed method for calculation neutron-capture reactions – capture component – contribution in effective energy release in a fuel core of nuclear reactor is discussed. The method was improved and implemented to the different models of VVER-1000 reactor developed for MCU 5 and MCNP 4 computer codes. Different models of equivalent cell and fuel assembly in the beginning of fuel cycle were calculated. These models differ by the geometry, fuel enrichment and presence of burnable absorbers. It is shown, that capture component depends on fuel enrichment and presence of burnable absorbers. Its value varies for different types of hot fuel assemblies from 3.35% to 3.85% of effective energy release. Average capture component contribution in effective energy release for typical serial fresh fuel of VVER-1000 is 3.5%, which is 7 MeV/fission. The method will be used in future to estimate the dependency of capture energy on fuel density, burn-up, etc.

  8. Odd-isotope enrichment studies of Gd by double resonance laser-ionization for the production of burnable nuclear reactor poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santala, M.I.K.; Daavittila, A.S.; Lauranto, H.M.; Salomaa, R.R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Because of its large neutron capture cross-section, gadolinium (Gd) is widely used as burnable poison in nuclear reactors. Only two of its naturally occurring seven isotopes are strong neutron absorbers; hence, it would be desirable to enrich Gd in those isotopes. We demonstrate experimentally that significant enrichment can be achieved by two-step laser-ionization by relatively broadband (bandwidth 1-2 GHz) lasers and by utilizing the isotope shifts only. Our results indicate that the content of the strong absorbers can be raised from the natural 30% to nearly 70%. We also compare the performance of this partially enriched Gd to natural Gd and to pure 157 Gd, the most strongly absorbing isotope, as burnable poison. (orig.)

  9. the effect of advanced fuel designs on fuel utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarikaya, B.; Colak, U.; Tombakoglu, M.; Yilmazbayhan, A.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel management is one of the key topic in nuclear engineering. It is possible to increase fuel burnup and reactor lifetime by using advanced fuel management strategies. In order to increase the cycle lifetime, required amount of excess reactivity must be added to system. Burnable poisons can be used to compensate this excess reactivity. Usually gadolinium (Gd) is used as burnable poison. But the use of Gd presents some difficulties that have not been encountered with the use of boron

  10. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lumin [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  11. LEU fuel cycle analyses for the Belgian BR2 Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Equilibrium fuel cycle characteristics were calculated for reference HEU and two proposed LEU fuel cycles using an 11-group diffusion-theory neutron flux solution in hexagonal-Z geometry. The diffusion theory model was benchmarked with a detailed Monte Carlo core model. The two proposed LEU fuel designs increased the 235 U loading 20% and the fuel meat volume 51%. The first LEU design used 10 B as a burnable absorber. Either proposed LEU fuel element would provide equilibrium fuel cycle characteristics similar to those of the HEU fuel cycle. Irradiation rates of Co control followers and Ir disks in the center of the core were reduced 6 ± 1% in the LEU equilibrium core compared to reference HEU core. 11 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  12. New UO2 fuel studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehaudt, P.; Lemaignan, C.; Caillot, L.; Mocellin, A.; Eminet, G.

    1998-01-01

    With improved UO 2 fuels, compared with the current PWR, one would enable to: retain the fission products, rise higher burn-ups and deliver the designed power in reactor for longer times, limit the pellet cladding interaction effects by easier deformation at high temperatures. Specific studies are made in each field to understand the basic mechanisms responsible for these improvements. Four programs on new UO 2 fuels are underway in the laboratory: advanced microstructure fuels (doped fuels), fuels containing Er 2 O 3 a burnable absorber, fuels with improved caesium retention, composite fuels. The advanced microstructure UO 2 fuels have special features such as: high grain sizes to lengthen the fission gas diffusion paths, intragranular precipitates as fission gas atoms pinning sites, intergranular silica based viscoplastic phases to improve the creep properties. The grain size growth can be obtained with a long time annealing or with corundum type oxide additives partly soluble in the UO 2 lattice. The amount of doping element compared with its solubility limit and the sintering conditions allows to obtain oxide or metallic precipitates. The fuels containing Er 2 O 3 as a burnable absorber are under irradiation in the TANOX device at the present time. Specific sintering conditions are required to improve the erbium solubility in UO 2 and to reach standard or large grain sizes. The improved caesium retention fuels are doped with SiO 2 +A1 2 O 3 or SiO 2 +ZrO 2 additives which may form stable compounds with the Cs element in accidental conditions. The composite fuels are made of UO 2 particles of about 100 μm in size dispersed in a molybdenum metallic (CERMET) or MgA1 2 O 4 ceramic (CERCER) matrix. The CERMET has a considerably higher thermal conductivity and remains ''cold'' during irradiation. The concept of double barrier (matrix+fuel) against fission products is verified for the CERMET fuel. A thermal analysis of all the irradiated rods shows that the thermal

  13. Progress in safety evaluation for the JMTR core conversion to LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, F.; Komori, Y.; Saito, J.; Komukai, B.; Ando, H.; Nakata, H.; Sakakura, A.; Niiho, S.; Saito, M.; Futamura, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The JMTR (50 MWt) has been in steady operation with MEU fuel since July 1986. The effort is still continued to convert the core from MEU to LEU fuel. The LEU silicide fuel element at 4.8 gU/cm 3 with Cd wires as burnable absorbers has been selected in order to achieve upgraded fuel cycle performance of extended cycle length and reduced control rod movement operation. The neutronic calculation methods (diffusion theory model) developed for the LEU core with Cd wires was benchmarked with a detailed Monte Carlo model and verified experimentally using the critical facility, JMTRC. Hydraulic tests of the LEU silicide fuel element with Cd wires were completed with satisfactory results, and measurements of release/born (R/B) ratios of FPs of silicide fuel at high temperature are in progress. (orig.)

  14. Fuel characteristics needed for optimal operation of the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.; Beeckmans, A.; Gubel, P.

    1998-01-01

    The standard BR2 fuel element contains 400 g 235 U under the form of UAl x with burnable absorbers homogeneously mixed into the fuel meat. The uranium is highly enriched with a density of ∼1.30 g U/cm 3 . This fuel element was developed in the early seventies to satisfy the irradiation conditions required by many experimental programmes: large reactivity available, cycle length, hard neutron spectrum, limited motion of the control rods during the cycle thereby stabilizing the irradiation conditions. Another benefit is the reduction of the fuel consumption by increasing the burnup at discharge. BR2 has recently been restarted after the completion of an important refurbishment programme. Future utilization will again be concentrated on engineering R and D in the field of nuclear fuels, materials and safety, and on radioisotope production. Therefore the required irradiation conditions and the corresponding fuel characteristics remain essentially the same as in the past. (author)

  15. Specific features of the WWER Uranium-Gadolinium fuel behavior at BOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcheglov, A.; Proselkov, V.; Volkov, B.

    2013-01-01

    The calculated-experimental analysis of the WWER fuel behavior with 5%wt of gadolinium oxide at the beginning of life (BOL) is presented. The results are based on the data on fuel centerline temperature measurements, gas media pressure inside the cladding and fuel elongation obtained during irradiation of the test fuel rods in HBWR (Halden). Computer analysis of experimental data is performed with TOPRA-2, version 2 code. It is shown that specific features of the uranium-gadolinium fuel behavior at the early of life is due to presence of burnable absorber influencing the average linear heat rating, radial power distribution and lower thermal conductivity. In particular, the analysis of “late” relocation effect on the maximum Gd fuel temperature is presented. (authors)

  16. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadaoka, Noriyuki.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain a satisfactory integrity by preventing the increase of corrosion at the outer surface of a fuel can near the point of contact between the fuel can and the spacer due to the use of fuel pellets incorporated with burnable poisons. Constitution: Since reactor coolants are at high temperature and high pressure, zirconium and water are brought into reaction to proceed oxidation at the outer surface of a fuel can to form uniform oxidation layers. However, abrasion corrosion is additionally formed at the contact portion between the spacer and the fuel can, by which the corrosion is increased by about 25 %. For preventing such nodular corrosion, fuel pellets not incorporated with burnable poisons are charged at a portion of the fuel rod where the spacer is supported and fuel pellets incorporated with burnable poisons are charged at the positions other than about to thereby suppress the amount of the corrosion at the portion where the corrosion of the fuel can is most liable to be increased to thereby improve the fuel integrity. That is, radiolysis of coolants due to gamma-rays produced from gadolinium is lowered to reduce the oxygen concentration near the outer surface thereby preventing the corrosion. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. The use of fuel burnable poison in inherent safe LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerullo, N.; Bufalino, D.; Fratangelo, P.; Iannaccone, N.; Riscossa, P.

    1996-01-01

    Pressurized Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR) are characterized by low power density and passive engineered safety features. A significant reduction of in core soluble boron concentration obtained replacing it by gadolinium or erbium allows one to improve the reactor life and to maintain the safety characteristics. In this paper a new original neutronic calculation system, developed at Genova and Pisa Universities, with the collaboration of the SORIT, is described and checked, taking as a basis a critical experience and Monte Carlo cell calculations performed, in regular and gadolinium poisoned cells. This system is particularly qualified to meet the need of accurate resonance absorption calculations

  18. A neutronic feasibility study of the AP1000 design loaded with fully ceramic micro-encapsulated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, C.; Ji, W.

    2013-01-01

    A neutronic feasibility study is performed to evaluate the utilization of fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel in the AP1000 reactor design. The widely used Monte Carlo code MCNP is employed to perform the full core analysis at the beginning of cycle (BOC). Both the original AP1000 design and the modified design with the replacement of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with FCM fuel compacts are modeled and simulated for comparison. To retain the original excess reactivity, ranges of fuel particle packing fraction and fuel enrichment in the FCM fuel design are first determined. Within the determined ranges, the reactor control mechanism employed by the original design is directly used in the modified design and the utilization feasibility is evaluated. The worth of control of each type of fuel burnable absorber (discrete/integral fuel burnable absorbers and soluble boron in primary coolant) is calculated for each design and significant differences between the two designs are observed. Those differences are interpreted by the fundamental difference of the fuel form used in each design. Due to the usage of silicon carbide as the matrix material and the fuel particles fuel form in FCM fuel design, neutron slowing down capability is increased in the new design, leading to a much higher thermal spectrum than the original design. This results in different reactivity and fission power density distributions in each design. We conclude that a direct replacement of fuel pellets by the FCM fuel in the AP1000 cannot retain the original optimum reactor core performance. Necessary modifications of the core design should be done and the original control mechanism needs to be re-designed. (authors)

  19. Standard specification for boron-Based neutron absorbing material systems for use in nuclear spent fuel storage racks

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This specification defines criteria for boron-based neutron absorbing material systems used in racks in a pool environment for storage of nuclear light water reactor (LWR) spent-fuel assemblies or disassembled components to maintain sub-criticality in the storage rack system. 1.2 Boron-based neutron absorbing material systems normally consist of metallic boron or a chemical compound containing boron (for example, boron carbide, B4C) supported by a matrix of aluminum, steel, or other materials. 1.3 In a boron-based absorber, neutron absorption occurs primarily by the boron-10 isotope that is present in natural boron to the extent of 18.3 ± 0.2 % by weight (depending upon the geological origin of the boron). Boron, enriched in boron-10 could also be used. 1.4 The materials systems described herein shall be functional – that is always be capable to maintain a B10 areal density such that subcriticality Keff <0.95 or Keff <0.98 or Keff < 1.0 depending on the design specification for the service...

  20. Performance predictions and manufacturing concerns of burnable poison rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, R.A.; Buescher, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    Burnable poison rods for reactors designed by B and W consist of low density pellets, composed of boron carbide dispersed in an alumina matrix (Al 2 O 3 --B 4 C), which are contained in Zircaloy-4 tubes. To predict reliable operation of these rods, the irradiation behavior of the components must be known. Performance models were developed based on experimental irradiation data. During rod fabrication, care must be taken to limit the amount of hydrogen in the rod because of the propensity of Zircaloy to hydride in the presence of high levels of hydrogen. Furthermore, the hygroscopic nature of alumina dictates that care must be taken to avoid moisture (a primary source of hydrogen) in the rods. Manufacturing and quality testing procedures have been developed to provide conformance to the design criteria. Examinations have been performed on irradiated burnable poison rods which verify the adequacy of both performance models and manufacturing procedures

  1. Calculation qualification of gadolinium burnable poisons in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaucheprat, P.

    1988-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis constitutes the qualification on the one end of Appolo-Neptune scheme for the gadolinium burnable poison in a pressurized water reactor, and on the other end of basis nuclear data on natural gadolinium. This study has permitted to reduce by a factor 3 the actual incertitude on the gadolinium poison comparatively at precisions cited in international benchmarks calculations [fr

  2. Recoverable neutron absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keay, R.T.; Williams, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    In the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel elements the nuclear fuel material is separated from the material which forms the remainder of the elements by dissolving the nuclear fuel material in nitric acid. Neutron absorbers are added to control criticality. The neutron absorbers comprise pellets each having a core of neutron absorbing material encased in a sheath of a material which is resistant to attack by acid, the core or sheath being magnetic. The sheath protects the core of neutron absorbing material from attack by the acid and the magnetic content of the core or sheath enables the absorbers to be recovered for reuse by magnetic separation techniques. (author)

  3. Assessment of the insertion of reprocessed fuel spiked with thorium in a PWR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Victor F.; Monteiro, Fabiana B.A.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: victorfc@fis.grad.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Reprocessed fuel by UREX+ technique and spiked with thorium was inserted in a PWR core and neutronic parameters have been analyzed. Based on the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) of the Angra-2 reactor, the core was modeled and simulated with SCALE6.0 package. The neutronic data evaluation was carried out by the analysis of the effective and infinite multiplication factors, and the fuel evolution during the burnup. The conversion ratio (CR) was also evaluated. The results show that, when inserting reprocessed fuel spiked with thorium, the insertion of burnable poison rods is not necessary, due to the amount of absorber isotopes present in the fuel. Besides, the conversion ratio obtained was greater than the presented by standard UO{sub 2} fuel, indicating the possibility of extending the burnup. (author)

  4. Neutron collar calibration for assay of LWR [light-water reactor] fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.; Pieper, J.E.

    1987-03-01

    The neutron-coincidence collar is used for the verification of the uranium content in light-water reactor fuel assemblies. An AmLi neutron source is used to give an active interrogation of the fuel assembly to measure the 235 U content, and the 238 U content is verified from a passive neutron-coincidence measurement. This report gives the collar calibration data of pressurized-water reactor and boiling-water reactor fuel assemblies. Calibration curves and correction factors are presented for neutron absorbers (burnable poisons) and different fuel assembly sizes. The data were collected at Exxon Nuclear, Franco-Belge de Fabrication de Combustibles, ASEA-Atom, and other nuclear fuel fabrication facilities

  5. Effect of densification additive (Al (OH)3) and U3O8 recycle in sintering UO2-7wt% Gd2O3 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, L.R.; Riella, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear fuels are the consumable parts of nuclear reactors, and this has several consequences. From an economic point of view, it is important to keep the fuel into reactor for long time. In this context the use of burnable poison, as advanced fuel based in gadolinium oxide dispersed in a uranium oxide matrix, is a technological solution adopted worldwide. The function of the burnable poison fuels is to control the neutrons population in the nuclear reactors cores during its start up and the beginning of the fuel burning cycle to extending their use. In consequence of the use of this advanced fuel, the nuclear reactors can operate with higher rate of power, optimizing the use of the nuclear fuels. The objective of the present work is to show the development of UO 2 -7wt% Gd 2 O 3 burnable absorber containing pellets by using mechanical blending of (Al(OH) 3 ) densification additive and U 3 O 8 of the recycling of nuclear fuel scrap. In the procedures, the gadolinium content of 7 wt% was established as a consequence of the P and D Cooperation Programmer firmed by the CTMSP and the INB, looking for the nationalization of this type of nuclear fuel used in the Nuclear Facility of Angra 2. The experimental results permit to observe the effectiveness action of the compound Al(OH) 3 as a additive to promote the increasing in the densification of the (U-Gd)O 2 pellets during its sintering, when amounts of recycle are recycled to the production processing up to 10 wt%, and when 0,20 wt% of Al(OH) 3 is used as additive. (author)

  6. Characteristics and use of urania-gadolinia fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    Burnable absorber fuels (BAF) are utilized, or are being considered for utilization, in all BWRs, in most PWRs and more recently in WWERs. The topic is therefore relevant to approximately 330 out of the 420 operating reactors in the world, representing 280 of the 330 GW(e) installed capacity worldwide. In the light of this importance, the IAEA has decided to issue this report providing an overall view of the various aspects of BAF. With the exception of Chapter 1, the whole report is devoted to urania-gadolinia fuel (''Gd fuel''), the most commonly used BAF, and a comprehensive technical review of this topic is provided, although the report does not include a complete survey of all examples of Gd utilization throughout the industry. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Preliminary Evaluation of Alternate Designs for HFIR Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Valentine, Jennifer R [ORNL

    2014-11-01

    Engineering design studies of the feasibility of conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of an effort sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI)/Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The fuel type selected by the program for the conversion of the five high-power research reactors in the U.S. that still use HEU fuel is a new U-Mo monolithic fuel. Studies by ORNL have previously indicated that HFIR can be successfully converted using the new fuel provided (1) the reactor power can be increased from 85 MW to 100 MW and (2) the fuel can be fabricated to a specific reference design. Fabrication techniques for the new fuel are under development by the program but are still immature, especially for the complex aspects of the HFIR fuel design. In FY 2012, the program underwent a major shift in focus to emphasize developing and qualifying processes for the fabrication of reliable and affordable LEU fuel. In support of this new focus and in an effort to ensure that the HFIR fuel design is as suitable for reliable fabrication as possible, ORNL undertook the present study to propose and evaluate several alternative design features. These features include (1) eliminating the fuel zone axial contouring in the previous reference design by substituting a permanent neutron absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, (2) relocating the burnable neutron absorber from the fuel plates of the inner fuel element to the side plates of the inner fuel element (the fuel plates of the outer fuel element do not contain a burnable absorber), (3) relocating the fuel zone inside the fuel plate to be centered on the centerline of the depth of the plate, and (4) reshaping the radial contour of the relocated fuel zone to be symmetric about this centerline. The present

  8. Preliminary Evaluation of Alternate Designs for HFIR Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Cook, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jain, Prashant [ORNL; Valentine, Jennifer [ORNL

    2014-10-30

    Engineering design studies of the feasibility of conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of an effort sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI)/Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The fuel type selected by the program for the conversion of the five high-power research reactors in the U.S. that still use HEU fuel is a new U-Mo monolithic fuel. Studies by ORNL have previously indicated that HFIR can be successfully converted using the new fuel provided (1) the reactor power can be increased from 85 MW to 100 MW and (2) the fuel can be fabricated to a specific reference design. Fabrication techniques for the new fuel are under development by the program but are still immature, especially for the “complex” aspects of the HFIR fuel design. In FY 2012, the program underwent a major shift in focus to emphasize developing and qualifying processes for the fabrication of reliable and affordable LEU fuel. In support of this new focus and in an effort to ensure that the HFIR fuel design is as suitable for reliable fabrication as possible, ORNL undertook the present study to propose and evaluate several alternative design features. These features include (1) eliminating the fuel zone axial contouring in the previous reference design by substituting a permanent neutron absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, (2) relocating the burnable neutron absorber from the fuel plates of the inner fuel element to the side plates of the inner fuel element (the fuel plates of the outer fuel element do not contain a burnable absorber), (3) relocating the fuel zone inside the fuel plate to be centered on the centerline of the depth of the plate, and (4) reshaping the radial contour of the relocated fuel zone to be symmetric about this centerline. The

  9. Technical Basis for Peak Reactivity Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Mertyurek, Ugur [ORNL; Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate application of burnup credit for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase (1) investigates applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in spent fuel pools (SFPs) to storage and transportation systems and (2) evaluates validation of both reactivity (keff) calculations and burnup credit nuclide concentrations within these methods. The second phase will focus on extending burnup credit beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the first phase, including an analysis of lattice design parameters and depletion effects, as well as both validation components. Initial efforts related to extended burnup credit are discussed in a companion paper. Peak reactivity analyses have been used in criticality analyses for licensing of BWR fuel in SFPs over the last 20 years. These analyses typically combine credit for the gadolinium burnable absorber present in the fuel with a modest amount of burnup credit. Gadolinium burnable absorbers are used in BWR assemblies to control core reactivity. The burnable absorber significantly reduces assembly reactivity at beginning of life, potentially leading to significant increases in assembly reactivity for burnups less than 15–20 GWd/MTU. The reactivity of each fuel lattice is dependent on gadolinium loading. The number of gadolinium-bearing fuel pins lowers initial lattice reactivity, but it has a small impact on the burnup and reactivity of the peak. The gadolinium concentration in each pin has a small impact on initial lattice reactivity but a significant effect on the reactivity of the peak and the burnup at which the peak occurs. The importance of the lattice parameters and depletion conditions are primarily determined by their impact on the gadolinium depletion. Criticality code validation for BWR burnup

  10. Implementation of strength pareto evolutionary algorithm II in the multiobjective burnable poison placement optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharari, Rahman [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Poursalehi, Navid; Abbasi, Mohmmadreza; Aghale, Mahdi [Nuclear Engineering Dept, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this research, for the first time, a new optimization method, i.e., strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm II (SPEA-II), is developed for the burnable poison placement (BPP) optimization of a nuclear reactor core. In the BPP problem, an optimized placement map of fuel assemblies with burnable poison is searched for a given core loading pattern according to defined objectives. In this work, SPEA-II coupled with a nodal expansion code is used for solving the BPP problem of Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) pressurized water reactor. Our optimization goal for the BPP is to achieve a greater multiplication factor (K-e-f-f) for gaining possible longer operation cycles along with more flattening of fuel assembly relative power distribution, considering a safety constraint on the radial power peaking factor. For appraising the proposed methodology, the basic approach, i.e., SPEA, is also developed in order to compare obtained results. In general, results reveal the acceptance performance and high strength of SPEA, particularly its new version, i.e., SPEA-II, in achieving a semioptimized loading pattern for the BPP optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor.

  11. Implementation of strength pareto evolutionary algorithm II in the multiobjective burnable poison placement optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharari, Rahman; Poursalehi, Navid; Abbasi, Mohmmadreza; Aghale, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    In this research, for the first time, a new optimization method, i.e., strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm II (SPEA-II), is developed for the burnable poison placement (BPP) optimization of a nuclear reactor core. In the BPP problem, an optimized placement map of fuel assemblies with burnable poison is searched for a given core loading pattern according to defined objectives. In this work, SPEA-II coupled with a nodal expansion code is used for solving the BPP problem of Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) pressurized water reactor. Our optimization goal for the BPP is to achieve a greater multiplication factor (K-e-f-f) for gaining possible longer operation cycles along with more flattening of fuel assembly relative power distribution, considering a safety constraint on the radial power peaking factor. For appraising the proposed methodology, the basic approach, i.e., SPEA, is also developed in order to compare obtained results. In general, results reveal the acceptance performance and high strength of SPEA, particularly its new version, i.e., SPEA-II, in achieving a semioptimized loading pattern for the BPP optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor

  12. Implementation of Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm II in the Multiobjective Burnable Poison Placement Optimization of KWU Pressurized Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Gharari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this research, for the first time, a new optimization method, i.e., strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm II (SPEA-II, is developed for the burnable poison placement (BPP optimization of a nuclear reactor core. In the BPP problem, an optimized placement map of fuel assemblies with burnable poison is searched for a given core loading pattern according to defined objectives. In this work, SPEA-II coupled with a nodal expansion code is used for solving the BPP problem of Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU pressurized water reactor. Our optimization goal for the BPP is to achieve a greater multiplication factor (Keff for gaining possible longer operation cycles along with more flattening of fuel assembly relative power distribution, considering a safety constraint on the radial power peaking factor. For appraising the proposed methodology, the basic approach, i.e., SPEA, is also developed in order to compare obtained results. In general, results reveal the acceptance performance and high strength of SPEA, particularly its new version, i.e., SPEA-II, in achieving a semioptimized loading pattern for the BPP optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor.

  13. Application of genetic algorithms to optimize burnable poison placement in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Serkan; Ivanov, Kostadin; Levine, Samuel; Mahgerefteh, Moussa

    2006-01-01

    An efficient and a practical genetic algorithm (GA) tool was developed and applied successfully to Burnable Poison (BP) placement optimization problem in the reference Three Mile Island-1 (TMI-1) core. Core BP optimization problem means developing a BP loading map for a given core loading pattern that minimizes the total Gadolinium (Gd) amount in the core without violating any design constraints. The number of UO 2 /Gd 2 O 3 pins and Gd 2 O 3 concentrations for each fresh fuel location in the core are the decision variables. The objective function was to minimize the total amount of Gd in the core together with the residual Gd reactivity binding at the End-of-Cycle (EOC). The constraints are to keep the maximum peak pin power during the core depletion and soluble boron (SOB) concentration at the Beginning of Cycle (BOC) both less than their limit values. The innovation of this study was to search all of the possible UO 2 /Gd 2 O 3 fuel assembly designs with variable number of UO 2 /Gd 2 O 3 fuel pins and concentration of Gd 2 O 3 in the overall decision space. The use of different fitness functions guided the solution towards desired (good solutions) region in the solution space, which accelerated the GA solution. The main objective of this study was to develop a practical and efficient GA tool and to apply this tool to designing an optimum BP pattern for a given core loading

  14. Effect of densification additive (Al (OH){sub 3}) and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} recycle in sintering UO{sub 2}-7wt% Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuel pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, L.R. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: lauro@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, e-mail: lrsantos@ipen.br; Riella, H.G. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica e Alimentos], e-mail: riella@enq.ufsc.br

    2009-07-01

    The nuclear fuels are the consumable parts of nuclear reactors, and this has several consequences. From an economic point of view, it is important to keep the fuel into reactor for long time. In this context the use of burnable poison, as advanced fuel based in gadolinium oxide dispersed in a uranium oxide matrix, is a technological solution adopted worldwide. The function of the burnable poison fuels is to control the neutrons population in the nuclear reactors cores during its start up and the beginning of the fuel burning cycle to extending their use. In consequence of the use of this advanced fuel, the nuclear reactors can operate with higher rate of power, optimizing the use of the nuclear fuels. The objective of the present work is to show the development of UO{sub 2}-7wt% Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} burnable absorber containing pellets by using mechanical blending of (Al(OH){sub 3}) densification additive and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} of the recycling of nuclear fuel scrap. In the procedures, the gadolinium content of 7 wt% was established as a consequence of the P and D Cooperation Programmer firmed by the CTMSP and the INB, looking for the nationalization of this type of nuclear fuel used in the Nuclear Facility of Angra 2. The experimental results permit to observe the effectiveness action of the compound Al(OH){sub 3} as a additive to promote the increasing in the densification of the (U-Gd)O{sub 2} pellets during its sintering, when amounts of recycle are recycled to the production processing up to 10 wt%, and when 0,20 wt% of Al(OH){sub 3} is used as additive. (author)

  15. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessho, Yasunori; Ishii, Yoshihiko; Sadaoka, Noriyuki.

    1990-01-01

    Burnable poisons are disposed in the lower portions of a water rod, a channel box and a control rod guide pipe in a fuel assembly, and the amount for each of them is set to burn out in one operation cycle. Since the inner side of the water rod and the control rod guide pipe and gaps are filled with steams at the initial and the intermediate stages of the operation cycle, moderation of neutrons is delayed to harden the spectrum. On the other hand, since the burnable poisons are burnt out in the final stage of the operation cycle, γ-ray heating is not expected and since the insides of the water rod and the control rod guide pipe and the gaps are filled with water of great moderation effect, the neutron spectrum arae softened. In view of the above, void coefficient is increased to promote conversion from U-235 to Pu-239 by utilizing exothermic reaction of burnable poisons at the initial and the intermediate stages in the operation cycle and generation of voids are eliminated at the final stage where the burnable poisons are burnt out, thereby enabling effective burning of Pu-239. (N.H.)

  16. New Small LWR Core Designs using Particle Burnable Poisons for Low Boron Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Ho Seong; Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The soluble boron has two major important roles in commercial PWR operations : 1) the control of the long-term reactivity to maintain criticality under normal operation, and 2) the shutdown of the reactor under accidents. However, the removal of the soluble boron gives several advantages in SMRs (Small Modular Reactor). These advantages resulted from the elimination of soluble boron include the significant simplification of nuclear power plant through the removal of pipes, pumps, and purification systems. Also, the use of soluble boron mitigates corrosion problems on the primary coolant loop. Furthermore, the soluble boron-free operation can remove an inadvertent boron dilution accident (BDA) which can lead to a significant insertion of positive reactivity. From the viewpoint of core physics, the removal of soluble boron or reduction of soluble boron concentration makes the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) more negative. From the core design studies using new fuel assemblies, it is shown that the cores have very low critical soluble boron concentrations less than 500ppm, low peaking factors within the design targets, strong negative MTCs over cycles, and large enough shutdown margins both at BOC and EOC. However, the present cores have relatively low average discharge burnups of ∼ 30MWD/kg leading to low fuel economy because the cores use lots of non-fuel burnable poison rods to achieve very low critical boron concentrations. So, in the future, we will perform the trade-off study between the fuel discharge burnup and the boron concentrations by changing fuel assembly design and the core loading pattern.

  17. Qualification of calculation of light water moderated lattices and gadolinium burnable poisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerdan, C.

    1984-10-01

    The aim of this work is, on one hand, to qualify the calculation of fundamental parameters of Pressurized Water Reactors and basic nuclear data, and on the other, to qualify the gadolinium burnable poisons. Our calculations have shown an over-estimation of about 700 pcm, with the presently recommended nuclear data (1979), of the multiplication factor calculated by the assembly code APOLLO concerning cold cores (T=20 0 C). The decoupling shows that the over-estimation essentialy comes from the infinite multiplication factor; as a matter of fact, the migration area has been calculated at 3%. According to our results, we conclude that the calculation, by the APOLLO code, of the perturbation induced by the gadolinium absorbers, is not a problem of time zero, even in the case of interaction with a water hole. The comparison between the performances of the different APOLLO multicell calculation methods illustrates the superiority, with regards to the quality and price, of the EURYDICE modul in its ROTH x 4 option [fr

  18. Program for optimization calculation of a cylindrical cell with a central burnable rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vtorova, O.Yu.; Isakova, L.Ya.; Novikova, N.N.

    1982-01-01

    The SVP program intended for determining optimum characteristics of a cylindrical multiplying unit with a central multilayer highly screened rod containing several burnable absorbers is described. The program consists of the SVP main program in which initial data input and call for the selected optimization subprogram are oraganised, F subprogram where alterated variables are identified, the MARS subprogram is called minimized functional restriction system and restriction performing conditions are formed; the MARS subprogram, where at the specified vector of independent variables the burnup in a multiplying unit with a rod, is calculated; two optimization programs, PB2 and PB2A: the first program solves the problem of nonlinear programming with the restrictions of the first series, the second one with those of the first and second series; a set of accessory subprograms organizing non-format data input search scale adjustment, random numbers and print selection. The program is written in FORTRAN-DUBNA language for the BESM computer. Varied parameters can be rod dimensions, of its zones and multiplying unit, composition of the specified chemical elements of all rod zones and that of the multiplying unit. The type of the minimized functional, composition of restrictions system and that of the varied vector is not determinated and is determined by the considered statement of optimization problem. The program is constructed in such a manner as to pass easily from one problem to the other

  19. Supplemental Reactor Physics Calculations and Analysis of ELF Mk 1A Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Michael A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    These calculations supplement previous the reactor physics work evaluating the Enhanced Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel (ELF) Mk 1A element. This includes various additional comparisons between the current Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and LEU along with further characterization of the performance of the ELF fuel. The excess reactivity to be held down at BOC for ELF Mk 1A fuel is estimated to be approximately $2.75 greater than with HEU for a typical cycle. This is a combined effect of the absence of burnable poison in the ELF fuel and the reduced neck shim worth in LEU fuel compared to HEU. Burnable poison rods were conceptualized for use in the small B positions containing Gd2O3 absorber. These were shown to provide $2.37 of negative reactivity at BOC and to burn out in less than half of a cycle. The worth of OSCCs is approximately the same between HEU and ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. This was evaluated by rotating all banks simultaneously. The safety rod worth is relatively unchanged between HEU and ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. However, this should be reevaluated with different loadings. Neutron flux, both total and fast (>1 MeV), is either the same or reduced upon changing from HEU to ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. This is consistent with the well-established trend of lower neutron fluxes for a given power in LEU than HEU.The IPT loop void reactivity is approximately the same or less positive with ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuel than HEU in the representative loading evaluated.

  20. Study of burnable poisons and gadolinium qualification in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasr, Mohamed.

    1981-09-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a calculation procedure for analyzing light water moderated reactors utilizing gadolinium as a burnable poison. The main points of this work can be summarized as follows: the available cross section data of gadolinium were analysed and corrected whenever it was necessary. The processes which include required precautions for obtaining multigroup cross sections were defined; an exhaustive study of the assumptions used in multicell calculation methods allowed the definition of option to be used for obtaining good results without excessive calculation cost. This study was followed by the interpretation of experimental results; when gadolinium is used in grain structure, a problem of double heterogeneity is encountered. A new calculation method was developed for such situations. Its validity was confirmed by a comparison with the Monte Carlo method; the problems encountered in performing a study of burn up of fuel elements containing gadolinium were analysed and the necessary precautions were established. The effect of the initial charge and geometrical form of the gadolinium and the behavior of lattices during the burn up were examined [fr

  1. Five-years fuel cycle implementation at NPP Dukovany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovicka, M.; Stech, S.; Vesely, P.

    2004-01-01

    The VVER-440 reactor has several fundamental design features that make it well suited for advanced fuel designs. In particular, there exist margins to the thermal limits and possibility to use low Gadolinia content concept for burnable absorbers. The purpose of this paper is to summarize some of the most important results of the modernization program which was accomplished step by step at Dukovany during the last two decades. Introduction of five years cycle in Dukovany started in 2002. Efforts continue to be made for further modernization with impact on the fuel cycle economy and operation flexibility of the plant. The following are the major activities: (i) Power uprating to 105% of nominal power together with fuel enrichment increase with a view to saving the 5x1 year cycle as a minimum. The maximum fuel pellet burnup will increase over 70 MWD/Kg. Startup of the licensing process is expected at the end of 2005. (ii) Upgrade of the plant I and C system which is now being installed at the first reactor (i.e. Unit 3) and will start to operate in April 2005. (iii) Increase in maneuverability of the reactor units by installation of new controllers enabling frequency control and secondary power control (this system was installed during the past years and currently is in operation). Innovation proper in the fuel assembly design, expected or discussed for the next period, includes: (i) Variability of the assembly enrichment according to the customer specification (this possibility is declared by the fuel supplier). (ii) Introduction of axial blankets in the fuel assembly together with axial profiling of the burnable absorber contents. (iii) Installation of a new type of debris filters. (iv) Relieved type of fuel assembly shroud which is transformed to a cage keeping the spacers and preserving the stiff structure of the assembly. This type of shroud was originally designed for VVER-1000 to protect the fuel against effects of bowing. Finally, the future VVER-440 fuel

  2. Transmutation of DUPIC spent fuel in the hyper system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.H.; Song, T.Y.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the transmutation of TRUs of the DUPIC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU) spent fuel has been studied with the HYPER system, which is an LBE-cooled ADS. The DUPIC concept is a synergistic combination of PWRs and CANDUs, in which PWR spent fuels are directly re-utilized in CANDU reactors after a very simple re-fabrication process. In the DUPIC-HYPER fuel cycle, TRUs are recovered by using a pyro-technology and they are incinerated in a metallic fuel form of U-TRU-Zr. The objective of this study is to investigate the TRU transmutation potential of the HYPER core for the DUPIC-HYPER fuel cycle. All the previously-developed HYPER core design concepts were retained except that fuel is composed of TRU from the DUPIC spent fuel. In order to reduce the burnup reactivity swing, a B 4 C burnable absorber is used. The HYPER core characteristics have been analyzed with the REBUS-3/DIF3D code system. (authors)

  3. Most advanced HTP fuel assembly design for EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francillon, Eric; Kiehlmann, Horst-Dieter

    2006-01-01

    End 2003, the Finnish electricity utility Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) signed the contract for building an EPR in Olkiluoto (Finland). Mid 2004, the French electricity utility EDF selected an EPR to be built in France. In 2005, Framatome ANP, an AREVA and Siemens company, announced that they will be pursuing a design certification in the U.S. The EPR development is based on the latest PWR product lines of former Framatome (N4) and Siemens Nuklear (Konvoi). As an introductory part, different aspects of the EPR core characteristics connected to fuel assembly design are presented. It includes means of ensuring reactivity control like hybrid AIC/B4C control rod absorbers and gadolinium as burnable absorber integrated in fuel rods, and specific options for in-core instrumentation, such as Aeroball type instrumentation. Then the design requirements for the EPR fuel assembly are presented in term of very high burnup capacity, rod cladding and fuel assembly reliability. Framatome ANP fuel assembly product characteristics meeting these requirements are then described. EPR fuel assembly design characteristics benefit from the experience feedback of the latest fuel assembly products designed within Framatome ANP, leading to resistance to assembly deformation, high fuel rod restraint and prevention of handling hazards. EPR fuel assembly design features the best components composing the cornerstones of the upgraded family of fuel assemblies that FRAMATOME ANP proposes today. This family is based on a set of common characteristics and associated features, which include the HMP grid as bottom end spacer, the MONOBLOC guide tube and the Robust FUELGUARD as lower tie plate, the use of the M5 Alloy, as cladding and structure material. This fully re-crystallized, ternary Zr-Nb-O alloy produces radically improved in-reactor corrosion, very low hydrogen uptake and growth and an excellent creep behavior, which are described there. EPR fuel assembly description also includes fuel rod

  4. Control component structure and its removal from fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, G.T.; Schluderberg, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    This invention provides methods and apparatus for securing and removing burnable poison rods to the spider in a fuel assembly. A pin is secured to one of the transverse ends of a burnable poison rod. The pin is seated in a bore that is formed in the spider arm appropriate to the rod under consideration. The burnable poison rod is separated from the spider arm by applying a force in a direction that is coincident with the longitudinal axis of the rod and its associated pin. The force is of sufficient magnitude to press the pin out of the spider arm

  5. Crud formation evaluation at the advanced fuel operating in Angra-1 NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Diego; Palheiros, Franklin; Gomes, Sydney, E-mail: franklin@inb.gov.br, E-mail: diegogomez@inb.gov.br, E-mail: sydney@inb.gov.br [Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Superintendência de Engenharia do Combustível

    2017-07-01

    In nuclear engineering, 'crud' is a technical term. It stands for Chalk River Unidentified Deposit, originally found on the cladding surface of some fuel rods in the referred canadian reactor, for which it was named. The deposit can be flaky, porous, or hard depending on its chemical composition. In most cases, it reduces the power output of nuclear reactors - the deposits absorb boron and the neutrons that keep the fission reaction going, as well lead to a more corrosion scenario by increasing the oxide/metal interface surface temperature. This issue might been a concern at Angra 1 where many design alterations have been performed in the new Fuel assembly design. The so called 16NGF has a smaller fuel rod diameter, different burnable absorber - gadolinium instead of pyrex borosilicate glass, hydraulic mismatch compared to 16STD fuel, new IFM grids, higher FDeltaH and several other characteristics. All those features lead to a increase in the subcooled boiling rates, which might favour particles depositions in fuel cladding forming the undesired Crud deposits. In order to evaluate how those implementations could impact negatively the new fuel performance at Angra 1, a study has ben carried out using Thermal Hydraulic calculations. With that, an existing methodology was used to assess the associated risks and what could be the done to mitigate further development of crud in 16NGF Fuel in Angra 1. (author)

  6. Upgrading nuclear-fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spetz, S.W.

    1978-01-01

    Because of the unavailability of nuclear-fuel reprocessing, more efficient methods must be found in using fresh uranium-fuel supplies in LWRs. The lumped-burnable-poison shuffle and multibatch-shuffle schemes are proposed by one reactor supplier as viable means of obtaining this practical and economical objective. Another means of attaining better fuel efficiency might be by increasing the number of fuel assemblies, with a higher uranium-enrichment percentage. Thus, refueling might be made at 18-month intervals

  7. Burnable poisons in the light water reactor design, microburnup experiments and calculations. Part of a coordinated programme on burnup calculations and experiments for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penndorf, K.

    1976-04-01

    Investigations on Research Agreement N 1519/CF (1.8.1974 - 31.7.1975) entitled ''Burnable poisons in light water reactor design, microburnup experiments and calculations'' were carried out in the frame of the IAEA's coordinated research programme on ''Burn-up calculation and experiments for thermal reactors''. The theoretical and experimental work on application of solid burnable poison used for reduction of the amount of boric acid necessary to control of PWR or to lower the number of control rods needed in a BWR. Solid burnable poisons are needed in present PWR designs for the reduction of the boron acid concentration in order to prevent positive coefficients of reactivity. The special operational conditions of a ship reactor lead to the application of this kind of poison for compensation of almost all burnup reactivity. This strengthens the necessity of a very accurate and many dimensional calculations because an appropriate binding of reactivity has to be kept over the whole cycle time. Several burnup experiments had been run in the 15 MW material test reactor FRG-II. The following devices have been irradiated: poison pins within and without PWR fuel pin lattice segments and fuel pins containing pellets with a poison core. Measurements of reactivity, fluence, fission product concentration have been performed. Methods applied were γ-scanning and neutron pulse, radiography and transmission measurement techniques. Evaluation of the experiments was done by one and two dimensional Ssub(N) transport burnup calculations. In parallel a collision probability transport burnup code for current PWR design work is being developed, the main feature of which is economy in manpower and computer time

  8. Absorber for nuclear radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planchamp, C.

    1987-01-01

    Neutrons, gamma and x radiations are highly absorbed by an alloy of gadolinium and aluminium. Workability, thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance of the alloy are good. Possible applications are transport or storage of radioactive wastes or nuclear fuels, fuel racks, shelters, etc [fr

  9. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Sei; Ando, Ryohei; Mitsutake, Toru.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly suitable to a BWR-type reactor and improved especially with the nuclear characteristic, heat performance, hydraulic performance, dismantling or assembling performance and economical property. A part of poison rods are formed as a large-diameter/multi-region poison rods having a larger diameter than a fuel rod. A large number of fuel rods are disposed surrounding a large diameter water rod and a group of the large-diameter/multi-region poison rods in adjacent with the water rod. The large-diameter water rod has a burnable poison at the tube wall portion. At least a portion of the large-diameter poison rods has a coolant circulation portion allowing coolants to circulate therethrough. Since the large-diameter poison rods are disposed at a position of high neutron fluxes, a large neutron multiplication factor suppression effect can be provided, thereby enabling to reduce the number of burnable poison rods relative to fuels. As a result, power peaking in the fuel assembly is moderated and a greater amount of plutonium can be loaded. In addition the flow of cooling water which tends to gather around the large diameter water rod can be controlled to improve cooling performance of fuels. (N.H.)

  10. Behaviour of a VVER-1000 fuel element with boron carbide/steel absorber tested under severe fuel damage conditions in the CORA facility (Results of experiment CORA-W2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.; Sepold, L.

    1994-10-01

    The 'Severe Fuel Damage' (SFD) experiments of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK), Federal Republic of Germany, were carried out in the out-of-pile facility 'CORA' as part of the international Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) research. The experimental program was set up to provide information on the failure mechanisms of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel elements in a temperature range from 1200 C to 2000 C and in few cases up to 2400 C. Between 1987 and 1992 a total of 17 CORA experiments with two different bundle configurations, i.e. PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) bundles were performed. These assemblies represented 'Western-type' fuel elements with the pertinent materials for fuel, cladding, grid spacer, and absorber rod. At the end of the experimental program two VVER-1000 specific tests were run in the CORA facility with identical objectives but with genuine VVER-type materials. The experiments, designated CORA-W1 and CORA-W2 were conducted on February 18, 1993 and April 21, 1993, respectively. Test bundle CORA-W1 was without absorber material whereas CORA-W2 contained one absorber rod (boron carbide/steel). As in the earlier CORA tests the test bundles were subjected to temperature transients of a slow heatup rate in a steam environment. The transient phases of the tests were initiated with a temperature ramp rate of 1 K/s. With these conditions a so-called small-break LOCA was simulated. The temperature escalation due to the exothermal zircon/niobium-steam reaction started at about 1200 C, leading the bundles to maximum temperatures of approximately 1900 C. The thermal response of bundle CORA-W2 is comparable to that of CORA-W1. In test CORA-W2, however, the temperature front moved faster from the top to the bottom compared to test CORA-W1 [de

  11. Advanced PWR fuel design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersor, C.K.; Harris, R.P.; Crump, M.W.; Fuhrman, N.

    1987-01-01

    For nearly 15 years, Combustion Engineering has provided pressurized water reactor fuel with the features most suppliers are now introducing in their advanced fuel designs. Zircaloy grids, removable upper end fittings, large fission gas plenum, high burnup, integral burnable poisons and sophisticated analytical methods are all features of C-E standard fuel which have been well proven by reactor performance. C-E's next generation fuel for pressurized water reactors features 24-month operating cycles, optimal lattice burnable poisons, increased resistance to common industry fuel rod failure mechanisms, and hardware and methodology for operating margin improvements. Application of these various improvements offer continued improvement in fuel cycle economics, plant operation and maintenance. (author)

  12. The ELCOS Code System - From Basic Neutron Files to Fuel Cycle Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, M.; Galperin, A.

    2002-01-01

    The performance record of ELCOS The reactor analysis group in the department of nuclear engineering in the Ben-Gurion University has been conducting fuel cycle analyses, for several years now, using the Swiss-based ELCOS code system. This code system was launched at about the year 1987 (1). We became certified users of it when we had actively participated in several of its upgrading activities since 1995 (2). The PSI institute, home of the ELCOS system, is routinely engaged in the use of the ELCOS for analysis of fuel cycles in operation in Switzerland, as a service to the Swiss PWR and BWR utilities. A special 1994 study (3) has shown the ELCOS system fully capable of analyzing a fuel cycle based on a modern, complex, core which consists of about a dozen fuel types, BP (Burnable Poison) insertions in the form of WABAs (Westinghaus Advanced Burnable Absorber), and burnable poison smears in the form of IFBAs (Integrated Fuel Burnable Absorber). The ELCOS analysis compared well with power plant data, as concerns both the soluble boron run-down curve and the in-core power distribution (assembly by assembly). For ten years now our group has been in the lead in a world wide search for a beneficial Thorium Uranium symbiosis. For such a symbiosis to be effective the assembly of the core must not consist of fuel rods in which U and Th are homogeneously mixed, but rather the assembly is divided into a central zone in which U rods constitute a Seed of neutrons, and a peripheral zone, the Blanket, absorbing the seed neutrons to build 233 U. The flexibility of the ELCOS enabled us relatively routine calculations of fuel cycles based on this Seed-Blanket geometry (4). The Structure of ELCOS ELCOS is structured mainly as two codes run in succession: BOXER- an assembly code based on the neutronics of coupled unit cells, then SILWER, a 3D nodal diffusion code for the core. The execution of BOXER generates assembly, 2 group, homogenized, burnup dependent, macroscopic cross sections

  13. Device for absorbing the axial forces occurring on the fuel assemblies during operation of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankovich, M.F.

    1978-01-01

    The fuel assemblies consisting of rod-shaped fuel rods stand on a grid plate. Opposite the projections of the upper grid plate mounted on a support barrel the fuel assemblies are elastically supported in order to compensate the mechanical vibrations and thermal expansions occurring during operation. This is achieved by combined bending and torsion springs bridging the distance between projections and fuel assembly end pieces. The bending and torsion springs consist of a bending arm, a torsion piece, and another bending arm being deflected by 90 0 and provided at the end with an upsetting. Each spring consists of round stock. In order to increase the flexibility one of the bending arms is designed conically or stepped. (DG) [de

  14. 78 FR 45575 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Oconee Nuclear Station Units 1, 2, and 3; Independent Spent Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ..., One White Flint North, 11555 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... Qualification Table for Zone 1 with 0.7 kW per Assembly, Fuel With or Without BPRAs [Burnable Poison Rod...

  15. Burnable Poison optimization for Seed-Blanket Cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koren, S.; Raitses, G.; Galperin, G.; Shwageraus, E.

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of the Seed and Blanket Units (SBU) core designs is to reduce production of Pu and long-term toxicity of the spent PWR fuel. The SBU concept assumes a heterogeneous seed-blanket fuel assembly, with spatial separation of the U and Th parts of the fuel. In the SBU assembly the Seed fuel is an alloy of 20% enriched metallic Uranium and zircaloy, the Blanket fuel is ThO 2 mixed with about 13% of 12.2% enriched UO 2 . The Uranium is included in the mix in order to increase the BOL power in the Th pins and dilute the bred U 233 isotope to avoid proliferation concerns. The 108 Seed fuel rods are located in the central region of the assembly and surrounded by 156 blanket rods. The use of metallic fuel in the Seed enables high density of fissile material. The U-Zr alloy also has a higher thermal conductivity than UO 2 , although this advantage is partially offset by the low melting temperature of metallic fuels. More importantly, compared with oxide fuel, the radiation induced creep and swelling phenomena are more pronounced in metallic fuel at elevated temperatures due to the loss of its crystallographic state. This loss occurs at a rather low temperature of 6600 C, and in U-Zr alloys at 6160 C. For this reason, reduction of the local pin power peaking in the assembly is particularly important

  16. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Housman, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    A shock absorber is described for use in a hostile environment at the end of a blind passage for absorbing impact loads. The shock absorber includes at least one element which occupies the passage and which is comprised of a porous brittle material which is substantially non-degradable in the hostile environment. A void volume is provided in the element to enable the element to absorb a predetermined level of energy upon being crushed due to impact loading

  17. Safety aspects of the using Gd as burnable poison in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenberg, C.; Bonet, H.; Charlier, A.

    1978-01-01

    The experience of BELGONUCLEAIRE in using Gd in LWR's has indicated the safety related advantages of this burnable poison. The successfully operation of the BR3 PWR power plant with 5% of Gd rods is presented and extrapolated to large PWR's. (authro)

  18. Effects of limestone petrography and calcite microstructure on OPC clinker raw meals burnability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Matteo; Marinoni, Nicoletta; Della Porta, Giovanna; Marchi, Maurizio; Dapiaggi, Monica

    2017-10-01

    Limestone represents the main raw material for ordinary Portland cement clinker production. In this study eight natural limestones from different geological environments were chosen to prepare raw meals for clinker manufacturing, aiming to define a parameter controlling the burnability. First, limestones were characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence, X-Ray Powder Diffraction and Optical Microscopy to assess their suitability for clinker production and their petrographic features. The average domains size and the microstrain of calcite were also determined by X-Ray Powder Diffraction line profile analysis. Then, each limestone was admixed with clay minerals to achieve the adequate chemical composition for clinker production. Raw meals were thermally threated at seven different temperatures, from 1000 to 1450 °C, to evaluate their behaviour on heating by ex situ X-Ray Powder Diffraction and to observe the final clinker morphology by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Results indicate the calcite microstrain is a reliable parameter to predict the burnability of the raw meals, in terms of calcium silicates growth and lime consumption. In particular, mixtures prepared starting from high-strained calcite exhibit a better burnability. Later, when the melt appears this correlation vanishes; however differences in the early burnability still reflect on the final clinker composition and texture.

  19. Credit to fuel burnup for criticality safety evaluations in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, J.M.; Recio, M.

    1998-01-01

    The status of development of burnup credit for criticality safety analyses in Spain is described in this paper. Ongoing activities in the country in this field, both national and international, are resumed. Burnup credit is currently being applied to wet storage of PWR fuel, and credit to integral burnable absorbers is given for BWR fuel storage. It is envisaged to apply burnup credit techniques to the new generation of transport casks now in the design phase. The analysis methodologies submitted for the analyses of PWR and BWR fuel wet storage are outlined. Analysis characteristics specific to burnup credit are described, namely the need to increase the experimental data to allow for a more detailed validation of the depletion codes, and of the criticality codes when applied to spent fuel. Reactivity effects that arise in burnup credit analysis, such as axial and radial effects, fuel irradiation history and others are revised. The methods used to address them in the approved methodologies are outlined. Finally, the regulatory approach used to accept these new analytical methodologies is described. (author)

  20. Evaluation of accuracy of calculations of WWER-1000 core states with incomplete covering of fuel by the absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhomirov, A.V.; Ponomarenko, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    An additional verification of bundled software SAPFIR 9 5 and RC and code KORSAR/GP was performed. Both software products were developed in A.P. Alexandrov NITI and certified by Rostekhnadzor of RF for numeric simulation of stationary, transitional and emergency conditions of WWER reactors. A benchmark model for neutronics calculations was created within the limits of this work. The cold subcritical state of VVER -1000 reactor stationary fuelling was simulated on the basis of fuel assemblies with an increased height of the fuel column (TVS-2M) considering detailed presentation of radial and front neutron reflectors. A case of passing of pure condensate slug through the core in initially deep subcritical state during start of the first RCP set after refueling was considered as an examined condition of reactor operation. A relatively small size of the slug, its spatial position near the reflectors (lower and lateral), as well as failure of the inserted control rods of the control and protection system to reach the lower limit of the fuel column stipulate for methodical complexity of a correct calculation of the neutron multiplication constant (K eff ) using engineering codes. Code RC was used as a test program in the process of reactor calculated 3-D modeling. Code MCNP5 was used as the precision program, which solves the equation of neutrons transfer by Monte-Carlo method and which was developed in the US (Los-Alamos). As a result of comparative calculations dependency of K eff on two parameters was evaluated-boron acid concentration (C b ) and CPS CR position. Reactivity effect was evaluated, which is implemented as a result of failure of all CPS control rods to reach the lower fuel limit calculated using the engineering codes mentioned above. (Authors)

  1. Determination of the NPP Kr\\vsko spent fuel decay heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromar, Marjan; Kurinčič, Bojan

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear fuel is designed to support fission process in a reactor core. Some of the isotopes, formed during the fission, decay and produce decay heat and radiation. Accurate knowledge of the nuclide inventory producing decay heat is important after reactor shut down, during the fuel storage and subsequent reprocessing or disposal. In this paper possibility to calculate the fuel isotopic composition and determination of the fuel decay heat with the Serpent code is investigated. Serpent is a well-known Monte Carlo code used primarily for the calculation of the neutron transport in a reactor. It has been validated for the burn-up calculations. In the calculation of the fuel decay heat different set of isotopes is important than in the neutron transport case. Comparison with the Origen code is performed to verify that the Serpent is taking into account all isotopes important to assess the fuel decay heat. After the code validation, a sensitivity study is carried out. Influence of several factors such as enrichment, fuel temperature, moderator temperature (density), soluble boron concentration, average power, burnable absorbers, and burnup is analyzed.

  2. Guidebook on quality control of mixed oxides and gadolinium bearing fuels for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    Under the coverage of an efficient quality assurance system, quality control in nuclear fuel fabrication is an essential element to assure the reliable performance of all its components in service. Incentives to increase fuel performance, by extending reactor cycles or achieving higher burnups and, in some countries to use recycled plutonium in light water reactors (LWRs) necessitated the development of new types of fuels. In the first case, due to higher uranium enrichments, a burnable neutron absorber was integrated to the fuel pellets. Gadolinia was found to form a solid solution with Uranium dioxide and, to present a burnup rate which matches fissile uranium depletion. (U,Gd)O 2 fuels which have been successfully used since the seventies, in boiling water reactors have more recently found an increased utilization, in pressurized water reactors. This amply justifies the publication of this TECDOC to encourage authorities, designers and manufacturers of these types of fuel to establish a more uniform, adapted and effective system of control, thus promoting improved materials reliability and good performance in advanced fuel for light water reactors. The Guidebook is subdivided into four chapters written by different authors. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these chapters. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Evaluation of accuracy of calculations of VVER-1000 core states with incomplete covering of fuel by the absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhomirov, A. V.; Ponomarenko, G. L.

    2012-01-01

    An additional verification of bundled software (BS) SAPFIR-95 and amp;RC [1] and code KORSAR/GP [2] was performed. Both software products were developed in A.P. Alexandrov NITI and certified by ROSTEKHNADZOR of RF for numeric simulation of stationary, transitional and emergency conditions of VVER reactors. A benchmark model for neutronics calculations was created within the limits of this work. The cold subcritical state of VVER - 1000 reactor stationary fuelling was simulated on the basis of FA with an increased height of the fuel column (TVS-2M) considering detailed presentation of radial and front neutron reflectors. A case of passing of pure condensate slug through the core in initially deep subcritical state during start of the first RCP set after refueling was considered as an examined condition of reactor operation. A relatively small size of the slug, its spatial position near the reflectors (lower and lateral), as well as failure of the inserted control rods of the control and protection system (CPS CR) to reach the lower limit of the fuel column stipulate for methodical complexity of a correct calculation of the neutron multiplication constant (K eff ) using engineering codes. Code RC was used as a test program in the process of reactor calculated 3-D modeling. Code MCNP5 [3] was used as the precision program, which solves the equation of neutrons transfer by Monte-Carlo method and which was developed in the US (Los-Alamos). As a result of comparative calculations dependency of K eff on two parameters was evaluated - boron acid concentration (Cb) and CPS CR position. Reactivity effect was evaluated, which is implemented as a result of failure of all CPS control rods to reach the lower fuel limit calculated using the engineering codes mentioned above. (authors)

  4. Dopant solubility and lattice contraction in gadolinia and gadolinia-chromia doped UO2 fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinaels, T.; Hertog, J.; Vos, B.; de Tollenaere, L.; Delafoy, C.; Verwerft, M.

    2012-05-01

    Gadolinia doped UO2 fuel is widely used as burnable neutron absorber in Light Water Reactors to reduce power peaking and excess reactivity during the first reactor cycle of fresh fuel assemblies. The thermal conductivity of gadolinia doped fuel is substantially lower than that of standard UO2. To maintain safety margins later in life, some design or operating restrictions can be defined, for example to compensate higher fission gas release levels. Development of large grain U/Gd fuel by suitable doping, e.g. Cr2O3, could offer a solution to such restrictions, but solid state information about the double doped (U1-x-yGdxCry)O2 system is very scarce. In the present paper, we present X-ray diffraction and microstructure results of standard U/Gd fuel and chromia doped U/Gd fuel manufactured by powder metallurgy. The dissolution of chromium in (U1-xGdx)O2 as a function of Gd content, the role of free UO2 and the lattice contraction at different Gd and Cr doping levels of (U1-x-yGdxCry)O2 is studied both for the single doped and double doped system. On the basis of lattice contraction and precise measurements of the composition of the solid solution phases, the evolution of theoretical density with dopant concentration is derived.

  5. Optimization of burnable poison assignment for PWR low-leakage reload core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Wei; Xie Zhongsheng; Yin Banghua

    1997-01-01

    A new method for optimization of burnable poison (BP) assignment in low-leakage reload core is presented. The optimum BP assignment scheme is determined by the Flexible Tolerance Method using the number of BP rods as control variable. The objective is to minimize the core radial power peaking factor. A program NLPOT based on the theory is encoded and has been successfully used in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant cycle 2 low-leakage reload core

  6. Neutron absorbing article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.; Dooker, G.I.

    1981-01-01

    A neutron-absorbing article suitable for use in spent fuel racks is described. It comprises boron carbide particles, diluent particles, and a phenolic polymer cured to a continuous matrix. The diluent may be silicon carbide, graphite, amorphous carbon, alumina, or silica. The combined boron carbide-diluent phase contains no more than 2 percent B 2 O 3 , and the neutron-absorbing article contains from 20 to 40 percent phenol resin. The ratio of boron carbide to diluent particles is in the range 1:9 to 9:1

  7. Out-of-core fuel management optimization utilizing the integer linear programming technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, S.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear fuel management decisions for light water reactors can be categorized as out-of-core and in-core decisions. Out-of-core decisions concern what fuel and burnable absorbers to place in the core and in-core decisions concern where to place them. This paper reports on an automated capability to determine the optimum values of out-of-core fuel management decisions. The objective is to determine the optimum cycling scheme so that the levelized fuel cycle cost over a planning horizon is minimized without violating any constraints. The cycle energy requirements are assumed known. By discharging the least reactive fuel at the end of each cycle, the burned assemblies to reinsert are determined. Selecting the number of fresh assemblies as the decision variables, the enrichments of these assemblies are uniquely specified by the cycle energy requirements. Constraints considered include maximum enrichment and discharge burnup limits. In addition, to assure quarter-core symmetry, the number of fresh assemblies is constrained to multiples of four

  8. Neutron absorbing article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.; Dooher, G.I.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron absorbing article, in flat plate form and suitable for use in a storage rack for spent fuel, includes boron carbide particles, diluent particles and a solid, irreversibly cured phenolic polymer cured to a continuous matrix binding the boron carbide and diluent particles. The total conent of boron carbide and diluent particles is a major proportion of the article and the content of cured phenolic polymer present is a minor proportion. By regulation of the ratio of boron carbide particles to diluent particles, normally within the range of 1:9 and 9:1 and preferably within the range of 1:5 to 5:1, the neutron absorbing activity of the product may be controlled, which facilitates the manufacture of articles of particular absorbing activities best suitable for specific applications

  9. Kinetic energy absorbing pad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricmont, R.J.; Hamilton, P.A.; Ming Long Ting, R.

    1981-01-01

    Reactors, fuel processing plants etc incorporate pipes and conduits for fluids under high pressure. Fractures, particularly adjacent to conduit elbows, produce a jet of liquid which whips the broken conduit at an extremely high velocity. An enormous impact load would be applied to any stationary object in the conduit's path. The design of cellular, corrugated metal impact pads to absorb the kinetic energy of the high velocity conduits is given. (U.K.)

  10. Sound Absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  11. Proceedings of the topical meeting on advances in fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on fuel management strategies for nuclear power plants. Topics considered at the conference included a world perspective on the nuclear fuel cycle, reactor core and fuel management for advanced reactor systems, innovative core loading strategies, automated and interactive fuel management tools, cycle length and design flexibility, applications of micro and mini computers for fuel management, advanced fuel and burnable poison designs, the development and validation of fuel management tools, practical constraints on fuel management, fuel performance optimization with on-line monitoring systems, and utility experience in reload design and licensing

  12. Laser-enrichment of the odd isotopes of gadolinium for use as burnable poison in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santala, M.I.K.; Lauranto, H.M.; Kajava, T.T.; Salomaa, R.R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) has two isotopes which are strong neutron absorbers. It would be desirable to enrich Gd in those isotopes for use in nuclear fuels. Isotope-selectivity based on spectral isotope shifts has been investigated. Our experimental results indicate that significant enrichment is achievable even with relatively broadband (∼3 GHz) lasers. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  13. Laser-enrichment of the odd isotopes of gadolinium for use as burnable poison in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santala, M. I. K.; Lauranto, H. M.; Kajava, T. T.; Salomaa, R. R. E.

    1995-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) has two isotopes which are strong neutron absorbers. It would be desirable to enrich Gd in those isotopes for use in nuclear fuels. Isotope-selectivity based on spectral isotope shifts has been investigated. Our experimental results indicate that significant enrichment is achievable even with relatively broadband (≅3 GHz) lasers

  14. Feasibility study on the development of advanced LWR fuel technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Youn Ho; Sohn, D. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Song, K. W.; Song, K. N.; Chun, T. H.; Bang, J. G.; Bae, K. K.; Kim, D. H. and others

    1997-07-01

    Worldwide R and D trends related to core technology of LWR fuels and status of patents have been surveyed for the feasibility study. In addition, various fuel cycle schemes have been studied to establish the target performance parameters. For the development of cladding material, establishment of long-term research plan for alloy development and optimization of melting process and manufacturing technology were conducted. A work which could characterize the effect of sintering additives on the microstructure of UO{sub 2} pellet has been experimentally undertaken, and major sintering variables and their ranges have been found in the sintering process of UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} burnable absorber pellet. The analysis of state of the art technology related to flow mixing device for spacer grid and debris filtering device for bottom nozzle and the investigation of the physical phenomena related to CHF enhancement and the establishment of the data base for thermal-hydraulic performance tests has been done in this study. In addition, survey on the documents of the up-to-date PWR fuel assemblies developed by foreign vendors have been carried out to understand their R and D trends and establish the direction of R and D for these structural components. And, to set the performance target of the new fuel, to be developed, fuel burnup and economy under the extended fuel cycle length scheme were estimated. A preliminary study on the failure mechanism of CANDU fuel, key technology and advanced coating has been performed. (author). 190 refs., 31 tabs., 129 figs.

  15. Field experience of new nuclear fuel types on the Kola NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeev, V.; Burlov, S.; Panov, A.; Saprykin, V.

    2008-01-01

    Specificity of the Kola nuclear power plant geographical position, conditions of region economics determine fuel management strategy. Isolation of Kola power supply system and, as a consequence, generating capacities redundancy cause operation of the nuclear power plant on reduced power level. At the same time there is a need to operate the power unit on the maximum power level in the case of not planned conditions. The basis of in-core fuel management is an achievement of the maximal burnup under providing of high installed capacity. At present there are not abilities to improve the fuel cycle based on traditional implementation fuel assemblies. Burnup maximum in these fuel cycles is achieved. At the core periphery installed highest possible quantity of the burned-up assemblies in the view of safety operation margins satisfaction. Works on application of the second generation fuel have been carried out on the Kola NPP since 2002. Fuel assemblies of this type are profiled. Burnable absorber, changed lattice spacing in relation to standard fuel, changed height of a fuel column, thickness of fuel pin clad are applied. In CR fuel followers modernized docking unit (with hafnium plates are intended for energy-release splash suppression) is used. At present 2-nd generation fuel is in experimental operation on unit 3 (18-21 fuel cycles, 2002-2007 years) and unit 4 (18-19 fuel cycles, 2005-2007 years). Safety margins did not exceeded. Coolant activity did not exceed the limiting value. There were not damaged fuel assemblies of second generation. Originally in the project of applications of new fuel it was supposed to refuel annually 78 fresh assemblies. At the moment annual refueling consists of 66 assemblies with effective enrichment 3.82 %. Cycle duration does not exceed 250-260 effective days. The part of assemblies is left on 5-th cycle of operation. In a similar fuel cycle in 2007 on the unit 1 operation with profiled fuel (enrichment of 3.82 %) of shakeproof type

  16. Target fuels for plutonium and minor actinide transmutation in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, J., E-mail: jwashing@gmail.com [Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); King, J., E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu [Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Shayer, Z., E-mail: zshayer@mines.edu [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • We evaluate transmutation fuels for plutonium and minor actinide destruction in LWRs. • We model a modified AP1000 fuel assembly in SCALE6.1. • We evaluate spectral shift absorber coatings to improve transmutation performance. - Abstract: The average nuclear power plant produces twenty metric tons of used nuclear fuel per year, containing approximately 95 wt% uranium, 1 wt% plutonium, and 4 wt% fission products and transuranic elements. Fast reactors are a preferred option for the transmutation of plutonium and minor actinides; however, an optimistic deployment time of at least 20 years indicates a need for a nearer-term solution. This study considers a method for plutonium and minor actinide transmutation in existing light water reactors and evaluates a variety of transmutation fuels to provide a common basis for comparison and to determine if any single target fuel provides superior transmutation properties. A model developed using the NEWT module in the SCALE 6.1 code package provided performance data for the burnup of the target fuel rods in the present study. The target fuels (MOX, PuO{sub 2}, Pu{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, PuN, PuUZrH, PuZrH, PuZrHTh, and PuZrO{sub 2}) are evaluated over a 1400 Effective Full Power Days (EFPD) interval to ensure each assembly remained critical over the entire burnup period. The MOX (5 wt% PuO{sub 2}), Pu{sub 0.31}ZrH{sub 1.6}Th{sub 1.08}, and PuZrO{sub 2}MgO (8 wt% Pu) fuels result in the highest rate of plutonium transmutation with the lowest rate of curium-244 production. This study selected eleven different burnable absorbers (B{sub 4}C, CdO, Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and TaC) for evaluation as spectral shift absorber coatings on the outside of the fuel pellets to determine if an absorber coating can improve the transmutation properties of the target fuels. The PuZrO{sub 2}MgO (8 wt% Pu) target

  17. Gas cooled high temperature reactor with a heap of pebble shaped fuel elements and absorber rods which can be driven directly into the heap of pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elter, C.; Schmitt, H.; Schoening, J.; Weicht, U.

    1980-01-01

    The absorber rod for the graphite moderated, helium cooled reactor is cylindrical and has a tip in the shape of the frustrum of a cone. It consists of three coaxially arranged sleeve tubes made of steel, the inner and centre sleeve tubes surrounding the absorber part (B4C) so as to be gastight. The inner sleeve tube represents the supporting tube and is cooled by cold gas, as is the annular gap between the centre and outer sleeve tube. (RW) [de

  18. Fuel Cycle Performance of Thermal Spectrum Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrall, Andrew [ORNL; Todosow, Michael [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    2016-01-01

    Small modular reactors may offer potential benefits, such as enhanced operational flexibility. However, it is vital to understand the holistic impact of small modular reactors on the nuclear fuel cycle and fuel cycle performance. The focus of this paper is on the fuel cycle impacts of light water small modular reactors in a once-through fuel cycle with low-enriched uranium fuel. A key objective of this paper is to describe preliminary reactor core physics and fuel cycle analyses conducted in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Options Campaign. Challenges with small modular reactors include: increased neutron leakage, fewer assemblies in the core (and therefore fewer degrees of freedom in the core design), complex enrichment and burnable absorber loadings, full power operation with inserted control rods, the potential for frequent load-following operation, and shortened core height. Each of these will impact the achievable discharge burn-up in the reactor and the fuel cycle performance. This paper summarizes the results of an expert elicitation focused on developing a list of the factors relevant to small modular reactor fuel, core, and operation that will impact fuel cycle performance. Preliminary scoping analyses were performed using a regulatory-grade reactor core simulator. The hypothetical light water small modular reactor considered in these preliminary scoping studies is a cartridge type one-batch core with 4.9% enrichment. Some core parameters, such as the size of the reactor and general assembly layout, are similar to an example small modular reactor concept from industry. The high-level issues identified and preliminary scoping calculations in this paper are intended to inform on potential fuel cycle impacts of one-batch thermal spectrum SMRs. In particular, this paper highlights the impact of increased neutron leakage and reduced number of batches on the achievable burn-up of the reactor. Fuel cycle performance

  19. Pellet cladding interaction (PCI) fuel duty during normal operation of ASEA-ATOM BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaernild, O.; Olsson, S.

    1983-01-01

    Local power changes may under special conditions cause PCI fuel failures in a power reactor. By restricting the local power increase rate in certain situations it is possible to prevent PCI failures. Fine motion control rod drives, large operating range of the main recirculation pumps and an advanced burnable absorber design have minimized the impact of the PCI restrictions. With current ICFM schemes the power of an assembly is due to the burnup of the gadolinia gradually increasing during the first cycle of operation. After this the power is essentially decreasing monotonously during the remaining life of the assembly. Some assemblies are for short burnup intervals operated at very low power in control cells. The control rods in these cells may however be withdrawn without restrictions leading to energy production losses. Base load operation would in the normal case lead to very minor PCI loads on the fuel regardless of any PCI related operating restrictions. At the return to full power after a short shutdown or in connection with load follow operation, the xenon transient may cause PCI loads on the fuel. To avoid this a few hoursholdtime before going back to full power is recommended. (author)

  20. Effect of transplutonium doping on approach to long-life core in uranium-fueled PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peryoga, Yoga; Saito, Masaki; Artisyuk, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    The present paper advertises doping of transplutonium isotopes as an essential measure to improve proliferation-resistance properties and burnup characteristics of UOX fuel for PWR. Among them 241 Am might play the decisive role of burnable absorber to reduce the initial reactivity excess while the short-lived nuclides 242 Cm and 244 Cm decay into even plutonium isotopes, thus increasing the extent of denaturation for primary fissile 239 Pu in the course of reactor operation. The doping composition corresponds to one discharged from a current PWR. For definiteness, the case identity is ascribed to atomic percentage of 241 Am, and then the other transplutonium nuclide contents follow their ratio as in the PWR discharged fuel. The case of 1 at% doping to 20% enriched uranium oxide fuel shows the potential of achieving the burnup value of 100 GWd/tHM with about 20% 238 Pu fraction at the end of irradiation. Since so far, americium and curium do not require special proliferation resistance measures, their doping to UOX would assist in introducing nuclear technology in developing countries with simultaneous reduction of accumulated minor actinides stockpiles. (author)

  1. Fuel assemblies for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Akihito.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To control power-up rate at the initial burning stage of new fuel assemblies due to fuel exchange in a pressure tube type power reactor. Constitution: Burnable poisons are disposed to a most portion of fuel pellets in a fuel assembly to such a low concentration as the burn-up rate changes with time at the initial stage of the burning. The most portion means substantially more than one-half part of the pellets and gadolinia is used as burn-up poisons to be dispersed and the concentration is set to less than about 0.2 %. Upon elapse of about 15 days after the charging, the burnable poisons are eliminated and the infinite multiplication factors are about at 1.2 to attain a predetermined power state. Since the power-up rate of the nuclear reactor fuel assembly is about 0.1 % power/hour and the power-up rate of the fuel assembly around the exchanged channel is lower than that, it can be lowered sufficiently than the limit for the power-up rate practiced upon reactor start-up thereby enabling to replace fuels during power operation. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. Investigation of Burnup Credit Modeling Issues Associated with BWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2000-10-12

    /or decreasing the neutron absorber concentration. However, regulations associated with permanent disposal require consideration of scenarios and/or package conditions that are not relevant or credible for storage or transportation, and as a result, necessitate credit for burnup in BWR fuel to maintain capacity objectives. Burnup credit relies on depletion calculations to provide a conservative estimate of spent fuel contents and subsequent criticality calculations to assess the value of k{sub eff} for a spent fuel cask or a fuel configuration under a variety of postulated conditions. Therefore, validation is necessary to quantify biases and uncertainties between analytic predictions and measured isotopics. However, the design and operational aspects of BWRs result in a more heterogeneous and time-varying reactor configuration than those of PWRs. Thus, BWR spent fuel analyses and validation efforts are significantly more complicated than those of their PWR counterparts. BWR spent fuel assemblies are manufactured with variable enrichments, both radially and axially, are exposed to time- and spatially-varying void distributions, contain integral burnable absorber rods, and are subject to partial control-blade insertion during operation. The latter is especially true in older fuel assemblies. Away-from-reactor depletion tools used for characterization of spent fuel have typically been developed and validated for more homogeneous PWR fuel assemblies without integral burnable absorber rods, and thus must be reassessed for BWR configurations to determine a conservative methodology for estimating the isotopic content of spent BWR fuel. This report examines the use of SAS2H8 for calculating spent BWR fuel isotopics for burnup-credit criticality safety analyses and assesses the adequacy of SAS2H for this task. The effects of SAS2H modeling assumptions on calculated spent BWR fuel isotopics and the effects of depletion assumptions on calculated k{sub inf} values are investigated. Detailed

  3. Regulatory status of burnup credit for dry storage and transport of spent nuclear fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, D.E.

    2001-01-01

    During 1999, the Spent Fuel Project Office of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) introduced technical guidance for allowing burnup credit in the criticality safety analysis of casks for transporting or storing spent fuel from pressurized water reactors. This paper presents the recommendations embodied by the current NRC guidance, discusses associated technical issues, and reviews information needs and industry priorities for expanding the scope and content of the guidance. Allowable analysis approaches for burnup credit must account for the fuel irradiation variables that affect spent fuel reactivity, including the axial and horizontal variation of burnup within fuel assemblies. Consistent with international transport regulations, the burnup of each fuel assembly must be verified by pre-loading measurements. The current guidance limits the credited burnup to no more than 40 GWd/MTU and the credited cooling time to five years, imposes a burnup offset for fuels with initial enrichments between 4 and 5 wt% 235U, does not include credit for fission products, and excludes burnup credit for damaged fuels and fuels that have used burnable absorbers. Burnup credit outside these limits may be considered when adequately supported by technical information beyond that reviewed to-date by the NRC staff. The guidance further recommends that residual subcritical margins from the neglect of fission products, and any other nuclides not credited in the licensing-basis analysis, be estimated for each cask design and compared against estimates of the maximum reactivity effects associated with remaining computational uncertainties and potentially nonconservative modeling assumptions. The NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research is conducting a research program to help develop the technical information needed for refining and expanding the evolving guidance. Cask vendors have announced plans to submit the first NRC license applications for burnup credit later this year

  4. Reactivity determination of the Al2O3-B4C burnable poison as a function of its concentration in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giada, Marino Reis

    2005-01-01

    Burnable poison rods made of Al 2 O 3 -B 4 C pellets with different concentrations of 10 B have been manufactured for a set of experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 zero-power reactor. The experiments evaluated the reactivity of the burnable poison rods as a function of the 10 B concentration, and the shadowing effect on the control rod reactivity worth as a function of the distance between the burnable position rods and the control rod. The results showed that the burnable poison rods have a non-linear behavior as function of the 10 B concentration, starting to reach an asymptotic value for concentrations higher than 7 g/cm 3 of 10 B. The shadowing effect on the control rods was substantial. When the burnable poison rods were beside the control rod, its reactivity worth decreased as much as 30 %, and when they were 10,5 cm distant, the control rod worth decreased by 7 %. The MCNP results for the burnable poison reactivity effects agreed within experimental errors with the measured values. (author)

  5. Absorber materials in CANDU PHWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, E.G.; Boss, C.R.; Novak, W.Z.; Fong, R.W.L.

    1995-03-01

    In a CANDU reactor the fuel channels are arranged on a square lattice in a calandria filled with heavy water moderator. This arrangement allows five types of tubular neutron absorber devices to be located in a relatively benign environment of low pressure, low temperature heavy water between neighbouring rows of columns of fuel channels. This paper will describe the roles of the devices and outline the design requirements of the absorber component from a reactor physics viewpoint. Nuclear heating and activation problems associated with the different absorbers will be briefly discussed. The design and manufacture of the devices will be also discussed. The control rod absorbers and shut off materials are cadmium and stainless steel. In the tubular arrangement, the cadmium is sandwiched between stainless steel tubes. This type of device has functioned well, but there is now concern over the availability and expense of cadmium which is used in two types of CANDU control devices. There are also concerns about the toxicity of cadmium during the fabrication of the absorbers. These concerns are prompting AECL to study alternatives. To minimize design changes, pure boron-10 alloyed in stainless steel is a favoured option. Work is underway to confirm the suitability of the boron-loaded steel and identify other encapsulated absorber materials for practical application. Because the reactivity devices or their guide tubes span the calandria vessel, the long slender components must be sufficiently rigid to resist operational vibration and also be seismically stable. Some of these components are made of Zircaloy to minimize neutron absorption. Slow irradiation growth and creep can reduce the spring tension, and periodic adjustments to the springs are required. Experience with the control absorber devices has generally been good. In one instance liquid zone controllers had a problem of vibration induced fretting but a designed back-fit resolved the problem. (author). 3 refs., 1

  6. Improving the AGR Fuel Testing Power Density Profile Versus Irradiation-Time in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray S. Chang; David A. Petti; John T. Maki; Misti A. Lillo

    2009-05-01

    the graphite fuel compacts versus EFPD, the P/T ratio was calculated to be 5.3, which is unacceptable given the fuel compact temperature control requirement. To flatten the FPD profile versus EFPDs, two proposed options are – (a) add fertile (232Th) particles to the fuel compact and (b) add burnable absorber (B4C) to the graphite holder. The effectiveness of these two proposed options to flatten the FPD profile versus EFPDs were investigated and the results are compared in this study.

  7. A study of the effect of the heterogeneity of a rod of burnable poisons of the reactors reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Demerdash, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    The use of burnable poisons rods in power water reactors is one of the recommended tools for modifying the economy of this type of reactors. Introducing the burnable poisons rod into the central cell will change the reactivity and hence a perturbation of the flux will result. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of the poisons rod and the heterogeneity of the assembly on the reactivity. With the use of code Apollo in a macrocell structure, it has been found that the highest perturbation will occur due to the use of Gadolinium rods (100%). A very important depression of the flux in the burnable poisons rod (especially for Gd, black body) has been observed and the perturbation decreases in the macrocell at a distance of 10 cm from the origin. Although this study shows the importance of evaluating the heterogeneity effects of the poisons rods through the different stages of the poisons rods evolutions, it is considered to be preliminary and a more accurate calculation is required. (author)

  8. New long-cycle small modular PWR cores using particle type burnable poisons for low boron operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hoseong; Hwang, Dae Hee [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ser Gi, E-mail: sergihong@khu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ho Choel [Core and Fuel Analysis Group, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Central Research Institute (KHNP-CRI), Daejon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • New advanced burnable poison rods (BPR) are suggested for low boron operation in PWR. • The new SMR cores have long cycle length of ∼4.5 EFPYs with low boron concentration. • The SMR core satisfies all the design targets and constraints. - Abstract: In this paper, new small long-cycle PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) cores for low boron concentration operation are designed by employing advanced burnable poison rods (BPRs) in which the BISO (Bi-Isotropic) particles of burnable poison are distributed in a SiC matrix. The BPRs are designed by adjusting the kernel diameter, the kernel material and the packing fraction to effectively reduce the excess reactivity in order to reduce the boron concentration in the coolant and achieve a flat change in excess reactivity over a long operational cycle. In addition, axial zoning of the BPRs was suggested to improve the core performances, and it was shown that the suggested axial zoning of BPRs considerably extends the cycle length compared to a core with no BPR axial zoning. The results of the core physics analyses showed that the cores using BPRs with a B{sub 4}C kernel have long cycle lengths of ∼4.5 EFPYs (Effective Full Power Years), small maximum CBCs (Critical Boron Concentration) lower than 370 ppm, low power peaking factors, and large shutdown margins of control element assemblies.

  9. Technical meeting on advanced fuel pellet materials and fuel rod designs for water cooled reactors. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The economics of current nuclear power plants have improved through increasing fuel burnups and fuel cycles, i.e. the effective time that fuel remains in the reactor core and the amount of energy it generates. Increasing the consumption of fissile material in the fuel element before it is discharged from the reactor means less fuel is required over the reactor's life cycle, which results in lower amounts of fresh fuel, lower spent fuel storage costs, and less waste for ultimate disposal. There has been a continuous historical increase in fuel burnup from 20-25 GWd/tU in Generation I reactors to 50-60 GWd/tU in today's light water reactors and this tendency continues in as much as technological and operational improvements make it possible. In parallel, higher enrichments are discussed, leading to a higher energy yield. For heavy water reactors slight enrichment of fuels and correspondingly growing burnups in CANDU/PHWR are driven by the same economical incentives. Higher burnups and better utilization of fissile nuclear materials (including use of MOX fuel and burnable neutron absorbers), as well as more flexible power manoeuvring, place challenging operational demands on materials used in reactor components, and first of all on fuel and cladding materials. It defines a need for increased attention to measures ensuring compliance to safety criteria related to fission gas release (to limit the internal rod pressure), pellet-cladding interaction (to avoid clad cracking combined with stress and aggressive chemical environment) and pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (to avoid clad mechanical fracture). These measures that secure desired in-pile fuel performance parameters include adequate improvements in fuel material properties and fuel rod designs. That is why the subject Technical Meeting was recommended to the IAEA in 2007 by the Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (TWGFPT), and the recommendation was supported by the TWG on Light and

  10. Storage, handling and movement of fuel and related components at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The report describes in general terms the various operations involved in the handling of fresh fuel, irradiated fuel, and core components such as control rods, neutron sources, burnable poisons and removable instruments. It outlines the principal safety problems in these operations and provides the broad safety criteria which must be observed in the design, operation and maintenance of equipment and facilities for handling, transferring, and storing nuclear fuel and core components at nuclear power reactor sites

  11. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    , Bubbles and precipitates, Modeling fuel behavior); Modeling defects and fission products in UO 2 ceramic by ab initio computation (Ab initio computation, Point defects in uranium dioxide, Fission products in uranium dioxide, The indispensable coupling of modeling and experiment); Cladding and assembly materials (What is the purpose of cladding?, Zirconium alloys, Claddings: required to exhibit good mechanical strength, Mechanical behavior of irradiated Zr alloys, Claddings: required to prove corrosion resistant); Pellet-cladding interaction (The phenomena involved in pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), Experimental simulation of PCI and the lessons to be drawn from it, The requirement for an experimental basis, Numerical simulation of PCI, Towards a lifting of PCI-related operating constraints); Advanced UO 2 and MOX ceramics (Chromium oxide-doped UO 2 fuel, Novel MOX microstructures); Mechanical behavior of fuel assemblies (Assembly mechanical behavior in normal operating conditions, Assembly mechanical behavior in accident situations, Fuel in a loss of primary coolant accident (LOCA)); Introduction to LOCA-type accident transients (Overview of thermal-hydraulic and fuel-related aspects, Incidence of LOCA transients on the thermal-metallurgical-mechanical behavior of zirconium-base alloy cladding); Fuel in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA) (Safety criteria); Fuel in a severe accident (The VERCORS analytical program, The Phebus-FP global tests, Control of severe accidents in the EPR reactor); In-core fuel management (Relationships between cycle length, maximum burnup, and batch fraction Enrichment and burnable poisons, The impact of the nature of the fuel used, and its evolution, on the major parameters of core physics, and management Prospects for future trends in core management); Fuel cycle material balances (In-core evolution of materials, Decay heat and potential radiotoxicity, Plutonium management); Long-term behavior of spent fuel (The nature of spent nuclear

  12. Waste management of the fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, H.

    1977-01-01

    1) Amounts and types of radioactive wastes arising in the different plants of the nuclear fuel cycle are explained. 2) Methods for treatment of low- and intermediate level liquid wastes are discussed. They consist in a separation of the radionuclides from the liquid as a first step, followed by a solidification of the concentrated radioactive fraction. 3) High level liquid wastes are transfromed into glasses or ceramic product after some cooling. 4) Burnable solid wastes are incinerated, the resulting ashes mixed with concrete grout. 5) Non burnable solid wastes are often reduced in volumen by baling. 6) The conditioned radioactive wastes have finally to be disposed of in a manner that they are well isolated from the biocycle until the radionuclides have decayed to innoxious levels. (orig.) [de

  13. Analyses for licensing of new fuel types at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kereszturi, A.; Bogatyr, S.; Miko, S.; Nemes, I.

    2003-01-01

    In the last years Paks NPP initiated several projects aiming at the introduction of new fuel types and resulting in more economic fuel cycles. The motivations, the reasons, and the economic consequences of the above modifications are detailed. The application of a new fuel type requires the renewal of the relevant chapters of the Safety Analysis Report. The fulfilment of fuel design basis requirements, to be summarised briefly also in the paper, must be investigated during normal and accidental conditions. The characteristics of the different codes, the data transfer between them are detailed. After, the cases of the Normal Operation, Anticipated Operation Occurrence, and the Postulated Accidents, judged as the most relevant ones in case of fuel modifications, are overviewed. In the last part, selected examples of the licensing calculations, performed by the above tools are presented. In conclusion, modifications of the WWER fuel, namely increased enrichment, application of burnable fuel pins, modified geometry make more economic fuel cycles (larger discharge burnup, power up-rate, reduced pressure vessel fluence) are possible. The further step (increased enrichment, burnable poison) of the fuel modernisation at NPP Paks is necessary for more economic fuel cycles and fuel consuming. A sound basis of licensing methodology, safety analysis, and necessary computer codes for the WWER fuel modernisation is available

  14. 78 FR 40200 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, Oconee Nuclear Station Units 1, 2, and 3; Independent Spent Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... examine and purchase copies of public documents at the NRC's PDR, Room O1-F21, One White Flint North... 1 with 0.7 kW per Assembly, Fuel With or Without BPRAs [Burnable Poison Rod Assembly], for the...

  15. Core physics performance of recycled LWR discharge TRU oxide fuel in a GT/AD-MHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taiwo, T.A.; Gohar, Y.; Finck, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    . The higher consumption levels in the gas-cooled system, relative to say a fast system is due to the relatively lower fuel inventory required in the gas-cooled system. Our evaluation also confirmed the need for burnable absorber, most likely Er-167, for both suppressing the initial excess reactivity and ensuring a negative temperature coefficient under all operating conditions. Additionally, current results suggest that it may be preferable to use a double strata thermal critical system and fast subcritical system to achieve nearly complete destruction of the TRU oxide fuel. (author)

  16. UO2-7%Gd2O3 fuel process development by mechanical blending with reprocessing of waste products and usage of densification additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Lauro Roberto dos

    2009-01-01

    In the nuclear fuel cycle, reprocessing and storage of 'burned' fuels, either temporary or permanent, demand high investments and, in addition, can potentially generate environmental problems. A strategy to decrease these problems is to adopt measures to reduce the amount of waste generated. The usage of integrated burnable poison based on gadolinium is a measure that contributes to achieve this goal. The reason to use burnable poison is to control the neutron population in the reactor during the early life of the fresh reactor core or the beginning of each recharging fuel cycle, extending its cycle duration. Another advantage of using burnable poison is to be able to operate the reactor with higher burning rate, optimizing the usage of the fuel. The process of manufacturing UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 integrated burnable fuel poison generates waste that, as much as possible, needs to be recycled. Blending of Gd 2 O 3 in UO 2 powder requires the usage of a special additive to achieve the final fuel pellet specified density. The objective of this work is to develop the process of obtaining UO 2 - 7% Gd 2 O 3 integrated burnable poison using densification additives, aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3), and reprocessing manufacturing waste products by mechanical blending. The content of 7%- Gd 2 O 3 is based on commercial PWR reactor fuels - Type Angra 2. The results show that the usage of Al(OH) 3 as an additive is a very effective choice that promotes the densification of fuel pellets with recycle up to 10%. Concentrations of 0,20 % of Al(OH) 3 were found to be the indicated amount on an 7 industrial scale, specially when the recycled products come from U 3 O 8 obtained by calcination of sintered pellets. This is particularly interesting because it is following the steps of sintering and rectifying of the pellets, which is generating the largest amounts of recycled material. (author)

  17. UO2-7%Gd2O3 fuel process development by mechanical blending with reprocessing of waste products and usage of densification additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Lauro Roberto dos

    2009-01-01

    In the nuclear fuel cycle, reprocessing and storage of 'burned' fuels, either temporary or permanent, demand high investments and, in addition, can potentially generate environmental problems. A strategy to decrease these problems is to adopt measures to reduce the amount of waste generated. The usage of integrated burnable poison based on gadolinium is a measure that contributes to achieve this goal. The reason to use burnable poison is to control the neutron population in the reactor during the early life of the fresh reactor core or the beginning of each recharging fuel cycle, extending its cycle duration. Another advantage of using burnable poison is to be able to operate the reactor with higher burning rate, optimizing the usage of the fuel. The process of manufacturing UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 integrated burnable fuel poison generates waste that, as much as possible, needs to be recycled. Blending of Gd 2 O 3 in UO 2 powder requires the usage of a special additive to achieve the final fuel pellet specified density. The objective of this work is to develop the process of obtaining UO 2 - 7% Gd 2 O 3 integrated burnable poison using densification additives, aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH) 3 ), and reprocessing manufacturing waste products by mechanical blending. The content of 7%- Gd 2 O 3 is based on commercial PWR reactor fuels - Type Angra 2. The results show that the usage of Al(OH) 3 as an additive is a very effective choice that promotes the densification of fuel pellets with recycle up to 10%. Concentrations of 0,20 % of Al(OH) 3 were found to be the indicated amount on an industrial scale, specially when the recycled products come from U 3 O 8 obtained by calcination of sintered pellets. This is particularly interesting because it is following the steps of sintering and rectifying of the pellets, which is generating the largest amounts of recycled material. (author)

  18. Bend-absorbing clamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, J. R.; Valencia, B., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Compact, inexpensive clamp for flexible cables or rigid tubes absorbs vibrations and other motion. It accomodates wide range of dimensions, and saves space by eliminating pigtails or bellows commonly used to absorb linear movement or vibrations

  19. Fuel burnup analysis for IRIS reactor using MCNPX and WIMS-D5 codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, E. A.; Bashter, I. I.; Hassan, Nabil M.; Mustafa, S. S.

    2017-02-01

    International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) reactor is a compact power reactor designed with especial features. It contains Integral Fuel Burnable Absorber (IFBA). The core is heterogeneous both axially and radially. This work provides the full core burn up analysis for IRIS reactor using MCNPX and WIMDS-D5 codes. Criticality calculations, radial and axial power distributions and nuclear peaking factor at the different stages of burnup were studied. Effective multiplication factor values for the core were estimated by coupling MCNPX code with WIMS-D5 code and compared with SAS2H/KENO-V code values at different stages of burnup. The two calculation codes show good agreement and correlation. The values of radial and axial powers for the full core were also compared with published results given by SAS2H/KENO-V code (at the beginning and end of reactor operation). The behavior of both radial and axial power distribution is quiet similar to the other data published by SAS2H/KENO-V code. The peaking factor values estimated in the present work are close to its values calculated by SAS2H/KENO-V code.

  20. Neutron absorbing article and method for manufacture of such article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hortman, M.T.; Mcmurtry, C.H.; Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.

    1980-01-01

    A neutron absorbing article, preferably in long, thin, flat form , suitable for but not necessarily limited to use in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel at locations between volumes of such stored fuel, to absorb neutrons from said spent fuel and prevent uncontrolled nuclear reaction of the spent fuel material, is composed of finely divided boron carbide particles and a solid, irreversibly cured phenolic polymer, forming a continuous matrix about the boron carbide particles, in such proportions that at least 6% of b10 from the boron carbide content is present therein. The described articles withstand thermal cycling from repeated spent fuel insertions and removals, withstand radiation from said spent nuclear fuel over long periods of time without losing desirable neutron absorbing and physical properties, are sufficiently chemically inert to water so as to retain neutron absorbing properties if brought into contact with it, are not galvanically corrodible and are sufficiently flexible so as to withstand operational basis earthquake and safe shutdown earthquake seismic events, without loss of neutron absorbing capability and other desirable properties, when installed in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel. The disclosure also relates to a plurality of such neutron absorbing articles in a storage rack for spent nuclear fuel and to a method for the manufacture of the articles

  1. Optimisation of initial core of AHWR-LEU using burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Neelima; Krishnani, P.D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the physics design optimisation of initial core of AHWR-LEU. Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) being designed for 920 MWth, is a vertical pressure tube thorium-based reactor cooled by boiling light water and moderated by heavy water designed to maximise power production from thorium. The equilibrium fuel cycle is based on the conversion of naturally available thorium into fissile 233 U driven by plutonium as external fissile feed. Plutonium is used as makeup fuel to achieve high discharge burnup and self-sustaining characteristics of Th- 233 U fuel cycle. The reactor would be operated in closed fuel cycle by recycling 233 U back into the reactor. Physics design of AHWR offers considerable flexibility to accommodate different kinds of fuel cycles. Use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel with thorium in AHWR has several attractive features like enhanced safe where all the reactivity coefficients are negative by design. The delayed neutron parameter β will be larger than the reference AHWR fuelled with (Th,Pu)MOX and (Th, 233 U) MOX and hence enhanced controllability. This fuel cycle would be operated in a once-through mode. The initial core will have large excess reactivity and will require large amount of neutron poison (boron) to be dissolved in moderator to quench this initial core excess reactivity. Generally, flux flattening is achieved by using differential enrichment in the central and outer region of the core. (author)

  2. Accident analysis for new reactor concepts and VVER type reactor design with advanced fuel. STC with Russia. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, U.; Kliem, S.; Mittag, S.; Rohde, U.; Seidel, A.

    2000-10-01

    In the frame of a project on scientific-technical cooperation funded by BMBF/BMWi, the 3D reactor dynamics code DYN3D developed at Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR), has been transferred to the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) Obninsk in Russia and integrated into the software package of IPPE. DYN3D has been coupled to a thermohydraulic system code used in IPPE making available 3D neutron kinetics within this software package. A new macroscopic cross section library has been created using a modified version of the WIMS/D4 code. This library includes data for modernized fuel design containing burnable absorbers in different concentrations, which is tested in VVER-1000 type reactors. The cross section library has been connected to DYN3D. Calculations were performed to check the library in comparison with other data libraries and codes. The code DYN3D and the coupled 3D neutron kinetics/thermal hydraulics code system were used to perform analyses of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) for the reactor design ABV-67, an integral reactor concept with small power developed under participation of IPPE. The fluid dynamics code DINCOR developed at IPPE was transferred to FZR. It was used in validation calculations on test problems for the short-term core melt behaviour (CORVIS experiments). (orig.) [de

  3. Monte Carlo simulation in UWB1 depletion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovecky, M.; Prehradny, J.; Jirickova, J.; Skoda, R.

    2015-01-01

    U W B 1 depletion code is being developed as a fast computational tool for the study of burnable absorbers in the University of West Bohemia in Pilsen, Czech Republic. In order to achieve higher precision, the newly developed code was extended by adding a Monte Carlo solver. Research of fuel depletion aims at development and introduction of advanced types of burnable absorbers in nuclear fuel. Burnable absorbers (BA) allow the compensation of the initial reactivity excess of nuclear fuel and result in an increase of fuel cycles lengths with higher enriched fuels. The paper describes the depletion calculations of VVER nuclear fuel doped with rare earth oxides as burnable absorber based on performed depletion calculations, rare earth oxides are divided into two equally numerous groups, suitable burnable absorbers and poisoning absorbers. According to residual poisoning and BA reactivity worth, rare earth oxides marked as suitable burnable absorbers are Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho and Er, while poisoning absorbers include Sc, La, Lu, Y, Ce, Pr and Tb. The presentation slides have been added to the article

  4. Fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Hutchinson, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel assembly in which the end fittings may be easily removed after the assembly has been irradiated so that defective fuel rods may be replaced or special fuel or burnable poison rods inserted therein. The fuel assembly is of the type wherein structural support is provided by several vertically extending hollow structural members attached at opposite ends to upper and lower end fittings. The upper and lower end fittings each comprise an end plate and means extending therefrom for alignment and support of the assembly within the reactor core. Threaded joints between the hollow structural members and the means for alignment form the connections between the hollow structural members and the upper and lower end fittings

  5. Nuclear fuel management optimization for LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turinsky, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    LWR in core nuclear fuel management involves the placement of fuel and control materials so that a specified objective is achieved within constraints. Specifically, one is interested in determining the core loading pattern (LP of fuel assemblies and burnable poisons and for BWR, also control rod insertion versus cycle exposure. Possible objectives include minimization of feed enrichment and maximization of cycle energy production, discharge burnup or thermal margin. Constraints imposed relate to physical constraints, e.g. no discrete burnable poisons in control rod locations, and operational and safety constraints, e.g. maximum power peaking limit. The LP optimization problem is a large scale, nonlinear, mixed-integer decision variables problem with active constraints. Even with quarter core symmetry imposed, there are above 10 100 possible LPs. The implication is that deterministic optimization methods are not suitable, so in this work we have pursued using the stochastic Simulated Annealing optimization method. Adaptive penalty functions are used to impose certain constraints, allowing unfeasible regions of the search space to be transverse. Since ten of thousands of LPs must be examined to achieve high computational efficiency, higher-order Generalized Perturbation Theory is utilized to solve the Nodal Expansion Method for of the two-group neutron diffusion. These methods have been incorporated into the FORMOSA series of codes and used to optimize PWR and BWR reload cores. (author). 9 refs., 3 tabs

  6. Absorber manufacturing made easy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berner, Joachim

    2010-07-01

    Whether by means of a laser source or an ultrasound head - automation technology is making progress in the solar thermal sector. S and WE presents news developments in welding technology in absorber manufacture. (orig.)

  7. TOMS Absorbing Aerosol Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — TOMS_AI_G is an aerosol related dataset derived from the Total Ozone Monitoring Satellite (TOMS) Sensor. The TOMS aerosol index arises from absorbing aerosols such...

  8. Out-of-core fuel cycle optimization for nonequilibrium cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comes, S.A.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for determining the family of near-optimum fuel management schemes that minimize the levelized fuel cycle costs of a light water reactor over a multicycle planning horizon. Feed batch enrichments and sizes, burned batches to reinsert, and burnable poison loadings are determined for each cycle in the planning horizon. Flexibility in the methodology includes the capability to assess the economic benefits of various partially burned bath reload strategies as well as the effects of using split feed enrichments and enrichment palettes. Constraint limitations are imposed on feed enrichments, discharge burnups, moderator temperature coefficient, and cycle energy requirements

  9. Improved nuclear fuel pellet design to eliminate the RIM effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulenko, J.S.; Wang, J.

    2007-01-01

    The University of Florida has proposed a new Pellet design which will eliminate the rim effect for light water reactor (LWR) fuel for both present and anticipated future burnup targets. The design implements a 200 micron rim of natural uranium in place of the normal enriched uranium. This rim is very similar to the Integral Fuel Burnable concept of Westinghouse. An analysis based on the Monteburn Monte-Carlo burnup code shows that the rim region of the new design is 116% of the average burnup compared to 151% for the current pellet designs. The proposed design can increase the burnup by 33% over current designs without encountering the rim effect phenomenon. (authors)

  10. Optimization of enrichment distributions in nuclear fuel assemblies loaded with uranium and plutonium via a modified linear programming technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas Vivas, Gabriel Francisco

    A methodology to optimize enrichment distributions in Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies is developed and tested. The optimization technique employed is the linear programming revised simplex method, and the fuel assembly's performance is evaluated with a neutron transport code that is also utilized in the calculation of sensitivity coefficients. The enrichment distribution optimization procedure begins from a single-value (flat) enrichment distribution until a target, maximum local power peaking factor, is achieved. The optimum rod enrichment distribution, with 1.00 for the maximum local power peaking factor and with each rod having its own enrichment, is calculated at an intermediate stage of the analysis. Later, the best locations and values for a reduced number of rod enrichments is obtained as a function of a target maximum local power peaking factor by applying sensitivity to change techniques. Finally, a shuffling process that assigns individual rod enrichments among the enrichment groups is performed. The relative rod power distribution is then slightly modified and the rod grouping redefined until the optimum configuration is attained. To verify the accuracy of the relative rod power distribution, a full computation with the neutron transport code using the optimum enrichment distribution is carried out. The results are compared and tested for assembly designs loaded with fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) and plutonium Mixed OXide (MOX) fuels. MOX isotopics for both reactor-grade and weapons-grade plutonium were utilized to demonstrate the wide-range of applicability of the optimization technique. The features of the assembly designs used for evaluation purposes included burnable absorbers and internal water regions, and were prepared to resemble the configurations of modern assemblies utilized in commercial Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). In some cases, a net improvement in the relative rod power distribution or

  11. BEVE, Isotope Buildup in LWR Fuel Pin with Self-Shielding in Pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistella, F.

    1987-01-01

    cell macroscopic constants for both energy schemes in BURNY (i.e. one or two thermal groups). When calculating the fuel element in x,y geometry, if a poisoned cell is present, BURNY identifies what poison cell type it belongs to and then reads in the associated constants from the correspond- ing table supplied by BEVE. In the thermal range two different cross section libraries are available, set up by the BELIB code and including Gd-155 and 157 and Gd-Nat. One uses a 22 group scheme and the other 30 groups with the standard THERMOS group structure. In the epithermal and fast range the FORM code was used to calculate the group constants. The two isotopes Gd-155 and 157 are assumed to burn independently (i.e. Gd-156 absorption neglected). It should be stressed that BEVE provides information on the behaviour of highly absorbing burnable poison in the thermal range. Although some epithermal and fast effects are accounted for in the depletion by BEVE, the epithermal constants of the poisoned cell are not calculated by BEVE, but by BURNY. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Up to 22 mesh intervals may be used in the geometrical description of the poisoned cell and of the surrounding coupling region representing the standard fuel cells. A maximum of 30 thermal energy groups may be used. 3 fissile isotopes may be considered in the depletion - U-235, Pu-239 and 241. Max. number of isotopes that may be burnt is 12. Max. number of regions in which burnup is calculated is 13. Max. number of isotopes included in the evaluation of the transport cross section is 16. Max. number of mixtures is 20

  12. Constant strength fuel-fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaseen, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical apparatus composed of both a nonconsumable anode and cathode; and electrolyte, fuel oxidant and controls. This invention guarantees the constant transfer of hydrogen atoms and their respective electrons, thus a constant flow of power by submergence of the negative electrode in a constant strength hydrogen furnishing fuel; when said fuel is an aqueous absorbed hydrocarbon, such as and similar to ethanol or methnol. The objective is accomplished by recirculation of the liquid fuel, as depleted in the cell through specific type membranes which pass water molecules and reject the fuel molecules; thus concentrating them for recycle use

  13. Feasibility study of 24-month cycle using enriched Gadolinium as burnable poison for OPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sang-Rae; Shin, Ho-Cheol [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    All of cobalt-60 sources are imported to Korea. CANDU units are generally used to produce cobalt-60 at Bruce and Point Lepreau in Canada and Embalse in Argentina. China has started production of cobalt-60 using its CANDU 6 Qinshan Phase III nuclear power plant in 2009. For cobalt-60 production, the reactor's full complement of stainless steel adjusters is replaced with neutronically equivalent cobalt-59 adjusters, which are essentially invisible to reactor operation. With its very high neutron flux and optimized fuel burn-up, the CANDU has a very high cobalt-60 production rate in a relatively short time. This makes CANDU an excellent vehicle for bulk cobalt-60 production. Several studies have been performed to produce cobalt-60 using adjuster rod at Wolsong nuclear power plant. This study proposed new concept for producing cobalt-60 and performed the feasibility study. Bundle typed cobalt loading concept is proposed and evaluated the feasibility to fuel management without physics and system design change. The requirement to load cobalt bundle to the core was considered and several channels are nominated. The production of cobalt-60 source is very depend on the flux level and burnup directly.

  14. In-core fuel management: New challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolmayer, A.; Vallee, A.; Mondot, J.

    1992-01-01

    Experience accumulated by pressurized water reactor (PWR) utilities allows them to improve their strategies in the use of eventual margins to core design limits. They are used for nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) power upgrading, to improve operating margins, or to adapt fuel management to specific objectives. As a result, in-core fuel management strategies have become very diverse: UO 2 or mixed-oxide loading, out-in or in-out fuel loading patterns, extended or annual cycle lengths with margins on design limits such as moderator temperature coefficients, boron concentrations, or peaking factors. Perspectives also appear concerning use of existing plutonium stocks or actinide incineration. Burnable poisons are most often needed to satisfactorily achieve these goals. Among them, gadolinia are now largely used, owing to their excellent performance. More than 24 Framatome first cores and reloads, representing more than 3000 gadolinia-bearing rods, have been irradiated since 1983

  15. Low Absorbance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T. D.; Williams, A. M.

    1983-10-01

    The application of low absorption measurements to dilute solute determination requires specific instrumental characteristics. The use of laser intracavity absorption and thermal lens calorimetry to measure concentration is shown. The specific operating parameters that determine sensitivity are delineated along with the limits different measurement strategies impose. Finally areas of improvement in components that would result in improve sensitivity, accuracy, and reliability are discussed. During the past decade, a large number of methods have been developed for measuring the light absorbed by transparent materials. These include measurements on gases, liquids, and solids. The activity has been prompted by a variety of applications and a similar variety of disciplines. In Table 1 some representative examples of these methods is shown along with their published detection limits.1 It is clear that extraordinarily small absorbances can be measured. Most of the methods can be conveniently divided into two groups. These groups are those that measure the transmission of the sample and those that measure the light absorbed by the sample. The light absorbed methods are calorimetric in character. The advantages and disadvantages of each method varies depending on the principal application for which they were developed. The most prevalent motivation has been to characterize the bulk optical properties of transparent materials. Two examples are the development of extremely transparent glasses for use as fiber optic materials and the development of substrates for high power laser operation.

  16. Revisiting basics of fertile-free-fuel reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridman, Emil; Kolesnikov, Sergei; Galperin, Alex; Shwageraus, Eugene

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the basic feasibility of using Reactor Grade Pu in Fertile Free Fuel (FFF) matrix in Pressurized Water Reactors. Although the subject was addressed in the past, no systematic approach for assessing the main design challenges of FFF cores was published. In this work, we examine all commercially available burnable poison materials in all geometrical arrangements currently used by the nuclear industry with regards to their potential to alleviate the problems associated with the use of FFF in PWRs. The analysis was performed with a neutron transport and fuel assembly burnup code BOXER. Modified Linear Reactivity Model was applied to the two dimensional single fuel assembly results to approximate the full core characteristics. Based on the results of the performed analyses, Pu loaded FFF showed potential feasibility to be used in existing PWRs. All FFF problems may be significantly mitigated through the correct choice of BP material and configuration, while the final assessment on viability of full FFF core may be performed only on the basis of detailed 3D-full core analysis and the results of main design base transients. It was found that a combination of BP materials and geometries may be required to meet all FFF design goals. The use of enriched (in most effective isotope) burnable poisons, such as Er-167 and Gd- 157, may further improve the BP effectiveness and reduce the fuel cycle length penalty associated with their use. (authors)

  17. Supports with apertures for fuel assemblies in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1977-01-01

    This invention concerns couplings for nuclear reactor fuel rod bundle and, inter alia, for holders fitted with apertures which uncover the ends of the fuel rods for inspection, and a similar operation. The difficulties arising from the use of slid cast holders of control rods and burnable poison rods, which have marked previous designs, are overcome to a large extent through the use of the invention. Under this invention a network of interpenetrating plates is provided to hold a guide tube arrangement for the control rods or the burnable poison rods. This network forms an open cellular structure that uncovers the ends of the fuel rods, for easy routine inspection. This structure is less costly and yet has the strength of the previous solid cast holders. It avoids problems of quality guaranty encountered in the fabrication of cast metal products having a complicated shape. It allows for the re-arrangement of the partially burnt up rods inside a reactor core, without requiring any structural changes in the fuel rod bundle. It also makes it possible to overcome a want of thermal efficiency that was a hindrance in the past [fr

  18. Absorbable and biodegradable polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Shalaby, Shalaby W

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION NOTES: Absorbable/Biodegradable Polymers: Technology Evolution. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATIONOF NEW SYSTEMS: Segmented Copolyesters with Prolonged Strength Retention Profiles. Polyaxial Crystalline Fiber-Forming Copolyester. Polyethylene Glycol-Based Copolyesters. Cyanoacrylate-Based Systems as Tissue Adhesives. Chitosan-Based Systems. Hyaluronic Acid-Based Systems. DEVELOPMENTS IN PREPARATIVE, PROCESSING, AND EVALUATION METHODS: New Approaches to the Synthesis of Crystalline. Fiber-Forming Aliphatic Copolyesters. Advances in Morphological Development to Tailor the Performance of Me

  19. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seigoro.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrafine particles of a thermal neutron absorber showing ultraplasticity is dispersed in oxide ceramic fuels by more than 1% to 10% or lower. The ultrafine particles of the thermal neutron absorber showing ultrafine plasticity is selected from any one of ZrGd, HfEu, HfY, HfGd, ZrEu, and ZrY. The thermal neutron absorber is converted into ultrafine particles and solid-solubilized in a nuclear fuel pellet, so that the dispersion thereof into nuclear fuels is made uniform and an absorbing performance of the thermal neutrons is also made uniform. Moreover, the characteristics thereof, for example, physical properties such as expansion coefficient and thermal conductivity of the nuclear fuels are also improved. The neutron absorber, such as ZrGd or the like, can provide plasticity of nuclear fuels, if it is mixed into the nuclear fuels for showing the plasticity. The nuclear fuel pellets are deformed like an hour glass as burning, but, since the end portion thereof is deformed plastically within a range of a repulsive force of the cladding tube, there is no worry of damaging a portion of the cladding tube. (N.H.)

  20. The influence of petrography, mineralogy and chemistry on burnability and reactivity of quicklime produced in Twin Shaft Regenerative (TSR) kilns from Neoarchean limestone (Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vola, Gabriele; Sarandrea, Luca; Della Porta, Giovanna; Cavallo, Alessandro; Jadoul, Flavio; Cruciani, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    This study evaluates the influence of chemical, mineralogical and petrographic features of the Neoarchean limestone from the Ouplaas Mine (Griqualand West, South Africa) on its burnability and quicklime reactivity, considering the main use as raw material for high-grade lime production in twin shaft regenerative (TSR) kilns. This limestone consists of laminated clotted peloidal micrite and fenestrate microbial boundstone with herringbone calcite and organic carbon (kerogen) within stylolites. Diagenetic modifications include hypidiotopic dolomite, micrite to microsparite recrystallization, stylolites, poikilotopic calcite, chert and saddle dolomite replacements. Burning and technical tests widely attest that the Neoarchean limestone is sensitive to high temperature, showing an unusual and drastically pronounced sintering or overburning tendency. The slaking reactivity, according to EN 459-2 is high for lime burnt at 1050 °C, but rapidly decreases for lime burnt at 1150 °C. The predominant micritic microbial textures, coupled with the organic carbon, are key-factors influencing the low burnability and the high sintering tendency. The presence of burial cementation, especially poikilotopic calcite, seems to promote higher burnability, either in terms of starting calcination temperature, or in terms of higher carbonate dissociation rate. In fact, the highest calcination velocity determined by thermal analysis is consistent with the highest slaking reactivity of the lower stratum of the quarry, enriched in poikilotopic calcite. Secondly, locally concentered dolomitic marly limestones, and sporadic back shales negatively affects the quicklime reactivity, as well. This study confirms that a multidisciplinary analytical approach is essential for selecting the best raw mix for achieving the highest lime reactivity in TSR kilns.

  1. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  2. Fuel management optimization based on generalized perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.R.; Chapman, D.M.; Biswas, D.

    1986-01-01

    A general methodology for optimization of assembly shuffling and burnable poison (BP) loadings for LWR reload design has been developed. The uniqueness of this approach lies in the coupling of Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) methods and standard Integer Programming (IP) techniques. An IP algorithm can simulate the discrete nature of the fuel shuffling and BP loading problems, and the use of GPT sensitivity data provides an efficient means for modeling the behavior of the important core performance parameters. The method is extremely flexible since the choice of objective function and the number and mix of constraints depend only on the ability of GPT to determine the appropriate sensitivity functions

  3. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  4. Solar radiation absorbing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  5. TOPICAL REPORT ON ACTINIDE-ONLY BURNUP CREDIT FOR PWR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL PACKAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE

    1997-01-01

    A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k eff , of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO 2 , UO 2 /Gd 2 O 3 , and UO 2 /PuO 2 critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on k eff (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased k eff , when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper assembly selection

  6. Topical report on actinide-only burnup credit for PWR spent nuclear fuel packages. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1997-04-01

    A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on k{sub eff} (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased k{sub eff}, when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package

  7. Reactivity Flattening for a Soluble Boron-Free Small Modular Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, JinHa; Kang, JungKil; Hah, ChangJoo [KINGS, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, it is found that double-layered BP rod with same absorber material, B{sub 4}C/B{sub 4}C, is the most efficient candidate of BP for a SBF reactor. This burnable absorber is flexible to cope with various reactivity shapes by adjusting the thickness of absorber material, weight ratio of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and B{sub 4}C, and it can be used like a single-layered burnable absorber by replacing outer layer with air. The results of depletion calculation verify that core excess reactivity can be well controlled, and show that core radial power distributions are also well flattened over the entire core burnup. Removing soluble boron from the primary coolant system brings many benefits of simplifying the reactor operation and maintenance. Although a Soluble Boron-Free (SBF) operation has a lot of advantages, there are several barriers to overcome such as heavily bottom skewed axial power distribution due to the strong negative MTC, control rod design to secure the reactivity shutdown margin, and excess reactivity holddown by using burnable absorbers and control rods, etc. For these reasons, there is no practical boron-free power operation in the world in spite of many studies on the SBF reactor. Burnable absorbers and control rods are the only available means, so far, to compensate excess reactivity for a SBF reactor. Frequent use of the control rods, however, can give a big burden to operators, and deep insertion of the control rods can cause fuel damage when Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) occurs like CEA ejection and bank withdrawal. The purpose of this study is to design a new conceptual burnable absorber to achieve flat reactivity from Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) to End Of Cycle (EOC). For these reasons, firstly, we carry out the investigation of the nuclear characteristics of the 17X17 WH (WestingHouse) type Fuel Assembly (FA) containing various burnable absorbers which have been widely used in PWR. Secondly, three kinds of new conceptual Burnable Poison

  8. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles. Part II: Utilization for excess reactivity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    In high temperature reactors, burnable absorbers are utilized to manage the excess reactivity at the early stage of the fuel cycle. In this paper QUADRISO particles are proposed to manage the initial excess reactivity of high temperature reactors. The QUADRISO concept synergistically couples the decrease of the burnable poison with the decrease of the fissile materials at the fuel particle level. This mechanism is set up by introducing a burnable poison layer around the fuel kernel in ordinary TRISO particles or by mixing the burnable poison with any of the TRISO coated layers. At the beginning of life, the initial excess reactivity is small because some neutrons are absorbed in the burnable poison and they are prevented from entering the fuel kernel. At the end of life, when the absorber is almost depleted, more neutrons stream into the fuel kernel of QUADRISO particles causing fission reactions. The mechanism has been applied to a prismatic high temperature reactor with europium or erbium burnable absorbers, showing a significant reduction in the initial excess reactivity of the core.

  9. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles. Part II: Utilization for excess reactivity control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto, E-mail: alby@anl.go [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    In high temperature reactors, burnable absorbers are utilized to manage the excess reactivity at the early stage of the fuel cycle. In this paper QUADRISO particles are proposed to manage the initial excess reactivity of high temperature reactors. The QUADRISO concept synergistically couples the decrease of the burnable poison with the decrease of the fissile materials at the fuel particle level. This mechanism is set up by introducing a burnable poison layer around the fuel kernel in ordinary TRISO particles or by mixing the burnable poison with any of the TRISO coated layers. At the beginning of life, the initial excess reactivity is small because some neutrons are absorbed in the burnable poison and they are prevented from entering the fuel kernel. At the end of life, when the absorber is almost depleted, more neutrons stream into the fuel kernel of QUADRISO particles causing fission reactions. The mechanism has been applied to a prismatic high temperature reactor with europium or erbium burnable absorbers, showing a significant reduction in the initial excess reactivity of the core.

  10. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles. Part II: Utilization for excess reactivity control.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2010-07-01

    In high temperature reactors, burnable absorbers are utilized to manage the excess reactivity at the early stage of the fuel cycle. In this paper QUADRISO particles are proposed to manage the initial excess reactivity of high temperature reactors. The QUADRISO concept synergistically couples the decrease of the burnable poison with the decrease of the fissile materials at the fuel particle level. This mechanism is set up by introducing a burnable poison layer around the fuel kernel in ordinary TRISO particles or by mixing the burnable poison with any of the TRISO coated layers. At the beginning of life, the initial excess reactivity is small because some neutrons are absorbed in the burnable poison and they are prevented from entering the fuel kernel. At the end of life, when the absorber is almost depleted, more neutrons stream into the fuel kernel of QUADRISO particles causing fission reactions. The mechanism has been applied to a prismatic high temperature reactor with europium or erbium burnable absorbers, showing a significant reduction in the initial excess reactivity of the core.

  11. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles : Part II Utilization for excess reactivity control.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-01-01

    In high temperature reactors, burnable absorbers are utilized to manage the excess reactivity at the early stage of the fuel cycle. In this paper QUADRISO particles are proposed to manage the initial excess reactivity of high temperature reactors. The QUADRISO concept synergistically couples the decrease of the burnable poison with the decrease of the fissile materials at the fuel particle level. This mechanism is set up by introducing a burnable poison layer around the fuel kernel in ordinary TRISO particles or by mixing the burnable poison with any of the TRISO coated layers. At the beginning of life, the initial excess reactivity is small because some neutrons are absorbed in the burnable poison and they are prevented from entering the fuel kernel. At the end of life, when the absorber is almost depleted, more neutrons stream into the fuel kernel of QUADRISO particles causing fission reactions. The mechanism has been applied to a prismatic high temperature reactor with europium or erbium burnable absorbers, showing a significant reduction in the initial excess reactivity of the core.

  12. Assessment of the linear power level in fuel rods irradiated in the CALLISTO loop in the high flux materials testing reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malambu, E.; Raedt, Ch. de; Weber, M.

    1999-01-01

    The pressurized light-water-cooled testing facility CALLISTO was designed to test the behaviour of advanced fuel rods (UO 2 or MOX, possibly with burnable poisons) under conditions representative of actual LWRs up to high burn-up rates. The accurate determination of the fission powers in each of the nine rods, and hence of the burn-up values, is carried out according to a rather elaborate procedure. (author)

  13. The Flexible Bass Absorber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    Multi-purpose concert halls face a dilemma. They host different performance types that require significantly different acoustic conditions in order to provide the best sound quality to both the performers, sound engineers and the audience. Pop and rock music often contain high levels of bass sound...... energy but still require high definition for good sound quality. The mid- and high-frequency absorption is easily regulated, but adjusting the low-frequency absorption has typically been too expensive or requires too much space to be practical for multi-purpose halls. A practical solution to this dilemma...... has been developed. Measurements were made on a variable and mobile low-frequency absorber. The paper presents the results of prototype sound absorption measurements as well as elements of the design....

  14. The Flexible Bass Absorber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    Multi-purpose concert halls face a dilemma. They host different performance types that require significantly different acoustic conditions in order to provide the best sound quality to both the performers, sound engineers and the audience. Pop and rock music often contains high levels of bass sound...... energy but still require high definition for good sound quality. The mid- and high-frequency absorption is easily regulated, but adjusting the low-frequency absorption has typically been too expensive or requires too much space to be practical for multi-purpose halls. A practical solution to this dilemma...... has been developed. Measurements were made on a variable and mobile low-frequency absorber. The paper presents the results of prototype sound absorption measurements as well as elements of the design....

  15. Metamaterial electromagnetic wave absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Claire M; Liu, Xianliang; Padilla, Willie J

    2012-06-19

    The advent of negative index materials has spawned extensive research into metamaterials over the past decade. Metamaterials are attractive not only for their exotic electromagnetic properties, but also their promise for applications. A particular branch-the metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA)-has garnered interest due to the fact that it can achieve unity absorptivity of electromagnetic waves. Since its first experimental demonstration in 2008, the MPA has progressed significantly with designs shown across the electromagnetic spectrum, from microwave to optical. In this Progress Report we give an overview of the field and discuss a selection of examples and related applications. The ability of the MPA to exhibit extreme performance flexibility will be discussed and the theory underlying their operation and limitations will be established. Insight is given into what we can expect from this rapidly expanding field and future challenges will be addressed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. An Empirical Approach to Bounding the Axial Reactivity Effects of PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Leary, P. M.; Scaglione, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    One of the significant issues yet to be resolved for using burnup credit (BUC) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is establishing a set of depletion parameters that produce an adequately conservative representation of the fuel's isotopic inventory. Depletion parameters (such as local power, fuel temperature, moderator temperature, burnable poison rod history, and soluble boron concentration) affect the isotopic inventory of fuel that is depleted in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). However, obtaining the detailed operating histories needed to model all PWR fuel assemblies to which BUC would be applied is an onerous and costly task. Simplifications therefore have been suggested that could lead to using ''bounding'' depletion parameters that could be broadly applied to different fuel assemblies. This paper presents a method for determining a set of bounding depletion parameters for use in criticality analyses for SNF

  17. Aperiodic-metamaterial-based absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanlong Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The periodic-metamaterial-based perfect absorber has been studied broadly. Conversely, if the unit cell in the metamaterial-based absorber is arranged aperiodically (aperiodic-metamaterial-based absorber, how does it perform? Inspired by this, here we present a systematic study of the aperiodic-metamaterial-based absorber. By investigating the response of metamaterial absorbers based on periodic, Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and quasicrystal lattices, we found that aperiodic-metamaterial-based absorbers could display similar absorption behaviors as the periodic one in one hand. However, their absorption behaviors show different tendency depending on the thicknesses of the spacer. Further studies on the angle and polarization dependence of the absorption behavior are also presented.

  18. Studying the fuel burnup of MNSR reactor and estimating the concentrations of main fission products using the codes WIMS-D4 and CITATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haj Hassan, H.; Ghazi, N.; Hainoun, A.

    2007-01-01

    The codes WIMSD-4 and BORGLES - part of the MTR-PC code package- have been applied to prepare the microscopic cross section library for the main elements of MNSR core for 6 neutron energy groups. The generated library was utilized from the 3D code CITATION to perform the calculation of fuel burn up and depletion including the identification of main fission products and its effects on the multiplication factor. In this regard some modifications have been introduced to the subroutine NUCY in CITATION to incorporate estimating the concentration of the related actinides and fission products. The burn up results indicated that the core life time of MNSR is being mainly estimated by Sm-149 following by Gd-157 and Cd-113. The accumulation of these actinides during 100 continuous operation days caused a reduction of ca. 2 mk for the excess reactivity. This result seems to be in good agreement with the available empirical value of 1.8 mk which relates to the whole discontinuous operation period of the reactor since its start and up to now. The calculation procedure simulates the sporadic operation with an adequate continuous operation period. This approximation is valid for the long lived actinides that mainly dictate the core life time. However, it is an overestimation for the concentration of short lived radioactive products like Xe-135. In the framework of this analysis the possibility of replacement of current MNSR fuel through low enriched fuels has been explored for two the fuel types U02-Mg and U3Si-Al. The results indicate that the first type (UO2-Mg) realize the criticality conditions with low enrichment of 20%, whereas the second type (U3Si-Al) required increasing the uranium enrichment up to 33%. For both fuel types the contribution of plutonium isotopes on the criticality has been also evaluated. Additionally, the influence of mixing burnable absorbers (Gd-113, Cd- 113) with the fresh fuels was investigated to identify their long-term control effect on the

  19. CO2 Absorbing Capacity of MEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José I. Huertas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the use of a gas bubbler apparatus in which the gas phase is bubbled into a fixed amount of absorbent under standard conditions as a uniform procedure for determining the absorption capacity of solvents. The method was systematically applied to determine the CO2 absorbing capacity of MEA (Ac at several aqueous MEA (β and gas-phase CO2 concentrations. Ac approached the nominal CO2 absorbing capacity of MEA (720 g CO2/kg MEA at very low β levels, increasing from 447.9±18.1 to 581.3±32.3 g CO2/kg MEA as β was reduced from 30 to 2.5% (w/w. Ac did not depend on the CO2 concentration in the inlet gas stream as long as the gas stream did not include other amine sensitive components. During the bubbling tests the outlet CO2 concentration profiles exhibited a sigmoidal shape that could be described by an exponential equation characterized by an efficiency factor (a and a form factor (n. Statistical analysis based on correlation analysis indicated that in all cases the experimental data fit the equation well when a was 6.1±0.35 and n was 2.5±0.12. The results of these experiments may be used to optimize scrubber designs for CO2 sequestration from fossil fuel derived flue gases.

  20. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, R. James

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  1. Metal-shearing energy absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Device, consisting of tongue of thin aluminum alloy strip, pull tab, slotted steel plate which serves as cutter, and steel buckle, absorbs mechanical energy when its ends are subjected to tensile loading. Device is applicable as auxiliary shock absorbing anchor for automobile and airplane safety belts.

  2. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  3. Visible light broadband perfect absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, X. L.; Meng, Q. X.; Yuan, C. X.; Zhou, Z. X.; Wang, X. O., E-mail: wxo@hit.edu.cn [School of Science, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-03-15

    The visible light broadband perfect absorbers based on the silver (Ag) nano elliptical disks and holes array are studied using finite difference time domain simulations. The semiconducting indium silicon dioxide thin film is introduced as the space layer in this sandwiched structure. Utilizing the asymmetrical geometry of the structures, polarization sensitivity for transverse electric wave (TE)/transverse magnetic wave (TM) and left circular polarization wave (LCP)/right circular polarization wave (RCP) of the broadband absorption are gained. The absorbers with Ag nano disks and holes array show several peaks absorbance of 100% by numerical simulation. These simple and flexible perfect absorbers are particularly desirable for various potential applications including the solar energy absorber.

  4. Investigation of neutron physical features of WWER-440 assembly containing differently enriched pins and Gd burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemes, Imre

    2000-01-01

    In this paper different pin-distributions of WWER-440 fuel assembly are examined. Assemblies contain 3 Gd-doped pins (Hungarian design), 6 Gd-doped pins near the assembly corners (Russian design) and differently profiled U5-enrichment in different pins. The main neutron physical characteristics of this assemblies - as the function of burnup - are calculated using HELIOS code. The calculated parameters of different assembly designs are analyzed from the standpoint of fuel cycle economy and refueling design practice. (Authors)

  5. FBFC's gadolinium fuel assembly manufacturing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Eynde, M.; Belvegue, P.

    1999-01-01

    The burnable poison used by Framatome is gadolinium oxide integrated in the pellet by blending with UO 2 . This is the integrated poison which provides the largest experience feedback world-wide. Its main advantages are design flexibility and its well-known rod in reactor behaviour. FBFC's manufacturing experience with gadolinium is extensive. The first pellets were produced in 1986, present production averages 10 tons/year and cumulated experience reaches 47 tons. In parallel Framatome acquired gadolinium irradiation experience with more then 2 000 fuel assemblies in 33 reactors in 5 countries. Taking into account the increasing needs, a new gadolinium shop has been implemented in the FBFC Dessel plant. This shop, with a production capacity of 30 tU/yr is to be commissioned in the second quarter of 1999. It implements the most recent technological developments to achieve top product quality, safety and environment protection. (authors)

  6. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  7. Integration of regenerative shock absorber into vehicle electric system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongxiao; Li, Peng; Xing, Shaoxu; Kim, Junyoung; Yu, Liangyao; Zuo, Lei

    2014-03-01

    Regenerative/Energy harvesting shock absorbers have a great potential to increase fuel efficiency and provide suspension damping simultaneously. In recent years there's intensive work on this topic, but most researches focus on electricity extraction from vibration and harvesting efficiency improvement. The integration of electricity generated from regenerative shock absorbers into vehicle electric system, which is very important to realize the fuel efficiency benefit, has not been investigated. This paper is to study and demonstrate the integration of regenerative shock absorber with vehicle alternator, battery and in-vehicle electrical load together. In the presented system, the shock absorber is excited by a shaker and it converts kinetic energy into electricity. The harvested electricity flows into a DC/DC converter which realizes two functions: controlling the shock absorber's damping and regulating the output voltage. The damping is tuned by controlling shock absorber's output current, which is also the input current of DC/DC converter. By adjusting the duty cycles of switches in the converter, its input impedance together with input current can be adjusted according to dynamic damping requirements. An automotive lead-acid battery is charged by the DC/DC converter's output. To simulate the working condition of combustion engine, an AC motor is used to drive a truck alternator, which also charges the battery. Power resistors are used as battery's electrical load to simulate in-vehicle electrical devices. Experimental results show that the proposed integration strategy can effectively utilize the harvested electricity and power consumption of the AC motor is decreased accordingly. This proves the combustion engine's load reduction and fuel efficiency improvement.

  8. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results. [fuel development for high-speed civil transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  9. Analysis of rim effect in high burnup (U, Gd)O2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, Takanori; Matsumura, Tetsuo; Kinoshita, Mikiyasu

    1992-01-01

    Extending burnup of LWR fuel is efficient to reduce the fuel cycle cost and the number of spent fuels. Gadolinia will be mixed in LWR fuels to control the initial reactivity of the high burnup assembly because gadolinia is one of the good burnable poisons of neutron. Rim effect in (U,Gd)O 2 fuel was analyzed by the detailed burnup analysis code VIMBURN. The rim effect in (U,Gd)O 2 is more significant than that in UO 2 fuel below 20 MWd/kgU and the difference of the rim effects in both fuels decreases as burnup proceeds above 20 MWd/kgU. The rim effects in (U,Gd)O 2 and UO 2 fuels are in the same level at high burnup of 80 MWd/kgU when the rim structure forms. The burnup rate of (U,Gd)O 2 rod is less than that of UO 2 rods surrounding the (U,Gd)O 2 rod in the assembly due to neutron absorption of gadolinium. Accordingly local burnup at the peripheral region in (U,Gd)O 2 fuel reaches the high burnup of 80 MWd/kgU a little after the local burnup in UO 2 fuel does. Therefore, it can be predicted that the impact of rim structure on the fuel behaviour in (U,Gd)O 2 fuel is as much as in UO 2 fuel at high burnup of the assembly. (author)

  10. Status of the inert matrix fuel program at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledergerber, G.; Degueldre, C.; Kasemeyer, U.; Stanculescu, A.; Paratte, J.M.; Chawla, R.

    1997-01-01

    Incineration of plutonium by a once-through cycle in LWRs utilising an inert matrix based fuel may prove to be an attractive way of making use of the energy of fissile plutonium and reducing both the hazard potential and the volumes of the waste. Yttria stabilised zirconia forms a solid solution with oxides of rare earth elements (e.g. erbium, cerium) and some actinides. The small absorption cross section, the excellent stability under irradiation, and the insolubility in acids and water recommends this material as an inert matrix. Neutronics calculations with erbium as burnable poison show that these compositions would be optimal from the reactivity point of view. A fuel element with an improved reactivity behaviour over its life cycle has been designed for possible introduction into a heterogeneous LWR core. (author). 16 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs

  11. A new method to measure the U-235 content in fresh LWR fuel assemblies via fast-neutron passive self-interrogation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menlove, Howard; Belian, Anthony; Geist, William; Rael, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a solution to a decades old safeguards problem in the verification of the fissile concentration in fresh light water reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies. The problem is that the burnable poison (e.g. Gd2O3) addition to the fuel rods decreases the active neutron assay for the fuel assemblies. This paper presents a new innovative method for the verification of the 235U linear mass density in fresh LEU fuel assemblies that is insensitive to the burnable poison content. The technique makes use of the 238U atoms in the fuel rods to self-interrogate the 235U mass. The innovation for the new approach is that the 238U spontaneous fission (SF) neutrons from the rods induces fission reactions (IF) in the 235U that are time correlated with the SF source neutrons. Thus, the coincidence gate counting rate benefits from both the nu-bar of the 238U SF (2.07) and the 235U IF (2.44) for a fraction of the IF reactions. Whereas, the 238U SF background has no time-correlation boost. The higher the detection efficiency, the higher the correlated boost because background neutron counts from the SF are being converted to signal doubles. This time-correlation in the IF signal increases signal/background ratio that provides a good precision for the net signal from the 235U mass. The hard neutron energy spectrum makes the technique insensitive to the burnable poison loading where a Cd or Gd liner on the detector walls is used to prevent thermal-neutron reflection back into the fuel assembly from the detector. We have named the system the fast-neutron passive collar (FNPC).

  12. Fuel storage rack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollon, L.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a storage rack for spent nuclear fuel elements comprising a multiplicity of elongated hollow containers of uniform cross-section, preferably square,some of said containers having laterally extending continuous flanges extending between adjacent containers and defining continuous elongated chambers therebetween for the reception of neutron absorbing panels. 18 claims, 7 figures

  13. Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Eric [Neumann Systems Group, Incorporated, Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

    2015-12-23

    During Project DE-FE0007528, CARE (Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment), Neumann Systems Group (NSG) designed, installed and tested a 0.5MW NeuStream® carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using the patented NeuStream® absorber equipment and concentrated (6 molal) piperazine (PZ) as the solvent at Colorado Springs Utilities’ (CSU’s) Martin Drake pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The 36 month project included design, build and test phases. The 0.5MW NeuStream® CO2 capture system was successfully tested on flue gas from both coal and natural gas combustion sources and was shown to meet project objectives. Ninety percent CO2 removal was achieved with greater than 95% CO2product purity. The absorbers tested support a 90% reduction in absorber volume compared to packed towers and with an absorber parasitic power of less than 1% when configured for operation with a 550MW coal plant. The preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) performed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) predicted an over-the-fence cost of $25.73/tonne of CO2 captured from a sub-critical PC plant.

  14. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  15. Evaluation of the need for stochastic optimization of out-of-core nuclear fuel management decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.L. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Work has been completed on utilizing mathematical optimization techniques to optimize out-of-core nuclear fuel management decisions. The objective of such optimization is to minimize the levelized fuel cycle cost over some planning horizon. Typical decision variables include feed enrichments and number of assemblies, burnable poison requirements, and burned fuel to reinsert for every cycle in the planning horizon. Engineering constraints imposed consist of such items as discharge burnup limits, maximum enrichment limit, and target cycle energy productions. Earlier the authors reported on the development of the OCEON code, which employs the integer Monte Carlo Programming method as the mathematical optimization method. The discharge burnpups, and feed enrichment and burnable poison requirements are evaluated, initially employing a linear reactivity core physics model and refined using a coarse mesh nodal model. The economic evaluation is completed using a modification of the CINCAS methodology. Interest now is to assess the need for stochastic optimization, which will account for cost components and cycle energy production uncertainties. The implication of the present studies is that stochastic optimization in regard to cost component uncertainties need not be completed since deterministic optimization will identify nearly the same family of near-optimum cycling schemes

  16. Shock Absorbers Save Structures and Lives during Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    With NASA funding, North Tonawanda, New York-based Taylor Devices Inc. developed fluidic shock absorbers to safely remove the fuel and electrical connectors from the space shuttles during launch. The company is now employing the technology as seismic dampers to protect structures from earthquakes. To date, 550 buildings and bridges have the dampers, and not a single one has suffered damage in the wake of an earthquake.

  17. Water fugacity in absorbing polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, K J; Shalaby, S W

    1997-01-01

    Absorbable biomaterials, as dynamic systems, require special handling, processing, and characterization techniques beyond those of the traditional nonabsorbable materials. As the material degrades or absorbs, in vitro or in vivo, it undergoes structural, physical, and chemical changes. These changes in the base material may significantly impact the performance of a particular biomedical device; hence, it is important that the investigator consider the full range of properties that constitute the lifetime of a given absorbable material. The long term degradation study presented here sought to identify one such property, the change in water retention of a degrading oriented polylactide film. The investigation found through differential scanning calorimetry that later stages of degradation are often characterized by a stronger retention of water, potentially due to a higher number of polar carboxyl groups within the relatively hydrophobic polymer matrix.

  18. Adaptive inertial shock-absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraj, Rami; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan; Knap, Lech; Seńko, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a new concept of impact absorption by means of impact energy management and storage in dedicated rotating inertial discs. The effectiveness of the concept is demonstrated in a selected case-study involving spinning management, a recently developed novel impact-absorber. A specific control technique performed on this device is demonstrated to be the main source of significant improvement in the overall efficiency of impact damping process. The influence of various parameters on the performance of the shock-absorber is investigated. Design and manufacturing challenges and directions of further research are formulated. (paper)

  19. Absorbing-and-diffusing coating

    OpenAIRE

    Tkalich, N. V.; Mokeev, Yu. G.; Onipko, A. F.; Vashchenko, V. F.; Topchev, M. D.; Glebov, V. V.; Ivanchenko, Dmitrij D.; Kolchigin, Nikolay N.; Yevdokimov, V. V.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the results of complex experimental research of the absorbing-and-diffusing material "Contrast". It is shown to be an efficient wideband-camouflage material in the radiolocation and the video bands. Ways for improving the material characteristics are outlined.

  20. Investigation regarding the safety of handling the fuel assemblies for the nuclear ship 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    It was concluded previously that the general inspection of safety and the repair of shielding can be carried out as the fuel assemblies are charged, and the safety can be secured sufficiently. According to the decision by the meeting of cabinet ministers concerned with the nuclear ship ''Mutsu'', the Mutsu General Inspection and Repair Technology Investigation Committee investigated on the basic concept regarding the method and the safety of taking out, transporting and preserving the fuel assemblies. 112 fuel rods and 9 burnable poison rods are arranged into the square grid of 11 x 11 in a fuel assembly, and 32 fuel assemblies are employed. The contents of the investigation are the outline of the fuel assemblies, the present states of nuclear fission products, surface dose rate and soundness of the fuel assemblies, the safety of taking out, transporting and preserving the fuel assemblies, the measures required for securing the safety, and the place for taking out the fuel assemblies. In case of taking out, transporting and preserving the fuel assemblies, it is considered in view of the present state of the fuel assemblies that the safety can be secured sufficiently if the works are carried out carefully by taking the methods and conditions investigated into consideration. Also the committee reached already the conclusion described at the outset. (Kako, I.)

  1. Fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enomoto, Hirofumi.

    1989-05-22

    This invention aims to maintain a long-term operation with stable cell output characteristics by uniformly supplying an electrolyte from the reserver to the matrix layer over the entire matrix layer, and further to prevent the excessive wetting of the catalyst layer by smoothly absorbing the volume change of the electrolyte, caused by the repeated stop/start-up of the fuel cell, within the reserver system. For this purpose, in this invention, an electrolyte transport layer, which connects with an electrolyte reservor formed at the electrode end, is partly formed between the electrode material and the catalyst layer; a catalyst layer, which faces the electrolyte transport layer, has through-holes, which connect to the matrix, dispersely distributed. The electrolyte-transport layer is a thin sheet of a hydrophilic fibers which are non-wovens of such fibers as carbon, silicon carbide, silicon nitride or inorganic oxides. 11 figs.

  2. FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, C.H.

    1961-11-21

    A fuel element is designed which is particularly adapted for reactors of high power density used to generate steam for the production of electricity. The fuel element consists of inner and outer concentric tubes forming an annular chamber within which is contained fissionable fuel pellet segments, wedge members interposed between the fuel segments, and a spring which, acting with wedge members, urges said fuel pellets radially into contact against the inner surface of the outer tube. The wedge members may be a fertile material convertible into fissionable fuel material by absorbing neutrons emitted from the fissionable fuel pellet segments. The costly grinding of cylindrical fuel pellets to close tolerances for snug engagement is reduced because the need to finish the exact size is eliminated. (AEC)

  3. Radiation sterilization of absorbent cotton and of absorbent gauze

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosobuchi, Kazunari; Oka, Mitsuru; Kaneko, Akira; Ishiwata, Hiroshi.

    1986-01-01

    The bioburden of absorbent cotton and of absorbent gauze and their physical and chemical characteristics after irradiation are investigated. The survey conducted on contaminants of 1890 cotton samples from 53 lots and 805 gauze samples from 56 lots showed maximum numbers of microbes per g of the cotton and gauze were 859 (an average of 21.4) and 777 (an average of 42.2), respectively. Isolation and microbiological and biochemical tests of representative microbes indicated that all of them, except one, were bacilli. The sterilization dose at 10 -6 of sterlity assurance level was found to be 2.0 Mrad when irradiated the spores loaded on paper strips and examined populations having graded D values from 0.10 to 0.28 Mrad. The sterilization dose would be about 1.5 Mrad if subjected the average numbers of contaminants observed in this study to irradiation. No significant differences were found between the irradiated samples and control up to 2 Mrad in tensile strength, change of color, absorbency, sedimentation rate, soluble substances, and pH of solutions used for immersion and other tests conventionally used. These results indicate that these products can be sterilized by irradiation. (author)

  4. 77 FR 28626 - Biweekly Notice, Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... internal pressure has been impacted by increased fuel duty, use of integral fuel burnable absorbers, and... the amount equal to the reduction in uncertainty in the heat balance calculation. The margins of... radiological accident dose calculations, bound the power uprate. Therefore, the proposed change does not...

  5. In-Core Fuel Managements for PWRs: Investigation on solution for optimal utilization of PWR fuel through the use of fuel assemblies with differently enriched {sup 235}U fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprioli, Sara

    2004-04-01

    A possibility for more efficient use of the nuclear fuel in a pressurized water reactor is investigated. The alternative proposed here consists of the implementation of PWR fuel assemblies with differently enriched {sup 235}U fuel pins. This possibility is examined in comparison with the standard assembly design. The comparison is performed both in terms of single assembly performance and in the terms of nuclear reactor core performance and fuel utility. For the evaluation of the actual performance of the new assembly types, 5 operated fuel core sequences of R3 (Ringhals' third unit), for the period 1999 - 2004 (cycles 17 - 21) were examined. For every cycle, the standard fresh fuel assemblies have been identified and taken as reference cases for the study of the new type of assemblies with differently enriched uranium rods. In every cycle, assemblies with and without burnable absorber are freshly loaded into the core. The axial enrichment distribution is kept uniform, allowing for a radial (planar) enrichment level distribution only. At an assembly level, it has been observed that the implementation of the alternative enrichment configuration can lead to lower and flatter internal peaking factor distribution with respect to the uniformly enriched reference assemblies. This can be achieved by limiting the enrichment levels distribution to a rather narrow range. The highest enrichment level chosen has the greatest impact on the power distribution of the assemblies. As it increases, the enrichment level drives the internal peaking factor to greater values than in the reference assemblies. Generally, the highest enrichment level that would allow an improvement in the power performance of the assembly lies between 3.95 w/o and 4.17 w/o. The highest possible enrichment level depends on the average enrichment of the overall assembly, which is kept constant to the average enrichment of the reference assemblies. The improvements that can be obtained at this level are

  6. The industrial tool of Areva NP fuel cycle: capacity, methods and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrot, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Areva is the world leader for the production of zirconium, it owns a fully integrated business from the processing of zirconium ore to the production of tubes and fuel assemblies. As for fuel manufacturing business, Areva owns plants in France (Romans-sur-Isere, Pierrelatte), Belgium (Dessel), Germany (Lingen, Karlstein) and Usa (Richland, Lynchburg). The Romans plant produces UO 2 powder, pellets, fuel rods and assemblies for PWRs. The Pierrelatte plant is specialized in the manufacturing of grids for PWR fuel assemblies and control rod clusters. The Dessel plant fabricates PWR fuel assemblies and Mox assemblies. The Lingen plant produces UO 2 powder, pellets, fuel rods and fuel assemblies for both PWRs and BWRs. The Karlstein plant produces components for fuel assemblies: grids, top and bottom nozzles destined to PWRs and BWRs and water boxes for BWRs. The Richland plant produces UO 2 powder, pellets and fuel rods and is specialized in the production of assemblies for BWR. The Lynchburg plant produces fuel assemblies for PWR. B 4 C pellets, control rod clusters, burnable poison assemblies, flux detectors are also fabricated in this plant. The global production capacity of all these plants is 3000 tU/year (2/3 in Europe and 1/3 in Usa). Areva maintains a policy of high investment for instance, more than 100*10 6 euros have been invested in the upgrading of the Romans plant. (A.C.)

  7. Fuel element shipping shim for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehri, A.

    1975-01-01

    A shim is described for use in the transportation of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies. It comprises a member preferably made of low density polyethylene designed to have three-point contact with the fuel rods of a fuel assembly and being of sufficient flexibility to effectively function as a shock absorber. The shim is designed to self-lock in place when associated with the fuel rods. (Official Gazette)

  8. Fuel Exhaling Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Varhade, Swapnil; Gautam, Manu; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-01-18

    State-of-the-art proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) anodically inhale H 2 fuel and cathodically expel water molecules. We show an unprecedented fuel cell concept exhibiting cathodic fuel exhalation capability of anodically inhaled fuel, driven by the neutralization energy on decoupling the direct acid-base chemistry. The fuel exhaling fuel cell delivered a peak power density of 70 mW/cm 2 at a peak current density of 160 mA/cm 2 with a cathodic H 2 output of ∼80 mL in 1 h. We illustrate that the energy benefits from the same fuel stream can at least be doubled by directing it through proposed neutralization electrochemical cell prior to PEMFC in a tandem configuration.

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF CaO AND P2O5 OF BONE ASH UPON THE REACTIVITY AND THE BURNABILITY OF CEMENT RAW MIXTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOMÁŠ IFKA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of CaO and P2O5 upon the reactivity of cement raw meal was investigated in this paper. Ash of bone meal containing Ca3(PO42 - 3CaO·P2O5 was used as the source of P2O5. Two series of samples with different content of the ash of bone meal were prepared. In the first series, the ash of bone was added into cement raw meal. The second series of samples were prepared by considering ash as one of CaO sources. Therefore, the total content of CaO in cement raw meal was kept constant, while the amount of P2O5 increased. These different series of samples were investigated by analyzing free lime content in the clinkers. The XRD analysis and Electron Micro Probe Analyzer analysis of the clinkers were also carried out. Two parameters were used to characterize the reactivity of cement raw meal: content of free lime and Burnability Index (BI calculated from free lime content in both series of samples burnt at 1350 ºC, 1400 ºC, 1450 ºC and 1500 ºC. According to the first parameter, P2O5 content that drastically makes worse the reactivity of cement raw meal was found at 1.11 wt.% in the first series, while this limit has reached 1.52 wt.% in the second one. According to the BI, the limit of P2O5 was found at 1.42 wt. % in the first series and 1, 61 wt.% in the second one. Furthermore, EPMA has demonstrated the presence of P2O5 in both calcium silicate phases forming thus solid solutions.

  10. Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures for perfect absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Li, Wen-Wei; Kinsey, Nathaniel

    2013-01-01

    We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material...

  11. Piezooptic effect of absorbing environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ю. А. Рудяк

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Application of piezooptic effect of absorbing environment for the definition of the parameter of stress deformation state was examined. The analysis of dielectric permeability tensor of imaginary parts was done. It is shown that changes in the real part dielectric permeability tensor mainly the indicator of fracture was fixed by means of mechanics interference methods and the changes in the imaginary part (α – real rate of absorption can be measured by means of analysis of light absorption and thus stress deformation state can be determined

  12. Neutron absorber qualification and acceptance testing from the designer's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracey, W.; Chiocca, R.

    2004-01-01

    Starting in the mid 1990's, the USNRC began to require less than 100% credit for the 10B present in fixed neutron absorbers spent fuel transport packages. The current practice in the US is to use only 75% of the specified 10B in criticality safety calculations unless extensive acceptance testing demonstrates both the presence of the 10B and uniformity of its distribution. In practice, the NRC has accepted no more than 90% credit for 10B in recent years, while other national competent authorities continue to accept 100%. More recently, with the introduction of new neutron absorber materials, particularly aluminum / boron carbide metal matrix composites, the NRC has also expressed expectations for qualification testing, based in large part on Transnuclear's successful application to use a new composite material in the TN-68 storage / transport cask. The difficulty is that adding more boron than is really necessary to a metal has some negative effects on the material, reducing the ductility and the thermal conductivity, and increasing the cost. Excessive testing requirements can have the undesired effect of keeping superior materials out of spent fuel package designs, without a corresponding justification based on public safety. In European countries and especially in France, 100% credit has been accepted up to now with materials controls specified in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR): Manufacturing process approved by qualification testing Materials manufacturing controlled under a Quality Assurance system. During fabrication, acceptance testing directly on products or on representative samples. Acceptance criteria taking into account a statistical uncertainty corresponding to 3σ. The original and current bases for the reduced 10 B credit, the design requirements for neutron absorber materials, and the experience of Transnuclear and Cogema Logistics with neutron absorber testing are examined. Guidelines for qualification and acceptance testing and process controls

  13. Multi-channel coherent perfect absorbers

    KAUST Repository

    Bai, Ping

    2016-05-18

    The absorption efficiency of a coherent perfect absorber usually depends on the phase coherence of the incident waves on the surfaces. Here, we present a scheme to create a multi-channel coherent perfect absorber in which the constraint of phase coherence is loosened. The scheme has a multi-layer structure such that incident waves in different channels with different angular momenta can be simultaneously and perfectly absorbed. This absorber is robust in achieving high absorption efficiency even if the incident waves become "incoherent" and possess "random" wave fronts. Our work demonstrates a unique approach to designing highly efficient metamaterial absorbers. © CopyrightEPLA, 2016.

  14. Graphene based salisbury screen for terahertz absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min Woo, Jeong; Kim, Min-Sik; Woong Kim, Hyun; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2014-02-01

    A graphene-based, multiband absorber operating in terahertz (THz) frequency range was demonstrated. Graphene film was transferred onto the top of a flexible polymer substrate backed with a gold reflector. The graphene acts as a resistive film that partially attenuates and reflects THz waves. The destructive interference between THz waves reflected from graphene and backside reflector gives rise to perfect absorbance at multiple frequencies. To enhance the absorbance on/off ratio (AR), the conductivity of graphene was varied using a chemical doping method. The resulting p-doped, graphene-based THz absorber exhibited absorbance at maxima and AR higher than 0.95 and 25 dB, respectively.

  15. Absorbing Aerosols Workshop, January 20-21, 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasiri, Shaima [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Williamson, Ashley [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cappa, Christopher D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kotamarthi, Davis Rao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sedlacek, Arthur J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Flynn, Conner [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lewis, Ernie [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McComiskey, Allison [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States); Riemer, Nicole [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-07-01

    A workshop was held at DOE Headquarters on January 20-21, 2016 during which experts within and outside DOE were brought together to identify knowledge gaps in modeling and measurement of the contribution of absorbing aerosols (AA) to radiative forcing. Absorbing aerosols refer to those aerosols that absorb light, whereby they both reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface (direct effect) and heat their surroundings. By doing so, they modify the vertical distribution of heat in the atmosphere and affect atmospheric thermodynamics and stability, possibly hastening cloud drop evaporation, and thereby affecting cloud amount, formation, dissipation and, ultimately, precipitation. Deposition of AA on snow and ice reduces surface albedo leading to accelerated melt. The most abundant AA type is black carbon (BC), which results from combustion of fossil fuel and biofuel. The other key AA types are brown carbon (BrC), which also results from combustion of fossil fuel and biofuel, and dust (crustal material). Each of these sources may result from, and be strongly influenced by, anthropogenic activities. The properties and amounts of AA depend upon various factors, primarily fuel source and burn conditions (e.g., internal combustion engine, flaming or smoldering wildfire), vegetation type (in the case of BC and BrC), and in the case of dust, soil type and ground cover (i.e., vegetation, snow, etc.). After emission, AA undergo chemical processing in the atmosphere that affects their physical and chemical properties. Thus, attribution of sources of AA, and understanding processes AA undergo during their atmospheric lifetimes, are necessary to understand how they will behave in a changing climate.

  16. Calculation of isotope burn-up and change in efficiency of absorbing elements of WWER-1000 control and protection system during burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeeva, O.A.; Kurakin, K.U.

    2006-01-01

    The report deals with fast and thermal neutron flows distribution in structural elements of WWER-1000 fuel assembly and absorbing rods, determination of absorbing isotope burn-up and worth variation in WWER reactor control and protection system rods. Simulation of absorber rod burn-up is provided using code package SAPPHIRE 9 5 end RC W WER allowing detailed description of the core segment spatial model. Maximum burn-up of absorbing rods and respective worth variation of control and protection system rods is determined on the basis of a number of calculations considering known characteristics of fuel cycles (Authors)

  17. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  18. Evaluation of CASMO-3 and HELIOS for Fuel Assembly Analysis from Monte Carlo Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Hyung Jin; Song, Jae Seung; Lee, Chung Chan

    2007-05-15

    This report presents a study comparing deterministic lattice physics calculations with Monte Carlo calculations for LWR fuel pin and assembly problems. The study has focused on comparing results from the lattice physics code CASMO-3 and HELIOS against those from the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code McCARD. The comparisons include k{sub inf}, isotopic number densities, and pin power distributions. The CASMO-3 and HELIOS calculations for the k{sub inf}'s of the LWR fuel pin problems show good agreement with McCARD within 956pcm and 658pcm, respectively. For the assembly problems with Gadolinia burnable poison rods, the largest difference between the k{sub inf}'s is 1463pcm with CASMO-3 and 1141pcm with HELIOS. RMS errors for the pin power distributions of CASMO-3 and HELIOS are within 1.3% and 1.5%, respectively.

  19. Optimized Latching Control of Floating Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadodia, Chaitanya; Shandilya, Shubham; Bansal, Hari Om

    2018-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for energy in today’s world. Currently main energy resources are fossil fuels, which will eventually drain out, also the emissions produced from them contribute to global warming. For a sustainable future, these fossil fuels should be replaced with renewable and green energy sources. Sea waves are a gigantic and undiscovered vitality asset. The potential for extricating energy from waves is extensive. To trap this energy, wave energy converters (WEC) are needed. There is a need for increasing the energy output and decreasing the cost requirement of these existing WECs. This paper presents a method which uses prediction as a part of the control scheme to increase the energy efficiency of the floating-point absorber WECs. Kalman Filter is used for estimation, coupled with latching control in regular as well as irregular sea waves. Modelling and Simulation results for the same are also included.

  20. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Hideyuki

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent bending of fuel rods caused by the difference of irradiation growth between coupling fuel rods and standards fuel rods thereby maintain the fuel rod integrity. Constitution: The f value for a fuel can (the ratio of pole of zirconium crystals in the entire crystals along the axial direction of the fuel can) of a coupling fuel rod secured by upper and lower tie plates is made smaller than the f value for the fuel can of a standard fuel rod not secured by the upper and the lower tie plates. This can make the irradiation growth of the fuel can of the coupling fuel rod greater than the irradiation growth of the fuel can of the standard fuel rod and, accordingly, since the elongation of the standard fuel rod can always by made greater, bending of the standard fuel rod can be prevented. (Yoshihara, M.)

  1. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  2. An omnidirectional electromagnetic absorber made of metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Qiang; Cui Tiejun; Jiang Weixiang; Cai Bengeng

    2010-01-01

    In a recent theoretical work by Narimanov and Kildishev (2009 Appl. Phys. Lett. 95 041106) an optical omnidirectional light absorber based on metamaterials was proposed, in which theoretical analysis and numerical simulations showed that all optical waves hitting the absorber are trapped and absorbed. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of an omnidirectional electromagnetic absorber in the microwave frequency. The proposed device is composed of non-resonant and resonant metamaterial structures, which can trap and absorb electromagnetic waves coming from all directions spirally inwards without any reflections due to the local control of electromagnetic fields. It is shown that the absorption rate can reach 99 per cent in the microwave frequency. The all-directional full absorption property makes the device behave like an 'electromagnetic black body', and the wave trapping and absorbing properties simulate, to some extent, an 'electromagnetic black hole.' We expect that such a device could be used as a thermal emitting source and to harvest electromagnetic waves.

  3. Fueling method in LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Inoue, Kotaro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To extend the burning cycle and decrease the number of fuel exchange batches without increasing the excess reactivity at the initial stage of burning cycles upon fuel loading to an LMFBR type reactor. Method: Each of the burning cycles is divided into a plurality of burning sections. Fuels are charged at the first burning section in each of the cycles such that driver fuel assemblies and blanket assemblies or those assemblies containing neutron absorbers such as boron are distributed in mixture in the reactor core region. At the final stage of the first burning section, the blanket assemblies or neutron absorber-containing assemblies present in mixture are partially or entirely replaced with driver fuel assemblies depending on the number of burning sections such that all of them are replaced with the driver fuel assemblies till the start of the final burning section of the abovementioned cycle. The object of this invention can thus be attained. (Horiuchi, T.)

  4. Mixed oxide fuels testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Chang, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    An intense worldwide effort is now under way to find means of reducing the stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium. One of the most attractive solutions would be to use WGPu as fuel in existing light water reactors (LWRs) in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel - i.e., plutonia (PUO 2 ) mixed with urania (UO 2 ). Before U.S. reactors could be used for this purpose, their operating licenses would have to be amended. Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification, (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania, (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition, (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight, (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu, (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu, (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure, (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity, (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products, (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies, and (11) Fuel performance code validation. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified

  5. Comments on liquid hydrogen absorbers for MICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the heat transfer problems associated with a liquid hydrogen absorber for the MICE experiment. This report describes a technique for modeling heat transfer from the outside world, to the absorber case and in its vacuum vessel, to the hydrogen and then into helium gas at 14 K. Also presented are the equation for free convection cooling of the liquid hydrogen in the absorber

  6. Multiband Negative Permittivity Metamaterials and Absorbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Tian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Design and characteristics of multiband negative permittivity metamaterial and its absorber configuration are presented in this paper. The proposed multiband metamaterial is composed of a novel multibranch resonator which can possess four electric resonance frequencies. It is shown that, by controlling the length of the main branches of such resonator, the resonant frequencies and corresponding absorbing bands of metamaterial absorber can be shifted in a large frequency band.

  7. Neutron absorbing article and method for manufacture thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, P.F.; Mcmurtry, C.H.; Naum, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    A composite, neutron absorbing, coated article, suitable for installation in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel and for other neutron absorbing applications, includes a backing member, preferably of flexible material such as woven fiberglass cloth, a synthetic organic polymeric coating or a plurality of such coatings on the backing member, preferably of cured phenolic resin, such as phenol formaldehyde or trimethylolphenol formaldehyde and boron carbide particles held to the backing member by the cured coating or a plurality of such coatings. Also within the invention is a method for the manufacture of the neutron absorbing coated article and the use of such an article. In a preferred method the backing member is first coated on both sides thereof with a filling coating of thermosettable liquid phenolic resin, which is then partially cured to solid state, one side of the backing member is then coated with a mixture of thermosettable liquid resin and finely divided boron carbide particles and the resin is partially cured to solid state, the other side is coated with a similar mixture, larger boron carbide particles are applied to it and the resin is partially cured to solid state, such side of the article is coated with thermosettable liquid phenolic resin, the resin is partially cured to solid state and such resin, including previously applied partially cured resins, is cured to final cross-linked and permanently set form

  8. Rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Herbert J.; Clark, Philip M.; Gilcrest, James D.

    1978-06-20

    A rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements in which a plurality of aligned rows of upright enclosures of generally square cross-sectional areas contain vertically disposed fuel elements. The enclosures are fixed at the lower ends thereof to a base. Pockets are formed between confronting walls of adjacent enclosures for receiving high absorption neutron absorbers, such as Boral, cadmium, borated stainless steel and the like for the closer spacing of spent fuel elements.

  9. Device for replacing the rods of a fuel element of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nissel, B.; Kybranz, R.; Will, R.

    1977-01-01

    In order to be able to replace several separate rods (fuel rods or absorber rods), in a fuel element, a special grab is introduced, which consists of several individual gripping devices and is operated by spring loading. (TK) [de

  10. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newlon, C.E.

    1979-08-29

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  11. Gaseous carbon dioxide absorbing column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harashina, Heihachi.

    1994-01-01

    The absorbing column of the present invention comprises a cyclone to which CO 2 gas and Ca(OH) 2 are blown to form CaCO 3 , a water supply means connected to an upper portion of the cyclone for forming a thin water membrane on the inner wall thereof, and a water processing means connected to a lower portion of the cyclone for draining water incorporating CaCO 3 . If a mixed fluid of CO 2 gas and Ca(OH) 2 is blown in a state where a flowing water membrane is formed on the inner wall of the cyclone, formation of CaCO 3 is promoted also in the inside of the cyclone in addition to the formation of CaCO 3 in the course of blowing. Then, formed CaCO 3 is discharged from the lower portion of the cyclone together with downwardly flowing water. With such procedures, solid contents such as CaCO 3 separated at the inner circumferential wall are sent into the thin water membrane, adsorbed and captured, and the solid contents are successively washed out, so that a phenomenon that the solid contents deposit and grow on the inner wall of the cyclone can be prevented effectively. (T.M.)

  12. Conceptual Core Analysis of Long Life PWR Utilizing Thorium-Uranium Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouf; Su'ud, Zaki

    2016-01-01

    Conceptual core analysis of long life PWR utilizing thorium-uranium based fuel has conducted. The purpose of this study is to evaluate neutronic behavior of reactor core using combined thorium and enriched uranium fuel. Based on this fuel composition, reactor core have higher conversion ratio rather than conventional fuel which could give longer operation length. This simulation performed using SRAC Code System based on library SRACLIB-JDL32. The calculation carried out for (Th-U)O 2 and (Th-U)C fuel with uranium composition 30 - 40% and gadolinium (Gd 2 O 3 ) as burnable poison 0,0125%. The fuel composition adjusted to obtain burn up length 10 - 15 years under thermal power 600 - 1000 MWt. The key properties such as uranium enrichment, fuel volume fraction, percentage of uranium are evaluated. Core calculation on this study adopted R-Z geometry divided by 3 region, each region have different uranium enrichment. The result show multiplication factor every burn up step for 15 years operation length, power distribution behavior, power peaking factor, and conversion ratio. The optimum core design achieved when thermal power 600 MWt, percentage of uranium 35%, U-235 enrichment 11 - 13%, with 14 years operation length, axial and radial power peaking factor about 1.5 and 1.2 respectively. (paper)

  13. Study on an innovative fast reactor utilizing hydride neutron absorber - Final report of phase I study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konashi, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Itoh, K.; Hirai, M.; Sato, J.; Kurosaki, K.; Suzuki, A.; Matsumura, Y.; Abe, S.

    2010-01-01

    These days, the demand to use nuclear resources efficiently is growing for long-term energy supply and also for solving the green house problem. It is indispensable to develop technologies to reduce environmental load with the nuclear energy supply for sustainable development of human beings. In this regard, the development of the fast breeder reactor (FBR) is preferable to utilize nuclear resources effectively and also to burn minor actinides which possess very long toxicity for more than thousands years if they are not extinguished. As one of the FBR developing works in Japan this phase I study started in 2006 to introduce hafnium (Hf) hydride and Gadolinium-Zirconium (Gd-Zr) hydride as new control materials in FBR. By adopting them, the FBR core control technology is improved by two ways. One is extension of control rod life time by using long life Hf hydride which leads to reduce the fabrication and disposal cost and the other is reduction of the excess reactivity by adopting Gd-Zr hydride which leads to reduce the number of control rods and simplifies the core upper structure. This three year study was successfully completed and the following results were obtained. The core design was performed to examine the applicability of the Hf hydride absorber to Japanese Sodium Fast Reactor (JSFR) and it is clarified that the control rod life time can be prolonged to 6 years by adopting Hf hydride and the excess reactivity of the beginning of the core cycle can be reduced to half and the number of the control rods is also reduced to half by using the Gd-Zr hydride burnable poison. The safety analyses also certified that the core safety can be maintained with the same reliability of JSFR Hf hydride and Gd-Zr hydride pellets were fabricated in good manner and their basic features for design use were measured by using the latest devices such as SEM-EDX. In order to reduce the hydrogen transfer through the stainless steel cladding a new technique which shares calorizing

  14. Fuel cell catholyte regenerating apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struthers, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    A catholyte regenerating apparatus for a fuel cell having a cathode section containing a catholyte solution and wherein fuel cell reaction reduces the catholyte to gas and water. The apparatus includes means to conduct partically reduced water diluted catholyte from the fuel cell and means to conduct the gas from the fuel cell to a mixing means. An absorption tower containing a volume of gas absorbing liquid solvent receives the mixed together gas and diluted catholyte from the mixing means within the absorption column, the gas is absorbed by the solvent and the gas ladened solvent and diluted catholyte are commingled. A liquid transfer means conducts gas ladened commingled. A liquid transfer means conducts gas ladened commingled solvent and electrolyte from the absorption column to an air supply means wherein air is added and commingled therewith and a stoichiometric volume of oxygen from the air is absorbed thereby. A second liquid transfer means conducts the gas ladened commingled solvent and diluted catholyte into a catalyst column wherein the oxygen and gas react to reconstitute the catholyte from which the gas was generated wna wherein the reconstituted diluted catholyte is separated from the solvent. Recirculating means conducts the solvent from the catalyst column back into the absorption column and liquid conducting means conducts the reconstituted catholyte to a holding tank preparatory for catholyte to a holding tank preparatory for recirculation through the cathode section of the fuel cell

  15. Burnable gas concentration control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hiroshi; Sanada, Takahiro; Kuboniwa, Takao.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide connecting ports by doubling nitrogen gas injection pipes thereby to secure lengthiness of the device only by providing one nitrogen gas generator. Constitution: Nitrogen gas injection pipes are provided in two lines separately, and attachable and detachable connecting ports for feeding nitrogen gas connectable to a movable type nitrogen gas supply installation for the purpose of backing up the nitrogen gas generator. (Yoshihara, H.)

  16. New high burnup fuel models for NRC's licensing audit code, FRAPCON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    Fuel behavior models have recently been updated within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission steady-state FRAPCON code used for auditing of fuel vendor/utility-codes and analyses. These modeling updates have concentrated on providing a best estimate prediction of steady-state fuel behavior up to the maximum burnup level s of current data (60 to 65 GWd/MTU rod-average). A decade has passed since these models were last updated. Currently, some U.S. utilities and fuel vendors are requesting approval for rod-average burnups greater than 60 GWd/MTU; however, until these recent updates the NRC did not have valid fuel performance models at these higher burnup levels. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has reviewed 15 separate effects models within the FRAPCON fuel performance code (References 1 and 2) and identified nine models that needed updating for improved prediction of fuel behavior at high burnup levels. The six separate effects models not updated were the cladding thermal properties, cladding thermal expansion, cladding creepdown, fuel specific heat, fuel thermal expansion and open gap conductance. Comparison of these models to the currently available data indicates that these models still adequately predict the data within data uncertainties. The nine models identified as needing improvement for predicting high-burnup behavior are fission gas release (FGR), fuel thermal conductivity (accounting for both high burnup effects and burnable poison additions), fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, fuel-cladding contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion, cladding mechanical properties and cladding axial growth. Each of the updated models will be described in the following sections and the model predictions will be compared to currently available high burnup data

  17. Opportunities for mixed oxide fuel testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, W.K.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification; (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania; (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition; (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight; (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu; (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu; (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure; (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity; (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products; (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies; and (11) Fuel performance code validation. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory possesses many advantages for performing tests to resolve most of the issues identified above. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified. The facilities at Argonne National Laboratory-West can meet all potential needs for pre- and post-irradiation examination that might arise in a MOX fuel qualification program

  18. Modeling of the reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve technical - economical parameters fuel with 2.4% enrichment and burnable absorber is started to be used at Ignalina NPP. Using code QUABOX/CUBBOX the main neutronic - physical characteristics were calculated for selected reactor core conditions

  19. Intrascleral outflow after deep sclerectomy with absorbable and non-absorbable implants in the rabbit eye

    OpenAIRE

    Ka?u?ny, Jakub J.; Grzanka, Dariusz; Wi?niewska, Halina; Niewi?ska, Alicja; Ka?u?ny, Bart?omiej J.; Grzanka, Alina

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The purpose of the study is an analysis of intrascleral drainage vessels formed in rabbits? eyes after non-penetrating deep sclerectomy (NPDS) with absorbable and non-absorbable implants, and comparison to eyes in which surgery was performed without implanted material. Material/Methods NPDS was carried out in 12 rabbits, with implantation of non-absorbable methacrylic hydrogel (N=10 eyes) or absorbable cross-linked sodium hyaluronate (N=6 eyes), or without any implant (N=8 ...

  20. Absorbencies of six different rodent beddings: commercially advertised absorbencies are potentially misleading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, C C; Mason, G J

    2005-01-01

    Moisture absorbency is one of the most important characteristics of rodent beddings for controlling bacterial growth and ammonia production. However, bedding manufacturers rarely provide information on the absorbencies of available materials, and even when they do, absorption values are usually expressed per unit mass of bedding. Since beddings are usually placed into cages to reach a required depth rather than a particular mass, their volumetric absorbencies are far more relevant. This study therefore compared the saline absorbencies of sawdust, aspen woodchips, two virgin loose pulp beddings (Alpha-Dri and Omega-Dri), reclaimed wood pulp (Tek-Fresh), and corncob, calculated both by volume and by mass. Absorbency per unit volume correlated positively with bedding density, while absorbency per unit mass correlated negatively. Therefore, the relative absorbencies of the beddings were almost completely reversed depending on how absorbency was calculated. By volume, corncob was the most absorbent bedding, absorbing about twice as much saline as Tek-Fresh, the least absorbent bedding. Conversely, when calculated by mass, Tek-Fresh appeared to absorb almost three times as much saline as the corncob. Thus, in practical terms the most absorbent bedding here was corncob, followed by the loose pulp beddings; and this is generally supported by their relatively low ammonia production as seen in previous studies. Many factors other than absorbency determine whether a material is suitable as a rodent bedding, and they are briefly mentioned here. However, manufacturers should provide details of bedding absorbencies in terms of volume, in order to help predict the relative absorbencies of the beddings in practical situations.

  1. Absorbed radiation dose on LHC interconnects

    CERN Document Server

    Versaci, R; Vlachoudis, V; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2011-01-01

    Here we present the results of our FLUKA simulations devoted to the evaluation of the peak dose absorbed by the busbar insulator in the LHC Interaction Region 7 interconnects. The peak dose absorbed by the cold magnet coils are also presented.

  2. Comments on liquid hydrogen absorbers for MICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-02-01

    This report describes the heat transfer problems associatedwith a liquid hydrogen absorber for the MICE experiment. This reportdescribes a technique for modeling heat transfer from the outside world,to the abosrber case and in its vacuum vessel, to the hydrogen and theninto helium gas at 14 K. Also presented are the equation for freeconvection cooling of the liquid hydrogen in the absorber.

  3. Absorber transmissivities in 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballet, O.

    1985-01-01

    Some useful relations are derived for the polarization dependent optical index of 57 Fe Moessbauer absorbers. Real rotation matrices are extensively used and, besides wave-direction dependence, their properties simplify also the treatment of texture and f-anisotropy. The derivation of absorber transmissivities from the optical index is discussed with a special emphasis on line overlapping. (Auth.)

  4. Metamaterial Resonant Absorbers for Terahertz Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    process was completed in the NPS clean room for an Al/SiOx/Al metamaterial absorber . After fabrication, FTIR testing was employed to determine the...is unlimited METAMATERIAL RESONANT ABSORBERS FOR TERAHERTZ SENSING by Eric A. Stinson December 2015 Thesis Advisor: Gamani Karunasiri...

  5. Liquid absorber experiments in ZED-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, F.N.

    1975-07-01

    A set of liquid absorber experiments was performed in ZED-2 to provide data with which to test the adequacy of calculational methods for zone controller and refuelling studies associated with advanced reactor concepts. The absorber consisted of a full length aluminum tube, containing either i)H 2 O, ii)H 2 O + boron (2.5 mg/ml) or iii)H 2 O + boron (8.0 mg/ml). The tube was suspended vertically at interstitial or in-channel locations. A U-tube absorber was also simulated using two absorber tubes with appropriate spacers. Experiments were carried out at two different square lattice pitches, 22.86 and 27.94 cm. Measurements were made of the reactivity effects of the absorbers and, in some cases, of the detailed flux distribution near the perturbation. The results from one calculational method, the source-sink approach, were compared with the data from selected experiments. (author)

  6. Characterization of shock-absorbing material for packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Rogerio Pimenta

    2007-01-01

    Since 2001 Brazil has been participating in a regional effort with other Latin American countries which operate research reactors to improve its capability in the management of spent fuel elements from these reactors. One of the options considered is the long-term dry storage of the spent fuel in a dual purpose cask, i.e., a package for the transport and storage of radioactive material. In the scope of an IAEA-sponsored project, a cask was designed and a half-scale model for test was built. The cask consists of a sturdy cylindrical body provided with internal cavity to accommodate a basket holding the spent fuel elements, a double lid system, and external impact limiters. The cask is provided with top and bottom impact limiters, which are structures made of an external stainless steel skin and an energy-absorbing filling material. The filling material chosen was the wood composite denominated Oriented Strand Board (OSB), which is an engineered, mat-formed panel product made of strands, flakes or wafers sliced from small diameter, round wood logs and bonded with a binder under heat and pressure. The characterization of this material was carried in the scope of the cask project at the CDTN's laboratories. The tests conducted were the quasi-static compression, impact, shear-bending and edgewise shear tests. The compression, shear-bending and edgewise shear tests were carried out in a standard compression test machine and the impact test at a drop test tower equipped with a sturdy base and a drop weight. The main parameters of the material, like the Young and shear moduli, as well as the static and dynamic stress-strain curves and the specific energy absorbed, were determined during the test campaign. (author)

  7. Alternative Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  8. Method of absorbing UF6 from gaseous mixtures in alkamine absorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafferty, R.H.; Smiley, S.H.; Radimer, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for recovering UF 6 from gaseous mixtures by absorption in a liquid. The liquid absorbent must have a relatively low viscosity and at least one component of the absorbent is an alkamine having less than 3 carbon atoms bonded to the amino nitrogen, less than 2 of the carbon atoms other than those bonded to the amino nitrogen are free of the hydroxy radical and precipitate the absorbed uranium from the absorbent. At least one component of the absorbent is chosen from the group consisting of ethanolamine, diethanolamine, and 3-methyl-3-amino-propane-diol-1,2

  9. FUEL BURN-UP DISTRIBUTION AND TRANSURANIC NUCLIDE CONTENTS PRODUCED AT THE FIRST CYCLE OPERATION OF AP1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jati Susilo

    2016-06-01

    bulan. Pada siklus operasi pertama, teras AP1000 menggunakan tiga jenis pengkayaan bahan bakar UO2 yaitu 2,35 w/o, 3,40 w/o dan 4,450 w/o. Penyerap neutron ZrB2, Pyrex dan larutan Boron digunakan sebagai kompensasi reaktivitas lebih pada awal siklus. Di dalam teras reaktor, bahan bakar U-235 mengalami pembakaran melalui reaksi fisi yang akan menghasilkan energi, produk fisi dan neutron baru. Karena adanya reaksi serapan neutron oleh U-238 maka reaktor juga menghasilkan limbah radioaktif tingkat tinggi berupa nuklida transuranium yang mempunyai waktu paruh sangat panjang seperti Np, Pu, Am, dan Cm. Dalam penelitian ini dilakukan analisis hasil perhitungan distribusi burn-up bahan bakar dan kandungan nuklida transuranium yang dihasilkan oleh teras AP1000 saat akhir siklus operasi pertama. Perhitungan model geometri 2 dimensi teras AP1000 bentuk ¼ bagian dilakukan dengan paket program SRAC2006 modul COREBN/HIST. Sedangkan input data berupa tabel tampang lintang makroskopik diperoleh dari perhitungan dengan modul PIJ. Hasil prhitungan menunjukkan bahwa burn-up perangkat bahan bakar (Fuel Assembly, FA tertinggi  adalah sebesar 27,04 GWD/MTU dan ini masih jauh lebih rendah dari batas maksimum burn-up yang diijinkan yaitu 62 GWd/MTU. Posisi pemuatan perangkat bahan bakar di bagian tengah teras akan menghasilkan burn-up dan nuklida transuranium yang lebih besar dibandingkan dengan ditepi teras. Penggunaan bahan bakar Integrated Fuel Burnable Absorber hanya sedikit berpengaruh terhadap penurunan burn-up dan nuklida transuranium yang dihasilkan. Kata kunci: Fuel burn-up, kandungan nuklida transuranium, AP1000, siklus operasi pertama, SRAC2006

  10. Vibration analysis on compact car shock absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, W. H.; Cheah, J. X.; Lam, C. K.; Lim, E. A.; Chuah, H. G.; Khor, C. Y.

    2017-10-01

    Shock absorber is a part of the suspension system which provides comfort experience while driving. Resonance, a phenomenon where forced frequency is coinciding with the natural frequency has significant effect on the shock absorber itself. Thus, in this study, natural frequencies of the shock absorber in a 2 degree-of-freedom system were investigated using Wolfram Mathematica 11, CATIA, and ANSYS. Both theoretical and simulation study how will the resonance affect the car shock absorber. The parametric study on the performance of shock absorber also had been conducted. It is found that the failure tends to occur on coil sprung of the shock absorber before the body of the shock absorber is fail. From mathematical modelling, it can also be seen that higher vibration level occurred on un-sprung mass compare to spring mass. This is due to the weight of sprung mass which could stabilize as compared with the weight of un-sprung mass. Besides that, two natural frequencies had been obtained which are 1.0 Hz and 9.1 Hz for sprung mass and un-sprung mass respectively where the acceleration is recorded as maximum. In conclusion, ANSYS can be used to validate with theoretical results with complete model in order to match with mathematical modelling.

  11. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao; Nishida, Koji; Karasawa, Hidetoshi; Kanazawa, Toru; Orii, Akihito; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Kashiwai, Shin-ichi; Masuhara, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly, for a BWR type nuclear reactor, comprising fuel rods in 9 x 9 matrix. The inner width of the channel box is about 132mm and the length of the fuel rods which are not short fuel rods is about 4m. Two water rods having a circular cross section are arranged on a diagonal line in a portion of 3 x 3 matrix at the center of the fuel assembly, and two fuel rods are disposed at vacant spaces, and the number of fuel rods is 74. Eight fuel rods are determined as short fuel rods among 74 fuel rods. Assuming the fuel inventory in the short fuel rod as X(kg), and the fuel inventory in the fuel rods other than the short fuel rods as Y(kg), X and Y satisfy the relation: X + Y ≥ 173m, Y ≤ - 9.7X + 292, Y ≤ - 0.3X + 203 and X > 0. Then, even when the short fuel rods are used, the fuel inventory is increased and fuel economy can be improved. (I.N.)

  12. Fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooie, D. T.; Harrington, B. C., III; Mayfield, M. J.; Parsons, E. L.

    1992-07-01

    The primary objective of DOE's Fossil Energy Fuel Cell program is to fund the development of key fuel cell technologies in a manner that maximizes private sector participation and in a way that will give contractors the opportunity for a competitive posture, early market entry, and long-term market growth. This summary includes an overview of the Fuel Cell program, an elementary explanation of how fuel cells operate, and a synopsis of the three major fuel cell technologies sponsored by the DOE/Fossil Energy Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell program, the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell program, and the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell program.

  13. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hajime.

    1995-01-01

    In a fuel assembly having fuel rods of different length, fuel pellets of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium are loaded to a short fuel rod. The volume ratio of a pellet-loaded portion to a plenum portion of the short fuel rod is made greater than the volume ratio of a fuel rod to which uranium fuel pellets are loaded. In addition, the volume of the plenum portion of the short fuel rod is set greater depending on the plutonium content in the loaded fuel pellets. MOX fuel pellets are loaded on the short fuel rods having a greater degree of freedom relevant to the setting for the volume of the plenum portion compared with that of a long rod fuel, and the volume of the plenum portion is ensured greater depending on the plutonium content. Even if a large amount of FP gas and He gas are discharged from the MOX fuels compared with that from the uranium fuels, the internal pressure of the MOX fuel rod during operation is maintained substantially identical with that of the uranium fuel rod, so that a risk of generating excess stresses applied to the fuel cladding tubes and rupture of fuels are greatly reduced. (N.H.)

  14. Inert matrix fuel performance during the first two irradiation cycles in a test reactor: comparison with modelling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Ch.; Kasemeyer, U.

    2003-06-01

    In the inert matrix fuel (IMF) type investigated at Paul Scherrer Institut, plutonium is dissolved in the yttrium stabilised zirconium oxide (YSZ), a highly radiation resistant cubic phase with additions of erbium as burnable poison for reactivity control. A first irradiation experiment of YSZ based IMF is ongoing in the OECD Material Test Reactor in Halden together with mixed oxide fuel. The results of the first two cycles for IMF to a burnup of some 105 kW d cm -3 are presented and the modelling results in comparison with the experimental results are shown. A first approximation for a simple swelling model for this YSZ based IMF can be given. Possible fission gas release mechanisms are briefly discussed. The implications of the modelling results are discussed.

  15. Quantification of cost of margin associated with in-core nuclear fuel management for a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropaczek, D.J.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of in-core nuclear fuel management optimization is discussed. The problem is to determine the location of core material, such as the fuel and burnable poisons, so as to minimize (maximize) a stated objective within engineering constraints. Typical objectives include maximization of cycle energy production or discharged fuel exposure, and minimization of power peaking factor or reactor vessel fluence. Constraints include discharge burnup limits and one or more of the possible objectives if not selected as the objective. The optimization problem can be characterized as a large combinatorial problem with nonlinear objective function and constraints, which are likely to be active. The authors have elected to employ the integer Monte Carlo programming method to address this optimization problem because of the just-noted problem characteristics. To evaluate the core physics characteristics as a function of fuel loading pattern, second-order accurate perturbation theory is employed with successive application to improve estimates of the optimum loading pattern. No constraints on fuel movement other than requiring quarter-core symmetry were imposed. In this paper the authors employed this methodology to address a related problem. The problem being addressed can be stated as What is the cost associated with margin? Specifically, they wish to assign some financial value in terms of increased levelized fuel cycle cost associated with an increase in core margin of some type, such as power peaking factor

  16. Fuel loading method to exchangeable reactor core of BWR type reactor and its core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koguchi, Kazushige.

    1995-01-01

    In a fuel loading method for an exchangeable reactor core of a BWR type reactor, at least two kinds of fresh fuel assemblies having different reactivities between axial upper and lower portions are preliminarily prepared, and upon taking out fuel assemblies of advanced combustion and loading the fresh fuel assemblies dispersingly, they are disposed so as to attain a predetermined axial power distribution in the reactor. At least two kinds of fresh fuel assemblies have a content of burnable poisons different between the axial upper portion and lower portions. In addition, reactivity characteristics are made different at a region higher than the central boundary and a region lower than the central boundary which is set within a range of about 6/24 to 16/24 from the lower portion of the fuel effective length. There can be attained axial power distribution as desired such as easy optimization of the axial power distribution, high flexibility, and flexible flattening of the power distribution, and it requires no special change in view of the design and has a good economical property. (N.H.)

  17. Graphene and Graphene Metamaterials for Terahertz Absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Booth, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Graphene, due to the possibility to tune its conductivity, is the promising material for a range of the terahertz (THz) applications, such as tunable reflectors, absorbers, modulators, filters and polarization converters. Subwavelength structuring of graphene in order to form metamaterials allows...... for even more control over the THz waves. In this poster presentation I will show an elegant way to describe the graphene metamaterials and the design of graphene based absorbers. I will also present our recent experimental results on the graphene absorbers characterization....

  18. Semiconductor saturable absorbers for ultrafast terahertz signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductors GaAs, GaP, and Ge in the terahertz THz frequency range at room temperature using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. The saturation mechanism is based on a decrease in electron conductivity of semiconductors at high electron momentum...... states, due to conduction band onparabolicity and scattering into satellite valleys in strong THz fields. Saturable absorber parameters, such as linear and nonsaturable transmission, and saturation fluence, are extracted by fits to a classic saturable absorber model. Further, we observe THz pulse...

  19. 75 FR 13314 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendments to Facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... containing both lumped burnable and/ or gadolinia integral absorbers. These calculations confirmed the... reactor cores containing both lumped burnable and/ or gadolinia integral absorbers. These calculations... calculations for reactor cores containing lumped burnable and/or gadolinia integral absorbers will not involve...

  20. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangwani, Saloni; Chakrabortty, Sumita

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fuel is a material that can be consumed to derive nuclear energy, by analogy to chemical fuel that is burned for energy. Nuclear fuels are the most dense sources of energy available. Nuclear fuel in a nuclear fuel cycle can refer to the fuel itself, or to physical objects (for example bundles composed of fuel rods) composed of the fuel material, mixed with structural, neutron moderating, or neutron reflecting materials. Long-lived radioactive waste from the back end of the fuel cycle is especially relevant when designing a complete waste management plan for SNF. When looking at long-term radioactive decay, the actinides in the SNF have a significant influence due to their characteristically long half-lives. Depending on what a nuclear reactor is fueled with, the actinide composition in the SNF will be different. The following paper will also include the uses. advancements, advantages, disadvantages, various processes and behavior of nuclear fuels

  1. Fuel and nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunier, C.

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear fuel is studied in detail, the best choice and why in relation with the type of reactor, the properties of the fuel cans, the choice of fuel materials. An important part is granted to the fuel assembly of PWR type reactor and the performances of nuclear fuels are tackled. The different subjects for research and development are discussed and this article ends with the particular situation of mixed oxide fuels ( materials, behavior, efficiency). (N.C.)

  2. Small PWR 'PFPWR50' using cermet fuel of Th-Pu particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Takashi; Shimazu, Yoichiro

    2009-01-01

    An innovative concept of PFPWR50 has been studied. The main feature of PFPWR50 has been to adopt TRISO coated fuel particles in a conventional PWR cladding. Coated fuel particle provides good confining ability of fission products. But it is pointed out that swelling of SiC layer at low temperature by irradiation has possibilities of degrading the integrity of coated fuel particle in the LWR environment. Thus, we examined the use of Cermet fuel replacing SiC layer to Zr metal or Zr compound. And the nuclear fuel has been used as fuel compact, which is configured to fix coated fuel particles in the matrix material to the shape of fuel pellet. In the previous study, graphite matrix is adopted as the matrix material. According to the burnup calculations of the several fuel concepts with those covering layers, we decide to use Zr layer embedded in Zr metal base or ZrC layer with graphite matrix. But carbon has the problem at low temperature by irradiation as well as SiC. Therefore, Zr covering layer and Zr metal base are finally selected. The other feature of PFPWR50 concept has been that the excess reactivity is suppressed during a cycle by initially loading burnable poison (gadolinia) in the fuels. In this study, a new loading pattern is determined by combining 7 types of assemblies in which the gadolinia concentration and the number of the fuel rods with gadolinia are different. This new core gives 6.7 equivalent full power years (EFPY) as the core life of a cycle. And the excess reactivity is suppressed to less than 2.0%Δk/k during the cycle. (author)

  3. Spacesuit Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary goal is to build and test a rigid Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR) coupon based on honeycomb geometry that would be applicable for EVA and...

  4. Absorbed dose uncertainty estimation for proton therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić-Jokić Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful radiotherapy treatment depends on the absorbed dose evaluation and the possibility to define metrological characteristics of the therapy beam. Radiotherapy requires tumor dose delivery with expanded uncertainty less than ±5 %. It is particularly important to reduce uncertainty during therapy beam calibration as well as to apply all necessary ionization chamber correction factors. Absorbed dose to water was determined using ionometric method. Calibration was performed in reference cobalt beam. Combined standard uncertainty of the calculated absorbed dose to water in 65 MeV proton beam was ±1.97% while the obtained expanded uncertainty of absorbed dose for the same beam quality was ±5.02%. The uncertainty estimation method has been developed within the project TESLA.

  5. Energy absorber uses expanded coiled tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    Mechanical shock mitigating device, based on working material to its failure point, absorbs mechanical energy by bending or twisting tubing. It functions under axial or tangential loading, has no rebound, is area independent, and is easy and inexpensive to build.

  6. Space Compatible Radar Absorbing Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase 1 project shall investigate novel radar absorbing materials (RAM) for use in space or simulated space environments. These materials are lightweight...

  7. Quantitative neutron radiography using neutron absorbing honeycomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Masayoshi; Oda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Ohkubo, Kohei; Tasaka, Kanji; Tsuruno, Akira; Matsubayashi, Masahito.

    1993-01-01

    This investigation concerns quantitative neutron radiography and computed tomography by using a neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator. By setting the neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator between object and imaging system, neutrons scattered in the object were absorbed by the honeycomb material and eliminated before coming to the imaging system, but the neutrons which were transmitted the object without interaction could reach the imaging system. The image by purely transmitted neutrons gives the quantitative information. Two honeycombs were prepared with coating of boron nitride and gadolinium oxide and evaluated for the quantitative application. The relation between the neutron total cross section and the attenuation coefficient confirmed that they were in a fairly good agreement. Application to quantitative computed tomography was also successfully conducted. The new neutron radiography method using the neutron-absorbing honeycomb collimator for the elimination of the scattered neutrons improved remarkably the quantitativeness of the neutron radiography and computed tomography. (author)

  8. An ultra-broadband multilayered graphene absorber

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    An ultra-broadband multilayered graphene absorber operating at terahertz (THz) frequencies is proposed. The absorber design makes use of three mechanisms: (i) The graphene layers are asymmetrically patterned to support higher order surface plasmon modes that destructively interfere with the dipolar mode and generate electromagnetically induced absorption. (ii) The patterned graphene layers biased at different gate voltages backedup with dielectric substrates are stacked on top of each other. The resulting absorber is polarization dependent but has an ultra-broadband of operation. (iii) Graphene\\'s damping factor is increased by lowering its electron mobility to 1000cm 2=Vs. Indeed, numerical experiments demonstrate that with only three layers, bandwidth of 90% absorption can be extended upto 7THz, which is drastically larger than only few THz of bandwidth that can be achieved with existing metallic/graphene absorbers. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  9. Optically Modulated Multiband Terahertz Perfect Absorber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seren, Huseyin R.; Keiser, George R.; Cao, Lingyue

    2014-01-01

    response of resonant metamaterials continues to be a challengingendeavor. Resonant perfect absorbers have flourished as one of the mostpromising metamaterial devices with applications ranging from power har-vesting to terahertz imaging. Here, an optically modulated resonant perfectabsorber is presented...

  10. Actual behaviour of a ball vibration absorber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pirner, Miroš

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 8 (2002), s. 987-1005 ISSN 0167-6105 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GV103/96/K034 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : TV towers * wind-excited vibrations * vibration absorbers * pendulum absorber Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 0.513, year: 2002 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167610502002155#

  11. Multilayer Radar Absorbing Non-Woven Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedov, A. V.; Nazarov, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the electrical properties of multilayer radar absorbing materials obtained by adding nonwoven sheets of dielectric fibers with an intermediate layer of electrically conductive carbon fibers. Multilayer materials that absorb electromagnetic radiation in a wide frequency range are obtained by varying the content of the carbon fibers. The carbon-fiber content dependent mechanism of absorption of electromagnetic radiation by sheets and multilayer materials is considered.

  12. A Wedge Absorber Experiment at MICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, David [Fermilab; Mohayai, Tanaz [IIT, Chicago; Rogers, Chris [Rutherford; Snopok, Pavel [IIT, Chicago; Summers, Don [Mississippi U.

    2017-05-01

    Emittance exchange mediated by wedge absorbers is required for longitudinal ionization cooling and for final transverse emittance minimization for a muon collider. A wedge absorber within the MICE beam line could serve as a demonstration of the type of emittance exchange needed for 6-D cooling, including the configurations needed for muon colliders, as well as configurations for low-energy muon sources. Parameters for this test are explored in simulation and possible experimental configurations with simulated results are presented.

  13. Energy-Absorbing Passenger Seat for Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, C. P.; Alfaro-Bou, E.; Fasanella, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Development of energy-absorbing passenger seat, designed to minimize injury in commercial-aircraft crash, part of joint FAA/NASA controlledimpact flight test of transport-category commercial aircraft. Modified seat mechanism collapses under heavy load to absorb impact energy and thereby protect passenger. Results of simulation tests indicate probability of passenger survival high. Proposed seat mechanism mitigates passenger injuries by reducing impact forces in crash.

  14. Semiconductor saturable absorbers for ultrafast THz signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductors in the THz frequency range using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. Further, we observe THz pulse shortening and increase of the group refractive index at high field strengths.......We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductors in the THz frequency range using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. Further, we observe THz pulse shortening and increase of the group refractive index at high field strengths....

  15. Phase Space Exchange in Thick Wedge Absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, David [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The problem of phase space exchange in wedge absorbers with ionization cooling is discussed. The wedge absorber exchanges transverse and longitudinal phase space by introducing a position-dependent energy loss. In this paper we note that the wedges used with ionization cooling are relatively thick, so that single wedges cause relatively large changes in beam phase space. Calculation methods adapted to such “thick wedge” cases are presented, and beam phase-space transformations through such wedges are discussed.

  16. Thorium-based Fuel Cycles: Reassessment of Fuel Economics and Proliferation Risk. Assessment of Proliferation Risk of Reactor-grade Plutonium regarding Construction of ‘Fizzle Bombs’ by Terrorists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serfontein, Dawid E.; Mulder, Eben J.; Reitsma, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Interventions which add resonance absorbers to the fuel deteriorate the neutron economy. This reduces the burn-up and increases the HM in spent fuel, especially 241 Pu and largely defeats the purpose of the exercise

  17. TEM characterization of UO2-Gd2O3 nuclear fuels synthesized by coprecipitation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldati, A.; Gana Watkins, I.; Menghini, J.; Prado, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a micro and nano structural characterization of 4% weight doped Gd 2 O 3 -UO 2 pellet using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Agglomerate morphology and crystallite sizes were determined using light/dark field and high resolution (HR-TEM) images. Convergent beam Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Electron Diffraction (ED) were used to evaluate sample composition and homogeneity, even at the nanometer scale. We obtained an average crystallite size of 90±20 nm. Moreover, from TEM-EDS analyses we determined the presence of Gadolinium in all the analyzed crystallites but with 25% variation among their concentrations. These results show the capability of TEM analysis to characterize a nuclear fuel pellet with burnable poisons nano structure and homogeneity.(author)

  18. Air Pollutants Minimalization of Pollutant Absorber with Condensation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhiat, Yayat; Wibowo, Firmanul Catur; Oktarisa, Yuvita

    2017-01-01

    Industrial development has implications for pollution, one of it is air pollution. The amount of air pollutants emitted from industrial depend on several factors which are capacity of its fuel, high chimneys and atmospheric stability. To minimize pollutants emitted from industries is created a tool called Pollutant Absorber (PA) with a condensing system. Research and Development with the approach of Design for Production was used as methodology in making PA. To test the function of PA, the simulation had been done by using the data on industrial emissions Cilegon industrial area. The simulation results in 15 years period showed that the PA was able to minimize the pollutant emissions of SO2 by 38% NOx by 37% and dust by 64%. Differences in the absorption of pollutants shows the weakness of particle separation process in the separator. This condition happen because the condensation process is less optimal during the absorption and separation in the separator. (paper)

  19. Hydrogen fuel. Uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darkrim-Lamari, F.; Malbrunot, P.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very energetic fuel which can be used in combustion to generate heat and mechanical energy or which can be used to generate electricity and heat through an electrochemical reaction with oxygen. This article deals with the energy conversion, the availability and safety problems linked with the use of hydrogen, and with the socio-economical consequences of a generalized use of hydrogen: 1 - hydrogen energy conversion: hydrogen engines, aerospace applications, fuel cells (principle, different types, domains of application); 2 - hydrogen energy availability: transport and storage (gas pipelines, liquid hydrogen, adsorbed and absorbed hydrogen in solid materials), service stations; 3 - hazards and safety: flammability, explosibility, storage and transport safety, standards and regulations; 4 - hydrogen economy; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  20. Simulations of a PSD Plastic Neutron Collar for Assaying Fresh Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausladen, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Newby, Jason [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McElroy, Robert Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The potential performance of a notional active coincidence collar for assaying uranium fuel based on segmented detectors constructed from the new PSD plastic fast organic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination capability was investigated in simulation. Like the International Atomic Energy Agency's present Uranium Neutron Collar for LEU (UNCL), the PSD plastic collar would also function by stimulating fission in the 235U content of the fuel with a moderated 241Am/Li neutron source and detecting instances of induced fission via neutron coincidence counting. In contrast to the moderated detectors of the UNCL, the fast time scale of detection in the scintillator eliminates statistical errors due to accidental coincidences that limit the performance of the UNCL. However, the potential to detect a single neutron multiple times historically has been one of the properties of organic scintillator detectors that has prevented their adoption for international safeguards applications. Consequently, as part of the analysis of simulated data, a method was developed by which true neutron-neutron coincidences can be distinguished from inter-detector scatter that takes advantage of the position and timing resolution of segmented detectors. Then, the performance of the notional simulated coincidence collar was evaluated for assaying a variety of fresh fuels, including some containing burnable poisons and partial defects. In these simulations, particular attention was paid to the analysis of fast mode measurements. In fast mode, a Cd liner is placed inside the collar to shield the fuel from the interrogating source and detector moderators, thereby eliminating the thermal neutron flux that is most sensitive to the presence of burnable poisons that are ubiquitous in modern nuclear fuels. The simulations indicate that the predicted precision of fast mode measurements is similar to what can be achieved by the present UNCL in thermal mode. For example, the

  1. SunFast: An interactive workstation code for PWR fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnhoff, W.J.; Parish, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    Fuel management decisions for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are quite formidable because of the large number of possible fuel reloading patterns and burnable poison distributions. Therefore, a nuclear engineer must repeatedly perform diffusion calculations for a variety of different operating strategies to determine an optimum core reload. Methods applied to fulfill final design specifications and licensing restrictions are prohibitively expensive and time consuming and are inappropriate for evaluations during the early stages of the reload design process. Fuel cycle scoping calculations are performed to eliminate many of the early alternative strategies. For efficient modeling, core prediction codes used for such analyses should take advantage of the interactive capabilities that work-stations offer. SunFast (Sun fuel analysis scoping tool) facilitates nuclear fuel analysis by taking advantage of recent developments in modern workstations, especially the use of the graphical user interface (GUI). The scoping problem is ideal for implementation in an interactive environment because it inherently requires a considerable amount of man/machine interaction. The challenge is to incorporate features into the scoping program that make the most effective use of the hardware and software capabilities of the modern workstation computer

  2. A Small Modular Reactor Core Design using FCM Fuel and BISO BP particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Yeon; Hwang, Dae Hee; Yoo, Ho Seong; Hong, Ser Gi [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The objective of this work is to design a PWR small modular reactor which employs the advanced fuel technology of FCM particle fuels including BISO burnable poisons and advanced cladding of SiC in order to improve the fuel economy and safety by increasing fuel burnup and temperature, and by reducing hydrogen generation under accidents. Recently, many countries including USA have launched projects to develop the accident tolerant fuels (ATF) which can cope with the accidents such as LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). In general, the ATF fuels are required to meet the PWR operational, safety, and fuel cycle constraints which include enhanced burnup, lower or no generation of hydrogen, lower operating temperatures, and enhanced retention of fission products. Another stream of research and development in nuclear society is to develop advanced small modular reactors in order to improve inherent passive safety and to reduce the risk of large capital investment. In this work, a small PWR modular reactor core was neutronically designed and analyzed. The SMR core employs new 13x13 fuel assemblies which are loaded with thick FCM fuel rods in which TRISO fuel particles AO and also the first cycle has the AOs which are within the typical design limit. Also, this figure shows that the evolutions of AO for the cycles 6 and 7 are nearly the same. we considered the SiC cladding for reduction of hydrogen generation under accidents. From the results of core design and analysis, it is shown that the core has long cycle length of 732 -1191 EFPDs, high discharge burnup of 101-105 MWD/kg, low power peaking factors, low axial offsets, negative MTCs, and large shutdown margins except for BOC of the first cycle. So, it can be concluded that the new SMR core is neutronically feasible.

  3. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  4. Warm Absorber Diagnostics of AGN Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, Timothy

    Warm absorbers and related phenomena are observable manifestations of outflows or winds from active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have great potential value. Understanding AGN outflows is important for explaining the mass budgets of the central accreting black hole, and also for understanding feedback and the apparent co-evolution of black holes and their host galaxies. In the X-ray band warm absorbers are observed as photoelectric absorption and resonance line scattering features in the 0.5-10 keV energy band; the UV band also shows resonance line absorption. Warm absorbers are common in low luminosity AGN and they have been extensively studied observationally. They may play an important role in AGN feedback, regulating the net accretion onto the black hole and providing mechanical energy to the surroundings. However, fundamental properties of the warm absorbers are not known: What is the mechanism which drives the outflow?; what is the gas density in the flow and the geometrical distribution of the outflow?; what is the explanation for the apparent relation between warm absorbers and the surprising quasi-relativistic 'ultrafast outflows' (UFOs)? We propose a focused set of model calculations that are aimed at synthesizing observable properties of warm absorber flows and associated quantities. These will be used to explore various scenarios for warm absorber dynamics in order to answer the questions in the previous paragraph. The guiding principle will be to examine as wide a range as possible of warm absorber driving mechanisms, geometry and other properties, but with as careful consideration as possible to physical consistency. We will build on our previous work, which was a systematic campaign for testing important class of scenarios for driving the outflows. We have developed a set of tools that are unique and well suited for dynamical calculations including radiation in this context. We also have state-of-the-art tools for generating synthetic spectra, which are

  5. Status in 1999 of the High Flux Reactor Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, J.; Gevers, A.; Sordon, A.; Thijssen, P.J.M.; Hendriks, J.A.; Wijtsma, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The High Flux Reactor located at Petten (The Netherlands) is owned by the European Commission and is operated under contract by NRG (Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group). This plant is in operation since 1962 using HEU. In 1998/1999 calculations were made with a parametric study to try to optimise a LEU element for a progressive conversion of the plant. The parameters of the study were the number of plates by element, the density of the fuel (from silicide 4.8 g/cm 3 to UMo 9.1 g/cm 3 ), the meat thickness and the type and quantity of the burnable poison. The optimum fuel element presented is of 4.8 g/cm 3 silicide LEU. The use of this element induces only small penalties on thermal fluxes (less than 5%), enables a longer cycle (28.3 operating days instead of 24.7 operating days in the current HEU cycle length) and complies with all thermal-hydraulic criteria as presently applied for the HEU core. A working plan has begun with the safety authorities for licensing this new fuel element and the main lines of this plan are also presented. For the UMo possibilities, a presentation is made of the first calculation results. Test on UMo with a special irradiation device, will also begin and are presented. For the back-end of the fuel cycle, this paper presents the interim storage in the pools of the plant, and the transportation possibilities to a dry storage. In conclusion, great progress has been made during this year for a conversion of the plant and for the improvement of MTR fuel in the future. (author)

  6. Distributed Absorber for Noise and Vibration Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Azoulay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to a wide-band frequency passive vibration attenuation is introduced in this paper. This aims to suppress noise and vibration of extended multimode objects like plates, panels and shells. The absorber is arranged in the form of a single-layer assembly of small inertial bodies (balls being distributed and moulded within the light visco-elastic media (e.g. silicone resin. The absorber as a whole is embedded into object face covering the critical patches of the system surface. For the purpose of characterization, the authors introduced the complex frequency response function relating the volume velocity produced by the vibrating object surface (response stimulated by a point-wise force (stimulus applied to a particular point. The simulation and optimization of the main frequency characteristics has been performed using a full scale 3-dimensional Finite Element model. These revealed some new dynamic features of absorber's structures, which can contribute to vibration attenuation. A full-scale physical experimentation with synthesised absorber's structures confirmed the main results of simulation and has shown significant noise reduction over a staggering 0–20 kHz frequency band. This was achieved with a negligible weight and volume penalty due to the addition of the absorber. The results can find multiple applications in noise and vibration control of different structures. Some examples of such applications are presented.

  7. Identifying the perfect absorption of metamaterial absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, G.; Schalch, J.; Zhao, X.; Zhang, J.; Averitt, R. D.; Zhang, X.

    2018-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the conditions that result in unity absorption in metamaterial absorbers to guide the design and optimization of this important class of functional electromagnetic composites. Multilayer absorbers consisting of a metamaterial layer, dielectric spacer, and ground plane are specifically considered. Using interference theory, the dielectric spacer thickness and resonant frequency for unity absorption can be numerically determined from the functional dependence of the relative phase shift of the total reflection. Further, using transmission line theory in combination with interference theory we obtain analytical expressions for the unity absorption resonance frequency and corresponding spacer layer thickness in terms of the bare resonant frequency of the metamaterial layer and metallic and dielectric losses within the absorber structure. These simple expressions reveal a redshift of the unity absorption frequency with increasing loss that, in turn, necessitates an increase in the thickness of the dielectric spacer. The results of our analysis are experimentally confirmed by performing reflection-based terahertz time-domain spectroscopy on fabricated absorber structures covering a range of dielectric spacer thicknesses with careful control of the loss accomplished through water absorption in a semiporous polyimide dielectric spacer. Our findings can be widely applied to guide the design and optimization of the metamaterial absorbers and sensors.

  8. Improvements of nuclear fuel management in pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    1978-07-01

    The severe variations to which the different elements contributing to the determination of the fuel cycle cost are subjected have led to a reopening of the problem of ''optimization'' of nuclear fuel management. The increase in costs of uranium ore, isotope separation work units (swu), reprocessing, the political implications of proliferation associated with the employment of reprocessing operations have been at the origin of a reassessment of present-day management. It therefore appeared to be appropriate to study variants with respect to a reference mode represented by the management of the PWR 900 MWe systems, without burnable poison in the cycle at equilibrium (Case 3 of Table 1). In order to obtain a complete view of impacts of such modifications, computations were carried out as far as the appraisal of the cycle cost and with reprocessing. There has likewise been added to this the estimate of the gain anticipated from certain improvements in the neutron balance contributed at the level of the lattice

  9. Visual inspections of the neutron absorber control rods of the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jose Eduardo R. da; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Castanheira, Myrthes; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Damy, Margaret de A.

    2002-01-01

    The Fuel Engineering Division at IPEN/CNEN-SP developed facilities for visual inspection of the IEA-R1 fuel elements and neutron absorbing control rod assemblies inside the research reactor pool. This work presents the method of visual inspection performed at IEA-R1 research reactor. These inspections were adopted to evaluate and to follow the state of the Ag-In-Cd control assemblies fabricated at CERCA in 1972 that remain in use at the reactor core. In 1998, 2000 and 20001, visual inspections were performed in these control rod assemblies, which the general conditions were evaluated. (author)

  10. Absorbed dose determination in water. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of new values of physical parameters as recommended by international organizations has consequences in radiotherapy, e.g. in the determination of absorbed doses in water based on ionometric measurements. A procedure is proposed for the determination of the conversion factor K w,u between kerma in air and absorbed dose in water, and of the factor C w,u between exposure measured and absorbed dose in water, for ionization chambers and high-energy photon beams. The conversion factors depend not only on the radiation quality but also on the dimensions and composition of the chamber and of the cup used in the calibrations. Numerical values are given for conventional kinds of ionization chambers. (author). 3 tabs., 16 refs

  11. Absorbed dose determination in water. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, J.; Hobzova, L.; Kindlova, A.

    1991-01-01

    The use of new values of physical parameters as recommended by international organizations has consequences in radiotherapy, e.g. in the determination of absorbed doses in water based on ionometric measurements. A procedure is proposed for the determination of the conversion factor K w,e from kerma in air to absorbed dose in water, and of the conversion factor C w,e from exposure measured to dose absorbed in water, this for ionization chambers and high-energy electron beams. The conversion factors depend not only on the radiation quality and measurement depth in the phantom but also on the dimensions and composition of the chamber and of the cup used in the calibrations. Numerical values are given for two conventional kinds of ionization chambers. (author). 3 tabs., 9 refs

  12. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  13. Properties of CGM-Absorbing Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Colin; Conway, Matthew; Apala, Elizabeth; Scott, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    We extend the results of a study of the sightlines of 45 low-redshift quasars (0.06 COS that lie within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We have used photometric data from the SDSS DR12, along with the known absorption characteristics of the intergalactic medium and circumgalactic medium, to identify the most probable galaxy matches to absorbers in the spectroscopic dataset. Here, we use photometric data and measured galaxy parameters from SDSS DR12 to examine the distributions of galaxy properties such as virial radius, morphology, and position angle among those that match to absorbers within a specific range of impact parameters. We compare those distributions to galaxies within the same impact parameter range that are not matched to any absorber in the HST/COS spectrum in order to investigate global properties of the circumgalactic medium.

  14. Quantum walk with one variable absorbing boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feiran [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information and Quantum Optoelectronic Devices, Shaanxi Province, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Zhang, Pei, E-mail: zhangpei@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information and Quantum Optoelectronic Devices, Shaanxi Province, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, Yunlong; Liu, Ruifeng; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information and Quantum Optoelectronic Devices, Shaanxi Province, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Quantum walks constitute a promising ingredient in the research on quantum algorithms; consequently, exploring different types of quantum walks is of great significance for quantum information and quantum computation. In this study, we investigate the progress of quantum walks with a variable absorbing boundary and provide an analytical solution for the escape probability (the probability of a walker that is not absorbed by the boundary). We simulate the behavior of escape probability under different conditions, including the reflection coefficient, boundary location, and initial state. Moreover, it is also meaningful to extend our research to the situation of continuous-time and high-dimensional quantum walks. - Highlights: • A novel scheme about quantum walk with variable boundary is proposed. • The analytical results of the survival probability from the absorbing boundary. • The behavior of survival probability under different boundary conditions. • The influence of different initial coin states on the survival probability.

  15. Tribology Aspect of Rubber Shock Absorbers Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Banić

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rubber is a very flexible material with many desirable properties Which enable its broad use in engineering practice. Rubber or rubber-metal springs are widely used as anti-vibration or anti-shock components in technical systems. Rubber-metal springs are usually realized as a bonded assembly, however especially in shock absorbers, it is possible to realize free contacts between rubber and metal parts. In previous research it authors was observed that friction between rubber and metal in such case have a significant influence on the damping characteristics of shock absorber. This paper analyzes the development process of rubber or rubber-metal shock absorbers realized free contacts between the constitutive parts, starting from the design, construction, testing and operation, with special emphasis on the development of rubber-metal springs for the buffing and draw gear of railway vehicles.

  16. Standard specification for nuclear-grade aluminum oxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This specification applies to pellets of aluminum oxide that may be ultimately used in a reactor core, for example, as filler or spacers within fuel, burnable poison, or control rods. In order to distinguish between the subject pellets and “burnable poison” pellets, it is established that the subject pellets are not intended to be used as neutron-absorbing material. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard.

  17. LINEAR MODEL FOR NON ISOSCELES ABSORBERS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERG,J.S.

    2003-05-12

    Previous analyses have assumed that wedge absorbers are triangularly shaped with equal angles for the two faces. In this case, to linear order, the energy loss depends only on the position in the direction of the face tilt, and is independent of the incoming angle. One can instead construct an absorber with entrance and exit faces facing rather general directions. In this case, the energy loss can depend on both the position and the angle of the particle in question. This paper demonstrates that and computes the effect to linear order.

  18. Multilayer detector for skin absorbed dose measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osanov, D.P.; Panova, V.P.; Shaks, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    A method for skin dosimetry based on utilization of multilayer detectors and permitting to estimate distribution of absorbed dose by skin depth is described. The detector represents a set of thin sensitive elements separated by tissue-equivalent absorbers. Quantitative evaluation and forecasting the degree of radiation injury of skin are determined by the formula based on determination of the probability of the fact that cells are not destroyed and they can divide further on. The given method ensures a possibility of quantitative evaluation of radiobiological effect and forecasting clinical consequences of skin irradiation by results of corresponding measurements of dose by means of the miultilayer detector

  19. Device for absorbing seismic effects on buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xercavins, Pierre; Pompei, Michel.

    1979-01-01

    Device for absorbing seismic effects. The construction or structure to be protected rests on its foundations through at least one footing formed of a stack of metal plates interlinked by layers of adhesive material, over at least a part of their extent, this material being an elastomer that can distort, characterized in that at least part of the area of some metal plates works in association with components which are able to absorb at least some of the energy resulting from friction during the relative movements of the metal plates against the distortion of the elastomer [fr

  20. Optimization of Perfect Absorbers with Multilayer Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Voti, Roberto

    2018-02-01

    We study wide-angle and broadband perfect absorbers with compact multilayer structures made of a sequence of ITO and TiN layers deposited onto a silver thick layer. An optimization procedure is introduced for searching the optimal thicknesses of the layers so as to design a perfect broadband absorber from 400 nm to 750 nm, for a wide range of angles of incidence from 0{°} to 50{°}, for both polarizations and with a low emissivity in the mid-infrared. We eventually compare the performances of several optimal structures that can be very promising for solar thermal energy harvesting and collectors.

  1. Safety aspects of using Ag-In-Cd absorber made by PT. Batan Teknologi (Persero) in the core of multi purposes reactor G.A. Siwabessy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anggoro Septilarso; Zulkarnain; Heryudo Kusumo

    2011-01-01

    Safety Evaluation has been carried out for the using of Ag-In-Cd Absorber made by PT. Batan Teknologi (Persero) in the core of Multi Purposes Reactor G.A. Siwabessy (RSG-GAS). PT. Batan Teknologi (Persero) only licensed by NUKEM GmbH to produce Fuel Element and Control Element U-Al, U 3 O 8 -Al dan U 3 Si 2 -Al, and not including to produce Ag-In-Cd Absorber. But, BAPETEN evaluator think that the danger would be greater if RSG-GAS use the older absorber than use Ag-In-Cd Absorber made by PT. Batan Teknologi. For this purposes, BAPETEN set some requirements and acceptance criteria to be met by the absorber, that is cold test, hot test, shutdown margin value, control rod drop test and visual test. The test show that Ag-In-Cd Absorber meets all the requirements and acceptance criteria required by BAPETEN. (author)

  2. Fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, E.R.

    1975-01-01

    Description of the operation of power plants and the respective procurement of fuel to fulfil the needs of the grid. The operation of the plants shall be optimised with respect to the fuel cost. (orig./RW) [de

  3. Fuel gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives a brief presentation of the context, perspectives of production, specificities, and the conditions required for the development of NGV (Natural Gas for Vehicle) and LPG-f (Liquefied Petroleum Gas fuel) alternative fuels. After an historical presentation of 80 years of LPG evolution in vehicle fuels, a first part describes the economical and environmental advantages of gaseous alternative fuels (cleaner combustion, longer engines life, reduced noise pollution, greater natural gas reserves, lower political-economical petroleum dependence..). The second part gives a comparative cost and environmental evaluation between the available alternative fuels: bio-fuels, electric power and fuel gases, taking into account the processes and constraints involved in the production of these fuels. (J.S.)

  4. Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Activities for the Spent Fuel Nondestructive Assay Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trellue, Holly Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trahan, Alexis Chanel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McMath, Garrett Earl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hu, Jianwei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Grogan, Brandon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-11

    The main focus of research in the NA-241 spent fuel nondestructive assay (NDA) project in FY17 has been completing the fabrication and testing of two prototype instruments for upcoming spent fuel measurements at the Clab interim storage facility in Sweden. One is a passive instrument: Differential Die-away Self Interrogation-Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (DDSI), and one is an active instrument: Differential Die-Away-Californium Interrogation with Prompt Neutron (DDA). DDSI was fabricated and tested with fresh fuel at Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY15 and FY16, then shipped to Sweden at the beginning of FY17. Research was performed in FY17 to simplify results from the data acquisition system, which is complex because signals from 56 different 3He detectors must be processed using list mode data. The DDA instrument was fabricated at the end of FY16. New high count rate electronics better suited for a spent fuel environment (i.e., KM-200 preamplifiers) were built specifically for this instrument in FY17, and new Tygon tubing to house electrical cables was purchased and installed. Fresh fuel tests using the DDA instrument with numerous configurations of fuel rods containing depleted uranium (DU), low enriched uranium (LEU), and LEU with burnable poisons (Gd) were successfully performed and compared to simulations.1 Additionally, members of the spent fuel NDA project team travelled to Sweden for a “spent fuel characterization and decay heat” workshop involving simulations of spent fuel and analysis of uncertainties in decay heat calculations.

  5. Assembly-level analysis of heterogeneous Th–Pu PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainuddin, Nurjuanis Zara; Parks, Geoffrey T.; Shwageraus, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We directly compare homogeneous and heterogeneous Th–Pu fuel. • Examine whether there is an increase in Pu incineration in the latter. • Homogeneous fuel was able to achieve much higher Pu incineration. • In the heterogeneous case, U-233 breeding is faster (larger power fraction), thus decreasing incineration of Pu. - Abstract: This study compares homogeneous and heterogeneous thorium–plutonium (Th–Pu) fuel assemblies (with high Pu content – 20 wt%), and examines whether there is an increase in Pu incineration in the latter. A seed-blanket configuration based on the Radkowsky thorium reactor concept is used for the heterogeneous assembly. This separates the thorium blanket from the uranium seed, or in this case a plutonium seed. The seed supplies neutrons to the subcritical thorium blanket which encourages the in situ breeding and burning of 233 U, allowing the fuel to stay critical for longer, extending burnup of the fuel. While past work on Th–Pu seed-blanket units shows superior Pu incineration compared to conventional U–Pu mixed oxide fuel, there is no literature to date that directly compares the performance of homogeneous and heterogeneous Th–Pu assembly configurations. Use of exactly the same fuel loading for both configurations allows the effects of spatial separation to be fully understood. It was found that the homogeneous fuel with and without burnable poisons was able to achieve much higher Pu incinerations than the heterogeneous fuel configurations, while still attaining a reasonably high discharge burnup. This is because in the heterogeneous cases, 233 U breeding is faster, thereby contributing to a much larger fraction of total power produced by the assembly. In contrast, 233 U build-up is slower in the homogeneous case and therefore Pu burning is greater. This 233 U begins to contribute a significant fraction of power produced only towards the end of life, thus extending criticality, allowing more Pu to burn.

  6. Fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel pellet for insertion into a cladding tube in order to form a fuel element or a fuel rod. The fuel pellet has got a belt-like projection around its essentially cylindrical lateral circumferential surface. The upper and lower edges in vertical direction of this belt-like projection are wave-shaped. The projection is made of the same material as the bulk pellet. Both are made in one piece. (orig.) [de

  7. A parametric study, based on physical and economic aspects, of the in-pile fuel cycle of pressurized light water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.-L.

    1978-01-01

    A method of determining the first core of a P.W.R. reactor was developed. This method is simple, inexpensive and takes the form of general laws expressing the effect of an enrichment variation from one batch to an other on the cycle characteristics (cycle length, end-of-cycle burn-up). These considerations are based upon an economic study which gives an idea of the financial consequences on the technical solution finally adopted. The parameters considered are the fuel cycle cost and the fuel investment cost. The computing methods used are based on a notion of purely theoretical core reactivity control which keeps stationary the power distributions during the cycle. A poisoned configuration involving burnable poisons, worked out on a particular case on the basis of this optimum control approach, has led to power distributions more uniform during the cycle and an appreciable limitation of the respective power peaks [fr

  8. Preliminary design study of small long life boiling water reactor (BWR) with tight lattice thorium nitride fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trianti, Nuri, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Su' ud, Zaki, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Arif, Idam, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia) (Indonesia); Riyana, EkaSapta [Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    Neutronic performance of small long-life boiling water reactors (BWR) with thorium nitride based fuel has been performed. A recent study conducted on BWR in tight lattice environments (with a lower moderator percentage) produces small power reactor which has some specifications, i.e. 10 years operation time, power density of 19.1 watt/cc and maximum excess reactivity of about 4%. This excess reactivity value is smaller than standard reactivity of conventional BWR. The use of hexagonal geometry on the fuel cell of BWR provides a substantial effect on the criticality of the reactor to obtain a longer operating time. Supported by a tight concept lattice where the volume fraction of the fuel is greater than the moderator and fuel, Thorium Nitride give good results for fuel cell design on small long life BWR. The excess reactivity of the reactor can be reduced with the addition of gadolinium as burnable poisons. Therefore the hexagonal tight lattice fuel cell design of small long life BWR that has a criticality more than 20 years of operating time has been obtained.

  9. Design of an equilibrium nucleus of a BWR type reactor based in a Thorium-Uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, J.L.; Nunez C, A.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the design of the reactor nucleus of boiling water using fuel of thorium-uranium is presented. Starting from an integral concept based in a type cover-seed assemble is carried out the design of an equilibrium reload for the nucleus of a reactor like that of the Laguna Verde Central and its are analyzed some of the main design variables like the cycle length, the reload fraction, the burnt fuel, the vacuum distribution, the generation of lineal heat, the margin of shutdown, as well as a first estimation of the fuel cost. The results show that it is feasible to obtain an equilibrium reload, comparable to those that are carried out in the Laguna Verde reactors, with a good behavior of those analyzed variables. The cost of the equilibrium reload designed with the thorium-uranium fuel is approximately 2% high that the uranium reload producing the same energy. It is concluded that it is convenient to include burnable poisons, type gadolinium, in the fuel with the end of improving the reload design, the fuel costs and the margin of shutdown. (Author)

  10. Fossil Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

  11. Fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A new fuel can with a loose bottom and head is described. The fuel bar is attached to the loose bottom and head with two grid poles keeping the distance between bottom and head. A bow-shaped handle is attached to the head so that the fuel bar can be lifted from the can

  12. Porphyrin Based Near Infrared-Absorbing Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qiwen

    The conservation and transformation of energy is essential to the survival of mankind, and thus concerns every modern society. Solar energy, as an everlasting source of energy, holds one of the key solutions to some of the most urgent problems the world now faces, such as global warming and the oil crisis. Advances in technologies utilizing clean, abundant solar energy, could be the steering wheel of our societies. Solar cells, one of the major advances in converting solar energy into electricity, are now capturing people's interest all over the globe. While solar cells have been commercially available for many years, the manufacturing of solar cells is quite expensive, limiting their broad based implementation. The cost of solar cell based electricity is 15-50 cents per kilowatt hour (¢/kwh), depending on the type of solar cell, compared to 0.7 ¢/kwh for fossil fuel based electricity. Clearly, decreasing the cost of electricity from solar cells is critical for their wide spread deployment. This will require a decrease in the cost of light absorbing materials and material processing used in fabricating the cells. Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) utilize organic materials such as polymers and small molecules. These devices have the advantage of being flexible and lower cost than conventional solar cells built from inorganic semiconductors (e.g. silicon). The low cost of OPVs is tied to lower materials and fabrication costs of organic cells. However, the current power conversion efficiencies of OPVs are still below 15%, while convention crystalline Si cells have efficiencies of 20-25%. A key limitation in OPVs today is their inability to utilize the near infrared (NIR) portion of the solar spectrum. This part of the spectrum comprises nearly half of the energy in sunlight that could be used to make electricity. The first and foremost step in conversion solar energy conversion is the absorption of light, which nature has provided us optimal model of, which is

  13. Review of Plasmonic Nanocomposite Metamaterial Absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Keshavarz Hedayati

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic metamaterials are artificial materials typically composed of noble metals in which the features of photonics and electronics are linked by coupling photons to conduction electrons of metal (known as surface plasmon. These rationally designed structures have spurred interest noticeably since they demonstrate some fascinating properties which are unattainable with naturally occurring materials. Complete absorption of light is one of the recent exotic properties of plasmonic metamaterials which has broadened its application area considerably. This is realized by designing a medium whose impedance matches that of free space while being opaque. If such a medium is filled with some lossy medium, the resulting structure can absorb light totally in a sharp or broad frequency range. Although several types of metamaterials perfect absorber have been demonstrated so far, in the current paper we overview (and focus on perfect absorbers based on nanocomposites where the total thickness is a few tens of nanometer and the absorption band is broad, tunable and insensitive to the angle of incidence. The nanocomposites consist of metal nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric matrix with a high filling factor close to the percolation threshold. The filling factor can be tailored by the vapor phase co-deposition of the metallic and dielectric components. In addition, novel wet chemical approaches are discussed which are bio-inspired or involve synthesis within levitating Leidenfrost drops, for instance. Moreover, theoretical considerations, optical properties, and potential application of perfect absorbers will be presented.

  14. Selective mass transfer in a membrane absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunev, A. Yu.; Laguntsov, N. I.

    2006-09-01

    A theoretical study of selective mass transfer in a plane-frame membrane absorber (contactor) has been made. A mathematical model of the process has been developed and the process of purification of a gas mixture depending on the flow parameters, the membrane, and the feeding-mixture composition has been studied with its help.

  15. Review of Plasmonic Nanocomposite Metamaterial Absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Mehdi Keshavarz; Faupel, Franz; Elbahri, Mady

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic metamaterials are artificial materials typically composed of noble metals in which the features of photonics and electronics are linked by coupling photons to conduction electrons of metal (known as surface _lasmon). These rationally designed structures have spurred interest noticeably since they demonstrate some fascinating properties which are unattainable with naturally occurring materials. Complete absorption of light is one of the recent exotic properties of plasmonic metamaterials which has broadened its application area considerably. This is realized by designing a medium whose impedance matches that of free space while being opaque. If such a medium is filled with some lossy medium, the resulting structure can absorb light totally in a sharp or broad frequency range. Although several types of metamaterials perfect absorber have been demonstrated so far, in the current paper we overview (and focus on) perfect absorbers based on nanocomposites where the total thickness is a few tens of nanometer and the absorption band is broad, tunable and insensitive to the angle of incidence. The nanocomposites consist of metal nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric matrix with a high filling factor close to the percolation threshold. The filling factor can be tailored by the vapor phase co-deposition of the metallic and dielectric components. In addition, novel wet chemical approaches are discussed which are bio-inspired or involve synthesis within levitating Leidenfrost drops, for instance. Moreover, theoretical considerations, optical properties, and potential application of perfect absorbers will be presented. PMID:28788511

  16. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  17. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF INDUSTRIAL FORMALDEHYDE ABSORBERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WINKELMAN, JGM; SIJBRING, H; BEENACKERS, AACM; DEVRIES, ET

    1992-01-01

    The industrially important process of formaldehyde absorption in water constitutes a case of multicomponent mass transfer with multiple reactions and considerable heat effects. A stable solution algorithm is developed to simulate the performance of industrial absorbers for this process using a

  18. Electromagnetic and microwave absorbing properties of hollow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bandwidth below −10 dB and minimum RL decrease with increasing thickness of HCNSs/paraffin composites. Keywords. Nanomaterials; nanospheres; CVD; electric; magnetic; microwave absorption properties. 1. Introduction. In recent years, microwave absorbing materials have attracted considerable attention because it ...

  19. Can polar bear hairs absorb environmental energy?

    OpenAIRE

    He Ji-Huan; Wang Qing-Li; Sun Jie

    2011-01-01

    A polar bear (Ursus maritimus) has superior ability to survive in harsh Arctic regions, why does the animal have such an excellent thermal protection? The present paper finds that the unique labyrinth cavity structure of the polar bear hair plays an important role. The hair can not only prevent body temperature loss but can also absorb energy from the environment.

  20. Can polar bear hairs absorb environmental energy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ji-Huan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A polar bear (Ursus maritimus has superior ability to survive in harsh Arctic regions, why does the animal have such an excellent thermal protection? The present paper finds that the unique labyrinth cavity structure of the polar bear hair plays an important role. The hair can not only prevent body temperature loss but can also absorb energy from the environment.

  1. Technology and assessment of neutron absorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, B.T.; Murgatroyd, R.A.

    1977-06-01

    The present review assesses more recent developments in the technology and application of those absorber materials which are considered to be established or to have shown potential in reactor control. Emphasis is placed on physical, chemical and metallurgical properties and upon irradiation behaviour. (author)

  2. Absorbance and fluorescence studies on porphyrin Nanostructures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work was to study some photophysical properties of PNR for application as light harvester in dye sensitized solar cells. These properties included absorbance, fluorescence, and fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime. The results of Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) images showed the formation of ...

  3. The in-core fuel management code system for VVER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cada, R.; Krysl, V.; Mikolas, P.; Sustek, J.; Svarny, J.

    2004-01-01

    The structure and methodology of a fuel management system for NPP VVER 1000 (NPP Temelin) and VVER 440 (NPP Dukovany) is described. It is under development in SKODA JS a.s. and is followed by practical applications. The general objectives of the system are maximization of end of cycle reactivity, the minimization of fresh fuel inventory for the minimization of fed enrichment and minimization of burnable poisons (BPs) inventory. They are also safety related constraints in witch minimization of power peaking plays a dominant role. General structure of the system consists in preparation of input data for macrocode calculation, algorithms (codes) for optimization of fuel loading, calculation of fuel enrichment and BPs assignment. At present core loading can be calculated (optimized) by Tabu search algorithm (code ATHENA), genetic algorithm (code Gen1) and hybrid algorithm - simplex procedure with application of Tabu search algorithm on binary shuffling (code OPAL B ). Enrichment search is realized by the application of simplex algorithm (OPAL B code) and BPs assignment by module BPASS and simplex algorithm in OPAL B code. Calculations of the real core loadings are presented and a comparison of different optimization methods is provided. (author)

  4. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Mitsuya; Yamashita, Jun-ichi; Mochida, Takaaki.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the fuel economy by increasing the reactivity at the latter burning stage of fuel assemblies and thereby increasing the burn-up degree. Constitution: At the later stage of the burning where the infinite multiplication factor of a fuel assembly is lowered, fuel rods are partially discharged to increase the fuel-moderator volume ratio in the fuel assembly. Then, plutonium is positively burnt by bringing the ratio near to an optimum point where the infinite multiplication factor becomes maximum and the reactivity of the fuel assembly is increased by utilizing the spectral shift effect. The number of the fuel rods to be removed is selected so as to approach the fuel-moderator atom number ratio where the infinite multiplication factor is maximum. Further, the positions where the thermal neutron fluxes are low are most effective for removing the rods and those positions between which no fuel rods are present and which are adjacent with neither the channel box nor the water rods are preferred. The rods should be removed at the time when the burning is proceeded at lest for one cycle. The reactivity is thus increased and the burn-up degree of fuels upon taking-out can be improved. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Letter Report: Looking Ahead at Nuclear Fuel Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Stephen Herring

    2013-09-01

    The future of nuclear energy and its ability to fulfill part of the world’s energy needs for centuries to come depend on a reliable input of nuclear fuel, either thorium or uranium. Obviously, the present nuclear fuel cycle is completely dependent on uranium. Future thorium cycles will also depend on 235U or fissile isotopes separated from used fuel to breed 232Th into fissile 233U. This letter report discusses several emerging areas of scientific understanding and technology development that will clarify and enable assured supplies of uranium and thorium well into the future. At the most fundamental level, the nuclear energy community needs to appreciate the origins of uranium and thorium and the processes of planetary accretion by which those materials have coalesced to form the earth and other planets. Secondly, the studies of geophysics and geochemistry are increasing understanding of the processes by which uranium and thorium are concentrated in various locations in the earth’s crust. Thirdly, the study of neutrinos and particularly geoneutrinos (neutrinos emitted by radioactive materials within the earth) has given an indication of the overall global inventories of uranium and thorium, though little indication for those materials’ locations. Crustal temperature measurements have also given hints of the vertical distribution of radioactive heat sources, primarily 238U and 232Th, within the continental crust. Finally, the evolving technologies for laser isotope separation are indicating methods for reducing the energy input to uranium enrichment but also for tailoring the isotopic vectors of fuels, burnable poisons and structural materials, thereby adding another tool for dealing with long-term waste management.

  6. Neutron absorbers and methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen, Donna P; Porter, Douglas L; Swank, W David; Erickson, Arnold W

    2014-12-02

    Methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber include combining a first material and a second material to form a compound, reducing the compound into a plurality of particles, mixing the plurality of particles with a third material, and pressing the mixture of the plurality of particles and the third material. One or more components of neutron absorbers may be formed by such methods. Neutron absorbers may include a composite material including an intermetallic compound comprising hafnium aluminide and a matrix material comprising pure aluminum.

  7. Report of Post Irradiation Examination for Dry Process Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Par, Jang Jin; Jung, I. H.; Kang, K. H.; Moon, J. S.; Lee, C. R.; Ryu, H. J.; Song, K. C.; Yang, M. S.; Yoo, B. O.; Jung, Y. H.; Choo, Y. S

    2006-08-15

    The spent PWR fuel typically contains 0.9 wt.% of fissile uranium and 0.6 wt.% of fissile plutonium, which exceeds the natural uranium fissile content of 0.711 wt.%. The neutron economy of a CANDU reactor is sufficient to utilize the DUPIC fuel, even though the neutron-absorbing fission products contained in the spent PWR fuel were remained in the DUPIC fuel. The DUPIC fuel cycle offers advantages to the countries operating both the PWR and CANDU reactors, such as saving the natural uranium, reducing the spent fuel in both PWR and CANDU, and acquiring the extra energy by reuse of the PWR spent fuel. This report contains the results of post-irradiation examination of the DUPIC fuel irradiated four times at HANARO from May 2000 to August 2006 present except the first irradiation test of simulated DUPIC fuel at HANARO on August 1999.

  8. Optimization of enrichment distributions in nuclear fuel assemblies loaded with Uranium and Plutonium via a modified linear programming technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas Vivas, Gabriel Francisco

    1999-12-01

    A methodology to optimize enrichment distributions in Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies is developed and tested. The optimization technique employed is the linear programming revised simplex method, and the fuel assembly's performance is evaluated with a neutron transport code that is also utilized in the calculation of sensitivity coefficients. The enrichment distribution optimization procedure begins from a single-value (flat) enrichment distribution until a target, maximum local power peaking factor, is achieved. The optimum rod enrichment distribution, with 1.00 for the maximum local power peaking factor and with each rod having its own enrichment, is calculated at an intermediate stage of the analysis. Later, the best locations and values for a reduced number of rod enrichments is obtained as a function of a target maximum local power peaking factor by applying sensitivity to change techniques. Finally, a shuffling process that assigns individual rod enrichments among the enrichment groups is performed. The relative rod power distribution is then slightly modified and the rod grouping redefined until the optimum configuration is attained. To verify the accuracy of the relative rod power distribution, a full computation with the neutron transport code using the optimum enrichment distribution is carried out. The results are compared and tested for assembly designs loaded with fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) and plutonium Mixed Oxide (MOX) isotopics for both reactor-grade and weapons-grade plutonium were utilized to demonstrate the wide range of applicability of the optimization technique. The feature of the assembly designs used for evaluation purposes included burnable absorbers and internal water regions, and were prepared to resemble the configurations of modern assemblies utilized in commercial Boiling Water Reactor (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). In some cases, a net improvement in the relative rod power distribution or in the

  9. Practice of fuel management and outage strategy at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farago, P.; Hamvas, I.; Szecsenyi, Zs.; Nemes, I.; Javor, E.

    2000-01-01

    The Paks Nuclear Power Plant generates almost 40% of Hungarian electricity production at lowest price. In spite of this fact the reduction of operational and maintenance costs is one of the most important goal of the plant management. The proper fuel management and outage strategy can give a considerable influence for this cost reduction. The aim of loading pattern planning is to get the required cycle length with available fuel cassettes and to keep all key parameters of safety analysis under safety limits. Another important point is production at profit, where both the fuel and spent fuel cost are determining. Earlier the conditions given by our only fuel supplier restricted our possibilities, so at the beginning the fuel arrangement changing was the only way to improve efficiency of fuel using. As first step we introduced the low leakage core design. The next step was the 4 years cycle using of some cassettes. By this way nearly half of 3 years cycle old cassettes remained in the core for fourth cycle. In the immediate future we want to use profiled cassettes developed by Russian supplier. Simultaneously we will load new type of WWER cassettes with burnable poison developed by BNFL Company. Hereby we can apply more BNFL cassettes for four years cycle even more. Both cost of fuel and number of spent fuel can be reduced besides keeping parameters under safety limits. The Hungarian in service inspection rules determine that every four year we have to make a complete inspection of reactor vessel. Therefore earlier we had two types of outages. Every 4 years we planned a long outage with 55-65 days duration and normal ones with about 30-35 days duration between the long ones. During the normal outages this way did not give us enough room to utilise the shortest possible critical path determined by works on reactor. Some years ago we changed our outage strategy. Now we plan every 4 years a long outage, and between them one normal and two short ones. As a result the

  10. Thermal expansion of UO2-Gd2O3 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Une, Katsumi

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, more consideration has been given to the application of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 burnable poison fuel to LWRs in order to improve the core physics and to extend the burnup. It has been known that UO 2 forms a single phase cubic fluorite type solid solution with Gd 2 O 3 up to 20 - 30 wt.% above 1300 K. The addition of Gd 2 O 3 to UO 2 lattices changes the properties of the fuel pellets. The limited data on the thermal expansion of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel exist, but those are inconsistent. UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel pellets were fabricated, and the linear thermal expansion of UO 2 and UO 2 -(5, 8 and 10 wt.%)Gd 2 O 3 fuel pellets was measured with a differential dilatometer over the temperature range of 298 - 1973 K. A sapphire rod of 6 mm diameter and 15.5 mm length was used as the reference material. After the preheating cycle, the measurement was performed in argon atmosphere. The results for UO 2 pellets showed excellent agreement with the data in literatures. The linear thermal expansion of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel pellets showed the increase with increasing the Gd 2 O 3 content. Consideration must be given to this excessive expansion in the fuel design of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 pellets. The equations for the linear thermal expansion and density of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel pellets were derived by the method of least squares. (Kako, I.)

  11. Developing and analyzing long-term fuel management strategies for an advanced Small Modular PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedayat, Afshin, E-mail: ahedayat@aeoi.org.ir

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Comprehensive introduction and supplementary concepts as a review paper. • Developing an integrated long-term fuel management strategy for a SMR. • High reliable 3-D core modeling over fuel pins against the traditional LRM. • Verifying the expert rules of large PWRs for an advanced small PWR. • Investigating large numbers of safety parameters coherently. - Abstract: In this paper, long-term fuel management (FM) strategies are introduced and analyzed for a new advanced Pressurized Light Water Reactor (PWR) type of Small Modular Reactors (SMRs). The FM strategies are developed to be safe and practical for implementation as much as possible. Safety performances, economy of fuel, and Quality Assurance (QA) of periodic equilibrium conditions are chosen as the main goals. Flattening power density distribution over fuel pins is the major method to ensure safety performance; also maximum energy output or permissible discharging burn up indicates economy of fuel fabrication costs. Burn up effects from BOC to EOC have been traced, studied, and highly visualized in both of transport lattice cell calculations and diffusion core calculations. Long-term characteristics are searched to gain periodical equilibrium characteristics. They are fissile changes, neutron spectrum, refueling pattern, fuel cycle length, core excess reactivity, average, and maximum burn up of discharged fuels, radial Power Peaking Factors (PPF), total PPF, radial and axial power distributions, batch effects, and enrichment effects for fine regulations. Traditional linear reactivity model have been successfully simulated and adapted via fine core and burn up calculations. Effects of high burnable neutron poison and soluble boron are analyzed. Different numbers of batches via different refueling patterns have been studied and visualized. Expert rules for large type PWRs have been influenced and well tested throughout accurate equilibrium core calculations.

  12. Abstracts. 1978 AFOSR Contractors Meeting on Air-Breathing Combustion Dynamics and Kinetics, Ramada Inn-Downtown Dayton, Ohio, 10 - 13 October 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-13

    extinction coefficient of decane was calculated from the spectra of the fine rotational structure of the CO laser and the linear2 absorbance . Since the...characteristics of all burnable materials, not just the fuel, is essential. b. Wide-Spec Fuels Combustion Research: Because of the global nature of...temperature = overall equivalence ratio * AFOSR-77-3446 R = universal gas constant Teb= dr~p l et evaporation time calculated from a,E = empirically

  13. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  14. Intrascleral outflow after deep sclerectomy with absorbable and non-absorbable implants in the rabbit eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałużny, Jakub J; Grzanka, Dariusz; Wiśniewska, Halina; Niewińska, Alicja; Kałużny, Bartłomiej J; Grzanka, Alina

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the study is an analysis of intrascleral drainage vessels formed in rabbits' eyes after non-penetrating deep sclerectomy (NPDS) with absorbable and non-absorbable implants, and comparison to eyes in which surgery was performed without implanted material. NPDS was carried out in 12 rabbits, with implantation of non-absorbable methacrylic hydrogel (N=10 eyes) or absorbable cross-linked sodium hyaluronate (N=6 eyes), or without any implant (N=8 eyes). All the animals were euthanized 1 year after surgery. Twenty-one eyeballs were prepared for light microscopy and 3 were prepared for transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. Aqueous humour pathways were stained with ferritin in 6 eyeballs. By light microscopy, small vessels adjacent to the areas of scarring were the most common abnormality. Vessel density was significantly higher in operated sclera compared to normal, healthy tissue, regardless of the type of implant used. The average vessel densities were 2.18±1.48 vessels/mm2 in non-implanted sclera, 2.34±1.69 vessels/mm2 in eyes with absorbable implants, and 3.64±1.78 vessels/mm2 in eyes with non-absorbable implants. Analysis of iron distribution in ferritin-injected eyes showed a positive reaction inside new aqueous draining vessels in all groups. TEM analysis showed that the ultrastructure of new vessels matched the features of the small veins. Aqueous outflow after NPDS can be achieved through the newly formed network of small intrascleral veins. Use of non-absorbable implants significantly increases vessel density in the sclera adjacent to implanted material compared to eyes in which absorbable implants or no implants were used.

  15. Effect of the bio-absorbent on the microwave absorption property of the flaky CIPs/rubber absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yang; Xu, Yonggang, E-mail: xuyonggang221@163.com; Cai, Jun; Yuan, Liming; Zhang, Deyuan

    2015-09-01

    Microwave absorbing composites filled with flaky carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) and the bio-absorbent were prepared by using a two-roll mixer and a vulcanizing machine. The electromagnetic (EM) parameters were measured by a vector network analyzer and the reflection loss (RL) was measured by the arch method in the frequency range of 1–4 GHz. The uniform dispersion of the absorbents was verified by comparing the calculated RL with the measured one. The results confirm that as the bio-absorbent was added, the permittivity was increased due to the volume content of absorbents, and the permeability was enlarged owing to the volume content of CIPs and interactions between the two absorbents. The composite filled with bio-absorbents achieved an excellent absorption property at a thickness of 1 mm (minimum RL reaches −7.8 dB), and as the RL was less than −10 dB the absorption band was widest (2.1–3.8 GHz) at a thickness of 2 mm. Therefore, the bio-absorbent is a promising additive candidate on fabricating microwave absorbing composites with a thinner thickness and wider absorption band. - Graphical abstract: Morphology of composites filled with flaky CIPs and the bio-absorbent. The enhancement of bio-absorbent on the electromagnetic absorption property of composites filled with flaky carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) is attributed to the interaction of the two absorbents. The volume content of the FCMPs with the larger shape CIPs play an important role in this effects, the composites filled with irons and bio-absorbents can achieve wider-band and thinner-thickness absorbing materials. - Highlights: • Absorbers filled with bio-absorbents and CIPs was fabricated. • Bio-absorbents enhanced the permittivity and permeability of the composites. • The absorbent interactions play a key role in the enhancement mechanism. • Bio-absorbents enhanced the composite RL in 1–4 GHz.

  16. Disposable Diaper Absorbency: Improvements via Advanced Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmes, C Tucker; O'Connor, Robert; Sawyer, Larry; Young, Sharon

    2014-08-01

    Absorbency effectiveness in diapers has improved significantly in recent years with the advent of new ingredient combinations and advanced design features. With these features, many leading products maintain their dryness performance overnight. Considering the importance of holding liquid away from the skin, ongoing research in diaper construction focuses on strategies to increase the effectiveness to capture liquid and help avoid rewetting of infant skin. The layout and design of a disposable diaper allows for distribution of absorbency features where they can provide the optimal benefit. Clinical evidence indicates materials can keep moisture away from the skin in the diapered area, helping maintain proper skin hydration, minimizing irritation, and contributing to reduced rates of diaper rash. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Use of Wedge Absorbers in MICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Summers, D. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Mohayai, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); IIT, Chicago, IL (United States); Snopok, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); IIT, Chicago, IL (United States); Rogers, C. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL)

    2017-03-01

    Wedge absorbers are needed to obtain longitudinal cooling in ionization cooling. They also can be used to obtain emittance exchanges between longitudinal and transverse phase space. There can be large exchanges in emittance, even with single wedges. In the present note we explore the use of wedge absorbers in the MICE experiment to obtain transverse–longitudinal emittance exchanges within present and future operational conditions. The same wedge can be used to explore “direct” and “reverse” emittance exchange dynamics, where direct indicates a configuration that reduces momentum spread and reverse is a configuration that increases momentum spread. Analytical estimated and ICOOL and G4BeamLine simulations of the exchanges at MICE parameters are presented. Large exchanges can be obtained in both reverse and direct configurations.

  18. Absorbing Software Testing into the Scrum Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomikoski, Janne; Tervonen, Ilkka

    In this paper we study, how to absorb software testing into the Scrum method. We conducted the research as an action research during the years 2007-2008 with three iterations. The result showed that testing can and even should be absorbed to the Scrum method. The testing team was merged into the Scrum teams. The teams can now deliver better working software in a shorter time, because testing keeps track of the progress of the development. Also the team spirit is higher, because the Scrum team members are committed to the same goal. The biggest change from test manager’s point of view was the organized Product Owner Team. Test manager don’t have testing team anymore, and in the future all the testing tasks have to be assigned through the Product Backlog.

  19. Theory of metasurface based perfect absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaee, Rasoul; Albooyeh, Mohammad; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2017-12-01

    Based on an analytic approach, we present a theoretical review on the absorption, scattering, and extinction of both dipole scatterers and regular arrays composed of such scatterers i.e. metasurfaces. Besides offering a tutorial by outlining the maximum absorption limit for electrically/magnetically resonant dipole particles/metasurfaces, we give an educative analytical approach to their analysis. Moreover, we put forward the analysis of two known alternatives in providing perfect absorbers out of electrically and or magnetically resonant metasurfaces; one is based on the simultaneous presence of both electric and magnetic responses in so called Huygens metasurfaces while the other is established upon the presence of a back reflector in so called Salisbury absorbers. Our work is supported by several numerical examples to clarify the discussions in each stage.

  20. Microstructured extremely thin absorber solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biancardo, Matteo; Krebs, Frederik C

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present the realization of extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells employing conductive glass substrates functionalized with TiO2 microstructures produced by embossing. Nanocrystalline or compact TiO2 films on Indium doped tin oxide (ITO) glass substrates were embossed by press......In this paper we present the realization of extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells employing conductive glass substrates functionalized with TiO2 microstructures produced by embossing. Nanocrystalline or compact TiO2 films on Indium doped tin oxide (ITO) glass substrates were embossed...... by pressing a silicon stamp containing a mu m size raised grid structure into the TiO2 by use of a hydraulic press (1 ton/50 cm(2)). The performance of these microstructured substrates in a ETA cell sensitized by a thermally evaporated or chemical bath deposited PbS film and completed by a PEDOT:PSS hole...

  1. Effect of Al(OH)3 on the sintering of UO2-Gd2O3 fuel pellets with addition of U3O8 from recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Lauro Roberto; Durazzo, Michelangelo; Urano de Carvalho, Elita Fontenele; Riella, Humberto Gracher

    2017-09-01

    The incorporation of gadolinium as burnable poison directly into nuclear fuel is important for reactivity compensation, which enables longer fuel cycles. The function of the burnable poison fuel is to control the neutron population in the reactor core during its startup and the beginning of the fuel burning cycle to extend the use of the fuel. The implementation of UO2-Gd2O3 poisoned fuel in Brazil has been proposed according to the future requirements established for the Angra-2 nuclear power plant. The UO2 powder used is produced from the Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC). The incorporation of Gd2O3 powder directly into the AUC-derived UO2 powder by dry mechanical blending is the most attractive process, because of its simplicity. Nevertheless, processing by this method leads to difficulties while obtaining sintered pellets with the minimum required density. The cause of the low densities is the bad sintering behavior of the UO2-Gd2O3 mixed fuel, which shows a blockage in the sintering process that hinders the densification. This effect has been overcome by microdoping of the fuel with small quantities of aluminum. The process for manufacturing the fuel inevitably generates uranium-rich scraps from various sources. This residue is reincorporated into the production process in the form of U3O8 powder additions. The addition of U3O8 also hinders densification in sintering. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of both aluminum and U3O8 additives on the density of fuel pellets after sintering. As the effects of these additives are counterposed, this work studied the combined effect thereof, seeking to find an applicable composition for the production process. The experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of aluminum, in the form of Al(OH)3, as an additive to promote increase in the densification of the (U,Gd)O2 pellets during sintering, even with high additions of U3O8 recycled from the manufacturing process.

  2. Fuel spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Koji; Yokomizo, Osamu; Kanazawa, Toru; Kashiwai, Shin-ichi; Orii, Akihito.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel spacer for a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor and a PTR type reactor. Springs each having a vane are disposed on the side surface of a circular cell which supports a fuel rods. A vortex streams having a vertical component are formed by the vanes in the flowing direction of a flowing channel between adjacent cylindrical cells. Liquid droplets carried by streams are deposited on liquid membrane streams flowing along the fuel rod at the downstream of the spacer by the vortex streams. In view of the above, the liquid droplets can be deposited to the fuel rod without increasing the amount of metal of the spacer. Accordingly, the thermal margin of the fuel assembly can be improved without losing neutron economy. (I.N.)

  3. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Matsuzuka, Ryuji.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a fuel assembly which can decrease pressure loss of coolant to uniform temperature. Structure: A sectional area of a flow passage in the vicinity of an inner peripheral surface of a wrapper tube is limited over the entire length to prevent the temperature of a fuel element in the outermost peripheral portion from being excessively decreased to thereby flatten temperature distribution. To this end, a plurality of pincture-frame-like sheet metals constituting a spacer for supporting a fuel assembly, which has a plurality of fuel elements planted lengthwise and in given spaced relation within the wrapper tube, is disposed in longitudinal grooves and in stacked fashion to form a substantially honeycomb-like space in cross section. The fuel elements are inserted and supported in the space to form a fuel assembly. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Room Modal Equalisation with Electroacoustic Absorbers

    OpenAIRE

    Rivet, Etienne Thierry Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The sound quality in a room is of fundamental importance for both recording and reproducing processes. Because of the room modes, the distributions in space and frequency of the sound field are largely altered. Excessive rise and decay times caused by the resonances might even mask some details at higher frequencies, and these irregularities may be heard as a coloration of the sound. To address this problem, passive absorbers are bulky and too inefficient to significantly improve the listen...

  5. Absorbed Doses to Patients in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Mattsson, Soeren; Nosslin, Bertil; Johansson, Lennart

    2004-09-01

    The work with a Swedish catalogue of radiation absorbed doses to patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations has continued. After the previous report in 1999, biokinetic data and dose estimates (mean absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and effective dose) have been produced for a number of substances: 11 C- acetate, 11 C- methionine, 18 F-DOPA, whole antibody labelled with either 99m Tc, 111 In, 123 I or 131 I, fragment of antibody, F(ab') 2 labelled with either 99m Tc, 111 In, 123 I or 131 I and fragment of antibody, Fab' labelled with either 99m Tc, 111 In, 123 I or 131 I. The absorbed dose estimates for these substances have been made from published biokinetic information. For other substances of interest, e.g. 14 C-urea (children age 3-6 years), 14 C-glycocholic acid, 14 C-xylose and 14 C-triolein, sufficient literature data have not been available. Therefore, a large number of measurements on patients and volunteers have been carried out, in order to determine the biokinetics and dosimetry for these substances. Samples of breast milk from 50 mothers, who had been subject to nuclear medicine investigations, have been collected at various times after administration of the radiopharmaceutical to the mother. The activity concentration in the breast milk samples has been measured. The absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to the child who ingests the milk have been determined for 17 different radiopharmaceuticals. Based on these results revised recommendations for interruption of breast-feeding after nuclear medicine investigations are suggested

  6. On the comparison of absorbing regions methods

    OpenAIRE

    Ke , Weina; Yaacoubi , Slah; Mckeon , Peter

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Numerical simulation methods are very useful in Non Destructive Testing because they save time, lower cost and allow for the investigation of diverse experimental configurations. However, these methods consume relatively long CPU time and system memory. Different solutions exist to minimize these limitations. Absorbing region methods are among them when it’s possible. These kinds of regions are also made to minimize or eliminate the spurious reflections at the boundari...

  7. 2D Saturable Absorbers for Fibre Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert I. Woodward

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D nanomaterials are an emergent and promising platform for future photonic and optoelectronic applications. Here, we review recent progress demonstrating the application of 2D nanomaterials as versatile, wideband saturable absorbers for Q-switching and mode-locking fibre lasers. We focus specifically on the family of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides, including MoS2, MoSe2 and WS2.

  8. Effect of additives in sintering UO2-7wt%Gd2O3 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, L.R.; Riella, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    Gadolinium has been used as burnable poison for reactivity control in modern PWRs. The incorporation of Gd 2 O 3 powder directly into the UO 2 powder enables longer fuel cycles and optimized fuel utilization. Nevertheless, processing by this method leads to difficulties while obtaining sintered pellets with the minimum required density. The process for manufacturing UO 2 - Gd 2 O 3 generates scraps that should be reused. The main scraps are green and sintered pellets, which must be calcined to U 3 O 8 to return to the fabrication process. Also, the incorporation of Gd 2 O 3 in UO 2 requires the use of an additive to improve the sintering process, in order to achieve the physical properties specified for the mixed fuel, mainly density and microstructure. This paper describes the effect of the addition of fabrication scraps on the properties of the UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel. Aluminum hydroxide Al(OH) 3 was also incorporated to the fuel as a sintering aid. The results shown that the use of 2000 ppm of Al(OH) 3 as additive allow to fabricate good pellets with up to 10 wt% of recycled scraps. (author)

  9. Fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahm, W.

    1989-01-01

    The situation of the nuclear fuel cycle for LWR type reactors in France and in the Federal Republic of Germany was presented in 14 lectures with the aim to compare the state-of-the-art in both countries. In addition to the momentarily changing fuilds of fuel element development and fueling strategies, the situation of reprocessing, made interesting by some recent developmnts, was portrayed and differences in ultimate waste disposal elucidated. (orig.) [de

  10. Heaving buoys, point absorbers and arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falnes, Johannes; Hals, Jørgen

    2012-01-28

    Absorption of wave energy may be considered as a phenomenon of interference between incident and radiated waves generated by an oscillating object; a wave-energy converter (WEC) that displaces water. If a WEC is very small in comparison with one wavelength, it is classified as a point absorber (PA); otherwise, as a 'quasi-point absorber'. The latter may be a dipole-mode radiator, for instance an immersed body oscillating in the surge mode or pitch mode, while a PA is so small that it should preferably be a source-mode radiator, for instance a heaving semi-submerged buoy. The power take-off capacity, the WEC's maximum swept volume and preferably also its full physical volume should be reasonably matched to the wave climate. To discuss this matter, two different upper bounds for absorbed power are applied in a 'Budal diagram'. It appears that, for a single WEC unit, a power capacity of only about 0.3 MW matches well to a typical offshore wave climate, and the full physical volume has, unfortunately, to be significantly larger than the swept volume, unless phase control is used. An example of a phase-controlled PA is presented. For a sizeable wave-power plant, an array consisting of hundreds, or even thousands, of mass-produced WEC units is required.

  11. An absorbed dose calorimeter for IMRT dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duane, S.; Aldehaybes, M.; Bailey, M.; Lee, N.D.; Thomas, C.G.; Palmans, H.

    2012-01-01

    A new calorimeter for dosimetry in small and complex fields has been built. The device is intended for the direct determination of absorbed dose to water in moderately small fields and in composite fields such as IMRT treatments, and as a transfer instrument calibrated against existing absorbed dose standards in conventional reference conditions. The geometry, materials and mode of operation have been chosen to minimize detector perturbations when used in a water phantom, to give a reasonably isotropic response and to minimize the effects of heat transfer when the calorimeter is used in non-reference conditions in a water phantom. The size of the core is meant to meet the needs of measurement in IMRT treatments and is comparable to the size of the air cavity in a type NE2611 ionization chamber. The calorimeter may also be used for small field dosimetry. Initial measurements in reference conditions and in an IMRT head and neck plan, collapsed to gantry angle zero, have been made to estimate the thermal characteristics of the device, and to assess its performance in use. The standard deviation (estimated repeatability) of the reference absorbed dose measurements was 0.02 Gy (0.6%). (authors)

  12. Thermal expansion absorbing structure for pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Takashi; Yamashita, Takuya.

    1995-01-01

    A thermal expansion absorbing structure for a pipeline is disposed to the end of pipelines to form a U-shaped cross section connecting a semi-circular torus shell and a short double-walled cylindrical tube. The U-shaped longitudinal cross-section is deformed in accordance with the shrinking deformation of the pipeline and absorbs thermal expansion. Namely, since the central lines of the outer and inner tubes of the double-walled cylindrical tube deform so as to incline, when the pipeline is deformed by thermal expansion, thermal expansion can be absorbed by a simple configuration thereby enabling to contribute to ensure the safety. Then, the entire length of the pipeline can greatly be shortened by applying it to the pipeline disposed in a high temperature state compared with a method of laying around a pipeline using only elbows, which has been conducted so far. Especially, when it is applied to a pipeline for an FBR-type reactor, the cost for the construction of a facility of a primary systems can greater be reduced. In addition, it can be applied to a pipeline for usual chemical plants and any other structures requiring absorption of deformation. (N.H.)

  13. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, I.E.

    1992-05-12

    An absorber waveguide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the waveguide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the waveguide. 11 figs.

  14. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, J.B.L. de.

    1980-01-01

    All stages of nuclear fuel cycle are analysed with respect to the present situation and future perspectives of supply and demand of services; the prices and the unitary cost estimation of these stages for the international fuel market are also mentioned. From the world resources and projections of uranium consumption, medium-and long term analyses are made of fuel availability for several strategies of use of different reactor types. Finally, the cost of nuclear fuel in the generation of electric energy is calculated to be used in the energetic planning of the electric sector. (M.A.) [pt

  15. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1993-01-01

    Among fuel pellets to be loaded to fuel cans of a fuel assembly, fuel pellets having a small thermal power are charged in a region from the end of each of spacers up to about 50mm on the upstream of coolants that flow vertically at the periphery of fuel rods. Coolants at the periphery of fuel rods are heated by the heat generation, to result in voids. However, since cooling effect on the upstream of the spacers is low due to influences of the spacers. Further, since the fuel pellets disposed in the upstream region have small thermal power, a void coefficient is not increased. Even if a thermal power exceeding cooling performance should be generated, there is no worry of causing burnout in the upstream region. Even if burnout should be caused, safety margin and reliability relative to burnout are improved, to increase an allowable thermal power, thereby enabling to improve integrity and reliability of fuel rods and fuel assemblies. (N.H.)

  16. Absorbing aerosols: contribution of biomass burning and implications for radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Gadhavi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorbing aerosols supplements the global warming caused by greenhouse gases. However, unlike greenhouse gases, the effect of absorbing aerosol on climate is not known with certainty owing to paucity of data. Also, uncertainty exists in quantifying the contributing factors whether it is biomass or fossil fuel burning. Based on the observations of absorption coefficient at seven wavelengths and aerosol optical depth (AOD at five wavelengths carried out at Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, a remote village in peninsular India, from April to November 2008, as part of the "Study of Atmospheric Forcing and Responses (SAFAR" pilot campaign we discuss seasonal variation of black carbon (BC concentration and aerosol optical depth. Also, using spectral information we estimate the fraction of fossil-fuel and non-fossil fuel contributions to absorption coefficient and contributions of soot (Black Carbon, non-soot fine mode aerosols and coarse mode aerosols to AOD. BC concentration is found to be around 1000 ng/m3 during monsoon months (JJAS and around 4000 ng/m3 during pre and post monsoon months. Non-fossil fuel sources contribute nearly 20% to absorption coefficient at 880 nm, which increases to 40% during morning and evening hours. Average AOD is found to be 0.38±0.15, with high values in May and low in September. Soot contributes nearly 10% to the AOD. This information is further used to estimate the clear sky aerosol direct radiative forcing. Top of the atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing varies between −4 to 0 W m−2, except for April when the forcing is positive. Surface level radiative forcing is between −10 to −20 W m−2. The net radiation absorbed within the atmosphere is in the range of 9 to 25 W m−2, of which soot contributes about 80 to 90%.

  17. The fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this brochure the fuel cycle is presented. The following fuel cycle steps are described: (1) Front of the fuel cycle (Mining and milling; Treatment; Refining, conversion and enrichment; Fuel fabrication); (2) Use of fuel in nuclear reactors; (3) Back end of the fuel cycle (Interim storage of spent fuel; spent fuel reprocessing; Final disposal of spent fuel)

  18. OPAL- the in-core fuel management code system for WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krysl, V.; Mikolas, P.; Sustek, J.; Svarny, J.; Vlachovsky, K.

    2002-01-01

    Fuel management optimization is a complex problem namely for WWER reactors, which at present are utilizing burnable poisons (BP) to great extent. In this paper, first the concept and methodologies of a fuel management system for WWER 440 (NPP Dukovany) and NPP WWER 1000 (NPP Temelin) under development in Skoda JS a.s. are described and followed by some practical applications. The objective of this advanced system is to minimize fuel cost by preserving all safety constraints and margins. Future enhancements of the system will allow is it to perform fuel management optimization in the multi-cycle mode. The general objective functions of the system are the maximization of EOC reactivity, the maximization of discharge burnup, the minimization of fresh fuel inventory / or the minimization of feed enrichment, the minimization of the BP inventory. There are also safety related constraints, in which the minimization of power peaking plays a dominant role. The core part of the system requires meeting the major objective: maximizing the EOC Keff for a given fuel cycle length and consists of four coupled calculation steps. The first is the calculation of a Loading Priority Scheme (LPS). which is used to rank the core positions in terms of assembly Kinf values. In the second step the Haling power distribution is calculated and by using fuel shuffle and/or enrichment splitting algorithms and heuristic rules the core pattern is modified to meet core constraints. In this second step a directive/evolutionary algorithm with expert rules based optimization code is used. The optimal BP assignment is alternatively considered to be a separate third step of the procedure. In the fourth step the core is depleted in normal up to 3D pin wise level using the BP distribution developed in step three and meeting all constraints is checked. One of the options of this optimization system is expert friendly interactive mode (Authors)

  19. Simulations of the Thermodynamic and Diffusion Properties of Actinide Oxide Fuel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel from commercial reactors is comprised of 95-99 percent UO 2 and 1-5 percent fission products and transuranic elements. Certain actinides and fission products are of particular interest in terms of fuel stability, which affects reprocessing and waste materials. The transuranics found in spent nuclear fuels are Np, Pu, Am, and Cm, some of which have long half- lives (e.g., 2.1 million years for 237 Np). These actinides can be separated and recycled into new fuel matrices, thereby reducing the nuclear waste inventory. Oxides of these actinides are isostructural with UO 2 , and are expected to form solid solutions. This project will use computational techniques to conduct a comprehensive study on thermodynamic properties of actinide-oxide solid solutions. The goals of this project are to: Determine the temperature-dependent mixing properties of actinide-oxide fuels; Validate computational methods by comparing results with experimental results; Expand research scope to complex (ternary and quaternary) mixed actinide oxide fuels. After deriving phase diagrams and the stability of solid solutions as a function of temperature and pressure, the project team will determine whether potential phase separations or ordered phases can actually occur by studying diffusion of cations and the kinetics of potential phase separations or ordered phases. In addition, the team will investigate the diffusion of fission product gases that can also have a significant influence on fuel stability. Once the system has been established for binary solid solutions of Th, U, Np, and Pu oxides, the methodology can be quickly applied to new compositions that apply to ternaries and quaternaries, higher actinides (Am, Cm), burnable poisons (B, Gd, Hf), and fission products (Cs, Sr, Tc) to improve reactivity

  20. Analysis of Urban Forest Needs as Anthropogenic (CO2) Gas Absorbent in Semarang City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febriani, Anisa Putri; Retnaningsih Soeprobowati, Tri; Maryono

    2018-02-01

    Green open space in cities in significant needs to maintenance environment quality. On of the critical function is to absorb increasing number of gas CO2. Therefore, developing urban forest in cities is very importance. The objective of the study is to determine the area of urban forest as CO2 gas anthropogenic absorb which is formed from fuel, diesel fuel, liquid petroleum gas. The study consists of (1) Analyzing the number of CO2 gas emission by calculating the needs of petroleum and gas based on the number of population, (2) Analyzing the power of gas absorption, (3) Measuring the air concentration of CO2 gas ambient based on daily traffic activities. This study shown that from year 2013 to year 2017, the increasing of urban forest is not so significant. For year 2013 the green open space in Semarang City are 373.67 hectares (7.5 percent from Semarang City area), consists of 239 parks, 11 public cemeteries, production forests, community forests, and urban forests, however the area of urban forest is not increase. The study assess that Antidesmabunius is one of the green species which high absorb capacity planted for Semarang. This trees produce 31,31 ton annually. This study proposed to fostering Antidesmabunius as one principle threes in Semarang urban forest.

  1. Experimental investigation of control absorber blade effects in a modern 10x10 BWR assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jatuff, F.; Grimm, P.; Murphy, M.; Luethi, A.; Seiler, R.; Joneja, O.; Meister, A.; Geemert, R. van; Brogli, R.; Chawla, R.; Williams, T.; Helmersson, S.

    2001-01-01

    The accurate estimation of reactor physics parameters related to the presence of cruciform absorber blades. In Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) is important for safety assessment, and for achieving a flexible operation during the cycle. Characteristics which are affected strongly include the power distribution for controlled core regions and its impact on linear heat generation rate margins, as well as the build-up of plutonium, and its influence on core excess reactivity and the reactivity worth of the shutdown system. PSI and the Swiss Nuclear Utilities (UAK) are conducting an experimental reactor physics programme related to modern Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies, as employed in the Swiss nuclear power plants: the so-called. LWR-PROTEUS Phase I project. A significant part of this project has been devoted to the characterization of highly heterogeneous BWR fuel elements in the presence of absorber blades. The paper presents typical results for the performance of modern lattice codes in the estimation of controlled assembly reaction rate distributions, the sensitivity to the geometrical and material characterization, and a preliminary comparison of reflected-test-zone calculations with experimental reaction rate distributions measured in a Westinghouse SVEA-96+ assembly under full-density water moderation conditions in the presence of Westinghouse boron-carbide absorber blades. (author)

  2. Selection and characterization of new absorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma' mun, Sholeh

    2005-09-01

    Removal of acidic gases, in particular CO2, is an important industrial operation. Carbon dioxide is produced in large quantities by fossil-fuel-fired power plants, steel production, the production of petrochemicals, cement production, and natural gas purification. The global climate change, where CO2 is found to be a major contributor, is one of the most important and challenging environmental issues facing the world community. This has motivated intensive research on CO2 capture and storage. Carbon dioxide capture by an absorption process is one of the most common industrial technologies today. Recent economic studies indicate that the process will also remain competitive in the future. One of the key improvements under development is new, faster and more energy-efficient absorbents. A chemical to be used as a commercial absorbent must have high net cyclic capacity, high absorption rate for CO2 and good chemical stability. Alkanolamines are the most commonly used chemical absorbents for the removal of acidic gases today. In the first part of this thesis, an experimental screening of new absorbents for CO2 capture was performed by absorption of CO2 into both single absorbents and absorbent mixtures for amine-based and non-amine-based systems at 40 deg. Celsius From testing of approx. 30 systems, it was found that an aqueous 30 mass % AEEA (2-(2-aminoethyl-amino)ethanol) solution seems to be a potentially good absorbent for capturing CO2 from atmospheric flue gases. It offers high absorption rate combined with high absorption capacity. In addition toAEEA, MMEA (2-(methylamino)ethanol) also needs to be considered. It could have a good potential when used in contactors where the two phases are separated, like in membrane contactors, whereas indications from the study showed foaming tendencies that will make it difficult to use in ordinary towers. AEEA as the selected absorbent obtained from the screening tests was further investigated to determine its vapor

  3. Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells have been the subject of intense research and development efforts for the past decades. Even so, the technology has not had its commercial breakthrough yet. This entry gives an overview of the technological challenges and status of fuel cells and discusses the most promising applications...

  4. Fuel cells:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil...... and nuclear fuel-based energy technologies....

  5. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Akiyoshi; Bessho, Yasunori; Aoyama, Motoo; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Hirakawa, Hiromasa; Yamashita, Jun-ichi; Hayashi, Tatsuo

    1998-01-01

    In a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor in which a water rod of a large diameter is disposed at the central portion, the cross sectional area perpendicular to the axial direction comprises a region a of a fuel rod group facing to a wide gap water region to which a control rod is inserted, a region b of a fuel rod group disposed on the side of the wide gap water region other than the region a, a region d of a fuel rod group facing to a narrow gap water region and a region c of a fuel rod group disposed on the side of the narrow gap water region other than the region d. When comparing an amount of fission products contained in the four regions relative to that in the entire regions and average enrichment degrees of fuel rods for the four regions, the relative amount and the average enrichment degree of the fuel rod group of the region a is minimized, and the relative amount and the average enrichment degree of the fuel rod group in the region b is maximized. Then, reactor shut down margin during cold operation can be improved while flattening the power in the cross section perpendicular to the axial direction. (N.H.)

  6. Inorganic UV absorbers for the photostabilisation of wood-clearcoating systems: Comparison with organic UV absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloui, F.; Ahajji, A.; Irmouli, Y.; George, B.; Charrier, B.; Merlin, A.

    2007-02-01

    Inorganic UV absorbers which are widely used today were originally designed neither as a UV blocker in coatings applications, nor for wood protection. In recent years however, there has been extensive interest in these compounds, especially with regard to their properties as a UV blocker in coating applications. In this work, we carried out a comparative study to look into some inorganic and organic UV absorbers used in wood coating applications. The aim of this study is to determine the photostabilisation performances of each type of UV absorbers, to seek possible synergies and the influences of different wood species. We have also searched to find eventual correlation between these performances and the influence of UV absorbers on the film properties. Our study has compared the performances of the following UV absorbers: hombitec RM 300, hombitec RM 400 from the Sachtleben Company; transparent yellow and red iron oxides from Sayerlack as inorganic UV absorbers; organic UV absorbers Tinuvin 1130 and Tinuvin 5151 from Ciba Company. The study was carried out on three wood species: Abies grandis, tauari and European oak. The environmental constraints (in particular the limitation of the emission of volatile organic compounds VOCs) directed our choice towards aqueous formulations marketed by the Sayerlack Arch Coatings Company. The results obtained after 800 h of dry ageing showed that the Tinuvins and the hombitecs present better wood photostabilisations. On the other hand in wet ageing, with the hombitec, there are appearances of some cracks and an increase in the roughness of the surface. This phenomenon is absent when the Tinuvins are used. With regard to these results, the thermomechanical analyses relating to the follow-up of the change of the glass transition temperature ( Tg) of the various coating systems, show a different behaviour between the two types of absorbers. However, contrary to organic UV absorbers, inorganic ones tend to increase Tg during ageing

  7. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinauk, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1985, Fragema has been marketing and selling the Advanced Fuel Assemby AFA whose main features are its zircaloy grids and removable top and bottom nozzles. It is this product, which exists for several different fuel assembly arrays and heights, that will be employed in the reactors at Daya Bay. Fragema employs gadolinium as the consumable poison to enable highperformance fuel management. More recently, the company has supplied fuel assemblies of the mixed-oxide(MOX) and enriched reprocessed uranium type. The reliability level of the fuel sold by Fragema is one of the highest in the world, thanks in particular to the excellence of the quality assurance and quality control programs that have been implemented at all stages of its design and manufacture

  8. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echigoya, Hironori; Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To render the axial distribution relatively flat. Constitution: First nuclear element comprises a fuel can made of zircalloy i.e., the metal with less neutron absorption, which is filled with a plurality of UO 2 pellets and sealed by using a lower end plug, a plenum spring and an upper end plug by means of welding. Second fuel element is formed by substituting a part of the UO 2 pellets with a water tube which is sealed with water and has a space for allowing the heat expansion. The nuclear fuel assembly is constituted by using the first and second fuel elements together. In such a structure, since water reflects neutrons and decrease their leakage to increase the temperature, reactivity is added at the upper portion of the fuel assembly to thereby flatten the axial power distribution. Accordingly, stable operation is possible only by means of deep control rods while requiring no shallow control rods. (Sekiya, K.)

  9. Effect of inclusions' distribution on microwave absorbing properties of composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Siliang; Wang, Qingguo; Qu, Zhaoming

    2013-01-01

    Effect of inclusions' spatial distributions on the permeability and permittivity of composites is studied using the generalized Maxwell-Garnett equations. The result indicates that inclusions' orientation distribution can increase the longitudinal electromagnetic parameters. For inclusions' random and orientation distribution, single and three-layer absorbers are designed and optimized using genetic algorithm. The result shows that under a given absorbing requirement, absorber with inclusions' orientation distribution is lighter and thinner than absorber with inclusions' random distribution.

  10. Absorbent material for type a radioactive materials packaging containing liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, G.A.

    1989-11-01

    The application of absorbent materials to the packaging and transport of liquid radioactive materials in Type A packages has not been reported in the literature. However, a significant body of research exists on absorbent materials for personal hygiene products such as diapers. Absorption capacity is dependent on both the absorbent material and the liquid being absorbed. Theoretical principles for capillary absorption in both the horizontal and the vertical plane indicate that small contact angle between the absorbent fibre and the liquid, and a small inter-fibre pore size are important. Some fluid parameters such as viscosity affect the rate of absorption but not the final absorption capacity. There appears to be little comparability between results obtained for the same absorbent and fluid using different test procedures. Test samples of materials from several classes of potential absorbents have been evaluated in this study, and shown to have a wide range of absorbent capacities. Foams, natural fibres, artificial fibres and granular materials are all potentially useful absorbents, with capacities ranging from as little as 0.86 to as much as 40.6 grams of distilled water per gram of absorbent. Two experimental procedures for evaluating the absorbent capacity of these materials have been detailed in this report, and found suitable for evaluating granular, fibrous or foam materials. Compression of the absorbent material reduces its capacity, but parameters such as relative humidity, pH, temperature, and viscosity appear to have little significant influence on capacity. When the materials were loaded to 50% of their one-minute absorbency, subsequent loss of the absorbed liquid was generally minimal. All of the absorbent materials rapidly lost their absorbed water through evaporation within twenty-four hours in still air at 21 degrees C and 50% relative humidity

  11. On (m, n)-absorbing ideals of commutative rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with respect to various ring theoretic constructions and study (m, n)-absorbing ideals in several commutative rings. For example, in a Bézout ring or a Boolean ring, an ideal is an (m, n)-absorbing ideal if and only if it is an n-absorbing ideal, and in an almost. Dedekind domain every (m, n)-absorbing ideal is a product of at ...

  12. Yucca Mountain Project - Science & Technology Radionuclide Absorbers Development Program Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong-Nian Jow; R.C. Moore; K.B. Helean; S. Mattigod; M. Hochella; A.R. Felmy; J. Liu; K. Rosso; G. Fryxell; J. Krumhansl; Y. Wang

    2005-01-14

    The proposed Yucca Mountain repository is anticipated to be the first facility for long-term disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The facility, located in the southern Nevada desert, is currently in the planning stages with initial exploratory excavations completed. It is an underground facility mined into the tuffaceous volcanic rocks that sit above the local water table. The focus of the work described in this paper is the development of radionuclide absorbers or ''getter'' materials for neptunium (Np), iodine (I), and technetium (Tc) for potential deployment in the repository. ''Getter'' materials retard the migration of radionuclides through sorption, reduction, or other chemical and physical processes, thereby slowing or preventing the release and transport of radionuclides. An overview of the objectives and approaches utilized in this work with respect to materials selection and modeling of ion ''getters'' is presented. The benefits of the ''getter'' development program to the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) are outlined.

  13. 21 CFR 880.5300 - Medical absorbent fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical absorbent fiber. 880.5300 Section 880.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5300 Medical absorbent fiber. (a) Identification. A medical absorbent fiber is a device...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... breathing circuit as a container for carbon dioxide absorbent. It may include a canister and water drain. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a...

  15. 21 CFR 886.3300 - Absorbable implant (scleral buckling method).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Absorbable implant (scleral buckling method). 886... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3300 Absorbable implant (scleral buckling method). (a) Identification. An absorbable implant (scleral buckling method) is a device...

  16. Organ absorbed doses in intraoral dental radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomber, A R; Faulkner, K

    1993-11-01

    A dental radiography unit operating at 70 kV (nominal) and 20 cm focus-skin distance was used to irradiate an anthropomorphic phantom loaded with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters, in order to assess the variation in organ absorbed dose with intraoral periapical radiographic view. 14 views using the bisecting-angle technique and four views using the paralleling technique were studied. The results are presented and the doses and dose distributions examined. Doses for the paralleling and bisecting-angle techniques are compared, and the effects of focus-skin distance and beam collimation upon patient dosimetry discussed. Sources of uncertainty in dental dosimetry studies using phantoms are also considered.

  17. Acoustical model of a Shoddy fibre absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, John Peter

    Shoddy fibres or "Shoddies" are a mixture of post-consumer and post-industrial fibres diverted from textile waste streams and recycled into their raw fibre form. They have found widespread use as a raw material for manufacturing sound absorbers that include, but are not limited to: automotive, architectural and home appliance applications. The purpose of this project is to develop a simple acoustic model to describe the acoustic behaviour of sound absorbers composed primarily of Shoddy fibres. The model requires knowledge of the material's bulk density only. To date, these materials have not been the focus of much published research and acoustical designers must rely on models that were developed for other materials or are overly complex. For modelling purposes, an equivalent fluid approach is chosen to balance complexity and accuracy. In deriving the proposed model, several popular equivalent fluid models are selected and the required input parameters for each model identified. The models are: the model of Delaney and Bazley, two models by Miki, the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Champoux and Allard and the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Lafarge. Characterization testing is carried out on sets of Shoddy absorbers produced using three different manufacturing methods. The measured properties are open porosity, tortuosity, airflow resistivity, the viscous and thermal characteristic lengths and the static thermal permeability. Empirical relationships between model parameters and bulk density are then derived and used to populate the selected models. This yields several 'simplified' models with bulk density as the only parameter. The most accurate model is then selected by comparing each model's prediction to the results of normal incidence sound absorption tests. The model of Johnson-Lafarge populated with the empirical relations is the most accurate model over the range of frequencies considered (approx. 300 Hz - 4000 Hz

  18. Liquid holdup in turbulent contact absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, A.; Zaman, M.; Inayat, M.H.; Chughtai, I.R.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic liquid holdup in a turbulent contact absorber was obtained through quick shut off valves technique. Experiments were carried out in a Perspex column. Effects of liquid velocity, gas velocity, packing diameter packing density and packing height on dynamic liquid holdup were studied. Hollow spherical high density polyethylene (HDPE) balls were used as inert fluidized packing. Experiments were performed at practical range of liquid and gas velocities. Holdup was calculated on the basis of static bed height. Liquid holdup increases with increasing both liquid and gas velocities both for type 1 and type 2 modes of fluidization. Liquid holdup increases with packing density. No effect of dia was observed on liquid holdup. (author)

  19. Fabrication of high efficacy selective solar absorbers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tile, N

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Peer-Reviewed Journal Papers: K.T. Roro, N. Tile, B.W. Mwakikunga, B. Yalisi, A. Forbes (2012). Solar absorption and thermal emission properties of Multiwall carbonnanotube/nickel oxide nanocomposite thin films synthesized by sol-gel process..., Materials Science and Engineering B 177,581? 587. K.T. Roro, N. Tile, A. Forbes (2012), Preparation and characterization of carbon/nickel oxide nanocomposite coatings for solar absorber applications, Applied Surface Science 258, 7174? 7180. K.T. Roro...

  20. DHCAL with Minimal Absorber: Measurements with Positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Freund, B; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Antequera, J.Berenguer; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H.L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Morin, L.; Besson, D.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kolk, N.van der; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Corriveau, F.; Blazey, G.C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-01-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  1. Impedance matched thin metamaterials make metals absorbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiucci, N; Bloemer, M J; Aközbek, N; D'Aguanno, G

    2013-11-13

    Metals are generally considered good reflectors over the entire electromagnetic spectrum up to their plasma frequency. Here we demonstrate an approach to tailor their absorbing characteristics based on the effective metamaterial properties of thin, periodic metallo-dielectric multilayers by exploiting a broadband, inherently non-resonant, surface impedance matching mechanism. Based on this mechanism, we design, fabricate and test omnidirectional, thin ( 99%) over a frequency range spanning from the UV to the IR. Our approach opens new venues to design cost effective materials for many applications such as thermo-photovoltaic energy conversion devices, light harvesting for solar cells, flat panel display, infrared detectors, stray light reduction, stealth and others.

  2. DHCAL with minimal absorber: measurements with positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, B.; Neubüser, C.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Antequera, J. Berenguer; Alamillo, E. Calvo; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.

    2016-01-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  3. An electromechanical low frequency panel sound absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Daoqing; Liu, Bilong; Li, Xiaodong

    2010-08-01

    The sound absorbing properties of a thin micro-perforated plate (MPP) coated with piezoelectric material with shunt damping technology is investigated. First a theoretical model is presented to predict the sound absorption coefficients of a thin plate attached with a piezoelectric patch and electrical circuits. Then the model is extended to analyze the sound absorption for a thin plate with micro perforations and piezoelectric material. Measurements are also carried out in an impedance tube and found to be in good agreements with the theoretical model. The sound absorption of the constructions can be much improved by tuning the electrical circuits.

  4. High energy model for irregular absorbing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiappetta, Pierre.

    1979-05-01

    In the framework of a high energy formulation of relativistic quantum scattering a model is presented which describes the scattering functions and polarization of irregular absorbing particles, whose dimensions are greater than the incident wavelength. More precisely in the forward direction an amplitude parametrization of eikonal type is defined which generalizes the usual diffraction theory, and in the backward direction a reflective model is used including a shadow function. The model predictions are in good agreement with the scattering measurements off irregular compact and fluffy particles performed by Zerull, Giese and Weiss (1977)

  5. Absorbency of Superabsorbent Polymers in Cementitious Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2012-01-01

    Optimal use of superabsorbent polymers (SAP) in cement-based materials relies on knowledge on how SAP absorbency is influenced by different physical and chemical parameters. These parameters include salt concentration in the pore fluid, temperature of the system and SAP particle size. The present...... work shows experimental results on this and presents a new technique to measure the swelling of SAP particles. This new technique is compared with existing techniques that have been recently proposed for the measurement of pore fluid absorption by superabsorbent polymers. It is seen...

  6. Optical Pulsing in an Absorbing Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jacob; Evans, Dean; Guha, Shekhar

    2003-03-01

    A continuous-wave laser can be converted into a series of repetitive pulses by focusing the laser beam into an absorbing liquid (e.g. nigrosine dissolved in a solvent), where the mechanism responsible for the pulses is the scattering of light off of photo-generated bubbles. The dependence of the pulsation frequency on the solvent, power, and cell thickness will be shown. The authors would like to acknowledge the contributions made by Prof. Daniel Lathrop (University of Maryland, Department of Physics) at the APS March 2002 meeting.

  7. Exposure testing of solar absorber surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has been involved in supporting, monitoring and conducting exposure testing of solar materials for approximately ten years. The Laboratory has provided technical monitoring of the IITRI, DSET, Lockheed, and Berry contracts and has operated the Los Alamos exposure Facility for over five years. This report will outline some of the past exposure testing, the testing still in progress, and describe some of the major findings. While this report will primarily emphasize solar absorber surfaces, some of the significant findings relative to advanced glazing will be discussed.

  8. Absorbed Energy in Ship Collisions and Grounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1998-01-01

    Minorsky's well-known empirical formula, which relates the absorbed energy to the destroyed material volume, has been widely used in analyses of high energy collision and grounding accidents for nearly 40 years. The advantage of the method is its apparent simplcity. Obviously, its drawback...... collisions and grounding. The developed expressions reflect the structural arrangement, the material properties and different damage patterns.The present method is validated against a large number of existing experimental results and detailed numerical simulation results. Applications to full-sale ship...

  9. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  10. Sensitivity studies of some important parameters in the criticality of nuclear fuel pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, C.

    1981-01-01

    The criticality study of spent fuels storage aiming to verify this security. A small description of the optimal moderation phenomena as well as the effect of stainless steel plates as neutron absorbed material, arre presented [pt

  11. Development and qualification of reference calculation schemes for absorbers in pressured water reactor; Elaboration et qualification de schemas de calcul de reference pour les absorbants dans les reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc-Tranchant, P

    2001-07-01

    The general field in which this work takes place is the field of the accuracy improvement of neutronic calculations, required to operate Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) with a better precision and a lower cost. More specifically, this thesis deals with the calculation of the absorber clusters used to control these reactors. The first aim of that work was to define and validate a reference calculation route of such an absorber cluster, based on the deterministic code APOLLO2. This calculation scheme was then to be checked against experimental data. This study of the complex situation of absorber clusters required several intermediate studies, of simpler problems, such as the study of fuel rods lattices and the study of single absorber rods (B4C, AIC, Hafnium) isolated in such lattices. Each one of these different studies led to a particular reference calculation route. All these calculation routes were developed against reference continuous energy Monte-Carlo calculations, carried out with the stochastic code TRIPOLI4. They were then checked against experimental data measured during French experimental programs, undertaken within the EOLE experimental reactor, at the Nuclear Research Center of Cadarache: the MISTRAL experiments for the study of isolated absorber rods and the EPICURE experiments for the study of absorber clusters. This work led to important improvements in the calculation of isolated absorbers and absorber clusters. The reactivity worth of these clusters in particular, can now be obtained with a great accuracy: the discrepancy observed between the calculated and the experimental values is less than 2.5 %, and then slightly lower than the experimental uncertainty. (author)

  12. Elaboration and qualification of a reference calculation routes for the absorbers in the PWR reactors; Elaboration et qualification des schemas de calcul de reference pour les absorbants dans les reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc-Tranchant, P

    1999-11-01

    The general field in which this work takes place is the field of the accuracy improvement of neutronic calculations, required to operate Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) with a better precision and a lower cost. More specifically, this thesis deals with the calculation of the absorber clusters used to control these reactors. The first aim of that work was to define and validate a reference calculation route of such an absorber cluster, based on the deterministic code Apollo 2. This calculation scheme was then to be checked against experimental data. This study of the complex situation of absorber clusters required several intermediate studies, of simpler problems, such as the study of fuel rods lattices and the study of single absorber rods (B{sub 4}C, AIC, Hafnium) isolated in such lattices. Each one of these different studies led to a particular reference calculation route. All these calculation routes were developed against reference continuous energy Monte-Carlo calculations, carried out with the stochastic code TRIPOLI14. They were then checked against experimental data measured during french experimental programs, undertaken within the EOLE experimental reactor, at the Nuclear Research Center of Cadarache: the MISTRAL experiments for the study of isolated absorber rods and the EPICURE experiments for the study of absorber clusters. This work led to important improvements in the calculation of isolated absorbers and absorber clusters. The reactivity worth of these clusters in particular, can now be obtained with a great accuracy: the discrepancy observed between the calculated and the experimental values is less than 2.5 %, and then slightly lower than the experimental uncertainty. (author)

  13. FUEL ELEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  14. Erbium concentration dependent absorbance in tellurite glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sazali, E. S., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Rohani, M. S., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Sahar, M. R., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Arifin, R., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Ghoshal, S. K., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Hamzah, K., E-mail: mdsupar@utm [Advanced Optical Material Research Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, Skudai, Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-25

    Enhancing the optical absorption cross-section in topically important rare earth doped tellurite glasses is challenging for photonic devices. Controlled synthesis and detailed characterizations of the optical properties of these glasses are important for the optimization. The influence of varying concentration of Er{sup 3+} ions on the absorbance characteristics of lead tellurite glasses synthesized via melt-quenching technique are investigated. The UV-Vis absorption spectra exhibits six prominent peaks centered at 490, 526, 652, 800, 982 and 1520 nm ascribed to the transitions in erbium ion from the ground state to the excited states {sup 4}F{sub 7/2}, {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}, {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}, respectively. The results are analyzed by means of optical band gap E{sub g} and Urbach energy E{sub u}. The values of the energy band gap are found decreased from 2.82 to 2.51 eV and the Urbach energy increased from 0.15 to 0.24 eV with the increase of the Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration from 0 to 1.5 mol%. The excellent absorbance of the prepared tellurite glasses makes them suitable for fabricating solid state lasers.

  15. Wave energy extraction by coupled resonant absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D V; Porter, R

    2012-01-28

    In this article, a range of problems and theories will be introduced that will build towards a new wave energy converter (WEC) concept, with the acronym 'ROTA' standing for resonant over-topping absorber. First, classical results for wave power absorption for WECs constrained to operate in a single degree of freedom will be reviewed and the role of resonance in their operation highlighted. Emphasis will then be placed on how the introduction of further resonances can improve power take-off characteristics by extending the range of frequencies over which the efficiency is close to a theoretical maximum. Methods for doing this in different types of WECs will be demonstrated. Coupled resonant absorbers achieve this by connecting a WEC device equipped with its own resonance (determined from a hydrodynamic analysis) to a new system having separate mass/spring/damper characteristics. It is shown that a coupled resonant effect can be realized by inserting a water tank into a WEC, and this idea forms the basis of the ROTA device. In essence, the idea is to exploit the coupling between the natural sloshing frequencies of the water in the internal tank and the natural resonance of a submerged buoyant circular cylinder device that is tethered to the sea floor, allowing a rotary motion about its axis of attachment.

  16. Pregnant woman mode for absorbed fraction calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloutier, R.J.; Snyder, W.S.; Watson, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    The most radiation-sensitive segment of our population is the developing fetus. Until recently, methods available for calculating the dose to the fetus were inadequate because a model for the pregnant woman was not available. Instead, the Snyder and Fisher model of Reference Man, which includes a uterus, was frequently used to calculate absorbed fractions when the source was in various organs of the body and the nongravid uterus was the target. These values would be representative of the dose to the embryo during the early stages of pregnancy. Unfortunately, Reference Man is considerable larger than Reference Woman. The authors recently reported on the design of a Reference Woman phantom that has dimensions quite similar to the ICRP Reference Woman. This phantom was suitable for calculating the dose to the embryo during early stages of pregnancy (0 to 3 mo.), but was not suitable for the later stages of pregnancy because of the changing shape of the mother and the displacement of several abdominal organs brought about by the growth of the uterus and fetus. The models of Reference Woman that were subsequently developed for each month of pregnancy are described. The models take into account the growth of the uterus and fetus and the repositioning of the various abdominal organs. These models have been used to calculate absorbed fractions for the fetus as a target and the gastrointestinal tract as a source of radiation for twelve photon energies ranging from 10 keV to 4 MeV

  17. High-efficiency ventilated metamaterial absorber at low frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoxiao; Au-Yeung, Ka Yan; Li, Xin; Roberts, Robert Christopher; Tian, Jingxuan; Hu, Chuandeng; Huang, Yingzhou; Wang, Shuxia; Yang, Zhiyu; Wen, Weijia

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate a ventilated metamaterial absorber operating at low frequency (90%) has been achieved in both simulations and experiments. This high-efficiency absorption under the ventilation condition originates from the weak coupling of two identical split tube resonators constituting the absorber, which leads to the hybridization of the degenerate eigenmodes and breaks the absorption upper limit of 50% for conventional transmissive symmetric acoustic absorbers. The absorber can also be extended to an array and work in free space. The absorber should have potential applications in acoustic engineering where both noise reduction and ventilation are required.

  18. Graphene metamaterials based tunable terahertz absorber: effective surface conductivity approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the efficient design of functional thin-film metamaterial devices with the effective surface conductivity approach. As an example, we demonstrate a graphene based perfect absorber. After formulating the requirements to the perfect absorber in terms of surface conductivity...... we investigate the properties of graphene wire medium and graphene fishnet metamaterials and demonstrate both narrowband and broadband tunable absorbers.......In this paper we present the efficient design of functional thin-film metamaterial devices with the effective surface conductivity approach. As an example, we demonstrate a graphene based perfect absorber. After formulating the requirements to the perfect absorber in terms of surface conductivity...

  19. Absorber Alignment Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    As we pursue efforts to lower the capital and installation costs of parabolic trough solar collectors, it is essential to maintain high optical performance. While there are many optical tools available to measure the reflector slope errors of parabolic trough solar collectors, there are few tools to measure the absorber alignment. A new method is presented here to measure the absorber alignment in two dimensions to within 0.5 cm. The absorber alignment is measured using a digital camera and four photogrammetric targets. Physical contact with the receiver absorber or glass is not necessary. The alignment of the absorber is measured along its full length so that sagging of the absorber can be quantified with this technique. The resulting absorber alignment measurement provides critical information required to accurately determine the intercept factor of a collector.

  20. Economic incentives for additional critical experimentation applicable to fuel dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincey, J.F.; Primm, R.T. III; Waltz, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel dissolution operations involving soluble absorbers for criticality control are among the most difficult to establish economical subcritical limits. The paucity of applicable experimental data can significantly hinder a precise determination of a bias in the method chosen for calculation of the required soluble absorber concentration. Resorting to overly conservative bias estimates can result in excessive concentrations of soluble absorbers. Such conservatism can be costly, especially if soluble absorbers are used in a throw-away fashion. An economic scoping study is presented which demonstrates that additional critical experimentation will likely lead to reductions in the soluble absorber (i.e., gadolinium) purchase costs for dissolution operations. The results indicate that anticipated savings maybe more than enough to pay for the experimental costs

  1. Microwave absorbing property of a hybrid absorbent with carbonyl irons coating on the graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yonggang, E-mail: xuyonggang221@163.com [Science and Technology on Electromagnetic Scattering Laboratory, Shanghai, 200438 (China); Yan, Zhenqiang; Zhang, Deyuan [Bionic and Micro/Nano/Bio Manufacturing Technology Research Center, School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: The absorbing property could be enhanced as the CIPs coated on the graphite. - Highlights: • Absorbers filled with CIPs coating on the graphite was fabricated. • The permittivity and permeability increased as CIPs coated. • The CIP materials enhanced the electromagnetic property. • The graphite coated CIPs were effective in 2–18 GHz. - Abstract: The hybrid absorbent filled with carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) coating on the graphite was prepared using a chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were done to analyze the particle crystal grain structure. The complex permittivity and permeability were measured using a vector network analyzer in the frequency range of 2–18 GHz. The results showed that α-Fe appeared in the super-lattice diffraction peaks in XRD graph. The composites added CIPs coating on the graphite had a higher permittivity and imaginary permeability due to the superior microwave dielectric loss and magnetic loss of the CIPs. The reflection loss (RL) result showed that composites filled with 5 vol% Fe-graphite had an excellent absorbing property in the 2–18 GHz, the minimum RL was −25.14 dB at 6 mm and −26.52 dB at 8 mm, respectively.

  2. A chiral microwave absorbing absorbent of Fe–CoNiP coated on spirulina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yonggang, E-mail: xuyonggang221@163.com [Science and Technology on Electromagnetic Scattering Laboratory, Shanghai, 200438 (China); Yuan, Liming [Science and Technology on Electromagnetic Scattering Laboratory, Shanghai, 200438 (China); Zhang, Deyuan [School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China)

    2015-11-15

    A chiral bio-absorbent of Fe–CoNiP coated on the spirulina was fabricated by the electroless and chemical vapor decomposition. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the spirulina cells particle morphology. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were done to analyze the particle crystal grain structure. The permittivity and permeability was measured by a vector network analyzer in frequency 8–18 GHz, and the reflection loss (RL) was calculated. The results showed the carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) and CoNiP were bonded to the spirulina surface, the permittivity and permeability could be enlarged as Fe films coated on the particles compared with the CoNiP spirulina, it was attributed to the excellent electromagnetic property of CIPs. The chiral Fe–CoNiP composites had a better absorbing property at 8–18 GHz than the CoNiP spirulina composite, the RL was −16.26 dB at 10.48 GHz, the absorbing band was 9.5–11.5 GHz of RL less than −10 dB, which indicated the Fe–CoNiP spirulina could be an effective absorbent used in 8–18 GHz. - Highlights: • Absorbers filled with Fe–CoNiP coating on the spirulina were fabricated. • The permittivity and permeability increased as CIPs coated. • The Fe material enhanced the electromagnetic property. • The spirulina coated Fe–CoNiP was effective in 8–18 GHz.

  3. Corundum-based transparent infrared absorbers

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2009-10-01

    Hypothetical corundum-based compounds are studied by electronic structure calculations. One quarter of the Al atoms in Al2O3 is replaced by a 3d transition metal from the M = Ti, ..., Zn (d1, ..., d9) series. Structure optimisations are performed for all the M-Al2O3 compounds and the electronic states are evaluated. Due to the M substitutes, narrow partially filled bands are formed at the Fermi energy. Beyond, for M = Ni and M = Cu the optical properties of Al2O3 in the visible range are conserved, while for M = Ti, ..., Co the systems form high accuracy optical filters. Since the compounds absorb the infrared radiation, the M = Ni and M = Cu systems are good candidates for heat-protective coatings. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Electromagnetic radiation absorbers and modulators comprising polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Arthur J.; Ginder, John M.; Roe, Mitchell G.; Hajiseyedjavadi, Hamid

    1992-01-01

    A composition for absorbing electromagnetic radiation, wherein said electromagnetic radiation possesses a wavelength generally in the range of from about 1000 Angstroms to about 50 meters, wherein said composition comprises a polyaniline composition of the formula ##STR1## where y can be equal to or greater than zero, and R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are independently selected from the group containing of H, --OCH.sub.3, --CH.sub.3, --F, --Cl, --Br, --I, NR.sup.3 .sub.2, --NHCOR.sup.3, --OH, --O.sup.-, SR.sup.3, --OCOR.sup.3, --NO.sub.2, --COOH, --COOR.sup.3, --COR.sup.3, --CHO, and --CN, where R.sup.3 is a C.sub.1 to C.sub.8 alkyl, aryl or aralkyl group.

  5. Ultrathin microwave metamaterial absorber utilizing embedded resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Ju; Hwang, Ji Sub; Yoo, Young Joon; Khuyen, Bui Xuan; Rhee, Joo Yull; Chen, Xianfeng; Lee, YoungPak

    2017-10-01

    We numerically and experimentally studied an ultrathin and broadband perfect absorber by enhancing the bandwidth with embedded resistors into the metamaterial structure, which is easy to fabricate in order to lower the Q-factor and by using multiple resonances with the patches of different sizes. We analyze the absorption mechanism in terms of the impedance matching with the free space and through the distribution of surface current at each resonance frequency. The magnetic field, induced by the antiparallel surface currents, is formed strongly in the direction opposite to the incident electromagnetic wave, to cancel the incident wave, leading to the perfect absorption. The corresponding experimental absorption was found to be higher than 97% in 0.88-3.15 GHz. The agreement between measurement and simulation was good. The aspects of our proposed structure can be applied to future electronic devices, for example, advanced noise-suppression sheets in the microwave regime.

  6. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  7. High density fuel storage racks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groves, M.D.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus is described for the safe and compact storage of nuclear fuel assemblies in an array of discrete open-ended neutron absorbing shields for which the theoretical minimum safe separation distance and cell pitch are known. Open-ended stainless steel end fittings are welded to each end of each shield and the end fittings are welded to each other in side-by-side relation, thereby reducing the cell pitch tolerance due to fabrication uncertainties. In addition, a multiplicity of ridges on the sides of each shield having a height equal to one half the theoretical minimum safe separation distance further reduce shield bowing tolerances. The net tolerance reduction permits a significant increase in the number of fuel assemblies that can be safely contained in a storage area of fixed size

  8. Light Absorbing Aerosols in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, N. A.; Kelley, K. L.; Kilaparty, P. S.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    The direct effects of aerosol radiative forcing has been identified by the IPCC as a major uncertainty in climate modeling. The DOE Megacity Aerosol Experiment-Mexico City (MAX-Mex), as part of the MILAGRO study in March of 2006, was undertaken to reduce these uncertainties by characterization of the optical, chemical, and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols emitted from this megacity environment. Aerosol samples collected during this study using quartz filters were characterized in the uv-visible-infrared by using surface spectroscopic techniques. These included the use of an integrating sphere approach combined with the use of Kubelka-Munk theory to obtain aerosol absorption spectra. In past work black carbon has been assumed to be the only major absorbing species in atmospheric aerosols with an broad band spectral profile that follows a simple inverse wavelength dependence. Recent work has also identified a number of other absorbing species that can also add to the overall aerosol absorption. These include primary organics from biomass and trash burning and secondary organic aerosols including nitrated PAHs and humic-like substances, or HULIS. By using surface diffuse reflection spectroscopy we have also obtained spectra in the infrared that indicate significant IR absorption in the atmospheric window-region. These data will be presented and compared to spectra of model compounds that allow for evaluation of the potential importance of these species in adding strength to the direct radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols. This work was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64327 as part of the Atmospheric Science Program.

  9. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Guzman G, K. A.; Valero L, C. Y.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L., E-mail: candy_borja@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The absorbed dose due to neutrons by a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes a patient that must be treated by radiotherapy with a linear accelerator; the pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. When the Linac is working in Bremsstrahlung mode an undesirable neutron field is produced due to photoneutron reactions; these neutrons could damage the CMOS putting the patient at risk during the radiotherapy treatment. In order to estimate the neutron dose in the CMOS a Monte Carlo calculation was carried out where a full radiotherapy vault room was modeled with a W-made spherical shell in whose center was located the source term of photoneutrons produced by a Linac head operating in Bremsstrahlung mode at 18 MV. In the calculations a phantom made of tissue equivalent was modeled while a beam of photoneutrons was applied on the phantom prostatic region using a field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}. During simulation neutrons were isotropically transported from the Linac head to the phantom chest, here a 1 {theta} x 1 cm{sup 2} cylinder made of polystyrene was modeled as the CMOS, where the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose were estimated. Main damages to CMOS are by protons produced during neutron collisions protective cover made of H-rich materials, here the neutron spectrum that reach the CMOS was calculated showing a small peak around 0.1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, both connected through epithermal neutrons. (Author)

  10. Hydrogen storage and integrated fuel cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karl J.

    2010-08-24

    Hydrogen is stored in materials that absorb and desorb hydrogen with temperature dependent rates. A housing is provided that allows for the storage of one or more types of hydrogen-storage materials in close thermal proximity to a fuel cell stack. This arrangement, which includes alternating fuel cell stack and hydrogen-storage units, allows for close thermal matching of the hydrogen storage material and the fuel cell stack. Also, the present invention allows for tailoring of the hydrogen delivery by mixing different materials in one unit. Thermal insulation alternatively allows for a highly efficient unit. Individual power modules including one fuel cell stack surrounded by a pair of hydrogen-storage units allows for distribution of power throughout a vehicle or other electric power consuming devices.

  11. Reassessment of gadolinium odd isotopes neutron cross sections: scientific motivations and sensitivity-uncertainty analysis on LWR fuel assembly criticality calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocchi Federico

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gadolinium odd isotopes cross sections are crucial in assessing the neutronic performance and safety features of a light water reactor (LWR core. Accurate evaluations of the neutron capture behavior of gadolinium burnable poisons are necessary for a precise estimation of the economic gain due to the extension of fuel life, the residual reactivity penalty at the end of life, and the reactivity peak for partially spent fuel for the criticality safety analysis of Spent Fuel Pools. Nevertheless, present gadolinium odd isotopes neutron cross sections are somehow dated and poorly investigated in the high sensitivity thermal energy region and are available with an uncertainty which is too high in comparison to the present day typical industrial standards and needs. This article shows how the most recent gadolinium cross sections evaluations appear inadequate to provide accurate criticality calculations for a system with gadolinium fuel pins. In this article, a sensitivity and uncertainty analysis (S/U has been performed to investigate the effect of gadolinium odd isotopes nuclear cross sections data on the multiplication factor of some LWR fuel assemblies. The results have shown the importance of gadolinium odd isotopes in the criticality evaluation, and they confirmed the need of a re-evaluation of the neutron capture cross sections by means of new experimental measurements to be carried out at the n_TOF facility at CERN.

  12. Fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Shinji; Kajiwara, Koichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure the safety for the fuel rod failures by adapting plenum springs to function when small forces such as during transportation of fuel rods is exerted and not to function the resilient force when a relatively great force is exerted. Constitution: Between an upper end plug and a plenum spring in a fuel rod, is disposed an insertion member to the lower portion of which is mounted a pin. This pin is kept upright and causes the plenum spring to function resiliently to the pellets against the loads due to accelerations and mechanical vibrations exerted during transportation of the fuel rods. While on the other hand, if a compression force of a relatively high level is exerted to the plenum spring during reactor operation, the pin of the insertion member is buckled and the insertion member is inserted to the inside of the plenum spring, whereby the pellets are allowed to expand freely and the failures in the fuel elements can be prevented. (Moriyama, K.)

  13. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hideaki; Sakai, Takao; Ishida, Tomio; Yokota, Norikatsu.

    1992-01-01

    The lower ends of a plurality of plate-like shape memory alloys are secured at the periphery of the upper inside of the handling head of a fuel assembly. As the shape memory alloy, a Cu-Zn alloy, a Ti-Pd alloy or a Fe-Ni alloy is used. When high temperature coolants flow out to the handling head, the shape memory alloy deforms by warping to the outer side more greatly toward the upper portion thereof with the temperature increase of the coolants. As the result, the shape of the flow channel of the coolants is changed so as to enlarge at the exit of the upper end of the fuel assembly. Then, the pressure loss of the coolants in the fuel assembly is decreased by the enlargement. Accordingly, the flow rate of the coolants in the fuel assembly is increased to lower the temperature of the coolants. Further, high temperature coolants and low temperature coolants are mixed sufficiently just above the fuel assembly. This can suppress the temperature fluctuation of the mixed coolants in the upper portion of the reactor core, thereby enabling to decrease a fatigue and failures of the structural components in the upper portion of the reactor core. (I.N.)

  14. Canadian power reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, R.D.

    1976-03-01

    The following subjects are covered: the basic CANDU fuel design, the history of the bundle design, the significant differences between CANDU and LWR fuel, bundle manufacture, fissile and structural materials and coolants used in the CANDU fuel program, fuel and material behaviour, and performance under irradiation, fuel physics and management, booster rods and reactivity mechanisms, fuel procurement, organization and industry, and fuel costs. (author)

  15. Kinematics and thermodynamics across a propagating non-stoichiometric oxidation phase front in spent fuel grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.; Kansa, E.J.; Wijesinghe, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    Spent fuel contains mixtures, alloy and compound, but are dominated by U and O except for some UO 2 fuels with burnable poisons (gadolinia in BWR rods), the other elements evolve during reactor operation from neutron reaction and fission + fission decay events. Due to decay, chemical composition and activity of spent fuel will continue to evolve after removal from reactors. During the time interval with significant radioactivity levels relevant for a geological repository, it is important to develop models for potential chemical responses in spent fuel and potential degradation of repository. One such potential impact is the oxidation of spent fuel, which results in initial phase change of UO 2 lattice to U 4 O 9 and the next phase change is probably to U 3 O 8 although it has not been observed yet below 200C. The U 4 O 9 lattice is nonstoichiometric with a O/U weight ratio at 2.4. Preliminary indications are that the UO 2 has a O/U of 2. 4 at the time just before it transforms into the U 4 O 9 phase. In the oxygen weight gain versus time response, a plateau appears as the O/U approaches 2.4. Part of this plateau is due to geometrical effects of a U 4 O 9 phase change front propagating into UO 2 grain volumes; however, this may indicate a metastable phase change delay kinetics or a diffusional related delay time until the oxygen density can satisfy stoichiometry and energy conditions for phase changes. Experimental data show a front of U 4 O 9 lattice structure propagating into grains of the UO 2 lattice. To describe this spatially inhomogenous oxidation phase transition, as well as the expected U 3 O 8 phase transition from the U 4 O 9 lattice, lattice models are developed and spatially discontinuous kinematic and energetic expressions are derived. 9 refs

  16. RCC-C: Design and construction rules for fuel assemblies of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The RCC-C code contains all the requirements for the design, fabrication and inspection of nuclear fuel assemblies and the different types of core components (rod cluster control assemblies, burnable poison rod assemblies, primary and secondary source assemblies and thimble plug assemblies). The design, fabrication and inspection rules defined in RCC-C leverage the results of the research and development work pioneered in France, Europe and worldwide, and which have been successfully used by industry to design and build nuclear fuel assemblies and incorporate the resulting feedback. The code's scope covers: fuel system design, especially for assemblies, the fuel rod and associated core components, the characteristics to be checked for products and parts, fabrication methods and associated inspection methods. The RCC-C code is used by the operator of the PWR nuclear power plants in France as a reference when sourcing fuel from the world's top two suppliers in the PWR market, given that the French operator is the world's largest buyer of PWR fuel. Fuel for EPR projects is manufactured according to the provisions of the RCC-C code. The code is available in French and English. The 2005 edition has been translated into Chinese. Contents of the 2015 edition of the RCC-C code: Chapter 1 - General provisions: 1.1 Purpose of the RCC-C, 1.2 Definitions, 1.3 Applicable standards, 1.4 Equipment subject to the RCC-C, 1.5 Management system, 1.6 Processing of non-conformances; Chapter 2 - Description of the equipment subject to the RCC-C: 2.1 Fuel assembly, 2.2 Core components; Chapter 3 - Design: Safety functions, operating functions and environment of fuel assemblies and core components, design and safety principles; Chapter 4 - Manufacturing: 4.1 Materials and part characteristics, 4.2 Assembly requirements, 4.3 Manufacturing and inspection processes, 4.4 Inspection methods, 4.5 Certification of NDT inspectors, 4.6 Characteristics to be inspected for the

  17. Preparation and characterization of super absorbent polymer from sugarcane bagasse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiwien Andriyanti; Suyanti; Ngasifudin

    2012-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is a source of biomass which large enough numbers and has not been fully exploited. At this time has developed a super absorbent polymer material of sugarcane bagasse that can absorb water up to several times of its own weight and keep this water. Super absorbent polymers can be used as a soil conditioner that can be used as an absorber and storage of ground water, the giver of nutrients for plants, and can improve soil properties. The purpose of this study is to make and characterization of super absorbent polymer (PCS) from sugarcane bagasse. Preparation of super absorbent polymers (PCS) has been done by grafting method using ionizing radiation from Electron Beam Engineering (MBE) 350 mA keV/10. Irradiation process carried out with a dose variation of 20, 35, and 50 kGy. Increasing doses of radiation will increase the percentage fraction of transplantation (grafting) and the fraction of water absorption ability (swelling ratio). (author)

  18. Non-fuel assembly components: 10 CFR 61.55 classification for waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliore, R.J.; Reid, B.D.; Fadeff, S.K.; Pauley, K.A.; Jenquin, U.P.

    1994-09-01

    This document reports the results of laboratory radionuclide measurements on a representative group of non-fuel assembly (NFA) components for the purposes of waste classification. This document also provides a methodology to estimate the radionuclide inventory of NFA components, including those located outside the fueled region of a nuclear reactor. These radionuclide estimates can then be used to determine the waste classification of NFA components for which there are no physical measurements. Previously, few radionuclide inventory measurements had been performed on NFA components. For this project, recommended scaling factors were selected for the ORIGEN2 computer code that result in conservative estimates of radionuclide concentrations in NFA components. These scaling factors were based upon experimental data obtained from the following NFA components: (1) a pressurized water reactor (PWR) burnable poison rod assembly, (2) a PVM rod cluster control assembly, and (3) a boiling water reactor cruciform control rod blade. As a whole, these components were found to be within Class C limits. Laboratory radionuclide measurements for these components are provided in detail

  19. Non-fuel assembly components: 10 CFR 61.55 classification for waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliore, R.J.; Reid, B.D.; Fadeff, S.K.; Pauley, K.A.; Jenquin, U.P.

    1994-09-01

    This document reports the results of laboratory radionuclide measurements on a representative group of non-fuel assembly (NFA) components for the purposes of waste classification. This document also provides a methodology to estimate the radionuclide inventory of NFA components, including those located outside the fueled region of a nuclear reactor. These radionuclide estimates can then be used to determine the waste classification of NFA components for which there are no physical measurements. Previously, few radionuclide inventory measurements had been performed on NFA components. For this project, recommended scaling factors were selected for the ORIGEN2 computer code that result in conservative estimates of radionuclide concentrations in NFA components. These scaling factors were based upon experimental data obtained from the following NFA components: (1) a pressurized water reactor (PWR) burnable poison rod assembly, (2) a PVM rod cluster control assembly, and (3) a boiling water reactor cruciform control rod blade. As a whole, these components were found to be within Class C limits. Laboratory radionuclide measurements for these components are provided in detail.

  20. Correlation of waterside corrosion and cladding microstructure in high-burnup fuel and gadolinia rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.

    1989-09-01

    Waterside corrosion of the Zircaloy cladding has been examined in high-burnup fuel rods from several BWRs and PWRs, as well as in 3 wt % gadolinia burnable poison rods obtained from a BWR. The corrosion behavior of the high-burnup rods was then correlated with results from a microstructural characterization of the cladding by optical, scanning-electron, and transmission-electron microscopy (OM, SEM, and TEM). OM and SEM examination of the BWR fuel cladding showed both uniform and nodular oxide layers 2 to 45 μm in thickness after burnups of 11 to 30 MWd/kgU. For one of the BWRs, which was operated at 307 degree C rather than the normal 288 degree C, a relatively thick (50 to 70 μm) uniform oxide, rather than nodular oxides, was observed after a burnup of 27 to 30 MWd/kgU. TEM characterization revealed a number of microstructural features that occurred in association with the intermetallic precipitates in the cladding metal, apparently as a result of irradiation-induced or -enhanced processes. The BWR rods that exhibited white nodular oxides contained large precipitates (300 to 700 nm in size) that were partially amorphized during service, indicating that a distribution of the large intermetallic precipitates is conductive to nodular oxidation. 23 refs., 9 figs

  1. Spent fuel packaging and its safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Kimitaka; Nakaoki, Kozo; Tamamura, Tadao; Matsuda, Fumio; Fukudome, Kazuyuki

    1983-01-01

    An all stainless steel B(U) type packaging is proposed to transport spent fuels discharged from research reactors and other radioactive materials. The package is used dry and provided with surface fins to absorb drop shock and to dissipate decay heat. Safety was analyzed for structural, thermal, containment shielding and criticality factors, and the integrity of the package was confirmed with the MARC-CDC, TRUMP, ORIGEN, QAD, ANISN, and KENO computer codes. (author)

  2. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimble, Ralph E.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

  3. Local Structure Analysis of Materials for Solar Cell Absorber Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Jewell, Leila Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation examines solar cell absorber materials that have the potential to replace silicon in solar cells, including several copper-based sulfides and perovskites. Earth-abundant absorbers such as these become even more cost-effective when used in a nanostructured solar cell. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) deposit highly conformal films and hence are important tools for developing extremely thin absorber solar cells with scalability. Thus, the prima...

  4. Tridimensional measurements of the Barrel absorbers (Module 0)

    CERN Document Server

    Puzo, P

    2001-01-01

    In this note we describe the principle of the measurements done on the ATLAS absorbers that have been fabricated for the module 0 of the Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Barrel Calorimeter. We explain how the measurements are used to reconstruct the tridimensional geometry of each absorber. We show the results obtained for module 0. The same kind of measurements will be done for the series absorbers

  5. CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacEwan, J.R.; Notley, M.J.F.; Wood, J.C.; Gacesa, M.

    1982-09-01

    The direction of CANDU fuel development was set in 1957 with the decision to build pressure tube reactors. Short - 50 cm long - rodded bundles of natural UO 2 clad in Zircaloy were adopted to facilitate on-power fuelling to improve uranium utilization. Progressive improvements were made during 25 years of development, involving 650 man years and 180 million dollars. Today's CANDU bundle is based on the knowledge gained from extensive irradiation testing and experience in power reactors. The main thrust of future development is to demonstrate that the present bundle is suitable, with minor modifications, for thorium fuels

  6. NASA's Bio-Inspired Acoustic Absorber Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, L. Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Transportation noise pollutes our worlds cities, suburbs, parks, and wilderness areas. NASAs fundamental research in aviation acoustics is helping to find innovative solutions to this multifaceted problem. NASA is learning from nature to develop the next generation of quiet aircraft.The number of road vehicles and airplanes has roughly tripled since the 1960s. Transportation noise is audible in nearly all the counties across the US. Noise can damage your hearing, raise your heart rate and blood pressure, disrupt your sleep, and make communication difficult. Noise pollution threatens wildlife when it prevents animals from hearing prey, predators, and mates. Noise regulations help drive industry to develop quieter aircraft. Noise standards for aircraft have been developed by the International Civil Aviation Organization and adopted by the US Federal Aviation Administration. The US National Park Service is working with the Federal Aviation Administration to try to balance the demand for access to the parks and wilderness areas with preservation of the natural soundscape. NASA is helping by conceptualizing quieter, more efficient aircraft of the future and performing the fundamental research to make these concepts a reality someday. Recently, NASA has developed synthetic structures that can absorb sound well over a wide frequency range, and particularly below 1000 Hz, and which mimic the acoustic performance of bundles of natural reeds. We are adapting these structures to control noise on aircraft, and spacecraft. This technology might be used in many other industrial or architectural applications where acoustic absorbers have tight constraints on weight and thickness, and may be exposed to high temperatures or liquids. Information about this technology is being made available through reports and presentations available through the NASA Technical Report Server, http:ntrs.nasa.gov. Organizations who would like to collaborate with NASA or commercialize NASAs technology

  7. The Australian Commonwealth standard of measurement for absorbed radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock, S.L.

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the absorbed dose standard for photon beams in the range from 1 to 25 MeV. Measurements of absorbed dose in graphite irradiated by a beam of cobalt-60 gamma rays from an Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) E1 Dorado 6 teletherapy unit are reported. The measurements were performed using a graphite calorimeter, which is the primary standard for absorbed dose. The measurements are used to calibrate a working standard ion chamber in terms of absorbed dose in graphite. Details of the methods, results and correction factors applied are given in Appendices. 13 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs

  8. Air box shock absorber for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, A.V.; George, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is an air box type shock absorber primarily for use in an ice condenser compartment of a nuclear reactor. The shock absorber includes a back plate member and sheet metal top, bottom, and front members. The front member is prefolded, and controlled clearances are provided among the members for predetermined escape of air under impact and compression. Prefolded internal sheet metal stiffeners also absorb a portion of the kinetic energy imparted to the shock absorber, and limit rebound. An external restraining rod guided by restraining straps insures that the sheet metal front member compresses inward upon impact. 6 claims, 11 figures

  9. Wideband aural acoustic absorbance predicts conductive hearing loss in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Douglas H; Sanford, Chris A; Ellison, John C; Fitzpatrick, Denis F; Gorga, Michael P

    2012-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that wideband aural absorbance predicts conductive hearing loss (CHL) in children medically classified as having otitis media with effusion. Absorbance was measured in the ear canal over frequencies from 0.25 to 8 kHz at ambient pressure or as a swept tympanogram. CHL was defined using criterion air-bone gaps of 20, 25, and 30 dB at octaves from 0.25 to 4 kHz. A likelihood-ratio predictor of CHL was constructed across frequency for ambient absorbance, and across frequency and pressure for absorbance tympanometry. Performance was evaluated at individual frequencies and for any frequency at which a CHL was present. Absorbance and conventional 0.226-kHz tympanograms were measured in children of age three to eight years with CHL and with normal hearing. Absorbance was smaller at frequencies above 0.7 kHz in the CHL group than the control group. Based on the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, wideband absorbance in ambient and tympanometric tests were significantly better predictors of CHL than tympanometric width, the best 0.226-kHz predictor. Accuracies of ambient and tympanometric wideband absorbance did not differ. Absorbance accurately predicted CHL in children and was more accurate than conventional 0.226-kHz tympanometry.

  10. ABSORBENCY CHARACTERISTICS OF PESHTAMALS: TRADITIONAL TURKISH WOVEN CLOTHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KESKIN Reyhan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Absorbency of textiles is defined as the ability of taking in a fluid in the manner of a sponge. Absorbency is required for comfort properties in so me clothes such as sportswear and underwear clothing, for drying properties in napkins, towels and bathrobes, for health concerns in some medical textiles such as bandages, gauze and absorbent cotton, and for cleaning properties in washclothes and mops. In this study five different fabric samples (three woven 100% cotton fabrics A, B and P respectively at plain, twill, and peshtamal weaving patterns and two 100% cotton terry towels T1 and T2 were tested. The absorbency properties of the samples were evaluated according to the droplet test, sinking time test and wicking height tests (pottasium chromate test. Peshtamal samples showed better absorbency results than plain and twill weaves and lower but close results to towel samples according to the droplet test, sinking time test and wicking height tests. The absorbency properties of peshtamals showed results close to towel samples. The void content of peshtamals is higher than plain and twill samples but closer and lower than towel samples. The good absorbency results of peshtamals might be due to the void content of peshtamals which is higher than plain and twill samples but closer and lower than towel samples. Peshtamals which are good in absorbency and light in weight might be used widespreadly in daily life for their high absorbency, and on travel for weight saving purposes.

  11. European Science Notes Information Bulletin: Reports on Current European/Middle Eastern Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    vni uiteeaenweog ultew aers musicians to form two additional symphony orchestras. paper are: Israel is having a difficult time absorbing this large in... burnable waste along with conventional effects of Chemoble are remembered. Safety and envi- fuels. In Sweden, excess powerplant heat is used when...lenses, or fibers. Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE) and the The losses are calculated to be 1 dB/cm. U.K. Ministry of Defence laboratories

  12. RERTR-13 Irradiation Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; D. M. Wachs; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme

    2012-09-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-13 was designed to assess performance of different types of neutron absorbers that can be potentially used as burnable poisons in the low enriched uranium-molybdenum based dispersion and monolithic fuels.1 The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-13 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

  13. Impact of Fuel Failure on Criticality Safety of Used Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, William J.; Wagner, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Commercial used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the United States is expected to remain in storage for considerably longer periods than originally intended (e.g., 45 GWd/t) may increase the potential for fuel failure during normal and accident conditions involving storage and transportation. Fuel failure, depending on the severity, can result in changes to the geometric configuration of the fuel, which has safety and regulatory implications. The likelihood and extent of fuel reconfiguration and its impact on the safety of the UNF is not well understood. The objective of this work is to assess and quantify the impact of fuel reconfiguration due to fuel failure on criticality safety of UNF in storage and transportation casks. This effort is primarily motivated by concerns related to the potential for fuel degradation during ES periods and transportation following ES. The criticality analyses consider representative UNF designs and cask systems and a range of fuel enrichments, burnups, and cooling times. The various failed-fuel configurations considered are designed to bound the anticipated effects of individual rod and general cladding failure, fuel rod deformation, loss of neutron absorber materials, degradation of canister internals, and gross assembly failure. The results quantify the potential impact on criticality safety associated with fuel reconfiguration and may be used to guide future research, design, and regulatory activities. Although it can be concluded that the criticality safety impacts of fuel reconfiguration during transportation subsequent to ES are manageable, the results indicate that certain configurations can result in a large increase in the effective neutron multiplication factor, k eff . Future work to inform decision making relative to which configurations are credible, and therefore need to be considered in a safety evaluation, is recommended.

  14. A variable passive low-frequency absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric R.; Gade, Anders Christian

    2005-04-01

    Multi-purpose concert halls face a dilemma. They can host classical music concerts, rock concerts and spoken word performances in a matter of a short period. These different performance types require significantly different acoustic conditions in order to provide the best sound quality to both the performers and the audience. A recommended reverberation time for classical music may be in the range of 1.5-2 s for empty halls, where rock music sounds best with a reverberation time around 0.8-1 s. Modern rhythmic music often contains high levels of sound energy in the low frequency bands but still requires a high definition for good sound quality. Ideally, the absorption of the hall should be adjustable in all frequency bands in order to provide good sound quality for all types of performances. The mid and high frequency absorption is easily regulated, but adjusting the low-frequency absorption has typically been too expensive or requires too much space to be practical for multi-purpose halls. Measurements were made on a variable low-frequency absorber to develop a practical solution to the dilemma. The paper will present the results of the measurements as well as a possible design.

  15. Absorber Coatings for Mid-Infrared Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dahlia Anne; Wollack, Edward; Rostem, Karwan

    2017-01-01

    Control over optical response is an important aspect of instrument design for astrophysical imaging. Here we consider a mid-infrared absorber coating proposed for use on HIRMES (High Resolution Mid-Infrared Spectrometer), a cryogenic spectrometer which will fly on the SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) aircraft. The aim of this effort is to develop an absorptive coating for the 20-200 microns spectral range based on a graphene loaded epoxy binder (Epotek 377H) and glass microsphere scatterers (3M K1). The coatings electromagnetic response was modeled using a Matlab script and the glass microspheres were characterized by the measured size distribution, the dielectric constant, and the filling fraction. Images of the microspheres taken by a microscope were used to determine the size distribution with an ImageJ particle analysis program. Representative test samples for optical evaluation were fabricated for characterization via infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. The optical tests will determine the material’s absorptance and reflectance. These test results will be compared to the modeled response.

  16. Method of manufacturing improved neutron absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masahiko; Yuzuhara, Shun-ichi; Tamaki, Shohei.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain control rods capable of suppressing swelling and having increased working life, high safety and economical advantage. Method: Boron carbide sintered body as the neutron absorber is adjusted such that the boron/carbon atomic ratio is within a range of 4.0 ± 0.2 and the average crystal grain size is of less than 5 μm. Then, for suppressing the growing of crystal grains in the course of sintering, press-sintering is applied under the conditions of a temperature at 1700 - 2200 deg C and a pressure of 100 - 500 kg/cm 2 . Aimed control rods can thus be obtained. If the average crystal grain size exceeds 5 μm, the diffusion rate of He formed by the neutron absorption reaction is fast at the grain boundary, whereas it is relatively low within the crystal grains. Accordingly, the He possessing amount is increased and the swelling is increased in the case of such large grain size that the grain boundary area per unit volume is relatively small. (Takahashi, M.)

  17. On the Optimization of Point Absorber Buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Sjökvist

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A point absorbing wave energy converter (WEC is a complicated dynamical system. A semi-submerged buoy drives a power take-off device (PTO, which acts as a linear or non-linear damper of the WEC system. The buoy motion depends on the buoy geometry and dimensions, the mass of the moving parts of the system and on the damping force from the generator. The electromagnetic damping in the generator depends on both the generator specifications, the connected load and the buoy velocity. In this paper a velocity ratio has been used to study how the geometric parameters buoy draft and radius, assuming constant generator damping coefficient, affects the motion and the energy absorption of a WEC. It have been concluded that an optimal buoy geometry can be identified for a specific generator damping. The simulated WEC performance have been compared with experimental values from two WECs with similar generators but different buoys. Conclusions have been drawn about their behaviour.

  18. Fuels characterization studies. [jet fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, G. T.; Antoine, A. C.; Flores, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Current analytical techniques used in the characterization of broadened properties fuels are briefly described. Included are liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. High performance liquid chromatographic ground-type methods development is being approached from several directions, including aromatic fraction standards development and the elimination of standards through removal or partial removal of the alkene and aromatic fractions or through the use of whole fuel refractive index values. More sensitive methods for alkene determinations using an ultraviolet-visible detector are also being pursued. Some of the more successful gas chromatographic physical property determinations for petroleum derived fuels are the distillation curve (simulated distillation), heat of combustion, hydrogen content, API gravity, viscosity, flash point, and (to a lesser extent) freezing point.

  19. Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the theories, construction, operation, types, and advantages of fuel cells developed by the American space programs. Indicates that the cell is an ideal small-scale power source characterized by its compactness, high efficiency, reliability, and freedom from polluting fumes. (CC)

  20. Transport fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronsse, Frederik; Jørgensen, Henning; Schüßler, Ingmar

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, the use of transport fuel derived from biomass increased four-fold between 2003 and 2012. Mainly based on food resources, these conventional biofuels did not achieve the expected emission savings and contributed to higher prices for food commod - ities, especially maize and oilseeds...