WorldWideScience

Sample records for fs alternative development

  1. Environment and Alternative Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Rajni

    Stressing the global dimension to the adversary relationship between economic development and environmental conservation, this monograph examines the philosophical, historical, cultural, and ethnic underpinnings of modern science and technology. In addition, the monograph spells out policy implications of an alternative concept of development and…

  2. Development of regional wheat VI-LAI models using Resourcesat-1 AWiFS data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sasmita Chaurasia; R Nigam; B K Bhattacharya; V N Sridhar; K Mallick; S P Vyas; N K Patel; J Mukherjee; Chander Shekhar; Dhiraj Kumar; K R P Singh; G D Bairagi; N L Purohit; J S Parihar

    2011-12-01

    The time of forcing of spatial LAI to crop models at single or multiple stages is important to simulate crop biomass and yield in varying agro-climatic conditions and scales. The high temporal resolution (5-day) by Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) on-board Resourcesat-1 Satellite IRS-P6 with 56 m spatial resolution and large swath (740 km) has substantially increased the availability of regional clear sky optical remote sensing data. The present study aimed at developing empirical vegetation index VI-LAI models for wheat using AWiFS optical data in four bands and in-situ measurements sampled over five different agro-climatic regions (ACRs) during 2005–2006 followed by validation during 2006–2007. While nonlinear relations exist for all the three normalized indices such as normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), normalized difference water index (NDWI) and Green NDVI, linear relation was the best fit for ratio vegetation index (RVI). Both NDVI and RVI models generally showed better correlation ranges (0.65–0.84 for NDVI and 0.37–0.76 for RVI) than other indices. The common NDVI-LAI model was found to produce lower root mean square errors (RMSE) between 0.5 and 1.1 from pooled model than those between 0.5 and 1.32 from regional models. The rate of substantial increase in errors from NDVILAI model (RMSE of modelled LAI: 0.85 to 1.28) as compared to RVI-LAI model (RMSE of modeled LAI: 1.12 to 1.17) at LAI greater than 3, than below 3 revealed the early saturation of NDVI than RVI. It is therefore recommended that LAI estimates can be used to force crop simulation model up to early vegetative stage based on NDVI and maximum vegetative to reproductive stages based on RVI.

  3. Alternative calcination development status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boardman, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    The Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel and (INEEL) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, dated June 1, 1995, specifies that high-level waste stored in the underground tanks at the ICPP continue to be calcined while other options to treat the waste are studied. Therefore, the High-Level Waste Program has funded a program to develop new flowsheets to increase the liquid waste processing rate. Simultaneously, a radionuclide separation process, as well as other options, are also being developed, which will be compared to the calcination treatment option. Two alternatives emerged as viable candidates; (1) elevated temperature calcination (also referred to as high temperature calcination), and (2) sugar-additive calcination. Both alternatives were determined to be viable through testing performed in a lab-scale calcination mockup. Subsequently, 10-cm Calciner Pilot Plant scoping tests were successfully completed for both flowsheets. The results were compared to the standard 500 C, high-ANN flow sheet (baseline flowsheet). The product and effluent streams were characterized to help elucidate the process chemistry and to investigate potential environmental permitting issues. Several supplementary tests were conducted to gain a better understanding of fine-particles generation, calcine hydration, scrub foaming, feed makeup procedures, sugar/organic elimination, and safety-related issues. Many of the experiments are only considered to be scoping tests, and follow-up experiments will be required to establish a more definitive understanding of the flowsheets. However, the combined results support the general conclusion that flowsheet improvements for the NWCF are technically viable.

  4. Alternative Water Processor Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Karen D.; Mitchell, Julie; Vega, Leticia; Adam, Niklas; Flynn, Michael; Wjee (er. Rau); Lunn, Griffin; Jackson, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The Next Generation Life Support Project is developing an Alternative Water Processor (AWP) as a candidate water recovery system for long duration exploration missions. The AWP consists of biological water processor (BWP) integrated with a forward osmosis secondary treatment system (FOST). The basis of the BWP is a membrane aerated biological reactor (MABR), developed in concert with Texas Tech University. Bacteria located within the MABR metabolize organic material in wastewater, converting approximately 90% of the total organic carbon to carbon dioxide. In addition, bacteria convert a portion of the ammonia-nitrogen present in the wastewater to nitrogen gas, through a combination of nitrogen and denitrification. The effluent from the BWP system is low in organic contaminants, but high in total dissolved solids. The FOST system, integrated downstream of the BWP, removes dissolved solids through a combination of concentration-driven forward osmosis and pressure driven reverse osmosis. The integrated system is expected to produce water with a total organic carbon less than 50 mg/l and dissolved solids that meet potable water requirements for spaceflight. This paper describes the test definition, the design of the BWP and FOST subsystems, and plans for integrated testing.

  5. Alternative Water Processor Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Karen D.; Mitchell, Julie L.; Adam, Niklas M.; Barta, Daniel; Meyer, Caitlin E.; Pensinger, Stuart; Vega, Leticia M.; Callahan, Michael R.; Flynn, Michael; Wheeler, Ray; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Next Generation Life Support Project is developing an Alternative Water Processor (AWP) as a candidate water recovery system for long duration exploration missions. The AWP consists of biological water processor (BWP) integrated with a forward osmosis secondary treatment system (FOST). The basis of the BWP is a membrane aerated biological reactor (MABR), developed in concert with Texas Tech University. Bacteria located within the MABR metabolize organic material in wastewater, converting approximately 90% of the total organic carbon to carbon dioxide. In addition, bacteria convert a portion of the ammonia-nitrogen present in the wastewater to nitrogen gas, through a combination of nitrification and denitrification. The effluent from the BWP system is low in organic contaminants, but high in total dissolved solids. The FOST system, integrated downstream of the BWP, removes dissolved solids through a combination of concentration-driven forward osmosis and pressure driven reverse osmosis. The integrated system is expected to produce water with a total organic carbon less than 50 mg/l and dissolved solids that meet potable water requirements for spaceflight. This paper describes the test definition, the design of the BWP and FOST subsystems, and plans for integrated testing.

  6. Environmental levels of PCDD/Fs and metals around a cement plant in Catalonia, Spain, before and after alternative fuel implementation. Assessment of human health risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, Joaquim [Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain); Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Països Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain); Nadal, Martí, E-mail: marti.nadal@urv.cat [Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain); Schuhmacher, Marta [Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain); Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Països Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain); Domingo, José L. [Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    The concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, Tl, V, and Zn, and the levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans were determined in samples of soil, vegetation, and air, collected in the vicinity of a cement plant (Catalonia, Spain), before (January 2011 and July 2011) and after (January 2012 and June 2013) alternative fuel partial substitution (fossil fuels by sewage sludge). Seven sampling points were selected at different directions and distances to the facility including two background sampling points. The results were used to assess the health risk assessment for the population living near the facility. Only few significant differences were found before and after alternative fuel partial substitution (Mn in soils and Cd in vegetation). Non-carcinogenic risks were below the safety threshold (HQ < 1), while carcinogenic risks were below 10{sup −5}, or exceeding slightly that value, always in the range considered as assumable (10{sup −6}–10{sup −4}). - Highlights: • The environmental impact of a cement plant using alternative fuel was monitored. • No significant differences in most pollutants were noted after the fuel change. • Traffic has a notable influence on the environmental levels of PCDD/Fs and metals. • Human health risks were below safety thresholds regardless of the used fuel.

  7. Measurements and alternative development reviews

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The report on the region Human Development for Latin America and the Caribbean 2016, the United Nations Program for Development (UNPD), is entitled: multidimensional Progress: Welfare Beyond income and particularly relevant to some papers  and books in this issue, a due Bet transcend the economic indicators for those oriented Quality of Life. El informe regional sobre Desarrollo Humano para América Latina y el Caribe 2016, del Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD), lleva po...

  8. Developing Benthic Class Specific, Chlorophyll-a Retrieving Algorithms for Optically-Shallow Water Using SeaWiFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Blakey

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the ability to improve Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS chl-a retrieval from optically shallow coastal waters by applying algorithms specific to the pixels’ benthic class. The form of the Ocean Color (OC algorithm was assumed for this study. The operational atmospheric correction producing Level 2 SeaWiFS data was retained since the focus of this study was on establishing the benefit from the alternative specification of the bio-optical algorithm. Benthic class was determined through satellite image-based classification methods. Accuracy of the chl-a algorithms evaluated was determined through comparison with coincident in situ measurements of chl-a. The regionally-tuned models that were allowed to vary by benthic class produced more accurate estimates of chl-a than the single, unified regionally-tuned model. Mean absolute percent difference was approximately 70% for the regionally-tuned, benthic class-specific algorithms. Evaluation of the residuals indicated the potential for further improvement to chl-a estimation through finer characterization of benthic environments. Atmospheric correction procedures specialized to coastal environments were recognized as areas for future improvement as these procedures would improve both classification and algorithm tuning.

  9. Alternative Fuels and Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj; Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The main report of the project on Transportation Fuels based on Renewable Energy. The report contains a review of potential technologies for electric, hybrid and hydrogen propulsion in the Danish transport sector, including an assessment of their development status. In addition, the energy...

  10. Alternative Fuels and Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj; Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The main report of the project on Transportation Fuels based on Renewable Energy. The report contains a review of potential technologies for electric, hybrid and hydrogen propulsion in the Danish transport sector, including an assessment of their development status. In addition, the energy...... and environmental effects of introduction of these technologies are studied....

  11. Alternatives to prison sentences : Experiences and development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junger-Tas, J.

    1994-01-01

    This study presents an overview of experiences with alternative sanctions in other countries with a view to the future development of the Dutch sanctioning system. The principal objective of the study was to examine the use of alternatives to prison with respect to their effectiveness and efficiency

  12. Characterization of alternative FBR development strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boegel, A.J.; Clausen, M.J.

    1981-08-01

    Near-term decisions regarding the nature and place of the FBR development program must be made. This study is part of a larger program designed to provide the Department of Energy (DOE) with imformation that can be used to make strategic programmatic decisions. The focus of this report is the description of alternative approaches for developing the FBR and the quantification of the duration and cost of each alternative. The time frames of the alternative approaches are investigated in companion reports (White 1981 and Fraley 1981). The results of these analyses will be described in a summary report (Burnham et al. 1981).

  13. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David

    2011-06-15

    In addition to promoting energy efficiency, China has actively pursued alternative energy development as a strategy to reduce its energy demand and carbon emissions. One area of particular focus has been to raise the share of alternative energy in China’s rapidly growing electricity generation with a 2020 target of 15% share of total primary energy. Over the last ten years, China has established several major renewable energy regulations along with programs and subsidies to encourage the growth of non-fossil alternative energy including solar, wind, nuclear, hydro, geothermal and biomass power as well as biofuels and coal alternatives. This study thus seeks to examine China’s alternative energy in terms of what has and will continue to drive alternative energy development in China as well as analyze in depth the growth potential and challenges facing each specific technology. This study found that despite recent policies enabling extraordinary capacity and investment growth, alternative energy technologies face constraints and barriers to growth. For relatively new technologies that have not achieved commercialization such as concentrated solar thermal, geothermal and biomass power, China faces technological limitations to expanding the scale of installed capacity. While some alternative technologies such as hydropower and coal alternatives have been slowed by uneven and often changing market and policy support, others such as wind and solar PV have encountered physical and institutional barriers to grid integration. Lastly, all alternative energy technologies face constraints in human resources and raw material resources including land and water, with some facing supply limitations in critical elements such as uranium for nuclear, neodymium for wind and rare earth metals for advanced solar PV. In light of China’s potential for and barriers to growth, the resource and energy requirement for alternative energy technologies were modeled and scenario analysis

  14. Towards an Alternative Development Model in Suriname

    OpenAIRE

    Dougal Martin

    2002-01-01

    This study advocates the adoption of an alternative development model in Suriname. Suriname adopted a state-centered and inward-looking development model in the early 1980s, although elements of the model had been present long before that time.

  15. Developing a successful alternative maternity unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C

    1987-07-01

    The users of maternity services are becoming increasingly interested in alternative delivery options, as a result hospitals are developing customer oriented, competitive maternity services. In this article, the author describes one hospital's efforts at developing a customer oriented family birthing center: the rationale, the benefits, the marketing and the satisfying results.

  16. Methods for generating hydroelectric power development alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Shoou-yuh; Liaw, Shu-liang; Sale, M.J.; Railsback, S.F.

    1989-01-01

    Hydropower development on large rivers can result in a number of environmental impacts, including potential reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. This study presents a methodology for generating different hydropower development alternatives for evaluation. This methodology employs a Streeter-Phelps model to simulate DO, and the Bounded Implicit Enumeration algorithm to solve an optimization model formulated to maximize hydroelectric energy production subject to acceptable DO limits. The upper Ohio River basin was used to illustrate the use and characteristics of the methodology. The results indicate that several alternatives which meet the specified DO constraints can be generated efficiently, meeting both power and environmental objectives. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Development of Sub 10 fs Visible-NIR, UV, and DUV Pulses and Their Applications to Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi Kobayashi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the first section of this Chapter, the basics of nonlinear optical (NLO processes are systematically described. Then the generation of the visible pulse utilizing the NLO processes is described and ultrafast spectroscopy using the visible pulse is discussed. By using such short pulse, fast chemical reactions, which cannot be identified by utilizing strobe light or flash lamp, can be studied. After the development of femtosecond lasers, they have been widely applied to observe the transition state of various chemical reactions. In the near infrared (NIR region, a commercial light source of Ti:sapphire laser is available as a femtosecond light source, but not available in the visible and ultraviolet (UV regions. In this article, we report our development of sub 10 fs visible-NIR, UV, and deep-ultraviolet (DUV pulses and their applications to ultrafast spectroscopy.

  18. Disputes on development and sense of alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Gudynas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is postulated that there are several varieties of development but all maintain a core set of ideas and sensibilities about how they understand progress, the appropriation of nature, quality of life and the advancement of history as linearity. These basic concepts are deeply rooted. In the past, despite cycles of sharp critiques, it returned as revised versions of development. More recently, the common background is seen in the shared features between extractivists styles by conservative and progressive governments. Three kinds of disputes on development are identified (focusing on instrumental issues, on different types of development, or as “alternative development”. Lastly, Buen Vivir, is briefly revised, as the most recent and powerful example of an alternative to development.

  19. Alternative Local Development models from the periphery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Lopez Oropeza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As neoliberal capitalism continues to fail on reducing inequities, and continues to fail on fulfilling its promise of a kind of “development” that would allow impoverished men and women to improve their situation and be able to experience a “freedom” which would empower them with new and better opportunities to vanish their many types of “poverties”, new and alternative models raise, presenting a different and inclusive type of development which intends to respond to their particular situations of exclusion and build on an alternative model.

  20. SeaWiFS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — SEAWiFS_US is a high resolution (1km) satellite dataset derived from the eight wavelength SEAWiFS sensor. The dataset also includes the aerosol reflectance over the...

  1. An approach to developing numeric water quality criteria for coastal waters using the SeaWiFS Satellite Data Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Blake A; Hagy, James D; Conmy, Robyn N; Lehrter, John C; Stumpf, Richard P

    2012-01-17

    Human activities on land increase nutrient loads to coastal waters, which can increase phytoplankton production and biomass and associated ecological impacts. Numeric nutrient water quality standards are needed to protect coastal waters from eutrophication impacts. The Environmental Protection Agency determined that numeric nutrient criteria were necessary to protect designated uses of Florida's waters. The objective of this study was to evaluate a reference condition approach for developing numeric water quality criteria for coastal waters, using data from Florida. Florida's coastal waters have not been monitored comprehensively via field sampling to support numeric criteria development. However, satellite remote sensing had the potential to provide adequate data. Spatial and temporal measures of SeaWiFS OC4 chlorophyll-a (Chl(RS)-a, mg m(-3)) were resolved across Florida's coastal waters between 1997 and 2010 and compared with in situ measurements. Statistical distributions of Chl(RS)-a were evaluated to determine a quantitative reference baseline. A binomial approach was implemented to consider how new data could be assessed against the criteria. The proposed satellite remote sensing approach to derive numeric criteria may be generally applicable to other coastal waters.

  2. E2Fs regulate the expression of genes involved in differentiation, development, proliferation, and apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, H; Bracken, A P; Vernell, R;

    2001-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and its two relatives, p107 and p130, regulate development and cell proliferation in part by inhibiting the activity of E2F-regulated promoters. We have used high-density oligonucleotide arrays to identify genes in which expression changed in response to activatio...

  3. Development of Alternative Technetium Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, Kenneth

    2013-09-13

    The UREX+1 process is under consideration for the separation of transuranic elements from spent nuclear fuel. The first steps of this process extract the fission product technicium-99 ({sup 99}Tc) into an organic phase containing tributylphosphate together with uranium. Treatment of this stream requires the separation of Tc from U and placement into a suitable waste storage form. A potential candidate waste form involves immobilizing the Tc as an alloy with either excess metallic zirconium or stainless steel. Although Tc-Zr alloys seem to be promising waste forms, alternative materials must be investigated. Innovative studies related to the synthesis and behavior of a different class of Tc materials will increase the scientific knowledge related to development of Tc waste forms. These studies will also provide a better understanding of the behavior of {sup 99}Tc in repository conditions. A literature survey has selected promising alternative waste forms for further study: technetium metallic alloys, nitrides, oxides, sulfides, and pertechnetate salts. The goals of this project are to 1) synthesize and structurally characterize relevant technetium materials that may be considered as waste forms, 2) investigate material behavior in solution under different conditions of temperature, electrochemical potential, and radiation, and 3) predict the long-term behavior of these materials.

  4. Alternative technological development for RF hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antônio Finardi, Célio; da Fontoura Ponchet, André; Battesini Adamo, Cristina; Flacker, Alexander; Cotrin Teixeira, Ricardo; Panepucci, Roberto Ricardo

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents a technological solution for high frequency packaging platform evaluated up to 40 GHz. The main purpose of this development was to define an alternative hybrid technology that is more flexible and faster to prototype compared with thin film or multi chip module (MCM-D). The alternative technology also shows adequate performance for high bit rate solutions integrating optical and electronics blocks. This approach consists of a soft substrate (laminate material), plating processes (electroless Ni-P/Au, electrolytic Au) and lithography patterning. Ground coplanar waveguide was used for microwave structures with excellent ground planes connections due to easy via holes implementation. We present results of high frequency packaging of important RF blocks, such as integrated broadband bias-T, transimpedance amplifier ICs and silicon photonics optical modulators. The paper demonstrates a solution for high frequency hybridization that can be implemented with standard substrates, designed with any shape and with large numbers of metalized via holes and compatible with usual assembling techniques.

  5. ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF FINANCING HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Kozarezenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the possibilities and expediency of endowment utilization as an alternative of the social sphere elements budgetary funding in Ukraine. We have conclusions that the endowments have some advantages. That’s is creates the possibility for a long-term planning and development of social sphere (mechanism of adequate general stable situation in the country, convenient for major companies inclined to strategic business planning and contributions in the social sphere, transparent and provides guarantees for the donors in the specific cash expenditure, provides the non-commercial organizations with the possibility to change the approach to implementation of social projects, to study how to earn the money and not to be just the consumers, creates the possibility to accumulate the funds in charitable purposes that makes them attractive for medium and small companies. The disadvantages of endowments are risks of financial nature (small income guaranteed transactions, high inflation rate, exposure to the financial crises, difficulties with forming the «body» of the specific capital of such size that would guarantee more or less substantial income directed for charity, no instant effect for recipient’s favor,  possibility to be used in swindling, no tax stimulation of donors. Let’s think that endowments or funds specific capital have an important meaning in the development of social sphere because they are basis for its long-term planning and development. For non-commercial organization there are at least two advantages. First is stable financing and second is attraction of new contributors for non-commercial organizations. It is both stability of financing and guarantee of stable functioning.

  6. Motor Development: Manual of Alternative Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, James E.

    The manual of alternative procedures for teaching handicapped children focuses on programming, planning, and implementing training in the gross motor (posture, limb control, locomotion) and fine motor (facial, digital) skills. The manual consists of the following sections: specific teaching tactics commonly used in motor training stiuations…

  7. Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process, elements and techniques guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This manual provides detailed guidance on Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The purpose of the RI/FS, to assess the risk posed by a hazardous waste site and to determine the best way to reduce that risk, and its structure (site characterization, risk assessment, screening and detailed analysis of alternatives, etc.) is defined in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and further explained in the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA (Interim Final) 540/G-89/004, OSWER Directive 9355.3-01, October 1988. Though issued in 1988, the EPA guidance remains an excellent source of information on the conduct and structure of an RI/FS. This document makes use of supplemental RI/FS-related guidance that EPA has developed since its initial document was issued in 1988, incorporates practical lessons learned in more than 12 years of experience in CERCLA hazardous site remediation, and drawing on those lessons, introduces the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER), developed by DOE as a way to proceed quickly and efficiently through the RI/FS process at DOE facilities. Thus as its title implies, this guidance is intended to describe in detail the process and component elements of an RI/FS, as well as techniques to manage the RI/FS effectively.

  8. SeaWiFS Technical Report Series. Volume 42; Satellite Primary Productivity Data and Algorithm Development: A Science Plan for Mission to Planet Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, Paul G.; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Esaias, Wayne E.; Balch, William; Campbell, Janet W.; Iverson, Richard L.; Kiefer, Dale A.; Morel, Andre; Yoder, James A.; Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Two issues regarding primary productivity, as it pertains to the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) are presented in this volume. Chapter 1 describes the development of a science plan for deriving primary production for the world ocean using satellite measurements, by the Ocean Primary Productivity Working Group (OPPWG). Chapter 2 presents discussions by the same group, of algorithm classification, algorithm parameterization and data availability, algorithm testing and validation, and the benefits of a consensus primary productivity algorithm.

  9. Environmental levels of PCDD/Fs and metals around a cement plant in Catalonia, Spain, before and after alternative fuel implementation. Assessment of human health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, Joaquim; Nadal, Martí; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

    2014-07-01

    The concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, Tl, V, and Zn, and the levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans were determined in samples of soil, vegetation, and air, collected in the vicinity of a cement plant (Catalonia, Spain), before (January 2011 and July 2011) and after (January 2012 and June 2013) alternative fuel partial substitution (fossil fuels by sewage sludge). Seven sampling points were selected at different directions and distances to the facility including two background sampling points. The results were used to assess the health risk assessment for the population living near the facility. Only few significant differences were found before and after alternative fuel partial substitution (Mn in soils and Cd in vegetation). Non-carcinogenic risks were below the safety threshold (HQ<1), while carcinogenic risks were below 10(-5), or exceeding slightly that value, always in the range considered as assumable (10(-6)-10(-4)).

  10. Alternative Models for Training Developers in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Richard A.

    Three steps may be taken to minimize the difficulties involved in educational development: 1) a realistic expectation should be projected in regard to the prowess of development; 2) the "state-of-the-art" should receive continuous improvement; and 3) training programs to prepare fully professional developers should be established as rapidly as…

  11. Medical Countermeasure Product Development - Alternatives Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Health Departments of Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Consortium seeks to develop MedCM including drugs, vaccines...Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Consortium seeks to develop MedCM including drugs, vaccines and diagnostics to assist...been very little incentive for the biotechnology /medical technology community to focus on MedCM product development. This was because the focus of

  12. Alternative Multilateral Development Banksand Global Financial Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Reisen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available What will be the future impact on multilateral lending shares of the New Development Bank (NDB and the Asian InfrastructureInvestment Bank (AIIB, two multilateral banks created in 2014 outside the established Bretton Woods system?Will these new institutions led by China and the BRICS help rebalance multilateral development finance away from westerndominance? The answer comes in three parts: first, increasing pressure for the BRICS to exit´ rises with past, present andexpected failure for ´voice´ reform in the established international financial institutions (IFIs; second, excess demand formultilateral soft loans; and, third, a quantification of the potential lending capacity by the NDB and AIIB to assess howmuch relative business – hence political influence – the existing IFIs might lose in favour of the new competitors. The NDBand AIIB combined will likely attract sufficient co-financing to rival the established multilateral development banks interms of annual lending. This article concludes that infrastructure finance will benefit from the creation of the NDB andAIIB by tapping the considerable saving potential in China and other BRICS members. The new institutions should thereforebe supported, not discouraged, by western governments and donors as well. As the new multilateral development banksintroduce choice in terms of funding cost and modalities, borrowers are well advised to join these new institutions rapidlyfor their own benefit. Competition in multilateral development banking may have a negative impact on loan enforcementmechanisms. The IFIs of the existing Bretton Woods system and the new development banks will have to unite by imposingcross-default clauses to safeguard their preferred creditor status.

  13. Career Development in Alternative High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyhof, Daniel Clark

    2013-01-01

    Public schools, colleges, and universities all strive to prepare students for the workforce or further education through career development activities and career education. Research shows many high school students have had insufficient exposure to and have inadequate information about career related tasks and duties. Studies also show that many…

  14. Controlling S2 terminal using FS software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhuhe

    New S2FS software for controlling S2 terminal of Sheshan station has been developed. It works under Field System software. All S2 operation commands are incorporated in a station program. The interface of SWT computer and S2 terminal is RS232 interface. S2FS software is designed by using Shell and C language. It has been used in VSOP experiments.

  15. Development of Self-Efficacy towards Using Alternative Assessment Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldur, Serkan; Tatar, Nilgun

    2011-01-01

    Determining the candidate teachers' opinions regarding self-efficacy towards alternative assessment will be beneficial in that this will improve their competencies while using these approaches in their applications within the classroom. In this article, the development and validation of the "Self-efficacy towards Using Alternative Assessment…

  16. Alternative Institutional Arrangements for Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The anger that comes from watching and feeling failure in development, in addition to the anger that comes from the West's reluctance or refusal to recognize thought and religious conviction needs to challenge us towards major institutional reform for a wider and drastic democratization of the world's architecture. Stephen Chan warns there are tremendous new hopes and fears and the old cannot understand them or miscegenate easily with them. In fact, the old keeps trying to express the new in ...

  17. Developments in alternative treatments for organophosphate poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rupa; Iken, Brian; Leon, Alex

    2015-03-04

    Organophosphosphates (OPs) are highly effective acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors that are used worldwide as cheap, multi-purpose insecticides. OPs are also used as chemical weapons forming the active core of G-series and V-series chemical agents including tabun, sarin, soman, cyclosarin, VX, and their chemical analogs. Human exposure to any of these compounds leads to neurotoxic accumulation of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, resulting in abnormal nerve function and multiple secondary health complications. Suicide from deliberate exposure to OPs is particularly prevalent in developing countries across the world and constitutes a major global health crisis. The prevalence and accessible nature of OP compounds within modern agricultural spheres and concern over their potential use in biochemical weapon attacks have incentivized both government agencies and medical researchers to enact stricter regulatory policies over their usage and to begin developing more proactive medical treatments in cases of OP poisoning. This review will discuss the research undertaken in recent years that has investigated new supplementary drug options for OP treatment and support therapy, including progress in the development of enzymatic prophylaxis.

  18. Development and In Vitro Bioactivity Profiling of Alternative Sustainable Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable, environmentally benign nanomaterials (NMs) are being designed as alternatives based on functionality to conventional metal-based nanomaterials (NMs) in order to minimize potential risk to human health and the environment. Development of rapid methods to evaluate the ...

  19. Alternative energy development strategies for China towards 2030

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linwei MA; Zheng LI; Feng FU; Xiliang ZHANG; Weidou NI

    2009-01-01

    The purposes, objectives and technology path-ways for alternative energy development are discussed with the aim of reaching sustainable energy development in China. Special attention has been paid to alternative power and alternative vehicle fuels. Instead of limiting alternative energy to energy sources such as nuclear and renewable energy, the scope of discussion is extended to alternative technologies such as coal power with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS), electric and hydrogen vehicles. In order to take account of the fact that China's sustainable energy development involves many dimen-sions, a six-dimensional indicator set has been established and applied with the aim of comprehensively evaluating different technology pathways in a uniform way. The ana-lysis reaches the following conclusions: (a) in the power sector, wind power, nuclear power and hydro power should be developed as much as possible, while R&D of solar power and coal power with CCS should be strengthened continuously for future deployment. (b) in the transporta-tion sector, there is no foreseeable silver bullet to replace oil on a large scale within the time frame of 20 to 30 years. To ease the severe energy security situation, expedient choices like coal derived fuels could be developed. However, its scale should be optimized in accordance to the trade-off of energy security benefits, production costs and environmental costs. Desirable alternative fuels (or technologies) like 2nd generation biofuels and electrical vehicles should be the subject of intensive R&D with the objective to be cost effective as early as possible.

  20. Alternative financial institutions? Sustainability, development, social reproduction, and gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder, T

    1999-08-01

    This paper proposes a conceptual framework for alternative financial institutions in Nicaragua. The article includes a discussion on innovative services and policies, which differentiate CARUNA (National Savings and Credit Cooperative ¿Caja Rural¿), and other financial institutions from conventional banks. It further examines theories that have altered the way development practitioners think about the economy, poverty reduction, and the positions of men and women in the society. These theories are the feminist economic theory and alternative development theories. Specific ways to incorporate the concepts of alternative and feminist economic theories in the design of financial institutions include open credit, savings, and remittance mechanisms, and coordinating councils. The gender analysis approach was used to evaluate the design of financial institutions.

  1. Advances in developing alternative treatments for postharvest pest control

    Science.gov (United States)

    USDA-ARS made two significant advances in the last 10 years in the development of alternative treatments for postharvest pest control: oxygenated phosphine fumigation and nitric oxide fumigation. Oxygenated phosphine is phosphine fumigation in an oxygen enriched atmosphere. It is significantly more...

  2. Drivers and barriers for development of alternative broadband

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadayoni, Reza; Sigurdsson, Halldór Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Alternative broadband infrastructures are emerging and developing very fast. Different technologies and organization/business models have been used to establish these networks. The aim of the paper is to understand and identify the technological, economic and political/regulatory drivers and barr...

  3. Local alternative energy futures: developing economies/building communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totten, M.; Glass, B.; Freedberg, M.; Webb, L.

    1980-12-01

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the three parts of the conference. A sufficient range of information is presented to enable interested parties to explore the viable alternatives for community self-sufficiency. The parts are entitled: Financial Incentives and Funding Sources; Standards, Regulations, Mandates, Ordinances, Covenants; and Community/Economic Development. (MCW)

  4. Characterization and inventory of PCDD/Fs and PBDD/Fs emissions from the incineration of waste printed circuit board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huabo; Li, Jinhui; Liu, Yicheng; Yamazaki, Norimasa; Jiang, Wei

    2011-08-01

    Many developing countries have not significantly changed their course with regard to electronic waste contamination, and they are still facing the specter of mountains of hazardous electronic waste, with serious consequences for both the environment and public health. An efficient and stable analytical method was developed to determine the inventory and emission factors of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) formed from the incineration of scrap printed circuit boards (PCBs). Both PBDD/Fs and PCDD/Fs have been found in all experimental sections with a maximum formation rate at temperatures between 250 and 400 °C. The amounts tended first to increase and then began to decrease as the temperature rose. When subjected to a heating temperature of 325 °C, the total content of twelve 2,3,7,8-substituted PBDD/Fs congeners (tetra- through octabromo-) gathered from three outputs was the largest, at 19 000, 160 000, and 57 ng TEQ/kg in solid, liquid, and gaseous fractions, respectively; the total content of seventeen 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs congeners (tetra- through octachloro-) was 820, 550, and 1.4 ng TEQ/kg. The formation of PCDD/Fs was remarkably less than that of PBDD/Fs because bromine concentrations considerably exceeded chlorine concentrations. The ingredients and conditions necessary to form PCDD/Fs or PBDD/Fs were definitely present, such as products of incomplete combustion, halogenides, an oxidizing atmosphere, and a catalyst-Cu salts being the most effective, significantly increasing the yields of PCDD/Fs and PBDD/Fs and decreasing the optimum temperature range.

  5. Drivers and barriers for development of alternative broadband

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadayoni, Reza; Sigurdsson, Halldór Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Alternative broadband infrastructures are emerging and developing very fast. Different technologies and organization/business models have been used to establish these networks. The aim of the paper is to understand and identify the technological, economic and political/regulatory drivers...... and barriers of this development, including the role of government in this process. The paper has a pure empirical approach and is mainly based on detailed case studies....

  6. Development of Sub 10 fs Visible-NIR, UV, and DUV Pulses and Their Applications to Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Takayoshi Kobayashi; Atsushi Yabushita; Yuichiro Kida

    2016-01-01

    In the first section of this Chapter, the basics of nonlinear optical (NLO) processes are systematically described. Then the generation of the visible pulse utilizing the NLO processes is described and ultrafast spectroscopy using the visible pulse is discussed. By using such short pulse, fast chemical reactions, which cannot be identified by utilizing strobe light or flash lamp, can be studied. After the development of femtosecond lasers, they have been widely applied to observe the transiti...

  7. The Three Fs of Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a cohesive theory of classroom management, developed by the author. This "three Fs" theory, predicated upon extant empiricism and scholarship vis-a-vis classroom management, was devised and implemented over several semesters within a field-based course at the University of Texas at Austin for preservice mathematics majors…

  8. A Comparison of Five Alternative Approaches to Information Systems Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Hirschheim

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The field of information systems (IS has grown dramatically over the past three decades. Recent trends have transformed the IS landscape. These trends include: the evolution of implementation technology from centralized mainframe environments towards distributed client-server architectures, embracing the internet and intranets; changes in user interface technology from character-based to graphical user interfaces, multimedia, and the World Wide Web; changes in applications from transaction processing systems towards systems supporting collaborative work; and the use of information technology as an enabler of business process reengineering and redesign. These technology changes coupled with changes in organizations and their operating environment, such as the growth of the network and virtual organization, internationalization and globalization of many organizations, intensified global competition, changes in values such as customer orientation (service quality and Quality of Working Life, have imposed new demands on the development of information systems. These changes have led to an increasing discussion about information systems development (ISO, and in particular, the various methods, tools, methodologies, and approaches for ISD. We believe such discussion has opened the door for new, alternative IS development approaches and methodologies. Our paper takes up this theme by describing five alternative ISD approaches, namely the Interactionist approach, the Speech Act-based approach, Soft Systems Methodology, the Trade Unionist approach, and the Professional Work Practices approach. Despite the fact that most of these approaches have a history of over 15 years, their relevance to IS development is not well recognized in the mainstream of IS practice and research, nor is their institutional status comparable to traditional approaches such as structured analysis and design methods. Therefore we characterize the five approaches as 'alternative' in

  9. Development strategy of alternative energy responding to Climate Change Concerns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Oh; Moon, Young Seok; Cho, Gyeong Lyeob [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea)

    1999-09-01

    Since UNICEF (UN Framework Convention on Climate Change) has adopted in Brazil, June 1992, there have been four times of COPS taken place to discuss more detailed and realistic international action plan for regulating greenhouse gas emission and reduction scheme. Due to this, the direction of future energy policy has been changed in a large scale. The reduction of greenhouse gas is the most urgent issue at present rather than the stable supply of energy in the past. It is natural that improving energy efficiency and developing clean alternative energy have been a major issue. In case of the advanced countries, the energy policy has been changed to the harmonization of so called 3E, environmental conservation, economic growth, and energy security from the economic growth oriented energy policy and has tried to enhance industrial competition through developing new technology and alternative energy for improving energy efficiency. Alternative energy, called as new renewable energy, does not have to concern about its exhaustion and is the only clean future energy source. Therefore this is an important project that should be implemented with a long-term vision and interest by the people as well as the government. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Rapid developmental maturation of neocortical FS cell intrinsic excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ethan M; Jeong, Hyo-Young; Kruglikov, Ilya; Tremblay, Robin; Lazarenko, Roman M; Rudy, Bernardo

    2011-03-01

    Fast-spiking (FS) cells are a prominent subtype of neocortical γ-aminobutyric acidergic interneurons that mediate feed-forward inhibition and the temporal sculpting of information transfer in neural circuits, maintain excitation/inhibition balance, and contribute to network oscillations. FS cell dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of disorders such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia. Mature FS cells exhibit coordinated molecular and cellular specializations that facilitate rapid responsiveness, including brief spikes and sustained high-frequency discharge. We show that these features appear during the second and third postnatal weeks driven by upregulation of K(+) channel subunits of the Kv3 subfamily. The low membrane resistance and fast time constant characteristic of FS cells also appears during this time, driven by expression of a K(+) leak current mediated by K(ir)2 subfamily inward rectifier K(+) channels and TASK subfamily 2-pore K(+) channels. Blockade of this leak produces dramatic depolarization of FS cells suggesting the possibility for potent neuromodulation. Finally, the frequency of FS cell membrane potential oscillations increases during development and is markedly slower in TASK-1/3 knockout mice, suggesting that TASK channels regulate FS cell rhythmogenesis. Our findings imply that some of the effects of acidosis and/or anesthetics on brain function may be due to blockade of TASK channels in FS cells.

  11. A New Globalization Paradigm: World Unity or Alternatives for Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Shvydanenko

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the conceptual foundations of the modern global economic system of development. It reflects the cyclical nature of changes to and the details of global integration processes. The creation of a global economy from a multi-paradigmatic angle is briefly outlined, taking into account the modern paradigms of globalization and the predominance of alternatives to the future development of a global economic space. The article investigates the development of a new type of world economy, a multi-system with a proven role for linkages and a more consolidated world economy. The article reveals the initial conditions for and main qualitative changes related to the integrated development of a complex network of interdependent national societies and macro-regional geo-economic structures. The article also reveals changes in the configuration of those factors that provide competitiveness for these societies and geo-economic formations.

  12. Alternative energy technologies: their application in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Carmona, L.S.

    1980-08-01

    This paper was presented at the Fourth Annual Conference of INTA, in Cairo, Egypt, in October 1980. It deals with the possibilities of using alternative energy technologies in planned urban areas in the developing countries. The case of Mexico is used to analyze use, energy balance, inventories of energy resources, and forecasts of energy supply by the year 2000. Described is the relationship between urban structures and energy requirements, providing data and commentary with respect to Mexican national urban plans, and with its programs in the energy area. Data in charts, maps, and statistics are included.

  13. Social contention in Denmark over alternative wind power development paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Sophie; Kirkegaard, Julia Kirch; Clausen, Laura Tolnov

    Through a case-study on the development of a contested wind farm project in the Northern part of Jutland in Denmark, this paper builds on an STS-approach to shed light on the contested acceptability of wind farm development, which has produced controversy and social contention over energy justice....... Wind energy projects on land in Denmark are increasingly subject to social contention. Research and policy are mostly directed towards understanding how 'public acceptance' of current market-driven ways of wind power development can be supported and less on exploring the potentiality of alternative...... paths or understanding processes of coalition formation and reasons for social contention that underlie socio-technical controversies over sustainable transitions. In this paper, we draw on case-study research, inquiring into the contested translation of a Danish wind farm site in the rural area...

  14. Development of alternative fuels from coal-derived syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.M.

    1992-05-19

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated fuels, hydrocarbon fuels, fuel intermediates, and octane enhancers; and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). BASF continues to have difficulties in scaling-up the new isobutanol synthesis catalyst developed in Air Products' laboratories. Investigations are proceeding, but the proposed operation at LaPorte in April is now postponed. DOE has accepted a proposal to demonstrate Liquid Phase Shift (LPS) chemistry at LaPorte as an alternative to isobutanol. There are two principal reasons for carrying out this run. First, following the extensive modifications at the site, operation on a relatively benign'' system is needed before we start on Fischer-Tropsch technology in July. Second, use of shift catalyst in a slurry reactor will enable DOE's program on coal-based Fischer-Tropsch to encompass commercially available cobalt catalysts-up to now they have been limited to iron-based catalysts which have varying degrees of shift activity. In addition, DOE is supportive of continued fuel testing of LaPorte methanol-tests of MIOO at Detroit Diesel have been going particularly well. LPS offers the opportunity to produce methanol as the catalyst, in the absence of steam, is active for methanol synthesis.

  15. USU Alternative and Unconventional Energy Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behunin, Robert [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Wood, Byard [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Heaslip, Kevin [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Zane, Regan [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Lyman, Seth [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Simmons, Randy [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Christensen, David [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

    2014-01-29

    The purpose and rationale of this project has been to develop enduring research capabilities at Utah State University (USU) and the Utah State University Research Foundation (USURF) in a number of energy efficient and renewable energy areas including primarily a) algae energy systems, b) solar lighting, c) intuitive buildings, d) electric transportation, 3) unconventional energy environmental monitoring and beneficial reuse technologies (water and CO2), f) wind energy profiling, and g) land use impacts. The long-term goal of this initiative has been to create high-wage jobs in Utah and a platform for sustained faculty and student engagement in energy research. The program’s objective has been to provide a balanced portfolio of R&D conducted by faculty, students, and permanent staff. This objective has been met. While some of the project’s tasks met with more success than others, as with any research project of this scope, overall the research has contributed valuable technical insight and broader understanding in key energy related areas. The algae energy systems research resulted in a highly productive workforce development enterprise as it graduated a large number of well prepared students entering alternative energy development fields and scholarship. Moreover, research in this area has demonstrated both the technological and economic limitations and tremendous potential of algae feedstock-based energy and co-products. Research conducted in electric transportation, specifically in both stationary and dynamic wireless inductive coupling charging technologies, has resulted in impactful advances. The project initiated the annual Conference on Electric Roads and Vehicles (http://www.cervconference.org/), which is growing and attracts more than 100 industry experts and scholars. As a direct result of the research, the USU/USURF spin-out startup, WAVE (Wireless Advanced Vehicle Electrification), continues work in wirelessly charged bus transit systems

  16. Interpretive description: a noncategorical qualitative alternative for developing nursing knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, S; Kirkham, S R; MacDonald-Emes, J

    1997-04-01

    Despite nursing's enthusiastic endorsement of the applicability of qualitative research approaches to answering relevant clinical questions, many nurse researchers have been hesitant to depart from traditional qualitative research methods. While various derivations of phenomenology, grounded theory, and ethnography have been popularized within qualitative nursing research, the methodological principles upon which these approaches are based reflect the foundations and objectives of disciplines whose aims are sometimes quite distinct from nursing's domain of inquiry. Thus, as many nurse researchers have discovered, nursing's unique knowledge mandate may not always be well served by strict adherence to traditional methods as the "gold standard" for qualitative nursing research. The authors present the point of view that a non-categorical description, drawing on principles grounded in nursing's epistemological mandate, may be an appropriate methodological alternative for credible research toward the development of nursing science. They propose a coherent set of strategies for conceptual orientation, sampling, data construction, analysis, and reporting by which nurses can use an interpretive descriptive approach to develop knowledge about human health and illness experience phenomena without sacrificing the theoretical or methodological integrity that the traditional qualitative approaches provide.

  17. Functionality of alternative protein in gluten-free product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deora, Navneet Singh; Deswal, Aastha; Mishra, Hari Niwas

    2015-07-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated disease triggered in genetically susceptible individuals by ingested gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and other closely related cereal grains. The current treatment for celiac disease is life-long adherence to a strict gluten-exclusion diet. The replacement of gluten presents a significant technological challenge, as it is an essential structure-building protein, which is necessary for formulating high-quality baked goods. A major limitation in the production of gluten-free products is the lack of protein functionality in non-wheat cereals. Additionally, commercial gluten-free mixes usually contain only carbohydrates, which may significantly limit the amount of protein in the diet. In the recent past, various approaches are attempted to incorporate protein-based ingredients and to modify the functional properties for gluten-free product development. This review aims to the highlight functionality of the alternative protein-based ingredients, which can be utilized for gluten-free product development both functionally as well as nutritionally.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Tijrn

    2003-05-31

    This Final Report for Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-95PC93052, the ''Development of Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas,'' was prepared by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products), and covers activities from 29 December 1994 through 31 July 2002. The overall objectives of this program were to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture primarily of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at the LaPorte, Texas Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). Laboratory work was performed by Air Products and a variety of subcontractors, and focused on the study of the kinetics of production of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, the production of DME using the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) Process, the conversion of DME to fuels and chemicals, and the production of other higher value products from syngas. Four operating campaigns were performed at the AFDU during the performance period. Tests of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process and the LPDME{trademark} Process were made to confirm results from the laboratory program and to allow for the study of the hydrodynamics of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) at a significant engineering scale. Two campaigns demonstrated the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon products via the slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. Other topics that were studied within this program include the economics of production of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), the identification of trace components in coal-derived syngas and the means to economically remove these species, and the study of systems for separation of wax from catalyst in the F-T process. The work performed under this Cooperative Agreement has continued to promote the development of technologies that use clean syngas produced

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Tijrn

    2003-05-31

    This Final Report for Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-95PC93052, the ''Development of Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas,'' was prepared by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products), and covers activities from 29 December 1994 through 31 July 2002. The overall objectives of this program were to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture primarily of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at the LaPorte, Texas Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). Laboratory work was performed by Air Products and a variety of subcontractors, and focused on the study of the kinetics of production of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, the production of DME using the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) Process, the conversion of DME to fuels and chemicals, and the production of other higher value products from syngas. Four operating campaigns were performed at the AFDU during the performance period. Tests of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process and the LPDME{trademark} Process were made to confirm results from the laboratory program and to allow for the study of the hydrodynamics of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) at a significant engineering scale. Two campaigns demonstrated the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon products via the slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. Other topics that were studied within this program include the economics of production of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), the identification of trace components in coal-derived syngas and the means to economically remove these species, and the study of systems for separation of wax from catalyst in the F-T process. The work performed under this Cooperative Agreement has continued to promote the development of technologies that use clean syngas produced

  20. "Collaborative Development": An Alternative to Phatic Discourse and the Art of Co-operative Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansley, Charles

    1994-01-01

    The risk of cooperative development sessions (J. Edge) is that they may reinforce negative stereotyping by teachers about students. Teacher's negative utterances and phatic discourse are used to support the argument. Collaborative development through empathic debate is offered as an alternative. (Contains 12 references.) (JP)

  1. Alternative Education, Equity and Compromise: Dilemmas for Practice Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this article is to provide a child rights analysis of the equity of educational experience afforded to young people outside mainstream schools by alternative providers. The dilemma for policy and existing practice is that alternative education supports children's right to an education as stated in Article 28 of the United Nations…

  2. Bacteriophages as an alternative strategy for fighting biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasion, Sylwia; Kwiatek, Magdalena; Gryko, Romuald; Mizak, Lidia; Malm, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The ability of microbes to form biofilms is an important element of their pathogenicity, and biofilm formation is a serious challenge for today's medicine. Fighting the clinical complications associated with biofilm formation is very difficult and linked to a high risk of failure, especially in a time of increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Bacterial species most commonly isolated from biofilms include coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. The frequent failure of antibiotic therapy led researchers to look for alternative methods and experiment with the use of antibacterial factors with a mechanism of action different from that of antibiotics. Experimental studies with bacteriophages and mixtures thereof, expressing lytic properties against numerous biofilm-forming bacterial species showed that bacteriophages may both prevent biofilm formation and contribute to eradication of biofilm bacteria. A specific role is played here by phage depolymerases, which facilitate the degradation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and thus the permeation of bacteriophages into deeper biofilm layers and lysis of the susceptible bacterial cells. Much hope is placed in genetic modifications of bacteriophages that would allow the equipping bacteriophages with the function of depolymerase synthesis. The use of phage cocktails prevents the development of phage-resistant bacteria.

  3. Future energy demand in Laos. Scenario alternatives for development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luukkanen, J.; Kouphokham, K.; Panula-Ontto, J. [and others

    2012-07-01

    Energy production in Laos is still dominated by traditional fuels. Fuelwood in the main source of energy and most of the energy is consumed at households for cooking. Increase in the number of cars and motorbikes is rapidly increasing the use of imported petroleum products. Electrification is one of the central targets of the Lao government. The electrification rate has increased fast in Laos and in the year 2010 over 70 % households had electricity supply. The target is to have 90 % access to electricity by the year 2020. The World Bank regards the electrification of Lao PDR to be a success story. This paper deals with the present and future energy consumption in Laos. First the historical trends of energy use in different sectors are analysed. The future scenarios are constructed using LaoLinda model. Four different future alternative development paths are analysed using the model results. The energy use data source for the analysis is from the Ministry of Energy and Mines (MEM) of Lao PDR. Economic and other data is from the Department of Statistics of Lao PDR.

  4. Unit Pricing and Alternatives: Developing an Individualized Shopping Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cude, Brenda; Walker, Rosemary

    1985-01-01

    This article offers a new perspective on the teaching of unit pricing in consumer economics classes by identifying ways to teach the costs as well as the benefits of unit pricing and realistic guidelines for suggesting situations in which it is most appropriate. Alternatives to unit pricing will also be explored. (CT)

  5. FS Tenure System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — This system tracks candidates applying for tenure as a Foreign Service Officer (FSO). Microsoft Access database used during the Tenure boards, which is conducted...

  6. Complementarity of ResourceSat-1 AWiFS and Landsat TM/ETM+ sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goward, S.N.; Chander, G.; Pagnutti, M.; Marx, A.; Ryan, R.; Thomas, N.; Tetrault, R.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable interest has been given to forming an international collaboration to develop a virtual moderate spatial resolution land observation constellation through aggregation of data sets from comparable national observatories such as the US Landsat, the Indian ResourceSat and related systems. This study explores the complementarity of India's ResourceSat-1 Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) with the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). The analysis focuses on the comparative radiometry, geometry, and spectral properties of the two sensors. Two applied assessments of these data are also explored to examine the strengths and limitations of these alternate sources of moderate resolution land imagery with specific application domains. There are significant technical differences in these imaging systems including spectral band response, pixel dimensions, swath width, and radiometric resolution which produce differences in observation data sets. None of these differences was found to strongly limit comparable analyses in agricultural and forestry applications. Overall, we found that the AWiFS and Landsat TM/ETM+ imagery are comparable and in some ways complementary, particularly with respect to temporal repeat frequency. We have found that there are limits to our understanding of the AWiFS performance, for example, multi-camera design and stability of radiometric calibration over time, that leave some uncertainty that has been better addressed for Landsat through the Image Assessment System and related cross-sensor calibration studies. Such work still needs to be undertaken for AWiFS and similar observatories that may play roles in the Global Earth Observation System of Systems Land Surface Imaging Constellation.

  7. Alternative Development for Data Migration Using Dynamic Query Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Ramírez Johan Alfredo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an ETL (Extract, Transform, Load prototype called Valery as alternative approach to migration process which includes a compiler for dynamic generation of SQL queries. Its main features involve: SQL dynamic generation, set of configuration commands and environment for file uploading. The tests use the Northwind academic database and an individual environment. The model implementation uses flat files and SQL as query language. Finally, there is an analysis of the results obtained.

  8. Considerations Regarding Development of Alternative Propulsion in Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Steiner

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ecological indications and the depletion of fossil fuel resourcesare the main reasons for current studies of alternativepropulsion in aviation i.e. for searching for new regenerativeenergy sources. The technical and technological presumptionsfor the transfer from the conventional to alternative fuel aremore radical than the transition from piston to jet propulsion.The main problems include the production of liquefied hydrogen,the necessary aircraft structure modifications, and the requiredinfrastntcture supporl.

  9. An update in the 'development of alternate liquid fuels'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, M. J.

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory has formulated a series of Alternate Liquid Fuels (AIF), compounded from combustible fluids such as alcohols, mineral oils and solvents, found in the waste streams of the cosmetic, petrochemical, electronics and other industries. These fuels are now being processed by a pilot plant with a productive capacity of 40,000 gallons in 8 hours, at direct costs ranging from $0.26 to $0.29 a gallon depending on selected feedstocks and blend ratios

  10. New class of compact diode pumped sub 10 fs lasers for biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, T.; Mueller, A.; Sumpf, B.;

    2016-01-01

    -laser. In this work we present an alternative method by deploying frequency-doubled IR diodes with good beam qualities to pump fs-lasers. The revolutionary approach allows choosing any pump wavelengths in the green region and avoids complicated relay optics for the diodes. For the first time we show results...... of a diode-pumped 10 fs-laser and how a single diode setup can be integrated into a 30 x 30 cm(2) fs-laser system generating sub 20 fs laser pulses with output power towards half a Watt. This technology paves the way for a new class of very compact and cost-efficient fs-lasers for life science and industrial...... applications....

  11. Vanuatu Education Policy Post-2015: "Alternative", Decolonising Processes for "Development"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on ongoing research in Vanuatu and the wider Pacific. It maps multilevel roles that education and development policy actors, and civil societies in particular, have increasingly been playing in official education and development policy activities. Most recently this has been in relation to the "post-2015" agendas…

  12. Schedule Optimization Study, Hanford RI/FS Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    A Schedule Optimization Study (SOS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Program was conducted by an independent team of professionals from other federal agencies and the private sector experienced in environmental restoration. This team spent two weeks at Hanford in September 1992 examining the reasons for the lengthy RI/FS process at Hanford and developing recommendations to expedite the process. The need for the study arose out of a schedule dispute regarding the submission of the 1100-EM-1 Operable Unit RI/FS Work Plan. This report documents the study called for in the August 29, 1991, Dispute Resolution Committee Decision Statement. Battelle's Environmental Management Operations (EMO) coordinated the effort for DOE's Richland Field Office (RL).

  13. Fs = μs Fn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ministro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-9288.2016v12n1p195 Fs = μs Fn é uma releitura a três vozes dos Homeóstatos de José-Alberto Marques. Partindo do desmembramento e recomposição digital do material sonoro, testam-se, com base nas possibilidades oferecidas pelo cruzamento entre a plasticidade vocal e as ferramentas digitais de manipulação, as potencialidades combinatórias que uma obra desta natureza encerra.

  14. Problems of the Development of Alternative Forms of Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballaeva, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    An insufficient number of affordable places in Russia's preschool system is affecting the educational development of many young children and reducing the number of mothers who could be working in the economy.

  15. Problems of the Development of Alternative Forms of Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballaeva, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    An insufficient number of affordable places in Russia's preschool system is affecting the educational development of many young children and reducing the number of mothers who could be working in the economy.

  16. Integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine Into Conventional Health Care System in Developing Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Shiva Raj; Neupane, Dinesh; Kallestrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine has been a part of human life and practices since the beginning of time. The role of complementary and alternative medicine for the health of humans is undisputed particularly in light of its role in health promotion and well-being. This article discusses ways...... through which complementary and alternative medicine can be promoted and sustained as an integrated element of health care in developing countries. We specifically present the exemplary of Amchi traditional doctors of Northern Himalayas...

  17. The Core Flight System (cFS) Community: Providing Low Cost Solutions for Small Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, David; Wilmot, Jonathan; Cudmore, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In February 2015 the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) completed the open source release of the entire Core Flight Software (cFS) suite. After the open source release a multi-NASA center Configuration Control Board (CCB) was established that has managed multiple cFS product releases. The cFS was developed and is being maintained in compliance with the NASA Class B software development process requirements and the open source release includes all Class B artifacts. The cFS is currently running on three operational science spacecraft and is being used on multiple spacecraft and instrument development efforts. While the cFS itself is a viable flight software (FSW) solution, we have discovered that the cFS community is a continuous source of innovation and growth that provides products and tools that serve the entire FSW lifecycle and future mission needs. This paper summarizes the current state of the cFS community, the key FSW technologies being pursued, the development/verification tools and opportunities for the small satellite community to become engaged. The cFS is a proven high quality and cost-effective solution for small satellites with constrained budgets.

  18. An ecological approach to language development: an alternative functionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, C H

    1990-11-01

    I argue for a new functionalist approach to language development, an ecological approach. A realist orientation is used that locates the causes of language development neither in the child nor in the language environment but in the functioning of perceptual systems that detect language-world relationships and use them to guide attention and action. The theory requires no concept of innateness, thus avoiding problems inherent in either the innate ideas or the genes-as-causal-programs explanations of the source of structure in language. An ecological explanation of language is discussed in relation to concepts and language, language as representation, problems in early word learning, metaphor, and syntactic development. Finally, problems incurred in using the idea of innateness are summarized: History prior to the chosen beginning point is ignored, data on organism-environment mutuality are not collected, and the explanation claims no effect of learning, which cannot be tested empirically.

  19. The Ecological Approach to Development: An Alternative to Cognitivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Stephen; Katz, Stuart

    1981-01-01

    Two approaches to development are identified--ecological and cognitive. A comparison of the two approaches is made, and decisions are made favoring the ecological approach. A detailed description of the advantages of the ecological approach is provided by means of a systems theory model. (Author/DB)

  20. The management of Marketing: an alternative in enterprises development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn Bernal Prado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The company product portfolio has to be review and permanent adjust in order to achieve the given objectives. The present work has as an objective to design and to implement a procedure of specialized cements development at Cement Siguaney's Company in Sancti Spíritus, due to the decline phase in which was the enterprise caused by the dated technologies and the development of other cement companies existing in the country with efficient and a cheap process in the dry way. The implementation of the procedure for the development of new products at Cement Siguaney's Company in Sancti Spíritus made possible that the company became one of its kind dedicated to the production and commercialization of specialized cements. Each of the phases of the procedure is based on the use of investigation techniques (inductive and deductive analytic-synthetic, historical and logicaland empirical-experimental level (document analysis, surveys, observation, experiment and data triangulation The fundamental results of present work are framed in the increment of the specialized cements request, bigger productivity of work, technological efficiency, humanization of work, among others.

  1. EST Table: FS932095 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available niofacial development protein 1 [Apis mellifera] 10/09/13 32 %/296 aa FBpp0169615|D...FS932095 E_FL_fwgP_33D17_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 36 %/283 aa ref|XP_001122476.1| PREDICTED: similar to cra

  2. Development of alternate methods of determining integrated SMR source terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Kenneth [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2014-06-10

    The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Licensing Task Force (TF) has been evaluating licensing issues unique and important to iPWRs, ranking these issues, and developing NEI position papers for submittal to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) during the past three years. Papers have been developed and submitted to the NRC in a range of areas including: Price-Anderson Act, NRC annual fees, security, modularity, and staffing. In December, 2012, NEI completed a draft position paper on SMR source terms and participated in an NRC public meeting presenting a summary of this paper, which was subsequently submitted to the NRC. One important conclusion of the source term paper was the evaluation and selection of high importance areas where additional research would have a significant impact on source terms. The highest ranked research area was iPWR containment aerosol natural deposition. The NRC accepts the use of existing aerosol deposition correlations in Regulatory Guide 1.183, but these were developed for large light water reactor (LWR) containments. Application of these correlations to an iPWR design has resulted in greater than a ten-fold reduction of containment airborne aerosol inventory as compared to large LWRs. Development and experimental justification of containment aerosol natural deposition correlations specifically for the unique iPWR containments is expected to result in a large reduction of design basis and beyond-design-basis accident source terms with concomitantly smaller dose to workers and the public. Therefore, NRC acceptance of iPWR containment aerosol natural deposition correlations will directly support the industry’s goal of reducing the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) for SMRs. Based on the results in this work, it is clear that thermophoresis is relatively unimportant for iPWRs. Gravitational settling is well understood, and may be the dominant process for a dry environment. Diffusiophoresis and enhanced

  3. Development of other oil-alternative energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Development efforts are being given on a large wind power generation system which has high reliability and economy and suits the actual situations in Japan. Verification tests will be conducted to establish control systems to realize load leveling against the increase in maximum power demand and the differences in demands between seasons, days and nights. Development will also be made on technologies for systems to operate devices optimally using nighttime power for household use. Solar light and heat energies will be introduced and used widely in housing to achieve efficient comprehensive energy utilization. Wastes, waste heat and unused energies locally available will be utilized to promote forming environment harmonious type energy communities. Photovoltaic and fuel cell power generation facilities will be installed on a trial basis to promote building a groundwork for full-scale installations. Photovoltaic power generation systems will be installed on actual houses to establish technologies to assess and optimize the load leveling effect. Attempts will be made on practical application of high-efficiency regional heat supply systems which utilize such unutilized energies as those from sea water and river water. Assistance will be given through preparing manuals on introduction of wastes power generation systems by local governments, and introduction of regional energy systems by using new discrete type power generation technologies and consumer-use cogeneration systems. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Development of alternatives to lead-bearing solders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianco, P.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Soldering technology, using tin-lead alloys has had a significant role in the packaging of highly functional, low cost electronic devices. The elimination of lead from all manufactured products, whether through legislation or tax incentives, will impact the electronics community which uses lead-containing solders. In response to these proposed measures, the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences has established a multi-year program involving participants from industry, academia, and the national laboratories with the objective to identify potential replacements for lead-bearing solders. Selection of candidate alloys is based upon the analysis of materials properties, manufacturability, modeling codes for reliability prediction, as well as toxicological properties and resource availability, data developed in the program.

  5. Development of alternative ship propulsion in terms of exhaust emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markowski Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of new emission limits for exhaust emissions of ship engines contributes to the development of new powertrain solutions. New solutions in the simplest approach concern the reduction of the concentration of sulfur in motor fuels. Typically, the aforementioned fuels have a lower value of viscosity which causes a number of supply system problems. It is becoming more and more common to use fuel cells in engine rooms of various types of marine vessels. Unlike conventional systems that use internal combustion engines, these systems have zero exhaust emissions. Hydrogen, methanol, methane and other substances may be used as a fuel in fuel cells. However, so far the best operating parameters are manifested by cells powered by hydrogen, which is associated with difficulties in obtaining and storing this fuel. Therefore, the use of turbine engines allows the obtaining of large operating and environmental advantages. The paper presents a comparison of the ecological parameters of turbine and piston engines.

  6. CHALLENGES AND ALTERNATIVE OF CREATIVITY DEVELOPMENT IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Yunus

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is the human ability to think, modify, discover and create something. Creativity in the scientific world and the general public is common term. In reality, creativity and human life are two different things, but inseparable, thus affecting and closely correlated. Life and civilization will stagnate and vacuum without creativity. Creativity always presents and appears in the rhythm of space and time as the level of thinking and the human needs. Problems faced by higher education in Indonesia today is the low creativity of both students and lecturers. Those are caused by: (1 creativity is not taught in higher education, (2 the creativity of students is less supported by parents, (3 the leader of higher education considers creativity as a means of damaging the system or existing products, and (4 the routines of lectures and students. In order to develop creativity in higher education, then the leader and lecturers should eliminate bad habits in destroying the creativity of subordinates and students, parents should continue the natural talent of the child, select the child’s social environment, minimize  punishment, and do not curb excessively  child to “do“ something. Ways that can be taken to intensify creativity in higher education including by the use of creative techniques based practical such as: brainstorming, incubator method, and the method of mapping the mind

  7. Alternatives in Research on the Social Aspects of Cognitive Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Faigenbaum

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The terms “social” and “cultural” are ambiguous and can be used with different meanings. This paper tries to clarify the prevailing conceptions of the social factors that intervene in cognitive development, as found in developmental psychology. These conceptions are grouped into five main approaches, based on their theoretical commitments and the corresponding methodological strategies: 1 some theories treat the social world as an object of knowledge; 2 other theories see social life as consisting in a collection of symbolic interactions; 3 some approaches tend to consider socio-cultural variables as constituting an environment that influences individual subjects; 4 still other approaches interpret this symbolic context in a technical way, as made-up of means-ends relationships; 5 finally, there remains the possibility of studying the social subject as an institutional actor. This article evaluates the virtues and limitations of some of the approaches already followed by researchers, and explores others, which appear as promising but still untried. 

  8. S&T advisors call for development of petroleum supplements and alternative energy sources in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Under the auspices of the Academic Divisions of CAS (CASAD), a panel of experts recently completed a consultative project on the medium- and long-term development strategy for petroleum supplements and alternative energy sources in China.

  9. Discrete Institutional Alternatives of Public Administration Reforms in Countries with Developed and Developing Institutional Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny A. Kapoguzov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an approach to evaluation the impact of the level of development of institutional environment on the success of the reforms of public administration. The indicators that characterize the degree of development of the institutional environment, in particular, the level of protection of property rights, the development of political competition, civil society, corruption, and trust in society are shown. Depending on the elements of the political-administrative system, socio-economic features, that determine the trajectories of reforms, showing alternative purposes and characterized some indicators, that characterizing the results of reforms for the OECD-counties. Showing institutional problems is implementing reforms in the transition countries, depending on the elements of the political and administrative systems, and socio-cultural factors that determine the path of reform, showing alternative purposes and characterized by individual indicators characterizing the results of the OECD reform. From the point of view of the classification results, the emphasis is made on quantitative results of the operational type, in particular, the dynamics of the general government expenditure and the level of employment of civil servants in relation to employment in the economy as a whole. Showing institutional problems in the implementation of reforms in the transition countries, in particular the gap of development of the bureaucratic ethos, the weakness of the market environment and the insufficient level of external pressure on the quality of public services. The significance for the success of reform and systemic cultural change within the state apparatus, which affects the quality of citizens' satisfaction with public services is observed. It is noted that the preliminary formalization of the public sector, the formation of Weberian bureaucracy type is essential for successful implementation of the New Public Management. The factors that

  10. Developmental neurotoxicity testing: recommendations for developing alternative methods for the screening and prioritization of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofton, Kevin M; Mundy, William R; Lein, Pamela J; Bal-Price, Anna; Coecke, Sandra; Seiler, Andrea E M; Knaut, Holger; Buzanska, Leonora; Goldberg, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Developmental neurotoxicity testing (DNT) is perceived by many stakeholders to be an area in critical need of alternative methods to current animal testing protocols and guidelines. An immediate goal is to develop test methods that are capable of screening large numbers of chemicals. This document provides recommendations for developing alternative DNT approaches that will generate the type of data required for evaluating and comparing predictive capacity and efficiency across test methods and laboratories. These recommendations were originally drafted to stimulate and focus discussions of alternative testing methods and models for DNT at the TestSmart DNT II meeting (http://caat.jhsph.edu/programs/workshops/dnt2.html) and this document reflects critical feedback from all stakeholders that participated in this meeting. The intent of this document is to serve as a catalyst for engaging the research community in the development of DNT alternatives and it is expected that these recommendations will continue to evolve with the science.

  11. Alternatives of Strategic Environmental Assessment for Road Traffic Development Planning-Case of Changchun City, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chong; XU Ye; SHANG Jincheng; Gordon HUANG

    2009-01-01

    On analyzing the achievement of the goal in the modern urban road traffic development planning, the alternative of Strategic Environmental Assessment for urban traffic planning should include the basic scheme, the extended scheme and the environmental protection scheme. This study from different perspectives designed the alternatives for Changchun's county-level road and urban road system planning, and used the method of System Dynamics to simulate, optimize and analyze those alternatives. Thereafter, some methods including the correlation function method were used to comprehensively assess and rank those alternatives for recommending two best alternatives with the consideration to the indicators, such as the total emission amount of CO, the total emission amount of nitrogen oxides, the noise value, the road construction cost, the fossil oil consumption and the traffic capacity. The result showed that the study would provide substantial supports for decision-makers to make more scientific decisions and promote the sustainable urban traffic in Changchun City.

  12. DIAGNOSIS OF ALTERNATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURE IN THE CITY OF UBÁ-MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Sperandio Duriguetto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional agriculture uses mechanization practices, remediation and soil fertilization and pesticides to control pests and diseases. The criticism of this farming system grows as studies show that pesticides contaminate food and the environment and cause health damage. Aiming at sustainable development and the pursuit of consolidation between the social, economic and ecological agriculture alternative arises. This work is outlined in order to understand the current status, characteristics, limitations and difficulties for the implementation of alternative agriculture in the municipality of Ubá-MG. Furthermore, we seek to identify the knowledge of agricultural alternative as well as the interest and profile of likely consumers of these products in the municipality. We conducted a quantitative research through the use of two questionnaires with multiple choice questions and dichotomous, by simple random sampling. The results show that there are many difficulties for the development of alternative agriculture in the county, including: a lack of resources for producers, small-scale production, lack of market and consumer knowledge about alternative product in the municipality. Given these difficulties, the alternative system seems advantageous and competitive both economically and environmentally compared to the conventional system. There was a lack of information regarding organic products, alternative, since access to these is restricted to much of the population in the municipality of Ubá and adjacent municipalities. Seeking theoretical basis it was necessary also to perform a literature search in several papers that address the theme.

  13. Effective management of regulator RI/FS comments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolinsky, S.M.; Lojek, D.; George, R.D.; Houser, S.M.; Strimbu, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a successful strategy that facilitates regulatory approval of CERCLA documents required by compliance agreement and CERCLA, based on the experience of Operable Unit 1, Waste Storage Area, of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This strategy, which has become the site standard at the FEMP, was instrumental in obtaining regulator approval of the OU1 RI and FS, and early approval of the Record of Decision during a very tight compliance agreement-driven schedule. This strategy can be applied at any DOE Superfund site, especially where there is need to recover lost schedule, an incentive to meet milestones early, a need to improve the relationship between the DOE and the regulators, or where the regulatory agencies have historically provided a large volume of comments on CERCLA documents. The strategy focuses on early identification and resolution of issues relating to draft RI/FS documents, as raised in regulatory agency review comments. This pro-active strategy has the potential for schedule and cost savings, as well as for improved communication between DOE and the regulators. The strategy includes preparation of a separate comment response document, integration of comment responses with RI/FS documents, development of a database of agency comments and their resolution, and sharing lessons learned with preparers of subsequent RI/FS documents. The paper provides background on the FEMP and describes the FEMP comment response strategy; DOE and regulator interface; the Sitewide Comment Database; networked electronic file management; the process for classifying, analyzing, and responding to comments; integration with base RI/FS documents; and a conclusion.

  14. Alternative Pathways to Talent Development in Music: The Narrative of an Eminent Filipino Singer-Songwriter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces-Bacsal, Rhoda Myra

    2014-01-01

    The narrative of an eminent Filipino singer-songwriter, Noel Cabangon, provides a description of an alternative pathway to musical talent development. Most theories on talent development assume that a young artist would have access to the resources required for one to advance in the domain. The results of multiple in-depth interviews suggested…

  15. Alternative Pathways to Talent Development in Music: The Narrative of an Eminent Filipino Singer-Songwriter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces-Bacsal, Rhoda Myra

    2014-01-01

    The narrative of an eminent Filipino singer-songwriter, Noel Cabangon, provides a description of an alternative pathway to musical talent development. Most theories on talent development assume that a young artist would have access to the resources required for one to advance in the domain. The results of multiple in-depth interviews suggested…

  16. Timing Childhoods: An Alternative Reading of Children's Development through Philosophy of Time, Temporality, Place and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesar, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This article argues that the denial of development can be a productive space and a liberating time for children in the current outcomes-driven times. The author offers an alternative reading of childhood, considering children's development differently through various philosophical theorizations of events, which emerge through utilizing philosophy…

  17. Alternative Education and the Development of Resilience in Youth Who Have Abandoned School in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Barrientos Soto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the practices of Alternative Schools in Puerto Rico that promote the aptitudes of resilience in students returning to school after having dropped-out. The research aims to identify the factors leading up the decision of dropping out of school and the specific practices performed which have made a difference for these students to remain in their new Alternative Schools. Information was analyzed from 10 Alternative Schools in Puerto Rico on the pressing factors that lead them to abandon school. The educational model of an Alternative School was examined to determine the best practices that build resilience in these youth. Among the findings, the leading factors in the decision to abandon school were related to academic failure followed by chronic absenteeism and cutting classes. The relation with a caring adult, significant student participation and emotional healing appear to be critical aspects in developing resilience in this student population.

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of Alternative Splicing during Development and Drought Stress in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Shawn R; Danilevskaya, Olga N; Meng, Xin; Beatty, Mary; Zastrow-Hayes, Gina; Harris, Charlotte; Van Allen, Brandon; Habben, Jeffrey; Li, Bailin

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a crucial role in plant development as well as stress responses. Although alternative splicing has been studied during development and in response to stress, the interplay between these two factors remains an open question. To assess the effects of drought stress on developmentally regulated splicing in maize (Zea mays), 94 RNA-seq libraries from ear, tassel, and leaf of the B73 public inbred line were constructed at four developmental stages under both well-watered and drought conditions. This analysis was supplemented with a publicly available series of 53 libraries from developing seed, embryo, and endosperm. More than 48,000 novel isoforms, often with stage- or condition-specific expression, were uncovered, suggesting that developmentally regulated alternative splicing occurs in thousands of genes. Drought induced large developmental splicing changes in leaf and ear but relatively few in tassel. Most developmental stage-specific splicing changes affected by drought were tissue dependent, whereas stage-independent changes frequently overlapped between leaf and ear. A linear relationship was found between gene expression changes in splicing factors and alternative spicing of other genes during development. Collectively, these results demonstrate that alternative splicing is strongly associated with tissue type, developmental stage, and stress condition.

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of Alternative Splicing during Development and Drought Stress in Maize1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Shawn R.; Meng, Xin; Beatty, Mary; Zastrow-Hayes, Gina; Harris, Charlotte; Habben, Jeffrey; Li, Bailin

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a crucial role in plant development as well as stress responses. Although alternative splicing has been studied during development and in response to stress, the interplay between these two factors remains an open question. To assess the effects of drought stress on developmentally regulated splicing in maize (Zea mays), 94 RNA-seq libraries from ear, tassel, and leaf of the B73 public inbred line were constructed at four developmental stages under both well-watered and drought conditions. This analysis was supplemented with a publicly available series of 53 libraries from developing seed, embryo, and endosperm. More than 48,000 novel isoforms, often with stage- or condition-specific expression, were uncovered, suggesting that developmentally regulated alternative splicing occurs in thousands of genes. Drought induced large developmental splicing changes in leaf and ear but relatively few in tassel. Most developmental stage-specific splicing changes affected by drought were tissue dependent, whereas stage-independent changes frequently overlapped between leaf and ear. A linear relationship was found between gene expression changes in splicing factors and alternative spicing of other genes during development. Collectively, these results demonstrate that alternative splicing is strongly associated with tissue type, developmental stage, and stress condition. PMID:26582726

  20. Field Support System (FS-AID) and Working Capital Fund Tracking System (WCF-TS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Field Support System (FS-AID) and Working Capital Fund Tracking System (WCF-TS) are two modules of a single data management system that share common tables and...

  1. System design specification Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Flight System (FS), and Ground Demonstration System (GDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-06-14

    The system design specification for ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) is presented. The requirements for both a BIPS conceptual Flight System (FS) and a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) are defined.

  2. Hollow-fiber compression of visible, 200 fs laser pulses to 40 fs pulse duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procino, I; Velotta, R; Altucci, C; Amoruso, S; Bruzzese, R; Wang, X; Tosa, V; Sansone, G; Vozzi, C; Nisoli, M

    2007-07-01

    We demonstrate the use of a very simple, compact, and versatile method, based on the hollow-fiber compression technique, to shorten the temporal length of visible laser pulses of 100-300 fs to pulse durations shorter than approximately 50 fs. In particular, 200 fs, frequency-doubled, Nd:glass laser pulses (527 nm) were spectrally broadened to final bandwidths as large as 25 nm by nonlinear propagation through an Ar-filled hollow fiber. A compact, dispersive, prism-pair compressor was then used to produce as short as 40 fs, 150 microJ pulses. A very satisfactory agreement between numerical simulations and measurements is found.

  3. Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

  4. Evaluation of New Product Development Alternatives Considering Interrelationships among Decision Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chieh Fang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In electronic industry, technologies are progressing rapidly nowadays. To maintain market competition with comparative advantages, an enterprise must continuously develop various new products. This research focuses on the initial stages of the new product development (NPD, which involves generating and screening NPD alternatives. A multiple criteria decision making (MCDM model considering interrelations among selection criteria is developed. The proposed MCDM model employs the fuzzy Delphi method to filter the performance evaluation criteria. Since the criteria are considered to be interdependent by decision-makers, the gray relation analysis (GRA is applied to identify the interactive relationships among criteria within each aspect. Two methods are used to calculate the synthetic utility score for each alternative. The first method evaluates the alternatives using an ANP model with relation-structure derived from GRA, whereas the second method rates the alternatives using non-additive fuzzy integral. An empirical example of the medical display monitor industry is provided to show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed model. The two evaluation methods achieve the same ranking of the alternatives

  5. Spatio-temporal regulations and functions of neuronal alternative RNA splicing in developing and adult brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Hidaka, Chiharu; Iijima, Yoko

    2016-08-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental mechanism that generates molecular diversity from a single gene. In the central nervous system (CNS), key neural developmental steps are thought to be controlled by alternative splicing decisions, including the molecular diversity underlying synaptic wiring, plasticity, and remodeling. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms and functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in neurons through studies in invertebrate systems; however, recent studies have begun to uncover the potential role of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS. This article provides an overview of recent findings regarding the regulation and function of neuronal alternative splicing. In particular, we focus on the spatio-temporal regulation of neurexin, a synaptic adhesion molecule, by neuronal cell type-specific factors and neuronal activity, which are thought to be especially important for characterizing neural development and function within the mammalian CNS. Notably, there is increasing evidence that implicates the dysregulation of neuronal splicing events in several neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the detailed mechanisms of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS may provide plausible treatment strategies for these diseases.

  6. Modeling alternatives for basin-level hydropower development: 1. Optimization methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shoou-Yuh; Liaw, Shu-Liang; Railsback, Steven F.; Sale, Michael J.

    1992-10-01

    Development of multiple hydroelectric projects at navigation dams on large river systems can result in a number of environmental impacts, including potential reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. This study presents a method for generating hydropower development alternatives for evaluation by planners by quantifying the trade-offs between water quality and power generation. This method employs a Streeter-Phelps model to simulate DO and the bounded implicit enumeration algorithm to solve an optimization model formulated to maximize hydroelectric energy production. A portion of the upper Ohio River basin was selected to illustrate the methodology. The results indicate that various alternatives that meet the specified DO constraints can be generated efficiently. These alternatives are nearly optimal solutions with respect to the modeled objectives but are different with respect to decision variables.

  7. Re-interpreting the citizen consumer: alternative consumer activism and the rights to health and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Su-ming

    2012-01-01

    Alternative Southern consumer activism, undertaken for example by the Consumers' Association of Penang (CAP) in Malaysia, presents significant sites of nodal governance through which local and global health rights are claimed. This alternative consumer approach distinctively integrates health with development, social justice and environmental issues. It has not always explicitly employed rights language, but consumer activism fits with rights-based approaches, emphasising entitlements, accountability and participation. This case-study traces the development of networked consumer campaigns to contest and shape global health governance. It highlights the important, yet under-researched role of Southern nodes within global networks mobilizing health rights and public health. Alternative consumer activism re-interprets the consumer as a countervailing force, collectively mobilizing citizens to claim their health rights.

  8. Alternative splicing during Arabidopsis flower development results in constitutive and stage-regulated isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng eWang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS is a process in eukaryotic gene expression, in which the primary transcript of a multi-exon gene is spliced into two or more different mature transcripts, thereby increasing proteome diversity. AS is often regulated differentially between different tissues or developmental stages. Recent studies suggested that up to 60% of intron-containing genes in Arabidopsis thaliana undergo AS. Yet little is known about this complicated and important process during floral development. To investigate the preferential expression of different isoforms of individual alternatively spliced genes, we used high throughput RNA-Seq technology to explore the transcriptomes of three floral development stages of Arabidopsis thaliana and obtained information of various alternative splicing events. We identified approximately 24,000 genes that were expressed at one or more of these stages, and found that nearly 25% of multi-exon genes had two or more spliced variants. This is less frequent than the previously reported 40%~60% for multiple organs and stages of A. thaliana, indicating that many genes expressed in floral development function with a single predominant isoform. On the other hand, 1,716 isoforms were differentially expressed between the three stages, suggesting that AS might still play important roles in stage transition during floral development. Moreover, 337 novel transcribed regions were identified and most of them have a single exon. In addition, our analyses provide a comprehensive survey of alternative splicing in floral development and facilitate further genomic and genetic studies.

  9. Assessing Life Skills in Young Working Adults--Part 1: The Development of an Alternative Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Rachel Jacoba; van der Wal, Ruurd

    2003-01-01

    A collage with pictorial and verbal stimuli to assess life skills of young workers was developed using a framework for alternative assessment and stimuli instruments. The instrument was evaluated using Bloom's taxonomy for the cognitive domain and Krathwohl et al.'s taxonomy for the affective domain. (Contains 16 references.) (SK)

  10. Rural Development Alternative Analysis Through the Use of Discriminant Function and Socioeconomic Indicator Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y. N.; Cleland, C. L.

    One approach to the use of socioeconomic indicators for analyzing rural development alternative strategies is presented in this paper. The underlying assumptions of such an analysis are discussed. Necessary analytic information include (1) data on rural opinions about each facet of the socioeconomic environment and selected socioeconomic…

  11. Education for Character: An Alternative to Values Clarification and Cognitive Moral Development Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, Edward

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the weaknesses inherent in Sidney Simon's values clarification method and Lawrence Kohlberg's cognitive moral development method, suggesting that single class, isolated instruction overlooks the affective, unconscious elements of character formation. Recommends an alternative holistic approach based on John Locke's concept of all…

  12. Development of Novel Alternative Technologies for Decontamination of Warfare Agents: Electric Heating with Intrinsically Conductive Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    in converting electric energy to thermal energy for the decon applications. Other conductive materials, such as polythiophenes , polypyrroles, carbon...Development of Novel Alternative Technologies for Decontamination of Warfare Agents: Electric Heating with Intrinsically Conductive Polymers...Joule)-heating with conducting polymers. The basic concept is that electrically conducting polymers, such as polyaniline, can be used as coatings or

  13. The potential of tissue engineering for developing alternatives to animal experiments: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, R.B.M. de; Leenaars, M.; Tra, J.; Huijbregtse, R.; Bongers, E.; Jansen, J.A.; Gordijn, B.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M.

    2015-01-01

    An underexposed ethical issue raised by tissue engineering is the use of laboratory animals in tissue engineering research. Even though this research results in suffering and loss of life in animals, tissue engineering also has great potential for the development of alternatives to animal experiment

  14. Incorporating Student Input in Developing Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Andrew T.; Beddow, Peter A.; Kurz, Alexander; Kettler, Ryan J.; Elliott, Stephen N.

    2010-01-01

    In developing alternate assessments based on modified academic achievement standards (AA-MAS), several states have modified existing test items with the aim of enhancing accessibility and reducing difficulty for students with disabilities. Using Grade 8 multiple-choice test items in unmodified and modified forms, two studies examined student…

  15. Incorporating Student Input in Developing Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Andrew T.; Beddow, Peter A.; Kurz, Alexander; Kettler, Ryan J.; Elliott, Stephen N.

    2010-01-01

    In developing alternate assessments based on modified academic achievement standards (AA-MAS), several states have modified existing test items with the aim of enhancing accessibility and reducing difficulty for students with disabilities. Using Grade 8 multiple-choice test items in unmodified and modified forms, two studies examined student…

  16. Field experiment on alternate bar development in a straight sand-bed stream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekhout, J.P.C.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Mosselman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Alternate bars in rivers and streams develop as a result of differences in length scales involved in the adjustment of flow and sediment transport to irregularities of the bed. The amount of field evidence supporting theoretical insights is highly limited. Here, we present results from a large-scale

  17. Development of alternative energies for oil and the problems facing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idemura, H.

    1982-01-01

    According to a provisional long-term energy forecast, Japan's degree of dependence on oil will drop from its present 74% to 62.9% in 1985 and to 48.1% in 1995. This is an indication of the amount of alternative energy required. Explanations are given of the characteristics of the following alternative energy sources: coal, natural gas, atomic energy, geothermal, solar energy, biomass, chemical energy, and energy from wastes. There is an introduction to the role and function of the engineering industry, which is closely related to the development of these energies.

  18. Development of the Model of Decision Support for Alternative Choice in the Transportation Transit System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabashkin Igor

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The decision support system is one of the instruments for choosing the most effective decision for cargo owner in constant fluctuated business environment. The objective of this Paper is to suggest the multiple-criteria approach for evaluation and choice the alternatives of cargo transportation in the large scale transportation transit system for the decision makers - cargo owners. The large scale transportation transit system is presented by directed finite graph. Each of 57 alternatives is represented by the set of key performance indicators Kvi and set of parameters Paj. There has been developed a two-level hierarchy system of criteria with ranging expert evaluations based on Analytic Hierarchy Process Method. The best alternatives were suggested according to this method.

  19. Development of Alternative Power Industry Based on Nanotechnologies: Forecast Effects for Russian Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inshakova Elena Ivanovna

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aspiration of countries to achieve sustainable economic growth by reducing the energy dependence of the main suppliers of energy resources and by increasing national energy security induces in the conditions of increasing competition between participants in the global energy market the necessity to intensify the use of internal development resources, including the introduction of energy-saving technologies and development of alternative power industry. The urgency of the problems of international competitiveness achievement based on the energy security strengthening, solution of which largely determines the directions of the energy sector development, is increasingly recognized in many countries, including Russia. Timeliness of preparation to the use of substitute innovative energy resources and energy sources, while the traditional fossil fuels are dwindling, is marked as one of the most important principles of the state policy of Russia. All these factors update the development of domestic alternative energy in accordance with the megatrends of the world energy sector. The prospects for the development of modern energy, especially alternative, are associated by many experts with the use of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials. Nanotechnologies contribute to the new opportunities for the use of renewable energy sources and a significant contribution to the production and conservation of energy. The main directions of the effective use of nanotechnologies in the energy sector are: the use of renewable sources; energy storage; reducing the consumption of materials; the use of alternative materials. On the example of the world and Russian practice of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials use in the sphere of wind and solar energy the basic effects of their application, important for the development of alternative energy and of the Russian national economy as a whole, are identified in the article. The most important effects include strengthening

  20. On the binary origin of FS CMa stars: young massive clusters as test beds

    CERN Document Server

    de la Fuente, Diego; Garcia, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    FS CMa stars are low-luminosity objects showing the B[e] phenomenon whose evolutionary origin is yet to be unraveled. Various binary-related hypotheses have been recently proposed, two of them involving the spiral-in evolution of the binary orbit. The latter occurs more often in dense stellar environments like young massive clusters (YMCs). Hence, a systematic study of FS CMa stars in YMCs would be crucial to find out how these objects are created. In YMCs, two FS CMa stars have been confirmed and three candidates have been found through a search method based on narrow-band photometry at Paschen-alpha and the neighboring continuum. We apply this method to archival data from the Paschen-alpha survey of the Galactic Center region, yielding a new candidate in the Quintuplet cluster. Limitations of this method and other alternatives are briefly discussed.

  1. Development Of Educational Programs In Renewable And Alternative Energy Processing: The Case Of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirina, Anna; Shindor, Olga; Tatmyshevsky, Konstantin

    2014-12-01

    The paper deals with the main problems of Russian energy system development that proves necessary to provide educational programs in the field of renewable and alternative energy. In the paper the process of curricula development and defining teaching techniques on the basis of expert opinion evaluation is defined, and the competence model for renewable and alternative energy processing master students is suggested. On the basis of a distributed questionnaire and in-depth interviews, the data for statistical analysis was obtained. On the basis of this data, an optimization of curricula structure was performed, and three models of a structure for optimizing teaching techniques were developed. The suggested educational program structure which was adopted by employers is presented in the paper. The findings include quantitatively estimated importance of systemic thinking and professional skills and knowledge as basic competences of a masters' program graduate; statistically estimated necessity of practice-based learning approach; and optimization models for structuring curricula in renewable and alternative energy processing. These findings allow the establishment of a platform for the development of educational programs.

  2. Alternatives for the treatment and disposal of healthcare wastes in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, L F; Savage, G M; Eggerth, L L

    2005-01-01

    Waste production in healthcare facilities in developing countries has brought about a variety of concerns due to the use of inappropriate methods of managing the wastes. Inappropriate treatment and final disposal of the wastes can lead to adverse impacts to public health, to occupational health and safety, and to the environment. Unfortunately, most economically developing countries suffer a variety of constraints to adequately managing these wastes. Generally in developing countries, few individuals in the staff of the healthcare facility are familiar with the procedures required for a proper waste management program. Furthermore, the management of wastes usually is delegated to poorly educated laborers who perform most activities without proper guidance and insufficient protection. This paper presents some of the most common treatment and disposal methods utilized in the management of infectious healthcare wastes in developing countries. The methods discussed include: autoclave; microwave; chemical disinfection; combustion (low-, medium-, and high-technology); and disposal on the ground (dump site, controlled landfill, pits, and sanitary landfill). Each alternative for treatment and disposal is explained, including a description of the types of wastes that can and cannot be treated. Background information on the technologies also is included in order to provide information to those who may not be familiar with the details of each alternative. In addition, a brief presentation of some of the emissions from each of the treatment and disposal alternatives is presented.

  3. [Developments and trends in traditional medicine and complementary and alternative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Chiao; Lin, I-Hsin; Yeh, Mei-Ling

    2008-04-01

    With the rapid development of society, medical science and technology, although quality of life is enhanced and life expectancy is prolonged, aging, environmental changes and health problems are unavoidable. More and more people, therefore, are concerned about their health and place high demands on medical care. As modern medicine cannot meet all such demands, other medical care systems emerge. Trends in the seeking of medical care show that people are inclined towards natural approaches, so attention is being paid once again to traditional medicine, as well as complementary and alternative medicine. Under the patient-oriented concept, medical personnel have to recognize means of health care while thinking of the individualized and socioeconomic impacts. The purpose of this paper therefore is to provide medical personnel with information on the developments and trends in, knowledge and research with regard to traditional medicine as well as complementary and alternative medicine.

  4. Development and Validation of Linear Alternator Models for the Advanced Stirling Convertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metscher, Jonathan F.; Lewandowski, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Two models of the linear alternator of the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) have been developed using the Sage 1-D modeling software package. The first model relates the piston motion to electric current by means of a motor constant. The second uses electromagnetic model components to model the magnetic circuit of the alternator. The models are tuned and validated using test data and also compared against each other. Results show both models can be tuned to achieve results within 7 of ASC test data under normal operating conditions. Using Sage enables the creation of a complete ASC model to be developed and simulations completed quickly compared to more complex multi-dimensional models. These models allow for better insight into overall Stirling convertor performance, aid with Stirling power system modeling, and in the future support NASA mission planning for Stirling-based power systems.

  5. Aspects of Sino-Japan Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Development on the Traditional Uighur Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Abdiryim Yusup; Nobuo Yamaguchi

    2009-01-01

    Two consecutive conferences on ‘Sino-Japan Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Development on the Traditional Uighur Medicine’ were held in Xinjiang Medical University on July 3 and Kanazawa Medical University on October 6, 2007. The Vice president Halmurat Upur presided over the meeting and gave congratulatory address on holding of the conference. In order to understand mutually and discuss the possibility of the Uighur Medicine as CAM and the situation of medicine in the global sense...

  6. Teacher empowerment and Socioepistemology: An alternative for the professional development of teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes-Gasperini, Daniela; Cantoral, Ricardo; Montiel, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Teacher empowerment is an alternative proposal from Socioepistemology that postulates it as a tool for the professional development of teachers. The concept of empowerment is accompanied by the “problematization of knowledge” in both senses: mathematical knowledge and school mathematical knowledge. We assume that teachers will be better able to transform their educational reality, since they will have taken possession of the teaching knowledge. This new relationship to...

  7. Development of Galleria mellonella as an Alternative Infection Model for the Burkholderia cepacia Complex▿

    OpenAIRE

    Seed, Kimberley D.; Dennis, Jonathan J.

    2008-01-01

    Burkholderia is an important bacterial genus with a complex taxonomy that contains species of both ecological and pathogenic importance, including nine closely related species collectively termed the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). In order to more thoroughly investigate the virulence of this bacterial complex of microorganisms, alternative infection models would be useful. To this end, we have adapted and developed the use of the Galleria mellonella wax moth larvae as a host for examinin...

  8. Performance and suggested alternative strategies in developing Indonesian cocoa export business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Dradjat

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This research focussed on the export development of cocoa bean with respect to its export growth, values and competitiveness. Based on this deve-lopment, the aim of this research is to propose alternative development strategies of export business for cocoa bean in the future. The Analysis Hierarchie Process (AHP framework of export business of cocoa bean was arranged consecutively from formulation of focuss or goals, identification of affecting factors and actors, deter mination of actor objectives, and recognition of alternative strategies needed. Each component of goals, factors, actors, objectives, and alternative strategies were valued on the basis of their importance using Saaty scales. Results of interviews with experts were analyzed using AHP technique. The development of cocoa bean export from 2000 to 2006 showed the competitiveness position of Indonesia in the world market was fairly good. In order to increase the growth and values of cocoa bean export, the experts consider the role of government as regulators and facilitators is very important. The government became the main actor for the export development through de/regulation related to the cocoa bean commodity. The objectives of actors could be achieved by combining strategies (i provision of fund in national and regional budget, as well as other sources (ii implementation of recomended technologies of cocoa, (iii acceleration of replanting program, (iv improvement of research productivity in producing high yielding plant materials, (v development of transportation facilities from farms to harbours, (vi development of farmers’ organization and partnerships as well as strategic alliance, and (viii pests and diseases control. Key words: Cocoa bean, expor, role of government, objectives and strategies.

  9. TRENDS IN OFFICIAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE TO DEVELOPING COUNTRIES AND POSSIBILITIES OF ALTERNATIVE FINANCING MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talknice Saungweme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study analyses trends in Official Development Assistance (ODA to developing countries, mainly Africa, and possibilities of new financing instruments. Economies of most developing countries, especially those in Sub-Saharan Africa, are characterised by low investment flows, huge import bills and lower exports. Subsequently, development assistance is the major source of external finance and has taken the form of budget support, humanitarian and development finance. However, the noted fall in ODA in 2005, 2009 and 2012 might adversely impact directly on the attainment of millennium development goals in 2015. This negative trend in ODA is a result of a combination of factors such as economic constraints in the donor countries (for example, the debt crisis and/or a new shift in financing mechanisms to developing countries.

  10. Streamlining the RI/FS process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, L.; Doss, R.C.

    1998-07-01

    In 1994, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) contracted with CH2M HILL to manage remedial investigations and feasibility studies (RI/FS) at its former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites in Chico, Willows, and Marysville, California. These three sites had similar histories, MGP-related contaminants, similar geologic settings, and geographically were close together. Recognizing the advantages that may be gained, both in time and money, by streamlining the RI/FS process, PG and E and CH2M HILL combined the sites into one project. From the start of the project, PG and E and CH2M HILL looked for an implemented changes to the RI/FS process to streamline the project. These changes included combining deliverables, linking field programs at the three sites, and negotiating bulk discounts on laboratory and other services by combining the work to be done at the three sites under one contract. CH2M HILL later proposed additional measures to streamline the project that were eventually adopted by both PG and E and the regulatory agencies. PG and E and CH2M HILL are currently working with the regulatory agencies to negotiate realistic measures to address contaminants in soil and groundwater, and are jointly preparing the FS with the regulatory agencies using a unique means of documentation.

  11. Epicardial origin of cardiac CFU-Fs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slukvin, Igor I

    2011-12-02

    The epicardium has been recognized as a source of cardiovascular progenitors during embryogenesis and postnatal life. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Chong et al. (2011) identify cardiac CFU-Fs as cardiac-resident cells of epicardial origin with broad multilineage differentiation potential.

  12. OPERATIONALIZING SUSTAINABLE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT IN GHANA: CONSUMER ATTITUDES TOWARD WILLINGNESS-TO-PAY FOR SUSTAINABLE ALTERNATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Ofori Ametepey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available For centuries humankind’s built environment and quality of life has been closely predicated on the diversity and availability of natural resources. However, it has become evident that the ecological bounds that have provided a seemingly infinite stream of resources are showing signs of global degradation. As a result, a new focus has been placed on the concept of sustainable development. For sustainable alternatives to materialize in a free-market, it must be driven by market-based solutions and not solely by government regulation. Hence, this research sought to determine the extent to which current markets exist for sustainable alternatives and consumer response to the cost-benefit of sustainable alternatives in Ghana. A Market Survey Assessments methodology was adopted to determine the extent to which capital costs and life-cycle return on investment (ROI affect consumer willingness to pay for sustainable alternatives. Questionnaire was adopted to assess consumer attitudes toward cost and non-cost related issues pertaining to sustainable residential construction. The population of study for this research consists of owner occupied single family housing units in high-growth residential regions of Accra consisting of areas of East Legon, and Trassaco Valley. Cross-tabulation and correlation analysis were then used to describe, correlate and draw inference from the survey response data. The results revealed that consumers were found to prioritize level of willingness-to-pay according to total return-on-investment, meaning willingness-to-pay changed proportional to changes in total return as that the vast majority of consumers chose high capital cost, high return alternatives. Results also indicated that the savings-to-investment (SIR ratio was not as significant a consideration, meaning that if consumers viewed the purchase of a sustainable alternative as an “opportunity” cost, they should have chosen low cost, low return alternatives

  13. Emissions of PCDD/Fs, PBDD/Fs, dioxin like-PCBs and PAHs from a cement plant using a long-term monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conesa, Juan A; Ortuño, Nuria; Abad, Esteban; Rivera-Austrui, Joan

    2016-11-15

    The aim of the present work was to assess the emission of different persistent organic pollutants from a cement plant over a period of one year, under normal operational conditions. Thus, a long-term sampling device was installed in the clinker kiln stack of the cement plant. The factory uses petroleum coke as primary fuel, but also alternative fuels such as solid recovered fuel (SRF), automotive shredder residue (ASR), sewage sludge, waste tires, and meat and bone meal (MBM) wastes, with an energy substitution level of about 40%. Both PCDD/Fs (together with dl-PCBs) and PBDD/Fs were continuously sampled, with a total of ten samples collected in 2-4week periods. Also, PAHs were sampled during one-week periods, in order to evaluate their emissions in three different samples. The emission levels throughout the year were much lower than the set legal limits in all substances, being cement sector, which were 8.5ng I-TEQ/ton clinker for PCDD/Fs and 3.2ng WHO-TEQ/ton clinker for PCBs. With respect to the congener distribution, 2,3,7,8-TCDF accounts for 60 to 68% of the total toxicity for PCDD/Fs, and in PBDD/F emissions, a clear predominance of octa-substituted species (both dioxin and furan) was found.

  14. Experimenting with alternative economies: four emergent counter-narratives of urban economic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longhurst, Noel; Avelino, Flor; Wittmayer, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Neoliberalism is a powerful narrative that has shaped processes of urban economic development across the globe. This paper reports on four nascent ‘new economic’ narratives which represent fundamentally different imaginaries of the urban economy. Experiments informed by these narratives challenge...... the dominant neoliberal logic in four key dimensions: What is the purpose of economic development? What are the preferred distributive mechanisms? Who governs the economy? What is the preferred form of economic organisation? The emergence of these experiments illustrates that cities are spaces where counter......-narratives canemerge and circulate. Acknowledgingthe existence of these alternative visions opens up a wider set of possibilities for future urban transitions....

  15. LRRTM3 Regulates Excitatory Synapse Development through Alternative Splicing and Neurexin Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Won Um

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The four members of the LRRTM family (LRRTM1-4 are postsynaptic adhesion molecules essential for excitatory synapse development. They have also been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we focus on LRRTM3, showing that two distinct LRRTM3 variants generated by alternative splicing regulate LRRTM3 interaction with PSD-95, but not its excitatory synapse-promoting activity. Overexpression of either LRRTM3 variant increased excitatory synapse density in dentate gyrus (DG granule neurons, whereas LRRTM3 knockdown decreased it. LRRTM3 also controlled activity-regulated AMPA receptor surface expression in an alternative splicing-dependent manner. Furthermore, Lrrtm3-knockout mice displayed specific alterations in excitatory synapse density, excitatory synaptic transmission and excitability in DG granule neurons but not in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Lastly, LRRTM3 required only specific splice variants of presynaptic neurexins for their synaptogenic activity. Collectively, our data highlight alternative splicing and differential presynaptic ligand utilization in the regulation of LRRTMs, revealing key regulatory mechanisms for excitatory synapse development.

  16. Eye development under the control of SRp55/B52-mediated alternative splicing of eyeless.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weronika Fic

    Full Text Available The genetic programs specifying eye development are highly conserved during evolution and involve the vertebrate Pax-6 gene and its Drosophila melanogaster homolog eyeless (ey. Here we report that the SR protein B52/SRp55 controls a novel developmentally regulated splicing event of eyeless that is crucial for eye growth and specification in Drosophila. B52/SRp55 generates two isoforms of eyeless differing by an alternative exon encoding a 60-amino-acid insert at the beginning of the paired domain. The long isoform has impaired ability to trigger formation of ectopic eyes and to bind efficiently Eyeless target DNA sequences in vitro. When over-produced in the eye imaginal disc, this isoform induces a small eye phenotype, whereas the isoform lacking the alternative exon triggers eye over-growth and strong disorganization. Our results suggest that B52/SRp55 splicing activity is used during normal eye development to control eye organogenesis and size through regulation of eyeless alternative splicing.

  17. MYCELIA DEVELOPMENT PERIOD OF (PLEUROTUS OSTREATUS AND P. SAJUR-CAJU ON THE ALTERNATIVE SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergün BAYSAL

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study it was aimed to measure mycelia development period of Pleurotus spp. on wheat grain, as an alternative substrate to wheat grain, rye, corn and barley. According to results obtained in this study, the fastest development of P. ostreatus mycelium on rye grain (8 day and the longest mycelia development on wheat grain (10.3 day was measured. Similarity, we observed that the fastest development of P. sajur-caju mycelium on rye grain (9.3 day and the longest mycelia development on wheat grain (16.4 day was measured. Results indicated that rye was the most appropriate material both P. ostreatus and P. sajur-caju. Contamination problem on corn grain was observed. Therefore, it must be additional research in this material.

  18. Testing alternative hypotheses regarding the association between behavioral inhibition and language development in toddlerhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Watts, Ashley K; Patel, Deepika; Corley, Robin P; Friedman, Naomi P; Hewitt, John K; Robinson, JoAnn L; Rhee, Soo H

    2014-01-01

    Studies have reported an inverse association between language development and behavioral inhibition or shyness across childhood, but the direction of this association remains unclear. This study tested alternative hypotheses regarding this association in a large sample of toddlers. Data on behavioral inhibition and expressive and receptive language abilities were collected from 816 twins at ages 14, 20, and 24 months. Growth and regression models were fit to the data to assess the longitudinal associations between behavioral inhibition and language development from 14 to 24 months. Overall, there were significant associations between behavioral inhibition and expressive language, and minimal associations with receptive language, indicating that the association is better explained by reticence to respond rather than deficient language development. © 2014 The Authors. Child Development © 2014 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  19. The Lessons of East Asian Development and Alternative Development Strategies for Hainan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    34 in Y. L. Wu and K. C. Yeh (eds.), Growth, Distribution, and Social Change: Essays on The Economy of The Republic of China , Occasional Papers, School...was supported by a grant from the National Research Center for Science and Technology for Development, People’s Republic of China . The RAND...Technology for Development, People’s Republic of China Accesion IFor NTIS CR.,-&! OTtC lA*ý •I, Justi ficjtion By

  20. Development and classification of an operational definition of complementary and alternative medicine for the Cochrane Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, L. Susan; Manheimer, Eric; Berman, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade the Cochrane Collaboration has been an increasingly important source of information on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. From 2007 to 2008 the Cochrane CAM Field developed a topics list that allowed us to categorize all 396 Cochrane reviews related to CAM (as of The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2009). This topics list is an advance in making Cochrane reviews on CAM topics accessible to the public. In this paper, we discuss challenges in developing the topics list, including developing an operational definition of CAM, deciding which reviews should be included within the CAM Field’s scope, developing the structured list of CAM Field-specific topics, and determining where in the topics list the reviews should be placed. Although aspects of our operational definition of CAM are open to revision, a standardized definition provides us with an objective, reproducible and systematic method for defining and classifying CAM therapies. PMID:21717826

  1. Developing a list of reference chemicals for testing alternatives to whole fish toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Kristin; Tanneberger, Katrin; Kramer, Nynke I; Völker, Doris; Scholz, Stefan; Hafner, Christoph; Lee, Lucy E J; Bols, Niels C; Hermens, Joop L M

    2008-11-11

    This paper details the derivation of a list of 60 reference chemicals for the development of alternatives to animal testing in ecotoxicology with a particular focus on fish. The chemicals were selected as a prerequisite to gather mechanistic information on the performance of alternative testing systems, namely vertebrate cell lines and fish embryos, in comparison to the fish acute lethality test. To avoid the need for additional experiments with fish, the U.S. EPA fathead minnow database was consulted as reference for whole organism responses. This database was compared to the Halle Registry of Cytotoxicity and a collation of data by the German EPA (UBA) on acute toxicity data derived from zebrafish embryos. Chemicals that were present in the fathead minnow database and in at least one of the other two databases were subject to selection. Criteria included the coverage of a wide range of toxicity and physico-chemical parameters as well as the determination of outliers of the in vivo/in vitro correlations. While the reference list of chemicals now guides our research for improving cell line and fish embryo assays to make them widely applicable, the list could be of benefit to search for alternatives in ecotoxicology in general. One example would be the use of this list to validate structure-activity prediction models, which in turn would benefit from a continuous extension of this list with regard to physico-chemical and toxicological data.

  2. The transformation of trust in China's alternative food networks: disruption, reconstruction, and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Yu. Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Food safety issues in China have received much scholarly attention, yet few studies systematically examined this matter through the lens of trust. More importantly, little is known about the transformation of different types of trust in the dynamic process of food production, provision, and consumption. We consider trust as an evolving interdependent relationship between different actors. We used the Beijing County Fair, a prominent ecological farmers' market in China, as an example to examine the transformation of trust in China's alternative food networks. We argue that although there has been a disruption of institutional trust among the general public since 2008 when the melamine-tainted milk scandal broke out, reconstruction of individual trust and development of organizational trust have been observed, along with the emergence and increasing popularity of alternative food networks. Based on more than six months of fieldwork on the emerging ecological agriculture sector in 13 provinces across China as well as monitoring of online discussions and posts, we analyze how various social factors - including but not limited to direct and indirect reciprocity, information, endogenous institutions, and altruism - have simultaneously contributed to the transformation of trust in China's alternative food networks. The findings not only complement current social theories of trust, but also highlight an important yet understudied phenomenon whereby informal social mechanisms have been partially substituting for formal institutions and gradually have been building trust against the backdrop of the food safety crisis in China.

  3. A Cost Comparison of Alternative Approaches to Distance Education in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventre, Gerard G.; Kalu, Alex

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a cost comparison of three approaches to two-way interactive distance learning systems for developing countries. Included are costs for distance learning hardware, terrestrial and satellite communication links, and designing instruction for two-way interactive courses. As part of this project, FSEC is developing a 30-hour course in photovoltaic system design that will be used in a variety of experiments using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). A primary goal of the project is to develop an instructional design and delivery model that can be used for other education and training programs. Over two-thirds of the world photovoltaics market is in developing countries. One of the objectives of this NASA-sponsored project was to develop new and better energy education programs that take advantage of advances in telecommunications and computer technology. The combination of desktop video systems and the sharing of computer applications software is of special interest. Research is being performed to evaluate the effectiveness of some of these technologies as part of this project. The design of the distance learning origination and receive sites discussed in this paper were influenced by the educational community's growing interest in distance education. The following approach was used to develop comparative costs for delivering interactive distance education to developing countries: (1) Representative target locations for receive sites were chosen. The originating site was assumed to be Cocoa, Florida, where FSEC is located; (2) A range of course development costs were determined; (3) The cost of equipment for three alternative two-way interactive distance learning system configurations was determined or estimated. The types of system configurations ranged from a PC-based system that allows instructors to originate instruction from their office using desktop video and shared application software, to a high cost system that uses a

  4. A Cost Comparison of Alternative Approaches to Distance Education in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventre, Gerard G.; Kalu, Alex

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a cost comparison of three approaches to two-way interactive distance learning systems for developing countries. Included are costs for distance learning hardware, terrestrial and satellite communication links, and designing instruction for two-way interactive courses. As part of this project, FSEC is developing a 30-hour course in photovoltaic system design that will be used in a variety of experiments using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). A primary goal of the project is to develop an instructional design and delivery model that can be used for other education and training programs. Over two-thirds of the world photovoltaics market is in developing countries. One of the objectives of this NASA-sponsored project was to develop new and better energy education programs that take advantage of advances in telecommunications and computer technology. The combination of desktop video systems and the sharing of computer applications software is of special interest. Research is being performed to evaluate the effectiveness of some of these technologies as part of this project. The design of the distance learning origination and receive sites discussed in this paper were influenced by the educational community's growing interest in distance education. The following approach was used to develop comparative costs for delivering interactive distance education to developing countries: (1) Representative target locations for receive sites were chosen. The originating site was assumed to be Cocoa, Florida, where FSEC is located; (2) A range of course development costs were determined; (3) The cost of equipment for three alternative two-way interactive distance learning system configurations was determined or estimated. The types of system configurations ranged from a PC-based system that allows instructors to originate instruction from their office using desktop video and shared application software, to a high cost system that uses a

  5. Economic development: the need for an alternative approach. [Case of Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinches, C.R.

    1977-10-01

    The economic growth of Libya is used to illustrate the need for a more relevant way of assessing development so that it includes an appreciation for the process of change. It is shown that many changes do not appear in the traditional economic statistics. A new approach is suggested that would enable a society to handle changes in ways that are in accord with its national goals and traditions. This would take into account future developments, international relations, the basic skill levels, and other factors rather than a limited measurement of the country's ability to absorb capital. Libya has chosen, as an alternative to increased consumption, policies for developing self-sufficiency, a limited foreign investment, and an emphasis on education as a basis for modernization. The goal is to evolve a national identity and ideology that will be unique to the Arab world. (DCK)

  6. Northern Regions of Russia as Alternative Sources of Pure Water for Sustainable Development: Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukerman, V. A.; Gudkov, A. V.; Ivanov, S. V.

    The paper discusses problems associated with the existing crisis of water scarcity in the modern conditions of the global water use. Available alternative sources of fresh water may be underground and surface waters of the North and the Arctic. Investigated the current situation and condition of fresh water resources in the technological and industrial development of the North and Arctic. The necessity of developing and using green technologies and measures to prevent pollution of surface and ground water from industrial sectors of the Northern regions is shown. Studied modern technologies and techniques for monitoring groundwater and determination of their age in order to avoid and prevent the effects of environmental contaminants. The ways of use of innovative production technologies of fresh and clean water of north Russia for sustainable development, and delivery of water in the needy regions of the world are investigated.

  7. An Developing Alternative Tourism Potentials: A Path Following the National Co developers on the Phu Phan Panges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanyut Hankhampa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The development of alternative tourism was necessary. The objectives of this research were to study: (1 the history of group collaborating in Thai National Development on Pu-pan Mountain Range, (2 the potentiality of tourism according to the keeping on track of the group collaborating in Thai National Development on Pu-pan Mountain Range and (3 the appropriate management in alternative tourism. Approach: The research area included Sakonnakon and Kalasin Provinces. The samples as informants were selected by Purposive Sampling, for 168 persons. The instrument using for collecting data consisted of the Interview Form, the Observation Form, Focus Group Discussion and Participatory Workshop. Data were classified into groups, investigated by using Triangulation and analyzed according to specified goal. The findings were presented in descriptive analysis. Results: (1 the historical background, Thailand was governed by soldier authoritarian system in 1964 in the age of Marshal Tanom Kittikajon who made a revolution. As a result, people were under political pressure with maltreating and suppressing people who loved democracy very much by accusing that they were communist party of Thailand. Finally, they collaborated in fighting with communist party for helping the suffered people. Then, they were suppressed by the government. There was fighting until the citizen had death and loss. This group stopped, (2 the problem situation in managing the recent tour origin, found that it was a lack of entrepreneurs leading the local tour, who had knowledge and competency in local culture. The tour places were not developed. There was a lack of tour guides in each place, in explaining for the tourists, public relation and facilities, (3 the appropriate management of alternative tourism on Pu-pan mountain range, consisted of 5 aspects as follows: (1 the service, (2 the tour activities, (3 the environmental condition, (4 the management and (5 the

  8. Manila on CephFS at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Wiebalck, Arne

    2017-01-01

    In response to the user demand for a light-weight provisioning of distributed file system shares, the OpenStack and Ceph teams at CERN have recently added Manila/CephFS to their service catalogues. While leveraging the operational experience with a 190'000 core OpenStack deployment and a 12 PB Ceph cluster for such a self-service kiosque suggested itself, the service design and setup phases were followed by a number of functionality and stress tests to ensure the individual components are ready for production use. The final service design and the results obtained during the pre-production phase, for instance when scaling to a large number of Manila and CephFS clients or the integration with Magnum/Kubernetes, will be presented alongside the initial use cases and our first experiences running these new services in production.

  9. NEO-INSTITUTIONALISM AND ENDOGENOUS DEVELOPMENT AS REGIONAL ALTERNATIVE. MODERNITY AND SUBJECTIVITY, LINKING AND LOCAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Mateo Bastidas-Morales

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of subjectivity involves overcoming criticism of individualism, utilitarianism and immediacy as the basis of society and consumer markets. Elemental is, with the addition of the individual as a subject of social action, the principal actor-oriented definition of welfare, community and local development. Obviously, the formation of human capital development. While it is imperative the state-society relationship in the context of the current modernization must also recover the principles of the community before the stressed relationship between the market-state. We intend here to link opposite the dichotomous thinking of Western rationalism, constitute an important element of social sustantivación. Along with this, the neo-institutionalism and institutional economics that questions the current neoliberal approves the participation of the state and, with new rules, can better confront the neoconservative positions. It is revalued, in the present work, interest in the new dynamics of social change in post-national or cosmopolitan side.

  10. What Do You Know about Alternative Energy? Development and Use of a Diagnostic Instrument for Upper Secondary School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Irene Poh-Ai; Johari, Marliza; Said, Hardimah; Treagust, David F.

    2015-01-01

    The need for renewable and non-fossil fuels is now recognised by nations throughout the world. Consequently, an understanding of alternative energy is needed both in schools and in everyday life-long learning situations. This study developed a two-tier instrument to diagnose students' understanding and alternative conceptions about alternative…

  11. BIOGAS AS AN ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SOURCE TO PROMOTE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos SABORÍO VÍQUEZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The key areas that determine the food and nutrition security are: availability, access, consumption and biological utilization. For this reason it is necessary to promote the health of vulnerable groups, in this case, indigenous communities, protecting and establishing conditions to ensure the human right to food. The initial plan focuses ondeveloping facilities for small swine and poultry farms, familiar, non-commercial. The main objective of the pigs raised at the site will be the production of animal waste in order to implement digesters for the production of biogas as an alternative energy source, the production of meat stays in the background, thinking only about the community consumption and helping to ensure their food source, from this perspective, the technologies applied to rural and indigenous progress are environmentally friendly, socially just, economically viable and culturally acceptable. The theme of rural and indigenous Development is focused on their food security and the use of alternative energies, considering that energy is a key element in achieving sustainable development in all sectors, therefore sought from a broad perspective solidarity and actively promote greater and more rational use of energy and the environment in remote communities, through diversification of supply sources and efficient use, thereby contributing toenvironmental conservation and reduction of health problems through the use of appropriate technologies.

  12. The private sector`s role in developing alternative energy systems in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulkadir, A. [PT. Adriant Trading and Engineering, Jakarta, (Indonesia)

    1996-12-31

    Several scenarios have been used to predict the need for electricity in Indonesia up to the year 2020, all of which should provide the best economic performance and the lowest damage to the environment. All scenarios have minimized the use of oil and natural gas as primary energy sources in favour of their use as foreign exchange generators and industrial raw materials. The alternative energy scenarios so developed shows the increasing use of coal, combined cycles, geothermal and hydro-power energy. Nuclear energy is apparently only considered whenever its selection becomes inevitable. The environmental issues associated with future energy generation necessitate serious consideration of the use of the latest technological state-of-the-art clean coal-fired power plants. Other types of alternative energy systems such as photovoltaic, wind energy, biomass, etc., are expected to be developed for site specific regions or remote areas where electricity grids are prohibitive economically. The Indonesian government has supported the use of NRSE (New and Renewable Sources of Energy) for electricity generation by introducing the SPPT, or Small Power Purchase Tariffs, intended to stimulate private sector participation in electricity by offering for purchase PLN (the State power company), using avoided cost calculation mainly for cogeneration systems and electric power from small power producers consisting of private sector and cooperative organizations. (author). 10 tabs., 14 refs.

  13. Risk-Informed Decision Making: Application to Technology Development Alternative Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, Homayoon; Maggio, Gaspare; Everett, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    NASA NPR 8000.4A, Agency Risk Management Procedural Requirements, defines risk management in terms of two complementary processes: Risk-informed Decision Making (RIDM) and Continuous Risk Management (CRM). The RIDM process is used to inform decision making by emphasizing proper use of risk analysis to make decisions that impact all mission execution domains (e.g., safety, technical, cost, and schedule) for program/projects and mission support organizations. The RIDM process supports the selection of an alternative prior to program commitment. The CRM process is used to manage risk associated with the implementation of the selected alternative. The two processes work together to foster proactive risk management at NASA. The Office of Safety and Mission Assurance at NASA Headquarters has developed a technical handbook to provide guidance for implementing the RIDM process in the context of NASA risk management and systems engineering. This paper summarizes the key concepts and procedures of the RIDM process as presented in the handbook, and also illustrates how the RIDM process can be applied to the selection of technology investments as NASA's new technology development programs are initiated.

  14. Language and communication teachers’ professional development in and for diversity: An Alter-Native proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Inés Calderón

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents results of a curricular and didactic research study framed within the objectives of the ALTER-NATIVE project, ALFA III. Results reflect the cooperative work of Latin American and Caribbean teacher educators who were team members of the ALTER-NATIVE language and communication interest. Based on both self-reflection on one’s own teaching practices and the curricular impact on the professional development of language and communication teachers, the project proposes common guidelines for teacher educators based in Latin America and the Caribbean. The project spouses the idea of communities of practice (Wenger, 2001 aiming at constructing knowledge by consensus with the participation of teacher educators involved in the professional development of language and communication teachers. One of the results is the designing of a curricular and didactic system which referents are highlighted in this article. Particularly, the didactic and epistemological implications carried out by this (coconstruction are presented. It is argued that this is a contribution for research on language and communication pedagogy and didactics on the horizon of diversity and difference.

  15. Adsorption and destruction of PCDD/Fs using surface-functionalized activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, J D; Hung, P C; Zhang, Z; Chang, M B; Yan, Z; Rood, M J

    2015-01-01

    Activated carbon adsorbs polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans (PCDD/Fs) from gas streams but can simultaneously generate PCDD/Fs via de novo synthesis, increasing an already serious disposal problem for the spent sorbent. To increase activated carbon's PCDD/F sorption capacity and lifetime while reducing the impact of hazardous waste, it is beneficial to develop carbon-based sorbents that simultaneously destroy PCDD/Fs while adsorbing the toxic chemicals from gas streams. In this work, hydrogen-treated and surface-functionalized (i.e., oxygen, bromine, nitrogen, and sulfur) activated carbons are tested in a bench-scale reactor as adsorbents for PCDD/Fs. All tested carbons adsorb PCDD/F efficiently, with international toxic equivalent removal efficiencies exceeding 99% and mass removal efficiencies exceeding 98% for all but one tested material. Hydrogen-treated materials caused negligible destruction and possible generation of PCDD/Fs, with total mass balances between 100% and 107%. All tested surface-functionalized carbons, regardless of functionality, destroyed PCDD/Fs, with total mass balances between 73% and 96%. Free radicals on the carbon surface provided by different functional groups may contribute to PCDD/F destruction, as has been hypothesized in the literature. Surface-functionalized materials preferentially destroyed higher-order (more chlorine) congeners, supporting a dechlorination mechanism as opposed to oxidation. Carbons impregnated with sulfur are particularly effective at destroying PCDD/Fs, with destruction efficiency improving with increasing sulfur content to as high as 27%. This is relevant because sulfur-treated carbons are used for mercury adsorption, increasing the possibility of multi-pollutant control.

  16. Development And Testing Of Biogas-Petrol Blend As An Alternative Fuel For Spark Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awogbemi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This research is on the development and testing of a biogas-petrol blend to run a spark ignition engine. A2080 ratio biogaspetrol blend was developed as an alternative fuel for spark ignition engine test bed. Petrol and biogas-petrol blend were comparatively tested on the test bed to determine the effectiveness of the fuels. The results of the tests showed that biogas petrol blend generated higher torque brake power indicated power brake thermal efficiency and brake mean effective pressure but lower fuel consumption and exhaust temperature than petrol. The research concluded that a spark ignition engine powered by biogas-petrol blend was found to be economical consumed less fuel and contributes to sanitation and production of fertilizer.

  17. Alternative input medium development for wheelchair user with severe spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihsan, Izzat Aqmar; Tomari, Razali; Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani Wan; Othman, Nurmiza

    2017-09-01

    Quadriplegia or tetraplegia patients have restricted four limbs as well as torso movement caused by severe spinal cord injury. Undoubtedly, these patients face difficulties when operating their powered electric wheelchair since they are unable to control the wheelchair by means of a standard joystick. Due to total loss of both sensory and motor function of the four limbs and torso, an alternative input medium for the wheelchair will be developed to assist the user in operating the wheelchair. In this framework, the direction of the wheelchair movement is determined by the user's conscious intent through a brain control interface (BCI) based on Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. A laser range finder (LFR) is used to perceive environment information for determining a safety distance of the wheelchair's surrounding. Local path planning algorithm will be developed to provide navigation planner along with user's input to prevent collision during control operation.

  18. SeaWiFS ocean color products and services at the NASA Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Rebecca A.; Kartan, Ravi; Li, Angela W.; Simmon, Robert B.

    1997-02-01

    SeaWiFS ocean color data will be archived at the Goddard DAAC in early 1997. The Goddard DAAC has been designated the primary archive for all SeaWiFS data. Almost all authorized SeaWiFS users will access SeaWiFS data via the Goddard DAAC Ocean Color Data and Resources web page. New interfaces and services are being developed by the Goddard DAAC Ocean Color Data Support Team on the Ocean Color website to support the SeaWiFS community following launch: A new SeaWiFS WWW Browser will allow users to browse and order SeaWiFS data via the Web. This Browser will incorporate all necessary elements for SeaWiFS data ordering, including password controls, subsetting, coincident search and visual browse. Users will also find SeaWiFS ancillary data, software routines, SeaWiFS data products specification, an order form for the SeaWIFS Technical Memoranda, as well as direct links to the 'Dear Colleague' letter and other documents and software on the SeaWiFS Project homepage. Other ocean color products available at he Goddard DAAC Ocean Color website include the following: New HDF versions of CZCS data files, including browse images and collection of regridded global composites designed for interdisciplinary study. New CZCS read and visualization software are available. A bibliography of ocean color research papers, several previously rare hardcopy documents, and a periodic ocean color newsletter are also available via the Web. The website also contains a collection of several new educational resources for ocean color educators and students. Being the main source of SeaWiFS data and consolidating ocean color data, documents, software, and points of contact form several other sources all at one convenient location, the Goddard DAAC hopes to become an important nexus for the entire global ocean color community. The Ocean Color Data and Resources webpage can be found at http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov under 'ocean color'. Contact the Goddard DAAC Ocean Color Data Support Team about

  19. Alternative method of highway traffic safety analysis for developing countries using delphi technique and Bayesian network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbakwe, Anthony C; Saka, Anthony A; Choi, Keechoo; Lee, Young-Jae

    2016-08-01

    Highway traffic accidents all over the world result in more than 1.3 million fatalities annually. An alarming number of these fatalities occurs in developing countries. There are many risk factors that are associated with frequent accidents, heavy loss of lives, and property damage in developing countries. Unfortunately, poor record keeping practices are very difficult obstacle to overcome in striving to obtain a near accurate casualty and safety data. In light of the fact that there are numerous accident causes, any attempts to curb the escalating death and injury rates in developing countries must include the identification of the primary accident causes. This paper, therefore, seeks to show that the Delphi Technique is a suitable alternative method that can be exploited in generating highway traffic accident data through which the major accident causes can be identified. In order to authenticate the technique used, Korea, a country that underwent similar problems when it was in its early stages of development in addition to the availability of excellent highway safety records in its database, is chosen and utilized for this purpose. Validation of the methodology confirms the technique is suitable for application in developing countries. Furthermore, the Delphi Technique, in combination with the Bayesian Network Model, is utilized in modeling highway traffic accidents and forecasting accident rates in the countries of research.

  20. Liquid phase fluid dynamic (methanol) run in the LaPorte alternative fuels development unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1997-05-01

    A fluid dynamic study was successfully completed in a bubble column at DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, Texas. Significant fluid dynamic information was gathered at pilot scale during three weeks of Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOJP) operations in June 1995. In addition to the usual nuclear density and temperature measurements, unique differential pressure data were collected using Sandia's high-speed data acquisition system to gain insight on flow regime characteristics and bubble size distribution. Statistical analysis of the fluctuations in the pressure data suggests that the column was being operated in the churn turbulent regime at most of the velocities considered. Dynamic gas disengagement experiments showed a different behavior than seen in low-pressure, cold-flow work. Operation with a superficial gas velocity of 1.2 ft/sec was achieved during this run, with stable fluid dynamics and catalyst performance. Improvements included for catalyst activation in the design of the Clean Coal III LPMEOH{trademark} plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, were also confirmed. In addition, an alternate catalyst was demonstrated for LPMEOH{trademark}.

  1. Analysis of words to development of augmentative and alternative communication boards for disabled student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Carla Paura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the contribution of the words used in language assessment instruments and/or the vocabulary used in Brazil for the development of alternative communication boards. Methods: word lists from the selected assessment instruments were analyzed through a protocol designed for this purpose. The frequency of occurrence of each word was verified considering four word lists from the instruments and the frequency of occurrence of these words according to the classification proposed by Comunication Pictu Symbols system - PCS. Results: Results showed that the frequency words occurred only once was of 67.88% and the frequency of occurrence of concrete and abstract nouns in the instruments was 60.04%. The instrument that presented words with more than one occurrence was the Vocabulary Test-PPVT Peabody Picture. Conclusions: The use of tool that are already used and standardized may contribute to the process of evaluation, selection and deployment of augmentative and alternative communication resources for children and youth with disabilities.

  2. Development and validation of an alternative disturbed skin model by mechanical abrasion to study drug penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlupp, P; Weber, M; Schmidts, T; Geiger, K; Runkel, F

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and cosmetics for dermal application are usually tested on healthy skin, although the primary permeation barrier, the stratum corneum, is often impaired by skin diseases or small skin lesions, especially on the hands. These skin conditions can considerably influence the permeation of chemicals and drugs. Furthermore, risk assessment for example of nanoparticles should be performed under various skin conditions to reflect the true circumstances. Therefore, an alternative and reproducible method for a high throughput of skin samples with impaired skin barrier was developed and verified by skin permeation studies (25 h) of caffeine, sorbic acid and testosterone compared to healthy (untreated) and tape-stripped skin. Skin barrier disruption was controlled by TEWL measurement. Skin permeation of the three substances was increased in tape-stripped and abraded skin compared to untreated skin due to the reduced barrier integrity. Enhancement of drug uptake was highest for the most hydrophilic substance, caffeine, followed by sorbic acid and lipophilic testosterone. No significant difference in drug uptake studies was observed between the new abrasion method with an aluminum-coated sponge and the tape-stripping method. The obtained results demonstrate that this abrasion method is an alternative way to achieve a disturbed skin barrier for drug and chemical uptake studies.

  3. Developing a Hierarchical Decision Model to Evaluate Nuclear Power Plant Alternative Siting Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingga, Marwan Mossa

    A strong trend of returning to nuclear power is evident in different places in the world. Forty-five countries are planning to add nuclear power to their grids and more than 66 nuclear power plants are under construction. Nuclear power plants that generate electricity and steam need to improve safety to become more acceptable to governments and the public. One novel practical solution to increase nuclear power plants' safety factor is to build them away from urban areas, such as offshore or underground. To date, Land-Based siting is the dominant option for siting all commercial operational nuclear power plants. However, the literature reveals several options for building nuclear power plants in safer sitings than Land-Based sitings. The alternatives are several and each has advantages and disadvantages, and it is difficult to distinguish among them and choose the best for a specific project. In this research, we recall the old idea of using the alternatives of offshore and underground sitings for new nuclear power plants and propose a tool to help in choosing the best siting technology. This research involved the development of a decision model for evaluating several potential nuclear power plant siting technologies, both those that are currently available and future ones. The decision model was developed based on the Hierarchical Decision Modeling (HDM) methodology. The model considers five major dimensions, social, technical, economic, environmental, and political (STEEP), and their related criteria and sub-criteria. The model was designed and developed by the author, and its elements' validation and evaluation were done by a large number of experts in the field of nuclear energy. The decision model was applied in evaluating five potential siting technologies and ranked the Natural Island as the best in comparison to Land-Based, Floating Plant, Artificial Island, and Semi-Embedded plant.

  4. Green Engines Development Using Compressed Natural Gas as an Alternative Fuel: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The Compressed Natural Gas (CNG is a gaseous form of natural gas, it have been recognized as one of the promising alternative fuel due to its substantial benefits compared to gasoline and diesel. Natural gas is produced from gas wells or tied in with crude oil production. Approach: Natural gas is promising alternative fuel to meet strict engine emission regulations in many countries. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG has long been used in stationary engines, but the application of CNG as a transport engines fuel has been considerably advanced over the last decade by the development of lightweight high-pressure storage cylinders. Results: The technology of engine conversion was well established and suitable conversion equipment is readily available. For petrol engines or spark ignition engines there are two options, a bi-fuel conversion and use a dedicated to CNG engine. The diesel engines converted or designed to run on natural gas, there were two main options discussed. There are dual-fuel engines and normal ignition can be initiated. Natural gas engines can be operated at lean burn and stoichiometric conditions with different combustion and emission characteristics. Conclusions: In this study, the low exhaust gas emissions of CNG engines research and development were highlighted. Stoichiometric natural gas engines were briefly reviewed. To keep the output power, torque and emissions of natural gas engines comparable to their gasoline or diesel counterparts. High activity for future green CNG engines research and development to meet future stringent emissions standards was recorded in the study.

  5. FS4, FS4-p, and FSP: a 4-month crossover study of 3 fine structure sound-coding strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riss, Dominik; Hamzavi, Jafar-Sasan; Blineder, Michaela; Honeder, Clemens; Ehrenreich, Isabella; Kaider, Alexandra; Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter; Gstoettner, Wolfgang; Arnoldner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare two novel fine structure strategies "FS4" and "FS4-p" with the established fine structure processing (FSP) strategy. FS4 provides fine structure information on the apical four-electrode channels. With FS4-p, these electrodes may be stimulated in a parallel manner. The authors evaluated speech perception, sound quality, and subjective preference. A longitudinal crossover study was done on postlingually deafened adults (N = 33) who were using FSP as their default strategy. Each participant was fitted with FS4, FS4-p, and FSP, for 4 months in a randomized and blinded order. After each run, an Adaptive Sentence test in noise (Oldenburger Sentence Test [OLSA]) and a Monosyllable test in quiet (Freiburger Monosyllables) were performed, and subjective sound quality was determined with a Visual Analogue Scale. At the end of the study the preferred strategy was noted. Scores of the OLSA did not reveal any significant differences among the three strategies, but the Freiburger test showed a statistically significant effect (p = 0.03) with slightly worse scores for FS4 (49.7%) compared with FSP (54.3%). Performance of FS4-p (51.8%) was comparable with the other strategies. Both audiometric tests depicted a high variability among subjects. The number of best-performing strategies for each participant individually was as follows: (a) for the OLSA: FSP, N = 10.5; FS4, N = 10.5; and FS4-p, N = 12; and (b) for the Freiburger test: FSP, N = 14; FS4, N = 9; and FS4-p, N = 10. A moderate agreement was found in the best-performing strategies of the Speech tests within the participants. For sound quality, speech in quiet, classical, and pop music were assessed. No significant effects of strategy were found for speech in quiet and classical music, but auditory impression of pop music was rated as more natural in FSP compared with FS4 (p = 0.04). It is interesting that at the end of the study, a majority of the participants favored the new

  6. A Review on the Development of Gravitational Water Vortex Power Plant as Alternative Renewable Energy Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. M.; Tan, J. H.; Fadzlita, M. T.; Khairul Muzammil, A. R. Wan

    2017-07-01

    Gravitational water vortex power plant is a green technology that generates electricity from alternative or renewable energy source. In the vortex power plant, water is introduced into a circular basin tangentially that creates a free vortex and energy is extracted from the free vortex by using a turbine. The main advantages of this type of power plant is the generation of electricity from ultra-low hydraulic pressure and it is also environmental friendly. Since the hydraulic head requirement is as low as 1m, this type of power plant can be installed at a river or a stream to generate electricity for few houses. It is a new and not well-developed technology to harvest electricity from low pressure water energy sources. There are limited literatures available on the design, fabrication and physical geometry of the vortex turbine and generator. Past researches focus on the optimization of turbine design, inlets, outlets and basin geometry. However, there are still insufficient literatures available for the technology to proceed beyond prototyping stage. The maximum efficiency obtained by the researchers are approximately 30% while the commercial companies claimed about 50% of efficiency with 500W to 20kW of power generated. Hence, the aim of this paper is to determine the gap in the vortex power plant technology development through past works and a set of research recommendations will be developed as efforts to accelerate the development of GWVPP.

  7. Alternative approach of developing all-optical Fredkin and Toffoli gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Dhoumendra; Mandal, Sumana; Garai, Sisir Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Reversible logic gates show potential roles in communication technology, and it has a wide area of applicability such as in sequential and combinational circuit of optical computing, optical signal processing, multi-valued logic operations, etc. because of its advantageous aspects of data-recovering capabilities, low power consumption, least power dissipation, faster speed of processing, less hardware complexity, etc. In a reversible logic gate not only the outputs can be determined from the inputs, but also the inputs can be uniquely recovered from the outputs. In this article an alternative approach has been made to develop three-input-output Fredkin and Toffoli gates using the frequency conversion property of semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and frequency-based beam routing by optical multiplexers and demultiplexers. Simulation results show the feasibility of our proposed scheme.

  8. Aspects of sino-Japan complementary and alternative medicine and development on the traditional uighur medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusup, Abdiryim; Yamaguchi, Nobuo

    2009-06-01

    Two consecutive conferences on 'Sino-Japan Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Development on the Traditional Uighur Medicine' were held in Xinjiang Medical University on July 3 and Kanazawa Medical University on October 6, 2007. The Vice president Halmurat Upur presided over the meeting and gave congratulatory address on holding of the conference. In order to understand mutually and discuss the possibility of the Uighur Medicine as CAM and the situation of medicine in the global sense, specialist scholars of Traditional Uighur Medicine and postgraduates attended this conference. In the meeting of the CAM, the achievements on the research of Traditional Uighur Medicine were exchanged and warmly discussed. Presentations were made in the consecutive conference.

  9. Development of an alternative method for testing the immunogenicity of diphtheria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghi, M A; Pasetti, M F; Brero, M L; Deluchi, S; di Paola, G; Mathet, V; Eriksson, P V

    1995-04-01

    The immunogenicity of the diphtheria component of 73 commercial vaccines from five different manufacturers was tested by the toxin neutralization test (TNT) and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed in our laboratory. A comparison of the antibody levels measured by both assays showed a very good correlation (r = 0.95, p antibody levels as low as 5.5 x 10(-5) IU ml-1. To evaluate the possibility of accelerating the active immunization during the activity test of vaccines, an alternative schedule using one single human dose was assayed. A very good correlation was observed between the IgG antibody response obtained with this schedule and with the traditional programme. Therefore, the cost and the time required to perform the activity test may be considerably reduced when both the rapid immunization schedule and the ELISA are used.

  10. Operating condition influences on PCDD/Fs emissions from sinter pot tests with hot flue gas recycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongmei Yu; Minghui Zheng; Xianwei Li; Xiaolei He

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to clarify the influence of operating conditions on the formation and emissions of polychlorinated-p- dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from a sintering process with hot flue gas recycling.A pilot scale sinter pot with simulated flue gas recycling was developed,and four key operational parameters,including temperature,oxygen content of the simulated waste,flue gas,the coke rate of the sintering mixture,and the quicklime quality,were selected for exploring PCDD/Fs formation.The results showed that the temperature of the recycled flue gas had a major affect on PCDD/Fs formation,and a high temperature could significantly increase their formation during sintering.A clear linear correlation between the temperature of recycling flue gas and PCDD/Fs emission (r =0.93) was found.PCDD/Fs could be reduced to a certain extent by decreasing the level of oxygen in the recycled flue gas,while sintering quality was unchanged.The coke rate had no significant influence on the formation of PCDD/Fs,but the quality of quicklime used in the sintering mixture could affect not only the amount of PCDD/Fs emissions but also the sintering productivity.Compared with a benchmark sinter pot test,PCDD/Fs emissions markedly decreased with improvements to quicklime quality.However,the reduction in PCDD/Fs emissions realized by using high-quality quicklime was limited by the temperature of the inlet gas.The highest reduction achieved was 51% compared with conventional quicklime when the temperature of the inlet gas was 150 ℃.

  11. Big Software for SmallSats: Adapting cFS to CubeSat Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudmore, Alan P.; Crum, Gary Alex; Sheikh, Salman; Marshall, James

    2015-01-01

    Expanding capabilities and mission objectives for SmallSats and CubeSats is driving the need for reliable, reusable, and robust flight software. While missions are becoming more complicated and the scientific goals more ambitious, the level of acceptable risk has decreased. Design challenges are further compounded by budget and schedule constraints that have not kept pace. NASA's Core Flight Software System (cFS) is an open source solution which enables teams to build flagship satellite level flight software within a CubeSat schedule and budget. NASA originally developed cFS to reduce mission and schedule risk for flagship satellite missions by increasing code reuse and reliability. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, which launched in 2009, was the first of a growing list of Class B rated missions to use cFS.

  12. Experimental study of fs-laser induced sub-100-nm periodic surface structures on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathala, Chandra S R; Ajami, Ali; Ionin, Andrey A; Kudryashov, Sergey I; Makarov, Sergey V; Ganz, Thomas; Assion, Andreas; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2015-03-09

    In this work the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on a titanium surface upon irradiation by linearly polarized femtosecond (fs) laser pulses with a repetition rate of 1 kHz in air environment was studied experimentally. In particular, the dependence of high-spatial-frequency-LIPSS (HSFL) characteristics on various laser parameters: fluence, pulse number, wavelength (800 nm and 400 nm), pulse duration (10 fs - 550 fs), and polarization was studied in detail. In comparison with low-spatial-frequency-LIPSS (LSFL), the HSFL emerge at a much lower fluence with orientation perpendicular to the ridges of the LSFL. It was observed that these two types of LIPSS demonstrate different fluence, shot number and wavelength dependencies, which suggest their origin is different. Therefore, the HSFL formation mechanism cannot be described by the widely accepted interference model developed for describing LSFL formation.

  13. Schedule Optimization Study, Hanford RI/FS Program. Volume 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    A Schedule Optimization Study (SOS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Program was conducted by an independent team of professionals from other federal agencies and the private sector experienced in environmental restoration. This team spent two weeks at Hanford in September 1992 examining the reasons for the lengthy RI/FS process at Hanford and developing recommendations to expedite the process. The need for the study arose out of a schedule dispute regarding the submission of the 1100-EM-1 Operable Unit RI/FS Work Plan. This report documents the study called for in the August 29, 1991, Dispute Resolution Committee Decision Statement. Battelle`s Environmental Management Operations (EMO) coordinated the effort for DOE`s Richland Field Office (RL).

  14. Environmental value considerations in public attitudes about alternative energy development in Oregon and Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Brent S; Pierce, John C; Warner, Rebecca L; Lovrich, Nicholas P

    2015-03-01

    The 2013 Pacific Coast Action Plan on Climate and Energy signed by the Governors of California, Oregon, and Washington and the Premier of British Columbia launched a broadly announced public commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through multiple strategies. Those strategies include the development and increased use of renewable energy sources. The initiative recognized that citizens are both a central component in abating greenhouse gas emissions with regard to their energy use behaviors, and are important participants in the public policymaking process at both state and local levels of government. The study reported here examines whether either support or opposition to state government leadership in the development of alternative energy technologies can be explained by environmental values as measured by the New Ecological Paradigm (NEP). The research results are based on mail surveys of randomly selected households conducted throughout Oregon and Washington in late 2009 and early 2010. Findings suggest that younger and more highly educated respondents are significantly more likely than older and less educated respondents to either support or strongly support government policies to promote bioenergy, wind, geothermal, and solar energy. Those respondents with higher NEP scores are also more supportive of government promotion of wind, geothermal, and solar technologies than are those with lower NEP scores. Support for wave energy does not show a statistical correlation with environmental values, maybe a reflection of this technology's nascent level of development. The paper concludes with a consideration of the implications of these findings for environmental management.

  15. The alternative strategies of the development of the nuclear power industry in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverdovskii, A. A.; Kalyakin, S. G.; Rachkov, V. I.

    2014-05-01

    This paper emphasizes the urgency of scientific-and-technical and sociopolitical problems of the modern nuclear power industry without solving of which the transition from local nuclear power systems now in operation to a large-scale nuclear power industry would be impossible. The existing concepts of the longterm strategy of the development of the nuclear power industry have been analyzed. On the basis of the scenarios having been developed it was shown that the most promising alternative is the orientation towards the closed nuclear fuel cycle with fast neutron reactors (hereinafter referred to as fast reactors) that would meet the requirements on the acceptable safety. It was concluded that the main provisions of "The Strategy of the Development of the Nuclear Power Industry of Russia for the First Half of the 21st Century" approved by the Government of the Russian Federation in the year 2000 remain the same at present as well, although they require to be elaborated with due regard for new realities in the market for fossil fuels, the state of both the Russian and the world economy, as well as tightening of requirements related to safe operation of nuclear power stations (NPSs) (for example, after the severe accident at the Fukushima nuclear power station, Japan) and nonproliferation of nuclear weapons.

  16. Environmental Value Considerations in Public Attitudes About Alternative Energy Development in Oregon and Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Brent S.; Pierce, John C.; Warner, Rebecca L.; Lovrich, Nicholas P.

    2015-03-01

    The 2013 Pacific Coast Action Plan on Climate and Energy signed by the Governors of California, Oregon, and Washington and the Premier of British Columbia launched a broadly announced public commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through multiple strategies. Those strategies include the development and increased use of renewable energy sources. The initiative recognized that citizens are both a central component in abating greenhouse gas emissions with regard to their energy use behaviors, and are important participants in the public policymaking process at both state and local levels of government. The study reported here examines whether either support or opposition to state government leadership in the development of alternative energy technologies can be explained by environmental values as measured by the New Ecological Paradigm (NEP). The research results are based on mail surveys of randomly selected households conducted throughout Oregon and Washington in late 2009 and early 2010. Findings suggest that younger and more highly educated respondents are significantly more likely than older and less educated respondents to either support or strongly support government policies to promote bioenergy, wind, geothermal, and solar energy. Those respondents with higher NEP scores are also more supportive of government promotion of wind, geothermal, and solar technologies than are those with lower NEP scores. Support for wave energy does not show a statistical correlation with environmental values, maybe a reflection of this technology's nascent level of development. The paper concludes with a consideration of the implications of these findings for environmental management.

  17. Preemiad said Rein Raud, fs, Mart Kivastik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Eesti Kultuurkapitali 2004. aasta kirjanduse aastapreemia laureaadid on: Rein Raud ("Hector ja Bernard"), fs (luulekogu "2004"), Mart Kivastik (näidend "Külmetava kunstniku portree"), Jaan Rannap ("Nelja nimega koer"), Toomas Haug ("Troojamäe tõotus"), Harald Rajamets (tõlkeluule kogumik "Pegasos ja peegel"), Antoine Chalvin ("Kalevipoja" tõlge prantsuse keelde"), Ilmar Talve ("Eesti kultuurilugu"), Lauri Sommer (artikkel Uku Masingu käsikirja "Saadik Magellani pilvest" vaimne, ajalis-ruumiline ja elulooline taust), Boris Tuch ("Gorjatshaja desjatka estonskihh pisatelei")

  18. Preemiad said Rein Raud, fs, Mart Kivastik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Eesti Kultuurkapitali 2004. aasta kirjanduse aastapreemia laureaadid on: Rein Raud ("Hector ja Bernard"), fs (luulekogu "2004"), Mart Kivastik (näidend "Külmetava kunstniku portree"), Jaan Rannap ("Nelja nimega koer"), Toomas Haug ("Troojamäe tõotus"), Harald Rajamets (tõlkeluule kogumik "Pegasos ja peegel"), Antoine Chalvin ("Kalevipoja" tõlge prantsuse keelde"), Ilmar Talve ("Eesti kultuurilugu"), Lauri Sommer (artikkel Uku Masingu käsikirja "Saadik Magellani pilvest" vaimne, ajalis-ruumiline ja elulooline taust), Boris Tuch ("Gorjatshaja desjatka estonskihh pisatelei")

  19. High-throughput process development of purification alternatives for the protein avidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Patrick; Hoffmann, Marc; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    With an increased number of applications in the field of the avidin-biotin technology, the resulting demand for highly-purified protein avidin has drawn our attention to the purification process of avidin that naturally occurs in chicken egg white. The high-throughput process development (HTPD) methodology was exploited, in order to evaluate purification process alternatives to commonly used ion-exchange chromatography. In a high-throughput format, process parameters for aqueous two-phase extraction, selective precipitation with salts and polyethylene glycol, and hydrophobic interaction and mixed-mode column chromatography experiments were performed. The HTPD strategy was complemented by a high-throughput tandem high-performance liquid chromatography assay for protein quantification. Suitable conditions for the separation of avidin from the major impurities ovalbumin, ovomucoid, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme were identified in the screening experiments. By combination of polyethylene glycol precipitation with subsequent resolubilization and separation in a polyethylene glycol/sulfate/sodium chloride two-phase system an avidin purity of 77% was obtained with a yield >90% while at the same time achieving a significant reduction of the process volume. The two-phase extraction and precipitation results were largely confirmed in larger scale with scale-up factors of 230 and 133, respectively. Seamless processing of the avidin enriched bottom phase was found feasible by using mixed-mode chromatography. By gradient elution a final avidin purity of at least 97% and yield >90% was obtained in the elution pool. The presented identification of a new and beneficial alternative for the purification of the high value protein thus represents a successful implementation of HTPD for an industrially relevant purification task. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  20. Levan in the developing of new colon-specific polymer material: evaluation of the permeability, moisture and thermal analyses in free films of Eudragit® FS 30 D = Levana no desenvolvimento de novo material polimérico cólon-específico: avaliação da permeabilidade, intumescimento e análises térmicas de filmes isolados de Eudragit® FS 30 D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Albuquerque Cavalcanti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Levan was used as agent in the synthesis of new colon-specific polymeric matrix together with Eudragit® FS 30 D. Eudragit® FS 30 D films incorporated with levan were made by casting process and characterized to: water vapour transmission, sweeling index, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric. The levan increased the films permeability (p 0.05. The thermal analyses of the films indicated a glass transition temperature approximate at 47°C and thermal decomposition at 400°C. The results indicated that there is potential for using such site-specificity blend as pharmaceutical coating material.Levana foi utilizada na síntese de novo material polimérico cólon-específico conjuntamente com o Eudragit® FS 30 D. Filmes de Eudragit® FS 30 D aditivados de levana foram feitos pelo método de “casting process” e caracterizados quanto à transmissão de vapor de água, índice de intumescimento, calorimetria diferencial de varredura e termogravimetria. A levana aumentou a permeabilidade dos filmes (p 0,05. As análises térmicas dos filmes indicaram uma temperatura de transição vítrea aproximada de 47°C e temperatura de decomposição de 400°C. Os resultados indicaram que há potencial de uso desta nova blenda sítio-específica como material de revestimento farmacêutico.

  1. SeaWiFS Third Anniversary Global Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    September 18,2000 is the third anniversary of the start of regular SeaWiFS operations of this remarkable planet called Earth. This SeaWiFS image is of the Global Biosphere depicting the ocean's long-term average phytoplankton chlorophyll concentration acquired between September 1997 and August 2000 combined with the SeaWiFS-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) over land during July 2000.

  2. Alternative energies; Energies alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonal, J.; Rossetti, P

    2007-07-01

    The earth took millions years to made the petroleum, the gas the coal and the uranium. Only a few centuries will be needed to exhaust these fossil fuels and some years to reach expensive prices. Will the wold continue on this way of energy compulsive consumption? The renewable energies and some citizen attitudes are sufficient to break this spiral. This book proposes to discuss these alternative energies. It shows that this attitude must be supported by the government. It takes stock on the more recent information concerning the renewable energies. it develops three main points: the electricity storage, the housing and the transports. (A.L.B.)

  3. 80-fs Nd:silicate glass laser pumped by a single-mode 200-mW diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesi, Antonio; Greborio, Alessandro; Pirzio, Federico; Reali, Giancarlo

    2010-05-10

    A Nd(3+)-doped Schott LG680 silicate glass laser was pumped with a single-mode 200-mW diode. Efficient cw operation was demonstrated with 37.5 mW output power and 36% slope efficiency. Passive mode-locking with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror yielded 80-fs pulses with a two-prism setup. Alternatively, pulses of approximately 200-fs, tunable over the range 1058-1076 nm, were obtained with either slit-tuning or a single-prism dispersive resonator. Output powers from 6 to 14 mW have been measured.

  4. Novel alternative splice variants of chicken NPAS3 are expressed in the developing central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jiheon; Kim, Jaesang

    2013-11-10

    We report isolation of novel splice variants of chicken Neuronal Per-Arnt-Sim domain protein 3 (cNPAS3) gene distinct from the previously predicted cNPAS3 at the 5' end. Newly identified cNPAS3 splice variants feature N-terminus coding sequences with high degrees of homology to human NPAS3 (hNAPS3). We also show that the alternative splicing pattern of NPAS3 is conserved between chicken and human. RNA in situ hybridization indicated that the expression of cNPAS3 in the developing central nervous system (CNS) is limited to the ventricular zone and only partially overlaps with that of chicken Reelin (cReelin), the only known regulatory target gene of NPAS3 in the adult brain. Overexpression of cNPAS3 by in ovo electroporation had little effect on the expression of Sox2, a marker for neural precursors, or of Isl1/2, a marker for early differentiating motor neurons. Taken together with the little effect of cNPAS3 overexpression on cReelin, it is noted that the function of NPAS3 in the developing CNS remains to be determined. Still, identification of proper cDNA sequences for cNPAS3 should represent a solid beginning of the understanding process. © 2013.

  5. Evaluation of complementary-alternative medicine (CAM) questionnaire development for Indonesian clinical psychologists: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Andrian; Newcombe, Peter A; Pohlman, Annie

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate questionnaire development to measure the knowledge of Complementary-Alternative Medicine (CAM), attitudes towards CAM, CAM experiences, and CAM educational needs of clinical psychologists in Indonesia. A 26-item questionnaire was developed through an extensive literature search. Data was obtained from provisional psychologists from the Master of Professional Clinical Psychology programs at two established public universities in urban areas of Indonesia. To validate the questionnaire, panel reviews by executive members of the Indonesian Clinical Psychology Association (ICPA), experts in health psychology, and experts in public health and CAM provided their professional judgements. The self-reporting questionnaire consisted of four scales including: knowledge of CAM (6 items), attitudes towards CAM (10 items), CAM experiences (4 items), and CAM educational needs (6 items). All scales, except CAM Experiences, were assessed on a 7-point Likert scale. Sixty provisional psychologists were eligible to complete the questionnaire with a response rate of 73% (N=44). The results showed that the CAM questionnaire was reliable (Cronbach's coefficient alpha range=0.62-0.96; item-total correlation range=0.14-0.92) and demonstrated content validity. Following further psychometric evaluation, the CAM questionnaire may provide the evidence-based information to inform the education and practice of Indonesian clinical psychologists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing during human heart development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Chen, Yanmei; Li, Xinzhong; Chen, Guojun; Zhong, Lintao; Chen, Gangbing; Liao, Yulin; Liao, Wangjun; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) drives determinative changes during mouse heart development. Recent high-throughput technological advancements have facilitated genome-wide AS, while its analysis in human foetal heart transition to the adult stage has not been reported. Here, we present a high-resolution global analysis of AS transitions between human foetal and adult hearts. RNA-sequencing data showed extensive AS transitions occurred between human foetal and adult hearts, and AS events occurred more frequently in protein-coding genes than in long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). A significant difference of AS patterns was found between foetal and adult hearts. The predicted difference in AS events was further confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of human heart samples. Functional foetal-specific AS event analysis showed enrichment associated with cell proliferation-related pathways including cell cycle, whereas adult-specific AS events were associated with protein synthesis. Furthermore, 42.6% of foetal-specific AS events showed significant changes in gene expression levels between foetal and adult hearts. Genes exhibiting both foetal-specific AS and differential expression were highly enriched in cell cycle-associated functions. In conclusion, we provided a genome-wide profiling of AS transitions between foetal and adult hearts and proposed that AS transitions and deferential gene expression may play determinative roles in human heart development. PMID:27752099

  7. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing during human heart development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Chen, Yanmei; Li, Xinzhong; Chen, Guojun; Zhong, Lintao; Chen, Gangbing; Liao, Yulin; Liao, Wangjun; Bin, Jianping

    2016-10-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) drives determinative changes during mouse heart development. Recent high-throughput technological advancements have facilitated genome-wide AS, while its analysis in human foetal heart transition to the adult stage has not been reported. Here, we present a high-resolution global analysis of AS transitions between human foetal and adult hearts. RNA-sequencing data showed extensive AS transitions occurred between human foetal and adult hearts, and AS events occurred more frequently in protein-coding genes than in long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). A significant difference of AS patterns was found between foetal and adult hearts. The predicted difference in AS events was further confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of human heart samples. Functional foetal-specific AS event analysis showed enrichment associated with cell proliferation-related pathways including cell cycle, whereas adult-specific AS events were associated with protein synthesis. Furthermore, 42.6% of foetal-specific AS events showed significant changes in gene expression levels between foetal and adult hearts. Genes exhibiting both foetal-specific AS and differential expression were highly enriched in cell cycle-associated functions. In conclusion, we provided a genome-wide profiling of AS transitions between foetal and adult hearts and proposed that AS transitions and deferential gene expression may play determinative roles in human heart development.

  8. PARTICIPATORY DIAGNOSIS TO DEVELOP TOURISM PROJECT IN THE COMMUNITY ALTERNATIVE AGIABAMPO, HUATABAMPO, SONORA, MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adán Guillermo Ramírez-García

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Agiabampo is a fishing community facing the lack of options for productive activities, which puts enormous pressure on natural resources. This paper aims to identify the areas with tourism potential through a participatory diagnosis to assess the relevance of such projects that contribute to sustainable development. It is located at coordinates 26 ° 21 'north latitude and 58''de 109 ° 08' 37 '' west longitude, down from 15 meters altitude. It is within the Ramsar site called "lagoon system Agiabampo-Bacorehuis-Rio Fuerte Old" also form part of the priority terrestrial region "Las Bocas" (RTP-21 and program CONABIO Areas of Importance for the Conservation of Birds (IBA, AICA 131 "Agiabampo". According to the rules of operation of CONAFOR (2009 for the tourist diagnosis proceeded to conduct the inventory and prioritization of natural and cultural resources, also five workshops with community residents and municipal authorities were carried out interviews semi structured with key players in the CONANP and three field trips to community guides. The identified natural attractions are the Horseshoe bay, cove San Lucas, Isla Bocanita Beach Baths, Bamocha Peninsula and Isle of ducks. The identified cultural appeal considered gastronomy, traditional medicine, crafts, customs and traditions. Two paths are proposed by the Laguna maritime lasts 3.5 hours, the Earth is Bamocha Peninsula lasting 3 hours. It is indisputable Agiabampo the potential to develop alternative tourism project due to its geographical location and natural and cultural attractions are there, allowing preserve and create jobs in the community.

  9. Front-end of the ILE Project: A design study for a 100 mJ sub-10 fs laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Ramirez, Patricia; Pellegrina, Alain; Druon, Frédéric; Georges, Patrick; Chen, Xiaowei; Canova, Lorenzo; Malvache, Arnaud; Jullien, Aurélie; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo

    2010-04-01

    Within the development of the ILE French project aiming on the building of a 10 PW, 150 J/15 fs laser chain (named APOLLON), a design study for a sub-10-fs, 100 mJ pilot laser operating at 800 nm have been conceived. This system is based on a non-collinear optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (NOPCPA) of the spectrally broadened and compressed pulses of a Ti:Sapphire laser system providing 1.5-mJ, 25-fs, pumped at 515 nm by a high-energy diode-pumped Yb-doped-based laser chain. The envisioned system, based on a novel combined architecture of picosecond and nanosecond NOPCPA stages, will finally deliver carrier envelope phased (CEP) stabilized 1 ns pulses (compressible to less than 10 fs) at 800 nm with 100 mJ energy and at a repetition rate in the range of 10-100 Hz.

  10. Isolated sub-10 attosecond pulse generation by a 6-fs driving pulse and a 5-fs subharmonic controlling pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhui Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically study high-order harmonic generation by quantum path control in a special two-color laser field, which is synthesized by a 6 fs/800 nm fundamental pulse and a weaker 5 fs/1600 nm subharmonic controlling pulse. Single quantum path is selected without optimizing any carrier phase, which not only broadens the harmonic bandwidth to 400 eV, but also enhances the harmonic conversion efficiency in comparison with the short-plus-long scheme, which is based on 5 fs/800 nm driving pulse and 6 fs/1600 nm control pulse. An isolated 8-attosecond pulse is produced with currently available ultrafast laser sources.

  11. Patterns of serum PCDD/Fs affected by vegetarian regime, consumption of locally produced food, and resident places of residents living near incinerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Hsiu-Ling; Lee Chang-Ching; Su Hue-Jen; Liao Pao-Chi [Inst. of Basic Medical Science, Medical Coll., National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan)

    2004-09-15

    Previous reports have been estimated that more than 90% of serum PCDD/Fs can be accounted for by the consumption of various food groups. Nouwen et al. suggested residents living near incinerators with the elevated dioxin exposure while they ate locally produced food compared to the general population from other areas. PCDD/Fs usually abound in fatty meats and marine foods, and consumption of which is the major pathway of human expose to PCDD/Fs. However, no distinct association was shown between vegetarian regime of human and their corresponding serum PCDD/Fs concentration. In addition, the resident region is associated to their corresponding dietary consumption and ambient exposure of PCDD/Fs, especially for subjects consumed the local foods with special dioxin-like contamination. The current study, therefore, was set to examine how dietary habits, including vegetarian regime and consumption of local food original for residents living near the incinerators are associated to serum PCDD/F concentrations. In addition, the further aim is to assess the influence on the serum PCDD/Fs levels resulting from subjects living in the alternative resident regions, even all of them exposed to PCDD/Fs emission from incinerators.

  12. Effects of Learning-Style Responsive versus Traditional Staff Development on Community College Professors' Attitudes toward Alternative Instructional Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Christina T.; Dunn, Rita

    2008-01-01

    How does one know whether traditional or innovative staff development is working? This study compared the effects of professors' attitudes toward learning through traditional staff development versus alternative instructional strategies for teaching community college students. Eight-four professors participated in this study. The average…

  13. The building of the kitchen table : In search of an alternative model for in-company leadership development programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigaloff, C.L.; Nabben, E.H. (Iselien); Bergsma, E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an alternative model of a leadership-development program. Design/methodology/approach: A leadership-development program based on a "closure-type description" instead of an "input-type description" (Varela) was designed and executed for an organization. The res

  14. The building of the kitchen table : In search of an alternative model for in-company leadership development programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigaloff, C.L.; Nabben, E.H. (Iselien); Bergsma, E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an alternative model of a leadership-development program. Design/methodology/approach: A leadership-development program based on a "closure-type description" instead of an "input-type description" (Varela) was designed and executed for an organization. The

  15. Nielsen: Aladdin-Suite, FS89. Maskarade-Overture / Robert Layton

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Layton, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Nielsen: Aladdin-Suite, FS89. Maskarade-Overture, Prelude, Act 2. The Cockerels' Dance. Rhapsody Overture: An imaginary journey to the Faroe Islands, FS123. Helios Overture, FS32. Saga-Drom, FS46. Pan and Syrinx, FS87. Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Järvi" DG 447 757-2GH (72 minutes: DDD)

  16. Nielsen: Aladdin-Suite, FS89. Maskarade-Overture / Robert Layton

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Layton, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Nielsen: Aladdin-Suite, FS89. Maskarade-Overture, Prelude, Act 2. The Cockerels' Dance. Rhapsody Overture: An imaginary journey to the Faroe Islands, FS123. Helios Overture, FS32. Saga-Drom, FS46. Pan and Syrinx, FS87. Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Järvi" DG 447 757-2GH (72 minutes: DDD)

  17. APPLICABILITY OF FS-ALL-METAL SELF-LOCK NUTS FOR RAILWAY ROLLING STOCK OF 1520 MM GAUGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Кreis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. One of key requirements for rolling stock of next generation is essential increase of warranty period or running between maintenance depots and in periods between programming repair works. This will lead to a reduction of costs to maintenance and repair during service life of rolling stock. In this regard, the industry aspires to use (during construction, repairs, modernization of rolling stock a modern screw joints in structures for fixing parts. These screw joints could provide a high reliability under the action of vibration load. FS-hexagon all-metal self-lock nuts of multiple use, Flaig + Hommel GmbH company meets these requirements. Therefore, there is the need to consider the results of tests to confirm the reliability of FS-nuts in the new environment. Methodology. Test complex of developed programs and methods was carried out on railway rolling stock for functional demonstration of screw joints with FS-nuts. These tests include: 1 proof test and locking moment test as specified in ISO 2320 under normal climatic conditions and after low temperatures impact; 2 running test for rolling stock, secured the most load condition and according to supervised operation of next generation cars on the railway. Findings. Results of the tests testify that FS-all-metal self-lock nuts meet the requirements of international standards and confirm the reliability of the next generation rolling stock during its operation on the railway of 1520 mm gauge. Namely, locking moment and tightening torque is maintained in screw joints both on spring-suspended and unspring parts of freight car bogies by the action of vibration load under multiple use of FS-nuts. Originality. The developed software and methods was improved by conducting additional tests after exposure of screw joints with FS-nuts to low temperatures, as well as by control operations for assessing the condition of screw joints with FS-nuts, in the conditions of controlled operation of rolling

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine use in Portugal: development of an assessment tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Carvalho

    Full Text Available Objective: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM usage is increasing in developing countries. However, little is known about its use in Portugal. This report describes the prevalence of CAM use in a sample of Portuguese adults from Lisbon area. Method: One hundred and seventy four individuals (62% females and 37% males with ages ranging from 20 to 80 years were inquired with a questionnaire designed to assess the use of a variety of mostly self-help CAM practices. Results: Seventy six percent of the individuals used CAM at least once in their lifetime, although 77% of participants reported having free or inexpensive access to a General Practitioner. The most commonly used CAM are natural products, massages, relaxation techniques and naturopathy, all above 20% of prevalence use. Consistent with the literature, CAM use was more prevalent among women, adults aged 30–69, higher educational levels, and monthly income between 1000€ and 1500€. Conclusion: The study provides some insight about the use of CAM in Portuguese adults and suggests the importance of further study in a larger sample of CAM usage in Portugal. The questionnaire should include a broader variety of CAM practices, as well as other health-related variables that literature suggests are related to CAM usage.

  19. UCP2 Regulates Embryonic Neurogenesis via ROS-mediated Yap Alternation in the Developing Neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Fen; Shen, Tianjin; Zou, Wenzheng; Jiao, Jianwei

    2017-03-09

    Mitochondrial metabolism is a fundamental process in tissue development. How this process play functions in embryonic neurogenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we show that mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) regulates the embryonic neurogenesis by inhibiting the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which affect the proliferation of progenitors. In the embryonic brains of UCP2 knockdown or condition knockout mice, the proliferation of progenitors is significantly increased, while the differentiation of progenitors is reduced. Furthermore, we identify that Yap is the response protein of UCP2 mediated ROS production. When UCP2 is inactive, the production of ROS are increased. The amount of Yap protein is increased as Yap degradation through ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway is decreased. The defect caused by UCP2 depression can be rescued by Yap down-regulation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that UCP2 regulates embryonic neurogenesis through ROS-mediated Yap alternation, thus shedding new sight on mitochondrial metabolism involved in embryonic neurogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a healthy biscuit: an alternative approach to biscuit manufacture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies B

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Obesity (BMI >30 and related health problems, including coronary heart disease (CHD, is without question a public health concern. The purpose of this study was to modify a traditional biscuit by the addition of vitamin B6, vitamin B12, Folic Acid, Vitamin C and Prebiotic fibre, while reducing salt and sugar. Design Development and commercial manufacture of the functional biscuit was carried out in collaboration with a well known and respected biscuit manufacturer of International reputation. The raw materials traditionally referred to as essential in biscuit manufacture, i.e. sugar and fat, were targeted for removal or reduction. In addition, salt was completely removed from the recipe. Participants University students of both sexes (n = 25 agreed to act as subjects for the study. Ethical approval for the study was granted by the University ethics committee. The test was conducted as a single blind crossover design, and the modified and traditional biscuits were presented to the subjects under the same experimental conditions in a random fashion. Results No difference was observed between the original and the modified product for taste and consistency (P > 0.05. The modified biscuit was acceptable to the consumer in terms of eating quality, flavour and colour. Commercial acceptability was therefore established. Conclusion This study has confirmed that traditional high-fat and high-sugar biscuits which are not associated with healthy diets by most consumers can be modified to produce a healthy alternative that can be manufactured under strict commercial conditions.

  1. Health, Islam and Alternative Capitalism. Three possible Key Factors in Developing Somaliland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Zizzola

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to investigate the socio, political and economic dynamics that have occurred in Somaliland in the last decades. Even though this country is still unrecognized by the international community, Somaliland’s economy has undertaken an enduring growth, above all in the private entrepreneurial sector. The author argues that religion has had an important role in the Somali cultural and social identification. According to this assumption, the article analyzes the Islamic factor by showing how it has led to the creation of many alternative connections supported by mutual trust and religious solidarity among involved communities. These connections are somehow fulfilling the absence of political legitimacy while progressively substituting conventional routes of intra-national negotiation, like diplomacy. To confirm this tendency, specific arguments are drawn from Somaliland’s health sector. The health care system is considered a preferential index to evaluate the level of national development. Above all, the private non-profit sector gives some evidence of the Somali capacity of running competitive private businesses while multiplying simultaneously their resources and suppliers with a consequent increase in autonomy and efficiency. This successful compromise bears the fruits of Somali engagement and can be identified by their inexhaustible adaptability to adverse conditions and their ability to avoid, not deny, the rational rules imposed by external actors and their ostensible, insurmountable interests.

  2. High Altitude Long Endurance UAV Analysis of Alternatives and Technology Requirements Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickol, Craig L.; Guynn, Mark D.; Kohout, Lisa L.; Ozoroski, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    An Analysis of Alternatives and a Technology Requirements Study were conducted for two mission areas utilizing various types of High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). A hurricane science mission and a communications relay mission provided air vehicle requirements which were used to derive sixteen potential HALE UAV configurations, including heavier-than-air (HTA) and lighter-than-air (LTA) concepts with both consumable fuel and solar regenerative propulsion systems. A HTA diesel-fueled wing-body-tail configuration emerged as the preferred concept given near-term technology constraints. The cost effectiveness analysis showed that simply maximizing vehicle endurance can be a sub-optimum system solution. In addition, the HTA solar regenerative configuration was utilized to perform both a mission requirements study and a technology development study. Given near-term technology constraints, the solar regenerative powered vehicle was limited to operations during the long days and short nights at higher latitudes during the summer months. Technology improvements are required in energy storage system specific energy and solar cell efficiency, along with airframe drag and mass reductions to enable the solar regenerative vehicle to meet the full mission requirements.

  3. Agrofood chains: a viable alternative for sustainable rural development or consolidation of big business?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Yumbla

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Beginning in the 90s, following patterns that responded to the global corporate food regime, the government of Ecuador encouraged the formation of agro-food chains, among them, the chain of corn-animal feed- poultry. The food chain includes two service links (SL and four productive links (PL controlled by companies such as Pronaca, Agripac, Ecuaquímica and Supermaxi. These companies implemented horizontal, vertical, financial, and brand integrations, as strategies to consolidate market power and something even more prejudicial –the shaping of decisions regarding what and how to plant, and the available choices of what and how to consume– progressively creating a gap between producers and consumers.This model promotes corn monoculture through contract farming, encourages the use of agrochemicals, and endorses large poultry and swine processing factories which cause air, soil and water pollution from the ‘by products’, gas, feces and urine produced by the animals. Additionally, it promotes, supports an increases the consumption of animal protein, which is energy inefficient.The article discusses the consolidation of the agro-food chain, corn –processed food– poultry, and their links in order to determine if the integration of producers and consumers in this chain is an alternative to equitable development. Or are they part of the business strategies that respond to global food systems?

  4. Development of Nb and Alternative Material Thin Films Tailored for SRF Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Reece, C E; Spradlin, J K; Xiao, B; Zhao, X; Gu, Diefeng; Baumgart, Helmut; Beringer, Douglas; Lukaszew, Rosa

    2011-09-01

    Over the years, Nb/Cu technology, despite its shortcomings due to the commonly used magnetron sputtering, has positioned itself as an alternative route for the future of superconducting structures used in accelerators. Recently, significant progress has been made in the development of energetic vacuum deposition techniques, showing promise for the production of thin films tailored for SRF applications. JLab is pursuing energetic condensation deposition via techniques such as Electron Cyclotron Resonance and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering. As part of this project, the influence of the deposition energy on the material and RF properties of the Nb thin film is investigated with the characterization of their surface, structure, superconducting properties and RF response. It has been shown that the film RRR can be tuned from single digits to values greater than 400. This paper presents results on surface impedance measurements correlated with surface and material characterization for Nb films produced on various substrates, monocrystalline and polycrystalline as well as amorphous. A progress report on work on NbTiN and AlN based multilayer structures will also be presented.

  5. Office of River Protection, plan for Developing Hanford Tank Waste Processing Alternatives, Revision 1, December 15, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WODRICH, D.D.

    2000-01-03

    In August 2000, The Department of Energy (DOE) must decide whether to authorize BNFL Inc. (BNFL) to construct and operate tank waste processing facilities as proposed or to take another path. This will be a multi-billion dollar commitment, requiring that the best path forward be chosen. The plan for reaching this decision is described in reference 1. The alternative evaluations in this plan are directed toward acquiring information needed for the August 2000 decision and for preparing an alternate path plan, should an acceptable agreement with BNFL not be reached. Many of the alternatives considered may still be applicable for failures that could occur after the year 2000, however, depending on the cause of later failures, others alternatives may need to be developed.

  6. Development and Alternate Form Reliability of the Complex Task Performance Assessment (CTPA) for People With Mild Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saa, Juan Pablo; Doherty, Meghan; Young, Alexis; Spiers, Meredith; Leary, Emily; Wolf, Timothy J

    Cognitive impairment is a common consequence of mild stroke. Current performance-based assessments for mild stroke can detect mild impairments in executive function but lack alternate forms to be used as outcome measures. This study aimed to develop an alternate form of the Complex Task Performance Assessment (CTPA-Alt), a performance-based assessment of executive function, and to establish the alternate form reliability of the CTPA-Alt. A repeated-measures study was conducted with 26 community participants. Participants were screened for eligibility and administered both forms of the CTPA; administration order was alternated. Overall performance was significantly correlated (rs = .44, p = .03), but pattern of scoring differed by CTPA form and order of administration. Our results indicate that the CTPA forms were similar but that the specific tasks in each form were different. The CTPA may be used as an ecologically valid outcome assessment with further considerations. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  7. Development of bond-length alternation in very large carbon rings: LDA pseudopotential results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, John H.; Kawai, Ryoichi

    1998-09-01

    Carbon rings Cn and infinite chains C∞ are investigated by molecular-orbital and band-structure calculations within the local-density approximation. Carbon rings C4N (N=20). For the infinite carbon chain uniform Brillouin-zone sampling with an even number of points Ns gives bond alternation. An odd number of sampling points gives no bond alternation for less than Ns=41. In the large Ns limit even and odd sampling lead to an upper and lower bound of 0.070a0 and 0.065a0 for bond alternation and 0.021-0.090 millihartrees/atom for condensation energy.

  8. Pupal remodeling and the evolution and development of alternative male morphologies in horned beetles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moczek Armin P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How novel morphological traits originate and diversify represents a major frontier in evolutionary biology. Horned beetles are emerging as an increasingly popular model system to explore the genetic, developmental, and ecological mechanisms, as well as the interplay between them, in the genesis of novelty and diversity. The horns of beetles originate during a rapid growth phase during the prepupal stage of larval development. Differential growth during this period is either implicitly or explicitly assumed to be the sole mechanism underlying differences in horn expression within and between species. Here I focus on male horn dimorphisms, a phenomenon at the center of many studies in behavioral ecology and evolutionary development, and quantify the relative contributions of a previously ignored developmental process, pupal remodeling, to the expression of male dimorphism in three horned beetle species. Results Prepupal growth is not the only determinant of differences in male horn expression. Instead, following their initial prepupal growth phase, beetles may be extensively remodeled during the subsequent pupal stage in a sex and size-dependent manner. Specifically, male dimorphism in the three Onthophagus species studied here was shaped not at all, partly or entirely by such pupal remodeling rather than differential growth, suggesting that pupal remodeling is phylogenetically widespread, evolutionarily labile, and developmentally flexible. Conclusion This study is the first to document that male dimorphism in horned beetles is the product of two developmentaly dissociated processes: prepupal growth and pupal remodeling. More generally, adult morphology alone appears to provide few clues, if any, as to the relative contributions of both processes to the expression of alternative male morphs, underscoring the importance of developmental studies in efforts aimed at understanding the evolution of adult diversity patterns.

  9. Development and Characterization of Nisin Nanoparticles as Potential Alternative for the Recurrent Vaginal Candidiasis Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Letícia Coli Louvisse; Todaro, Valerio; Sathler, Plinio Cunha; da Silva, Luiz Cláudio Rodrigues Pereira; do Carmo, Flávia Almada; Costa, Cleonice Marques; Toma, Helena Keiko; Castro, Helena Carla; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; de Sousa, Valeria Pereira; Cabral, Lucio Mendes

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work was the development and characterization of nisin-loaded nanoparticles and the evaluation of its potential antifungal activity. Candidiasis is a fungal infection caused by Candida sp. considered as one of the major public health problem currently. The discovery of antifungal agents that present a reduced or null resistance of Candida sp. and the development of more efficient drug release mechanisms are necessary for the improvement of candidiasis treatment. Nisin, a bacteriocin commercially available for more than 50 years, exhibits antibacterial action in food products with potential antifungal activity. Among several alternatives used to modulate antifungal activity of bacteriocins, polymeric nanoparticles have received great attention due to an effective drug release control and reduction of therapeutic dose, besides the minimization of adverse effects by the preferential accumulation in specific tissues. The nisin nanoparticles were prepared by double emulsification and solvent evaporation methods. Nanoparticles were characterized by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy. Antifungal activity was accessed by pour plate method and cell counting using Candida albicans strains. The in vitro release profile and in vitro permeation studies were performed using dialysis bag method and pig vaginal mucosa in Franz diffusion cell, respectively. The results revealed nisin nanoparticles (300 nm) with spherical shape and high loading efficiency (93.88 ± 3.26%). In vitro test results suggest a promising application of these nanosystems as a prophylactic agent in recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis and other gynecological diseases.

  10. Fruit development, growth, and stored reserves in macauba palm (Acrocomia aculeata), an alternative bioenergy crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Sebastián Giraldo; Motoike, Sérgio Yoshimitsu; Kuki, Kacilda Naomi; Couto, Adriano Donato

    2016-10-01

    Main conclusion Macauba palm fruiting is supra-annual, and the fruit growth follows a double sigmoidal trend. The prevailing compound in the mesocarp differs as the fruit ages, oil being the major storage compound. Acrocomia aculeata, macauba palm, is a conspicuous species in the tropical Americas. Because the species is highly productive in oil-rich fruits, it is the subject of domestication as an alternative vegetable oil crop, especially as a bioenergy feedstock. This detailed study first presents the macauba fruit growth and development patterns, morphological changes and accumulation of organic compounds. Fruits were monitored weekly in a natural population. The fruiting was supra-annual, and the fruit growth curve followed a double sigmoidal trend with four stages (S): SI-slow growth and negligible differentiation of the fruit inner parts; SII-first growth spurt and visible, but not complete, differentiation of the inner parts; SIII-growth slowed down and all structures attained differentiation; and SIV-second growth spurt and fruit maturation. In SII, the exocarp and endocarp were the main contributors to fruit growth, whereas the mesocarp and endosperm were responsible for most of the weight gain during SIV. In comparison with starch and oil, soluble sugars did not accumulate in the mesocarp. However, starch was transitory and fueled the oil synthesis. The protective layers, the exocarp and endocarp, fulfilling their ecological roles, were the first to reach maturity, followed by the storage tissues, the mesocarp, and endosperm. The amount and nature of organic compounds in the mesocarp varied with the fruit development and growth stages, and oil was the main and final storage material. The description of macauba fruit's transformations and their temporal order may be of importance for future ecological and agronomical references.

  11. EST Table: FS891984 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS891984 E_FL_ftes_05B02_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0004298(threonine-type endopeptidas...50|ref|XP_968855.1| PREDICTED: similar to proteasome beta subunit [Tribolium castaneum] FS891984 ftes ...

  12. EST Table: FS919845 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS919845 E_FL_fufe_48J12_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0031072(heat shock protein binding)...916-PA 10/09/10 55 %/163 aa gi|189241035|ref|XP_971765.2| PREDICTED: similar to mrj CG8448-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS919845 fufe ...

  13. EST Table: FS919685 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS919685 E_FL_fufe_48B17_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0005789(endoplasmic reticulum membr...9/10 34 %/234 aa gi|91087517|ref|XP_969270.1| PREDICTED: similar to CG13089 CG13089-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS919685 fufe ...

  14. EST Table: FS744174 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS744174 E_FL_bmmt_27L11_R_0 10/09/28 62 %/254 aa ref|XP_966408.1| PREDICTED: simil...|Amel|GB13140-PA 10/09/10 62 %/254 aa gi|91091742|ref|XP_966408.1| PREDICTED: similar to AGAP000313-PA isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS744301 bmmt ...

  15. EST Table: FS916979 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS916979 E_FL_fufe_39O23_F_0 10/09/28 42 %/282 aa ref|XP_975212.1| PREDICTED: similar to asteroid...aa gi|91083987|ref|XP_975212.1| PREDICTED: similar to asteroid CG4426-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS761536 fufe ...

  16. EST Table: FS938903 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS938903 E_FL_fwgP_53F15_F_0 10/09/28 60 %/190 aa ref|XP_968396.2| PREDICTED: similar to failed...0 aa gi|189235487|ref|XP_968396.2| PREDICTED: similar to failed axon connections protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS937483 fwgP ...

  17. EST Table: FS939195 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS939195 E_FL_fwgP_54D09_F_0 10/09/28 59 %/184 aa ref|XP_968396.2| PREDICTED: similar to failed...4 aa gi|189235487|ref|XP_968396.2| PREDICTED: similar to failed axon connections protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS937483 fwgP ...

  18. EST Table: FS852221 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS852221 E_FL_fner_42O22_F_0 10/09/28 74 %/189 aa ref|XP_001658413.1| neuroendocrine... differentiation factor [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT40780.1| neuroendocrine differentiation factor [Aedes aegypti...5 aa gi|91089815|ref|XP_968988.1| PREDICTED: similar to neuroendocrine differentiation factor [Tribolium castaneum] FS765648 fner ...

  19. EST Table: FS871984 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS871984 E_FL_fner_47A02_R_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 33 %/210 aa gb|ABN58714.1| pol-l... gi|270016726|gb|EFA13172.1| hypothetical protein TcasGA2_TC001813 [Tribolium castaneum] FS871984 fner ...

  20. EST Table: FS819844 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS819844 E_FL_fmgV_05D01_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0004181(metallocarboxypeptidase act...10 42 %/287 aa gi|91085361|ref|XP_971346.1| PREDICTED: similar to putative carboxypeptidase A-like [Tribolium castaneum] FS819844 fmgV ...

  1. EST Table: FS845415 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS845415 E_FL_fner_23J15_F_0 10/09/28 42 %/122 aa ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteori...a gi|91078226|ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteorin [Tribolium castaneum] FS767139 fner ...

  2. EST Table: FS849851 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS849851 E_FL_fner_36C21_F_0 10/09/28 44 %/171 aa ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteori...a gi|91078226|ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteorin [Tribolium castaneum] FS767139 fner ...

  3. EST Table: FS930966 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS930966 E_FL_fwgP_29M10_F_0 10/09/28 44 %/215 aa ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteori...a gi|91078226|ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteorin [Tribolium castaneum] FS767139 fwgP ...

  4. EST Table: FS767139 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS767139 E_FL_fcaL_45B09_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 43 %/171 aa ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteor...10 43 %/171 aa gi|91078226|ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteorin [Tribolium castaneum] FS767139 fcaL ...

  5. EST Table: FS850158 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS850158 E_FL_fner_37A23_F_0 10/09/28 43 %/137 aa ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteori...a gi|91078226|ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteorin [Tribolium castaneum] FS767139 fner ...

  6. EST Table: FS855797 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS855797 E_FL_fner_52P17_F_0 10/09/28 43 %/137 aa ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteori...a gi|91078226|ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteorin [Tribolium castaneum] FS767139 fner ...

  7. EST Table: FS827409 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS827409 E_FL_fmgV_26E17_R_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 42 %/146 aa ref|XP_974840.1| PREDICTED: similar to harmon...27|ref|XP_974840.1| PREDICTED: similar to harmonin [Tribolium castaneum] FS827409 fmgV ...

  8. EST Table: FS911923 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS911923 E_FL_fufe_24L11_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 36 %/206 aa ref|XP_974840.1| PREDICTED: similar to harmon...27|ref|XP_974840.1| PREDICTED: similar to harmonin [Tribolium castaneum] FS911923 fufe ...

  9. EST Table: FS904669 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS904669 E_FL_fufe_02L06_F_0 10/09/28 39 %/215 aa ref|XP_967337.1| PREDICTED: similar to Serge... %/215 aa gi|91083383|ref|XP_967337.1| PREDICTED: similar to Sergef protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS910504 fufe ...

  10. EST Table: FS811161 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS811161 E_FL_fmgV_33P23_F_0 10/09/28 40 %/212 aa ref|XP_967337.1| PREDICTED: similar to Serge...B17309-PA 10/09/10 40 %/212 aa gi|91083383|ref|XP_967337.1| PREDICTED: similar to Sergef protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS910504 fmgV ...

  11. EST Table: FS810311 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS810311 E_FL_fmgV_31J05_F_0 10/09/28 39 %/186 aa ref|XP_967337.1| PREDICTED: similar to Serge...186 aa gi|91083383|ref|XP_967337.1| PREDICTED: similar to Sergef protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS910504 fmgV ...

  12. EST Table: FS877412 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS877412 E_FL_ftes_09L06_F_0 10/09/28 63 %/108 aa ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolution...94187|ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathway, mitochondrial [Tribolium castaneum] FS756091 ftes ...

  13. EST Table: FS773307 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS773307 E_FL_fcaL_01B18_R_0 10/09/28 51 %/210 aa ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolution...187|ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathway, mitochondrial [Tribolium castaneum] FS874188 fcaL ...

  14. EST Table: FS784619 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS784619 E_FL_fcaL_48C03_R_0 10/09/28 64 %/109 aa ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolution...187|ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathway, mitochondrial [Tribolium castaneum] FS874188 fcaL ...

  15. EST Table: FS843095 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS843095 E_FL_fner_17B02_F_0 10/09/28 84 %/185 aa ref|XP_972038.2| PREDICTED: similar to liquid...26|ref|XP_972038.2| PREDICTED: similar to liquid facets [Tribolium castaneum] FS840960 fner ...

  16. EST Table: FS896666 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS896666 E_FL_ftes_24D11_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0003824(catalytic activity)|GO:0005... aa gi|91085015|ref|XP_973533.1| PREDICTED: similar to malate dehydrogenase [Tribolium castaneum] FS896666 ftes ...

  17. EST Table: FS866668 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS866668 E_FL_fner_31M13_R_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 54 %/126 aa ref|XP_966747.1| PRE.../10 54 %/126 aa gi|91088415|ref|XP_966747.1| PREDICTED: similar to CG32418 CG32418-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS866668 fner ...

  18. EST Table: FS922014 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS922014 E_FL_fwgP_03G10_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 43 %/123 aa ref|XP_001650999.1| ...A 10/09/10 41 %/128 aa gi|91089477|ref|XP_969208.1| PREDICTED: similar to AGAP011858-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS922014 fwgP ...

  19. EST Table: FS845891 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS845891 E_FL_fner_24P19_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/150 aa ref|NP_001170796.1| cell differentiation protein RCD...ref|XP_974015.1| PREDICTED: similar to cell differentiation protein rcd1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS909406 fner ...

  20. EST Table: FS920530 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS920530 E_FL_fufe_50K23_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0047800(cysteamine dioxygenase acti...090992|ref|XP_974899.1| PREDICTED: similar to 2-aminoethanethiol (cysteamine) dioxygenase [Tribolium castaneum] FS920530 fufe ...

  1. EST Table: FS919947 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS919947 E_FL_fufe_48O15_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0003924(GTPase activity)|GO:0005515... 56 %/203 aa gnl|Amel|GB16230-PA 10/09/10 55 %/209 aa gi|237820631|ref|NP_001153783.1| Rab-protein 14 [Tribolium castaneum] FS919947 fufe ...

  2. EST Table: FS906632 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS906632 E_FL_fufe_08M07_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0005634(nucleus)|GO:0006974(response to DNA damage stim...2 %/162 aa gi|91087647|ref|XP_973370.1| PREDICTED: similar to Timeless-interacting protein (XTipin) [Tribolium castaneum] FS906632 fufe ...

  3. EST Table: FS905741 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS905741 E_FL_fufe_06A07_F_0 10/09/28 31 %/238 aa ref|XP_968918.2| PREDICTED: similar to william...189241014|ref|XP_968918.2| PREDICTED: similar to williams-beuren syndrome critical region protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS920403 fufe ...

  4. EST Table: FS882512 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS882512 E_FL_ftes_24I11_F_0 10/09/28 46 %/122 aa ref|XP_968918.2| PREDICTED: similar to william...189241014|ref|XP_968918.2| PREDICTED: similar to williams-beuren syndrome critical region protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS920403 ftes ...

  5. EST Table: FS767215 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS767215 E_FL_fcaL_45F03_F_0 10/09/28 44 %/190 aa ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about...ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about silencing protein 10 [Tribolium castaneum] FS937283 fcaL ...

  6. EST Table: FS913032 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS913032 E_FL_fufe_28A02_F_0 10/09/28 44 %/216 aa ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about...A 10/09/10 44 %/216 aa gi|91081571|ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about silencing protein 10 [Tribolium castaneum] FS937283 fufe ...

  7. EST Table: FS731312 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS731312 E_FL_bmmt_30F21_F_0 10/09/28 48 %/145 aa ref|XP_001361655.2| GA19154 [Dros...35651170:1|gene:AGAP006645 10/09/10 31 %/148 aa gnl|Amel|GB10945-PA 10/09/10 n.h FS932597 bmmt ...

  8. EST Table: FS764450 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS764450 E_FL_fcaL_36N15_F_0 10/09/28 42 %/214 aa ref|XP_001945612.1| PREDICTED: similar to glucocerebro...608.1| PREDICTED: similar to putative lysosomal glucocerebrosidase [Tribolium castaneum] FS759318 fcaL ...

  9. EST Table: FS759708 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS759708 E_FL_fcaL_12C07_F_0 10/09/28 48 %/108 aa gb|EFA09250.1| thickveins [Tribol...|XP_970678.1| PREDICTED: similar to thickveins CG14026-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS936628 fcaL ...

  10. EST Table: FS854714 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS854714 E_FL_fner_49P07_F_0 10/09/28 48 %/108 aa gb|EFA09250.1| thickveins [Tribol...|XP_970678.1| PREDICTED: similar to thickveins CG14026-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS936628 fner ...

  11. EST Table: FS805538 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS805538 E_FL_fmgV_18D12_F_0 10/09/28 48 %/108 aa gb|EFA09250.1| thickveins [Tribol...|XP_970678.1| PREDICTED: similar to thickveins CG14026-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS936628 fmgV ...

  12. EST Table: FS923333 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS923333 E_FL_fwgP_07E04_F_0 10/09/28 91 %/230 aa ref|NP_001119719.1| K3 protein [B...189237630|ref|XP_970913.2| PREDICTED: similar to CG10933 CG10933-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS906506 fwgP ...

  13. EST Table: FS868268 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS868268 E_FL_fner_36G03_R_0 10/09/28 100 %/133 aa ref|NP_001040212.1| sericotropin... 38 %/131 aa gi|91087441|ref|XP_975685.1| PREDICTED: similar to 13 kDa hemolymph protein a [Tribolium castaneum] FS784478 fner ...

  14. EST Table: FS836036 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS836036 E_FL_fmgV_50E03_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0005515(protein binding)|GO:0008745...CTED: similar to Tm-peptidoglycan recogntition protein-SA [Tribolium castaneum] FS836036 fmgV ...

  15. EST Table: FS836368 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS836368 E_FL_fmgV_51D01_R_0 10/09/28 90 %/196 aa dbj|BAG41976.1| alkaline phosphat... 47 %/164 aa gi|270012502|gb|EFA08950.1| hypothetical protein TcasGA2_TC006657 [Tribolium castaneum] FS823697 fmgV ...

  16. EST Table: FS919894 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS919894 E_FL_fufe_48M03_F_0 10/09/28 41 %/229 aa ref|XP_624752.2| PREDICTED: similar to Niemann-Pic..._967619.2| PREDICTED: similar to niemann-pick C1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS758709 fufe ...

  17. EST Table: FS848732 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS848732 E_FL_fner_33A19_F_0 10/09/28 39 %/198 aa ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefin... %/152 aa gnl|Amel|GB16043-PA 10/09/10 39 %/198 aa gi|189240340|ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefinin [Tribolium castaneum] FS921551 fner ...

  18. EST Table: FS867121 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS867121 E_FL_fner_33A19_R_0 10/09/28 39 %/198 aa ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefin... %/152 aa gnl|Amel|GB16043-PA 10/09/10 39 %/198 aa gi|189240340|ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefinin [Tribolium castaneum] FS752084 fner ...

  19. EST Table: FS918193 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS918193 E_FL_fufe_43J18_F_0 10/09/28 39 %/198 aa ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefin... %/152 aa gnl|Amel|GB16043-PA 10/09/10 39 %/198 aa gi|189240340|ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefinin [Tribolium castaneum] FS921551 fufe ...

  20. EST Table: FS845801 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS845801 E_FL_fner_24L14_F_0 10/09/28 43 %/155 aa ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefin... %/116 aa gnl|Amel|GB16043-PA 10/09/10 43 %/155 aa gi|189240340|ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefinin [Tribolium castaneum] FS921551 fner ...

  1. EST Table: FS905568 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS905568 E_FL_fufe_05H13_F_0 10/09/28 40 %/188 aa ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefin... %/142 aa gnl|Amel|GB16043-PA 10/09/10 40 %/188 aa gi|189240340|ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefinin [Tribolium castaneum] FS921551 fufe ...

  2. EST Table: FS915603 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS915603 E_FL_fufe_35N07_F_0 10/09/28 47 %/233 aa ref|XP_970789.1| PREDICTED: similar to Integrat... %/233 aa gi|91082039|ref|XP_970789.1| PREDICTED: similar to Integrator complex subunit 4 (Int4) [Tribolium castaneum] FS906031 fufe ...

  3. EST Table: FS811017 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS811017 E_FL_fmgV_33J08_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 low homology 10/09/09 36 %/103 a...|gene:AGAP006784 10/09/10 42 %/121 aa gnl|Amel|GB13334-PA 10/09/10 low homology FS811017 fmgV ...

  4. EST Table: FS811019 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS811019 E_FL_fmgV_33J10_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0003824(catalytic activity)|GO:0006...9/10 34 %/226 aa gi|91075984|ref|XP_970026.1| PREDICTED: similar to AGAP011683-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS811019 fmgV ...

  5. EST Table: FS776803 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS776803 E_FL_fcaL_12G19_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0005524(ATP binding)|GO:0006464(pro... 10/09/10 78 %/169 aa gi|91094331|ref|XP_966352.1| PREDICTED: similar to ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS776803 fcaL ...

  6. EST Table: FS916803 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS916803 E_FL_fufe_39G19_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0016020(membrane)|GO:0030001(metal ...45 %/281 aa gi|91082985|ref|XP_974198.1| PREDICTED: similar to zinc transporter [Tribolium castaneum] FS916803 fufe ...

  7. EST Table: FS916404 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS916404 E_FL_fufe_38D19_F_0 10/09/28 48 %/244 aa ref|XP_971977.1| PREDICTED: similar to reserve...el|GB11583-PA 10/09/10 48 %/244 aa gi|91086211|ref|XP_971977.1| PREDICTED: similar to reserved [Tribolium castaneum] FS918257 fufe ...

  8. EST Table: FS908881 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS908881 E_FL_fufe_15I20_F_0 10/09/28 49 %/232 aa ref|XP_971977.1| PREDICTED: similar to reserve...el|GB11583-PA 10/09/10 49 %/232 aa gi|91086211|ref|XP_971977.1| PREDICTED: similar to reserved [Tribolium castaneum] FS918257 fufe ...

  9. EST Table: FS847171 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS847171 E_FL_fner_28J23_F_0 10/09/28 45 %/144 aa ref|XP_971977.1| PREDICTED: similar to reserve...gi|91086211|ref|XP_971977.1| PREDICTED: similar to reserved [Tribolium castaneum] FS918257 fner ...

  10. EST Table: FS893327 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS893327 E_FL_ftes_11B24_R_0 10/09/28 87 %/134 aa ref|NP_001036831.1| saposin-relat...mology 10/09/10 35 %/119 aa gi|91077504|ref|XP_966852.1| PREDICTED: similar to saposin isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS895586 ftes ...

  11. EST Table: FS798702 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS798702 E_FL_ffbm_28C11_F_0 10/09/28 89 %/278 aa ref|NP_001036831.1| saposin-relat...a gnl|Amel|GB16561-PA 10/09/10 52 %/117 aa gi|91077504|ref|XP_966852.1| PREDICTED: similar to saposin isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS791050 ffbm ...

  12. EST Table: FS733896 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS733896 E_FL_bmmt_22L01_F_0 10/09/28 30 %/251 aa ref|XP_974925.1| PREDICTED: similar to Juvenile.../10 low homology 10/09/10 30 %/251 aa gi|91080979|ref|XP_974925.1| PREDICTED: similar to Juvenile hormone-inducible protein, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS725285 bmmt ...

  13. EST Table: FS913232 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS913232 E_FL_fufe_28J15_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0003824(catalytic activity)|GO:0009...|189237620|ref|XP_969707.2| PREDICTED: similar to GA10348-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS913232 fufe ...

  14. EST Table: FS932932 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS932932 E_FL_fwgP_35K07_F_0 10/09/28 72 %/148 aa ref|NP_001166687.1| cuticular pro...mology 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 low homology FS934632 fwgP ...

  15. EST Table: FS832832 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS832832 E_FL_fmgV_41G24_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0003824(catalytic activity)|GO:0004...a gnl|Amel|GB18896-PA 10/09/10 39 %/281 aa gi|91091528|ref|XP_970224.1| PREDICTED: similar to beta-glucosidase [Tribolium castaneum] FS832832 fmgV ...

  16. EST Table: FS932732 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS932732 E_FL_fwgP_35B10_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/200 aa ref|NP_001091823.1| poly A bindin...75975.1| PREDICTED: similar to poly A binding protein isoform 4 [Tribolium castaneum] FS932483 fwgP ...

  17. EST Table: FS920442 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS920442 E_FL_fufe_50G21_F_0 10/09/28 41 %/229 aa ref|XP_969213.1| PREDICTED: similar to artemis...2-PA 10/09/10 41 %/229 aa gi|91090768|ref|XP_969213.1| PREDICTED: similar to artemis protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS920671 fufe ...

  18. EST Table: FS877907 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS877907 E_FL_ftes_11B10_F_0 10/09/28 42 %/170 aa ref|XP_969213.1| PREDICTED: similar to artemis...2-PA 10/09/10 42 %/170 aa gi|91090768|ref|XP_969213.1| PREDICTED: similar to artemis protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS920671 ftes ...

  19. EST Table: FS920671 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS920671 E_FL_fufe_51C07_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 40 %/240 aa ref|XP_969213.1| PREDICTED: similar to artemi... 40 %/240 aa gi|91090768|ref|XP_969213.1| PREDICTED: similar to artemis protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS920671 fufe ...

  20. EST Table: FS906357 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS906357 E_FL_fufe_07P06_F_0 10/09/28 89 %/170 aa gb|EFA11544.1| kurtz [Tribolium c...l|GB13683-PA 10/09/10 89 %/170 aa gi|270015096|gb|EFA11544.1| kurtz [Tribolium castaneum] FS911973 fufe ...

  1. EST Table: FS910111 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS910111 E_FL_fufe_19D22_F_0 10/09/28 73 %/268 aa ref|XP_970542.1| PREDICTED: similar to brix...B12626-PA 10/09/10 73 %/268 aa gi|91090402|ref|XP_970542.1| PREDICTED: similar to brix domain-containing protein 2 [Tribolium castaneum] FS911686 fufe ...

  2. EST Table: FS908191 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS908191 E_FL_fufe_13H10_F_0 10/09/28 76 %/234 aa ref|XP_970542.1| PREDICTED: similar to brix...B12626-PA 10/09/10 76 %/234 aa gi|91090402|ref|XP_970542.1| PREDICTED: similar to brix domain-containing protein 2 [Tribolium castaneum] FS911686 fufe ...

  3. EST Table: FS919087 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS919087 E_FL_fufe_46E24_F_0 10/09/28 76 %/246 aa ref|XP_970542.1| PREDICTED: similar to brix...B12626-PA 10/09/10 76 %/246 aa gi|91090402|ref|XP_970542.1| PREDICTED: similar to brix domain-containing protein 2 [Tribolium castaneum] FS911686 fufe ...

  4. EST Table: FS818739 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS818739 E_FL_fmgV_02A22_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0003735(structural constituent of r.../09/10 56 %/248 aa gi|91085243|ref|XP_973115.1| PREDICTED: similar to ribosomal protein L6e [Tribolium castaneum] FS818739 fmgV ...

  5. EST Table: FS919410 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS919410 E_FL_fufe_47E05_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0005515(protein binding) 10/09/28 4...015218|gb|EFA11666.1| hypothetical protein TcasGA2_TC008530 [Tribolium castaneum] FS919410 fufe ...

  6. MarFS-Requirements-Design-Configuration-Admin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettering, Brett Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grider, Gary Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-08

    This document will be organized into sections that are defined by the requirements for a file system that presents a near-POSIX (Portable Operating System Interface) interface to the user, but whose data is stored in whatever form is most efficient for the type of data being stored. After defining the requirement the design for meeting the requirement will be explained. Finally there will be sections on configuring and administering this file system. More and more, data dominates the computing world. There is a “sea” of data out there in many different formats that needs to be managed and used. “Mar” means “sea” in Spanish. Thus, this product is dubbed MarFS, a file system for a sea of data.

  7. Fs-laser processing of polydimethylsiloxane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasov, Petar A., E-mail: paatanas@ie.bas.bg; Nedyalkov, Nikolay N. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsarigradsko Shose, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Valova, Eugenia I.; Georgieva, Zhenya S.; Armyanov, Stefan A.; Kolev, Konstantin N. [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Amoruso, Salvatore; Wang, Xuan; Bruzzese, Ricardo [CNR-SPIN, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Sawczak, Miroslaw; Śliwiński, Gerard [Photophysics Department, The Szewalski Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, 14 Fiszera St, 80-231 Gdańsk (Poland)

    2014-07-14

    We present an experimental analysis on surface structuring of polydimethylsiloxane films with UV (263 nm) femtosecond laser pulses, in air. Laser processed areas are analyzed by optical microscopy, SEM, and μ-Raman spectroscopy. The laser-treated sample shows the formation of a randomly nanostructured surface morphology. μ-Raman spectra, carried out at both 514 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths, prior and after laser treatment allow evidencing the changes in the sample structure. The influence of the laser fluence on the surface morphology is studied. Finally, successful electro-less metallization of the laser-processed sample is achieved, even after several months from the laser-treatment contrary to previous observation with nanosecond pulses. Our findings address the effectiveness of fs-laser treatment and chemical metallization of polydimethylsiloxane films with perspective technological interest in micro-fabrication devices for MEMS and nano-electromechanical systems.

  8. Water-flushing toilets: Systemic development and path-dependent characteristics and their bearing on technological alternatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quitzau, Maj-Britt

    2007-01-01

    In this study, I analyse the historical process that led to embedding water-flushing toilets in the Western world, then I explore innovative developments connected to alternative toilet solutions that use less water. The core argument is that path-dependent characteristics are found both...... at the systemic level and the level of daily practices. Systemic development and its embedding into daily practices changed and contributed to a lock-in. Then current attempts to introduce alternative toilet solutions are analysed. I conclude by suggesting that established water-flushing routines impede...

  9. Water-flushing toilets: Systemic development and path-dependent characteristics and their bearing on technological alternatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quitzau, Maj-Britt

    2007-01-01

    In this study, I analyse the historical process that led to embedding water-flushing toilets in the Western world, then I explore innovative developments connected to alternative toilet solutions that use less water. The core argument is that path-dependent characteristics are found both...... at the systemic level and the level of daily practices. Systemic development and its embedding into daily practices changed and contributed to a lock-in. Then current attempts to introduce alternative toilet solutions are analysed. I conclude by suggesting that established water-flushing routines impede...

  10. Alternative neural circuitry that might be impaired in the development of Alzheimer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus eAvila

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that some individuals with normal cognitive capacity have abundant senile plaques in their brains. It has been proposed that those individuals are resilient or have compensation factors to prevent cognitive decline. In this comment, we explore an alternative mechanism through which cognitive capacity is maintained. This mechanism could involve the impairment of alternative neural circuitry. Also, the proportion of molecules such as Aβ or tau protein present in different areas of the brain could be important.

  11. AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENTS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNIQUE. PART 32: ALTERNATIVE ENERGY: STATE AND PROSPECTS OF DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Baranov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Implementation of brief analytical review of the state and prospect of development in the modern world of alternative energy, including wind energy, sun energy, geothermal energy, biogas energy, flood-tide water energy, hydrogen energy and small water energy. Methodology. Scientific methods of collection, analysis and analytical treatment of scientific and technical information in area of the present state of world energy and ways of its further development. Results. A brief scientific and technical review is resulted about the state and prospects of world development of basic types of alternative energy. It is shown that, in spite of comparatively small stake (to 10 % of this untraditional energy in general world balance of making of electric power, world association taking into account the necessary changing in the nearest 50 years of present oil-gas «foundation» of energy on other with large raw material, potential and ecological possibilities are forced to invest large financial means in development of the indicated directions of alternative energy. Originality. First on the basis of materials of separate magazine publications, scientific monographs and internet-reports on power problem the brief analytical review of the state and prospects of world development of basic types of alternative energy is executed. Practical value. Deepening and spread of the scientific and technical learnings in area of functioning and ways of development of modern energy. Scientific popularization of arising up before society claimed tasks from global and important for all of humanity of power problem.

  12. SeaWiFS technical report series. Volume 11: Analysis of selected orbit propagation models for the SeaWiFS mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patt, Frederick S.; Hoisington, Charles M.; Gregg, Watson W.; Coronado, Patrick L.; Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Indest, A. W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of orbit propagation models was performed by the Mission Operations element of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) Project, which has overall responsibility for the instrument scheduling. The orbit propagators selected for this analysis are widely available general perturbations models. The analysis includes both absolute accuracy determination and comparisons of different versions of the models. The results show that all of the models tested meet accuracy requirements for scheduling and data acquisition purposes. For internal Project use the SGP4 propagator, developed by the North American Air Defense (NORAD) Command, has been selected. This model includes atmospheric drag effects and, therefore, provides better accuracy. For High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) ground stations, which have less stringent accuracy requirements, the publicly available Brouwer-Lyddane models are recommended. The SeaWiFS Project will make available portable source code for a version of this model developed by the Data Capture Facility (DCF).

  13. Alternative buffer layer development in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Peipei

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2-based thin film solar cells are considered to be one of the most promising photovoltaic technologies. Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar devices have the potential advantage of low-cost, fast fabrication by using semiconductor layers of only a few micrometers thick and high efficiency photovoltaics have been reported at both the cell and the module levels. CdS via chemical bath deposition (CBD) has been the most widely used buffer option to form the critical junction in CIGS-based thin film photovoltaic devices. However, the disadvantages of CdS can’t be ignored - regulations on cadmium usage are getting stricter primarily due to its toxicity and environmental impacts, and the proper handling of the large amount of toxic chemical bath waste is a massive and expensive task. This dissertation is devoted to the development of Cd-free alternative buffer layers in CIGS-based thin film solar cells. Based on the considerations of buffer layer selection criteria and extensive literature review, Zn-compound buffer materials are chosen as the primary investigation candidates. Radio frequency magnetron sputtering is the preferred buffer deposition approach since it’s a clean and more controllable technique compared to CBD, and is readily scaled to large area manufacturing. First, a comprehensive study of the ZnSe1-xOx compound prepared by reactive sputtering was completed. As the oxygen content in the reactive sputtering gas increased, ZnSe1-xOx crystallinity and bandgap decreased. It’s observed that oxygen miscibility in ZnSe was low and a secondary phase formed when the O2 / (O2 + Ar) ratio in the sputtering gas exceeded 2%. Two approaches were proposed to optimize the band alignment between the CIGS and buffer layer. One method focused on the bandgap engineering of the absorber, the other focused on the band structure modification of the buffer. As a result, improved current of the solar cell was achieved although a carrier transport barrier at the junction

  14. Single-port laparoscopic surgery in children: A new alternative in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Dhaou Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS is a technique in laparoscopic surgery, which is based on the idea that all the laparoscopic trocars are inserted through a single umbilical incision. This paper documents a single-centre experience, which performed the single-port surgery in children using an improvised trans-umbilical glove-port with conventional rigid instruments. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied the outcomes of SILS procedures between January 2013 and June 2014. Materials required making our homemade trans-umbilical port consisted on: A flexible ring, a rigid larger ring, one powder-free surgical glove, a wire-to-skin and standard standards laparoscopic trocars. Results: A total of 90 consecutive procedures had been done in our institution: 15 girls and 75 boys (mean age: 7.5 years. We used SILS on 59 appendectomies with an average operative time of 48 minutes. We needed conversion to conventional surgery in three cases (two with perforated appendicitis and one for difficulty to mobilize the appendix. SIL cholecystectomy was performed for four patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis; mean operative time was 60 min. All patients were discharged on postoperative day 2. Eighteen boys with non-palpable testis were explored and treated. Other procedures included: Varicocelectomy (n = 2, intra-abdominal lymph node biopsies (n = 2, ovarian cystectomy (n = 1, ovarian transposition (n = 1, aspiration of renal hydatid cyst (n = 1, explorative laparoscopy in research to Meckel′s diverticulum (n = 1 and intestinal intussusceptions (n = 1. No post-operative complications were seen in all cases. Conclusions: SILS in the paediatric population using conventional rigid instruments is feasible, safe and effective. It may be an alternative to the costly commercially available single-port systems especially in a developing country like Tunisia.

  15. Development of alternative versions of the Logical Memory subtest of the WMS-R for use in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Adriana Prado Bolognani

    Full Text Available The logical memory test of the Wechsler Memory Scale is one of the most frequently used standardized tests for assessing verbal memory and consists of two separate short stories each containing 25 idea units. Problems with practice effects arise with re-testing a patient, as these stories may be remembered from previous assessments. Therefore, alternative versions of the test stimuli should be developed to minimize learning effects when repeated testing is required for longitudinal evaluations of patients. OBJECTIVE: To present three alternative stories for each of the original stories frequently used in Brazil (Ana Soares and Roberto Mota and to show their similarity in terms of content, structure and linguistic characteristics. METHODS: The alternative stories were developed according to the following criteria: overall structure or thematic content (presentation of the character, conflict, aggravation or complements and resolution; specific structure (sex of the character, location and occupation, details of what happened; formal structure (number of words, characters, verbs and nouns; and readability. RESULTS: The alternative stories and scoring criteria are presented in comparison to the original WMS stories (Brazilian version. CONCLUSION: The alternative stories presented here correspond well thematically and structurally to the Brazilian versions of the original stories.

  16. Antimicrobial growth promoter use in livestock: a requirement to understand their modes of action to develop effective alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kirsty; Uwiera, Richard R E; Kalmokoff, Martin L; Brooks, Steve P J; Inglis, G Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents (AMAs) have been used in agriculture since the 1950s as growth-promoting agents [antimicrobial growth promoters (AGPs)]. They have provided benefits to the agricultural industry by increasing production efficiencies and maximising livestock health, yet the potential risks surrounding resistance to AMAs in medically important pathogenic bacteria have enhanced public and government scrutiny regarding AMA use in agriculture. Although it is recognised that AGP administration can select for resistance to AMAs in enteric bacteria of livestock, conclusive evidence showing a link between resistant bacteria from livestock and human health is lacking (e.g. transmission of resistant zoonotic pathogens). Livestock production output must be increased significantly due to the increase in global population, and thus the identification of non-AMA alternatives to AGP use is required. One strategy employed to identify alternatives to AGPs is an observational empirical methodology, but this approach has failed to deliver effective alternatives. A second approach is aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in AGP function and developing alternatives that mimic the physiological responses to AGPs. New evidence indicates that AGP function is more complex than merely affecting enteric bacterial populations, and AGPs likely function by directly or indirectly modulating host responses such as the immune system. As such, a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms associated with AMA function as AGPs will facilitate the development of effective alternatives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  17. Lessons Learned from Implementing Self-Regulated Strategy Development with Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Alternative Educational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Robin Parks; Harris, Karen R.; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Mason, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Self-regulated strategy development (SRSD) is an evidence-based intervention for use with students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). To date, there are nine studies investigating SRSD in alternative education settings, including self-contained day and residential schools, with 113 students with EBD in grades 3 through 12. A brief…

  18. The development of an in vitro model for studying mechanisms of nephrotoxicity as an alternative for animal experiments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, J.J.W.M.

    1991-01-01

    SUMMARYPresently in our society animal tests still form the main starting point for the assessment of the possible risks of chemicals with regard to human and animal health. For scientific. economic, and ethical reasons. attempts are undertaken continuously to develop cell models as alternatives to

  19. SeaWiFS Postlaunch Technical Report Series. Volume 2; AMT-5 Cruise Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Aiken, James; Cummings, Denise G.; Gibb, Stuart W.; Rees, Nigel W.; Woodd-Walker, Rachel; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.; Woolfenden, James; Berthon, Jean-Francois; Dempsey, Cyril D.; Suggett, David J.; Wood, Peter; Donlon, Craig; Gonzalez-Benitez, Natalia; Huskin, Ignacio; Quevedo, Mario; Barciela-Fernandez, Rosa; deVargas, Colomban; McKee, Connor

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities on board the Royal Research Ship (RRS) James Clark Ross (JCR) during the fifth Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT-5), 14 September to 17 October 1997. There are three objectives of the AMT Program. The first is to derive an improved understanding of the links between biogeochemical processes, biogenic gas exchange, air-sea interactions, and the effects on, and responses of, oceanic ecosystems to climate change. The second is to investigate the functional roles of biological particles and processes that influence ocean color in ecosystem dynamics. The Program relates directly to algorithm development and the validation of remotely-sensed observations of ocean color. Because the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) instrument achieved operational status during the cruise (on 18 September), AMT-5 was designated the SeaWiFS Atlantic Characterization Experiment (SeaACE) and was the only major research cruise involved in the validation of SeaWiFS data during the first 100 days of operations. The third objective involved the near-real time reporting of in situ light and pigment observations to the SeaWiFS Project, so the performance of the satellite sensor could be determined.

  20. Evolution of recombinant factor VIII safety: KOGENATE and Kogenate FS/Bayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusher, Jeanne M; Scharrer, Inge

    2009-11-01

    The use of factor VIII (FVIII) concentrates in the treatment of hemophilia A has raised important safety issues, historically of pathogen transmission and increasingly of inhibitor development to FVIII treatment. While manufacturing processes of current recombinant FVIII products have been shaped entirely around preventing pathogen transmission, the same modifications that afford a greater margin of safety could affect immunogenicity of the product, consequences of which could only be seen through long-term clinical experience. This review summarizes pathogen safety and inhibitor reports from clinical trials, post-marketing surveillance studies, and study reports on KOGENATE and its successor, Kogenate FS/Bayer. Although KOGENATE and Kogenate FS/Bayer are nearly identical products, subtle manufacturing improvements to address the need for greater margins of safety from a pathogen transmission perspective have also led to a potentially improved immunogenicity profile (15% in previously untreated/minimally treated patients with severe hemophilia A for Kogenate FS/Bayer). Notably, there has been no occurrence of pathogen contamination, and minimal de novo inhibitor formation in previously treated patients throughout the use of both products. Overall, KOGENATE and Kogenate FS/Bayer have a long history of safety in a variety of clinical settings, including treatment of bleeding, surgical management, and prophylaxis therapy.

  1. ImgFS:a transparent cryptography for stored images using a filesystem in userspace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osama A. KHASHAN; Abdullah M. ZIN; Elankovan A. SUNDARARAJAN

    2015-01-01

    Real-time encryption and decryption of digital images stored on end-user devices is a challenging task due to the inherent features of the images. Traditional software encryption applications generally suffered from the expense of user con-venience, performance efficiency, and the level of security provided. To overcome these limitations, the concept of transparent encryption has been proposed. This type of encryption mechanism can be implemented most efficiently with kernel file systems. However, this approach has some disadvantages since developing a new file system and attaching it in the kernel level requires a deep understanding of the kernel internal data structure. A filesystem in userspace (FUSE) can be used to bridge the gap. Never-theless, current implementations of cryptographic FUSE-based file systems suffered from several weaknesses that make them less than ideal for deployment. This paper describes the design and implementation of ImgFS, a fully transparent cryptographic file system that resides on user space. ImgFS can provide a sophisticated way to access, manage, and monitor all encryption and key management operations for image files stored on the local disk without any interaction from the user. The development of ImgFS has managed to solve weaknesses that have been identified on cryptographic FUSE-based implementations. Experiments were carried out to measure the performance of ImgFS over image files’ read and write against the cryptographic service, and the results indicated that while ImgFS has managed to provide higher level of security and transparency, its performance was competitive with other established cryptographic FUSE-based schemes of high performance.

  2. Role of the Department of Defense in the Research and Development of Alternative Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    of Alternative Fuels Approved by: , Thesis Committee Chair Timothy R. Hentschel, Ph.D. , Member Stephen E. Brown, M.S...this process. Special thanks to Mrs. Ann Chapman and Venita Krueger for their hard work. Finally, I would like to thank my family for being so patient...

  3. Generating alternative alignments in terrain suitability studies for environmental impact assessments of linear developments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Deventer, Heidi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available wide variety of specialist in a TSS could ensure a well informed choice of alternatives for the EIA and a choice of optimum corridors, could result in cost savings. This may in turn avoid delays during the EIA process if routes were rejected completely...

  4. Development and media regulate alternative splicing of a methyltransferase pre-mRNA in Monascus pilosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Yong; Miyake, Tsuyoshi

    2009-05-27

    Two alternatively spliced mRNAs (d- and l-MpLaeA) of a methyltransferase gene (MpLaeA) were identified from Monascus pilosus IFO4520 and its mutant MK-1. Alternative splicing of the MpLaeA pre-mRNA occurred in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR). The alternative splicing patterns of MpLaeA were regulated by the fungal growth stage and the principal nutrients: that is, the short l-MpLaeA mRNA was a constitutive transcript at all growth stages and different carbon or nitrogen sources, but the glutamate and NaNO(3) as main nitrogen source could up-regulate the long d-MpLaeA mRNA form. The long spliced 5'-UTR of d-MpLaeA blocked GFP expression in Escherichia coli , suggesting that d-MpLaeA mRNA was an ineffective spliced mRNA. Down-regulation of MpLaeA by transgenic antisense d-MpLaeA cDNA resulted in decreasing synthesis of monacolin K in M. pilosus. This suggested that the alternative splicing of MpLaeA mRNA might regulate the synthesis of monacolin K.

  5. Technical Evaluation Report 24: Open Source Software: an alternative to costly Learning Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Depow

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This is the first in a series of two reports discussing the use of open source software (OSS and free software (FS in online education as an alternative to expensive proprietary software. It details the steps taken in a Canadian community college to download and install the Linux Operating System in order to support an OSS/ FS learning management system (LMS.

  6. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing in Drosophila spliceosomal assembly factor RNP-4F during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetherson, Rebecca A; Strock, Stephen B; White, Kristen N; Vaughn, Jack C

    2006-04-26

    The 5'- and 3'-UTR regions in pre-mRNAs play a variety of roles in controlling eukaryotic gene expression, including translational modulation. Here we report the results of a systematic study of alternative splicing in rnp-4f, which encodes a Drosophila spliceosomal assembly factor. We show that most of the nine introns are constitutively spliced, but several patterns of alternative splicing are observed in two pre-mRNA regions including the 5'-UTR. Intron V is shown to be of recent evolutionary origin and is infrequently spliced, resulting in generation of an in-frame stop codon and a predicted truncated protein lacking a nuclear localization signal, so that alternative splicing regulates its subcellular localization. Intron 0, located in the 5'-UTR, is subject to three different splicing decisions in D. melanogaster. Northern analysis of poly(A+) mRNAs reveals two differently sized rnp-4f mRNA isoforms in this species. A switch in relative isoform abundance occurs during mid-embryo stages, when the larger isoform becomes more abundant. This isoform is shown to represent intron 0 unspliced mRNA, whereas the smaller transcript represents the product of alternative splicing. Comparative genomic analysis predicts that intron 0 is present in diverse Drosophila species. Intron 0 splicing results in loss of an evolutionarily conserved stem-loop constituting a potential cis-regulatory element at the 3'-splice site. A model is proposed for the role of this element both in 5'-UTR alternative splicing decisions and in RNP-4F translational modulation. Preliminary evidences in support of our model are discussed.

  7. Strongly Semicontinuous Domains and Semi-FS Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyu He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We are mainly concerned with some special kinds of semicontinuous domains and relationships between them. New concepts of strongly semicontinuous domains, meet semicontinuous domains and semi-FS domains are introduced. It is shown that a dcpo L is strongly semicontinuous if and only if L is semicontinuous and meet semicontinuous. It is proved that semi-FS domains are strongly semicontinuous. Some interpolation properties of semiway-below relations in (strongly semicontinuous bc-domains are given. In terms of these properties, it is proved that strongly semicontinuous bc-domains, in particular strongly semicontinuous lattices, are all semi-FS domains.

  8. Scenario Analysis of Alternative Land Development Patterns for the Leipzig-Halle Region: Implications for Transport-Land-Use Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Ustaoglu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present alternative land development scenarios for the sustainability impact assessment of transport-land-use relationship in the Leipzig-Halle Region. Using the MOLAND Model that was applied to a declining urban region for the first time, two different land-use scenarios were developed representing a baseline dispersed development and an alternative compact development case. The assessment of land-use-transport relationships is carried out incorporating the use of social, economic and environmental indicators. The impacts and indicators were specified and evaluated subject to a quantitative and qualitative assessment. The findings imply that a compact development scenario is preferable over dispersed development scenario in terms of potential quantitative data on the benefits to the environment and society. In contrast, dispersed development in the baseline case indicates the costs of such development exceed the benefits. The results of this type of scenario analysis provide an objective evidence basis in policy evaluation and decisions regarding future urban developments. This research was developed from several scenarios created with the key stakeholders of the Leipzig-Halle Region from research originally conducted as part of the PLUREL Project in 2012 and updated in 2016. It aims at contributing to literature by providing a sustainability assessment framework for rapid rail infrastructure provision that incorporates socio-economic and environmental impact assessment of alternative future urban form scenarios into the analysis. In addition, due to MOLAND features, it provides the opportunity for the sustainability impact assessment of different forms of urban development linked with transport infrastructure provision in the Region and compare the findings with other case study areas in Europe and internationally.

  9. ReRouting biomedical innovation: observations from a mapping of the alternative research and development (R&D) landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Alexandra; Kiddell-Monroe, Rachel

    2016-09-14

    In recent years, the world has witnessed the tragic outcomes of multiple global health crises. From Ebola to high prices to antibiotic resistance, these events highlight the fundamental constraints of the current biomedical research and development (R&D) system in responding to patient needs globally.To mitigate this lack of responsiveness, over 100 self-identified "alternative" R&D initiatives, have emerged in the past 15 years. To begin to make sense of this panoply of initiatives working to overcome the constraints of the current system, UAEM began an extensive, though not comprehensive, mapping of the alternative biomedical R&D landscape. We developed a two phase approach: (1) an investigation, via the RE:Route Mapping, of both existing and proposed initiatives that claim to offer an alternative approach to R&D, and (2) evaluation of those initiatives to determine which are in fact achieving increased access to and innovation in medicines. Through phase 1, the RE:Route Mapping, we examined 81 initiatives that claim to redress the inequity perpetuated by the current system via one of five commonly recognized mechanisms necessary for truly alternative R&D.Preliminary analysis of phase 1 provides the following conclusions: 1. No initiative presents a completely alternative model of biomedical R&D. 2. The majority of initiatives focus on developing incentives for drug discovery. 3. The majority of initiatives focus on rare diseases or diseases of the poor and marginalized. 4. There is an increasing emphasis on the use of push, pull, pool, collaboration and open mechanisms alongside the concept of delinkage in alternative R&D. 5. There is a trend towards public funding and launching of initiatives by the Global South. Given the RE:Route Mapping's inevitable limitations and the assumptions made in its methodology, it is not intended to be the final word on a constantly evolving and complex field; however, its findings are significant. The Mapping's value lies in its

  10. The post-opium scenario and rubber in northern Laos: Alternative Western and Chinese models of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Paul T

    2009-09-01

    In the past few years rubber planting has spread rapidly throughout northern Laos, especially in Luang Namtha province that borders China. The impetus for this boom has come partly from the spiralling demand for rubber in China (now the world's largest rubber consumer), the high world prices for rubber, and China's promotion of overseas investment through its opium-replacement policy. These economic factors have converged with the desperate need of impoverished highlanders in northern Laos to replace opium as a cash crop as a consequence of a recent opium-eradication campaign and inadequate alternative development. This paper draws upon ethnographic and agro-economic research in northern Laos and neighbouring regions and reports of international development organisations operating in Laos. The rubber boom in northern Laos represents a fundamental clash between Western drug-oriented alternative development, on the one hand, and China's national economic strategies abroad and investment-led narcotics policy, on the other. China's opium-replacement policy has contributed to a type of unregulated frontier capitalism with socio-economic and environmental effects that threaten the principles and goals of alternative development and even to marginalise the role international development organisations in northern Laos.

  11. Developing alternative resources of rare earth elements in Europe - EURARE and the red mud challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deady, Eimear; Mouchos, Evangelos; Goodenough, Kathryn; Wall, Frances; Williamson, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are considered to be highly "critical" by the European Commission [1], owing to the concentration of global supply [2] and their use in a wide range of emerging technologies (e.g. smart phones, electric cars and wind turbines). The main source of REE is the mineral bastnäsite, which is primarily extracted from carbonatites. Alternative resources of REE have been identified in a variety of other environments such as alluvial placers, bauxites and ore tailings. The EURARE project (www.eurare.eu), funded by the European Commission, aims to improve understanding of potential REE resources in Europe with the overall objective of establishing the basis for a European REE industry. As a part of this project, alternative sources of rare earth elements in Europe are being considered. REE have been identified as being particularly enriched in karst-bauxites and hence in the red muds generated as a waste product from the processing of these bauxites to alumina through the Bayer process [3]. Karst-bauxites are widely distributed with deposits known across the Mediterranean and with intermittent exploitation occurring over many decades. REE become concentrated in the bauxite deposits by the bauxitisation process and are retained due to the geochemical barrier created by the limestone bedrock below. This can result in several processes, including the crystallisation of authigenic REE-bearing minerals, the accumulation of residual phases and the adsorption of ions onto clays and other mineral surfaces [4]. Red muds produced from alumina processing represent a potentially important concentration of REE as it has been demonstrated that the REE pass through the alumina extraction process into the waste, and the total REE concentrations are typically enriched by a factor of two compared with the original bauxite ore [5]. Bauxites and red muds from the Parnassus Ghiona region of Greece [6] and the Seydişehir-Akseki region of Turkey have been assessed as

  12. Development and validation of an alternative disturbed skin model by mechanical abrasion to study drug penetration

    OpenAIRE

    Schlupp, P.; M. Weber; T. Schmidts; Geiger, K.; Runkel, F.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and cosmetics for dermal application are usually tested on healthy skin, although the primary permeation barrier, the stratum corneum, is often impaired by skin diseases or small skin lesions, especially on the hands. These skin conditions can considerably influence the permeation of chemicals and drugs. Furthermore, risk assessment for example of nanoparticles should be performed under various skin conditions to reflect the true circumstances. Therefore, an alternative and re...

  13. DESIGNING CULTURALLY CONSCIOUS ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION TO FOSTER ASIAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Herliana, Mrs.

    2011-01-01

    Creating an Asian model of alternative dispute resolution which considers Asian cultures is important. A mere adoption of western standard will less likely accommodate Asian’s unique way of handling disputes. Culture-related problems can be avoided if international commercial mediation or arbitration is tuned in to cultural needs and expectations. Penyusunan model alternatif penyelesaian sengketa gaya Asia yang mengakomodasi budaya setempat penting untuk dilakukan. Penerapan standar barat ti...

  14. Emission spectra investigation of fs induced NPs probed by the ns laser pulse of a fs/ns DP-LIBS orthogonal configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santagata, A. [CNR-IMIP, Unita Operativa di Potenza, Zona Industriale di Tito Scalo, Via S. Loja, Zona Ind., 85050 Tito Scalo, PZ (Italy)], E-mail: antonio.santagata@cnr.it; Albano, G.; Spera, D. [CNR-IMIP, Unita Operativa di Potenza, Zona Industriale di Tito Scalo, Via S. Loja, Zona Ind., 85050 Tito Scalo, PZ (Italy); Teghil, R. [Universita degli Studi della Basilicata, Dipartimento di Chimica, Via N. Sauro 85, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Villani, P.; Parisi, G.P. [CNR-IMIP, Unita Operativa di Potenza, Zona Industriale di Tito Scalo, Via S. Loja, Zona Ind., 85050 Tito Scalo, PZ (Italy); De Bonis, A. [Universita degli Studi della Basilicata, Dipartimento di Chimica, Via N. Sauro 85, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Sordelet, D.J. [Materials and Engineering Physics Program, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    A dual-pulse fs/ns laser induced breakdown spectroscopy configuration, where an initial 250 fs ablating pulsed laser followed by a delayed ns laser beam placed at a fixed distance, orthogonally with the expanding plasma plume, has been used in air on a Al{sub 65}Cu{sub 23}Fe{sub 12} quasicrystal. The obtained emission data were acquired with a set-up arrangement providing space detections, with a resolution up to 15 {mu}m, of the ns laser pulse generated signals. Assuming the fulfillment of local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, the role played by the time lag between the two laser beams on the induced plasma excitation temperatures and electronic densities, as well as a space resolved process survey, has been followed. The spatial and time resolved spectra show, almost, steady values of the determined elementary plasma features with the development of nanoparticles occurring during the fs laser pulsed ablation process. The ns laser probe of the dual-pulse LIBS configuration here presented confirms that the nanoparticles induced can be largely widespread in both space and time whose compositions, overall, could retain the starting target stoichiometry. It is shown that these nanoparticles formation can actually take place at different times following the initial ultra-short laser beam incidence and that, especially at long inter-pulse delays (>100 {mu}s), modest compositional changes can be observed.

  15. EST Table: FS929848 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DICTED: similar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterole...1| PREDICTED: similar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS929848 fwgP ...

  16. EST Table: FS936166 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) ... similar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS929848 fwgP ...

  17. EST Table: FS731272 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DICTED: similar to Protein SDA1 homolog (Mystery protein 45A) [Tribolium castaneum] gb|EFA00563.1| hypotheti...imilar to Protein SDA1 homolog (Mystery protein 45A) [Tribolium castaneum] FS731272 bmmt ...

  18. EST Table: FS745067 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DICTED: similar to Protein SDA1 homolog (Mystery protein 45A) [Tribolium castaneum] gb|EFA00563.1| hypotheti...imilar to Protein SDA1 homolog (Mystery protein 45A) [Tribolium castaneum] FS745067 bmmt ...

  19. EST Table: FS759318 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 25 aa ref|XP_975608.1| PREDICTED: similar to putative lysosomal glucocerebrosidas...%/225 aa gi|91087345|ref|XP_975608.1| PREDICTED: similar to putative lysosomal glucocerebrosidase [Tribolium castaneum] FS759318 fcaL ...

  20. EST Table: FS796464 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ar to putative lysosomal glucocerebrosidase [Tribolium castaneum] 10/09/09 32 %/334 aa FBpp0237202|DvirGJ227...milar to putative lysosomal glucocerebrosidase [Tribolium castaneum] FS796494 ffbm ...

  1. Nonlinear light propagation in fs laser-written waveguide arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szameit A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on recent achievements in the field of nonlinear light propagation in fs laser-written waveguide lattices. Particular emphasis is thereby given on discrete solitons in such systems.

  2. EST Table: FS879118 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available milar to Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2-17 kDa (Ubiquitin-protein ligase) (Ubiquitin carrier protein) (Protein effet...se) (Ubiquitin carrier protein) (Protein effete) [Tribolium castaneum] FS793905 ftes ...

  3. EST Table: FS748350 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PREDICTED: similar to fetal alzheimer antigen, falz [Nasonia vitripennis] 10/09/08 37 %/193 aa FBpp0290563|E...811424.1| PREDICTED: similar to fetal alzheimer antigen, falz [Tribolium castaneum] FS748350 caL- ...

  4. Destruction of PCDD/Fs by gliding arc discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    PCDD/Fs have been become a serious issue because of their lexicological effects and associated adverse health implications. In this study, the gliding arc plasma was tested for treatment of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and pol ychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), which was synthesized from pentachlorophenol in atmospheric condition at 350℃ with or without the catalysis of CuCh-From the experiment, we found that the destruction efficiency of PCDD/F homologues after gliding was discharge ranged from 25% to 79%. This result demonstrates that gliding arc plasma is an effective technology to decompose PCDDs/Fs in flue gas. A plausible degradation mechanism for PCDD/Fs by gliding arc was discussed. Finally, a multistage reactor structure of gliding arc was proposed to upgrade removal efficiency for PCDD/Fs.

  5. Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development - An Application on Alternative Fuels in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Cobb, D.A.; Worhach, P.; Jacobson, J.J.; Berrett, S.

    2000-12-30

    The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

  6. EST Table: FS926683 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS926683 E_FL_fwgP_17C05_F_0 10/09/28 92 %/204 aa ref|NP_001164152.1| held out wings...0 %/173 aa gnl|Amel|GB13678-PA 10/09/10 92 %/204 aa gi|270002790|gb|EEZ99237.1| held out wings [Tribolium castaneum] FS761805 fwgP ...

  7. EST Table: FS935751 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 86181|ref|XP_971039.1| PREDICTED: similar to scaffold protein salvador (shar-pei) [Tribolium castaneum] FS920136 fwgP ... ...ar to scaffold protein salvador (shar-pei) [Tribolium castaneum] 10/09/13 30 %/208 aa FBpp0159976|DmojGI1075...FS935751 E_FL_fwgP_43P13_F_0 10/09/28 37 %/295 aa ref|XP_971039.1| PREDICTED: simil

  8. EST Table: FS790109 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 86181|ref|XP_971039.1| PREDICTED: similar to scaffold protein salvador (shar-pei) [Tribolium castaneum] FS920136 ffbm ... ...ar to scaffold protein salvador (shar-pei) [Tribolium castaneum] 10/09/09 31 %/225 aa FBpp0159976|DmojGI1075...FS790109 E_FL_ffbm_02K08_F_0 10/09/28 37 %/312 aa ref|XP_971039.1| PREDICTED: simil

  9. EST Table: FS770700 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS770700 E_FL_fcaL_20A18_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/164 aa ref|NP_001091766.1| fructose 1,6-...8 aa gnl|Amel|GB19460-PA 10/09/10 78 %/163 aa gi|270008484|gb|EFA04932.1| hypothetical protein TcasGA2_TC014998 [Tribolium castaneum] FS797404 fcaL ...

  10. EST Table: FS770170 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS770170 E_FL_fcaL_18G15_F_0 10/09/28 69 %/163 aa ref|NP_001166694.1| cuticular pro...0 %/135 aa gnl|Amel|GB12600-PA 10/09/10 46 %/136 aa gi|270001940|gb|EEZ98387.1| hypothetical protein TcasGA2_TC000851 [Tribolium castaneum] FS768607 fcaL ...

  11. EST Table: FS881997 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS881997 E_FL_ftes_22P21_F_0 10/09/28 31 %/133 aa ref|NP_001037199.1| promoting pro...tein [Bombyx mori] gb|AAQ01563.1| promoting protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS795677 ftes ...

  12. EST Table: FS838539 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS838539 E_FL_fner_04C21_F_0 10/09/28 31 %/133 aa ref|NP_001037199.1| promoting pro...tein [Bombyx mori] gb|AAQ01563.1| promoting protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/10 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS795677 fner ...

  13. EST Table: FS871608 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS871608 E_FL_fner_45P05_R_0 10/09/28 31 %/133 aa ref|NP_001037199.1| promoting pro...tein [Bombyx mori] gb|AAQ01563.1| promoting protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS870852 fner ...

  14. EST Table: FS795073 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS795073 E_FL_ffbm_17E01_F_0 10/09/28 31 %/133 aa ref|NP_001037199.1| promoting pro...tein [Bombyx mori] gb|AAQ01563.1| promoting protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS795677 ffbm ...

  15. EST Table: FS853288 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS853288 E_FL_fner_45P05_F_0 10/09/28 31 %/133 aa ref|NP_001037199.1| promoting pro...tein [Bombyx mori] gb|AAQ01563.1| promoting protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS795677 fner ...

  16. EST Table: FS790985 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS790985 E_FL_ffbm_05H17_F_0 10/09/28 31 %/133 aa ref|NP_001037199.1| promoting pro...tein [Bombyx mori] gb|AAQ01563.1| promoting protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS795677 ffbm ...

  17. EST Table: FS852530 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS852530 E_FL_fner_43M18_F_0 10/09/28 31 %/133 aa ref|NP_001037199.1| promoting pro...tein [Bombyx mori] gb|AAQ01563.1| promoting protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS795677 fner ...

  18. EST Table: FS903535 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS903535 E_FL_ftes_51F14_R_0 10/09/28 31 %/133 aa ref|NP_001037199.1| promoting pro...tein [Bombyx mori] gb|AAQ01563.1| promoting protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/12 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS870852 ftes ...

  19. EST Table: FS857297 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS857297 E_FL_fner_04C21_R_0 10/09/28 31 %/133 aa ref|NP_001037199.1| promoting pro...tein [Bombyx mori] gb|AAQ01563.1| promoting protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS870852 fner ...

  20. EST Table: FS902723 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS902723 E_FL_ftes_48J09_R_0 10/09/28 31 %/133 aa ref|NP_001037199.1| promoting pro...tein [Bombyx mori] gb|AAQ01563.1| promoting protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/12 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS870852 ftes ...

  1. EST Table: FS902674 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS902674 E_FL_ftes_48G03_R_0 10/09/28 31 %/133 aa ref|NP_001037199.1| promoting pro...tein [Bombyx mori] gb|AAQ01563.1| promoting protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/12 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS870852 ftes ...

  2. EST Table: FS774579 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS774579 E_FL_fcaL_05D18_R_0 10/09/28 60 %/153 aa ref|NP_001164203.1| cannonball [T...ribolium castaneum] gb|EFA04573.1| cannonball [Tribolium castaneum] 10/09/08 49 %/161 aa FBpp0170014|DmojGI2...%/153 aa gi|270008125|gb|EFA04573.1| cannonball [Tribolium castaneum] FS786025 fcaL ...

  3. EST Table: FS825912 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS825912 E_FL_fmgV_22B23_R_0 10/09/28 65 %/235 aa ref|NP_001164203.1| cannonball [T...ribolium castaneum] gb|EFA04573.1| cannonball [Tribolium castaneum] 10/09/10 57 %/236 aa FBpp0170014|DmojGI2...%/235 aa gi|270008125|gb|EFA04573.1| cannonball [Tribolium castaneum] FS786025 fmgV ...

  4. EST Table: FS920303 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS920303 E_FL_fufe_50A06_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0005622(intracellular)|GO:0007165(s...09303 10/09/10 34 %/166 aa gnl|Amel|GB19108-PA 10/09/10 41 %/186 aa gi|270008558|gb|EFA05006.1| hypothetical protein TcasGA2_TC015086 [Tribolium castaneum] FS920303 fufe ...

  5. EST Table: FS838350 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS838350 E_FL_fner_03K13_F_0 10/09/28 84 %/180 aa ref|XP_001651215.1| vitellogenin,... putative [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT42854.1| vitellogenin, putative [Aedes aegypti] 10/09/10 70 %/207 aa FBpp027...gi|91086835|ref|XP_974078.1| PREDICTED: similar to vitellogenin, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS729194 fner ...

  6. EST Table: FS922886 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS922886 E_FL_fwgP_05P03_F_0 10/09/28 84 %/198 aa ref|XP_001847442.1| vitellogenin ...[Culex quinquefasciatus] gb|EDS26195.1| vitellogenin [Culex quinquefasciatus] 10/09/13 72 %/197 aa FBpp02478...206 aa gi|91086835|ref|XP_974078.1| PREDICTED: similar to vitellogenin, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS729194 fwgP ...

  7. EST Table: FS938859 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS938859 E_FL_fwgP_53D14_F_0 10/09/28 92 %/249 aa ref|NP_001037309.1| vitellogenin ...rt=VH; Flags: Precursor dbj|BAA02444.1| vitellogenin precursor [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAA06397.1| vitellogenin [B...2654|ref|XP_970210.1| PREDICTED: similar to vitellogenin [Tribolium castaneum] FS939370 fwgP ...

  8. EST Table: FS824678 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f|XP_971868.2| PREDICTED: similar to esophageal cancer associated protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS824678 fmgV ... ...phageal cancer associated protein [Nasonia vitripennis] 10/09/10 39 %/103 aa FBpp01...FS824678 E_FL_fmgV_18K16_R_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 46 %/114 aa ref|XP_001604914.1| PREDICTED: similar to eso

  9. EST Table: FS803374 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS803374 E_FL_fmgV_12D12_F_0 10/09/28 45 %/149 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...46 %/150 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 45 %/149 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS906679 fmgV ...

  10. EST Table: FS822360 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS822360 E_FL_fmgV_12D12_R_0 10/09/28 46 %/153 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...46 %/151 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 46 %/153 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS891321 fmgV ...

  11. EST Table: FS787608 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS787608 E_FL_fcaL_21P07_R_0 10/09/28 46 %/153 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...46 %/151 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 46 %/153 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS891321 fcaL ...

  12. EST Table: FS847583 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS847583 E_FL_fner_29M11_F_0 10/09/28 45 %/153 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...45 %/151 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 45 %/153 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS906679 fner ...

  13. EST Table: FS923051 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS923051 E_FL_fwgP_06G17_F_0 10/09/28 45 %/153 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...45 %/151 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 45 %/153 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS906679 fwgP ...

  14. EST Table: FS895588 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS895588 E_FL_ftes_18N10_R_0 10/09/28 46 %/153 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...46 %/151 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 46 %/153 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS891321 ftes ...

  15. EST Table: FS844168 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS844168 E_FL_fner_20A08_F_0 10/09/28 45 %/153 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...45 %/151 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 45 %/153 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS906679 fner ...

  16. EST Table: FS880548 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS880548 E_FL_ftes_18N10_F_0 10/09/28 45 %/153 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...45 %/151 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 45 %/153 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS906679 ftes ...

  17. EST Table: FS862828 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS862828 E_FL_fner_20A08_R_0 10/09/28 46 %/153 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...46 %/151 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 46 %/153 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS891321 fner ...

  18. EST Table: FS865993 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS865993 E_FL_fner_29M11_R_0 10/09/28 46 %/153 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...46 %/151 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 46 %/153 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS891321 fner ...

  19. EST Table: FS875608 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS875608 E_FL_ftes_04F20_F_0 10/09/28 45 %/153 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...45 %/151 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 45 %/153 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS906679 ftes ...

  20. EST Table: FS928974 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS928974 E_FL_fwgP_23N08_F_0 10/09/28 45 %/153 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...45 %/151 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 45 %/153 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS906679 fwgP ...

  1. EST Table: FS891805 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS891805 E_FL_ftes_04F20_R_0 10/09/28 46 %/153 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...46 %/151 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 46 %/153 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS891321 ftes ...

  2. EST Table: FS874950 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS874950 E_FL_ftes_02G24_F_0 10/09/28 45 %/153 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...45 %/151 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 45 %/153 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS906679 ftes ...

  3. EST Table: FS771324 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS771324 E_FL_fcaL_21P07_F_0 10/09/28 46 %/146 aa ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jump...45 %/146 aa gnl|Amel|GB14856-PA 10/09/10 46 %/146 aa gi|91086783|ref|XP_973163.1| PREDICTED: similar to jumping translocation breakpoint protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS906679 fcaL ...

  4. EST Table: FS795245 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS795245 E_FL_ffbm_17L22_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/173 aa ref|NP_001093312.1| gloverin 3 [...Bombyx mori] dbj|BAF63527.1| gloverin3 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS791278 ffbm ...

  5. EST Table: FS792011 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS792011 E_FL_ffbm_08H19_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/173 aa ref|NP_001093312.1| gloverin 3 [...Bombyx mori] dbj|BAF63527.1| gloverin3 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS791278 ffbm ...

  6. EST Table: FS792609 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS792609 E_FL_ffbm_10C20_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/173 aa ref|NP_001093312.1| gloverin 3 [...Bombyx mori] dbj|BAF63527.1| gloverin3 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS791278 ffbm ...

  7. EST Table: FS793269 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS793269 E_FL_ffbm_12A24_F_0 10/09/28 82 %/146 aa ref|NP_001093312.1| gloverin 3 [B...ombyx mori] dbj|BAF63527.1| gloverin3 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS791278 ffbm ...

  8. EST Table: FS841256 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS841256 E_FL_fner_11N20_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/173 aa ref|NP_001093312.1| gloverin 3 [...Bombyx mori] dbj|BAF63527.1| gloverin3 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/10 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS791278 fner ...

  9. EST Table: FS859964 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS859964 E_FL_fner_11N20_R_0 10/09/28 99 %/173 aa ref|NP_001093312.1| gloverin 3 [B...ombyx mori] dbj|BAF63527.1| gloverin3 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS789236 fner ...

  10. EST Table: FS796763 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS796763 E_FL_ffbm_22C21_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/162 aa ref|NP_001093312.1| gloverin 3 [B...ombyx mori] dbj|BAF63527.1| gloverin3 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS791278 ffbm ...

  11. EST Table: FS793562 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS793562 E_FL_ffbm_12P11_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/173 aa ref|NP_001093312.1| gloverin 3 [...Bombyx mori] dbj|BAF63527.1| gloverin3 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS791278 ffbm ...

  12. EST Table: FS799323 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS799323 E_FL_ffbm_29O13_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/172 aa ref|NP_001093312.1| gloverin 3 [B...ombyx mori] dbj|BAF63527.1| gloverin3 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS791278 ffbm ...

  13. EST Table: FS797046 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS797046 E_FL_ffbm_22P20_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/173 aa ref|NP_001093312.1| gloverin 3 [...Bombyx mori] dbj|BAF63527.1| gloverin3 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS791278 ffbm ...

  14. EST Table: FS792731 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS792731 E_FL_ffbm_10I07_F_0 10/09/28 85 %/162 aa ref|NP_001093312.1| gloverin 3 [B...ombyx mori] dbj|BAF63527.1| gloverin3 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS791278 ffbm ...

  15. EST Table: FS880988 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS880988 E_FL_ftes_20B09_F_0 10/09/28 71 %/202 aa ref|XP_001648944.1| dendritic cel...ubunit M; Short=eIF3m gb|EAT44291.1| dendritic cell protein [Aedes aegypti] 10/09/11 66 %/198 aa FBpp0276999...91954|ref|XP_968265.1| PREDICTED: similar to dendritic cell protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS916297 ftes ...

  16. EST Table: FS839662 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS839662 E_FL_fner_07F07_F_0 10/09/28 69 %/186 aa ref|XP_001648944.1| dendritic cel...ubunit M; Short=eIF3m gb|EAT44291.1| dendritic cell protein [Aedes aegypti] 10/09/10 65 %/183 aa FBpp0276999...|XP_968265.1| PREDICTED: similar to dendritic cell protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS916297 fner ...

  17. EST Table: FS851964 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS851964 E_FL_fner_42D09_F_0 10/09/28 71 %/204 aa ref|XP_001648944.1| dendritic cel...ubunit M; Short=eIF3m gb|EAT44291.1| dendritic cell protein [Aedes aegypti] 10/09/11 66 %/201 aa FBpp0276999...91954|ref|XP_968265.1| PREDICTED: similar to dendritic cell protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS916297 fner ...

  18. EST Table: FS932249 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS932249 E_FL_fwgP_33K22_F_0 10/09/28 69 %/188 aa ref|XP_001648944.1| dendritic cel...ubunit M; Short=eIF3m gb|EAT44291.1| dendritic cell protein [Aedes aegypti] 10/09/13 65 %/185 aa FBpp0276999...|XP_968265.1| PREDICTED: similar to dendritic cell protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS916297 fwgP ...

  19. EST Table: FS846539 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS846539 E_FL_fner_26N03_F_0 10/09/28 70 %/190 aa ref|XP_001648944.1| dendritic cel...ubunit M; Short=eIF3m gb|EAT44291.1| dendritic cell protein [Aedes aegypti] 10/09/10 65 %/187 aa FBpp0276999...|XP_968265.1| PREDICTED: similar to dendritic cell protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS916297 fner ...

  20. EST Table: FS913523 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS913523 E_FL_fufe_29I07_F_0 10/09/28 74 %/270 aa ref|XP_001648944.1| dendritic cel...ubunit M; Short=eIF3m gb|EAT44291.1| dendritic cell protein [Aedes aegypti] 10/09/12 69 %/267 aa FBpp0276999...91954|ref|XP_968265.1| PREDICTED: similar to dendritic cell protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS916297 fufe ...

  1. EST Table: FS919842 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS919842 E_FL_fufe_48J09_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0003735(structural constituent of r...-1|gene:AGAP000508 10/09/10 60 %/164 aa gnl|Amel|GB10944-PA 10/09/10 60 %/187 aa gi|189236859|ref|XP_974352.2| PREDICTED: similar to GA18397-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS919842 fufe ...

  2. EST Table: FS916464 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS916464 E_FL_fufe_38G11_F_0 10/09/28 54 %/242 aa ref|XP_972061.1| PREDICTED: similar to thymus... 10/09/10 58 %/212 aa gnl|Amel|GB19831-PA 10/09/10 54 %/242 aa gi|91078858|ref|XP_972061.1| PREDICTED: similar to thymus-specific serine protease [Tribolium castaneum] FS916293 fufe ...

  3. EST Table: FS871957 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS871957 E_FL_fner_46O21_R_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 47 %/211 aa gb|EFA02106.1| hypot...0809 10/09/10 49 %/213 aa gnl|Amel|GB16525-PA 10/09/10 47 %/211 aa gi|270005658|gb|EFA02106.1| hypothetical protein TcasGA2_TC007750 [Tribolium castaneum] FS871957 fner ...

  4. EST Table: FS849566 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS849566 E_FL_fner_35F20_F_0 10/09/28 57 %/111 aa ref|NP_001040215.1| stathmin [Bom...byx mori] gb|ABD36259.1| stathmin [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 low homology FS915193 fner ...

  5. EST Table: FS750430 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS750430 E_ET_caL-_01H08_R_0 10/09/28 65 %/149 aa ref|NP_001130045.1| flightin [Bom...byx mori] gb|ACI96114.1| flightin [Bombyx mori] 10/09/08 n.h 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 low homology FS783611 caL- ...

  6. EST Table: FS745476 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS745476 E_ET_caL-_01H08_F_0 10/09/28 57 %/128 aa ref|NP_001130045.1| flightin [Bom...byx mori] gb|ACI96114.1| flightin [Bombyx mori] 10/09/08 n.h 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS763751 caL- ...

  7. EST Table: FS910504 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS910504 E_FL_fufe_20G20_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 39 %/248 aa ref|XP_967337.1| PREDICTED: similar to Serge.../244 aa gnl|Amel|GB17309-PA 10/09/10 39 %/248 aa gi|91083383|ref|XP_967337.1| PREDICTED: similar to Sergef protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS910504 fufe ...

  8. EST Table: FS892940 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 108 aa gi|91094187|ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathway, mitochondrial [Tribolium castaneum] FS892940 ftes ... ...FS892940 E_FL_ftes_09L06_R_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 63 %/108 aa ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolut...ionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathway, mitochondrial [Tribolium

  9. EST Table: FS840960 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS840960 E_FL_fner_11A09_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 87 %/139 aa ref|XP_001659698.1| liquid... facets [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39088.1| liquid facets [Aedes aegypti] 10/09/10 88 %/136 aa FBpp0227429|...A 10/09/10 84 %/143 aa gi|189240526|ref|XP_972038.2| PREDICTED: similar to liquid facets [Tribolium castaneum] FS840960 fner ...

  10. EST Table: FS771867 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS771867 E_FL_fcaL_23K08_F_0 10/09/28 87 %/139 aa ref|XP_001659698.1| liquid facets... [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39088.1| liquid facets [Aedes aegypti] 10/09/08 88 %/136 aa FBpp0227429|DvirGJ13012-P... %/143 aa gi|189240526|ref|XP_972038.2| PREDICTED: similar to liquid facets [Tribolium castaneum] FS840960 fcaL ...

  11. EST Table: FS881403 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS881403 E_FL_ftes_21E11_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0005515(protein binding)|GO:0008270...niProt:Q 9U3L0#protein_id:CAB54207.1 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 low homology FS881403 ftes ...

  12. EST Table: FS918672 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS918672 E_FL_fufe_45B07_F_0 10/09/28 57 %/175 aa ref|XP_001664237.1| breast cancer metastasis...-suppressor [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT33713.1| breast cancer metastasis-suppressor [Aedes aegypti] 10...0 57 %/173 aa gi|91080755|ref|XP_966988.1| PREDICTED: similar to breast cancer metastasis-suppressor 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS939099 fufe ...

  13. EST Table: FS802051 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS802051 E_FL_fmgV_08I20_F_0 10/09/28 62 %/109 aa ref|XP_001664237.1| breast cancer metastasis...-suppressor [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT33713.1| breast cancer metastasis-suppressor [Aedes aegypti] 10...0 59 %/107 aa gi|91080755|ref|XP_966988.1| PREDICTED: similar to breast cancer metastasis-suppressor 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS939099 fmgV ...

  14. EST Table: FS920146 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS920146 E_FL_fufe_49I05_F_0 11/12/09 10/09/28 low homology 10/09/13 low homology 1...0/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 33 %/142 aa gi|91080515|ref|XP_971732.1| PREDICTED: similar to galectin (AGAP008844-PA) [Tribolium castaneum] FS920146 fufe ...

  15. EST Table: FS734952 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS734952 E_FL_bmmt_01L24_R_0 10/09/28 44 %/134 aa ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglios...2 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 44 %/134 aa gi|91078536|ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated-protein 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS741586 bmmt ...

  16. EST Table: FS820105 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS820105 E_FL_fmgV_05P05_R_0 10/09/28 43 %/144 aa ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglios...2 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 43 %/144 aa gi|91078536|ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated-protein 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS741586 fmgV ...

  17. EST Table: FS823467 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS823467 E_FL_fmgV_15E11_R_0 10/09/28 40 %/161 aa ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglios...2 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 40 %/161 aa gi|91078536|ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated-protein 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS741586 fmgV ...

  18. EST Table: FS740251 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS740251 E_FL_bmmt_16L03_R_0 10/09/28 42 %/143 aa ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglios...2 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 42 %/143 aa gi|91078536|ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated-protein 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS741586 bmmt ...

  19. EST Table: FS743781 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS743781 E_FL_bmmt_26K02_R_0 10/09/28 45 %/125 aa ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglios...2 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 45 %/125 aa gi|91078536|ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated-protein 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS741586 bmmt ...

  20. EST Table: FS734992 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS734992 E_FL_bmmt_01N18_R_0 10/09/28 45 %/125 aa ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglios...2 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 45 %/125 aa gi|91078536|ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated-protein 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS741586 bmmt ...

  1. EST Table: FS823499 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS823499 E_FL_fmgV_15F21_R_0 10/09/28 45 %/131 aa ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglios...2 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 45 %/131 aa gi|91078536|ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated-protein 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS741586 fmgV ...

  2. EST Table: FS739740 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS739740 E_FL_bmmt_15E02_R_0 10/09/28 43 %/144 aa ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglios...2 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 43 %/144 aa gi|91078536|ref|XP_970577.1| PREDICTED: similar to ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated-protein 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS741586 bmmt ...

  3. EST Table: FS918214 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS918214 E_FL_fufe_43K22_F_0 10/09/28 53 %/199 aa ref|XP_001659582.1| xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli...) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39285.1| xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli) [Aedes aegypti... aa gi|189233738|ref|XP_971576.2| PREDICTED: similar to xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli) [Tribolium castaneum] FS768084 fufe ...

  4. EST Table: FS730803 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS730803 E_FL_bmmt_19O18_F_0 10/09/28 54 %/206 aa ref|XP_001659582.1| xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli...) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39285.1| xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli) [Aedes aegypti... aa gi|189233738|ref|XP_971576.2| PREDICTED: similar to xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli) [Tribolium castaneum] FS768084 bmmt ...

  5. EST Table: FS896014 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS896014 E_FL_ftes_20I10_R_0 10/09/28 46 %/262 aa ref|XP_974065.1| PREDICTED: similar to Outer dense fiber... protein 2 (Outer dense fiber of sperm tails protein 2) (84 kDa outer dense fiber pro...DICTED: similar to Outer dense fiber protein 2 (Outer dense fiber of sperm tails protein 2) (84 kDa outer dense fiber protein) (Cenexin) [Tribolium castaneum] FS893448 ftes ...

  6. EST Table: FS930987 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS930987 E_FL_fwgP_29N09_F_0 10/09/28 64 %/130 aa ref|XP_001865018.1| suppression of tumorigen...icity [Culex quinquefasciatus] gb|EDS41077.1| suppression of tumorigenicity [Culex quinquefasciat...09/10 62 %/130 aa gi|91091438|ref|XP_972410.1| PREDICTED: similar to suppression of tumorigenicity [Tribolium castaneum] FS881106 fwgP ...

  7. EST Table: FS881106 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS881106 E_FL_ftes_20G18_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 52 %/186 aa ref|XP_001865018.1| suppression of tumorigen...icity [Culex quinquefasciatus] gb|EDS41077.1| suppression of tumorigenicity [Culex q...B15913-PA 10/09/10 50 %/186 aa gi|91091438|ref|XP_972410.1| PREDICTED: similar to suppression of tumorigenicity [Tribolium castaneum] FS881106 ftes ...

  8. EST Table: FS887803 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS887803 E_FL_ftes_40G04_F_0 10/09/28 35 %/122 aa ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephen... %/149 aa gnl|Amel|GB19565-PA 10/09/10 35 %/122 aa gi|91093471|ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephensi ubiquitin, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS914988 ftes ...

  9. EST Table: FS900811 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS900811 E_FL_ftes_40G04_R_0 10/09/28 35 %/117 aa ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephen... %/144 aa gnl|Amel|GB19565-PA 10/09/10 35 %/117 aa gi|91093471|ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephensi ubiquitin, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS788262 ftes ...

  10. EST Table: FS915066 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS915066 E_FL_fufe_34C05_F_0 10/09/28 35 %/122 aa ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephen... %/149 aa gnl|Amel|GB19565-PA 10/09/10 35 %/122 aa gi|91093471|ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephensi ubiquitin, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS914988 fufe ...

  11. EST Table: FS854155 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS854155 E_FL_fner_48F23_F_0 10/09/28 35 %/122 aa ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephen... %/149 aa gnl|Amel|GB19565-PA 10/09/10 35 %/122 aa gi|91093471|ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephensi ubiquitin, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS914988 fner ...

  12. EST Table: FS934225 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS934225 E_FL_fwgP_39G18_F_0 10/09/28 34 %/122 aa ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephen... %/149 aa gnl|Amel|GB19565-PA 10/09/10 34 %/122 aa gi|91093471|ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephensi ubiquitin, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS914988 fwgP ...

  13. EST Table: FS923067 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS923067 E_FL_fwgP_06H12_F_0 10/09/28 39 %/164 aa ref|XP_975114.2| PREDICTED: similar to almond...|Amel|GB17827-PA 10/09/10 39 %/164 aa gi|189239453|ref|XP_975114.2| PREDICTED: similar to almondex CG12127-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS916326 fwgP ...

  14. EST Table: FS895931 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS895931 E_FL_ftes_20D04_R_0 10/09/28 48 %/263 aa ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about.../309 aa gnl|Amel|GB19080-PA 10/09/10 48 %/263 aa gi|91081571|ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about silencing protein 10 [Tribolium castaneum] FS823506 ftes ...

  15. EST Table: FS773374 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS773374 E_FL_fcaL_01E22_R_0 10/09/28 46 %/259 aa ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about.../265 aa gnl|Amel|GB19080-PA 10/09/10 46 %/259 aa gi|91081571|ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about silencing protein 10 [Tribolium castaneum] FS823506 fcaL ...

  16. EST Table: FS918452 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS918452 E_FL_fufe_44G17_F_0 10/09/28 46 %/244 aa ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about.../253 aa gnl|Amel|GB19080-PA 10/09/10 46 %/244 aa gi|91081571|ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about silencing protein 10 [Tribolium castaneum] FS937283 fufe ...

  17. EST Table: FS771043 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS771043 E_FL_fcaL_21B10_F_0 10/09/28 50 %/102 aa ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about.../109 aa gnl|Amel|GB19080-PA 10/09/10 50 %/102 aa gi|91081571|ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about silencing protein 10 [Tribolium castaneum] FS937283 fcaL ...

  18. EST Table: FS783759 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS783759 E_FL_fcaL_45F03_R_0 10/09/28 49 %/292 aa ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about.../298 aa gnl|Amel|GB19080-PA 10/09/10 49 %/292 aa gi|91081571|ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about silencing protein 10 [Tribolium castaneum] FS823506 fcaL ...

  19. EST Table: FS787334 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS787334 E_FL_fcaL_21B10_R_0 10/09/28 47 %/229 aa ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about.../235 aa gnl|Amel|GB19080-PA 10/09/10 47 %/229 aa gi|91081571|ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about silencing protein 10 [Tribolium castaneum] FS823506 fcaL ...

  20. EST Table: FS756160 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS756160 E_FL_fcaL_01E22_F_0 10/09/28 45 %/124 aa ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about.../134 aa gnl|Amel|GB19080-PA 10/09/10 45 %/124 aa gi|91081571|ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about silencing protein 10 [Tribolium castaneum] FS937283 fcaL ...

  1. EST Table: FS881026 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS881026 E_FL_ftes_20D04_F_0 10/09/28 48 %/142 aa ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about.../146 aa gnl|Amel|GB19080-PA 10/09/10 48 %/142 aa gi|91081571|ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about silencing protein 10 [Tribolium castaneum] FS937283 ftes ...

  2. EST Table: FS804514 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS804514 E_FL_fmgV_15G04_F_0 10/09/28 46 %/124 aa ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about.../134 aa gnl|Amel|GB19080-PA 10/09/10 46 %/124 aa gi|91081571|ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about silencing protein 10 [Tribolium castaneum] FS937283 fmgV ...

  3. EST Table: FS877343 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS877343 E_FL_ftes_09I06_F_0 10/09/28 48 %/136 aa ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about.../146 aa gnl|Amel|GB19080-PA 10/09/10 48 %/136 aa gi|91081571|ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about silencing protein 10 [Tribolium castaneum] FS937283 ftes ...

  4. EST Table: FS772104 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS772104 E_FL_fcaL_24G15_F_0 10/09/28 50 %/114 aa ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about.../125 aa gnl|Amel|GB19080-PA 10/09/10 50 %/114 aa gi|91081571|ref|XP_975194.1| PREDICTED: similar to something about silencing protein 10 [Tribolium castaneum] FS937283 fcaL ...

  5. EST Table: FS897753 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS897753 E_FL_ftes_28E17_R_0 10/09/28 47 %/256 aa ref|XP_974065.1| PREDICTED: similar to Outer dense fiber... protein 2 (Outer dense fiber of sperm tails protein 2) (84 kDa outer dense fiber pro...DICTED: similar to Outer dense fiber protein 2 (Outer dense fiber of sperm tails protein 2) (84 kDa outer dense fiber protein) (Cenexin) [Tribolium castaneum] FS893448 ftes ...

  6. EST Table: FS903628 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS903628 E_FL_ftes_51L18_R_0 10/09/28 47 %/257 aa ref|XP_974065.1| PREDICTED: similar to Outer dense fiber... protein 2 (Outer dense fiber of sperm tails protein 2) (84 kDa outer dense fiber pro...DICTED: similar to Outer dense fiber protein 2 (Outer dense fiber of sperm tails protein 2) (84 kDa outer dense fiber protein) (Cenexin) [Tribolium castaneum] FS893448 ftes ...

  7. EST Table: FS922930 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS922930 E_FL_fwgP_06B07_F_0 10/09/28 44 %/250 aa ref|NP_001107813.1| glass bottom boat... protein [Tribolium castaneum] gb|EFA04645.1| glass bottom boat [Tribolium castaneum] 10/09/13 36 %/273 ...|270008197|gb|EFA04645.1| glass bottom boat [Tribolium castaneum] FS844271 fwgP ...

  8. EST Table: FS933331 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS933331 E_FL_fwgP_36M08_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 56 %/232 aa ref|XP_001655582.1| ...10/09/10 49 %/218 aa gi|270013095|gb|EFA09543.1| hypothetical protein TcasGA2_TC011651 [Tribolium castaneum] FS933331 fwgP ...

  9. EST Table: FS768368 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS768368 E_FL_fcaL_48N17_F_0 10/09/28 78 %/215 aa ref|NP_001161754.1| integrin beta...otein|X:14937399:14948907:1|gene:INTB 10/09/10 40 %/194 aa gnl|Amel|GB19541-PA 10/09/10 43 %/192 aa gi|270014241|gb|EFA10689.1| myospheroid [Tribolium castaneum] FS932451 fcaL ...

  10. EST Table: FS844440 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS844440 E_FL_fner_20M15_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/207 aa gb|ACY95331.1| ribosomal protein...0 90 %/207 aa gnl|Amel|GB17629-PA 10/09/10 88 %/207 aa gi|91083393|ref|XP_967983.1| PREDICTED: similar to ribosomal protein L8e [Tribolium castaneum] FS794442 fner ...

  11. EST Table: FS738267 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS738267 E_FL_bmmt_11C08_R_0 10/09/28 80 %/137 aa gb|ACT36277.1| antitrypsin isofor...m 2 [Bombyx mori] gb|ACT36279.1| antitrypsin isoform 4 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/07 n.h 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS783140 bmmt ...

  12. EST Table: FS894471 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS894471 E_FL_ftes_15C05_R_0 10/09/28 47 %/260 aa ref|XP_974065.1| PREDICTED: similar to Outer dense fiber... protein 2 (Outer dense fiber of sperm tails protein 2) (84 kDa outer dense fiber pro...DICTED: similar to Outer dense fiber protein 2 (Outer dense fiber of sperm tails protein 2) (84 kDa outer dense fiber protein) (Cenexin) [Tribolium castaneum] FS893448 ftes ...

  13. EST Table: FS901584 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS901584 E_FL_ftes_43M21_R_0 10/09/28 35 %/178 aa ref|XP_974065.1| PREDICTED: similar to Outer dense fiber... protein 2 (Outer dense fiber of sperm tails protein 2) (84 kDa outer dense fiber pro...DICTED: similar to Outer dense fiber protein 2 (Outer dense fiber of sperm tails protein 2) (84 kDa outer dense fiber protein) (Cenexin) [Tribolium castaneum] FS893448 ftes ...

  14. EST Table: FS893822 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS893822 E_FL_ftes_12P11_R_0 10/09/28 47 %/258 aa ref|XP_974065.1| PREDICTED: similar to Outer dense fiber... protein 2 (Outer dense fiber of sperm tails protein 2) (84 kDa outer dense fiber pro...DICTED: similar to Outer dense fiber protein 2 (Outer dense fiber of sperm tails protein 2) (84 kDa outer dense fiber protein) (Cenexin) [Tribolium castaneum] FS893448 ftes ...

  15. EST Table: FS837816 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS837816 E_FL_fner_02D05_F_0 10/09/28 55 %/109 aa ref|XP_968887.1| PREDICTED: similar to cleft...gnl|Amel|GB16225-PA 10/09/10 55 %/109 aa gi|91081299|ref|XP_968887.1| PREDICTED: similar to cleft lip and palate transmembrane protein 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS920349 fner ...

  16. EST Table: FS725996 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS725996 E_FL_bmmt_06E05_F_0 10/09/28 55 %/109 aa ref|XP_968887.1| PREDICTED: similar to cleft...gnl|Amel|GB16225-PA 10/09/10 55 %/109 aa gi|91081299|ref|XP_968887.1| PREDICTED: similar to cleft lip and palate transmembrane protein 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS920349 bmmt ...

  17. EST Table: FS808745 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS808745 E_FL_fmgV_27D04_F_0 10/09/28 32 %/212 aa ref|XP_001865385.1| niemann-Pick ...C1 protein [Culex quinquefasciatus] gb|EDS41634.1| niemann-Pick C1 protein [Culex quinquefasciatus] 10/09/09.../10 30 %/210 aa gi|189241956|ref|XP_967619.2| PREDICTED: similar to niemann-pick C1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS803743 fmgV ...

  18. EST Table: FS747012 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS747012 E_ET_caL-_07O17_F_0 10/09/28 39 %/183 aa ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefin... %/135 aa gnl|Amel|GB16043-PA 10/09/10 39 %/183 aa gi|189240340|ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefinin [Tribolium castaneum] FS921551 caL- ...

  19. EST Table: FS752084 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available P_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefinin [Tribolium castaneum] FS752084 caL- ... ...FS752084 E_ET_caL-_07O17_R_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 39 %/198 aa ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antole...finin [Tribolium castaneum] 10/09/08 34 %/152 aa FBpp0116483|DanaGF13291-PA 10/08/2

  20. EST Table: FS899341 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS899341 E_FL_ftes_34E24_R_0 10/09/28 39 %/198 aa ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefin...0 low homology 10/09/10 39 %/152 aa gnl|Amel|GB16043-PA 10/09/10 39 %/198 aa gi|189240340|ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefinin [Tribolium castaneum] FS752084 ftes ...

  1. EST Table: FS864234 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS864234 E_FL_fner_24L14_R_0 10/09/28 38 %/198 aa ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefin...0 low homology 10/09/10 39 %/152 aa gnl|Amel|GB16043-PA 10/09/10 38 %/198 aa gi|189240340|ref|XP_971046.2| PREDICTED: similar to antolefinin [Tribolium castaneum] FS752084 fner ...

  2. EST Table: FS860601 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS860601 E_FL_fner_13L02_R_0 10/09/28 69 %/112 aa ref|NP_001091750.1| ribosomal pro...#protein_id:AAK27864.1 10/09/10 60 %/110 aa AGAP007740-PA Protein|3R:173065:17380...1| PREDICTED: similar to 60S acidic ribosomal protein P1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS784781 fner ...

  3. EST Table: FS912812 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS912812 E_FL_fufe_27F15_F_0 10/09/28 50 %/274 aa ref|XP_970789.1| PREDICTED: similar to Integrat... aa gnl|Amel|GB19912-PA 10/09/10 50 %/274 aa gi|91082039|ref|XP_970789.1| PREDICTED: similar to Integrator complex subunit 4 (Int4) [Tribolium castaneum] FS906031 fufe ...

  4. EST Table: FS736136 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS736136 E_FL_bmmt_05B11_R_0 10/09/28 32 %/210 aa ref|XP_972036.1| PREDICTED: simil...gy 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 32 %/210 aa gi|91088865|ref|XP_972036.1| PREDICTED: similar to CG7702 CG7702-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS834274 bmmt ...

  5. EST Table: FS811016 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS811016 E_FL_fmgV_33J07_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0005328(neurotransmitter:sodium sym...66 aa gnl|Amel|GB18422-PA 10/09/10 57 %/127 aa gi|270012260|gb|EFA08708.1| hypothetical protein TcasGA2_TC006379 [Tribolium castaneum] FS811016 fmgV ...

  6. EST Table: FS861101 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS861101 E_FL_fner_15B20_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0005576(extracellular region) 10/09...K lipoprotein precursor [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS861101 fner ...

  7. EST Table: FS766762 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS766762 E_FL_fcaL_43O18_F_0 10/09/28 66 %/124 aa ref|NP_001165864.1| extended syna...2 aa gnl|Amel|GB16451-PA 10/09/10 66 %/124 aa gi|288869514|ref|NP_001165864.1| extended synaptotagmin-like protein 2a [Tribolium castaneum] FS756117 fcaL ...

  8. EST Table: FS905729 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS905729 E_FL_fufe_05P17_F_0 10/09/28 64 %/289 aa ref|XP_968073.1| PREDICTED: similar to Longevity...gene:AGAP001761 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 64 %/289 aa gi|91087843|ref|XP_968073.1| PREDICTED: similar to Longevity assurance gene 1 CG3576-PB [Tribolium castaneum] FS764148 fufe ...

  9. EST Table: FS918257 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS918257 E_FL_fufe_43N05_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 47 %/253 aa ref|XP_971977.1| PREDICTED: similar to reserv...277 aa gnl|Amel|GB11583-PA 10/09/10 47 %/253 aa gi|91086211|ref|XP_971977.1| PREDICTED: similar to reserved [Tribolium castaneum] FS918257 fufe ...

  10. EST Table: FS822271 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS822271 E_FL_fmgV_11P16_R_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 75 %/112 aa ref|XP_001656149.1| fetal alzheimer... antigen, falz [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT35210.1| fetal alzheimer antigen, falz [Aedes aegypti] 1...8 %/115 aa gi|189240808|ref|XP_001811424.1| PREDICTED: similar to fetal alzheimer antigen, falz [Tribolium castaneum] FS822271 fmgV ...

  11. EST Table: FS742012 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS742012 E_FL_bmmt_21K17_R_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 54 %/122 aa ref|XP_970450.1| PRE...gnl|Amel|GB11088-PA 10/09/10 54 %/122 aa gi|91084727|ref|XP_970450.1| PREDICTED: similar to CG3655 CG3655-PB [Tribolium castaneum] FS742012 bmmt ...

  12. EST Table: FS828361 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS828361 E_FL_fmgV_28P15_R_0 10/09/28 92 %/173 aa ref|NP_001036831.1| saposin-relat...29 n.h 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 39 %/158 aa gi|91077504|ref|XP_966852.1| PREDICTED: similar to saposin isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS895586 fmgV ...

  13. EST Table: FS809383 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS809383 E_FL_fmgV_28P15_F_0 10/09/28 91 %/173 aa ref|NP_001036831.1| saposin-relat...29 n.h 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 39 %/158 aa gi|91077504|ref|XP_966852.1| PREDICTED: similar to saposin isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS791050 fmgV ...

  14. EST Table: FS766125 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available similar to Myosin-IA (MIA) (Brush border myosin IA) (BBMIA) [Tribolium castaneum] FS929464 fcaL ... ...FS766125 E_FL_fcaL_41P06_F_0 10/09/28 63 %/144 aa ref|XP_966392.1| PREDICTED: simil...ar to Myosin-IA (MIA) (Brush border myosin IA) (BBMIA) [Tribolium castaneum] gb|EFA08265.1| hypothetical pro

  15. EST Table: FS801980 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS801980 E_FL_fmgV_08F19_F_0 10/09/28 42 %/152 aa ref|XP_001648294.1| Juvenile horm...one-inducible protein, putative [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT44634.1| Juvenile hormone-inducible protein, putative ...|GB15308-PA 10/09/10 34 %/148 aa gi|91080979|ref|XP_974925.1| PREDICTED: similar to Juvenile hormone-inducible protein, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS808716 fmgV ...

  16. EST Table: FS816465 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS816465 E_FL_fmgV_48K22_F_0 10/09/28 43 %/181 aa ref|XP_001648294.1| Juvenile horm...one-inducible protein, putative [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT44634.1| Juvenile hormone-inducible protein, putative ...|GB15308-PA 10/09/10 37 %/178 aa gi|91080979|ref|XP_974925.1| PREDICTED: similar to Juvenile hormone-inducible protein, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS808716 fmgV ...

  17. EST Table: FS913793 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS913793 E_FL_fufe_30F13_F_0 10/09/28 41 %/299 aa ref|XP_001648294.1| Juvenile horm...one-inducible protein, putative [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT44634.1| Juvenile hormone-inducible protein, putative ...|GB15308-PA 10/09/10 38 %/286 aa gi|91080979|ref|XP_974925.1| PREDICTED: similar to Juvenile hormone-inducible protein, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS808716 fufe ...

  18. EST Table: FS760335 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS760335 E_FL_fcaL_14A08_F_0 10/09/28 42 %/192 aa ref|XP_001648294.1| Juvenile horm...one-inducible protein, putative [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT44634.1| Juvenile hormone-inducible protein, putative ...|GB15308-PA 10/09/10 38 %/184 aa gi|91080979|ref|XP_974925.1| PREDICTED: similar to Juvenile hormone-inducible protein, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS808716 fcaL ...

  19. EST Table: FS898442 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS898442 E_FL_ftes_30N10_R_0 10/09/28 92 %/225 aa ref|NP_001037622.1| timeless [Bom...byx mori] gb|ABD52733.1| timeless [Bombyx mori] 10/09/12 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 low homology FS751324 ftes ...

  20. EST Table: FS742806 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS742806 E_FL_bmmt_23P01_R_0 10/09/28 45 %/155 aa gb|ACN52067.1| insect intestinal mucin 3 [Mamestra configu...rata] 10/09/07 n.h 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS740161 bmmt ...

  1. EST Table: FS731466 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS731466 E_FL_bmmt_30M21_F_0 10/09/28 46 %/205 aa gb|ACN52067.1| insect intestinal mucin 3 [Mamestra configu...rata] 10/09/03 n.h 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS733323 bmmt ...

  2. EST Table: FS734325 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS734325 E_FL_bmmt_23O20_F_0 10/09/28 46 %/205 aa gb|ACN52067.1| insect intestinal mucin 3 [Mamestra configu...rata] 10/09/03 n.h 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS733323 bmmt ...

  3. EST Table: FS741790 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS741790 E_FL_bmmt_21A21_R_0 10/09/28 48 %/172 aa gb|ACN52067.1| insect intestinal mucin 3 [Mamestra configu...rata] 10/09/07 n.h 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS740161 bmmt ...

  4. EST Table: FS743730 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS743730 E_FL_bmmt_26H21_R_0 10/09/28 49 %/178 aa gb|ACN52067.1| insect intestinal mucin 3 [Mamestra configu...rata] 10/09/07 n.h 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS740161 bmmt ...

  5. EST Table: FS745261 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS745261 E_FL_bmmt_30M21_R_0 10/09/28 45 %/135 aa gb|ACN52067.1| insect intestinal mucin 3 [Mamestra configu...rata] 10/09/08 n.h 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS740161 bmmt ...

  6. EST Table: FS728748 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS728748 E_FL_bmmt_14B19_F_0 10/09/28 46 %/205 aa gb|ACN52067.1| insect intestinal mucin 3 [Mamestra configu...rata] 10/09/03 n.h 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS733323 bmmt ...

  7. EST Table: FS732832 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS732832 E_FL_bmmt_27K04_F_0 10/09/28 69 %/163 aa ref|XP_974883.1| PREDICTED: simil...gnl|Amel|GB14192-PA 10/09/10 69 %/163 aa gi|91083327|ref|XP_974883.1| PREDICTED: similar to 39S ribosomal protein L15, mitochondrial [Tribolium castaneum] FS914543 bmmt ...

  8. EST Table: FS803120 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS803120 E_FL_fmgV_11I07_F_0 10/09/28 74 %/111 aa ref|NP_001034501.1| extradenticle... [Tribolium castaneum] emb|CAD57734.1| extradenticle [Tribolium castaneum] 10/09/09 68 %/113 aa FBpp0123364|...XD_ANOGA 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 74 %/111 aa gi|38490515|emb|CAD57734.1| extradenticle [Tribolium castaneum] FS924788 fmgV ...

  9. EST Table: FS772493 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS772493 E_FL_fcaL_25K03_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/180 aa ref|NP_001040437.1| muscular prot...ein 20 [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51386.1| muscular protein 20 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/08 60 %/171 aa FBpp0235584|DvirG.../179 aa gi|91077564|ref|XP_972465.1| PREDICTED: similar to muscular protein 20 [Tribolium castaneum] FS765856 fcaL ...

  10. EST Table: FS781921 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS781921 E_FL_fcaL_39B11_R_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 50 %/189 aa ref|XP_001662178.1| ...A 10/09/10 44 %/172 aa gi|91078880|ref|XP_972914.1| PREDICTED: similar to THUMP domain-containing protein 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS781921 fcaL ...

  11. EST Table: FS932533 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS932533 E_FL_fwgP_34I10_F_0 10/09/28 96 %/124 aa ref|NP_001129358.1| osiris 21 [Bo...mbyx mori] gb|ACI23616.1| osiris 21 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS930345 fwgP ...

  12. EST Table: FS934649 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS934649 E_FL_fwgP_40K10_F_0 10/09/28 31 %/210 aa ref|NP_001129360.1| osiris 9 [Bom...byx mori] gb|ACI23620.1| osiris 9 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS923180 fwgP ...

  13. EST Table: FS853077 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS853077 E_FL_fner_45F16_F_0 10/09/28 78 %/203 aa ref|XP_001847239.1| arsenical pump-driving...: Full=Arsenite-stimulated ATPase; AltName: Full=Arsenical pump-driving ATPase homolog gb|EDS45868.1| arsenical pump-driving...5|ref|XP_974589.1| PREDICTED: similar to arsenical pump-driving atpase [Tribolium castaneum] FS918630 fner ...

  14. EST Table: FS813184 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS813184 E_FL_fmgV_39K08_F_0 10/09/28 76 %/238 aa ref|XP_970542.1| PREDICTED: similar to brix...B12626-PA 10/09/10 76 %/238 aa gi|91090402|ref|XP_970542.1| PREDICTED: similar to brix domain-containing protein 2 [Tribolium castaneum] FS911686 fmgV ...

  15. EST Table: FS911686 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS911686 E_FL_fufe_23P16_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 74 %/268 aa ref|XP_970542.1| PREDICTED: similar to brix...aa gnl|Amel|GB12626-PA 10/09/10 74 %/268 aa gi|91090402|ref|XP_970542.1| PREDICTED: similar to brix domain-containing protein 2 [Tribolium castaneum] FS911686 fufe ...

  16. EST Table: FS776725 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS776725 E_FL_fcaL_12C20_R_0 10/09/28 72 %/185 aa ref|XP_970542.1| PREDICTED: similar to brix...B12626-PA 10/09/10 72 %/185 aa gi|91090402|ref|XP_970542.1| PREDICTED: similar to brix domain-containing protein 2 [Tribolium castaneum] FS825195 fcaL ...

  17. EST Table: FS882477 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS882477 E_FL_ftes_24G17_F_0 10/09/28 78 %/195 aa ref|XP_001847239.1| arsenical pump-driving...: Full=Arsenite-stimulated ATPase; AltName: Full=Arsenical pump-driving ATPase homolog gb|EDS45868.1| arsenical pump-driving...5|ref|XP_974589.1| PREDICTED: similar to arsenical pump-driving atpase [Tribolium castaneum] FS918630 ftes ...

  18. EST Table: FS757860 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS757860 E_FL_fcaL_06I06_F_0 10/09/28 76 %/215 aa ref|XP_001847239.1| arsenical pump-driving...: Full=Arsenite-stimulated ATPase; AltName: Full=Arsenical pump-driving ATPase homolog gb|EDS45868.1| arsenical pump-driving...5|ref|XP_974589.1| PREDICTED: similar to arsenical pump-driving atpase [Tribolium castaneum] FS918630 fcaL ...

  19. EST Table: FS908977 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS908977 E_FL_fufe_15N16_F_0 10/09/28 76 %/277 aa ref|XP_001847239.1| arsenical pump-driving...: Full=Arsenite-stimulated ATPase; AltName: Full=Arsenical pump-driving ATPase homolog gb|EDS45868.1| arsenical pump-driving...5|ref|XP_974589.1| PREDICTED: similar to arsenical pump-driving atpase [Tribolium castaneum] FS918630 fufe ...

  20. EST Table: FS892222 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS892222 E_FL_ftes_06F11_R_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 50 %/224 aa ref|XP_395189.3| PRE...el|GB15458-PA 10/09/10 42 %/238 aa gi|91083381|ref|XP_967258.1| PREDICTED: similar to AGAP009881-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS892222 ftes ...

  1. The Efficacy of the Quorum Sensing Inhibitor FS8 and Tigecycline in Preventing Prosthesis Biofilm in an Animal Model of Staphylococcal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Giacometti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the efficacy of tigecycline and FS8, alone or combined, in preventing prosthesis biofilm in a rat model of staphylococcal vascular graft infection. Graft infections were established in the back subcutaneous tissue of adult male Wistar rats by implantation of Dacron prostheses followed by topical inoculation with 2 x 107 colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus, strain Smith diffuse. The study included a control group, a contaminated group that did not receive any antibiotic prophylaxis, and three contaminated groups that received: (i intraperitoneal tigecycline, (ii FS8-soaked graft, and (iii tigecycline plus FS8-soaked graft, respectively. Each group included 15 animals. The infection burden was evaluated by using sonication and quantitative agar culture. Moreover, an in vitro binding-study was performed to quantify the how much FS8 was coated to the surface of the prosthesis. Tigecycline, combined with FS8, against the adherent bacteria showed MICs (2.00 mg/L and MBCs (4.00 mg/L four-fold lower with respect to tigecycline alone in in vitro studies. The rat groups treated with tigecycline showed the lowest bacterial numbers (4.4 x 104 ± 1.2 x 104 CFU/mL. The FS8-treated group showed a good activity and significant differences compared to control group with bacterial numbers of 6.8 x 104 ± 2.0 x 104 CFU/mL. A stronger inhibition of bacterial growth was observed in rats treated with a combined FS8 and tigecycline therapy than in those that were singly treated with bacterial numbers of 101 CFU/mL graft. In conclusion, the ability to affect biofilm formation as well, its property to be an antibiotic enhancer suggests FS8 as alternative or additional agent to use in conjunction with conventional antimicrobial for prevention of staphylococcal biofilm related infection.

  2. Proposal and Development of a High Voltage Variable Frequency Alternating Current Power System for Hybrid Electric Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadey, David J.; Taylor, Linda M.; Beach, Raymond F.

    2017-01-01

    The development of ultra-efficient commercial vehicles and the transition to low-carbon emission propulsion are seen as strategic thrust paths within NASA Aeronautics. A critical enabler to these paths comes in the form of hybrid electric propulsion systems. For megawatt-class systems, the best power system topology for these hybrid electric propulsion systems is debatable. Current proposals within NASA and the Aero community suggest using a combination of alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) for power generation, transmission, and distribution. This paper proposes an alternative to the current thought model through the use of a primarily high voltage AC power system, supported by the Convergent Aeronautics Solutions (CAS) Project. This system relies heavily on the use of doubly-fed induction machines (DFIMs), which provide high power densities, minimal power conversion, and variable speed operation. The paper presents background on the activity along with the system architecture, development status, and preliminary results.

  3. Influenza Vaccine: Federal Investments in Alternative Technologies and Challenges to Development and Licensure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    late 1990s and early 2000s, detection of the H5N1 avian influenza (also known as “bird flu”) virus in animals raised concerns among experts that it or...of infection by, for example, the H5N1 avian influenza virus (also known as “bird flu”). Alternative technologies that can be used in producing...genes. Recombinant technology is currently used in U.S.-marketed vaccines against other diseases, such as hepatitis B and the human papillomavirus

  4. Alternative splicing modulates Disabled-1 (Dab1) function in the developing chick retina

    OpenAIRE

    Katyal, Sachin; Godbout, Roseline

    2004-01-01

    The Reelin–Disabled 1 (Dab1)-signaling pathway plays a critical role in neuronal cell positioning in the brain. We have isolated two alternatively spliced variants of Dab1 from chick retina, an early form (chDab1-E) expressed in undifferentiated cells and a late form (chDab1-L) expressed in amacrine and ganglion cells. A key difference between the two forms is the exclusion in chDab1-E of two Src-related tyrosine kinase recognition sites implicated in Reelin-mediated Dab1 tyrosine phosphoryla...

  5. Development and validation of an alternative disturbed skin model by mechanical abrasion to study drug penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Schlupp

    2014-01-01

    Skin permeation of the three substances was increased in tape-stripped and abraded skin compared to untreated skin due to the reduced barrier integrity. Enhancement of drug uptake was highest for the most hydrophilic substance, caffeine, followed by sorbic acid and lipophilic testosterone. No significant difference in drug uptake studies was observed between the new abrasion method with an aluminum-coated sponge and the tape-stripping method. The obtained results demonstrate that this abrasion method is an alternative way to achieve a disturbed skin barrier for drug and chemical uptake studies.

  6. Parametric Study to Characterize Low Activity Waste Tank Heat Removal Alternatives for Phase 1 Specification Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRENARD, C.E.

    2000-09-11

    Alternative for removing heat from Phase 1, low-activity waste feed double-shell tanks using the ventilation systems have been analyzed for Phase 1 waste feed delivery. The analysis was a parametric study using a model that predicted the waste temperatures for a range of primary and annulus ventilation system flow rates. The analysis was performed to determine the ventilation flow required to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding the Limiting Conditions for Operation limits during normal operation and the Safety Limits during off-normal events.

  7. Development of a permanent magnet alternative for a solenoidal ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, J.; Fahy, A.; Barr, M. [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Jardine, A.; Allison, W. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Dastoor, P.C., E-mail: Paul.Dastoor@newcastle.edu.au [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    The most sensitive desktop-sized ionizer utilising electron bombardment is currently the solenoidal ion source. We present an alternate design for such an ion source whereby the solenoidal windings of the electromagnet are replaced by a shaped cylindrical permanent magnet in order to reduce the complexity and running costs of the instrument. Through finite element modelling of the magnetic field in COMSOL and experimental measurements on a small-scale prototype magnet stack, we demonstrate the required shape of the permanent magnet in order to generate the needed field, and the necessity of soft iron collars to smooth fluctuations along the central axis.

  8. Pulse compression below 40fs at 1μm: The first step towards a short-pulse, high-energy beam line at LULI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Zou, Jiping; Martin, Luc; Simon, Francois; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Audebert, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    We present the upgrading project ELFIE (Equipement Laser de Forte Intensité et Energie) based on the "100TW" mixed Nd:glass CPA laser system at 1μm at LULI, which includes an energy enhancement and the development of a short-pulse, high-energy, good temporal contrast beam line (50fs/5J). We report the first experimental step towards the short-pulse, high-energy beam line: spectral broadening above 60nm from 7nm and temporal pulse compression below 40fs from 300fs at 1μm through a Krypton-filled hollow fiber compressor.

  9. Gene Regulation, Alternative Splicing, and Posttranslational Modification of Troponin Subunits in Cardiac Development and Adaptation: A Focused Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Juan eSheng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Troponin plays a central role in regulating the contraction and relaxation of vertebrate striated muscles. This review focuses on the isoform gene regulation, alternative RNA splicing, and posttranslational modifications of troponin subunits in cardiac development and adaptation. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations such as phosphorylation and proteolysis modifications, and structure-function relationships of troponin subunit proteins are summarized. The physiological and pathophysiological significances are discussed for impacts on cardiac muscle contractility, heart function, and adaptations in health and diseases.

  10. Development of alternative strategies for the control of the important phytopathogens Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) and Erwinia amylovora (Burrill)

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Within the framework of two projects, financed by DBU (Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt) and ProInno ("Förderung der Erhöhung der Innovationskompetenz mittelständischer Unternehmen"), respectively, in co-operation with an industrial partner, alternative phytosanitary compounds from natural sources have been screened. High throughput screening systems were developed and used for testing of large numbers of extracts of Actinomycetes in 96-well multiplates against Phytophthora infestans and Erwini...

  11. Gene regulation, alternative splicing, and posttranslational modification of troponin subunits in cardiac development and adaptation: a focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Juan-Juan; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Troponin plays a central role in regulating the contraction and relaxation of vertebrate striated muscles. This review focuses on the isoform gene regulation, alternative RNA splicing, and posttranslational modifications of troponin subunits in cardiac development and adaptation. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations such as phosphorylation and proteolysis modifications, and structure-function relationships of troponin subunit proteins are summarized. The physiological and pathophysiological significances are discussed for impacts on cardiac muscle contractility, heart function, and adaptations in health and diseases.

  12. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of WAG-2 alternative splicing transcripts in developing spikes of Aegilops tauschii

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SHUHONG WEI

    2016-09-01

    WAG-2 is a C-class MADS-box gene, which is orthologous to AGAMOUS (AG )inArabidopsis. The AG group C-classMADS-box genes are involved in stamen and pistil identity. In this study, two WAG-2 transcripts, namely, WAG-2f and WAG-2g, were isolated and characterized from Aegilops tauschii . The open reading frames of WAG-2f and WAG-2g were 825 and 822 bp, respectively, encoding 275 and 274 amino acid residues. BLAST searches of partial WAG-2 genomic sequence againstthe draft sequence of Ae. tauschii genome database revealed the complex structure of WAG-2 gene, which consisted of seven exons and six introns. TheWAG-2f and WAG-2g cDNAs were two alternative splicing transcripts. The alternative splicing events were produced by an alternative 5 ' splice site. The expression level of WAG-2f transcript, which was extremely weak inyoung spikes of floret primordium formation stage, increased as the spikes developed. The highest expression was observed in the spikes at the anther separation stage. Low expression levels of WAG-2f were also detected at the tetrad stage. The WAG-2g transcript was expressed at all four stages of spike development but at a relatively low level. The expression pattern of thetwo transcripts was distinctly different during floral development, thereby suggesting a functional divergence.

  13. Alternative development in Polystoma gallieni (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) and life cycle evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badets, Mathieu; Du Preez, Louis; Verneau, Olivier

    2013-10-01

    Considering the addition of intermediate transmission steps during life cycle evolution, developmental plasticity, canalization forces and inherited parental effect must be invoked to explain new host colonization. Unfortunately, there is a lack of experimental procedures and relevant models to explore the adaptive value of alternative developmental phenotypes during life cycle evolution. However, within the monogeneans that are characterized by a direct life cycle, an extension of the transmission strategy of amphibian parasites has been reported within species of Polystoma and Metapolystoma (Polyopisthocotylea; Polystomatidae). In this study, we tested whether the infection success of Polystoma gallieni within tadpoles of its specific host, the Stripeless Tree Frog Hyla meridionalis, differs depending on the parental origin of the oncomiracidium. An increase in the infection success of the parasitic larvae when exposed to the same experimental conditions as their parents was expected as an adaptive pattern of non-genetic inherited information. Twice as many parasites were actually recorded from tadpoles infected with oncomiracidia hatching from eggs of the bladder parental phenotype (1.63 ± 0.82 parasites per host) than from tadpoles infected with oncomiracidia hatching from eggs of the branchial parental phenotype (0.83 ± 0.64 parasites per host). Because in natural environments the alternation of the two phenotypes is likely to occur due to the ecology of its host, the differential infection success within young tadpoles could have an adaptive value that favors the parasite transmission over time.

  14. Alternative splicing modulates Disabled-1 (Dab1) function in the developing chick retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Sachin; Godbout, Roseline

    2004-01-01

    The Reelin–Disabled 1 (Dab1)-signaling pathway plays a critical role in neuronal cell positioning in the brain. We have isolated two alternatively spliced variants of Dab1 from chick retina, an early form (chDab1-E) expressed in undifferentiated cells and a late form (chDab1-L) expressed in amacrine and ganglion cells. A key difference between the two forms is the exclusion in chDab1-E of two Src-related tyrosine kinase recognition sites implicated in Reelin-mediated Dab1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Retinal cultures transfected with a chDab1-L expression construct undergo a dramatic change in morphology, accompanied by the formation of numerous thin elongated processes, increased tyrosine phosphorylation, activation of Src family kinase(s) and increased levels of the axonal outgrowth protein growth-associated protein-43. In contrast, chDab1-E transfectants retain an undifferentiated morphology. Mutational analysis implicates a specific tyrosine (tyr-198) in the morphological and biochemical alterations associated with chDab1-L expression. We propose that alternative splicing of chDab1 represents an effective and flexible way of regulating the Reelin–Dab1-signaling pathway in a mixed cell population, by ensuring that secreted Reelin activates the signaling cascade only in target neuronal cells. PMID:15057276

  15. POLITICAL ECONOMY AND PUBLIC POLICY OFMARGINALIZATION:ALTERNATIVE DEVELOPMENT, MULTILEVEL PLANNING AND DISADVANTAGED COMMUNITIES IN SLOVENIA AND CANADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja Durnik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Are alternative development models relevant in the context of revitalization of disadvantaged communities without the visible role of the state in building development strategies? In some reasonable conditions, the state has to carry out specific tasks which would guarantee marginalized communities to become a relevant partner in creating and establishing participatory development approaches. In many developed countries the inclusion schema is usually established but power relations are not reconstructed properly in a sense of a more fair cooperationbetweenthestateanddisadvantaged communities. The main goal of the present paper is to problematise development policies according to marginalized communities in Slovenia and Canada and to show which development principles from Canadian socio-economic praxis are revenant for Slovenian reality.

  16. Efficient chirped-pulse amplification of sub-20 fs laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, Shinichi; Yamakawa, Koichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    We have developed a model for ultrabroadband and ultrashort pulse amplification including the effects of a pulse shaper for regenerative pulse shaping, gain narrowing and gain saturation in the amplifiers. Thin solid etalons are used to control both gain narrowing and gain saturation during amplification. This model has been used to design an optimized Ti:sapphire amplifier system for producing efficiently pulses of < 20-fs duration with approaching peak and average powers of 100 TW and 20 W. (author)

  17. PCDD/FS EMISSION IN A 150T/D MSW AND COAL CO-FIRING FLUIDIZED BED INCINERATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Incineration as a method of reducing Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) volume and recovery of energy has been developed gradually in China. More attention is paid on polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) formed in MSW incineration process. This paper presents results of the analysis of PCDD/Fs in the residues of a fluidized bed incinerator co-firing MSW and coal in the Yuhang Thermal Power Plant. The effects of operation conditions and the wet scrubber system on PCDD/Fs formation were also analyzed. PCDD/Fs emitting from the smoke stack was 0.92 I-TEQ ng/Nm3. After the wet scrubber emission of dioxins increased and the shifting of homologue profiles in flue gas was also observed, PCDFs were not detected in the incinerator residues. From this, we can see that in the MSW incineration process, the formation mechanism of PCDFs was different from that of PCDDs. The results will benefit further research on the optimal operation of incinerator and control of PCDD/Fs emission from the MSW incinerator.

  18. Theoretical model of superconducting spintronic SIsFS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakurskiy, S. V.; Klenov, N. V.; Soloviev, I. I.; Bol'ginov, V. V.; Ryazanov, V. V.; Vernik, I. V.; Mukhanov, O. A.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Golubov, A. A.

    2013-05-01

    Motivated by recent progress in the development of cryogenic memory compatible with single flux quantum (SFQ) circuits, we have performed a theoretical study of magnetic SIsFS Josephson junctions, where "S" is a bulk superconductor, "s" is a thin superconducting film, "F" is a metallic ferromagnet, and "I" is an insulator. We calculate the Josephson current as a function of s and F layers thickness, temperature, and exchange energy of F film. We outline several modes of operation of these junctions and demonstrate their unique ability to have large product of a critical current IC and a normal-state resistance RN in the π state, comparable to that in superconductor-insulator-superconductor tunnel junctions commonly used in SFQ circuits. We develop a model describing switching of the Josephson critical current in these devices by external magnetic field. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data for Nb-Al/AlOx-Nb-Pd0.99Fe0.01-Nb junctions.

  19. Bacterial signal transduction networks via connectors and development of the inhibitors as alternative antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial cells possess a signal transduction system that differs from those described in higher organisms, including human cells. These so-called two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) consist of a sensor (histidine kinase, HK) and a response regulator, and are involved in cellular functions, such as virulence, drug resistance, biofilm formation, cell wall synthesis, cell division. They are conserved in bacteria across all species. Although TCSs are often studied and characterized individually, they are assumed to interact with each other and form signal transduction networks within the cell. In this review, I focus on the formation of TCS networks via connectors. I also explore the possibility of using TCS inhibitors, especially HK inhibitors, as alternative antimicrobial agents.

  20. The West Central Alberta Woodland Caribou Landscape Plan: Using a Modeling Approach to Develop Alternative Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Hubbs

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus are classified as threatened in Alberta. In support of Canada's Species at Risk Act, a Recovery Plan for Woodland Caribou in Alberta was completed in 2004 which required local implementation plans to be completed within 5 areas of the province. The West Central Alberta Caribou Landscape Plan (WCCLP is the first of these to be initiated and it addresses the recovery strategies for 4 herds. Two aspatial computer models built on the STELLA© modelling platform (ISee Systems, 2007 were used to assist the planning team in evaluating cumulative effects and alternative scenarios for caribou conservation. The ALCES© (Forem Technologies 2008 modelling tool was used to forecast potential changes in the west central Alberta landscape over time. Yearly landscape condition outputs from ALCES© were then exported into a caribou-specific population model, REMUS© (Weclaw, 2004, that was used to project potential population responses by woodland caribou, other primary prey species [moose (Alces alces, elk (Cervus elaphus and deer (Odocoileus sp.] and wolves (Canis lupus (Weclaw & Hudson, 2004. Simulated habitat management strategies that resulted in the highest likelihood of caribou recovery included the maintenance of a high proportion of old forest, the aggregation of industrial footprints and the reclamation of historic seismic lines (although the latter took decades to provide real dividends. Sharing of industrial roads, protection of fragments of old-growth, and expanding an already aggressive fire control strategy in Alberta had little additional effect on caribou recovery. Simulated population management strategies that were successful all involved decades of intensive wolf control, either directly or indirectly through intensive primary prey control (with the exception of woodland caribou until old-growth forests recovered to densities that provided caribou habitat and decreased alternate prey of wolves. Although