WorldWideScience

Sample records for frequency resolved spectroscopy

  1. Rapid and economical data acquisition in ultrafast frequency-resolved spectroscopy using choppers and a microcontroller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang; Monahan, Daniele M; Fleming, Graham

    2016-08-08

    Spectrometers and cameras are used in ultrafast spectroscopy to achieve high resolution in both time and frequency domains. Frequency-resolved signals from the camera pixels cannot be processed by common lock-in amplifiers, which have only a limited number of input channels. Here we demonstrate a rapid and economical method that achieves the function of a lock-in amplifier using mechanical choppers and a programmable microcontroller. We demonstrate the method's effectiveness by performing a frequency-resolved pump-probe measurement on the dye Nile Blue in solution.

  2. Space-resolved characterization of high frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma in nitrogen, applying optical emission spectroscopy and numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekaran, Priyadarshini; Ruhrmann, Cornelia; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Averaged plasma parameters such as electron distribution function and electron density are determined by characterization of high frequency (2.4 GHz) nitrogen plasma using both experimental methods, namely optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and microphotography, and numerical simulation. Both direct and step-wise electron-impact excitation of nitrogen emissions are considered. The determination of space-resolved electron distribution function, electron density, rate constant for electron-impact dissociation of nitrogen molecule and the production of nitrogen atoms, applying the same methods, is discussed. Spatial distribution of intensities of neutral nitrogen molecule and nitrogen molecular ion from the microplasma is imaged by a CCD camera. The CCD images are calibrated using the corresponding emissions measured by absolutely calibrated OES, and are then subjected to inverse Abel transformation to determine space-resolved intensities and other parameters. The space-resolved parameters are compared, respectively, with the averaged parameters, and an agreement between them is established. (paper)

  3. Time-resolved ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckert, D.

    1986-06-01

    The time-resolved ESR spectroscopy is one of the modern methods in radiospectroscopy and plays an important role in solving various problems in chemistry and biology. Proceeding from the basic ideas of time-resolved ESR spectroscopy the experimental equipment is described generally including the equipment developed at the Central Institute of Isotope and Radiation Research. The experimental methods applied to the investigation of effects of chemically induced magnetic polarization of electrons and to kinetic studies of free radicals in polymer systems are presented. The theory of radical pair mechanism is discussed and theoretical expressions are summarized in a computer code to compute the theoretical polarization for each pair of the radicals

  4. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  5. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  6. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since 1997 we systematically perform direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on in-situ grown thin (< 30 nm) cuprate films. Specifically, we probe low-energy electronic structure and properties of high-c superconductors (HTSC) under different degrees of epitaxial (compressive vs. tensile) strain.

  7. Time-resolved spectroscopy in synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, V.; Stanford Univ., CA

    1980-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) from large-diameter storage rings has intrinsic time structure which facilitates time-resolved measurements form milliseconds to picoseconds and possibly below. The scientific importance of time-resolved measurements is steadily increasing as more and better techniques are discovered and applied to a wider variety of scientific problems. This paper presents a discussion of the importance of various parameters of the SR facility in providing for time-resolved spectroscopy experiments, including the role of beam-line optical design parameters. Special emphasis is placed on the requirements of extremely fast time-resolved experiments with which the effects of atomic vibrational or relaxation motion may be studied. Before discussing the state-of-the-art timing experiments, we review several types of time-resolved measurements which have now become routine: nanosecond-range fluorescence decay times, time-resolved emission and excitation spectroscopies, and various time-of-flight applications. These techniques all depend on a short SR pulse length and a long interpulse period, such as is provided by a large-diameter ring operating in a single-bunch mode. In most cases, the pulse shape and even the stability of the pulse shape is relatively unimportant as long as the pulse length is smaller than the risetime of the detection apparatus, typically 1 to 2 ns. For time resolution smaller than 1 ns, the requirements on the pulse shape become more stringent. (orig./FKS)

  8. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with optimized high-harmonic pulses using frequency-doubled Ti:Sapphire lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eich, S.; Stange, A.; Carr, A.V.; Urbancic, J.; Popmintchev, T.; Wiesenmayer, M.; Jansen, K.; Ruffing, A.; Jakobs, S.; Rohwer, T.; Hellmann, S.; Chen, C.; Matyba, P.; Kipp, L.; Rossnagel, K.; Bauer, M.; Murnane, M.M.; Kapteyn, H.C.; Mathias, S.; Aeschlimann, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a scheme to generate high intensity XUV pulses from HHG with variable time-bandwidth product. • Shorter-wavelength driven high-harmonic XUV trARPES provides higher photon flux and increased energy resolution. • High-quality high-harmonic XUV trARPES data with sub 150 meV energy and sub 30 fs time resolution is presented. - Abstract: Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet high harmonics has recently emerged as a powerful tool for investigating ultrafast quasiparticle dynamics in correlated-electron materials. However, the full potential of this approach has not yet been achieved because, to date, high harmonics generated by 800 nm wavelength Ti:Sapphire lasers required a trade-off between photon flux, energy and time resolution. Photoemission spectroscopy requires a quasi-monochromatic output, but dispersive optical elements that select a single harmonic can significantly reduce the photon flux and time resolution. Here we show that 400 nm driven high harmonic extreme-ultraviolet trARPES is superior to using 800 nm laser drivers since it eliminates the need for any spectral selection, thereby increasing photon flux and energy resolution to <150 meV while preserving excellent time resolution of about 30 fs

  9. Laser Spectroscopy and Frequency Combs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of a frequency comb, commonly generated by a mode-locked femtosecond laser consists of several hundred thousand precisely evenly spaced spectral lines. Such laser frequency combs have revolutionized the art measuring the frequency of light, and they provide the long-missing clockwork for optical atomic clocks. The invention of the frequency comb technique has been motivated by precision laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom. The availability of commercial instruments is facilitating the evolution of new applications far beyond the original purpose. Laser combs are becoming powerful instruments for broadband molecular spectroscopy by dramatically improving the resolution and recording speed of Fourier spectrometers and by creating new opportunities for highly multiplexed nonlinear spectroscopy, such as two-photon spectroscopy or coherent Raman spectroscopy. Other emerging applications of frequency combs range from fundamental research in astronomy, chemistry, or attosecond science to telecommunications and satellite navigation

  10. Examining Electron-Boson Coupling Using Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentef, Michael; Kemper, Alexander F.; Moritz, Brian; Freericks, James K.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Devereaux, Thomas P.

    2013-12-26

    Nonequilibrium pump-probe time-domain spectroscopies can become an important tool to disentangle degrees of freedom whose coupling leads to broad structures in the frequency domain. Here, using the time-resolved solution of a model photoexcited electron-phonon system, we show that the relaxational dynamics are directly governed by the equilibrium self-energy so that the phonon frequency sets a window for “slow” versus “fast” recovery. The overall temporal structure of this relaxation spectroscopy allows for a reliable and quantitative extraction of the electron-phonon coupling strength without requiring an effective temperature model or making strong assumptions about the underlying bare electronic band dispersion.

  11. Comb-Resolved Dual-Comb Spectroscopy Stabilized by Free-Running Continuous-Wave Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuse, Naoya; Ozawa, Akira; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate dual-comb spectroscopy with relatively phase-locked two frequency combs, instead of frequency combs firmly fixed to the absolute frequency references. By stabilizing two beat frequencies between two mode-locked lasers at different wavelengths observed via free-running continuous-wave (CW) lasers, two combs are tightly phase locked to each other. The frequency noise of the CW lasers barely affects the performance of dual-comb spectroscopy because of the extremely fast common-mode noise rejection. Transform-limited comb-resolved dual-comb spectroscopy with a 6 Hz radio frequency linewidth is demonstrated by the use of Yb-fiber oscillators.

  12. Continuous time-resolved regional methane leak detection with on-line background estimation using a novel combination of dual frequency comb laser spectroscopy and atmospheric inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, C. B.; Coburn, S.; Wright, R.; Baumann, E.; Cossel, K.; Sweeney, C.; Ghosh, S.; Newbury, N.; Prasad, K.; Coddington, I.; Rieker, G. B.

    2017-12-01

    Advances in natural gas extraction technology have led to increased US production and transport activity, and as a consequence, an increased need for monitoring of methane leaks. Current leak detection methods provide time snapshots, and not continuous, time-varying estimates of emissions. Most approaches also require specific atmospheric conditions, operators, or the use of a tracer gas, requiring site access. Given known intermittency in fugitive methane emissions, continuous monitoring is a critical need for emissions mitigation. We present a novel leak detection method that employs dual frequency comb spectrometry to offer continuous, autonomous, leak detection and quantification over square-km scale areas. The spectrometer is situated in a field of natural gas pads, and a series of retroreflectors around the field direct light back to a detector. The laser light spans 1620-1680 nm with 0.002 nm line spacing, measuring thousands of individual absorption features from multiple species. The result is high-stability trace gas (here CH4, CO2, and H2O) measurements over long (1 km+) open paths through the atmosphere. Measurements are used in an atmospheric inversion to estimate the time variability of emissions at each location of interest. Importantly, the measurement framework and inversion solve explicitly for background concentrations, which vary rapidly in fields of active oil and gas production. We present the results of controlled-leak field tests in rural Colorado. We demonstrate the ability to locate and size a leak located 1 km away from the spectrometer and varying in strength from 1.5 to 7.7 g/min, resulting in mean atmospheric enhancements of 20 ppb. The inversion correctly identifies when the leak turned on and off over a 24-hour period, and determines the mean leak strength to within 10% of the true controlled rate. We further demonstrate the ability of the system to correctly locate and size the start and end of simultaneous 2.7 to 4.8 g/min leaks

  13. Orbital Evolution and Orbital Phase Resolved Spectroscopy of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    binary. We have carried out orbital phase resolved spectroscopy to mea- ... agreement with a simple model of a spherically symmetric stellar wind from the .... has a set of Narrow Field Instruments (NFI) comprising one Low Energy Concen-.

  14. Spatially resolved spectroscopy on semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roessler, Johanna

    2009-02-20

    Cleared edge overgrowth (CEO) nanostructures are identified and studied by 1D und 2D {mu}PL mapping scans and by time-resolved and power-dependent measurements. Distinct excitonic ground states of 2fold CEO QDs with large localization energies are achieved. The deeper localization reached as compared to the only other report on 2fold CEO QDs in literature is attributed to a new strain-free fabrication process and changed QW thickness in [001] growth. In order to achieve controlled manipulation of 2fold CEO QDs the concept of a CEO structure with three top gates and one back gate is presented. Due to the complexity of this device, a simpler test structure is realized. Measurements on this test structure confirm the necessity to either grow significantly thicker overgrowth layers or to provide separate top gates in all three spatial direction to controllably manipulate 2fold CEO QDs with an external electric field. (orig.)

  15. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  16. Frequency-resolved pump-probe characterization of femtosecond infrared pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeremenko, S.; Baltuška, A.; Haan, F. de; Pshenichnikov, M.S.; Wiersma, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    A novel method for ultrashort IR pulse characterization is presented. The technique utilizes a frequency-resolved pump-probe geometry that is common in applications of ultrafast spectroscopy, without any modifications of the setup. The experimental demonstration of the method was carried out to

  17. Time resolved spectroscopy of GRB 030501 using INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, V.; Borkowski, J.; Courvoisier, T.J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The gamma-ray instruments on-board INTEGRAL offer an unique opportunity to perform time resolved analysis on GRBs. The imager IBIS allows accurate positioning of GRBs and broad band spectral analysis, while SPI provides high resolution spectroscopy. GRB 030501 was discovered by the INTEGRAL Burst...... the Ulysses and RHESSI experiments....

  18. Energy- and angled-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegg, D.J.; Thompson, J.S.; Compton, R.N.; Alton, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Energy- and angle-resolved photoelectron detachment spectroscopy is currently being used to investigate the structure of negative ions and their interaction with radiation. Measurements of the electron affinity of the Ca atom and the partial cross sections for photodetachment of the metastable negative ion, He - (1s2s2p 4 P), are reported. 5 refs., 5 figs

  19. Recent trends in spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Taichi

    2017-12-01

    Since the discovery of the Rashba effect on crystal surfaces and also the discovery of topological insulators, spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) has become more and more important, as the technique can measure directly the electronic band structure of materials with spin resolution. In the same way that the discovery of high-Tc superconductors promoted the development of high-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, the discovery of this new class of materials has stimulated the development of new SARPES apparatus with new functions and higher resolution, such as spin vector analysis, ten times higher energy and angular resolution than conventional SARPES, multichannel spin detection, and so on. In addition, the utilization of vacuum ultra violet lasers also opens a pathway to the realization of novel SARPES measurements. In this review, such recent trends in SARPES techniques and measurements will be overviewed.

  20. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik

    This thesis describes time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurements on various semiconductor nanostructures. The aim is to study the carrier dynamics in these nanostructures on a picosecond timescale. In a typical experiment carriers are excited with a visible or near-infrared pulse and by me......This thesis describes time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurements on various semiconductor nanostructures. The aim is to study the carrier dynamics in these nanostructures on a picosecond timescale. In a typical experiment carriers are excited with a visible or near-infrared pulse...... and by measuring the transmission of a terahertz probe pulse, the photoconductivity of the excited sample can be obtained. By changing the relative arrival time at the sample between the pump and the probe pulse, the photoconductivity dynamics can be studied on a picosecond timescale. The rst studied semiconductor...

  1. Frequency-agile dual-comb spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Millot, Guy; Pitois, Stéphane; Yan, Ming; Hovannysyan, Tatevik; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach to near-infrared molecular spectroscopy, harnessing advanced concepts of optical telecommunications and supercontinuum photonics. We generate, without mode-locked lasers, two frequency combs of slightly different repetition frequencies and moderate, but rapidly tunable, spectral span. The output of a frequency-agile continuous wave laser is split and sent into two electro-optic intensity modulators. Flat-top low-noise frequency combs are produced by wave-breaking in ...

  2. Emerging biomedical applications of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Koen, Peter A.

    1994-07-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy is presently regarded as a research tool in biochemistry, biophysics, and chemical physics. Advances in laser technology, the development of long-wavelength probes, and the use of lifetime-based methods are resulting in the rapid migration of time-resolved fluorescence to the clinical chemistry lab, to the patient's bedside, to flow cytometers, to the doctor's office, and even to home health care. Additionally, time-resolved imaging is now a reality in fluorescence microscopy, and will provide chemical imaging of a variety of intracellular analytes and/or cellular phenomena. In this overview paper we attempt to describe some of the opportunities available using chemical sensing based on fluorescence lifetimes, and to predict those applications of lifetime-based sensing which are most likely in the near future.

  3. Covariance J-resolved spectroscopy: Theory and application in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zohaib; Verma, Gaurav; Kumar, Anand; Thomas, M Albert

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a powerful tool capable of investigating the metabolic status of several tissues in vivo. In particular, single-voxel-based 1 H spectroscopy provides invaluable biochemical information from a volume of interest (VOI) and has therefore been used in a variety of studies. Unfortunately, typical one-dimensional MRS data suffer from severe signal overlap and thus important metabolites are difficult to distinguish. One method that is used to disentangle overlapping resonances is the two-dimensional J-resolved spectroscopy (JPRESS) experiment. Due to the long acquisition duration of the JPRESS experiment, a limited number of points are acquired in the indirect dimension, leading to poor spectral resolution along this dimension. Poor spectral resolution is problematic because proper peak assignment may be hindered, which is why the zero-filling method is often used to improve resolution as a post-processing step. However, zero-filling leads to spectral artifacts, which may affect visualization and quantitation of spectra. A novel method utilizing a covariance transformation, called covariance J-resolved spectroscopy (CovJ), was developed in order to improve spectral resolution along the indirect dimension (F 1 ). Comparison of simulated data demonstrates that peak structures remain qualitatively similar between JPRESS and the novel method along the diagonal region (F 1 = 0 Hz), whereas differences arise in the cross-peak (F 1 ≠0 Hz) regions. In addition, quantitative results of in vivo JPRESS data acquired on a 3T scanner show significant correlations (r 2 >0.86, pCOVariance Spectral Evaluation of 1 H Acquisitions using Representative prior knowledge' (Cov-SEHAR), was developed in order to quantify γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate from the CovJ spectra. These preliminary findings indicate that the CovJ method may be used to improve spectral resolution without hindering metabolite quantitation for J-resolved spectra

  4. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of nitrobenzene and its aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, Oliver; Townsend, Dave; Wolf, Thomas J. A.; Holland, David M. P.; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E.; Szöri, Milan; Stolow, Albert

    2018-01-01

    We report the first femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy study of 2-, 3- and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde (NBA) and nitrobenzene (NBE) in the gas phase upon excitation at 200 nm. In 3- and 4-NBA, the dynamics follow fast intersystem crossing within 1-2 picoseconds. In 2-NBA and NBE, the dynamics are faster (∼ 0.5 ps). 2-NBA undergoes hydrogen transfer similar to solution phase dynamics. NBE either releases NO2 in the excited state or converts internally back to the ground state. We discuss why these channels are suppressed in the other nitrobenzaldehydes.

  5. Time-resolved spectroscopy defines perturbation in molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.

    1998-01-01

    Time-resolved LIF spectroscopy is employed in order to investigate perturbations in different excited electronic state of alkali molecules. Dunham Coefficients are used to search the selected excited ro-vibrational level, which is overlap with the other nearby excited states. Lifetime measurement has been performed of more than 50 ro-vibrational levels. Out of these 25 levels were observed drastically different lifetimes from the other unperturbed levels. In this report, influence of different perturbations on this anomalous behavior is investigated and discussed. (author)

  6. Resolving molecular vibronic structure using high-sensitivity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizimana, Laurie A.; Brazard, Johanna; Carbery, William P.; Gellen, Tobias; Turner, Daniel B., E-mail: dturner@nyu.edu [Department of Chemistry, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York, New York 10003 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is an emerging technique for resolving structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecules, proteins, semiconductors, and other materials. A current challenge is the quality of kinetics that are examined as a function of waiting time. Inspired by noise-suppression methods of transient absorption, here we incorporate shot-by-shot acquisitions and balanced detection into coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy. We demonstrate that implementing noise-suppression methods in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy not only improves the quality of features in individual spectra but also increases the sensitivity to ultrafast time-dependent changes in the spectral features. Measurements on cresyl violet perchlorate are consistent with the vibronic pattern predicted by theoretical models of a highly displaced harmonic oscillator. The noise-suppression methods should benefit research into coherent electronic dynamics, and they can be adapted to multidimensional spectroscopies across the infrared and ultraviolet frequency ranges.

  7. Direct Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Alkali Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhananga, Trinity; Palm, Christopher; Nguyen, Khoa; Guttikonda, Srikanth; Kimball, Derek Jackson

    2011-11-01

    We are using direct frequency comb spectroscopy to study transition frequencies and excited state hyperfine structure in potassium and rubidium using 2-photon transitions excited directly with the frequency-doubled output of a erbium fiber optical frequency comb. The frequency comb output is directed in two counterpropagating directions through a vapor cell containing the atomic vapor of interest. A pair of optical filters is used to select teeth of the comb in order to identify the transition wavelengths. A photomultiplier tube (PMT) measures fluorescence from a decay channel wavelength selected with another optical filter. Using different combinations of filters enables a wide range of transitions to be investigated. By scanning the repetition rate, a Doppler-free spectrum can be obtained enabling kHz-resolution spectral measurements. The thermal motion of the atoms in the vapor cell actually eliminates the need to fine-tune the offset frequency and repetition rate, alleviating a somewhat challenging requirement for spectroscopy of cold atoms. Our investigations are laying the groundwork for a long-term research program to use direct frequency comb spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms.

  8. Plasma polarization spectroscopy. Time resolved spectroscopy in soft x-ray region on recombining plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamae, Atsushi; Hasuo, Masahiro; Atake, Makoto; Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental study of polarization of emission radiations from recombining plasmas generated by the interaction of 60 fs ultra-short laser pulses with a gas jet. Time-resolved spectroscopy with a temporal resolution of 5 ps with repetitive accumulation is used to follow the recombination time histories. (author)

  9. Mid-Infrared Frequency-Agile Dual-Comb Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Pei-Ling; Yan, Ming; Iwakuni, Kana; Millot, Guy; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a new approach to mid-infrared dual-comb spectroscopy. It opens up new opportunities for accurate real-time spectroscopic diagnostics and it significantly simplifies the technique of dual-comb spectroscopy. Two mid-infrared frequency combs of slightly different repetition frequencies and moderate, but rapidly tunable, spectral span are generated in the 2800-3200 cm-1 region. The generators rely on electro-optic modulators, nonlinear fibers for spectral broadening and difference frequency generation and do not involve mode-locked lasers. Flat-top frequency combs span up to 10 cm-1 with a comb line spacing of 100 MHz (3×10-3 cm-1). The performance of the spectrometer without any phase-lock electronics or correction scheme is illustrated with spectra showing resolved comb lines and Doppler-limited spectra of methane. High precision on the spectroscopic parameter (line positions and intensities) determination is demonstrated for spectra measured on a millisecond time scale and it is validated with comparison with literature data. G. Millot, S. Pitois, M. Yan, T. Hovannysyan, A. Bendahmane, T.W. Hänsch, N. Picqué, Frequency-agile dual-comb spectroscopy, Nature Photonics 10, 27-30 (2016).

  10. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on iron-chalcogenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maletz, Janek; Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr; Evtushinsky, Daniil; Thirupathaiah, Setti; Wolter-Giraud, Anja; Harnagea, Luminita; Kordyuk, Alexander; Borisenko, Sergey [IFW Dresden (Germany); Yaresko, Alexander [MPI-FKF, Stuttgart (Germany); Vasiliev, Alexander [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Chareev, Dimitri [RAS, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Rienks, Emile [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Buechner, Bernd [IFW Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden (Germany); Shermadini, Zurab; Luetkens, Hubertus; Sedlak, Kamil; Khasanov, Rustem; Amato, Alex; Krzton-Maziopa, Anna; Conder, Kazimierz; Pomjakushina, Ekaterina [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Klauss, Hans-Henning [TU Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The electronic structure of the iron chalcogenide superconductors FeSe{sub 1-x} and Rb{sub 0.77}Fe{sub 1.61}Se{sub 2} was investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The results were compared to DFT calculations and μSR measurements. Both compounds share ''cigar-shaped'' Fermi surface sheets in their electronic structure, that can be found in almost all iron-pnictide superconductors. These features originate from a strong interplay of two hole- and electron-like bands in the Brillouin zone center, leading to a pronounced singularity in the density of states just below the Fermi level. This facilitates the coupling to a bosonic mode responsible for superconductivity.

  11. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of formaldehyde and methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, P. R.; Taylor, J. W.; Grimm, F. A.; Carlson, Thomas A.

    1984-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy was employed to obtain the angular distribution parameter, β, for the valence orbitals (IP < 21.1 eV) of formaldehyde and methanol over the 10-30 eV photon energy range using dispersed polarized synchrotron radiation as the excitation source. It was found that the energy dependence of β in the photoelectron energy range between 2 and 10 eV can be related to the molecular-orbital type from which ionization occurs. This generalized energy behavior is discussed with regard to earlier energy-dependence studies on molecules of different orbital character. Evidence is presented for the presence of resonance photoionization phenomena in formaldehyde in agreement with theoretical cross-section calculations.

  12. Dual time-resolved temperature-jump fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy for the study of fast protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Caitlin M; Reddish, Michael J; Dyer, R Brian

    2017-05-05

    Time-resolved temperature-jump (T-jump) coupled with fluorescence and infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for monitoring protein dynamics. Although IR spectroscopy of the polypeptide amide I mode is more technically challenging, it offers complementary information because it directly probes changes in the protein backbone, whereas, fluorescence spectroscopy is sensitive to the environment of specific side chains. With the advent of widely tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) it is possible to efficiently probe multiple IR frequencies with high sensitivity and reproducibility. Here we describe a dual time-resolved T-jump fluorescence and IR spectrometer and its application to study protein folding dynamics. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser provides the T-jump source for both time-resolved IR and fluorescence spectroscopy, which are probed by a QCL and Ti:Sapphire laser, respectively. The Ho:YAG laser simultaneously pumps the time-resolved IR and fluorescence spectrometers. The instrument has high sensitivity, with an IR absorbance detection limit of jump induced difference spectrum from 50ns to 0.5ms. This study demonstrates the power of the dual time-resolved T-jump fluorescence and IR spectroscopy to resolve complex folding mechanisms by complementary IR absorbance and fluorescence measurements of protein dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Atomic column resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duscher, G.; Pennycook, S.J.; Browning, N.D.

    1998-01-01

    Spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is rapidly developing into a unique and powerful tool to characterize internal interfaces. Because atomic column resolved Z-contrast imaging can be performed simultaneously with EELS in the scanning transmission electron microscope, this combination allows the atomic structure to be correlated with the electronic structure, and thus the local properties of interfaces or defects can be determined directly. However, the ability to characterize interfaces and defects at that level requires not only high spatial resolution but also the exact knowledge of the beam location, from where the spectrum is obtained. Here we discuss several examples progressing from cases where the limitation in spatial resolution is given by the microscopes or the nature of the sample, to one example of impurity atoms at a grain boundary, which show intensity and fine structure changes from atomic column to atomic column. Such data can be interpreted as changes in valence of the impurity, depending on its exact site in the boundary plane. Analysis ofthis nature is a valuable first step in understanding the microscopic structural, optical and electronic properties of materials. (orig.)

  14. Pulsed-High Field/High-Frequency EPR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhs, Michael; Moebius, Klaus

    Pulsed high-field/high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is used to disentangle many kinds of different effects often obscured in continuous wave (cw) EPR spectra at lower magnetic fields/microwave frequencies. While the high magnetic field increases the resolution of G tensors and of nuclear Larmor frequencies, the high frequencies allow for higher time resolution for molecular dynamics as well as for transient paramagnetic intermediates studied with time-resolved EPR. Pulsed EPR methods are used for example for relaxation-time studies, and pulsed Electron Nuclear DOuble Resonance (ENDOR) is used to resolve unresolved hyperfine structure hidden in inhomogeneous linewidths. In the present article we introduce the basic concepts and selected applications to structure and mobility studies on electron transfer systems, reaction centers of photosynthesis as well as biomimetic models. The article concludes with an introduction to stochastic EPR which makes use of an other concept for investigating resonance systems in order to increase the excitation bandwidth of pulsed EPR. The limited excitation bandwidth of pulses at high frequency is one of the main limitations which, so far, made Fourier transform methods hardly feasible.

  15. Near-Infrared Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy for Tablet Quality Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igne, Benoît; Talwar, Sameer; Feng, Hanzhou; Drennen, James K; Anderson, Carl A

    2015-12-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has become a well-established tool for the characterization of solid oral dosage forms manufacturing processes and finished products. In this work, the utility of a traditional single-point NIR measurement was compared with that of a spatially resolved spectroscopic (SRS) measurement for the determination of tablet assay. Experimental designs were used to create samples that allowed for calibration models to be developed and tested on both instruments. Samples possessing a poor distribution of ingredients (highly heterogeneous) were prepared by under-blending constituents prior to compaction to compare the analytical capabilities of the two NIR methods. The results indicate that SRS can provide spatial information that is usually obtainable only through imaging experiments for the determination of local heterogeneity and detection of abnormal tablets that would not be detected with single-point spectroscopy, thus complementing traditional NIR measurement systems for in-line, and in real-time tablet analysis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  16. Spatially resolved NEXAFS spectroscopy of siderophores in biological matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieme, J; Kilcoyne, D; Tyliszczak, T; Haselwandter, K

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for almost all forms of life. In the presence of oxygen iron is present in its ferric form which precipitates under formation of rather insoluble oxide-hydroxide polymers. Hence the bioavailability of iron is extremely low ( −17 M at pH 7 for Fe 3+ ). Under such conditions almost all microorganisms synthesize siderophores as iron chelating agents, thus solubilizing ferric iron from rather insoluble iron sources. Siderophores form soluble complexes with Fe 3+ . The present study aims at developing a methodology that would allow for the specific detection and localization of such iron chelators in their natural environment. The applicability of spatially resolved NEXAFS spectroscopy in the soft X-ray energy (E < 1 keV) range was evaluated for localization of typical fungal hydroxamate siderophores like ferrichrome or coprogen, which can be present in various biological materials. Results obtained with the scanning transmission X-ray microscopes at beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2 of the ALS have shown characteristic signatures for siderophores. Thus NEXAFS spectroscopy at the carbon K-edge, nitrogen K-edge and iron L-edge with high spatial resolution has proven to be extremely useful for their identification in their natural environment. Spectra of different siderophores as well as spectra and images of biological material containing siderophores are presented

  17. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with quantum gas microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrdt, A.; Greif, D.; Demler, E.; Knap, M.; Grusdt, F.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum gas microscopes are a promising tool to study interacting quantum many-body systems and bridge the gap between theoretical models and real materials. So far, they were limited to measurements of instantaneous correlation functions of the form 〈O ̂(t ) 〉 , even though extensions to frequency-resolved response functions 〈O ̂(t ) O ̂(0 ) 〉 would provide important information about the elementary excitations in a many-body system. For example, single-particle spectral functions, which are usually measured using photoemission experiments in electron systems, contain direct information about fractionalization and the quasiparticle excitation spectrum. Here, we propose a measurement scheme to experimentally access the momentum and energy-resolved spectral function in a quantum gas microscope with currently available techniques. As an example for possible applications, we numerically calculate the spectrum of a single hole excitation in one-dimensional t -J models with isotropic and anisotropic antiferromagnetic couplings. A sharp asymmetry in the distribution of spectral weight appears when a hole is created in an isotropic Heisenberg spin chain. This effect slowly vanishes for anisotropic spin interactions and disappears completely in the case of pure Ising interactions. The asymmetry strongly depends on the total magnetization of the spin chain, which can be tuned in experiments with quantum gas microscopes. An intuitive picture for the observed behavior is provided by a slave-fermion mean-field theory. The key properties of the spectra are visible at currently accessible temperatures.

  18. Ultrafast optical responses of {beta}-carotene and lycopene probed by sub-20-fs time-resolved coherent spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, M.; Sugisaki, M. [CREST-JST and Department of Physics, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Gall, A.; Robert, B. [CEA, Institut de Biologie et Technologies de Saclay, and CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Cogdell, R.J. [IBLS, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hashimoto, H., E-mail: hassy@sci.osaka-cu.ac.j [CREST-JST and Department of Physics, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    We investigate how structural distortions in carotenoid cause decoherences of its high-frequency vibrational modes by applying the sub-20-fs time-resolved transient grating spectroscopy to {beta}-carotene and lycopene. The results indicate that the C=C central stretching mode shows significant loss of coherence under the effects of the steric hindrance between {beta}-ionone ring and polyene backbone, whereas the other high-frequency modes do not show such dependency on the structural distortions.

  19. Ultrafast optical responses of β-carotene and lycopene probed by sub-20-fs time-resolved coherent spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, M.; Sugisaki, M.; Gall, A.; Robert, B.; Cogdell, R.J.; Hashimoto, H.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate how structural distortions in carotenoid cause decoherences of its high-frequency vibrational modes by applying the sub-20-fs time-resolved transient grating spectroscopy to β-carotene and lycopene. The results indicate that the C=C central stretching mode shows significant loss of coherence under the effects of the steric hindrance between β-ionone ring and polyene backbone, whereas the other high-frequency modes do not show such dependency on the structural distortions.

  20. Orientation Characterisation of Aerospace Materials by Spatially Resolved Acoustic Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wenqi; Coulson, Jethro; Smith, Richard J; Clark, Matt; Somekh, Michael G; Sharples, Steve D; Aveson, John W

    2014-01-01

    Material characteristics in metals such as strength, stiffness and fracture resistance are strongly related to the underlying microstructure. The crystallographic structure and orientation are related to the ultrasonic properties through the stiffness matrix. In individual grains it is possible to analytically determine the ultrasonic velocity from the orientation and stiffness, or determine the stiffness from the known orientation and measured velocity. In this paper we present a technique for imaging the crystallographic orientation of grains in metals using spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy (SRAS) and a novel inverse solver that can determine the crystallographic orientation from the known stiffness matrix for the material and the SRAS velocity measurement. Previously we have shown the ability of this technique to determine the orientation on single crystal nickel samples; we extended the technique to multigrain industrial metals, such as aluminium, nickel and Inconel. The comparison between SRAS and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) on the nickel sample is presented. SRAS is a fast, accurate, quantitative and robust technique for imaging material microstructure and orientation over a wide range of scales and industrial materials

  1. Highly Resolved Sub-Terahertz Vibrational Spectroscopy of Biological Macromolecules and Bacteria Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    HIGHLY RESOLVED SUB-TERAHERTZ VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY OF BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES AND BACTERIA CELLS ECBC...SUBTITLE Highly Resolved Sub-Terahertz Vibrational Spectroscopy of Biological Macromolecules and Bacteria Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911SR-14-P...22 4.3 Bacteria THz Study

  2. Laser frequency stabilization using bichromatic crossover spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Taek; Seb Moon, Han, E-mail: hsmoon@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-07

    We propose a Doppler-free spectroscopic method named bichromatic crossover spectroscopy (BCS), which we then use for the frequency stabilization of an off-resonant frequency that does not correspond to an atomic transition. The observed BCS in the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition of {sup 87}Rb is related to the hyperfine structure of the conventional saturated absorption spectrum of this transition. Furthermore, the Doppler-free BCS is numerically calculated by considering all of the degenerate magnetic sublevels of the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition in an atomic vapor cell, and is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, we successfully achieve modulation-free off-resonant locking at the center frequency between the two 5S{sub 1/2}(F = 1 and 2) → 5P{sub 1/2}(F′ = 1) transitions using a polarization rotation of the BCS. The laser frequency stability was estimated to be the Allan variance of 2.1 × 10{sup −10} at 1 s.

  3. Frequency-agile dual-comb spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millot, Guy; Pitois, Stéphane; Yan, Ming; Hovhannisyan, Tatevik; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic gas sensing and its applications to, for example, trace detection or chemical kinetics, require ever more demanding measurement times, acquisition rates, sensitivities, precisions and broad tuning ranges. Here, we propose a new approach to near-infrared molecular spectroscopy, utilizing advanced concepts of optical telecommunications and supercontinuum photonics. We generate, without mode-locked lasers, two frequency combs of slightly different repetition frequencies and moderate, but rapidly tunable, spectral span. The output of a frequency-agile continuous-wave laser is split and sent into two electro-optic intensity modulators. Flat-top low-noise frequency combs are produced by wave-breaking in a nonlinear optical fibre of normal dispersion. With a dual-comb spectrometer, we record Doppler-limited spectra spanning 60 GHz within 13 μs and an 80 kHz refresh rate, at a tuning speed of 10 nm s-1. The sensitivity for weak absorption is enhanced by a long gas-filled hollow-core fibre. New opportunities for real-time diagnostics may be opened up, even outside the laboratory.

  4. Introduction to Time-Resolved Spectroscopy: Nanosecond Transient Absorption and Time-Resolved Fluorescence of Eosin B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Erik P.; Quintana, Jason C.; Reynoso, Vanessa; Ruberry, Josiah D.; Shin, Wook R.; Swartz, Kevin R.

    2018-01-01

    Here we present a new undergraduate laboratory that will introduce the concepts of time-resolved spectroscopy and provide insight into the natural time scales on which chemical dynamics occur through direct measurement. A quantitative treatment of the acquired data will provide a deeper understanding of the role of quantum mechanics and various…

  5. Optical frequency comb Faraday rotation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Alexandra C.; Westberg, Jonas; Wysocki, Gerard; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate optical frequency comb Faraday rotation spectroscopy (OFC-FRS) for broadband interference-free detection of paramagnetic species. The system is based on a femtosecond doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator and a fast-scanning Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The sample is placed in a DC magnetic field parallel to the light propagation. Efficient background suppression is implemented via switching the direction of the field on consecutive FTS scans and subtracting the consecutive spectra, which enables long-term averaging. In this first demonstration, we measure the entire Q- and R-branches of the fundamental band of nitric oxide in the 5.2-5.4 µm range and achieve good agreement with a theoretical model.

  6. Sum frequency generation for surface vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.H.; Guyot-Sionnest, P.; Shen, Y.R.

    1987-01-01

    Surface vibrational spectroscopy is one of the best means for characterizing molecular adsorbates. For this reason, many techniques have been developed in the past. However, most of them suffer from poor sensitivity, low spectral and temporal resolution, and applications limited to vacuum solid interfaces. Recently, the second harmonic generation (SHG) technique was proved repeatedly to be a simple but versatile surface probe. It is highly sensitive and surface specific; it is also capable of achieving high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution. Being an optical technique, it can be applied to any interface accessible by light. The only serious drawback is its lack of molecular selectivity. An obvious remedy is the extension of the technique to IR-visible sum frequency generation (SFG). Surface vibrational spectroscopy with submonolayer sensitivity is then possible using SFG with the help of a tunable IR laser. The authors report here an SFG measurement of the C-H stretch vibration of monolayers of molecules at air-solid and air-liquid interfaces

  7. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is

  8. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc,max ~95 K and (Bi1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc,max 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major di erences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to ( π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is consistent with

  9. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of xanthophylls at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Hong; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; Frank, Harry A

    2008-03-20

    Many of the spectroscopic features and photophysical properties of xanthophylls and their role in energy transfer to chlorophyll can be accounted for on the basis of a three-state model. The characteristically strong visible absorption of xanthophylls is associated with a transition from the ground state S0 (1(1)Ag-) to the S2 (1(1)Bu+) excited state. The lowest lying singlet state denoted S1 (2(1)Ag-), is a state into which absorption from the ground state is symmetry forbidden. Ultrafast optical spectroscopic studies and quantum computations have suggested the presence of additional excited singlet states in the vicinity of S1 (2(1)Ag-) and S2 (1(1)Bu+). One of these is denoted S* and has been suggested in previous work to be associated with a twisted molecular conformation of the molecule in the S1 (2(1)Ag-) state. In this work, we present the results of a spectroscopic investigation of three major xanthophylls from higher plants: violaxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin. These molecules have systematically increasing extents of pi-electron conjugation from nine to eleven conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. All-trans isomers of the molecules were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and studied by steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopy at 77 K. Analysis of the data using global fitting techniques has revealed the inherent spectral properties and ultrafast dynamics of the excited singlet states of each of the molecules. Five different global fitting models were tested, and it was found that the data are best explained using a kinetic model whereby photoexcitation results in the promotion of the molecule into the S2 (1(1)Bu+) state that subsequently undergoes decay to a vibrationally hot S1 (1(1)Ag-) state and with the exception of violaxanthin also to the S* state. The vibrationally hot S1 (1(1)Ag-) state then cools to a vibrationally relaxed S1 (2(1)Ag-) state in less than a picosecond. It was also found that a portion

  10. Spatially resolved spectroscopy analysis of the XMM-Newton large program on SN1006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang-Tao; Decourchelle, Anne; Miceli, Marco; Vink, Jacco; Bocchino, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    We perform analysis of the XMM-Newton large program on SN1006 based on our newly developed methods of spatially resolved spectroscopy analysis. We extract spectra from low and high resolution meshes. The former (3596 meshes) is used to roughly decompose the thermal and non-thermal components and characterize the spatial distributions of different parameters, such as temperature, abundances of different elements, ionization age, and electron density of the thermal component, as well as photon index and cutoff frequency of the non-thermal component. On the other hand, the low resolution meshes (583 meshes) focus on the interior region dominated by the thermal emission and have enough counts to well characterize the Si lines. We fit the spectra from the low resolution meshes with different models, in order to decompose the multiple plasma components at different thermal and ionization states and compare their spatial distributions. In this poster, we will present the initial results of this project.

  11. Element-resolved x-ray ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boero, G; Mouaziz, S; Rusponi, S; Bencok, P; Nolting, F; Stepanow, S; Gambardella, P

    2008-01-01

    We report on the measurement of element-specific magnetic resonance spectra at gigahertz frequencies using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). We investigate the ferrimagnetic precession of Gd and Fe ions in Gd-substituted yttrium iron garnet, showing that the resonant field and linewidth of Gd precisely coincide with Fe up to the nonlinear regime of parametric excitations. The opposite sign of the Gd x-ray magnetic resonance signal with respect to Fe is consistent with dynamic antiferromagnetic alignment of the two ionic species. Further, we investigate a bilayer metal film, Ni 80 Fe 20 (5 nm)/Ni(50 nm), where the coupled resonance modes of Ni and Ni 80 Fe 20 are separately resolved, revealing shifts in the resonance fields of individual layers but no mutual driving effects. Energy-dependent dynamic XMCD measurements are introduced, combining x-ray absorption and magnetic resonance spectroscopies

  12. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning studies of hexamethylcyclopentadiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, T. J. A.; Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Schalk, O.

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning were applied to the ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of hexamethylcyclopentadiene. The high level of agreement between experiment and theory associates wavepacket motion with a distinct degree of freedom.......Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning were applied to the ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of hexamethylcyclopentadiene. The high level of agreement between experiment and theory associates wavepacket motion with a distinct degree of freedom....

  13. Femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy of xanthophylls

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niedzwiedzki, D.; Sullivan, J.O.; Polívka, Tomáš; Birge, R.R.; Frank, H.A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 45 (2006), s. 22872-22885 ISSN 1520-6106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : xanthophyll * spectroscopy study Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.115, year: 2006

  14. TIME-RESOLVED INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY IN THE U121R BEAMLINE AT THE NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARR, G.L.; LAVEIGNE, J.D.; LOBO, R.P.S.M.; REITZE, D.H.; TANNER, D.B.

    1999-01-01

    A facility for performing time-resolved infrared spectroscopy has been developed at the NSLS, primarily at beamline U12IR. The pulsed IR light from the synchrotron is used to perform pump-probe spectroscopy. The authors present here a description of the facility and results for the relaxation of photoexcitations in both a semiconductor and superconductor

  15. Determination of quenching coefficients by time resolved emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gans, T.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Doebele, H.F. [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik

    2001-07-01

    Capacitively coupled RF discharges (CCRF discharges) at 13.56 MHz in hydrogen exhibit a field reversal phase of about 10 ns during which an intense electron current provides collisional excitation, within the sheath region. After this strongly dominant short pulsed electron impact excitation, it is possible to determine quenching coefficients from the lifetime of the fluorescence at various pressures by time resolved OES even for high energy levels and without any restrictions of optical selection rules. This novel technique allows the measurement of quenching coefficients for atomic and molecular emission lines of hydrogen itself, as well as for emission lines of small admixtures (e.g. noble gases) to the hydrogen discharge, since with a fast gate-able ICCD camera operating at 13.56 MHz it is possible to measure even faint emission lines temporally resolved.

  16. Determination of quenching coefficients by time resolved emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gans, T.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Doebele, H.F.

    2001-01-01

    Capacitively coupled RF discharges (CCRF discharges) at 13.56 MHz in hydrogen exhibit a field reversal phase of about 10 ns during which an intense electron current provides collisional excitation, within the sheath region. After this strongly dominant short pulsed electron impact excitation, it is possible to determine quenching coefficients from the lifetime of the fluorescence at various pressures by time resolved OES even for high energy levels and without any restrictions of optical selection rules. This novel technique allows the measurement of quenching coefficients for atomic and molecular emission lines of hydrogen itself, as well as for emission lines of small admixtures (e.g. noble gases) to the hydrogen discharge, since with a fast gate-able ICCD camera operating at 13.56 MHz it is possible to measure even faint emission lines temporally resolved

  17. Hyperfine-resolved transition frequency list of fundamental vibration bands of H35Cl and H37Cl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakuni, Kana; Sera, Hideyuki; Abe, Masashi; Sasada, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    Sub-Doppler resolution spectroscopy of the fundamental vibration bands of H35Cl and H37Cl has been carried out from 87.1 to 89.9 THz. We have determined the absolute transition frequencies of the hyperfine-resolved R(0) to R(4) transitions with a typical uncertainty of 10 kHz. We have also yielded six molecular constants for each isotopomer in the vibrational excited state, which reproduce the determined frequencies with a standard deviation of about 10 kHz.

  18. Energy resolved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for electronic structure mapping in organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nádaždy, V., E-mail: nadazdy@savba.sk; Gmucová, K. [Institute of Physics SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 11 Bratislava (Slovakia); Schauer, F. [Faculty of Education, Trnava University in Trnava, 918 43 Trnava (Slovakia); Faculty of Applied Informatics, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, 760 05 Zlin (Czech Republic)

    2014-10-06

    We introduce an energy resolved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method to map the electronic density of states (DOS) in organic semiconductor materials. The method consists in measurement of the charge transfer resistance of a semiconductor/electrolyte interface at a frequency where the redox reactions determine the real component of the impedance. The charge transfer resistance value provides direct information about the electronic DOS at the energy given by the electrochemical potential of the electrolyte, which can be adjusted using an external voltage. A simple theory for experimental data evaluation is proposed, along with an explanation of the corresponding experimental conditions. The method allows mapping over unprecedentedly wide energy and DOS ranges. Also, important DOS parameters can be determined directly from the raw experimental data without the lengthy analysis required in other techniques. The potential of the proposed method is illustrated by tracing weak bond defect states induced by ultraviolet treatment above the highest occupied molecular orbital in a prototypical σ-conjugated polymer, poly[methyl(phenyl)silylene]. The results agree well with those of our previous DOS reconstruction by post-transient space-charge-limited-current spectroscopy, which was, however, limited to a narrow energy range. In addition, good agreement of the DOS values measured on two common π-conjugated organic polymer semiconductors, polyphenylene vinylene and poly(3-hexylthiophene), with the rather rare previously published data demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method.

  19. Resolved spectroscopy of adolescent and infant galaxies (1 < z < 10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Shelley; IRIS Science Team

    2014-07-01

    The combination of integral field spectroscopy (IFS) and adaptive optics (AO) on TMT will be revolutionary in studying the distant universe. The high angular resolution exploited by an AO system with this large aperture will be essential for studying high-redshift (1 < z < 5) galaxies' kinematics and chemical abundance histories. At even greater distances, TMT will be essential for conducting follow-up spectroscopy of Ly-alpha emission from first lights galaxies (6 < z < 10) and determining their kinematics and morphologies. I will present simulations and sensitivity calculations for high-z and first light galaxies using the diffraction-limited instrument IRIS coupled with NFIRAOS. I will put these simulations in context with current IFS+AO high-z observations and future capabilities with JWST.

  20. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of lead halide perovskite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idowu, Mopelola A.; Yau, Sung H.; Varnavski, Oleg; Goodson, Theodore

    2015-09-01

    Recently, lead halide perovskites which are organic-inorganic hybrid structures, have been discovered to be highly efficient as light absorbers. Herein, we show the investigation of the excited state dynamics and emission properties of non-stoichiometric precursor formed lead halide perovskites grown by interdiffusion method using steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. The influence of the different ratios of the non-stoichiometric precursor solution was examined. The observed photoluminescence properties were correlated with the femtosecond transient absorption measurements.

  1. Femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy of xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Sullivan, James O; Polívka, Tomás; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2006-11-16

    Xanthophylls are a major class of photosynthetic pigments that participate in an adaptation mechanism by which higher plants protect themselves from high light stress. In the present work, an ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopic investigation of all the major xanthophyll pigments from spinach has been performed. The molecules are zeaxanthin, lutein, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin. beta-Carotene was also studied. The experimental data reveal the inherent spectral properties and ultrafast dynamics including the S(1) state lifetimes of each of the pigments. In conjunction with quantum mechanical computations the results address the molecular features of xanthophylls that control the formation and decay of the S* state in solution. The findings provide compelling evidence that S* is an excited state with a conformational geometry twisted relative to the ground state. The data indicate that S* is formed via a branched pathway from higher excited singlet states and that its yield depends critically on the presence of beta-ionylidene rings in the polyene system of pi-electron conjugated double bonds. The data are expected to be beneficial to researchers employing ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopic methods to investigate the mechanisms of both energy transfer and nonphotochemical quenching in higher plant preparations.

  2. Resolving The ISM Surrounding GRBs with Afterglow Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prochaska, J. X.; Chen, H.-W.; Dessauges-Zavadsky, M.; Bloom, J. S.

    2008-01-01

    We review current research related to spectroscopy of gamma-ray burst (GRB) after-glows with particular emphasis on the interstellar medium (ISM) of the galaxies hosting these high redshift events. These studies reveal the physical conditions of star-forming galaxies and yield clues to the nature of the GRB progenitor. We offer a pedagogical review of the experimental design and review current results. The majority of sightlines are characterized by large HI column densities, negligible molecular fraction, the ubiquitous detection of UV pumped fine-structure transitions, and metallicities ranging from 1/100 to nearly solar abundance

  3. Picosecond rotationally resolved stimulated emission pumping spectroscopy of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanjaroon, Chakree; Reeve, Scott W.; Ford, Alan; Murry, W. Dean; Lyon, Kevin; Yount, Bret; Britton, Dan; Burns, William A.; Allen, Susan D.; Bruce Johnson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) experiments were performed on the nitric oxide molecule in a flow cell environment using lasers with pulse widths of 17-25 ps. A lambda excitation scheme, or ''pump-dump" arrangement, was employed with the pump laser tuned to the T 00 vibronic band origin ( λ=226.35(1)nm) of the A2Σ+( v' = 0, J') ← X2Π1/2( v″ = 0, J″) and the dump laser scanned from 246-248 nm within the A2Σ+( v' = 0, J') → X2Π1/2( v″ = 2, J″) transition. The rotationally resolved SEP spectra were measured by observing the total fluorescence within the A2Σ+( v' = 0, J') → X2Π1/2( v″ = 1, J″) transition between 235 nm and 237.2 nm while scanning the dump laser wavelengths. Multiple rotational states were excited due to the broad laser bandwidth. Measurements showed that the resolved rotational structure depended on the energy and bandwidth of the applied pump and dump laser pulses. Analysis of the observed fluorescence depletion signals yielded an average percent fluorescence depletion of about 19% when λ=226.35(1)nm and λ=247.91(1)nm. This value reflects the percent transfer of the NO population from the A2Σ+( V' = 0, J') excited electronic state to the X2Π1/2( v″ = 2, J″) ground electronic state. The maximum expected depletion is 50% in the limit of dump saturation. Selective excitation of NO at the bandhead provides good spectral discrimination from the background emission and noise and unambiguously confirms the identity of the emitter.

  4. Thermal dynamics of thermoelectric phenomena from frequency resolved methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. García-Cañadas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of thermoelectric (TE phenomena is important for the detailed knowledge of the operation of TE materials and devices. By analyzing the impedance response of both a single TE element and a TE device under suspended conditions, we provide new insights into the thermal dynamics of these systems. The analysis is performed employing parameters such as the thermal penetration depth, the characteristic thermal diffusion frequency and the thermal diffusion time. It is shown that in both systems the dynamics of the thermoelectric response is governed by how the Peltier heat production/absorption at the junctions evolves. In a single thermoelement, at high frequencies the thermal waves diffuse semi-infinitely from the junctions towards the half-length. When the frequency is reduced, the thermal waves can penetrate further and eventually reach the half-length where they start to cancel each other and further penetration is blocked. In the case of a TE module, semi-infinite thermal diffusion along the thickness of the ceramic layers occurs at the highest frequencies. As the frequency is decreased, heat storage in the ceramics becomes dominant and starts to compete with the diffusion of the thermal waves towards the half-length of the thermoelements. Finally, the cancellation of the waves occurs at the lowest frequencies. It is demonstrated that the analysis is able to identify and separate the different physical processes and to provide a detailed understanding of the dynamics of different thermoelectric effects.

  5. Linear and Nonlinear Molecular Spectroscopy with Laser Frequency Combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picque, Nathalie

    2013-06-01

    The regular pulse train of a mode-locked femtosecond laser can give rise to a comb spectrum of millions of laser modes with a spacing precisely equal to the pulse repetition frequency. Laser frequency combs were conceived a decade ago as tools for the precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. They are now becoming enabling tools for an increasing number of applications, including molecular spectroscopy. Recent experiments of multi-heterodyne frequency comb Fourier transform spectroscopy (also called dual-comb spectroscopy) have demonstrated that the precisely spaced spectral lines of a laser frequency comb can be harnessed for new techniques of linear absorption spectroscopy. The first proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated a very exciting potential of dual-comb spectroscopy without moving parts for ultra-rapid and ultra-sensitive recording of complex broad spectral bandwidth molecular spectra. Compared to conventional Michelson-based Fourier transform spectroscopy, recording times could be shortened from seconds to microseconds, with intriguing prospects for spectroscopy of short lived transient species. The resolution improves proportionally to the measurement time. Therefore longer recordings allow high resolution spectroscopy of molecules with extreme precision, since the absolute frequency of each laser comb line can be known with the accuracy of an atomic clock. Moreover, since laser frequency combs involve intense ultrashort laser pulses, nonlinear interactions can be harnessed. Broad spectral bandwidth ultra-rapid nonlinear molecular spectroscopy and imaging with two laser frequency combs is demonstrated with coherent Raman effects and two-photon excitation. Real-time multiplex accessing of hyperspectral images may dramatically expand the range of applications of nonlinear microscopy. B. Bernhardt et al., Nature Photonics 4, 55-57 (2010); A. Schliesser et al. Nature Photonics 6, 440-449 (2012); T. Ideguchi et al. arXiv:1201.4177 (2012) T

  6. Spectrally interleaved, comb-mode-resolved spectroscopy using swept dual terahertz combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Iyonaga, Yuki; Sakaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Yokoyama, Shuko; Inaba, Hajime; Minoshima, Kaoru; Hindle, Francis; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Optical frequency combs are innovative tools for broadband spectroscopy because a series of comb modes can serve as frequency markers that are traceable to a microwave frequency standard. However, a mode distribution that is too discrete limits the spectral sampling interval to the mode frequency spacing even though individual mode linewidth is sufficiently narrow. Here, using a combination of a spectral interleaving and dual-comb spectroscopy in the terahertz (THz) region, we achieved a spectral sampling interval equal to the mode linewidth rather than the mode spacing. The spectrally interleaved THz comb was realized by sweeping the laser repetition frequency and interleaving additional frequency marks. In low-pressure gas spectroscopy, we achieved an improved spectral sampling density of 2.5 MHz and enhanced spectral accuracy of 8.39 × 10-7 in the THz region. The proposed method is a powerful tool for simultaneously achieving high resolution, high accuracy, and broad spectral coverage in THz spectroscopy.

  7. Spectrally interleaved, comb-mode-resolved spectroscopy using swept dual terahertz combs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Iyonaga, Yuki; Sakaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Yokoyama, Shuko; Inaba, Hajime; Minoshima, Kaoru; Hindle, Francis; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2014-01-22

    Optical frequency combs are innovative tools for broadband spectroscopy because a series of comb modes can serve as frequency markers that are traceable to a microwave frequency standard. However, a mode distribution that is too discrete limits the spectral sampling interval to the mode frequency spacing even though individual mode linewidth is sufficiently narrow. Here, using a combination of a spectral interleaving and dual-comb spectroscopy in the terahertz (THz) region, we achieved a spectral sampling interval equal to the mode linewidth rather than the mode spacing. The spectrally interleaved THz comb was realized by sweeping the laser repetition frequency and interleaving additional frequency marks. In low-pressure gas spectroscopy, we achieved an improved spectral sampling density of 2.5 MHz and enhanced spectral accuracy of 8.39 × 10(-7) in the THz region. The proposed method is a powerful tool for simultaneously achieving high resolution, high accuracy, and broad spectral coverage in THz spectroscopy.

  8. Resolved Sideband Spectroscopy for the Detection of Weak Optical Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    was excited with an IR diode laser locked to a stable frequency comb. An UV laser then transferred the excited population to a dissociative state...effects caused by lasers are avoided - particularly desirable in spectro - scopic experiments [2]. Sympathetic cooling does not cool the internal...jumps) in the UV fluorescence light. Whenever the atom is excited to the metastable level, the UV fluorescence stops until a quantum jump to the

  9. Picosecond rotationally resolved stimulated emission pumping spectroscopy of nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanjaroon, Chakree; Reeve, Scott W.; Ford, Alan; Murry, W. Dean; Lyon, Kevin; Yount, Bret; Britton, Dan; Burns, William A.; Allen, Susan D.; Bruce Johnson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Stimulated emission pumping for nitric oxide was studied using picosecond lasers. ► Weak and tightly focused pulses provide sufficient energy for population transfer. ► Selective excitation at the bandhead yields strong fluorescence depletion signals. ► We observe 19% population transfer to v″ = 2 of the X 2 Π 1/2 ground electronic state. - Abstract: Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) experiments were performed on the nitric oxide molecule in a flow cell environment using lasers with pulse widths of 17–25 ps. A lambda excitation scheme, or ‘‘pump–dump” arrangement, was employed with the pump laser tuned to the T 00 vibronic band origin (λ pump =226.35(1)nm) of the A 2 Σ + (v′ = 0, J′) ← X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 0, J″) and the dump laser scanned from 246–248 nm within the A 2 Σ + (v′ = 0, J′) → X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 2, J″) transition. The rotationally resolved SEP spectra were measured by observing the total fluorescence within the A 2 Σ + (v′ = 0, J′) → X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 1, J″) transition between 235 nm and 237.2 nm while scanning the dump laser wavelengths. Multiple rotational states were excited due to the broad laser bandwidth. Measurements showed that the resolved rotational structure depended on the energy and bandwidth of the applied pump and dump laser pulses. Analysis of the observed fluorescence depletion signals yielded an average percent fluorescence depletion of about 19% when λ pump =226.35(1)nm and λ dump =247.91(1)nm. This value reflects the percent transfer of the NO population from the A 2 Σ + (V′ = 0, J′) excited electronic state to the X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 2, J″) ground electronic state. The maximum expected depletion is 50% in the limit of dump saturation. Selective excitation of NO at the bandhead provides good spectral discrimination from the background emission and noise and unambiguously confirms the identity of the emitter.

  10. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation time structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeard, N.; Silly, M.G.; Chauvet, C.; Guzzo, M.; Ricaud, J.P.; Izquierdo, M.; Sirotti, F.; Krizmancic, D.; Guzzo, M.; Stebel, L.; Pittana, P.; Sergo, R.; Cautero, G.; Dufour, G.; Rochet, F.

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation time structure is becoming a common tool for studying dynamic properties of materials. The main limitation is often the wide time domain the user would like to access with pump-probe experiments. In order to perform photoelectron spectroscopy experiments over time scales from milliseconds to picoseconds it is mandatory to measure the time at which each measured photoelectron was created. For this reason the usual CCD camera based two-dimensional detection of electron energy analyzers has been replaced by a new delay-line detector adapted to the time structure of the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation source. The new two-dimensional delay-line detector has a time resolution of 5 ns and was installed on a Scienta SES 2002 electron energy analyzer. The first application has been to characterize the time of flight of the photo emitted electrons as a function of their kinetic energy and the selected pass energy. By repeating the experiment as a function of the available pass energy and of the kinetic energy, a complete characterization of the analyzer behaviour in the time domain has been obtained. Even for kinetic energies as low as 10 eV at 2 eV pass energy, the time spread of the detected electrons is lower than 140 ns. These results and the time structure of the SOLEIL filling modes assure the possibility of performing pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy experiments with the time resolution given by the SOLEIL pulse width, the best performance of the beamline and of the experimental station. (authors)

  11. Space- and time-resolved raman and breakdown spectroscopy: advanced lidar techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silviu, Gurlui; Marius Mihai, Cazacu; Adrian, Timofte; Oana, Rusu; Georgiana, Bulai; Dimitriu, Dan

    2018-04-01

    DARLIOES - the advanced LIDAR is based on space- and time-resolved RAMAN and breakdown spectroscopy, to investigate chemical and toxic compounds, their kinetics and physical properties at high temporal (2 ns) and spatial (1 cm) resolution. The high spatial and temporal resolution are needed to resolve a large variety of chemical troposphere compounds, emissions from aircraft, the self-organization space charges induced light phenomena, temperature and humidity profiles, ice nucleation, etc.

  12. Highly-resolving Rutherford-scattering spectroscopy with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, C.

    2003-10-01

    in the present thesis for the first time the Browne-Buechner spectrometer for the highly resolving ion-beam analysis in the ion beam center Rossendorf is completely presented. A main topic of this theis lied in the apparative construction and the taking-into-operation of the spectrometer and the scattering chamber including the facilities for the sample treatment and characterization. In the framework of this thesis for the chosen measurement arrangement the experimental conditions were elaborated, which allow the routine-like application of the spectrometer for analyses of thin-film systems. for C and Li ions as incident particles especially the straggling was more precisely determined in a large range of materials. By means of the spectrometer also the interaction of the ion with the solid respectively single atoms on its surface could be studied. For the first time the mean charge-state after the single collision on a gold atom was determined for differently heavy ions in a wide energy range

  13. Mobile charge generation dynamics in P3HT: PCBM observed by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, D. G.; Krebs, Frederik C; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale.......Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale....

  14. Frequency resolved transverse mode instability in rod fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mette Marie; Laurila, Marko; Maack, Martin D.

    2013-01-01

    Frequency dynamics of transverse mode instabilities (TMIs) are investigated by testing three 285/100 rod fibers in a single-pass amplifier setup reaching up to ~200W of extracted output power without beam instabilities. The pump power is increased well above the TMI threshold to uncover output dy...

  15. Application of microfluidic devices for time resolved FTIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, C.

    2012-01-01

    Within this thesis, micro fluidic mixers, operated in continuous flow mode, were used for time resolved FTIR studies of chemical reactions in aqueous solution. Any chemical reaction, that can be started upon mixing two reagents, can be examined with this technique. The mixing channel also serves as the observation window for the IR measurements. The actual measurements take place at well defined spots along this channel, corresponding to specific reaction times: moving the measurement spot (100 × 100 μm 2 ) towards the entry yields shorter reaction times, moving it towards the channel's end gives longer reaction times. The temporal resolution of the experiment depends on the flow rate inside the mixing channel and the spacing between subsequent measurement points. Fast flow rates, limited by the back pressure of the mixer leading to leakages, allow time resolutions in the sub-millisecond time range using a standard FTIR microscope, whereas slow flow rates allow the measurement of reaction times up to 1000 ms. Evaluating the mixer using a fast chemical reaction resulted in mixing times of approximately 5 ms and a homogeneous distribution of the liquids across the width of the mixing channel. The mixer was then used for the measurement of the H/D exchange on carbohydrates, the complex formaldehyde sulfite clock reaction, and the folding of the protein ubiquitin from its native to the ''A'' state, induced by mixing it with an acidified methanol solution. For cleaning the mixer a software tool, called ATLAS, was developed in LabVIEW, which was used to automatize the necessary cleaning steps performed by a dedicated flow system. Additionally, the micro mixer technology was combined with the step scan measurement technique using a beam condenser focusing the IR beam of an FTIR spectrometer down to a spot size of 1 mm diameter and through the mixer. The laser light, initiating the chemical reaction inside the mixing channel, was coupled into the focusing unit using a

  16. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of the uranium including calcium. Time resolved measurement spectroscopic analysis (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaoka, Katsuaki; Maruyama, Youichiro; Oba, Masaki; Miyabe, Masabumi; Otobe, Haruyoshi; Wakaida, Ikuo

    2010-05-01

    For the remote analysis of low DF TRU (Decontamination Factor Transuranic) fuel, Laser Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to uranium oxide including a small amount of calcium oxide. The characteristics, such as spectrum intensity and plasma excitation temperature, were measured using time-resolved spectroscopy. As a result, in order to obtain the stable intensity of calcium spectrum for the uranium spectrum, it was found out that the optimum observation delay time of spectrum is 4 microseconds or more after laser irradiation. (author)

  17. Resolving Fast, Confined Diffusion in Bacteria with Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, David J; Tuson, Hannah H; Biteen, Julie S

    2016-05-24

    By following single fluorescent molecules in a microscope, single-particle tracking (SPT) can measure diffusion and binding on the nanometer and millisecond scales. Still, although SPT can at its limits characterize the fastest biomolecules as they interact with subcellular environments, this measurement may require advanced illumination techniques such as stroboscopic illumination. Here, we address the challenge of measuring fast subcellular motion by instead analyzing single-molecule data with spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) with a focus on measurements of confined motion. Our SPT and STICS analysis of simulations of the fast diffusion of confined molecules shows that image blur affects both STICS and SPT, and we find biased diffusion rate measurements for STICS analysis in the limits of fast diffusion and tight confinement due to fitting STICS correlation functions to a Gaussian approximation. However, we determine that with STICS, it is possible to correctly interpret the motion that blurs single-molecule images without advanced illumination techniques or fast cameras. In particular, we present a method to overcome the bias due to image blur by properly estimating the width of the correlation function by directly calculating the correlation function variance instead of using the typical Gaussian fitting procedure. Our simulation results are validated by applying the STICS method to experimental measurements of fast, confined motion: we measure the diffusion of cytosolic mMaple3 in living Escherichia coli cells at 25 frames/s under continuous illumination to illustrate the utility of STICS in an experimental parameter regime for which in-frame motion prevents SPT and tight confinement of fast diffusion precludes stroboscopic illumination. Overall, our application of STICS to freely diffusing cytosolic protein in small cells extends the utility of single-molecule experiments to the regime of fast confined diffusion without requiring advanced

  18. Photophysical characterization and time-resolved spectroscopy of a anthradithiophene dimer: exploring the role of conformation in singlet fission

    KAUST Repository

    Dean, Jacob C.; Zhang, Ruomeng; Hallani, Rawad K.; Pensack, Ryan D.; Sanders, Samuel N.; Oblinsky, Daniel G.; Parkin, Sean R.; Campos, Luis M.; Anthony, John E.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    carried out in toluene and acetone solution via absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and their photo-initiated dynamics were investigated with time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. In accordance

  19. GHz Yb:KYW oscillators in time-resolved spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changxiu; Krauß, Nico; Schäfer, Gerhard; Ebner, Lukas; Kliebisch, Oliver; Schmidt, Johannes; Winnerl, Stephan; Hettich, Mike; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    A high-speed asynchronous optical sampling system (ASOPS) based on Yb:KYW oscillators with 1-GHz repetition rate is reported. Two frequency-offset-stabilized diode-pumped Yb:KYW oscillators are employed as pump and probe source, respectively. The temporal resolution of this system within 1-ns time window is limited to 500 fs and the noise floor around 10-6 (ΔR/R) close to the shot-noise level is obtained within an acquisition time of a few seconds. Coherent acoustic phonons are investigated by measuring multilayer semiconductor structures with multiple quantum wells and aluminum/silicon membranes in this ASOPS system. A wavepacket-like phonon sequence at 360 GHz range is detected in the semiconductor structures and a decaying sequence of acoustic oscillations up to 200 GHz is obtained in the aluminum/silicon membranes. Coherent acoustic phonons generated from semiconductor structures are further manipulated by a double pump scheme through pump time delay control.

  20. Resolving stellar populations with crowded field 3D spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamann, S.; Wisotzki, L.; Roth, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new method of extracting the spectra of stars from observations of crowded stellar fields with integral field spectroscopy (IFS). Our approach extends the well-established concept of crowded field photometry in images into the domain of 3-dimensional spectroscopic datacubes. The main features of our algorithm follow. (1) We assume that a high-fidelity input source catalogue already exists, e.g. from HST data, and that it is not needed to perform sophisticated source detection in the IFS data. (2) Source positions and properties of the point spread function (PSF) vary smoothly between spectral layers of the datacube, and these variations can be described by simple fitting functions. (3) The shape of the PSF can be adequately described by an analytical function. Even without isolated PSF calibrator stars we can therefore estimate the PSF by a model fit to the full ensemble of stars visible within the field of view. (4) By using sparse matrices to describe the sources, the problem of extracting the spectra of many stars simultaneously becomes computationally tractable. We present extensive performance and validation tests of our algorithm using realistic simulated datacubes that closely reproduce actual IFS observations of the central regions of Galactic globular clusters. We investigate the quality of the extracted spectra under the effects of crowding with respect to the resulting signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) and any possible changes in the continuum level, as well as with respect to absorption line spectral parameters, radial velocities, and equivalent widths. The main effect of blending between two nearby stars is a decrease in the S/N in their spectra. The effect increases with the crowding in the field in a way that the maximum number of stars with useful spectra is always ~0.2 per spatial resolution element. This balance breaks down when exceeding a total source density of one significantly detected star per resolution element. We also explore the

  1. Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedqvist, A.; Rachlew-Kaellne, E.

    1998-01-01

    Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of impurities in a reversed field pinch operating with a resistive shell. Results of electron temperature, impurity ion densities, particle confinement time and Z eff together with a description of the interpretation and the equipment are presented. (author)

  2. Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedqvist, Anders; Rachlew-Källne, Elisabeth

    1998-09-01

    Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of impurities in a reversed field pinch operating with a resistive shell. Results of electron temperature, impurity ion densities, particle confinement time and 0741-3335/40/9/004/img1 together with a description of the interpretation and the equipment are presented.

  3. Spatially resolved sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy of wheat leaves infected by Puccinia triticina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberg, H; Prange, A; Hormes, J; Steiner, U; Oerke, E-C

    2009-01-01

    In this study, wheat leaves infected with brown rust, a plant disease of serious economic concern caused by the fungus Puccinia triticina, were investigated using spatially resolved XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) spectroscopy at the sulfur K-absorption edge.

  4. Spatially resolved sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy of wheat leaves infected by Puccinia triticina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenberg, H; Prange, A; Hormes, J [CAMD, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Hwy, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States); Steiner, U; Oerke, E-C, E-mail: lichtenberg@lsu.ed [INRES-Phytomedicine, University of Bonn, Nussallee 9, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    In this study, wheat leaves infected with brown rust, a plant disease of serious economic concern caused by the fungus Puccinia triticina, were investigated using spatially resolved XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) spectroscopy at the sulfur K-absorption edge.

  5. Finite-difference time-domain analysis of time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper; Cooke, David G.; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report on the numerical analysis of a time-resolved terahertz (THz) spectroscopy experiment using a modified finite-difference time-domain method. Using this method, we show that ultrafast carrier dynamics can be extracted with a time resolution smaller than the duration of the T...

  6. Hexamethylcyclopentadiene: time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, T. J. A.; Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Schalk, O.

    2014-01-01

    comparing time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) with ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulations on the MS-MR-CASPT2 level of theory. We disentangle the relationship between two phenomena that dominate the immediate molecular response upon light absorption: a spectrally dependent delay...

  7. Speciation of actinides in aqueous solution by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Takaumi; Kato, Yoshiharu; Meinrath, G.; Yoshida, Zenko; Choppin, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) as a sensitive and selective method has been applied to the speciation of actinides in aqueous solution. Studies on hydrolysis and carbonate complexation of U(VI) and on determination of hydration number of Cm(III) are reported. (author)

  8. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy of cross-beam pulsed laser ablation on graphite targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangines, R.; Sanchez Ake, C.; Sobral, H.; Villagran-Muniz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Cross-beam pulsed laser ablation with two delayed lasers is performed on two perpendicular graphite targets. The time delay between lasers is varied by up to 5 μs, and physical changes on the second plasma, due to the interaction with the first generated one, are determined by time resolved optical emission spectroscopy

  9. Sensitivity Analysis and Requirements for Temporally and Spatially Resolved Thermometry Using Neutron Resonance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Juan Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Barnes, Cris William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mocko, Michael Jeffrey [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavorka, Lukas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-31

    This report is intended to examine the use of neutron resonance spectroscopy (NRS) to make time- dependent and spatially-resolved temperature measurements of materials in extreme conditions. Specifically, the sensitivities of the temperature estimate on neutron-beam and diagnostic parameters is examined. Based on that examination, requirements are set on a pulsed neutron-source and diagnostics to make a meaningful measurement.

  10. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of semiconductors for optical applications beyond the visible spectral range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernikov, Alexey A.

    2011-07-01

    The work discussed in this thesis is focused on the experimental studies regarding these three steps: (1) investigation of the fundamental effects, (2) characterization of new material systems, and (3) optimization of the semiconductor devices. In all three cases, the experimental technique of choice is photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The thesis is organized as follows. Chapter 2 gives a summary of the PL properties of semiconductors relevant for this work. The first section deals with the intrinsic processes in an ideal direct band gap material, starting with a brief summary of the theoretical background followed by the overview of a typical PL scenario. In the second part of the chapter, the role of the lattice-vibrations, the internal electric fields as well as the influence of the band-structure and the dielectric environment are discussed. Finally, extrinsic PL properties are presented in the third section, focusing on defects and disorder in real materials. In chapter 3, the experimental realization of the spectroscopic studies is discussed. The time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) setup is presented, focusing on the applied excitation source, non-linear frequency mixing, and the operation of the streak camera used for the detection. In addition, linear spectroscopy setup for continous-wave (CW) PL and absorption measurements is illustrated. Chapter 4 aims at the study of the interactions between electrons and lattice-vibrations in semiconductor crystals relevant for the proper description of carrier dynamics as well as the heat-transfer processes. The presented discussion covers the experimental studies of many-body effects in phonon-assisted emission of semiconductors due to the carriercarrier Coulomb-interaction. The corresponding theoretical background is discussed in detail in chapter 2. The investigations are focused on the two main questions regarding electron-hole plasma contributions to the phonon-assisted light-matter interaction as well as

  11. Energy and angle resolved ion scattering spectroscopy: new possibilities for surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellings, G.J.A.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis the design and development of a novel, very sensitive and high-resolving spectrometer for surface analysis is described. This spectrometer is designed for Energy and Angle Resolved Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (EARISS). There are only a few techniques that are sensitive enough to study the outermost atomic layer of surfaces. One of these techniques, Low-Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS), is discussed in chapter 2. Since LEIS is destructive, it is important to make a very efficient use of the scattered ions. This makes it attractive to simultaneously carry out energy and angle dependent measurements (EARISS). (Auth.)

  12. Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy for study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Deng, Leimin; Fan, Lisha; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yao; Shen, Xiaokang; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-François; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-10-30

    Identification of chemical intermediates and study of chemical reaction pathways and mechanisms in laser-induced plasmas are important for laser-ablated applications. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), as a promising spectroscopic technique, is efficient for elemental analyses but can only provide limited information about chemical products in laser-induced plasmas. In this work, time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was studied as a promising tool for the study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas. Resonance fluorescence excitation of diatomic aluminum monoxide (AlO) and triatomic dialuminum monoxide (Al 2 O) was used to identify these chemical intermediates. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of AlO and Al 2 O were used to observe the temporal evolution in laser-induced Al plasmas and to study their formation in the Al-O 2 chemistry in air.

  13. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of radiation-chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, G.N.R.

    1983-01-01

    A tunable pulsed laser Raman spectrometer for time resolved Raman studies of radiation-chemical processes is described. This apparatus utilizes the state of art optical multichannel detection and analysis techniques for data acquisition and electron pulse radiolysis for initiating the reactions. By using this technique the resonance Raman spectra of intermediates with absorption spectra in the 248-900 nm region, and mean lifetimes > 30 ns can be examined. This apparatus can be used to time resolve the vibrational spectral overlap between transients absorbing in the same region, and to follow their decay kinetics by monitoring the well resolved Raman peaks. For kinetic measurements at millisecond time scale, the Raman technique is preferable over optical absorption method where low frequency noise is quite bothersome. A time resolved Raman study of the pulse radiolytic oxidation of aqueous tetrafluorohydroquinone and p-methoxyphenol is briefly discussed. 15 references, 5 figures

  14. Space-resolved vacuum ultra-violet spectroscopy on T.F.R. Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported of space-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet spectroscopy (between 100 A and 2000A) on T.F.R. Tokamak plasmas and examples are given of profiles for both heavy and light impurity ions. The experimental method and the associated uncertainties and problems are stressed. The great importance of numerical calculations in the interpretation of the impurity profiles is pointed out. (author)

  15. Charge transport in nanostructured materials for solar energy conversion studied by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Hynek; Kužel, Petr; Sundström, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 215, 2-3 (2010), s. 123-139 ISSN 1010-6030 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP202/09/P099; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100100902; GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy * ultrafast dynamics * bulk heterojunction * semiconductor nanostructures * transport * mobility Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.243, year: 2010

  16. Ionic classification of Xe laser lines: A new approach through time resolved spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schinca, D.; Duchowicz, R.; Gallardo, M.

    1992-01-01

    Visible and UV laser emission from a highly ionized pulsed Xe plasma was studied in relation to the ionic assignment of the laser lines. Time-resolved spectroscopy was used to determine the ionic origin of the studied lines. The results are in agreement with an intensity versus pressure analysis performed over the same wavelength range. From the temporal behaviour of the spontaneous emission, a probable classification can be obtained. (author). 7 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  17. Electronic structure of Sr2RuO4 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, H.; Aiura, Y.; Saitoh, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Hase, I.; Ikeda, S.I.; Bando, H.; Kubota, M.; Ono, K.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic structure of the monolayer strontium ruthenate Sr 2 RuO 4 was investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We present photon-energy (hν) dependence of the electronic structure near the Fermi level along the ΓM line. The hν dependence has shown a strong spectral weight modulation of the Ru 4d xy and 4d zx bands

  18. Time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of pulsed plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adámek, Petr; Olejníček, Jiří; Čada, Martin; Kment, Š.; Hubička, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 14 (2013), s. 2428-2430 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12045; GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/0386; GA MŠk LD12002; GA MŠk LH12043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diode laser s * plasma diagnostics * absorption spectroscopy * time resolved Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.179, year: 2013

  19. Time-resolved single-shot terahertz time-domain spectroscopy for ultrafast irreversible processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhao-Hui; Zhong, Sen-Cheng; Li, Jun; Zhu, Li-Guo; Meng, Kun; Li, Jiang; Liu, Qiao; Peng, Qi-Xian; Li, Ze-Ren; Zhao, Jian-Heng

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed terahertz spectroscopy is suitable for spectroscopic diagnostics of ultrafast events. However, the study of irreversible or single shot ultrafast events requires ability to record transient properties at multiple time delays, i.e., time resolved at single shot level, which is not available currently. Here by angular multiplexing use of femtosecond laser pulses, we developed and demonstrated a time resolved, transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique, where burst mode THz pulses were generated and then detected in a single shot measurement manner. The burst mode THz pulses contain 2 sub-THz pulses, and the time gap between them is adjustable up to 1 ns with picosecond accuracy, thus it can be used to probe the single shot event at two different time delays. The system can detect the sub-THz pulses at 0.1 THz-2.5 THz range with signal to noise ratio (SNR) of ˜400 and spectrum resolution of 0.05 THz. System design was described here, and optimizations of single shot measurement of THz pulses were discussed in detail. Methods to improve SNR were also discussed in detail. A system application was demonstrated where pulsed THz signals at different time delays of the ultrafast process were successfully acquired within single shot measurement. This time resolved transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique provides a new diagnostic tool for irreversible or single shot ultrafast events where dynamic information can be extracted at terahertz range within one-shot experiment.

  20. Application of two-dimensional J-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to differentiation of beer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatib, Alfi; Wilson, Erica G.; Kim, Hye Kyong; Lefeber, Alfons W.M.; Erkelens, Cornelis; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A number of ingredients in beer that directly or indirectly affect its quality require an unbiased wide-spectrum analytical method that allows for the determination of a wide array of compounds for its efficient control. 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a method that clearly meets this description as the broad range of compounds in beer is detectable. However, the resulting congestion of signals added to the low resolution of 1 H NMR spectra makes the identification of individual components very difficult. Among two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques that increase the resolution, J-resolved NMR spectra were successfully applied to the analysis of 2-butanol extracts of beer as overlapping signals in 1 H NMR spectra were fully resolved by the additional axis of the coupling constant. Principal component analysis based on the projected J-resolved NMR spectra showed a clear separation between all of the six brands of pilsner beer evaluated in this study. The compounds responsible for the differentiation were identified by 2D NMR spectra including correlated spectroscopy and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation spectra together with J-resolved spectra. They were identified as nucleic acid derivatives (adenine, uridine and xanthine), amino acids (tyrosine and proline), organic acid (succinic and lactic acid), alcohol (tyrosol and isopropanol), cholines and carbohydrates

  1. Time-resolved diode laser infrared absorption spectroscopy of the nascent HCl in the infrared laser chemistry of 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Peter; Quack, Martin; Seyfang, George

    1990-04-01

    The IR multiphoton excitation and the frequency, fluence and intensity dependence of the IR-laser chemical yields of CF 2ClCH 2Cl have been studied in the fluence range of 1 to 10 J cm -2 yielding a steady-state constant k(st)/ I=0.74×10 6 s -1 MW -1 cm 2 which is approximately independent of intensity. Time-resolved IR absorption spectroscopy with diode laser sources has been used to observe the nascent HCl during the first few 100 ns indicating a population inversion between the levels ν=1, J=4 and ν=2, J=5. At low reactant pressures ( p⩽10 Pa) the time-resolved measurement gives a steady-state rate constant consistent with the theoretical result adjusted to the static yield measurements. The capability of state-selective and time-resolved IR spectroscopy is thus demonstrated, giving real-time determinations of rate constants.

  2. Laser frequency stabilization and shifting by using modulation transfer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bing; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Wu, Bin; Xu, Ao-Peng; Wang, Qi-Yu; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    The stabilizing and shifting of laser frequency are very important for the interaction between the laser and atoms. The modulation transfer spectroscopy for the 87Rb atom with D2 line transition F = 2 → F' = 3 is used for stabilizing and shifting the frequency of the external cavity grating feedback diode laser. The resonant phase modulator with electro—optical effect is used to generate frequency sideband to lock the laser frequency. In the locking scheme, circularly polarized pump- and probe-beams are used. By optimizing the temperature of the vapor, the pump- and probe-beam intensity, the laser linewidth of 280 kHz is obtained. Furthermore, the magnetic field generated by a solenoid is added into the system. Therefore the system can achieve the frequency locking at any point in a range of hundreds of megahertz frequency shifting with very low power loss.

  3. Ultrasensitive detection of atmospheric trace gases using frequency modulation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David E.

    1986-01-01

    Frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy is a new technique that promises to significantly extend the state-of-the-art in point detection of atmospheric trace gases. FM spectroscopy is essentially a balanced bridge optical heterodyne approach in which a small optical absorption or dispersion from an atomic or molecular species of interest generates an easily detected radio frequency (RF) signal. This signal can be monitored using standard RF signal processing techniques and is, in principle, limited only by the shot noise generated in the photodetector by the laser source employed. The use of very high modulation frequencies which exceed the spectral width of the probed absorption line distinguishes this technique from the well-known derivative spectroscopy which makes use of low (kHz) modulation frequencies. FM spectroscopy was recently extended to the 10 micron infrared (IR) spectral region where numerous polyatomic molecules exhibit characteristic vibrational-rotational bands. In conjunction with tunable semiconductor diode lasers, the quantum-noise-limited sensitivity of the technique should allow for the detection of absorptions as small as .00000001 in the IR spectral region. This sensitivity would allow for the detection of H2O2 at concentrations as low as 1 pptv with an integration time of 10 seconds.

  4. High resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy based on frequency upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Hu, Qi; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    signals can be analyzed. The obtainable frequency resolution is usually in the nm range where sub nm resolution is preferred in many applications, like gas spectroscopy. In this work we demonstrate how to obtain sub nm resolution when using upconversion. In the presented realization one object point...... high resolution spectral performance by observing emission from hot water vapor in a butane gas burner....

  5. Precision Spectroscopy, Diode Lasers, and Optical Frequency Measurement Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, Leo (Editor); Fox, Richard (Editor); Waltman, Steve (Editor); Robinson, Hugh

    1998-01-01

    This compilation is a selected set of reprints from the Optical Frequency Measurement Group of the Time and Frequency Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and consists of work published between 1987 and 1997. The two main programs represented here are (1) development of tunable diode-laser technology for scientific applications and precision measurements, and (2) research toward the goal of realizing optical-frequency measurements and synthesis. The papers are organized chronologically in five, somewhat arbitrarily chosen categories: Diode Laser Technology, Tunable Laser Systems, Laser Spectroscopy, Optical Synthesis and Extended Wavelength Coverage, and Multi-Photon Interactions and Optical Coherences.

  6. Structure in nascent carbon nanotubes revealed by spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landois, Périne [CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CNRS URA 2453), 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR CNRS 8502, Université Paris Sud 11, 91405 Orsay (France); Pinault, Mathieu [CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CNRS URA 2453), 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Huard, Mickaël [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR CNRS 8502, Université Paris Sud 11, 91405 Orsay (France); Reita, Valérie [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Rouzière, Stéphan; Launois, Pascale [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR CNRS 8502, Université Paris Sud 11, 91405 Orsay (France); Mayne-L' Hermite, Martine [CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CNRS URA 2453), 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bendiab, Nedjma, E-mail: nedjma.bendiab@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France)

    2014-10-01

    The understanding of carbon nanotube (CNT) growth is crucial for the control of their production. In particular, the identification of structural changes of carbon possibly occurring near the catalyst particle in the very early stages of their formation is of high interest. In this study, samples of nascent CNT obtained during nucleation step and samples of vertically aligned CNT obtained during growth step are analysed by combined spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy reveals that iron-based phases and carbon phases are co-localized at the same position, and indicates that sp{sup 2} carbon nucleates preferentially on iron-based particles during this nucleation step. Depth scan Raman spectroscopy analysis, performed on nascent CNT, highlights that carbon structural organisation is significantly changing from defective graphene layers surrounding the iron-based particles at their base up to multi-walled nanotube structures in the upper part of iron-based particles. - Highlights: • Spatial co-localization of iron and carbon structures in nascent carbon nanotubes • Imaging local carbon structure changes along catalyst particles by Raman spectroscopy. • In nascent nanotubes, significant structural changes occur along catalyst particle.

  7. Time-resolved and doppler-reduced laser spectroscopy on atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, H.

    1991-10-01

    Radiative lifetimes have been studied in neutral boron, carbon, silicon and strontium, in singly ionized gadolinium and tantalum and in molecular carbon monoxide and C 2 . The time-resolved techniques were based either on pulsed lasers or pulse-modulated CW lasers. Several techniques have been utilized for the production of free atoms and ions such as evaporation into an atomic beam, sputtering in hollow cathodes and laser-produced plasmas. Hyperfine interactions in boron, copper and strontium have been examined using quantum beat spectroscopy, saturation spectroscopy and collimated atomic beam spectroscopy. Measurement techniques based on effusive hollow cathodes as well as laser produced plasmas in atomic physics have been developed. Investigations on laser produced plasmas using two colour beam deflection tomography for determination of electron densities have been performed. Finally, new possibilities for view-time-expansion in light-in-flight holography using mode-locked CW lasers have been demonstrated. (au)

  8. PLASTIQUE: A synchrotron radiation beamline for time resolved fluorescence in the frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Stasio, G.; Zema, N.; Antonangeli, F.; Parasassi, T.; Rosato, N.

    1991-01-01

    PLASTIQUE is the only synchrotron radiation beamline in the world that performs time resolved fluorescence experiments in the frequency domain. These experiments are extremely valuable sources of informations on the structure and dynamics of molecules. The beamline and some examples of initial data are described

  9. Plastique: A synchrotron radiation beamline for time resolved fluorescence in the frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Zema, N.; Antonangeli, F.; Savoia, A.; Parasassi, T.; Rosato, N.

    1991-06-01

    PLASTIQUE is the only synchrotron radiation beamline in the world that performs time resolved fluorescence experiments in frequency domain. These experiments are extremely valuable sources of information on the structure and dynamics of molecules. We describe the beamline and some initial data.

  10. Coherent radio-frequency detection for narrowband direct comb spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstie, James D; Perrella, Christopher; Light, Philip S; Luiten, Andre N

    2016-02-22

    We demonstrate a scheme for coherent narrowband direct optical frequency comb spectroscopy. An extended cavity diode laser is injection locked to a single mode of an optical frequency comb, frequency shifted, and used as a local oscillator to optically down-mix the interrogating comb on a fast photodetector. The high spectral coherence of the injection lock generates a microwave frequency comb at the output of the photodiode with very narrow features, enabling spectral information to be further down-mixed to RF frequencies, allowing optical transmittance and phase to be obtained using electronics commonly found in the lab. We demonstrate two methods for achieving this step: a serial mode-by-mode approach and a parallel dual-comb approach, with the Cs D1 transition at 894 nm as a test case.

  11. Frequency modulation spectroscopy with a THz quantum-cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichholz, R; Richter, H; Wienold, M; Schrottke, L; Hey, R; Grahn, H T; Hübers, H-W

    2013-12-30

    We report on a terahertz spectrometer for high-resolution molecular spectroscopy based on a quantum-cascade laser. High-frequency modulation (up to 50 MHz) of the laser driving current produces a simultaneous modulation of the frequency and amplitude of the laser output. The modulation generates sidebands, which are symmetrically positioned with respect to the laser carrier frequency. The molecular transition is probed by scanning the sidebands across it. In this way, the absorption and the dispersion caused by the molecular transition are measured. The signals are modeled by taking into account the simultaneous modulation of the frequency and amplitude of the laser emission. This allows for the determination of the strength of the frequency as well as amplitude modulation of the laser and of molecular parameters such as pressure broadening.

  12. Effect of randomness on multi-frequency aeroelastic responses resolved by Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witteveen, Jeroen A.S.; Bijl, Hester

    2009-01-01

    The Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements (UASFE) method resolves the effect of randomness in numerical simulations of single-mode aeroelastic responses with a constant accuracy in time for a constant number of samples. In this paper, the UASFE framework is extended to multi-frequency responses and continuous structures by employing a wavelet decomposition pre-processing step to decompose the sampled multi-frequency signals into single-frequency components. The effect of the randomness on the multi-frequency response is then obtained by summing the results of the UASFE interpolation at constant phase for the different frequency components. Results for multi-frequency responses and continuous structures show a three orders of magnitude reduction of computational costs compared to crude Monte Carlo simulations in a harmonically forced oscillator, a flutter panel problem, and the three-dimensional transonic AGARD 445.6 wing aeroelastic benchmark subject to random fields and random parameters with various probability distributions.

  13. Trapped Ion Oscillation Frequencies as Sensors for Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Nörtershäuser

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The oscillation frequencies of charged particles in a Penning trap can serve as sensors for spectroscopy when additional field components are introduced to the magnetic and electric fields used for confinement. The presence of so-called “magnetic bottles” and specific electric anharmonicities creates calculable energy-dependences of the oscillation frequencies in the radiofrequency domain which may be used to detect the absorption or emission of photons both in the microwave and optical frequency domains. The precise electronic measurement of these oscillation frequencies therefore represents an optical sensor for spectroscopy. We discuss possible applications for precision laser and microwave spectroscopy and their role in the determination of magnetic moments and excited state lifetimes. Also, the trap-assisted measurement of radiative nuclear de-excitations in the X-ray domain is discussed. This way, the different applications range over more than 12 orders of magnitude in the detectable photon energies, from below μeV in the microwave domain to beyond MeV in the X-ray domain.

  14. Noncontact blood species identification method based on spatially resolved near-infrared transmission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linna; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Li, Hongxiao; Li, Yingxin; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2017-09-01

    The inspection and identification of whole blood are crucially significant for import-export ports and inspection and quarantine departments. In our previous research, we proved Near-Infrared diffuse transmitted spectroscopy method was potential for noninvasively identifying three blood species, including macaque, human and mouse, with samples measured in the cuvettes. However, in open sampling cases, inspectors may be endangered by virulence factors in blood samples. In this paper, we explored the noncontact measurement for classification, with blood samples measured in the vacuum blood vessels. Spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy was used to improve the prediction accuracy. Results showed that the prediction accuracy of the model built with nine detection points was more than 90% in identification between all five species, including chicken, goat, macaque, pig and rat, far better than the performance of the model built with single-point spectra. The results fully supported the idea that spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy method can improve the prediction ability, and demonstrated the feasibility of this method for noncontact blood species identification in practical applications.

  15. Time-resolved x-ray laser induced photoelectron spectroscopy of isochoric heated copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.J.; Dunn, J.; Hunter, J.; Widmann, K.

    2005-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the nonsteady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultrathin (50 nm) copper. A metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.1-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500x700 μm 2 spot to create heated conditions of 0.07-1.8x10 12 W cm -2 intensity. Valence band photoemission spectra are presented showing the changing occupancy of the Cu 3d level with heating are presented. These picosecond x-ray laser induced time-resolved photoemission spectra of laser-heated ultrathin Cu foil show dynamic changes in the electronic structure. The ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials

  16. Broad-band time-resolved near infrared spectroscopy in the TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M.C.; Pastor, I.; Cal, E. de la; McCarthy, K.J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Diaz, D. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Dept Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-11-15

    First experimental results on broad-band, time-resolved Near Infrared (NIR;here loosely defined as covering from 750 to 1650 nm) passive spectroscopy using a high sensitivity InGaAs detector are reported for the TJ-II Stellarator. Experimental set-up is described together with its main characteristics, the most remarkable ones being its enhanced NIR response, broadband spectrum acquisition in a single shot, and time-resolved measurements with up to 1.8 kHz spectral rate. Prospects for future work and more extended physics studies in this newly open spectral region in TJ-II are discussed. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. OH spectroscopy with frequency-doubled dye laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ter Meulen, J J

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the excitation of the OH radical by UV radiation for the determination of the hyperfine structure of the excited states. The 307 nm UV light is obtained by doubling the frequency (in double-refraction crystals) of a tunable dye laser. Details of the laser set-up are given. The method is suitable for application to other high-resolution molecular spectroscopy experiments in the area between 200 and 400 nm. Further extensions can be expected with ring compound dyes and external doubling of the frequency.

  18. Hole emission from Ge/Si quantum dots studied by time-resolved capacitance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapteyn, C.M.A.; Lion, M.; Heitz, R.; Bimberg, D. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik; Miesner, C.; Asperger, T.; Brunner, K.; Abstreiter, G. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Walter-Schottky-Inst. fuer Physikalische Grundlagen der Halbleiterelektronik

    2001-03-01

    Emission of holes from self-organized Ge quantum dots (QDs) embedded in Si Schottky diodes is studied by time-resolved capacitance spectroscopy (DLTS). The DLTS signal is rather broad and depends strongly on the filling and detection bias conditions. The observed dependence is interpreted in terms of carrier emission from many-hole states of the QDs. The activation energies obtained from the DLTS measurements are a function of the amount of stored charge and the position of the Fermi level in the QDs. (orig.)

  19. Photolytic interruptions of the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle examined by time-resolved resonance raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, I; Atkinson, G H

    1985-09-24

    An investigation of the photolytic conditions used to initiate and spectroscopically monitor the bacteriorhodopsin (BR) photocycle utilizing time-resolved resonance Raman (TR3) spectroscopy has revealed and characterized two photoinduced reactions that interrupt the thermal pathway. One reaction involves the photolytic interconversion of M-412 and M', and the other involves the direct photolytic conversion of the BR-570/K-590 photostationary mixture either to M-412 and M' or to M-like intermediates within 10 ns. The photolytic threshold conditions describing both reactions have been quantitatively measured and are discussed in terms of experimental parameters.

  20. Time-resolved spectroscopy of plasma resonances in highly excited silicon and germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.; Kurz, H.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of the electron-hole plasma in silicon and germanium samples irradiated by 20 ps. 532 nm laser pulses has been investigated in the near infrared by the time-resolved picosecond optical spectroscopy. The experimental reflectivities and transmission are compared with the predictions of the thermal model for degenerate carrier distributions through the Drude formalism. Above a certain fluence, a significant deviation between measured and calculated values indicates a strong increase of the recombination rate as soon as the plasma resonances become comparable with the band gaps. These new plasmon-aided recombination channels are particularly pronounced in germanium. 15 refs., 8 figs

  1. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of conjugated polymer/CdSe nanorod composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; Lek, Jun Y.; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-01-01

    report ultrafast carrier dynamics in hybrid CdSe nanorod / poly(3-hexythiophene) (P3HT) bulk heterojunction films measured by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy, and compare to the well studied P3HT/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend. Both films show an improved peak...... photoconductivity compared to P3HT alone, consistent with efficient charge transfer. The photoconductivity dynamics show fast, picosecond trapping or recombination in the hybrid blend while the all-organic film shows no such loss of mobile charge over ns time scales. The ac conductivity for all samples is well...

  2. Time-resolved luminescent spectroscopy of YAG:Ce single crystal and single crystalline films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorenko, Yu.; Gorbenko, V.; Savchyn, V.; Vozniak, T.; Puzikov, V.; Danko, A.; Nizhankovski, S.

    2010-01-01

    The peculiarities of the luminescence and energy transfer from YAG host to the emission centers formed by the Y Al antisite defects and Ce 3+ ions have been studied in YAG:Ce single crystals, grown from the melt by modified Bridgman method in Ar and CO 2 + H 2 atmospheres, and YAG:Ce single crystalline film, grown by liquid phase epitaxy method, using the comparative time-resolved luminescent spectroscopy under excitation by synchrotron radiation in the range of fundamental adsorption of this garnet.

  3. Spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy for rapid imaging of material microstructure and grain orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Richard J; Li, Wenqi; Coulson, Jethro; Clark, Matt; Somekh, Michael G; Sharples, Steve D

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the grain structure of aerospace materials is very important to understand their mechanical properties and in-service performance. Spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy is an acoustic technique utilizing surface acoustic waves to map the grain structure of a material. When combined with measurements in multiple acoustic propagation directions, the grain orientation can be obtained by fitting the velocity surface to a model. The new instrument presented here can take thousands of acoustic velocity measurements per second. The spatial and velocity resolution can be adjusted by simple modification to the system; this is discussed in detail by comparison of theoretical expectations with experimental data. (paper)

  4. Bogoliubov Angle, Particle-Hole Mixture and Angular Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy in Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, A.

    2010-05-04

    Superconducting excitations - Bogoliubov quasiparticles - are the quantum mechanical mixture of negatively charged electron (-e) and positively charged hole (+e). We propose a new observable for Angular Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) studies that is the manifestation of the particle-hole entanglement of the superconducting quasiparticles. We call this observable a Bogoliubov angle. This angle measures the relative weight of particle and hole amplitude in the superconducting (Bogoliubov) quasiparticle. We show how this quantity can be measured by comparing the ratio of spectral intensities at positive and negative energies.

  5. A tunable low-energy photon source for high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harter, John W.; Monkman, Eric J.; Shai, Daniel E.; Nie Yuefeng; Uchida, Masaki; Burganov, Bulat; Chatterjee, Shouvik; King, Philip D. C.; Shen, Kyle M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a tunable low-energy photon source consisting of a laser-driven xenon plasma lamp coupled to a Czerny-Turner monochromator. The combined tunability, brightness, and narrow spectral bandwidth make this light source useful in laboratory-based high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy experiments. The source supplies photons with energies up to ∼7 eV, delivering under typical conditions >10 12 ph/s within a 10 meV spectral bandwidth, which is comparable to helium plasma lamps and many synchrotron beamlines. We first describe the lamp and monochromator system and then characterize its output, with attention to those parameters which are of interest for photoemission experiments. Finally, we present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data using the light source and compare its performance to a conventional helium plasma lamp.

  6. Spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy study of transformed zones in magnesia-partially-stabilized zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davskardt, R.H.; Veirs, D.K.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    Raman vibrational spectroscopy provides an effective phase characterization technique in materials systems containing particle dispersions of the tetragonal and monoclinic polymorphs of zirconia, each of which yields a unique Raman spectrum. An investigation is reported to assess a novel, spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy system in the study of transformed zones surrounding cracks in partially stabilized MgO-ZrO 2 (PSZ). The experimental arrangement uses an imaging (two-dimensional) photomultiplier tube to produce a one-dimensional Raman profile of phase compositions along a slitlike laser beam without translation of either the sample or the laser beam and without scanning the spectrometer. Results from phase characterization studies of the size, frontal morphology, and extent of transformation of transformation zones surrounding cracks produced under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions are presented

  7. Spatially resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy on friction stir weld induced defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Karin; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Pikart, Philip; Böni, Peter

    2010-04-01

    A friction stir welded (FSW) Al alloy sample was investigated by Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) of the positron annihilation line. The spatially resolved defect distribution showed that the material in the joint zone becomes completely annealed during the welding process at the shoulder of the FSW tool, whereas at the tip, annealing is prevailed by the deterioration of the material due to the tool movement. This might be responsible for the increased probability of cracking in the heat affected zone of friction stir welds. Examination of a material pairing of steel S235 and the Al alloy Silafont36 by coincident Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) indicates the formation of annealed steel clusters in the Al alloy component of the sample. The clear visibility of Fe in the CDB spectra is explained by the very efficient trapping at the interface between steel cluster and bulk.

  8. Multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy for in vivo determination of carotenoids in human skin and blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Magnussen, Björn; Lademann, Juergen; Köcher, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive measurement of carotenoid antioxidants in human skin is one of the important tasks to investigate the skin physiology in vivo. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy are the most frequently used non-invasive techniques in dermatology and skin physiology. In the present study, an improved method based on multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy (MSRRS) was introduced. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the ‘gold standard’ resonance Raman spectroscopy method and showed strong correlations for the total carotenoid concentration (R  =  0.83) as well as for lycopene (R  =  0.80). The measurement stability was confirmed to be better than 10% within the total temperature range from 5 °C to  +  30 °C and pressure contact between the skin and the MSRRS sensor from 800 Pa to 18 000 Pa. In addition, blood samples taken from the subjects were analyzed for carotenoid concentrations. The MSRRS sensor was calibrated on the blood carotenoid concentrations resulting in being able to predict with a correlation of R  =  0.79. On the basis of blood carotenoids it could be demonstrated that the MSRRS cutaneous measurements are not influenced by Fitzpatrick skin types I-VI. The MSRRS sensor is commercially available under the brand name biozoom.

  9. Pulse Retrieval Algorithm for Interferometric Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating Based on Differential Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hyyti, Janne; Escoto, Esmerando; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2017-01-01

    A novel algorithm for the ultrashort laser pulse characterization method of interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating (iFROG) is presented. Based on a genetic method, namely differential evolution, the algorithm can exploit all available information of an iFROG measurement to retrieve the complex electric field of a pulse. The retrieval is subjected to a series of numerical tests to prove robustness of the algorithm against experimental artifacts and noise. These tests show that the i...

  10. Frequency metrology of a photomixing source for gas phase spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Yang, Chun; Cuisset, Arnaud; Bocquet, Robin; Lours, Michel; Rovera, Daniele

    2010-08-01

    The availability of frequency combs has opened new possibilities for the measurement of optical frequencies. Photomixing is an attractive solution for high resolution THz spectroscopy of gases due to the narrow spectral resolution and ability to access the 100 GHz to 3.5 THz range. One limitation of present photomixing spectrometers is the accuracy with which the THz frequency is established. Measurement of the centre frequency gas phase molecular transitions requires an accuracy better than 100 kHz in order to allow spectroscopic constants to be determined. Standard optical techniques like those employed in wavelength meters can only provide accuracies in the order of 50 MHz. We have used a turnkey fibre based frequency comb and a standard photomixing configuration to realize a THz synthesizer with an accuracy of around 50kHz. Two ECDLs used to pump the photomixer are phase locked onto the frequency comb and provide a tuning range of 10 MHz. In order to extend the tuning range an additional phase locked ECLD has been added to obtain a range in excess of 100 MHz. The absorption profiles of many Doppler limited transitions of carbonyl sulphide and formaldehyde have been measured to validate this instrument.

  11. Laser frequency stabilization by combining modulation transfer and frequency modulation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Fei; Wu, Xuejian; Zhong, Weicheng; Parker, Richard H; Yu, Chenghui; Budker, Simon; Lu, Xuanhui; Müller, Holger

    2017-04-01

    We present a hybrid laser frequency stabilization method combining modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS) and frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) for the cesium D2 transition. In a typical pump-probe setup, the error signal is a combination of the DC-coupled MTS error signal and the AC-coupled FMS error signal. This combines the long-term stability of the former with the high signal-to-noise ratio of the latter. In addition, we enhance the long-term frequency stability with laser intensity stabilization. By measuring the frequency difference between two independent hybrid spectroscopies, we investigate the short-and long-term stability. We find a long-term stability of 7.8 kHz characterized by a standard deviation of the beating frequency drift over the course of 10 h and a short-term stability of 1.9 kHz characterized by an Allan deviation of that at 2 s of integration time.

  12. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a chopper wheel as a fast shutter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E.; Boffard, John B.; Lin, Chun C.

    2015-01-01

    Widely available, small form-factor, fiber-coupled spectrometers typically have a minimum exposure time measured in milliseconds, and thus cannot be used directly for time-resolved measurements at the microsecond level. Spectroscopy at these faster time scales is typically done with an intensified charge coupled device (CCD) system where the image intensifier acts as a “fast” electronic shutter for the slower CCD array. In this paper, we describe simple modifications to a commercially available chopper wheel system to allow it to be used as a “fast” mechanical shutter for gating a fiber-coupled spectrometer to achieve microsecond-scale time-resolved optical measurements of a periodically pulsed light source. With the chopper wheel synchronized to the pulsing of the light source, the time resolution can be set to a small fraction of the pulse period by using a chopper wheel with narrow slots separated by wide spokes. Different methods of synchronizing the chopper wheel and pulsing of the light sources are explored. The capability of the chopper wheel system is illustrated with time-resolved measurements of pulsed plasmas

  13. Frame-Transfer Gating Raman Spectroscopy for Time-Resolved Multiscalar Combustion Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Fischer, David G.; Kojima, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Accurate experimental measurement of spatially and temporally resolved variations in chemical composition (species concentrations) and temperature in turbulent flames is vital for characterizing the complex phenomena occurring in most practical combustion systems. These diagnostic measurements are called multiscalar because they are capable of acquiring multiple scalar quantities simultaneously. Multiscalar diagnostics also play a critical role in the area of computational code validation. In order to improve the design of combustion devices, computational codes for modeling turbulent combustion are often used to speed up and optimize the development process. The experimental validation of these codes is a critical step in accepting their predictions for engine performance in the absence of cost-prohibitive testing. One of the most critical aspects of setting up a time-resolved stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) diagnostic system is the temporal optical gating scheme. A short optical gate is necessary in order for weak SRS signals to be detected with a good signal- to-noise ratio (SNR) in the presence of strong background optical emissions. This time-synchronized optical gating is a classical problem even to other spectroscopic techniques such as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) or laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Traditionally, experimenters have had basically two options for gating: (1) an electronic means of gating using an image intensifier before the charge-coupled-device (CCD), or (2) a mechanical optical shutter (a rotary chopper/mechanical shutter combination). A new diagnostic technology has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center that utilizes a frame-transfer CCD sensor, in conjunction with a pulsed laser and multiplex optical fiber collection, to realize time-resolved Raman spectroscopy of turbulent flames that is free from optical background noise (interference). The technology permits not only shorter temporal optical gating (down

  14. Time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques for the study of interfacial charge dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neppl, Stefan, E-mail: sneppl@lbl.gov; Gessner, Oliver

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Ultrafast interfacial charge transfer is probed with atomic site specificity. • Femtosecond X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using a free electron laser. • Efficient and flexible picosecond X-ray photoelectron pump–probe scheme using synchrotron radiation. - Abstract: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is one of the most powerful techniques to quantitatively analyze the chemical composition and electronic structure of surfaces and interfaces in a non-destructive fashion. Extending this technique into the time domain has the exciting potential to shed new light on electronic and chemical dynamics at surfaces by revealing transient charge configurations with element- and site-specificity. Here, we describe prospects and challenges that are associated with the implementation of picosecond and femtosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at third-generation synchrotrons and X-ray free-electron lasers, respectively. In particular, we discuss a series of laser-pump/X-ray-probe photoemission experiments performed on semiconductor surfaces, molecule-semiconductor interfaces, and films of semiconductor nanoparticles that demonstrate the high sensitivity of time-resolved XPS to light-induced charge carrier generation, diffusion and recombination within the space charge layers of these materials. Employing the showcase example of photo-induced electronic dynamics in a dye-sensitized semiconductor system, we highlight the unique possibility to probe heterogeneous charge transfer dynamics from both sides of an interface, i.e., from the perspective of the molecular electron donor and the semiconductor acceptor, simultaneously. Such capabilities will be crucial to improve our microscopic understanding of interfacial charge redistribution and associated chemical dynamics, which are at the heart of emerging energy conversion, solar fuel generation, and energy storage technologies.

  15. Application of cascaded frequency multiplication to molecular spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Maiwald, Frank W.; Pearson, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory molecular spectroscopy provides the basis for interpretation of atmospheric, planetary, and astrophysical data gathered by remote sensing. Laboratory studies of atomic and molecular signatures across the electromagnetic spectrum provide high-precision, quantitative data used to interpret the observed environment from remote measurements. Historically, the region of the spectrum above 500 GHz has been relatively unexplored due to atmospheric absorption and technical difficulties generating and detecting radiation. Laboratory spectroscopy at these frequencies has traditionally involved measurement of one or two absorption features and relied on fitting of models to the limited data. We report a new spectrometer built around a computer-controlled commercial synthesizer and millimeter-wave module driving a series of amplifiers followed by a series of wide-bandwidth frequency doublers and triplers. The spectrometer provides the ability to rapidly measure large pieces of frequency space with higher resolution, accuracy, and sensitivity than with Fourier transform infrared techniques. The approach is simple, modular, and requires no custom-built electronics or high voltage and facilitates the use of infrared data analysis techniques on complex submillimeter spectra

  16. Noise-Immune Cavity-Enhanced Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Lucile; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Johanssson, Alexandra C.; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2015-06-01

    We present noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy (NICE-OFCS), a recently developed technique for sensitive, broadband, and high resolution spectroscopy. In NICE-OFCS an optical frequency comb (OFC) is locked to a high finesse cavity and phase-modulated at a frequency precisely equal to (a multiple of) the cavity free spectral range. Since each comb line and sideband is transmitted through a separate cavity mode in exactly the same way, any residual frequency noise on the OFC relative to the cavity affects each component in an identical manner. The transmitted intensity contains a beat signal at the modulation frequency that is immune to frequency-to-amplitude noise conversion by the cavity, in a way similar to continuous wave noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). The light transmitted through the cavity is detected with a fast-scanning Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) and the NICE-OFCS signal is obtained by fast Fourier transform of the synchronously demodulated interferogram. Our NICE-OFCS system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a cavity with a finesse of ˜9000 and a fast-scanning FTS equipped with a high-bandwidth commercial detector. We measured NICE-OFCS signals from the 3νb{1}+νb{3} overtone band of CO_2 around 1.57 μm and achieved absorption sensitivity 6.4×10-11cm-1 Hz-1/2 per spectral element, corresponding to a minimum detectable CO_2 concentration of 25 ppb after 330 s integration time. We will describe the principles of the technique and its technical implementation, and discuss the spectral lineshapes of the NICE-OFCS signals. A. Khodabakhsh, C. Abd Alrahman, and A. Foltynowicz, Opt. Lett. 39, 5034-5037 (2014). J. Ye, L. S. Ma, and J. L. Hall, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 15, 6-15 (1998). A. Khodabakhsh, A. C. Johansson, and A. Foltynowicz, Appl. Phys. B (2015) doi:10.1007/s00340-015-6010-7.

  17. Voxel-based measurement sensitivity of spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy in layered tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2018-03-01

    We quantitatively investigated the measurement sensitivity of spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) across six tissue models: cerebral tissue, a small animal brain, the forehead of a fetus, an adult brain, forearm muscle, and thigh muscle. The optical path length in the voxel of the model was analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that the measurement sensitivity can be represented as the product of the change in the absorption coefficient and the difference in optical path length in two states with different source-detector distances. The results clarified the sensitivity ratio between the surface layer and the deep layer at each source-detector distance for each model and identified changes in the deep measurement area when one of the detectors was close to the light source. A comparison was made with the results from continuous-wave spectroscopy. The study also identified measurement challenges that arise when the surface layer is inhomogeneous. Findings on the measurement sensitivity of SRS at each voxel and in each layer can support the correct interpretation of measured values when near-infrared oximetry or functional near-infrared spectroscopy is used to investigate different tissue structures. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  18. Two-photon direct frequency comb spectroscopy of alkali atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Christopher; Pradhananga, Trinity; Nguyen, Khoa; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Kimball, Derek

    2012-11-01

    We have studied transition frequencies and excited state hyperfine structure in rubidium using 2-photon transitions excited directly with the frequency-doubled output of a erbium fiber optical frequency comb. The frequency comb output is directed in two counterpropagating directions through a vapor cell containing the rubidium vapor. A pair of optical filters is used to select teeth of the comb in order to identify the transition wavelengths. A photomultiplier tube (PMT) measures fluorescence from a decay channel wavelength selected with another optical filter. Using different combinations of filters enables a wide range of transitions to be investigated. By scanning the repetition rate, a Doppler-free spectrum can be obtained enabling kHz-resolution spectral measurements. An interesting dependence of the 2-photon spectrum on the energy of the intermediate state of the 2-photon transition is discussed. Our investigations are laying the groundwork for a long-term research program to use direct frequency comb spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms.

  19. Spectrally resolved, broadband frequency response characterization of photodetectors using continuous-wave supercontinuum sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Vishal; Prakash, Roopa; Nagarjun, K. P.; Supradeepa, V. R.

    2018-02-01

    A simple and powerful method using continuous wave supercontinuum lasers is demonstrated to perform spectrally resolved, broadband frequency response characterization of photodetectors in the NIR Band. In contrast to existing techniques, this method allows for a simple system to achieve the goal, requiring just a standard continuous wave(CW) high-power fiber laser source and an RF spectrum analyzer. From our recent work, we summarize methods to easily convert any high-power fiber laser into a CW supercontinuum. These sources in the time domain exhibit interesting properties all the way down to the femtosecond time scale. This enables measurement of broadband frequency response of photodetectors while the wide optical spectrum of the supercontinuum can be spectrally filtered to obtain this information in a spectrally resolved fashion. The method involves looking at the RF spectrum of the output of a photodetector under test when incident with the supercontinuum. By using prior knowledge of the RF spectrum of the source, the frequency response can be calculated. We utilize two techniques for calibration of the source spectrum, one using a prior measurement and the other relying on a fitted model. Here, we characterize multiple photodetectors from 150MHz bandwidth to >20GHz bandwidth at multiple bands in the NIR region. We utilize a supercontinuum source spanning over 700nm bandwidth from 1300nm to 2000nm. For spectrally resolved measurement, we utilize multiple wavelength bands such as around 1400nm and 1600nm. Interesting behavior was observed in the frequency response of the photodetectors when comparing broadband spectral excitation versus narrower band excitation.

  20. Frequency-resolved interferometric measurement of local density fluctuations for turbulent combustion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köberl, S; Giuliani, F; Woisetschläger, J; Fontaneto, F

    2010-01-01

    A validation of a novel interferometric measurement technique for the frequency-resolved detection of local density fluctuation in turbulent combustion analysis was performed in this work. Two laser vibrometer systems together with a signal analyser were used to obtain frequency spectra of density fluctuations across a methane-jet flame. Since laser vibrometry is based on interferometric techniques, the derived signals are path-integrals along the measurement beam. To obtain local frequency spectra of density fluctuations, long-time-averaged measurements from each of the two systems were performed using correlation functions and cross spectra. Results were compared to data recorded by standard interferometric techniques for validation purposes. Additionally, Raman scattering and laser Doppler velocimetry were used for flame characterization

  1. Time-resolved study of formate on Ni( 1 1 1 ) by picosecond SFG spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusafuka, K.; Noguchi, H.; Onda, K.; Kubota, J.; Domen, K.; Hirose, C.; Wada, A.

    2002-04-01

    Time-resolved vibrational measurements were carried out on formate (HCOO) adsorbed on Ni(1 1 1) surface by combining the sum-frequency generation method and picosecond laser system (time resolution of 6 ps). Rapid intensity decrease (within the time resolution) followed by intensity recovery (time constant of several tens of ps) of CH stretching signal was observed when picosecond 800 nm pulse was irradiated on the sample surface. From the results of temperature and pump fluence dependences of temporal behaviour of signal intensity, we concluded that the observed intensity change was induced by non-thermal process. Mechanism of the temporal intensity change was discussed.

  2. Computational expressions for signals in frequency-modulation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rosa, Michael D; Reiten, M T

    2015-06-01

    General expressions for the signals in frequency-modulation spectroscopy (FMS) appear in the literature but are often reduced to simple analytical equations following the assumption of a weak modulation index. This is little help to the experimentalist who wants to predict signals for modulation depths of the order of unity or greater, where strong FMS signals reside. Here, we develop general formulas for FMS signals in the case of an absorber with a Voigt line shape and then link these expressions to an example and existing numerical code for the line shape. The resulting computational recipe is easy to implement and exercised here to show where the larger FMS signals are found over the coordinates of modulation index and modulation frequency. One can also estimate from provided curves the in-phase FMS signal over a wide range of modulation parameters at either the Lorentzian-broadening or Doppler-broadening limit, or anywhere in between by interpolation.

  3. Dimensional Crossover in a Charge Density Wave Material Probed by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, C. W.; Berthod, C.; Puppin, M.; Berger, H.; Wolf, M.; Hoesch, M.; Monney, C.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data reveal evidence of a crossover from one-dimensional (1D) to three-dimensional (3D) behavior in the prototypical charge density wave (CDW) material NbSe3 . In the low-temperature 3D regime, gaps in the electronic structure are observed due to two incommensurate CDWs, in agreement with x-ray diffraction and electronic-structure calculations. At higher temperatures we observe a spectral weight depletion that approaches the power-law behavior expected in one dimension. From the warping of the quasi-1D Fermi surface at low temperatures, we extract the energy scale of the dimensional crossover. This is corroborated by a detailed analysis of the density of states, which reveals a change in dimensional behavior dependent on binding energy. Our results offer an important insight into the dimensionality of excitations in quasi-1D materials.

  4. Time-resolved pump-probe X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of Gaq3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicke, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Gallium(tris-8-hydroxyquinoline) (Gaq 3 ) belongs to a class of metal organic compounds, used as electron transport layer and emissive layer in organic light emitting diodes. Many research activities have concentrated on the optical and electronic properties, especially of the homologue molecule aluminum(tris-8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq 3 ). Knowledge of the first excited state S 1 structure of these molecules could provide deeper insight into the processes involved into the operation of electronic devices, such as OLEDs and, hence, it could further improve their efficiency and optical properties. Until now the excited state structure could not be determined experimentally. Most of the information about this structure mainly arises from theoretical calculations. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is a well developed technique to determine both, the electronic and the geometric properties of a sample. The connection of ultrashort pulsed X-ray sources with a pulsed laser system offers the possibility to use XAFS as a tool for studying the transient changes of a sample induced by a laser pulse. In the framework of this thesis a new setup for time-resolved pump-probe X-ray absorption spectroscopy at PETRA III beamline P11 was developed for measuring samples in liquid form. In this setup the sample is pumped into its photo-excited state by a femtosecond laser pump pulse with 343 nm wavelength and after a certain time delay probed by an X-ray probe pulse. In this way the first excited singlet state S 1 of Gaq 3 dissolved in benzyl alcohol was analyzed. A structural model for the excited state structure of the Gaq 3 molecule based on the several times reproduced results of the XAFS experiments is proposed. According to this model it was found that the Ga-N A bond length is elongated, while the Ga-O A bond length is shortened upon photoexcitation. The dynamics of the structural changes were not the focus of this thesis. Nevertheless the excited state lifetime

  5. The application of time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy to a remote uranyl sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varineau, P.T.; Duesing, R.; Wangen, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Time resolved luminescence spectroscopy is an effective method for the determination of a wide range of uranyl concentrations in aqueous samples. We have applied this technique to the development of a remote sensing device using fiber optic cables coupled with a micro flow cell in order to probe for uranyl in aqueous samples. This sensor incorporates a Nafion membrane through which UO 2 2+ can diffuse in to a reaction/analysis chamber which holds phosphoric acid, a reagent which enhances the uranyl luminescence intensity and lifetime. With this device, anionic and fluorescing organic interferences could be eliminated, allowing for the determination of uranyl over a concentration range of 10 4 to 10 -9 M. 17 refs., 5 figs

  6. General theoretical description of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of van der Waals structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, B.

    2018-04-01

    We develop a general theory to model the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) of commensurate and incommensurate van der Waals (vdW) structures, formed by lattice mismatched and/or misaligned stacked layers of two-dimensional materials. The present theory is based on a tight-binding description of the structure and the concept of generalized umklapp processes, going beyond previous descriptions of ARPES in incommensurate vdW structures, which are based on continuous, low-energy models, being limited to structures with small lattice mismatch/misalignment. As applications of the general formalism, we study the ARPES bands and constant energy maps for two structures: twisted bilayer graphene and twisted bilayer MoS2. The present theory should be useful in correctly interpreting experimental results of ARPES of vdW structures and other systems displaying competition between different periodicities, such as two-dimensional materials weakly coupled to a substrate and materials with density wave phases.

  7. Structure-activity relationships of heterogeneous catalysts from time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ressler, T.; Jentoft, R.E.; Wienold, J.; Girgsdies, F.; Neisius, T.; Timpe, O.

    2003-01-01

    Knowing the composition and the evolution of the bulk structure of a heterogeneous catalyst under working conditions (in situ) is a pre-requisite for understanding structure-activity relationships. X-ray absorption spectroscopy can be employed to study a catalytically active material in situ. In addition to steady-state investigations, the technique permits experiments with a time-resolution in the sub-second range to elucidate the solid-state kinetics of the reactions involved. Combined with mass spectrometry, the evolution of the short-range order structure of a heterogeneous catalyst, the average valence of the constituent metals, and the phase composition can be obtained. Here we present results obtained from time-resolved studies on the reduction of MoO 3 in propene and in propene and oxygen

  8. Femtosecond time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy using sub-7-fs pulses: Apparatus and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramochi, Hikaru [Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei, E-mail: tahei@riken.jp [Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Ultrafast Spectroscopy Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (RAP), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    We describe details of the setup for time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy (TR-ISRS). In this method, snapshot molecular vibrational spectra of the photoreaction transients are captured via time-domain Raman probing using ultrashort pulses. Our instrument features transform-limited sub-7-fs pulses to impulsively excite and probe coherent nuclear wavepacket motions, allowing us to observe vibrational fingerprints of transient species from the terahertz to 3000-cm{sup −1} region with high sensitivity. Key optical components for the best spectroscopic performance are discussed. The TR-ISRS measurements for the excited states of diphenylacetylene in cyclohexane are demonstrated, highlighting the capability of our setup to track femtosecond dynamics of all the Raman-active fundamental molecular vibrations.

  9. Imaging buried organic islands by spatially resolved ballistic electron emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, Kuan Eng J; Bannani, A; Troadec, C

    2008-01-01

    The well-known Au/n-Si(111) Schottky interface is modified by a discontinuous pentacene film (∼1.5 nm thick) and studied using spatially resolved ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). The pentacene film introduced subtle changes to the interface which cannot be definitively detected by current-voltage measurements or a standard BEES analysis of the barrier height. In contrast, analyzing the BEES results in a dual-parameter (transmission attenuation and barrier height) space allows the effect of the pentacene film on the Au/n-Si(111) interface to be clearly demonstrated. We found that the pentacene film behaves like a tunneling barrier and increases the distribution of local barrier heights with a tendency toward lower values. Our results highlight the potential of the dual-parameter BEES analysis for understanding local interface modification by molecules.

  10. Isotope effect on hydrated electron relaxation dynamics studied with time-resolved liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-05-01

    The excited state relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron in H2O and D2O are investigated using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy in a liquid microjet. The data show that the initial excited state decays on a time scale of 75 ± 12 fs in H2O and 102 ± 8 fs in D2O, followed by slower relaxation on time scales of 400 ± 70 fs and 390 ± 70 fs that are isotopically invariant within the precision of our measurements. Based on the time evolution of the transient signals, the faster and slower time constants are assigned to p → s internal conversion (IC) of the hydrated electron and relaxation on the ground electronic state, respectively. This assignment is consistent with the non-adiabatic mechanism for relaxation of the hydrated electron and yields an isotope effect of 1.4 ± 0.2 for IC of the hydrated electron.

  11. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of liquid water at 29.5 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitani, Junichi; West, Christopher W; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2017-07-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of liquid water was performed using extreme ultraviolet radiation at 29.5 eV and a time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer. SiC/Mg coated mirrors were employed to select the single-order 19th harmonic from laser high harmonics, which provided a constant photon flux for different laser polarizations. The instrument was tested by measuring photoemission anisotropy for rare gases and water molecules and applied to a microjet of an aqueous NaI solution. The solute concentration was adjusted to eliminate an electric field gradient around the microjet. The observed photoelectron spectra were analyzed considering contributions from liquid water, water vapor, and an isotropic background. The anisotropy parameters of the valence bands (1 b 1 , 3 a 1 , and 1 b 2 ) of liquid water are considerably smaller than those of gaseous water, which is primarily attributed to electron scattering in liquid water.

  12. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of liquid water at 29.5 eV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Nishitani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of liquid water was performed using extreme ultraviolet radiation at 29.5 eV and a time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer. SiC/Mg coated mirrors were employed to select the single-order 19th harmonic from laser high harmonics, which provided a constant photon flux for different laser polarizations. The instrument was tested by measuring photoemission anisotropy for rare gases and water molecules and applied to a microjet of an aqueous NaI solution. The solute concentration was adjusted to eliminate an electric field gradient around the microjet. The observed photoelectron spectra were analyzed considering contributions from liquid water, water vapor, and an isotropic background. The anisotropy parameters of the valence bands (1b1, 3a1, and 1b2 of liquid water are considerably smaller than those of gaseous water, which is primarily attributed to electron scattering in liquid water.

  13. Exploring the Dynamics of Superconductors by Time-Resolved Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, G. L.; Lobo, R. P. S. M.; LaVeigne, J.; Reitze, D. H.; Tanner, D. B.

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the recombination of excess quasiparticles in superconducting Pb by time-resolved far-infrared spectroscopy using a pulsed synchrotron source. The energy gap shift calculated by Owen and Scalapino [Phys. Rev. Lett. 28, 1559 (1972)] is directly observed, as is the associated reduction in the Cooper pair density. The relaxation process involves a two-component decay; the faster (∼200 ps) is associated with the actual (effective) recombination process, while the slower (∼10 to 100ns) is due to heat transport across the film/substrate interface. The temperature dependence of the recombination process between 0.5T c and 0.85T c is in good agreement with theory

  14. Direct observation of superconducting gaps in MgB 2 by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souma, S.; Machida, Y.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Matsui, H.; Wang, S.-C.; Ding, H.; Kaminski, A.; Campuzano, J. C.; Sasaki, S.; Kadowaki, K.

    2004-08-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been carried out to clarify the anomalous superconductivity of MgB 2. We observed three bands crossing the Fermi level, which are ascribed to B2p-σ, π and surface bands. We have succeeded for the first time in directly observing the superconducting gaps of these bands separately. We have found that the superconducting-gap sizes of σ and surface bands are 6.5 ± 0.5 and 6.0 ± 0.5 meV, respectively, while that of the π band is much smaller (1.5 ± 0.5 meV). The present experimental result unambiguously demonstrates the validity of the two-band superconductivity in MgB 2.

  15. Direct observation of superconducting gaps in MgB2 by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souma, S.; Machida, Y.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Matsui, H.; Wang, S.-C.; Ding, H.; Kaminski, A.; Campuzano, J.C.; Sasaki, S.; Kadowaki, K.

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been carried out to clarify the anomalous superconductivity of MgB 2 . We observed three bands crossing the Fermi level, which are ascribed to B2p-σ, π and surface bands. We have succeeded for the first time in directly observing the superconducting gaps of these bands separately. We have found that the superconducting-gap sizes of σ and surface bands are 6.5 ± 0.5 and 6.0 ± 0.5 meV, respectively, while that of the π band is much smaller (1.5 ± 0.5 meV). The present experimental result unambiguously demonstrates the validity of the two-band superconductivity in MgB 2

  16. Development of Micron-Resolved Electron Spectroscopy to Study Organic Thin Films in Real Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.-H.; Fan, L.-J.; Yang, Y.-W.; Su, J.-W.; Chan, S.-W.; Chen, M.-C.

    2010-01-01

    A straightforward application of an electron energy analyzer equipped with an image detector to micron-resolved electron spectroscopic studies of organic thin film devices is reported. The electron spectroscopies implemented include synchrotron-based UPS, XPS, and Auger yield NEXAFS. Along the non-energy-dispersion direction of the analyzer, a spatial resolution of ∼40 μm is obtained through the employment of entrance slits, electrostatic lenses and segmented CCD detector. One significant benefit offered by the technique is that the electronic transport and electronic structure of the same micron-sized sample can be directly examined. The example illustrated is a top-contact organic field effect transistor (OFET) fabricated from semiconducting triethylsilylethynyl anthradithiophene and gold electrodes. It is found that an extensive out-diffusion of gold atoms to adjacent conduction channels takes place, presumably due to the inability of soft organic materials in dissipating the excess energy with which gaseous Au atoms possess.

  17. Development of in situ time-resolved Raman spectroscopy facility for dynamic shock loading in materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, S.; Rastogi, V.; Rao, U.; Sijoy, C. D.; Mishra, V.; Deo, M. N.

    2017-11-01

    The transient state of excitation and relaxation processes in materials under shock compression can be investigated by coupling the laser driven shock facility with Raman spectroscopy. For this purpose, a time resolved Raman spectroscopy setup has been developed to monitor the physical and the chemical changes such as phase transitions, chemical reactions, molecular kinetics etc., under shock compression with nanosecond time resolution. This system consist of mainly three parts, a 2 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser system used for generation of pump and probe beams, a Raman spectrometer with temporal and spectral resolution of 1.2 ns and 3 cm-1 respectively and a target holder in confinement geometry assembly. Detailed simulation for the optimization of confinement geometry targets is performed. Time resolved measurement of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) targets at focused laser intensity of 2.2 GW/cm2 has been done. The corresponding pressure in the Aluminum and PTFE are 3.6 and 1.7 GPa respectively. At 1.7 GPa in PTFE, a red shift of 5 cm-1 is observed for the CF2 twisting mode (291 cm-1). Shock velocity in PTFE is calculated by measuring rate of change of ratios of the intensity of Raman lines scattered from shocked volume to total volume of sample in the laser focal spot along the laser axis. The calculated shock velocity in PTFE is found to be 1.64 ± 0.16 km/s at shock pressure of 1.7 GPa, for present experimental conditions.

  18. Improved ultrashort pulse-retrieval algorithm for frequency-resolved optical gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.

    1994-01-01

    We report on significant improvements in the pulse-retrieval algorithm used to reconstruct the amplitude and the phase of ultrashort optical pulses from the experimental frequency-resolved optical gating trace data in the polarization-gate geometry. These improvements involve the use of an intensity constraint, an overcorrection technique, and a multidimensional minimization scheme. While the previously published, basic algorithm converged for most common ultrashort pulses, it failed to retrieve pulses with significant intensity substructure. The improved composite algorithm successfully converges for such pulses. It can now retrieve essentially all pulses of practical interest. We present examples of complex waveforms that were retrieved by the improved algorithm

  19. Ultrashort-pulse measurement using noninstantaneous nonlinearities: Raman effects in frequency-resolved optical gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLong, K.W.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.; Kohler, B.; Wilson, K.R.

    1995-01-01

    Ultrashort-pulse-characterization techniques generally require instantaneously responding media. We show that this is not the case for frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). We include, as an example, the noninstantaneous Raman response of fused silica, which can cause errors in the retrieved pulse width of as much as 8% for a 25-fs pulse in polarization-gate FROG. We present a modified pulse-retrieval algorithm that deconvolves such slow effects and use it to retrieve pulses of any width. In experiments with 45-fs pulses this algorithm achieved better convergence and yielded a shorter pulse than previous FROG algorithms

  20. Time-resolved experiments in the frequency domain using synchrotron radiation (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Giusti, A. M.; Parasassi, T.; Ravagnan, G.; Sapora, O.

    1992-01-01

    PLASTIQUE is the only synchrotron radiation beam line in the world that performs time-resolved fluorescence experiments in frequency domain. These experiments are extremely valuable sources of information on the structure and the dynamics of molecules. This technique measures fluorescence lifetimes with picosecond resolution in the near UV spectral range. Such accurate measurements are rendered possible by taking phase and modulation data, and by the advantages of the cross-correlation technique. A successful experiment demonstrated the radiation damage induced by low doses of radiation on rabbit blood cell membranes.

  1. Femtosecond time-resolved vibrational SFG spectroscopy of CO/Ru( 0 0 1 )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Ch.; Wolf, M.; Roke, S.; Bonn, M.

    2002-04-01

    Vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) employing femtosecond infrared (IR) laser pulses is used to study the dynamics of the C-O stretch vibration on Ru(0 0 1). Time-resolved measurements of the free induction decay (FID) of the IR-polarization for 0.33 ML CO/Ru(0 0 1) exhibit single exponential decays over three decades corresponding to dephasing times of T2=1.94 ps at 95 K and T2=1.16 ps at 340 K. This is consistent with pure homogeneous broadening due to anharmonic coupling with the thermally activated low-frequency dephasing mode together with a contribution from saturation of the IR transition. In pump-probe SFG experiments using a strong visible (VIS) pump pulse the perturbation of the FID leads to transient line shifts even at negative delay times, i.e. when the IR-VIS SFG probe pair precedes the pump pulse. Based on an analysis of the time-dependent polarization we discuss the influence of the perturbed FID on time-resolved SFG spectra. We investigate how coherent effects affect the SFG spectra and we examine the time resolution in these experiments, in particular in dependence of the dephasing time.

  2. Angle-resolved reflection spectroscopy of high-quality PMMA opal crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsev, Ivan V.; Tambasov, Igor A.; Ivanenko, Alexander A.; Zyryanov, Victor Ya.

    2018-02-01

    PMMA opal crystal was prepared by a simple hybrid method, which includes sedimentation, meniscus formation and evaporation. We investigated three surfaces of this crystal by angle-resolved reflective light spectroscopy and SEM study. The angle-resolved reflective measurements were carried out in the 400-1100 nm range. We have determined the high-quality ordered surface of the crystal region. Narrow particle size distribution of the surface has been revealed. The average particle diameter obtained with SEM was nearly 361 nm. The most interesting result was that reflectivity of the surface turned out up to 98% at normal light incidence. Using a fit of dependences of the maximum reflectivity wavelength from an angle based on the Bragg-Snell law, the wavelength of maximum 0° reflectivity, the particle diameter and the fill factor have been determined. For the best surface maximum reflectivity wavelength of a 0° angle was estimated to be 869 nm. The particle diameter and fill factor were calculated as 372 nm and 0.8715, respectively. The diameter obtained by fitting is in excellent agreement with the particle diameter obtained with SEM. The reflectivity maximum is assumed to increase significantly when increasing the fill factor. We believe that using our simple approach to manufacture PMMA opal crystals will significantly increase the fabrication of high-quality photonic crystal templates and thin films.

  3. Quantum state-resolved gas/surface reaction dynamics probed by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Li [Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, Goettingen (Germany); Ueta, Hirokazu; Beck, Rainer D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Moleculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Bisson, Regis [Aix-Marseille Universite, PIIM, CNRS, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France)

    2013-05-15

    We report the design and characterization of a new molecular-beam/surface-science apparatus for quantum state-resolved studies of gas/surface reaction dynamics combining optical state-specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage with detection of surface-bound reaction products by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). RAIRS is a non-invasive infrared spectroscopic detection technique that enables online monitoring of the buildup of reaction products on the target surface during reactant deposition by a molecular beam. The product uptake rate obtained by calibrated RAIRS detection yields the coverage dependent state-resolved reaction probability S({theta}). Furthermore, the infrared absorption spectra of the adsorbed products obtained by the RAIRS technique provide structural information, which help to identify nascent reaction products, investigate reaction pathways, and determine branching ratios for different pathways of a chemisorption reaction. Measurements of the dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111) with this new apparatus are presented to illustrate the utility of RAIRS detection for highly detailed studies of chemical reactions at the gas/surface interface.

  4. Scanning photoelectron microscope for nanoscale three-dimensional spatial-resolved electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiba, K; Nakamura, Y; Nagamura, N; Toyoda, S; Kumigashira, H; Oshima, M; Amemiya, K; Senba, Y; Ohashi, H

    2011-11-01

    In order to achieve nondestructive observation of the three-dimensional spatially resolved electronic structure of solids, we have developed a scanning photoelectron microscope system with the capability of depth profiling in electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). We call this system 3D nano-ESCA. For focusing the x-ray, a Fresnel zone plate with a diameter of 200 μm and an outermost zone width of 35 nm is used. In order to obtain the angular dependence of the photoelectron spectra for the depth-profile analysis without rotating the sample, we adopted a modified VG Scienta R3000 analyzer with an acceptance angle of 60° as a high-resolution angle-resolved electron spectrometer. The system has been installed at the University-of-Tokyo Materials Science Outstation beamline, BL07LSU, at SPring-8. From the results of the line-scan profiles of the poly-Si/high-k gate patterns, we achieved a total spatial resolution better than 70 nm. The capability of our system for pinpoint depth-profile analysis and high-resolution chemical state analysis is demonstrated. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  5. Spatially resolved x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy of beryllium capsule implosions at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Bishel, D. T.; Saunders, A. M.; Scott, H. A.; Kyrala, G.; Kline, J.; MacLaren, S.; Thorn, D. B.; Yi, S. A.; Zylstra, A. B.; Falcone, R. W.; Doeppner, T.

    2017-10-01

    Beryllium ablators used in indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are doped with copper to prevent preheat of the cryogenic hydrogen fuel. Here, we present analysis of spatially resolved copper K- α fluorescence spectra from the beryllium ablator layer. It has been shown that K- α fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to measure plasma conditions of partially ionized dopants in high energy density systems. In these experiments, K-shell vacancies in the copper dopant are created by the hotspot emission at stagnation, resulting in K-shell fluorescence at bang time. Spatially resolved copper K- α emission spectra are compared to atomic kinetics and radiation code simulations to infer density and temperature profiles. This work was supported by the US DOE under Grant No. DE-NA0001859, under the auspices of the US DOE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and by Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-06NA52396.

  6. Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy: Watching atoms dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Chris J.; Pham, Van-Thai; Gawelda, Wojciech; van der Veen, Renske M.; El Nahhas, Amal; Johnson, Steven L.; Beaud, Paul; Ingold, Gerhard; Lima, Frederico; Vithanage, Dimali A.; Benfatto, Maurizio; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Kaiser, Maik; Hauser, Andreas; Abela, Rafael; Bressler, Christian; Chergui, Majed

    2009-11-01

    The introduction of pump-probe techniques to the field of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has allowed the monitoring of both structural and electronic dynamics of disordered systems in the condensed phase with unprecedented accuracy, both in time and in space. We present results on the electronically excited high-spin state structure of an Fe(II) molecular species, [FeII(bpy)3]2+, in aqueous solution, resolving the Fe-N bond distance elongation as 0.2 Å. In addition an analysis technique using the reduced χ2 goodness of fit between FEFF EXAFS simulations and the experimental transient absorption signal in energy space has been successfully tested as a function of excited state population and chemical shift, demonstrating its applicability in situations where the fractional excited state population cannot be determined through other measurements. Finally by using a novel ultrafast hard x-ray 'slicing' source the question of how the molecule relaxes after optical excitation has been successfully resolved using femtosecond XANES.

  7. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  8. Time-resolved ultraviolet laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for organic material analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudelet, Matthieu; Boueri, Myriam [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5579, 43, Bd. du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Yu Jin [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5579, 43, Bd. du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)], E-mail: jin.yu@lasim.univ-lyon1.fr; Mao, Samuel S; Piscitelli, Vincent; Xianglei, Mao; Russo, Richard E [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Ultraviolet pulses (266 nm) delivered by a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser were used to analyze organic samples with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). We present characteristics of the spectra obtained from organic samples with special attentions on the emissions of organic elements, O and N, and molecular bonds CN. The choice of these atomic or molecular species is justified on one hand, by the importance of these species to specify organic or biological materials; and on the other hand by the possible interferences with ambient air when laser ablation takes place in the atmosphere. Time-resolved LIBS was used to determine the time-evolution of line intensity emitted from these species. We demonstrate different kinetic behaviors corresponding to different origins of emitters: native atomic or molecular species directly vaporized from the sample or those generated through dissociation or recombination due to interaction between laser-induced plasma and air molecules. Our results show the ability of time-resolved UV-LIBS for detection and identification of native atomic or molecular species from an organic sample.

  9. New techniques of time-resolved infrared and Raman spectroscopy using ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laubereau, A.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in the field of spectroscopic applications of ultrashort laser pulses. This paper examines two approaches toward studying ultrafast relaxation processes in condensed matter: an IR technique which complements coherent Raman scattering; and a Fourier Raman method with high frequency resolution. The time domain IR spectroscopy technique has been applied to various vibration-rotation transitions of pure HCl gas and in mixtures with Ar buffer gas. The advantage of the time domain measurements instead of frequency spectroscopy is readily visualized when one recalls that a frequency resolution of 10 -3 cm -1 corresponds to time observations over 10 -8 , which are readily feasible. As a first demonstration of the FT-Raman technique the author presents experimental data on the Q-branch of the v 1 -vibrational mode of methane. An example for the experimental data obtained approximately 2 mm behind the nozzle is presented; the coherent anti-Stokes Raman signal is plotted versus delay time. A complicated beating structure and the decay of the signal envelope are readily seen. The desired spectroscopic information is obtained by numerical Fourier transformation of the experimental points presented

  10. Call for papers for special issue of Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy focusing on "Frequency-comb spectroscopy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltynowicz, Aleksandra; Picqué, Nathalie; Ye, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Frequency combs are becoming enabling tools for many applications in science and technology, beyond the original purpose of frequency metrology of simple atoms. The precisely evenly spaced narrow lines of a laser frequency comb inspire intriguing approaches to molecular spectroscopy, designed and implemented by a growing community of scientists. Frequency-comb spectroscopy advances the frontiers of molecular physics across the entire electro-magnetic spectrum. Used as frequency rulers, frequency combs enable absolute frequency measurements and precise line shape studies of molecular transitions, for e.g. tests of fundamental physics and improved determination of fundamental constants. As light sources interrogating the molecular samples, they dramatically improve the resolution, precision, sensitivity and acquisition time of broad spectral-bandwidth spectroscopy and open up new opportunities and applications at the leading edge of molecular spectroscopy and sensing.

  11. Theory of sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of adsorbed molecules using the density matrix method-broadband vibrational sum-frequency generation and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonn, M; Ueba, H; Wolf, M

    2005-01-01

    A generalized theory of frequency- and time-resolved vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy of adsorbates at surfaces is presented using the density matrix formalism. Our theoretical treatment is specifically aimed at addressing issues that accompany the relatively novel SFG approach using broadband infrared pulses. The ultrashort duration of these pulses makes them ideally suited for time-resolved investigations, for which we present a complete theoretical treatment. A second key characteristic of these pulses is their large bandwidth and high intensity, which allow for highly non-linear effects, including vibrational ladder climbing of surface vibrations. We derive general expressions relating the density matrix to SFG spectra, and apply these expressions to specific experimental results by solving the coupled optical Bloch equations of the density matrix elements. Thus, we can theoretically reproduce recent experimentally demonstrated hot band SFG spectra using femtosecond broadband infrared excitation of carbon monoxide (CO) on a Ru(001) surface

  12. Mobile Charge Generation Dynamics in P3HT:PCBM Observed by Time-Resolved Terahertz Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, D. G.; Krebs, Frederik C; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale.......Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale....

  13. Transient photoconductivity in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells, measured by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Cooke, David

    2009-01-01

    Terahertz conductivity of InGaN/GaN MQWs was studied by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. Restoration of the built-in piezoelectric field leads to a nonexponential carrier density decay. Terahertz conductivity spectrum is described by the Drude-Smith......Terahertz conductivity of InGaN/GaN MQWs was studied by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. Restoration of the built-in piezoelectric field leads to a nonexponential carrier density decay. Terahertz conductivity spectrum is described by the Drude-Smith...

  14. Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopies of chemical systems: New perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed Chergui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The past 3–5 years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopic studies, mainly driven by novel technical and methodological developments. The latter include (i the high repetition rate optical pump/X-ray probe studies, which have greatly boosted the signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond (ps X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, while enabling ps X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES at synchrotrons; (ii the X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs are a game changer and have allowed the first femtosecond (fs XES and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments to be carried out; (iii XFELs are also opening the road to the development of non-linear X-ray methods. In this perspective, I will mainly focus on the most recent technical developments and briefly address some examples of scientific questions that have been addressed thanks to them. I will look at the novel opportunities in the horizon.

  15. Sequence-Dependent Mechanism of DNA Oligonucleotide Dehybridization Resolved through Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanstead, Paul J; Stevenson, Paul; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-09-14

    Despite its important role in biology and nanotechnology, many questions remain regarding the molecular mechanism and dynamics by which oligonucleotides recognize and hybridize to their complementary sequence. The thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA oligonucleotide hybridization and dehybridization are often assumed to involve an all-or-nothing two-state dissociation pathway, but deviations from this behavior can be considerable even for short sequences. We introduce a new strategy to characterize the base-pair-specific thermal dissociation mechanism of DNA oligonucleotides through steady-state and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. Experiments are interpreted with a lattice model to provide a structure-specific interpretation. This method is applied to a model set of self-complementary 10-base-pair sequences in which the placement of GC base pairs is varied in an otherwise AT strand. Through a combination of Fourier transform infrared and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, experiments reveal varying degrees of deviation from simple two-state behavior. As the temperature is increased, duplexes dissociate through a path in which the terminal bases fray, without any significant contribution from loop configurations. Transient temperature jump experiments reveal time scales of 70-100 ns for fraying and 10-30 μs for complete dissociation near the melting temperature. Whether or not frayed states are metastable intermediates or short-lived configurations during the full dissociation of the duplex is dictated by the nucleobase sequence.

  16. Time resolved super continuum Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy for multicomponent gas detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaema, Walter Morinobu

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we present a variation of the technique CRDS (Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy) to obtain simultaneously a multicomponent absorption spectrum in a broad visible range. This new approach uses the Supercontinuum (SC) spectrum (resulting from irradiation of nonlinear media by femtosecond lasers, or simply generated by compact sources) as a light source to illuminate the cavity. In this context it is described the features of the modules assembling a MC-SC-CRDS (Multicomponent Supercontinuum Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy): a set of high reflectivity mirrors, the resonant cavity and the detection system. Some problems related to the multimode excitation, stray light, effective use of the dynamic range of the detector, the poor resolution of the instrument to resolve narrow absorption lines are issued. We present the absorption spectra of H 2 O (polyads 4υ, 4υ + δ) and O 2 (spin-forbidden b-X branch) measured simultaneously by this technique in the visible range and a comparison with the absorption lines based on HITRAN database is made to demonstrate the functionality of this method. (author)

  17. a Study on SODIUM(110) and Other Nearly Free Electron Metals Using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyo, In-Whan

    Electronic properties of the epitaxially grown Na(110) film have been studied using angle resolved ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation as the light source. Na provides an ideal ground to study the fundamental aspects of the electron-electron interactions in metals, because of its simple Fermi surface and small pseudopotential. The absolute band structure of Na(110) using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been mapped out using the extrema searching method. The advantage of this approach is that the usual assumption of the unoccupied state dispersion is not required. We have found that the dispersion of Na(1l0) is very close to the parabolic band with the effective mass 1.21 M_{rm e} at 90 K. Self-consistent calculations of the self-energy for the homogeneous electron gas have been performed using the Green's function technique within the framework of the GW approximation, in the hope of understanding the narrowing mechanism of the bandwidth observed for all the nearly-free-electron (NFE) metals. Good agreements between the experimental data and our calculated self-energy were obtained not only for our data on k-dependency from Na(l10), but also for the total bandwidth corrections for other NFE metals, only if dielectric functions beyond the random phase approximation were used. Our findings emphasize the importance of the screening by long wavelength plasmons. Off-normal spectra of angle resolved photoemission from Na(110) show strong asymmetry of the bulk peak intensity for the wide range of photon energies. Using a simple analysis, we show this asymmetry has an origin in the interference of the surface Umklapp electrons with the normal electrons. We have also performed the detailed experimental studies of the anomalous Fermi level structure observed in the forbidden gap region of Na. This was claimed by A. W. Overhauser as the evidence of the charge density wave in the alkali metal. The possibility of this hypothesis is

  18. Charge and frequency resolved isochronous mass spectrometry and the mass of 51Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuai, P.; Xu, H.S.; Tu, X.L.; Zhang, Y.H.; Sun, B.H.; Wang, M.

    2014-01-01

    Revolution frequency measurements of individual ions in storage rings require sophisticated timing detectors. One of common approaches for such detectors is the detection of secondary electrons released from a thin foil due to penetration of the stored ions. A new method based on the analysis of intensities of secondary electrons was developed which enables determination of the charge of each ion simultaneously with the measurement of its revolution frequency. Although the mass-over-charge ratios of 51 Co 27+ and 34 Ar 18+ ions are almost identical, and therefore, the ions cannot be resolved in a storage ring, by applying the new method the mass excess of the short-lived 51 Co is determined for the first time to be ME( 51 Co)=−27342(48) keV. Shell-model calculations in the fp-shell nuclei compared to the new data indicate the need to include isospin-nonconserving forces

  19. Characterization of Ultrafast Laser Pulses using a Low-dispersion Frequency Resolved Optical Grating Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelock, Hope; Bishop, Michael; Khosravi, Soroush; Obaid, Razib; Berrah, Nora

    2016-05-01

    A low dispersion frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) spectrometer was designed to characterize ultrashort (non-colinear optical parametric amplifier. This instrument splits a laser pulse into two replicas with a 90:10 intensity ratio using a thin pellicle beam-splitter and then recombines the pulses in a birefringent medium. The instrument detects a wavelength-sensitive change in polarization of the weak probe pulse in the presence of the stronger pump pulse inside the birefringent medium. Scanning the time delay between the two pulses and acquiring spectra allows for characterization of the frequency and time content of ultrafast laser pulses, that is needed for interpretation of experimental results obtained from these ultrafast laser systems. Funded by the DoE-BES, Grant No. DE-SC0012376.

  20. Spatially Resolved Imaging and Spectroscopy of Candidate Dual Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, R. C.; Max, C. E.; Medling, A. M.; Shields, G. A.; Comerford, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    When galaxies merge, both central supermassive black holes are immersed in a dense and chaotic environment. If there is sufficient gas in the nuclear regions, one expects to see close pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or dual AGNs, in a fraction of galaxy mergers. However, finding them remains a challenge. The presence of double-peaked [O iii] emission lines has been proposed as a technique to select dual AGNs efficiently. We studied a sample of double-peaked narrow [O iii] emitting AGNs from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7. By obtaining new and archival high spatial resolution images taken with the Keck II Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system and the near-infrared camera NIRC2, we show that 30% of 140 double-peaked [O iii] emission line SDSS AGNs have two spatial components within a 3″ radius. However, spatially resolved spectroscopy or X-ray observations are needed to confirm these galaxy pairs as systems containing two AGNs. We followed up three spatially double candidate dual AGNs with integral field spectroscopy from Keck OSIRIS and 10 candidates with long-slit spectroscopy from the Shane Kast Double Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. We find that the double-peaked emission lines in our sample of 12 candidates are caused by: one dual AGN (SDSS J114642.47+511029.6), one confirmed outflow and four likely outflows, two pairs of star-forming galaxies, one candidate indeterminate due to sky line interference, and three AGNs with spatially coincident double [O iii] peaks, likely due to unresolved complex narrow line kinematics, outflows, binary AGN, or small-scale jets.

  1. SPATIALLY RESOLVED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF CANDIDATE DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGurk, R. C.; Max, C. E. [Astronomy Department and UCO-Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Medling, A. M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Shields, G. A. [Laguna Falls Institute for Astrophysics, Austin, TX 78746 (United States); Comerford, J. M., E-mail: rosalie.mcgurk@gmail.com, E-mail: max@ucolick.org, E-mail: anne.medling@anu.edu.au, E-mail: shields@lfastro.org, E-mail: julie.comerford@colorado.edu [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2015-09-20

    When galaxies merge, both central supermassive black holes are immersed in a dense and chaotic environment. If there is sufficient gas in the nuclear regions, one expects to see close pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or dual AGNs, in a fraction of galaxy mergers. However, finding them remains a challenge. The presence of double-peaked [O iii] emission lines has been proposed as a technique to select dual AGNs efficiently. We studied a sample of double-peaked narrow [O iii] emitting AGNs from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7. By obtaining new and archival high spatial resolution images taken with the Keck II Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system and the near-infrared camera NIRC2, we show that 30% of 140 double-peaked [O iii] emission line SDSS AGNs have two spatial components within a 3″ radius. However, spatially resolved spectroscopy or X-ray observations are needed to confirm these galaxy pairs as systems containing two AGNs. We followed up three spatially double candidate dual AGNs with integral field spectroscopy from Keck OSIRIS and 10 candidates with long-slit spectroscopy from the Shane Kast Double Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. We find that the double-peaked emission lines in our sample of 12 candidates are caused by: one dual AGN (SDSS J114642.47+511029.6), one confirmed outflow and four likely outflows, two pairs of star-forming galaxies, one candidate indeterminate due to sky line interference, and three AGNs with spatially coincident double [O iii] peaks, likely due to unresolved complex narrow line kinematics, outflows, binary AGN, or small-scale jets.

  2. SPATIALLY RESOLVED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF CANDIDATE DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGurk, R. C.; Max, C. E.; Medling, A. M.; Shields, G. A.; Comerford, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    When galaxies merge, both central supermassive black holes are immersed in a dense and chaotic environment. If there is sufficient gas in the nuclear regions, one expects to see close pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or dual AGNs, in a fraction of galaxy mergers. However, finding them remains a challenge. The presence of double-peaked [O iii] emission lines has been proposed as a technique to select dual AGNs efficiently. We studied a sample of double-peaked narrow [O iii] emitting AGNs from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7. By obtaining new and archival high spatial resolution images taken with the Keck II Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system and the near-infrared camera NIRC2, we show that 30% of 140 double-peaked [O iii] emission line SDSS AGNs have two spatial components within a 3″ radius. However, spatially resolved spectroscopy or X-ray observations are needed to confirm these galaxy pairs as systems containing two AGNs. We followed up three spatially double candidate dual AGNs with integral field spectroscopy from Keck OSIRIS and 10 candidates with long-slit spectroscopy from the Shane Kast Double Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. We find that the double-peaked emission lines in our sample of 12 candidates are caused by: one dual AGN (SDSS J114642.47+511029.6), one confirmed outflow and four likely outflows, two pairs of star-forming galaxies, one candidate indeterminate due to sky line interference, and three AGNs with spatially coincident double [O iii] peaks, likely due to unresolved complex narrow line kinematics, outflows, binary AGN, or small-scale jets

  3. Time resolved high frequency spectrum of Br2 molecules using pulsed photoacoustic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehya, Fahem; Chaudhary, A K

    2013-11-01

    The paper reports the time resolved spectral distribution of higher order acoustic modes generated in Br2 molecules using pulsed Photoacoustic (PA) technique. New time resolved vibrational spectrum of Br2 molecules are recorded using a single 532nm, pulses of 7ns duration at 10Hz repetition rate obtained from Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Frank-Condon principle based assignments confirms the presence of 12 numbers of (ν″-ν') vibrational transitions covered by a single 532+2nm pulse profile. Inclusions of higher order zeroth modes in Bassel's function expansion series shows the probability of overlapping of different types of acoustic modes in the designed PA cells. These modes appear in the form of clusters which occupies higher frequency range. The study of decay behavior of PA signal with respect to time confirms the photolysis of Br2 at 532nm wavelength. In addition, the shifting and clustering effect of cavity eigen modes in Br2 molecules have been studied between 1 and 10ms time scale. The estimated Q-factor of PA cell (l=16cm, R=1.4cm) is 145±4 at 27kHz frequency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Coherent spectroscopy of a {Lambda} atomic system and its prospective application to tunable frequency offset locking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kale, Y B [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ray, Ayan [Radioactive Ion Beam Group, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700064 (India); Lawande, Q V [Theoretical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Jagatap, B N, E-mail: yogeshwar84@rediffmail.com, E-mail: ayan_ray_in@rediffmail.com, E-mail: bnj@barc.gov.in [Atomic and Molecular Physics Division and Homi Bhabha National Institute, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the coherent pump-probe spectroscopy of a three-level {Lambda} system, 6s{sub 1/2}F = 3,4{yields}6p{sub 3/2}F{sup '}= 4, in the hyperfine manifold of D{sub 2} transition (852 nm) of cesium with particular reference to the sub-Doppler linewidth resonance arising from Aulter-Townes (AT) splitting and the possibility of using it for realizing a scheme for tunable atomic frequency offset locking (AFOL). We discuss here the theoretical framework for a {Lambda} system interacting with a coherent pump and probe and use it to describe the process of modulation transfer in the AT and electromagnetically induced transparency regimes. We further employ an experimental scheme consisting of a strong pump and a pair of weak probes to resolve the sub-Doppler linewidth ({approx}8 MHz) AT resonance and study its dependence on pump intensity and detuning. In order to explore the possibility of using such a sub-Doppler linewidth resonance for AFOL, we use its first derivative signal as a frequency discriminator to stabilize the probe laser. The frequency stability of the probe is characterized by means of error signal analysis. This study reveals that while the frequency stability of the AT locked laser is limited by the pump laser, the tuning range of the offset frequency lock can cover the entire Doppler profile and its immediate neighbourhood, thereby providing a simple and cost effective alternative to the external modulator. The study described in this paper contributes to the discussion on the subtle link between dressed state spectroscopy and AFOL, which is relevant for developing a master-slave-type laser system in the domain of coherent photon-atom interaction.

  5. Gauge invariance in the theoretical description of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freericks, J. K.; Krishnamurthy, H. R.; Sentef, M. A.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-10-01

    Nonequilibrium calculations in the presence of an electric field are usually performed in a gauge, and need to be transformed to reveal the gauge-invariant observables. In this work, we discuss the issue of gauge invariance in the context of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission. If the probe is applied while the pump is still on, one must ensure that the calculations of the observed photocurrent are gauge invariant. We also discuss the requirement of the photoemission signal to be positive and the relationship of this constraint to gauge invariance. We end by discussing some technical details related to the perturbative derivation of the photoemission spectra, which involve processes where the pump pulse photoexcites electrons due to nonequilibrium effects.

  6. Exciplex formation in bimolecular photoinduced electron-transfer investigated by ultrafast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Marius; Letrun, Romain; Vauthey, Eric

    2014-03-12

    The dynamics of bimolecular photoinduced electron-transfer reactions has been investigated with three donor/acceptor (D/A) pairs in tetrahydrofuran (THF) and acetonitrile (ACN) using a combination of ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, including time-resolved infrared absorption. For the D/A pairs with the highest driving force of electron transfer, all transient spectroscopic features can be unambiguously assigned to the excited reactant and the ionic products. For the pair with the lowest driving force, three additional transient infrared bands, more intense in THF than in ACN, with a time dependence that differs from those of the other bands are observed. From their frequency and solvent dependence, these bands can be assigned to an exciplex. Moreover, polarization-resolved measurements point to a relatively well-defined mutual orientation of the constituents and to a slower reorientational time compared to those of the individual reactants. Thanks to the minimal overlap of the infrared signature of all transient species in THF, a detailed reaction scheme including the relevant kinetic and thermodynamic parameters could be deduced for this pair. This analysis reveals that the formation and recombination of the ion pair occur almost exclusively via the exciplex.

  7. Studies of Minerals, Organic and Biogenic Materials through Time-Resolved Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Ismail, Syed; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Nyugen, Trac; Elsayed-Ali, hani

    2009-01-01

    A compact remote Raman spectroscopy system was developed at NASA Langley Research center and was previously demonstrated for its ability to identify chemical composition of various rocks and minerals. In this study, the Raman sensor was utilized to perform time-resolved Raman studies of various samples such as minerals and rocks, Azalea leaves and a few fossil samples. The Raman sensor utilizes a pulsed 532 nm Nd:YAG laser as excitation source, a 4-inch telescope to collect the Raman-scattered signal from a sample several meters away, a spectrograph equipped with a holographic grating, and a gated intensified CCD (ICCD) camera system. Time resolved Raman measurements were carried out by varying the gate delay with fixed short gate width of the ICCD camera, allowing measurement of both Raman signals and fluorescence signals. Rocks and mineral samples were characterized including marble, which contain CaCO3. Analysis of the results reveals the short (approx.10-13 s) lifetime of the Raman process, and shows that Raman spectra of some mineral samples contain fluorescence emission due to organic impurities. Also analyzed were a green (pristine) and a yellow (decayed) sample of Gardenia leaves. It was observed that the fluorescence signals from the green and yellow leaf samples showed stronger signals compared to the Raman lines. Moreover, it was also observed that the fluorescence of the green leaf was more intense and had a shorter lifetime than that of the yellow leaf. For the fossil samples, Raman shifted lines could not be observed due the presence of very strong short-lived fluorescence.

  8. Generation of pulsed far-infrared radiation and its application for far-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Yasuhiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-07-01

    So-called time-resolved spectroscopy technique has been used from old time as the means for studying the dynamic optical property, light-induced reaction and so on of matters. As an example, there is the method called pump and probe, and here, the wavelength of this probe light is the problem. If the object energy region is limited to about 0.1 eV, fast time-resolved spectroscopy is feasible relatively easily. However, energy region is extended to low energy region, the light source which is available as the pulsed probe light having sufficient intensity is limited. In this paper, the attempt of time-resolved spectroscopy utilizing coherent radiation, which has ended in failure, and the laser pulse-induced far-infrared radiation which can be utilized as new far-infrared probe light are reported. The reason why far-infrared radiation is used is explained. The attempt of time-resolved spectroscopy using NaCl crystals is reported on the equipment, the method of measuring absorption spectra and the results. Laser pulse-induced far-infrared radiation and the method of generating it are described. The multi-channel detector for far-infrared radiation which was made for trial is shown. (K.I.)

  9. NO kinetics in pulsed low-pressure nitrogen plasmas studied by time resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welzel, S.; Guaitella, O.; Lazzaroni, C.; Pintassilgo, C.; Rousseau, A.; Röpcke, J.

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy at 1897 cm-1 (5.27 µm) has been applied to study the NO(X) kinetics on the micro- and millisecond time scale in pulsed low-pressure N2/NO dc discharges. Experiments have been performed under flowing and static gas conditions to infer the

  10. Generation of a new spectral format, the lifetime synchronous spectrum (LiSS), using phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaver, J.M.; McGown, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    A new fluorescence spectral format is introduced in which fluorescence lifetime is shown as a function of synchronously scanned wavelength to generate a Lifetime Synchronous Spectrum (LiSS). Lifetimes are determined in the frequency domain with the use of Phase-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy (PRFS) to obtain the phase of the fluorescence signal. Theory and construction of the LiSS are presented and experimental results are shown for solutions of single components and simple binary and ternary mixtures. These results show how the lifetime information in the LiSS augments the steady-state intensity information of a standard synchronous spectrum, providing unique information for identification of components and resolution of overlapping spectral peaks. The LiSS technique takes advantage of noise reduction inherent in the extraction of lifetime from PRFS in addition to standard spectral smoothing techniques. The precision of phase determination through PRFS is found to be comparable to that of direct phase measurements at normal fluorescence intensities and superior for low-intensity signals

  11. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  12. Superconducting-circuit quantum heat engine with frequency resolved thermal baths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Patrick P.; Souquet, Jean-René; Clerk, Aashish A.

    The study of quantum heat engines promises to unravel deep, fundamental concepts in quantum thermodynamics. With this in mind, we propose a novel, realistic device that efficiently converts heat into work while maintaining reasonably large output powers. The key concept in our proposal is a highly peaked spectral density in both the thermal baths as well as the working fluid. This allows for a complete separation of the heat current from the working fluid. In our setup, Cooper pairs tunnelling across a Josephson junction serve as the the working fluid, while two resonant cavities coupled to the junction act as frequency-resolved thermal baths. The device is operated such that a heat flux carried entirely by the photons induces an electrical current against a voltage bias, providing work.

  13. Nonlinear correlations in phase-space resolved fluctuations at drift wave frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiff, F [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Uzun, I [Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Diallo, A [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasams EPF, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-12-15

    In an effort to better understand plasma transport, we measure fluctuations associated with drift instabilities resolved in the ion phase-space. Primary attention is given to fluctuations near the electron drift frequency where there are two general components to the observed fluctuations. From two (spatial) point measurements of the ion distribution function with a variable separation along the magnetic field, a number of statistical measures of the fluctuations are calculated including cross-correlation and cross-bicoherence. Both fluid ({omega}/k >> v{sub ti}) and kinetic ({omega}/k {approx} v{sub ti}) components are observed in the fluctuations. The nonlinear interactions are found to depend strongly on the ion particle velocity.

  14. Time resolved measurements of cathode fall in high frequency fluorescent lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadrath, S; Garner, R C; Lieder, G H; Ehlbeck, J

    2007-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the time resolved cathode and anode falls of high frequency fluorescent lamps for a range of discharge currents typically encountered in dimming mode. Measurements were performed with the movable anode technique. Supporting spectroscopic emission measurements were made of key transitions (argon 420.1 nm and mercury 435.8 nm), whose onset coincide with cathode fall equalling the value associated with the energy, relative to the ground state, of the upper level of the respective transition. The measurements are in general agreement with the well-known understanding of dimmed lamp operation: peak cathode fall decreases with increasing lamp current and with increasing auxiliary coil heating. However, the time dependence of the measurements offers additional insight

  15. Time-resolved spectroscopy of nonequilibrium ionization in laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjoribanks, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The highly transient ionization characteristic of laser-produced plasmas at high energy densities has been investigated experimentally, using x-ray spectroscopy with time resolution of less than 20 ps. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma density and temperature were used, including line ratios, line profile broadening and continuum emission, to characterize the plasma conditions without relying immediately on ionization modeling. The experimentally measured plasma parameters were used as independent variables, driving an ionization code, as a test of ionization modeling, divorced from hydrodynamic calculations. Several state-of-the-art streak spectrographs, each recording a fiducial of the laser peak along with the time-resolved spectrum, characterized the laser heating of thin signature layers of different atomic numbers imbedded in plastic targets. A novel design of crystal spectrograph, with a conically curved crystal, was developed. Coupled with a streak camera, it provided high resolution (λ/ΔΛ > 1000) and a collection efficiency roughly 20-50 times that of planar crystal spectrographs, affording improved spectra for quantitative reduction and greater sensitivity for the diagnosis of weak emitters. Experimental results were compared to hydrocode and ionization code simulations, with poor agreement. The conclusions question the appropriateness of describing electron velocity distributions by a temperature parameter during the time of laser illumination and emphasis the importance of characterizing the distribution more generally

  16. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of rare earth LaSb{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michiardi, Matteo; Arnold, Fabian; Faerch Fisher, Karl Frederik; Svane, Axel; Bianchi, Marco; Brummerstedt Iversen, Bo; Hofmann, Philip [Aarhus University (Denmark); Shwetha, G.; Kanchana, V. [IIT-Hyderabad (India); Ganapathy, Vaitheeswaran [University of Hyderabad (India)

    2016-07-01

    Several rare earth diantimonides have been found to exhibit intriguing electronic properties such as anisotropic linear and non-saturating magnetoresistance. Among these materials, LaSb{sub 2} is not only considered for application in magnetoresistive devices but it is also found to be superconducting at low temperatures and it is investigated as candidate material to host charge density wave phases. Despite the several studies on its transport properties, the electronic structure of LaSb{sub 2} is still largely unknown. Here we present an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and ab-initio calculation study of LaSb{sub 2}(001). The observed band structure is found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Our results reveal that LaSb{sub 2} is a semimetal with a strongly nested two-dimensional Fermi surface. The low energy spectrum is characterized by four massive hole pockets and by four shallow, strongly directional, electron pockets that exhibit Dirac-like dispersion. We speculate on the possibility that this peculiar electronic structure drives the magnetoresistance to its quantum limit, explaining its unconventional behavior.

  17. Investigation of microstructure in additive manufactured Inconel 625 by spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Gao, Yan; Dial, Laura C.; Grazzi, Francesco; Shinohara, Takenao

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive testing techniques based on neutron imaging and diffraction can provide information on the internal structure of relatively thick metal samples (up to several cm), which are opaque to other conventional non-destructive methods. Spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy is an extension of traditional neutron radiography, where multiple images are acquired simultaneously, each corresponding to a narrow range of energy. The analysis of transmission spectra enables studies of bulk microstructures at the spatial resolution comparable to the detector pixel. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of imaging (with 100 μm resolution) distribution of some microstructure properties, such as residual strain, texture, voids and impurities in Inconel 625 samples manufactured with an additive manufacturing method called direct metal laser melting (DMLM). Although this imaging technique can be implemented only in a few large-scale facilities, it can be a valuable tool for optimization of additive manufacturing techniques and materials and for correlating bulk microstructure properties to manufacturing process parameters. In addition, the experimental strain distribution can help validate finite element models which many industries use to predict the residual stress distributions in additive manufactured components.

  18. The layered-resolved microstructure and spectroscopy of mouse oral mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuo Shuangmu [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Normal University, Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Chen Jianxin [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Normal University, Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Jiang Xingshan [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Normal University, Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Xie Shusen [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Normal University, Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Chen Rong [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Normal University, Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Cao Ning [Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350004 (China); Zou Qilian [Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350004 (China); Xiong Shuyuan [Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350004 (China)

    2007-08-21

    The layered-resolved microstructure and spectroscopy of mouse oral mucosa are obtained using a combination of multiphoton imaging and spectral analysis with different excitation wavelengths. In the keratinizing layer, the keratinocytes microstructure can be characterized and the keratinizing thickness can be measured. The keratin fluorescence signal can be further characterized by emission maxima at 510 nm. In the epithelium, the cellular microstructure can be quantitatively visualized with depth and the epithelium thickness can be determined by multiphoton imaging excited at 730 nm. The study also shows that the epithelial spectra excited at 810 nm, showing a combination of NADH and FAD fluorescence, can be used for the estimation of the metabolic state in epithelium. Interestingly, a second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal from DNA was observed for the first time within the epithelial layer in backscattering geometry and provides the possibility of analyzing the chromatin structure. In the stroma, the combination of multiphoton imaging and spectral analysis excited at 850 nm in tandem can obtain quantitative information regarding the biomorphology and biochemistry of stroma. Specifically, the microstructure of collagen, minor salivary glands and elastic fibers, and the optical property of the stroma can be quantitatively displayed. Overall, these results suggest that the combination of multiphoton imaging and spectral analysis with different excitation wavelengths has the potential to provide important and comprehensive information for early diagnosis of oral cancer.

  19. Electronic properties of novel topological quantum materials studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    The discovery of quantum Hall e ect has motivated the use of topology instead of broken symmetry to classify the states of matter. Quantum spin Hall e ect has been proposed to have a separation of spin currents as an analogue of the charge currents separation in quantum Hall e ect, leading us to the era of topological insulators. Three-dimensional analogue of the Dirac state in graphene has brought us the three-dimensional Dirac states. Materials with three-dimensional Dirac states could potentially be the parent compounds for Weyl semimetals and topological insulators when time-reversal or space inversion symmetry is broken. In addition to the single Dirac point linking the two dispersion cones in the Dirac/Weyl semimetals, Dirac points can form a line in the momentum space, resulting in a topological node line semimetal. These fascinating novel topological quantum materials could provide us platforms for studying the relativistic physics in condensed matter systems and potentially lead to design of new electronic devices that run faster and consume less power than traditional, silicon based transistors. In this thesis, we present the electronic properties of novel topological quantum materials studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES).

  20. DARK MATTER SUBSTRUCTURE DETECTION USING SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF LENSED DUSTY GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hezaveh, Yashar; Holder, Gilbert; Dalal, Neal; Kuhlen, Michael; Marrone, Daniel; Murray, Norman; Vieira, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    We investigate how strong lensing of dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) by foreground galaxies can be used as a probe of dark matter halo substructure. We find that spatially resolved spectroscopy of lensed sources allows dramatic improvements to measurements of lens parameters. In particular, we find that modeling of the full, three-dimensional (angular position and radial velocity) data can significantly facilitate substructure detection, increasing the sensitivity of observables to lower mass subhalos. We carry out simulations of lensed dusty sources observed by early ALMA (Cycle 1) and use a Fisher matrix analysis to study the parameter degeneracies and mass detection limits of this method. We find that even with conservative assumptions, it is possible to detect galactic dark matter subhalos of ∼10 8 M ☉ with high significance in most lensed DSFGs. Specifically, we find that in typical DSFG lenses, there is a ∼55% probability of detecting a substructure with M > 10 8 M ☉ with more than 5σ detection significance in each lens, if the abundance of substructure is consistent with previous lensing results. The full ALMA array, with its significantly enhanced sensitivity and resolution, should improve these estimates considerably. Given the sample of ∼100 lenses provided by surveys such as the South Pole Telescope, our understanding of dark matter substructure in typical galaxy halos is poised to improve dramatically over the next few years.

  1. DARK MATTER SUBSTRUCTURE DETECTION USING SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF LENSED DUSTY GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hezaveh, Yashar; Holder, Gilbert [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Dalal, Neal [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kuhlen, Michael [Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marrone, Daniel [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Murray, Norman [CITA, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Vieira, Joaquin [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Blvd, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    We investigate how strong lensing of dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) by foreground galaxies can be used as a probe of dark matter halo substructure. We find that spatially resolved spectroscopy of lensed sources allows dramatic improvements to measurements of lens parameters. In particular, we find that modeling of the full, three-dimensional (angular position and radial velocity) data can significantly facilitate substructure detection, increasing the sensitivity of observables to lower mass subhalos. We carry out simulations of lensed dusty sources observed by early ALMA (Cycle 1) and use a Fisher matrix analysis to study the parameter degeneracies and mass detection limits of this method. We find that even with conservative assumptions, it is possible to detect galactic dark matter subhalos of {approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} with high significance in most lensed DSFGs. Specifically, we find that in typical DSFG lenses, there is a {approx}55% probability of detecting a substructure with M > 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} with more than 5{sigma} detection significance in each lens, if the abundance of substructure is consistent with previous lensing results. The full ALMA array, with its significantly enhanced sensitivity and resolution, should improve these estimates considerably. Given the sample of {approx}100 lenses provided by surveys such as the South Pole Telescope, our understanding of dark matter substructure in typical galaxy halos is poised to improve dramatically over the next few years.

  2. Creation of free excitons in solid krypton investigated by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisand, Vambola; Kirm, Marco; Negodin, Evgeni; Sombrowski, Elke; Steeg, Barbara; Vielhauer, Sebastian; Zimmerer, Georg

    2003-01-01

    The creation and relaxation of secondary excitons in solid Kr was investigated using energy-and time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy in the vacuum ultraviolet region. The spectrally selected emission of the free exciton (FE) was used as a probe for an investigation of the different exciton creation processes. Delayed FE creation via electron-hole recombination and 'prompt' (in terms of the time-resolution of the experiment) creation of excitons were separated. The 'prompt' creation of a FE appears in the region above threshold energy E th , which is equal to the sum of the band gap energy and the free exciton energy. 'Prompt' creation of excitons above E th is ascribed to a superposition of two processes: (i) creation of the electronic polaron complex (one-step process) and (ii) inelastic scattering of photoelectrons described in the framework of the multiple-parabolic-branch band model (two-step process). In addition, the ratio spectrum of the time-integrated FE and self-trapped exciton (STE) emission was analysed. The behaviour of the ratio spectrum is a proof that electron-hole recombination leads to STE states through FE states as precursors

  3. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy of organic ligands by europium: Fluorescence quenching and lifetime properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhi, A.; Hajjoul, H.; Redon, R.; Gagné, J. P.; Mounier, S.

    2018-03-01

    Time-resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) has proved its usefulness in the fields of biophysics, life science and geochemistry to characterize the fluorescence probe molecule with its chemical environment. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the applicability of this powerful technique combined with Steady-State (S-S) measurements. A multi-mode factor analysis, in particular CP/PARAFAC, was used to analyze the interaction between Europium (Eu) and Humic substances (HSs) extracted from Saint Lawrence Estuary in Canada. The Saint Lawrence system is a semi-enclosed water stream with connections to the Atlantic Ocean and is an excellent natural laboratory. CP/PARAFAC applied to fluorescence S-S data allows introspecting ligands-metal interactions and the one-site 1:1 modeling gives information about the stability constants. From the spectral signatures and decay lifetimes data given by TRLFS, one can deduce the fluorescence quenching which modifies the fluorescence and discuss its mechanisms. Results indicated a relatively strong binding ability between europium and humic substances samples (Log K value varies from 3.38 to 5.08 at pH 7.00). Using the Stern-Volmer plot, it has been concluded that static and dynamic quenching takes places in the case of salicylic acid and europium interaction while for HSs interaction only a static quenching is observed.

  4. Diagnosis of laser ablated carbon particles measured by time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Atsumi; Yoda, Osamu; Ohyanagi, T.; Murakami, K.

    1995-01-01

    The time and space resolved properties of laser ablated carbon particles were measured by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using LPX as an X-ray source. The energy density of the irradiation laser on the sample was in the range of 0.5-20J/cm 2 and the time delay was varied between 0 and 120ns. The absorption spectra exhibited several peaks originated from level to level transitions and an intense broad absorption in the energy range of C-K edge. At a delay time of 120ns, the absorption peak from 1s→2p transition of neutral carbon atom (C 0 ), C - , C + and C 2+ ions were observed. The absorption peak from C 0 was stronger as the probing position was closer to the sample surface and decreased rapidly with distance from the sample surface. The absorption peak C 2+ ion was observed only at comparatively distant positions from surface. The maximum speeds of highly charged ions were faster than that of neutral atoms and negative charged ions. The neutral atom and lower charged ions were emitted from the sample even after laser irradiation. The spatial distributions of the laser ablated carbon particles in the localized helium gas environment were measured. In the helium gas environment, the ablation plume was depressed by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume. (author)

  5. Improved Fast, Deep Record Length, Time-Resolved Visible Spectroscopy of Plasmas Using Fiber Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Cruz, E.; Williams, A.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Horton, R.; Klauser, R.; Hwang, D.

    2017-10-01

    HyperV Technologies is developing a fiber-coupled, deep record-length, low-light camera head for performing high time resolution spectroscopy on visible emission from plasma events. By coupling the output of a spectrometer to an imaging fiber bundle connected to a bank of amplified silicon photomultipliers, time-resolved spectroscopic imagers of 100 to 1,000 pixels can be constructed. A second generation prototype 32-pixel spectroscopic imager employing this technique was constructed and successfully tested at the University of California at Davis Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX). Pixel performance of 10 Megaframes/sec with record lengths of up to 256,000 frames ( 25.6 milliseconds) were achieved. Pixel resolution was 12 bits. Pixel pitch can be refined by using grids of 100 μm to 1000 μm diameter fibers. Experimental results will be discussed, along with future plans for this diagnostic. Work supported by USDOE SBIR Grant DE-SC0013801.

  6. Studies of the reactions of hydrogen atoms by time-resolved E. S. R. spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, R W; Verma, N C [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1977-01-01

    Time-resolved e.s.r. spectroscopy has been used to follow directly the reactions of H atoms produced by pulse radiolysis of acid solutions. Detailed analysis of the time profile of the e.s.r. signal was carried out by means of modified Bloch equations. The increased signal found when a scavenger for OH such as t-butyl alcohol is present is shown to be mainly the result of slower H atom decay by radical-radical reaction. The reaction H + OH does not appear to produce any signal polarization. The decay curves observed in the presence of solute are readily accounted for by the treatment, and good plots of pseudo first-order rate constant against solute concentration are obtained. The absolute rate constants for reaction with H atoms are for methanol 2.5 x10/sup 6/, for ethanol 2.1 X 10/sup 7/, for isopropanol 6.8 x 10/sup 7/, and for succinic acid 3.0 x 10/sup 6/ dm/sup 3/ mol/sup -1/s/sup -1/. These values are in good agreement with the earlier chemical measurements.

  7. Isotope effect on hydrated electron relaxation dynamics studied with time-resolved liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neumark, Daniel M., E-mail: dneumark@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-14

    The excited state relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O are investigated using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy in a liquid microjet. The data show that the initial excited state decays on a time scale of 75 ± 12 fs in H{sub 2}O and 102 ± 8 fs in D{sub 2}O, followed by slower relaxation on time scales of 400 ± 70 fs and 390 ± 70 fs that are isotopically invariant within the precision of our measurements. Based on the time evolution of the transient signals, the faster and slower time constants are assigned to p → s internal conversion (IC) of the hydrated electron and relaxation on the ground electronic state, respectively. This assignment is consistent with the non-adiabatic mechanism for relaxation of the hydrated electron and yields an isotope effect of 1.4 ± 0.2 for IC of the hydrated electron.

  8. A split imaging spectrometer for temporally and spatially resolved titanium absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hager, J. D., E-mail: hager@lanl.gov; Lanier, N. E.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Bruns, H. C.; Schneider, M.; Saculla, M.; McCarville, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    We present a temporally and a spatially resolved spectrometer for titanium x-ray absorption spectroscopy along 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight. Each line-of-sight of the instrument uses an elliptical crystal to acquire both the 2p and 3p Ti absorption lines on a single, time gated channel of the instrument. The 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight allow the 2p and 3p absorption features to be measured through the same point in space using both channels of the instrument. The spatially dependent material temperature can be inferred by observing the 2p and the 3p Ti absorption features. The data are recorded on a two strip framing camera with each strip collecting data from a single line-of-sight. The design is compatible for use at both the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility. The spectrometer is intended to measure the material temperature behind a Marshak wave in a radiatively driven SiO{sub 2} foam with a Ti foam tracer. In this configuration, a broad band CsI backlighter will be used for a source and the Ti absorption spectrum measured.

  9. Resolving dual binding conformations of cellulosome cohesin-dockerin complexes using single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Markus A; Milles, Lukas F; Schoeler, Constantin; Ott, Wolfgang; Fried, Daniel B; Bayer, Edward A; Gaub, Hermann E; Nash, Michael A

    2015-10-31

    Receptor-ligand pairs are ordinarily thought to interact through a lock and key mechanism, where a unique molecular conformation is formed upon binding. Contrary to this paradigm, cellulosomal cohesin-dockerin (Coh-Doc) pairs are believed to interact through redundant dual binding modes consisting of two distinct conformations. Here, we combined site-directed mutagenesis and single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) to study the unbinding of Coh:Doc complexes under force. We designed Doc mutations to knock out each binding mode, and compared their single-molecule unfolding patterns as they were dissociated from Coh using an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever. Although average bulk measurements were unable to resolve the differences in Doc binding modes due to the similarity of the interactions, with a single-molecule method we were able to discriminate the two modes based on distinct differences in their mechanical properties. We conclude that under native conditions wild-type Doc from Clostridium thermocellum exocellulase Cel48S populates both binding modes with similar probabilities. Given the vast number of Doc domains with predicted dual binding modes across multiple bacterial species, our approach opens up new possibilities for understanding assembly and catalytic properties of a broad range of multi-enzyme complexes.

  10. Surface State Dynamics of Topological Insulators Investigated by Femtosecond Time- and Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamoon Hedayat

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Topological insulators (TI are known for striking quantum phenomena associated with their spin-polarized topological surface state (TSS. The latter in particular forms a Dirac cone that bridges the energy gap between valence and conduction bands, providing a unique opportunity for prospective device applications. In TI of the BixSb2−xTeySe3−y (BSTS family, stoichiometry determines the morphology and position of the Dirac cone with respect to the Fermi level. In order to engineer specific transport properties, a careful tuning of the TSS is highly desired. Therefore, we have systematically explored BSTS samples with different stoichiometries by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TARPES. This technique provides snapshots of the electronic structure and discloses the carrier dynamics in surface and bulk states, providing crucial information for the design of electro-spin current devices. Our results reveal the central role of doping level on the Dirac cone structure and its femtosecond dynamics. In particular, an extraordinarily long TSS lifetime is observed when the the vertex of the Dirac cone lies at the Fermi level.

  11. Time resolved infrared spectroscopy of femtosecond proton dynamics in the liquid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir, W.

    2003-12-01

    This work of thesis aims to understand the strong mobility of protons in water. Water is fundamental to life and mediates many chemical and biological processes. However this liquid is poorly understood at the molecular level. The richness of interdisciplinary sciences allows us to study the properties which make it so unique. The technique used for this study was the femtosecond time resolved vibrational spectroscopy. Several experiments were carried out to characterize the femtosecond proton dynamics in water. The visualization of the rotation of water molecules obtained by anisotropy measurements will be presented. This experiment is carried out in isotopic water HDO/D 2 O for reasons of experimental and theoretical suitability. However this is not water. Pure water H 2 O was also studied without thermal effects across vibrations modes. An intermolecular energy resonant transfer was observed. Finally the localized structure of the proton in water (called Eigen form) was clearly experimentally observed. This molecule is implicated in the abnormal mobility of the proton in water (Grotthuss mechanism). (author)

  12. Light adaptation of the unicellular red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, probed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    Photosynthetic organisms change the quantity and/or quality of their pigment-protein complexes and the interactions among these complexes in response to light conditions. In the present study, we analyzed light adaptation of the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, whose pigment composition is similar to that of cyanobacteria because its phycobilisomes (PBS) lack phycoerythrin. C. merolae were grown under different light qualities, and their responses were measured by steady-state absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. Cells were cultivated under four monochromatic light-emitting diodes (blue, green, yellow, and red), and changes in pigment composition and energy transfer were observed. Cells grown under blue and green light increased their relative phycocyanin levels compared with cells cultured under white light. Energy-transfer processes to photosystem I (PSI) were sensitive to yellow and red light. The contribution of direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI increased only under yellow light, while red light induced a reduction in energy transfer from photosystem II to PSI and an increase in energy transfer from light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complex I to PSI. Differences in pigment composition, growth, and energy transfer under different light qualities are discussed.

  13. Meso-scale defect evaluation of selective laser melting using spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, M; Catchpole-Smith, S; Patel, R; Marrow, P; Li, Wenqi; Tuck, C; Sharples, S D; Clare, A T

    2017-09-01

    Developments in additive manufacturing technology are serving to expand the potential applications. Critical developments are required in the supporting areas of measurement and in process inspection to achieve this. CM247LC is a nickel superalloy that is of interest for use in aerospace and civil power plants. However, it is difficult to process via selective laser melting (SLM) as it suffers from cracking during rapid cooling and solidification. This limits the viability of CM247LC parts created using SLM. To quantify part integrity, spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy (SRAS) has been identified as a viable non-destructive evaluation technique. In this study, a combination of optical microscopy and SRAS was used to identify and classify the surface defects present in SLM-produced parts. By analysing the datasets and scan trajectories, it is possible to correlate morphological information with process parameters. Image processing was used to quantify porosity and cracking for bulk density measurement. Analysis of surface acoustic wave data showed that an error in manufacture in the form of an overscan occurred. Comparing areas affected by overscan with a bulk material, a change in defect density from 1.17% in the bulk material to 5.32% in the overscan regions was observed, highlighting the need to reduce overscan areas in manufacture.

  14. Meso-scale defect evaluation of selective laser melting using spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, M.; Catchpole-Smith, S.; Patel, R.; Marrow, P.; Li, Wenqi; Tuck, C.; Sharples, S. D.; Clare, A. T.

    2017-09-01

    Developments in additive manufacturing technology are serving to expand the potential applications. Critical developments are required in the supporting areas of measurement and in process inspection to achieve this. CM247LC is a nickel superalloy that is of interest for use in aerospace and civil power plants. However, it is difficult to process via selective laser melting (SLM) as it suffers from cracking during rapid cooling and solidification. This limits the viability of CM247LC parts created using SLM. To quantify part integrity, spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy (SRAS) has been identified as a viable non-destructive evaluation technique. In this study, a combination of optical microscopy and SRAS was used to identify and classify the surface defects present in SLM-produced parts. By analysing the datasets and scan trajectories, it is possible to correlate morphological information with process parameters. Image processing was used to quantify porosity and cracking for bulk density measurement. Analysis of surface acoustic wave data showed that an error in manufacture in the form of an overscan occurred. Comparing areas affected by overscan with a bulk material, a change in defect density from 1.17% in the bulk material to 5.32% in the overscan regions was observed, highlighting the need to reduce overscan areas in manufacture.

  15. Hemodynamic measurements in deep brain tissues of humans by near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Oda, Motoki; Yamaki, Etsuko; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Yamashita, Daisuke; Yoshimoto, Kenji; Homma, Shu; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    Using near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS), we measured the human head in transmittance mode to obtain the optical properties, tissue oxygenation, and hemodynamics of deep brain tissues in 50 healthy adult volunteers. The right ear canal was irradiated with 3-wavelengths of pulsed light (760, 795, and 835nm), and the photons passing through the human head were collected at the left ear canal. Optical signals with sufficient intensity could be obtained from 46 of the 50 volunteers. By analyzing the temporal profiles based on the photon diffusion theory, we successfully obtained absorption coefficients for each wavelength. The levels of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2), deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb), total hemoglobin (tHb), and tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) were then determined by referring to the hemoglobin spectroscopic data. Compared with the SO2 values for the forehead measurements in reflectance mode, the SO2 values of the transmittance measurements of the human head were approximately 10% lower, and tHb values of the transmittance measurements were always lower than those of the forehead reflectance measurements. Moreover, the level of hemoglobin and the SO2 were strongly correlated between the human head measurements in transmittance mode and the forehead measurements in the reflectance mode, respectively. These results demonstrated a potential application of this TRS system in examining deep brain tissues of humans.

  16. Nonadiabatic Dynamics May Be Probed through Electronic Coherence in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kochise; Kowalewski, Markus; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-02-09

    We present a hierarchy of Fermi golden rules (FGRs) that incorporate strongly coupled electronic/nuclear dynamics in time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) signals at different levels of theory. Expansion in the joint electronic and nuclear eigenbasis yields the numerically most challenging exact FGR (eFGR). The quasistatic Fermi Golden Rule (qsFGR) neglects nuclear motion during the photoionization process but takes into account electronic coherences as well as populations initially present in the pumped matter as well as those generated internally by coupling between electronic surfaces. The standard semiclassical Fermi Golden Rule (scFGR) neglects the electronic coherences and the nuclear kinetic energy during the ionizing pulse altogether, yielding the classical Condon approximation. The coherence contributions depend on the phase-profile of the ionizing field, allowing coherent control of TRPES signals. The photoelectron spectrum from model systems is simulated using these three levels of theory. The eFGR and the qsFGR show temporal oscillations originating from the electronic or vibrational coherences generated as the nuclear wave packet traverses a conical intersection. These oscillations, which are missed by the scFGR, directly reveal the time-evolving splitting between electronic states of the neutral molecule in the curve-crossing regime.

  17. The development of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy; 1900-1960

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkin, J.G.; La Trobe Univ., Bundoora

    1981-01-01

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now a sophisticated and particularly powerful technique for studying the electronic structure of matter, in addition the photoelectric effect has been of great significance in the history of 20th-century physics. This article seeks to uncover the origins and chart the development of the ARPES field, and focusses on the first half of this century; that is, up to the beginnings of the modern phase in the late 1960's. It is suggested that present workers will find interest in, and indeed profit from a knowledge of, the enormous experimental effort that was made to acquire quality data, the frustrating attempts that were initially made to understand them theoretically, and the contribution of early wave-mechanics, which brought order to a troubled field and thereby provided the necessary foundation for current studies. In addition, it is noted that the physicists involved often obtained inspiration and important insights which led them into studies of other significant problems of 20th-century physics. (orig.)

  18. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the probe fluorescence in the study of human blood protein dynamic structure on SR beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobretsov, G.E.; Kurek, N.K.; Syrejshchikova, T.I.; Yakimenko, M.N.; Clarke, D.T.; Jones, G.R.; Munro, I.H.

    2000-01-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy on the SRS of the Daresbury Laboratory was used for the study of the human serum lipoproteins and human blood albumins with fluorescent probes K-37 and K-35, developed in Russia. The probe K-37 was found sensitive to the difference in dynamic properties of the lipid objects. Two sets of the parameters were used for the description of lipid dynamic structure: (1) time-resolved fluorescence spectra and (2) time-resolved fluorescence depolarization as a function of rotational mobility of lipid molecules. Each measured dynamic parameter reflected the monotonous changes of dynamic properties in the range: lipid spheres-very low density lipoproteins-low density lipoproteins-high density lipoproteins-phospholipid liposomes. The range is characterized by the increase of the ratio polar/ nonpolar lipids. Thus, time-resolved fluorescence could be used to detect some structural modifications in lipoproteins related to atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular diseases development

  19. Gas spectroscopy with integrated frequency monitoring through self-mixing in a terahertz quantum-cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhantyal-Pun, Rabi; Valavanis, Alexander; Keeley, James T; Rubino, Pierluigi; Kundu, Iman; Han, Yingjun; Dean, Paul; Li, Lianhe; Davies, A Giles; Linfield, Edmund H

    2018-05-15

    We demonstrate a gas spectroscopy technique, using self-mixing in a 3.4 terahertz quantum-cascade laser (QCL). All previous QCL spectroscopy techniques have required additional terahertz instrumentation (detectors, mixers, or spectrometers) for system pre-calibration or spectral analysis. By contrast, our system self-calibrates the laser frequency (i.e., with no external instrumentation) to a precision of 630 MHz (0.02%) by analyzing QCL voltage perturbations in response to optical feedback within a 0-800 mm round-trip delay line. We demonstrate methanol spectroscopy by introducing a gas cell into the feedback path and show that a limiting absorption coefficient of ∼1×10 -4   cm -1 is resolvable.

  20. Review of the theoretical description of time-resolved angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in electron-phonon mediated superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemper, A.F. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Sentef, M.A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Moritz, B. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Devereaux, T.P. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Freericks, J.K. [Department of Physics, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-09-15

    We review recent work on the theory for pump/probe photoemission spectroscopy of electron-phonon mediated superconductors in both the normal and the superconducting states. We describe the formal developments that allow one to solve the Migdal-Eliashberg theory in nonequilibrium for an ultrashort laser pumping field, and explore the solutions which illustrate the relaxation as energy is transferred from electrons to phonons. We focus on exact results emanating from sum rules and approximate numerical results which describe rules of thumb for relaxation processes. In addition, in the superconducting state, we describe how Anderson-Higgs oscillations can be excited due to the nonlinear coupling with the electric field and describe mechanisms where pumping the system enhances superconductivity. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy Diagnostic of Laser-Induced Optical Breakdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian G. Parigger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient laser plasma is generated in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB. Here we report experiments conducted with 10.6-micron CO2 laser radiation, and with 1.064-micron fundamental, 0.532-micron frequency-doubled, 0.355-micron frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser radiation. Characterization of laser induced plasma utilizes laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS techniques. Atomic hydrogen Balmer series emissions show electron number density of 1017 cm−3 measured approximately 10 μs and 1 μs after optical breakdown for CO2 and Nd:YAG laser radiation, respectively. Recorded molecular recombination emission spectra of CN and C2 Swan bands indicate an equilibrium temperature in excess of 7000 Kelvin, inferred for these diatomic molecules. Reported are also graphite ablation experiments where we use unfocused laser radiation that is favorable for observation of neutral C3 emission due to reduced C3 cation formation. Our analysis is based on computation of diatomic molecular spectra that includes accurate determination of rotational line strengths, or Hönl-London factors.

  2. Investigations of suspension stability of iron oxide nanoparticles using time-resolved UV–visible spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikram, S.; Vasanthakumari, R. [B. S. Abdur Rahman University, Polymer Nanotechnology Centre (India); Tsuzuki, Takuya [Australian National University, Research School of Engineering, College of Engineering and Computer Science (Australia); Rangarajan, Murali, E-mail: r-murali@cb.amrita.edu [Amrita University, Center of Excellence in Advanced Materials and Green Technologies, Amrita School of Engineering Coimbatore (India)

    2016-09-15

    This study examines the suspension stability of iron oxide nanoparticles of different sizes, magnetic susceptibility, and saturation magnetization over long time scales in dilute systems using time-resolved UV–visible spectroscopy. The effects of citric acid as a chelating agent and applied external magnetic field are also studied. UV–visible spectra are obtained at different times for citric-acid-stabilized nanoparticles dispersed in water, and the peak absorbance is tracked with time, in the presence and absence of external magnetic fields. It is seen that the nanoparticles sediment slowly even in the absence of chain formation, with the phenomenon occurring in two-to-three regimes for the systems studied. Sedimentation exhibits either exponential or power-law behavior of maximum absorbance with time. In the dilute dispersions studied, thermal dispersion is about two orders of magnitude stronger than van der Waals interactions, and chain formation is not easy. Yet, it is likely that local anisotropic structures of the nanoparticles form, through which the attractive interactions result in sedimentation. Citric acid gradually stabilizes the aggregating particles; after an initial faster sedimentation, electrostatic repulsion causes the particles to segregate, as observed by a linear increase in the concentration of the nanoparticles at long times. In the presence of magnetic field, stabilization effects are significantly reduced. It is seen that though the attractive force between the nanoparticles and the external field is smaller than Brownian forces, together with van der Waals interactions, these attractive forces likely act as directing agents facilitating sedimentation. This study demonstrates that aggregation-induced sedimentation of magnetic nanoparticles is likely to play a significant role in magnetic drug targeting even when the particles are stabilized with chelating agents.Graphical abstract.

  3. Investigations of suspension stability of iron oxide nanoparticles using time-resolved UV–visible spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, S.; Vasanthakumari, R.; Tsuzuki, Takuya; Rangarajan, Murali

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the suspension stability of iron oxide nanoparticles of different sizes, magnetic susceptibility, and saturation magnetization over long time scales in dilute systems using time-resolved UV–visible spectroscopy. The effects of citric acid as a chelating agent and applied external magnetic field are also studied. UV–visible spectra are obtained at different times for citric-acid-stabilized nanoparticles dispersed in water, and the peak absorbance is tracked with time, in the presence and absence of external magnetic fields. It is seen that the nanoparticles sediment slowly even in the absence of chain formation, with the phenomenon occurring in two-to-three regimes for the systems studied. Sedimentation exhibits either exponential or power-law behavior of maximum absorbance with time. In the dilute dispersions studied, thermal dispersion is about two orders of magnitude stronger than van der Waals interactions, and chain formation is not easy. Yet, it is likely that local anisotropic structures of the nanoparticles form, through which the attractive interactions result in sedimentation. Citric acid gradually stabilizes the aggregating particles; after an initial faster sedimentation, electrostatic repulsion causes the particles to segregate, as observed by a linear increase in the concentration of the nanoparticles at long times. In the presence of magnetic field, stabilization effects are significantly reduced. It is seen that though the attractive force between the nanoparticles and the external field is smaller than Brownian forces, together with van der Waals interactions, these attractive forces likely act as directing agents facilitating sedimentation. This study demonstrates that aggregation-induced sedimentation of magnetic nanoparticles is likely to play a significant role in magnetic drug targeting even when the particles are stabilized with chelating agents.Graphical abstract

  4. Comparison of grain to grain orientation and stiffness mapping by spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy and EBSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, A F; Li, W; Sharples, S; Withers, P J

    2017-07-01

    Our aim was to establish the capability of spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy (SRAS) to map grain orientations and the anisotropy in stiffness at the sub-mm to micron scale by comparing the method with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) undertaken within a scanning electron microscope. In the former the grain orientations are deduced by measuring the spatial variation in elastic modulus; conversely, in EBSD the elastic anisotropy is deduced from direct measurements of the crystal orientations. The two test-cases comprise mapping the fusion zones for large TIG and MMA welds in thick power plant austenitic and ferritic steels, respectively; these are technologically important because, among other things, elastic anisotropy can cause ultrasonic weld inspection methods to become inaccurate because it causes bending in the paths of sound waves. The spatial resolution of SRAS is not as good as that for EBSD (∼100 μm vs. ∼a few nm), nor is the angular resolution (∼1.5° vs. ∼0.5°). However the method can be applied to much larger areas (currently on the order of 300 mm square), is much faster (∼5 times), is cheaper and easier to perform, and it could be undertaken on the manufacturing floor. Given these advantages, particularly to industrial users, and the on-going improvements to the method, SRAS has the potential to become a standard method for orientation mapping, particularly in cases where the elastic anisotropy is important over macroscopic/component length scales. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. System for time-resolved laser absorption spectroscopy and its application to high-power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adámek, Petr; Olejníček, Jiří; Hubička, Zdeněk; Čada, Martin; Kment, Štěpán; Kohout, Michal; Do, H.T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 2 (2017), 1-8, č. článku 023105. ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TF01000084; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-00863S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : plasma diagnostics * HiPIMS * time resolved measurement * laser absorption spectroscopy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 1.515, year: 2016

  6. Pulse retrieval algorithm for interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating based on differential evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyyti, Janne; Escoto, Esmerando; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2017-10-01

    A novel algorithm for the ultrashort laser pulse characterization method of interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating (iFROG) is presented. Based on a genetic method, namely, differential evolution, the algorithm can exploit all available information of an iFROG measurement to retrieve the complex electric field of a pulse. The retrieval is subjected to a series of numerical tests to prove the robustness of the algorithm against experimental artifacts and noise. These tests show that the integrated error-correction mechanisms of the iFROG method can be successfully used to remove the effect from timing errors and spectrally varying efficiency in the detection. Moreover, the accuracy and noise resilience of the new algorithm are shown to outperform retrieval based on the generalized projections algorithm, which is widely used as the standard method in FROG retrieval. The differential evolution algorithm is further validated with experimental data, measured with unamplified three-cycle pulses from a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. Additionally introducing group delay dispersion in the beam path, the retrieval results show excellent agreement with independent measurements with a commercial pulse measurement device based on spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field retrieval. Further experimental tests with strongly attenuated pulses indicate resilience of differential-evolution-based retrieval against massive measurement noise.

  7. Spectrally Resolved and Functional Super-resolution Microscopy via Ultrahigh-Throughput Single-Molecule Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rui; Moon, Seonah; Kenny, Samuel J; Xu, Ke

    2018-03-20

    As an elegant integration of the spatial and temporal dimensions of single-molecule fluorescence, single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) overcomes the diffraction-limited resolution barrier of optical microscopy by localizing single molecules that stochastically switch between fluorescent and dark states over time. While this type of super-resolution microscopy (SRM) technique readily achieves remarkable spatial resolutions of ∼10 nm, it typically provides no spectral information. Meanwhile, current scanning-based single-location approaches for mapping the positions and spectra of single molecules are limited by low throughput and are difficult to apply to densely labeled (bio)samples. In this Account, we summarize the rationale, design, and results of our recent efforts toward the integration of the spectral dimension of single-molecule fluorescence with SMLM to achieve spectrally resolved SMLM (SR-SMLM) and functional SRM ( f-SRM). By developing a wide-field scheme for spectral measurement and implementing single-molecule fluorescence on-off switching typical of SMLM, we first showed that in densely labeled (bio)samples it is possible to record the fluorescence spectra and positions of millions of single molecules synchronously within minutes, giving rise to ultrahigh-throughput single-molecule spectroscopy and SR-SMLM. This allowed us to first show statistically that for many dyes, single molecules of the same species exhibit near identical emission in fixed cells. This narrow distribution of emission wavelengths, which contrasts markedly with previous results at solid surfaces, allowed us to unambiguously identify single molecules of spectrally similar dyes. Crosstalk-free, multiplexed SRM was thus achieved for four dyes that were merely 10 nm apart in emission spectrum, with the three-dimensional SRM images of all four dyes being automatically aligned within one image channel. The ability to incorporate single-molecule fluorescence measurement with

  8. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-20

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ~ 7 eV) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν >/~ 400 eV) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of CeMIn5(M = Rh, Ir, and Co) and YbRh2Si2 with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant U5f compounds such as UFeGa5, their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all U5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized U5f compounds such as UPd3 and UO2 are essentially explained by the localized model that treats U5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion U-based compounds such as the hidden-order compound URu2Si2, their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures are generally well-explained by the band-structure calculation, whereas the states in the vicinity of EF show some deviations due to electron correlation effects. Furthermore, the electronic structures of URu2Si2 in the paramagnetic and hidden-order phases are

  9. Optimization of genetic algorithm for reconstruction of cross-phase modulation frequency-resolved optical gating data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vraný, Boleslav; Honzátko, Pavel; Kaňka, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 5 (2011), 448-456 ISSN 0894-3370 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : frequency resolved optical gating, FROG * amplitude and phase retrieval * genetic algorithm, GA Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.600, year: 2011

  10. Detection of rhodopsin dimerization in situ by PIE-FCCS, a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam W

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin self-associates in the plasma membrane. At low concentrations, the interactions are consistent with a monomer-dimer equilibrium (Comar et al., J Am Chem Soc 136(23):8342-8349, 2014). At high concentrations in native tissue, higher-order clusters have been observed (Fotiadis et al., Nature 421:127-128, 2003). The physiological role of rhodopsin dimerization is still being investigated, but it is clear that a quantitative assessment is essential to determining the function of rhodopsin clusters in vision. To quantify rhodopsin interactions, I will outline the theory and methodology of a specialized time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for measuring membrane protein-protein interactions called pulsed-interleaved excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (PIE-FCCS). The strength of this technique is its ability to quantify rhodopsin interactions in situ (i.e., a live cell plasma membrane). There are two reasons for restricting the scope to live cell membranes. First, the compositional heterogeneity of the plasma membrane creates a complex milieu with thousands of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate species. This makes it difficult to infer quaternary interactions from detergent solubilized samples or construct a model phospholipid bilayer that recapitulates all of the interactions present in native membranes. Second, organizational structure and dynamics is a key feature of the plasma membrane, and fixation techniques like formaldehyde cross-linking and vitrification will modulate the interactions. PIE-FCCS is based on two-color fluorescence imaging with time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) (Becker et al., Rev Sci Instrum 70:1835-1841, 1999). By time-tagging every detected photon, the data can be analyzed as a fluorescence intensity distribution, fluorescence lifetime histogram, or fluorescence (cross-)correlation spectra (FCS/FCCS) (Becker, Advanced time-correlated single-photon counting techniques, Springer, Berlin, 2005). These

  11. Combined multi-distance frequency domain and diffuse correlation spectroscopy system with simultaneous data acquisition and real-time analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carp, Stefan A; Farzam, Parisa; Redes, Norin; Hueber, Dennis M; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2017-09-01

    Frequency domain near infrared spectroscopy (FD-NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) have emerged as synergistic techniques for the non-invasive assessment of tissue health. Combining FD-NIRS oximetry with DCS measures of blood flow, the tissue oxygen metabolic rate can be quantified, a parameter more closely linked to underlying physiology and pathology than either NIRS or DCS estimates alone. Here we describe the first commercially available integrated instrument, called the "MetaOx", designed to enable simultaneous FD-NIRS and DCS measurements at rates of 10 + Hz, and offering real-time data evaluation. We show simultaneously acquired characterization data demonstrating performance equivalent to individual devices and sample in vivo measurements of pulsation resolved blood flow, forearm occlusion hemodynamic changes and muscle oxygen metabolic rate monitoring during stationary bike exercise.

  12. Two-dimensional spectroscopy at infrared and optical frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2007-01-01

    This Perspective on multidimensional spectroscopy in the optical and infrared spectral regions focuses on the principles and the scientific and technical challenges facing these new fields. The methods hold great promise for advances in the visualization of time-dependent structural changes in complex systems ranging from liquids to biological assemblies, new materials, and fundamental physical processes. The papers in this special feature on multidimensional spectroscopy in chemistry, physic...

  13. Rydberg-atom based radio-frequency electrometry using frequency modulation spectroscopy in room temperature vapor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Kübler, Harald; Jahangiri, Akbar J; Shaffer, James P

    2017-04-17

    Rydberg atom-based electrometry enables traceable electric field measurements with high sensitivity over a large frequency range, from gigahertz to terahertz. Such measurements are particularly useful for the calibration of radio frequency and terahertz devices, as well as other applications like near field imaging of electric fields. We utilize frequency modulated spectroscopy with active control of residual amplitude modulation to improve the signal to noise ratio of the optical readout of Rydberg atom-based radio frequency electrometry. Matched filtering of the signal is also implemented. Although we have reached similarly, high sensitivity with other read-out methods, frequency modulated spectroscopy is advantageous because it is well-suited for building a compact, portable sensor. In the current experiment, ∼3 µV cm-1 Hz-1/2 sensitivity is achieved and is found to be photon shot noise limited.

  14. Frequency locking of an extended-cavity quantum cascade laser to a frequency comb for precision mid infrared spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaif, Bidoor; Lamperti, Marco; Gatti, Davide; Laporta, Paolo; Fermann, Martin E.; Farooq, Aamir; Marangoni, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Extended-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) enable mode-hope-free frequency sweeps in the mid-infrared region over ranges in excess of 100 cm−1, at speeds up to 1 THz/s and with a 100-mW optical power level. This makes them ideally suited for broadband absorption spectroscopy and for the simultaneous detection of multiple gases. On the other hand, their use for precision spectroscopy has been hampered so far by a large amount of frequency noise, resulting in an optical linewidth of about 30 MHz over 50 ms [1]. This is one of the reasons why neither their frequency nor their phase have been so far locked to a frequency comb. Their use in combination with frequency combs has been performed in an open loop regime only [2], which has the merit of preserving the inherently fast modulation speed of these lasers, yet not to afford high spectral resolution and accuracy.

  15. Frequency locking of an extended-cavity quantum cascade laser to a frequency comb for precision mid infrared spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaif, Bidoor

    2017-11-02

    Extended-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) enable mode-hope-free frequency sweeps in the mid-infrared region over ranges in excess of 100 cm−1, at speeds up to 1 THz/s and with a 100-mW optical power level. This makes them ideally suited for broadband absorption spectroscopy and for the simultaneous detection of multiple gases. On the other hand, their use for precision spectroscopy has been hampered so far by a large amount of frequency noise, resulting in an optical linewidth of about 30 MHz over 50 ms [1]. This is one of the reasons why neither their frequency nor their phase have been so far locked to a frequency comb. Their use in combination with frequency combs has been performed in an open loop regime only [2], which has the merit of preserving the inherently fast modulation speed of these lasers, yet not to afford high spectral resolution and accuracy.

  16. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy for accurate and well resolved analysis of coatings and thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Wilke, Marcus; Teichert, Gerd; Gemma, Ryota; Pundt, Astrid; Kirchheim, Reiner; Romanus, Henry; Schaaf, Peter

    2011-01-01

    overview on new developments in instrument design for accurate and well resolved thin film analyses is presented. The article focuses on the analytical capabilities of glow discharge optical emission spectrometry in the analysis of metallic coatings

  17. Characterization of type I, II, III, IV, and V collagens by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura; Cohen, David; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    2000-04-01

    The relative proportions of genetically distinct collagen types in connective tissues vary with tissue type and change during disease progression, development, wound healing, aging. This study aims to 1) characterize the spectro- temporal fluorescence emission of fiber different types of collagen and 2) assess the ability of time-resolved laser- induced fluorescence spectroscopy to distinguish between collagen types. Fluorescence emission of commercially available purified samples was induced with nitrogen laser excitation pulses and detected with a MCP-PMT connected to a digital storage oscilloscope. The recorded time-resolved emission spectra displayed distinct fluorescence emission characteristics for each collagen type. The time domain information complemented the spectral domain intensity data for improved discrimination between different collagen types. Our results reveal that analysis of the fluorescence emission can be used to characterize different species of collagen. Also, the results suggest that time-resolved spectroscopy can be used for monitoring of connective tissue matrix composition changes due to various pathological and non-pathological conditions.

  18. New methods and applications in time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoetzel, Jan Eric

    2012-07-01

    Recent experimental advances and developments in the QEXAFS technique were presented along with new applications in the disciplines of catalysis and surface science. Both performance and user-friendliness of the QEXAFS method were significantly improved, while the applicability of QEXAFS was extended by newly designed mechanics. The application of a fast angular encoder proved to be capable to sample the continuously changing Bragg angle of the monochromator crystal synchronized to the acquired absorption data. A new data acquisition system was designed, based on a multifunctional ADC board, which provides high acquisition frequencies, while low noise acquisition could be achieved due to the provided differential acquisition mode. Additionally, control of all experimental devices as current amplifiers, monochromator motors and sample stages were implemented to further increase the efficiency of the experimental setup for QEFAS measurements. In order to simplify the processing of the huge generated QEXAFS raw data files, a completely new software tool for data analysis was designed, which provides not only the basic procedures of QEXAFS data analysis, but also many approaches customized for time-resolved data. Apart from technical advances, various experiments were performed with QEXAFS to gain new insights into the complex processes of several catalytic reactions, the thermal decomposition of metal oxalates, as well as layer growth processes and reactions on rough surfaces. Supported Pd catalysts were investigated during catalytic partial oxidation of methane, whereby oscillations in the conversion were linked to structural changes of the catalyst. Kinetic oscillations were also investigated on a supported Pt catalyst during the extinction of CO oxidation induced by decreasing temperature. Modulated experiments were investigated (i) on supported Pt-Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts during active catalytic partial oxidation in switching gas atmospheres of methane and

  19. Temperature Measurements in Reacting Flows Using Time-Resolved Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (fs-CARS) Spectroscopy (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, Sukesh; Kinnius, Paul J; Lucht, Robert P; Gord, James R

    2007-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) spectroscopy of the nitrogen molecule is used for the measurement of temperature in atmospheric-pressure, near-adiabatic, hydrogen-air diffusion flames...

  20. Study of the Bulk Charge Carrier Dynamics in Anatase and Rutile TiO2 Single Crystals by Femtosecond Time Resolved Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Maity, Partha; Mohammed, Omar F.; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Idriss, Hicham

    2018-01-01

    as the best model for fundamental studies. Their ultrafast charge carrier dynamics especially on TiO2 anatase single crystal (the most active phase) are unresolved. Here femtosecond time resolved spectroscopy (TRS) was carried out to explore the dynamics

  1. Frequency Correction for MIRO Chirp Transformation Spectroscopy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2012-01-01

    This software processes the flyby spectra of the Chirp Transform Spectrometer (CTS) of the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO). The tool corrects the effect of Doppler shift and local-oscillator (LO) frequency shift during the flyby mode of MIRO operations. The frequency correction for CTS flyby spectra is performed and is integrated with multiple spectra into a high signal-to-noise averaged spectrum at the rest-frame RF frequency. This innovation also generates the 8 molecular line spectra by dividing continuous 4,096-channel CTS spectra. The 8 line spectra can then be readily used for scientific investigations. A spectral line that is at its rest frequency in the frame of the Earth or an asteroid will be observed with a time-varying Doppler shift as seen by MIRO. The frequency shift is toward the higher RF frequencies on approach, and toward lower RF frequencies on departure. The magnitude of the shift depends on the flyby velocity. The result of time-varying Doppler shift is that of an observed spectral line will be seen to move from channel to channel in the CTS spectrometer. The direction (higher or lower frequency) in the spectrometer depends on the spectral line frequency under consideration. In order to analyze the flyby spectra, two steps are required. First, individual spectra must be corrected for the Doppler shift so that individual spectra can be superimposed at the same rest frequency for integration purposes. Second, a correction needs to be applied to the CTS spectra to account for the LO frequency shifts that are applied to asteroid mode.

  2. Direct Imaging of Transient Fano Resonances in N_{2} Using Time-, Energy-, and Angular-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Martin; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Frassetto, Fabio; Poletto, Luca; Sansone, Giuseppe; Vrakking, Marc J J; Kornilov, Oleg

    2016-04-22

    Autoionizing Rydberg states of molecular N_{2} are studied using time-, energy-, and angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulse with a photon energy of 17.5 eV excites the resonance and a subsequent IR pulse ionizes the molecule before the autoionization takes place. The angular-resolved photoelectron spectra depend on pump-probe time delay and allow for the distinguishing of two electronic states contributing to the resonance. The lifetime of one of the contributions is determined to be 14±1  fs, while the lifetime of the other appears to be significantly shorter than the time resolution of the experiment. These observations suggest that the Rydberg states in this energy region are influenced by the effect of interference stabilization and merge into a complex resonance.

  3. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts: Disordering versus Removal of Organic Capping

    KAUST Repository

    Krier, James M.; Michalak, William D.; Baker, L. Robert; An, Kwangjin; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent work with nanoparticle catalysts shows that size and shape control on the nanometer scale influences reaction rate and selectivity. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying heterogeneous

  4. Sensitivity enhancement of 13C nuclei in 2D J-resolved NMR spectroscopy using a recycled-flow system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, S.T.K.; Lee, R.W.K.; Wilkins, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    Recycled-flow nuclear magnetic resonance for sensitivity enhancement in 1/2 spin nuclei has been reported previously, achieving several-fold signal enhancement. The success of the method depends upon premagnetization of nuclei prior to flowing into the detector region, obviating the need for delays following data acquisition to allow spin-lattice relaxation and reduce experiment time. The actual gains of sensitivity enhancement for 13 C- 1 H 2D J-resolved NMR using a recycled-flow method are evaluated. Possible enhancements for two types of J-resolved measurements, namely, one-bond 13 C- 1 H and long range J-resolved spectroscopy, are estimated using a simple Carr-Purcell spin-echo approach to quantify the 13 C signals. The pulse sequence is simply 90 0 -t /sub 1/2/-180 0 -t/sub 1/2/-AT-t/sub d/, where t/sub 1/2/ is half the evolution time, AT is the acquisition time, and t/sub d/ the experiment repetition time. In a static 2D NMR experiment, t/sub d/ usually must be the same order of the longest spin-lattice relaxation time (T 1 ) of nuclei. Quantitative measurements using a recycled-flow system indicate t/dub d/ can be reduced to a fraction of T 1 ; hence significant time savings can be achieved. Time-savings of between 2 and 25 can be anticipated for 2D spectroscopy under flow measurement conditions used in the present study. Other types of 2D NMR spectroscopy (autocorrelation and double quantum NMR) are discussed

  5. Detecting aromatic compounds on planetary surfaces using ultraviolet time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshelman, E.; Daly, M. G.; Slater, G.; Cloutis, E.

    2018-02-01

    Many aromatic organic molecules exhibit strong and characteristic fluorescence when excited with ultraviolet radiation. As laser excitation in the ultraviolet generates both fluorescence and resonantly enhanced Raman scattering of aromatic vibrational modes, combined Raman and fluorescence instruments have been proposed to search for organic compounds on Mars. In this work the time-resolved fluorescence of a suite of 24 compounds composed of 2-5 ringed alternant, non-alternant, and heterocyclic PAHs was measured. Fluorescence instrumentation with similar specifications to a putative flight instrument was capable of observing the fluorescence decay of these compounds with a sub-ns resolution. Incorporating time-resolved capabilities was also found to increase the ability to discriminate between individual PAHs. Incorporating time-resolved fluorescence capabilities into an ultraviolet gated Raman system intended for a rover or lander can increase the ability to detect and characterize PAHs on planetary surfaces.

  6. High-Resolution Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for beta-Spectroscopy on 187-Rhenium and Position Resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Porst, Jan-Patrick

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) for high resolution spectroscopy. MMCs are energy dispersive particle detectors based on the calorimetric principle which are typically operated at temperatures below 100 mK. The detectors make use of a paramagnetic temperature sensor to transform the temperature rise upon the absorption of a particle in the detector into a measurable magnetic flux change in a dc-SQUID. The application of MMCs for neutrino mass mea...

  7. Trace gas absorption spectroscopy using laser difference-frequency spectrometer for environmental application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Cazier, F.; Boucher, D.; Tittel, F. K.; Davies, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    A widely tunable infrared spectrometer based on difference frequency generation (DFG) has been developed for organic trace gas detection by laser absorption spectroscopy. On-line measurements of concentration of various hydrocarbons, such as acetylene, benzene, and ethylene, were investigated using high-resolution DFG trace gas spectroscopy for highly sensitive detection.

  8. X-ray Crystal Structure and Time-resolved Spectroscopy of the Blue Carotenoid Violerythrin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš; Frank, H.A.; Enriquez, M.M.; Niedzwiedzki, D.M.; Liaaen-Jensen, S.; Hemming, J.; Helliwell, J.R.; Helliwell, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 26 (2010), s. 8760-8769 ISSN 1520-6106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids * excited states * spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.603, year: 2010

  9. Development of time-resolved electron momentum spectroscopy. Toward real-time imaging of frontier electrons in molecular reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, M.; Takahashi, M.

    2016-01-01

    This report will introduce a new experimental technique to readers, which we would like to propose towards advances in the field of molecular reaction dynamics. It is time-resolved electron momentum spectroscopy and aims to take in momentum space snapshots of the rapid change of molecular orbitals, which is the driving force behind any structural changes occurring in transient molecules. Following a description of the working principle of the technique, some preliminary result will be presented in order to illustrate the current performance of the apparatus. (author)

  10. Time resolved measurement of laser-ablated particles by LAPXAS (Laser Plasma Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Atsumi; Yoda, Osamu; Murakami, Kouichi

    1999-01-01

    The time- and spatially-resolved properties of laser ablated carbon, boron and silicon particles were measured by LAPXAS (Laser Plasma Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy). The maximum speed of positively charged ions is higher than those of neutral atoms and negatively charged ions. The spatial distributions of the laser-ablated particles in the localized rare gas environment were measured. In helium gas environment, by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume depressed the ablation plume. There is no formation of silicon clusters till 15 μs after laser ablation in the argon gas environment. (author)

  11. Temperature-induced band shift in bulk γ-InSe by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huanfeng; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Yafei; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Feng, Yue; Tu, Jian; Gu, Chenyi; Sun, Yizhe; Liu, Chang; Nie, Yuefeng; Edmond Turcu, Ion C.; Xu, Yongbing; He, Liang

    2018-05-01

    Indium selenide (InSe) has recently become popular research topics because of its unique layered crystal structure, direct band gap and high electron mobilities. In this work, we have acquired the electronic structure of bulk γ-InSe at various temperatures using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We have also found that as the temperature decreases, the valence bands of γ-InSe exhibit a monotonic shift to lower binding energies. This band shift is attributed to the change of lattice parameters and has been validated by variable temperature X-ray diffraction measurements and theoretical calculations.

  12. Electronic structure of C r2AlC as observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takahiro; Pinek, Damir; Fujita, Taishi; Nakatake, Masashi; Ideta, Shin-ichiro; Tanaka, Kiyohisa; Ouisse, Thierry

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the electronic band structure and Fermi surfaces (FSs) of C r2AlC single crystals with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We evidence hole bands centered around the M points and electron bands centered around the Γ point in reciprocal space. Electron and hole bands exhibit an open, tubular structure along the c axis, confirming the quasi-two-dimensional character of this highly anisotropic, nanolamellar compound. Dependence of the photoionization cross sections on beam light polarization and orientation allows us to assess the orbital character of each observed band locally. Despite some differences, density functional theory calculations show a good agreement with experiment.

  13. Soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of heavily boron-doped superconducting diamond films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yokoya, T. Nakamura, T. Matushita, T. Muro, H. Okazaki, M. Arita, K. Shimada, H. Namatame, M. Taniguchi, Y. Takano, M. Nagao, T. Takenouchi, H. Kawarada and T. Oguchi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have performed soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SXARPES of microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition diamond films with different B concentrations in order to study the origin of the metallic behavior of superconducting diamond. SXARPES results clearly show valence band dispersions with a bandwidth of ~23 eV and with a top of the valence band at gamma point in the Brillouin zone, which are consistent with the calculated valence band dispersions of pure diamond. Boron concentration-dependent band dispersions near the Fermi level (EF exhibit a systematic shift of EF, indicating depopulation of electrons due to hole doping. These SXARPES results indicate that diamond bands retain for heavy boron doping and holes in the diamond band are responsible for the metallic states leading to superconductivity at low temperature. A high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy spectrum near EF of a heavily boron-doped diamond superconductor is also presented.

  14. Far Infrared High Resolution Synchrotron FTIR Spectroscopy of the Low Frequency Bending Modes of Dmso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Smirnova, Irina; Bocquet, Robin; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Sadovskii, Dmitrii A.; Pirali, Olivier; Roy, Pascale

    2010-06-01

    In addition to its importance for industrial and environmental studies, the monitoring of DiMethylSulfOxyde (DMSO, (CH_3)_2SO) concentrations is of considerable interest for civil protection. The existing high resolution gas phase spectroscopic data of DMSO only concerned the pure rotational transitions in the ground state. In the Far-IR domain, the low-frequency rovibrational transitions have never previously resolved. The high brightness of the AILES beamline of the synchrotron SOLEIL and the instrumental sensitivity provided by the multipass cell allowed to measure for the first time these transitions. 1581 A-type and C-type transitions in the ν11 band have been assigned and 25 molecular constants of Watson's s-form hamiltonian developed to degree 8 have been fitted within the experimental accuracy. The use of then synchrotron radiation has opened many possibilities for new spectroscopic studies. Together with several other recent studies, our successful measurement and analysis of DMSO convincingly demonstrates the potential of the AILES beamline for high resolution FIR spectroscopy. Thus our present work is just at the beginning of unraveling the rovibrational structure of low frequency bending and torsional vibrational states of DMSO and yielding important comprehensive structural and spectroscopic information on this molecule. L. Margules, R. A. Motienko, E. A. Alekseev, J. Demaison, J. Molec. Spectrosc., 260(23),2009 V. Typke, M. Dakkouri, J. Molec. Struct., 599(177),2001 A. Cuisset, L. Nanobashvili, I. Smirnova, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, D. Sadovskii, Chem. Phys. Lett., accepted for publication

  15. Dual-etalon, cavity-ring-down, frequency comb spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2010-10-01

    The 'dual etalon frequency comb spectrometer' is a novel low cost spectometer with limited moving parts. A broad band light source (pulsed laser, LED, lamp ...) is split into two beam paths. One travels through an etalon and a sample gas, while the second arm is just an etalon cavity, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges (FSR) of the two cavities are not identical, the intensity pattern at the detector with consist of a series of heterodyne frequencies. Each mode out of the sample arm etalon with have a unique frequency in RF (radio-frequency) range, where modern electronics can easily record the signals. By monitoring these RF beat frequencies we can then determine when an optical frequencies is absorbed. The resolution is set by the FSR of the cavity, typically 10 MHz, with a bandwidth up to 100s of cm{sup -1}. In this report, the new spectrometer is described in detail and demonstration experiments on Iodine absorption are carried out. Further we discuss powerful potential next generation steps to developing this into a point sensor for monitoring combustion by-products, environmental pollutants, and warfare agents.

  16. Temporal characterization of FEL micropulses as function of cavity length detuning using frequency-resolved optical gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richman, B.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Results of frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) measurements on the Stanford mid-IR FEL system show the effect of FEL cavity length detuning on the micropulse temporal structure. The FROG technique enables the acquisition of complete and uniquely invertible amplitude and phase temporal dependence of optical pulses. Unambiguous phase and amplitude profiles are recovered from the data. The optical pulses are nearly transform limited, and the pulse length increases with cavity length detuning.

  17. Mapping of trap densities and hotspots in pentacene thin-film transistors by frequency-resolved scanning photoresponse microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermeier, Christian; Fiebig, Matthias; Nickel, Bert

    2013-10-25

    Frequency-resolved scanning photoresponse microscopy of pentacene thin-film transistors is reported. The photoresponse pattern maps the in-plane distribution of trap states which is superimposed by the level of trap filling adjusted by the gate voltage of the transistor. Local hotspots in the photoresponse map thus indicate areas of high trap densities within the pentacene thin film. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH 8 Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Kinetics of the reaction F+NO+M->FNO+M studied by pulse radiolysis combined with time-resolved IR and UV spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn; Sillesen, A.; Jodkowski, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    The title reaction was initiated by pulse radiolysis of SF6/NO gas mixtures, and the formation of FNO was studied by time-resolved IR and UV spectroscopy. At SF6 pressures of 10-320 mbar at 298 K, the formation of FNO was studied by infrared diode laser spectroscopy at 1857.324 cm(-1). Comparative...

  19. Optical frequency comb for high resolution hydrogen spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoult, O.

    2006-11-01

    In this work, we perform an absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-3S transition in atomic hydrogen, in order to improve the uncertainties on both the Rydberg constant and the Lamb shift L1S. In the experiment, a CW stabilized Ti:Sa laser is doubled twice in LBO (LiB 3 O 5 ) and BBO (β-BaB 2 O 4 ) crystals. The 1S-3S transition is excited by two photons at 205 nm in an optical cavity colinear with the atomic beam, at room temperature. The remaining second-order Doppler effect is compensated by a quadratic Stark effect resulting from an applied static magnetic field. An optical frequency comb is used to compare directly the Ti:Sa frequency with the microwave frequency standard. We detect fluorescence at 656 nm thanks to a CCD camera. Fitting the experimental data with our calculated line shapes leads to a value of the second-order Doppler effect in disagreement with approximative predictions for the 1S-3S frequency. We suggest the existence of stray electric fields as a possible systematic effect. The slides of the defence of the thesis have been added at the end of the document. (author)

  20. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-04-30

    In addition to the record high superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}), high temperature cuprate superconductors are characterized by their unusual superconducting properties below T{sub c}, and anomalous normal state properties above T{sub c}. In the superconducting state, although it has long been realized that superconductivity still involves Cooper pairs, as in the traditional BCS theory, the experimentally determined d-wave pairing is different from the usual s-wave pairing found in conventional superconductors. The identification of the pairing mechanism in cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. The normal state properties, particularly in the underdoped region, have been found to be at odd with conventional metals which is usually described by Fermi liquid theory; instead, the normal state at optimal doping fits better with the marginal Fermi liquid phenomenology. Most notable is the observation of the pseudogap state in the underdoped region above T{sub c}. As in other strongly correlated electrons systems, these unusual properties stem from the interplay between electronic, magnetic, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. Understanding the microscopic process involved in these materials and the interaction of electrons with other entities is essential to understand the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. Since the discovery of high-T{sub c} superconductivity in cuprates, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has provided key experimental insights in revealing the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors. These include, among others, the earliest identification of dispersion and a large Fermi surface, an anisotropic superconducting gap suggestive of a d-wave order parameter, and an observation of the pseudogap in underdoped samples. In the mean time, this technique itself has experienced a dramatic improvement in its energy and momentum resolutions, leading to a series of new discoveries not

  1. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the record high superconducting transition temperature (T c ), high temperature cuprate superconductors are characterized by their unusual superconducting properties below T c , and anomalous normal state properties above T c . In the superconducting state, although it has long been realized that superconductivity still involves Cooper pairs, as in the traditional BCS theory, the experimentally determined d-wave pairing is different from the usual s-wave pairing found in conventional superconductors. The identification of the pairing mechanism in cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. The normal state properties, particularly in the underdoped region, have been found to be at odd with conventional metals which is usually described by Fermi liquid theory; instead, the normal state at optimal doping fits better with the marginal Fermi liquid phenomenology. Most notable is the observation of the pseudogap state in the underdoped region above T c . As in other strongly correlated electrons systems, these unusual properties stem from the interplay between electronic, magnetic, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. Understanding the microscopic process involved in these materials and the interaction of electrons with other entities is essential to understand the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. Since the discovery of high-T c superconductivity in cuprates, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has provided key experimental insights in revealing the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors. These include, among others, the earliest identification of dispersion and a large Fermi surface, an anisotropic superconducting gap suggestive of a d-wave order parameter, and an observation of the pseudogap in underdoped samples. In the mean time, this technique itself has experienced a dramatic improvement in its energy and momentum resolutions, leading to a series of new discoveries not thought possible

  2. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy in the UV/VUV spectral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, J.

    1992-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes ranging from 3 to 500 ns were measured on various states of Ag, N, Se, Te and As, by recording the fluorescence light decay after excitation by a laser pulse. Ag was supplied by a collimated atomic beam while Se, Te and As were contained in quartz cells. Pulsed laser radiation, with a wavelength down to 185 nm, was generated by different set-ups, using Nd-YAG pumped dye lasers combined with non-linear crystals and Raman shifting. Short laser pulses were produced by a nitrogen laser or a distributed feedback dye laser. Two-photon processes and stepwise excitation were used to populate high-lying levels. Depletion spectroscopy, quantum-beat spectroscopy and optical double resonance spectroscopy were also performed

  3. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of the light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Fuciman, Marcel; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Frank, Harry A; Blankenship, Robert E

    2011-10-01

    The light-harvesting complex 2 from the thermophilic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption and fluorescence, sub-nanosecond-time-resolved fluorescence and femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The measurements were performed at room temperature and at 10 K. The combination of both ultrafast and steady-state optical spectroscopy methods at ambient and cryogenic temperatures allowed the detailed study of carotenoid (Car)-to-bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) as well BChl-to-BChl excitation energy transfer in the complex. The studies show that the dominant Cars rhodopin (N=11) and spirilloxanthin (N=13) do not play a significant role as supportive energy donors for BChl a. This is related with their photophysical properties regulated by long π-electron conjugation. On the other hand, such properties favor some of the Cars, particularly spirilloxanthin (N=13) to play the role of the direct quencher of the excited singlet state of BChl. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  4. Towards atomically resolved EELS elemental and fine structure mapping via multi-frame and energy-offset correction spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Huang, Michael R S; Salzberger, Ute; Hahn, Kersten; Sigle, Wilfried; van Aken, Peter A

    2018-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are two of the most common means for chemical analysis in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The marked progress of the instrumentation hardware has made chemical analysis at atomic resolution readily possible nowadays. However, the acquisition and interpretation of atomically resolved spectra can still be problematic due to image distortions and poor signal-to-noise ratio of the spectra, especially for investigation of energy-loss near-edge fine structures. By combining multi-frame spectrum imaging and automatic energy-offset correction, we developed a spectrum imaging technique implemented into customized DigitalMicrograph scripts for suppressing image distortions and improving the signal-to-noise ratio. With practical examples, i.e. SrTiO 3 bulk material and Sr-doped La 2 CuO 4 superlattices, we demonstrate the improvement of elemental mapping and the EELS spectrum quality, which opens up new possibilities for atomically resolved EELS fine structure mapping. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Optical fiber strain sensor using fiber resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Ping; Chen, Li

    2012-01-01

    A novel (to our best knowledge) optical fiber strain sensor using a fiber ring resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy is proposed and demonstrated. A passively mode-locked optical fiber laser is employed to generate a phased-locked frequency comb. Strain applied to the optical fib...

  6. Spectroscopy of the Schwarzschild black hole at arbitrary frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casals, Marc; Ottewill, Adrian

    2012-09-14

    Linear field perturbations of a black hole are described by the Green function of the wave equation that they obey. After Fourier decomposing the Green function, its two natural contributions are given by poles (quasinormal modes) and a largely unexplored branch cut in the complex frequency plane. We present new analytic methods for calculating the branch cut on a Schwarzschild black hole for arbitrary values of the frequency. The branch cut yields a power-law tail decay for late times in the response of a black hole to an initial perturbation. We determine explicitly the first three orders in the power-law and show that the branch cut also yields a new logarithmic behavior T(-2ℓ-5)lnT for late times. Before the tail sets in, the quasinormal modes dominate the black hole response. For electromagnetic perturbations, the quasinormal mode frequencies approach the branch cut at large overtone index n. We determine these frequencies up to n(-5/2) and, formally, to arbitrary order. Highly damped quasinormal modes are of particular interest in that they have been linked to quantum properties of black holes.

  7. High-resolution metallic magnetic calorimeters for β-spectroscopy on 187rhenium and position resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porst, Jan-Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) for high resolution spectroscopy. MMCs are energy dispersive particle detectors based on the calorimetric principle which are typically operated at temperatures below 100 mK. The detectors make use of a paramagnetic temperature sensor to transform the temperature rise upon the absorption of a particle in the detector into a measurable magnetic flux change in a dc-SQUID. The application of MMCs for neutrino mass measurements and their advantages with respect to other approaches are discussed. In view of this application the development of an MMC optimized for β-endpoint spectroscopy on 187 rhenium is presented. A fully micro-fabricated X-ray detector is characterized and performs close to design values. Furthermore, a new technique to more efficiently couple rhenium absorbers mechanically and thermally to the sensor was developed and successfully tested. By employing a metallic contact, signal rise times faster than 5 μs could be observed with superconducting rhenium absorbers. In addition to the single pixel detectors, an alternative approach of reading out multiple pixels was developed in this work, too. Here, the individual absorbers have a different thermal coupling to only one temperature sensor resulting in a distribution of different pulse shapes. Straightforward position discrimination by means of rise time analysis is demonstrated for a four pixel MMC and a thermal model of the detector is provided. Unprecedented so far, an energy resolution of less than ΔE FWHM <5 eV for 5.9 keV X-rays was achieved across all absorbers. (orig.)

  8. A high-efficiency spin-resolved photoemission spectrometer combining time-of-flight spectroscopy with exchange-scattering polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozwiak, Chris M.; Graff, Jeff; Lebedev, Gennadi; Andresen, Nord; Schmid, Andreas; Fedorov, Alexei; El Gabaly, Farid; Wan, Weishi; Lanzara, Alessandra; Hussain, Zahid

    2010-04-13

    We describe a spin-resolved electron spectrometer capable of uniquely efficient and high energy resolution measurements. Spin analysis is obtained through polarimetry based on low-energy exchange scattering from a ferromagnetic thin-film target. This approach can achieve a similar analyzing power (Sherman function) as state-of-the-art Mott scattering polarimeters, but with as much as 100 times improved efficiency due to increased reflectivity. Performance is further enhanced by integrating the polarimeter into a time-of-flight (TOF) based energy analysis scheme with a precise and flexible electrostatic lens system. The parallel acquisition of a range of electron kinetic energies afforded by the TOF approach results in an order of magnitude (or more) increase in efficiency compared to hemispherical analyzers. The lens system additionally features a 90 degrees bandpass filter, which by removing unwanted parts of the photoelectron distribution allows the TOF technique to be performed at low electron drift energy and high energy resolution within a wide range of experimental parameters. The spectrometer is ideally suited for high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES), and initial results are shown. The TOF approach makes the spectrometer especially ideal for time-resolved spin-ARPES experiments.

  9. Development of soft x-ray time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy system with a two-dimensional angle-resolved time-of-flight analyzer at SPring-8 BL07LSU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Manami; Yamamoto, Susumu; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Yukawa, Ryu; Fukushima, Akiko; Harasawa, Ayumi; Kakizaki, Akito; Matsuda, Iwao [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Kousa, Yuka; Kondoh, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Tanaka, Yoshihito [RIKEN/SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    We have developed a soft x-ray time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy system using synchrotron radiation (SR) at SPring-8 BL07LSU and an ultrashort pulse laser system. Two-dimensional angle-resolved measurements were performed with a time-of-flight-type analyzer. The photoemission spectroscopy system is synchronized to light pulses of SR and laser using a time control unit. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by mapping the band structure of a Si(111) crystal over the surface Brillouin zones and observing relaxation of the surface photo-voltage effect using the pump (laser) and probe (SR) method.

  10. Ultrabroadband time-resolved THz spectroscopy of polymer-based solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David G.; Krebs, Frederik C; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2011-01-01

    We have developed ultrabroadband THz spectroscopy in reflection mode for characterization of conductivity dynamics in conductive polymer samples used in organic solar cells. The spectrometer is designed to have a time resolution limited only by the duration of the optical pump pulse, thus enabling...

  11. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votava, Ondřej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, A. E.; Jain, Ch.; Fittschen, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 4 (2012), 043110 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0422 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : CW-DIODE-LASER * DOWN SPECTROSCOPY * KINETICS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.602, year: 2012

  12. Frequency-comb-assisted broadband precision spectroscopy with cascaded diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Junqiu; Brasch, Victor; Pfeiffer, Martin H. P.

    2016-01-01

    Frequency-comb-assisted diode laser spectroscopy, employing both the accuracy of an optical frequency comb and the broad wavelength tuning range of a tunable diode laser, has been widely used in many applications. In this Letter, we present a novel method using cascaded frequency agile diode lasers......, which allows us to extend the measurement bandwidth to 37.4 THz (1355-1630 nm) at megahertz resolution with scanning speeds above 1 THz/s. It is demonstrated as a useful tool to characterize a broadband spectrum for molecular spectroscopy, and in particular it enables us to characterize the dispersion...

  13. Spectrally- and Time-Resolved Sum Frequency Generation (STiR-SFG): a new tool for ultrafast hydrogen bond dynamics at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benderskii, Alexander; Bordenyuk, Andrey; Weeraman, Champika

    2006-03-01

    The recently developed spectrally- and time-resolved Sum Frequency Generation (STiR-SFG) is a surface-selective 3-wave mixing (IR+visible) spectroscopic technique capable of measuring ultrafast spectral evolution of vibrational coherences. A detailed description of this measurement will be presented, and a noniterative method or deconvolving the laser pulses will be introduced to obtain the molecular response function. STiR-SFG, combined with the frequency-domain SFG spectroscopy, was applied to study hydrogen bonding dynamics at aqueous interfaces (D2O/CaF2). Spectral dynamics of the OD-stretch on the 50-150 fs time scale provides real-time observation of ultrafast H-bond rearrangement. Tuning the IR wavelength to the blue or red side of the OD-stretch transition, we selectively monitor the dynamics of different sub-ensembles in the distribution of the H-bond structures. The blue-side excitation (weaker H-bonding) shows monotonic red-shift of the OD-frequency. In contrast, the red-side excitation (stronger H-bonding structures) produces a blue-shift and a recursion, which may indicate the presence of an underdamped intermolecular mode of interfacial water. Effect of electrolyte concentration on the H-bond dynamics will be discussed.

  14. Spatial frequency domain spectroscopy of two layer media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2011-10-01

    Monitoring of tissue blood volume and oxygen saturation using biomedical optics techniques has the potential to inform the assessment of tissue health, healing, and dysfunction. These quantities are typically estimated from the contribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin to the absorption spectrum of the dermis. However, estimation of blood related absorption in superficial tissue such as the skin can be confounded by the strong absorption of melanin in the epidermis. Furthermore, epidermal thickness and pigmentation varies with anatomic location, race, gender, and degree of disease progression. This study describes a technique for decoupling the effect of melanin absorption in the epidermis from blood absorption in the dermis for a large range of skin types and thicknesses. An artificial neural network was used to map input optical properties to spatial frequency domain diffuse reflectance of two layer media. Then, iterative fitting was used to determine the optical properties from simulated spatial frequency domain diffuse reflectance. Additionally, an artificial neural network was trained to directly map spatial frequency domain reflectance to sets of optical properties of a two layer medium, thus bypassing the need for iteration. In both cases, the optical thickness of the epidermis and absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of the dermis were determined independently. The accuracy and efficiency of the iterative fitting approach was compared with the direct neural network inversion.

  15. Atomic-layer-resolved analysis of surface magnetism by diffraction spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements by Auger-electron-yield detection are powerful analysis tools for the electronic and magnetic structures of surfaces, but all the information from atoms within the electron mean-free-path range is summed into the obtained spectrum. In order to investigate the electronic and magnetic structures of each atomic layer at subsurface, we have proposed a new method, diffraction spectroscopy, which is the combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Auger electron diffraction (AED). From a series of measured thickness dependent AED patterns, we deduced a set of atomic-layer-specific AED patterns arithmetically. Based on these AED patterns, we succeeded in disentangling obtained XANES and XMCD spectra into those from different atomic layers.

  16. Investigation of natural frequencies of laser inertial confinement fusion capsules using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaojun [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tang, Xing; Wang, Zongwei [Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Chen, Qian; Qian, Menglu [Institute of Acoustic, Tongji University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Meng, Jie [Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tang, Yongjian [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zou, Yaming; Shen, Hao [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Gao, Dangzhong, E-mail: dgaocn@163.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The frequency equation of isotropic multi-layer hollow spheres was derived using three-dimension (3D) elasticity theory and transfer matrix method. • The natural frequencies of the capsules with a millimeter-sized diameter are determined experimentally using resonant ultrasound spectrum (RUS) system. • The predicted natural frequencies of the frequency equation accord well with the observed results. • The theoretical and experimental investigation has proved the potential applicability of RUS to both metallic and non-metallic capsules. - Abstract: The natural frequency problem of laser inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules is one of the basic problems for determining non-destructively the elasticity modulus of each layer material using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS). In this paper, the frequency equation of isotropic one-layer hollow spheres was derived using three dimension (3D) elasticity theory and some simplified frequency equations were discussed under axisymmetric and spherical symmetry conditions. The corresponding equation of isotropic multi-layer hollow spheres was given employing transfer matrix method. To confirm the validity of the frequency equation and explore the feasibility of RUS for characterizing the ICF capsules, three representative capsules with a millimeter-sized diameter were determined by piezoelectric-based resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (PZT-RUS) and laser-based resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (LRUS) techniques. On the basis of both theoretical and experimental results, it is proved that the calculated and measured natural frequencies are accurate enough for determining the ICF capsules.

  17. Broad bandwidth frequency domain instrument for quantitative tissue optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Tuan H.; Coquoz, Olivier; Fishkin, Joshua B.; Anderson, Eric; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) optical properties of turbid media, e.g., tissue, can be accurately quantified noninvasively using methods based on diffuse reflectance or transmittance, such as frequency domain photon migration (FDPM). Factors which govern the accuracy and sensitivity of FDPM-measured optical properties include instrument performance, the light propagation model, and fitting algorithms used to calculate optical properties from measured data. In this article, we characterize instrument, model, and fitting uncertaintics of an FDPM system designed for clinical use and investigate how each of these factors affects the quantification of NIR absorption (μ a ) and reduced scattering (μ s ' ) parameters in tissue phantoms. The instrument is based on a 500 MHz, multiwavelength platform that sweeps through 201 discrete frequencies in as little as 675 ms. Phase and amplitude of intensity modulated light launched into tissue, i.e., diffuse photon density waves (PDW), are measured with an accuracy of ±0.30 degree sign and ±3.5%, while phase and amplitude precision are ±0.025 degree sign and ±0.20%, respectively. At this level of instrument uncertainty, simultaneous fitting of frequency-dependent phase and amplitude nonlinear model functions derived from a photon diffusion approximation provides an accurate and robust strategy for determining optical properties from FDPM data, especially for media with high absorption. In an optical property range that is characteristic of most human tissues in the NIR (5x10 -3 a -2 mm -1 , 0.5 s ' -1 ), we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that the multifrequency, simultaneous-fit approach allows μ a and μ s ' to be quantified with an accuracy of ±5% and ±3%, respectively. Although exceptionally high levels of precision can be obtained using this approach ( a and μ s ' . (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  18. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy and Near Infrared Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection: Receptor-targeted and Native Biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang

    Optical spectroscopy and imaging using near-infrared (NIR) light provides powerful tools for non-invasive detection of cancer in tissue. Optical techniques are capable of quantitative reconstructions maps of tissue absorption and scattering properties, thus can map in vivo the differences in the content of certain marker chromophores and/or fluorophores in normal and cancerous tissues (for example: water, tryptophan, collagen and NADH contents). Potential clinical applications of optical spectroscopy and imaging include functional tumor detection and photothermal therapeutics. Optical spectroscopy and imaging apply contrasts from intrinsic tissue chromophores such as water, collagen and NADH, and extrinsic optical contrast agents such as Indocyanine Green (ICG) to distinguish disease tissue from the normal one. Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging also gives high sensitivity and specificity for biomedical diagnosis. Recent developments on specific-targeting fluorophores such as small receptor-targeted dye-peptide conjugate contrast agent offer high contrast between normal and cancerous tissues hence provide promising future for early tumour detection. This thesis focus on a study to distinguish the cancerous prostate tissue from the normal prostate tissues with enhancement of specific receptor-targeted prostate cancer contrast agents using optical spectroscopy and imaging techniques. The scattering and absorption coefficients, and anisotropy factor of cancerous and normal prostate tissues were investigated first as the basis for the biomedical diagnostic and optical imaging. Understanding the receptors over-expressed prostate cancer cells and molecular target mechanism of ligand, two small ICG-derivative dye-peptides, namely Cypate-Bombesin Peptide Analogue Conjugate (Cybesin) and Cypate-Octreotate Peptide Conjugate (Cytate), were applied to study their clinical potential for human prostate cancer detection. In this work, the steady-state and time-resolved

  19. Probing Pharmaceutical Mixtures during Milling: The Potency of Low-Frequency Raman Spectroscopy in Identifying Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Greg; Römann, Philipp; Poller, Bettina; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rooney, Jeremy S; Huff, Gregory S; Smith, Geoffrey P S; Rades, Thomas; Gordon, Keith C; Strachan, Clare J; Fraser-Miller, Sara J

    2017-12-04

    This study uses a multimodal analytical approach to evaluate the rates of (co)amorphization of milled drug and excipient and the effectiveness of different analytical methods in detecting these changes. Indomethacin and tryptophan were the model substances, and the analytical methods included low-frequency Raman spectroscopy (785 nm excitation and capable of measuring both low- (10 to 250 cm -1 ) and midfrequency (450 to 1800 cm -1 ) regimes, and a 830 nm system (5 to 250 cm -1 )), conventional (200-3000 cm -1 ) Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The kinetics of amorphization were found to be faster for the mixture, and indeed, for indomethacin, only partial amorphization occurred (after 360 min of milling). Each technique was capable of identifying the transformations, but some, such as low-frequency Raman spectroscopy and XRPD, provided less ambiguous signatures than the midvibrational frequency techniques (conventional Raman and FTIR). The low-frequency Raman spectra showed intense phonon mode bands for the crystalline and cocrystalline samples that could be used as a sensitive probe of order. Multivariate analysis has been used to further interpret the spectral changes. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential of low-frequency Raman spectroscopy, which has several practical advantages over XRPD, for probing (dis-)order during pharmaceutical processing, showcasing its potential for future development, and implementation as an in-line process monitoring method.

  20. New approaches for a time- and position-resolved detector for positron annihilation spectroscopy at PLEPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, Ulrich; Egger, Werner; Sperr, Peter; Loewe, Benjamin; Ravelli, Luca; Koegel, Gottfried; Dollinger, Guenther [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, LRT2 (Germany); Jagutzki, Ottmar [Universitaet Frankfurt, RoentDek GmbH (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The pulsed low energy positron system PLEPS at NEPOMUC at the FRM II is a tool for depth resolved positron lifetime measurements. Besides positron lifetime measurements 2D-AMOC (two dimensional age momentum correlation) experiments are also possible. 2D-AMOC provides in coincidence the lifetime of the positron and the longitudinal momentum distribution of the annihilating electron. It would be of great scientific concern to measure simultaneously the entire 3D-momentum distribution of the annihilating electron and the corresponding lifetime of the positron (4D-AMOC). To perform 4D-AMOC measurements, a time and spatially resolving detector with a time resolution of about 100 ps (FWHM) and a spatial resolution of circa 2 mm over an area of about 12 cm{sup 2} is required in coincidence with a pixelated Ge-detector and currently under development at our institute. It is intended to use a MCP-based UV-light detector with two MCP-stages coupled to a BaF{sub 2} scintillator. To achieve the spatial resolution the centroid information of the photoelectron-cloud is detected with a position sensitive anode installed outside the housing of the MCP detector. As an alternative to a MCP-based detector, silicon photomultipliers are also envisaged.

  1. Muon implantation in inert gases studied by radio frequency spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C; Cottrell, S P; Ghandi, K; Fleming, D G

    2005-01-01

    Diamagnetic and muonium (Mu) fractions formed in low-pressure inert gases, by energetic muon implantation, have been studied using the technique of time-delayed radio frequency muon spin resonance (RF-μSR). Results obtained establish the validity of the long-held view that formation of these species is due only to prompt processes, and in turn confirms that the diamagnetic environment is due to a muon molecular ion, MMu + , and not a bare μ + . In addition, polarization fractions for the diamagnetic and Mu environments have been determined at different pressures, thereby complementing earlier data, and demonstrating that the RF-μSR technique provides polarization fractions in good accord with those obtained using conventional transverse-field muon spin resonance measurements

  2. Muon implantation in inert gases studied by radio frequency spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C [ISIS Facility, CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Cottrell, S P [ISIS Facility, CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Ghandi, K [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Fleming, D G [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    2005-01-14

    Diamagnetic and muonium (Mu) fractions formed in low-pressure inert gases, by energetic muon implantation, have been studied using the technique of time-delayed radio frequency muon spin resonance (RF-{mu}SR). Results obtained establish the validity of the long-held view that formation of these species is due only to prompt processes, and in turn confirms that the diamagnetic environment is due to a muon molecular ion, MMu{sup +}, and not a bare {mu}{sup +}. In addition, polarization fractions for the diamagnetic and Mu environments have been determined at different pressures, thereby complementing earlier data, and demonstrating that the RF-{mu}SR technique provides polarization fractions in good accord with those obtained using conventional transverse-field muon spin resonance measurements.

  3. In Situ Planetary Mineralogy Using Simultaneous Time Resolved Fluorescence and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman , G.R.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is one of the primary methods of mineralogical analysis in the laboratory, and more recently in the field. Because of its versatility and ability to interrogate rocks in their natural form it is one of the front runners for the next generation of in situ instruments designed to explore adverse set of solar system bodies (e.g. Mars, Venus, the Moon, and other primitive bodies such as asteroids and the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos), as well as for pre-selection of rock and soil samples for potential cache and return missions.

  4. The Fourteenth International Meeting on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS XIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    conferences covering the use of advanced vibrational spectroscopy for the use of studying time-dependent molecular processes in chemistry, physics ...Netherlands a.huertaviga@uva.nl Neil Hunt Dept of  Physics , University of Strathclyde United Kingdom nhunt@phys.strath.ac Koichi Iwata Gakushuin University...Dasgupta Mark Creelman Sangdeok Shim Biochemical Reaction Dynamics, , , UC B k ler e ey 11:50 AM C W. Zinth, W. J. Schreier, J. Kubon, N. Regner, K

  5. Spin-resolved entanglement spectroscopy of critical spin chains and Luttinger liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laflorencie, Nicolas; Rachel, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Quantum critical chains are well-described and understood by virtue of conformal field theory. Still, the meaning of the real space entanglement spectrum—the eigenvalues of the reduced density matrix—of such systems remains elusive in general, even when there is an additional quantum number available such as the spin or particle number. In this paper, we explore in detail the properties and structure of the reduced density matrix of critical XXZ spin- (1/2) chains. We investigate the quantum/thermal correspondence between the reduced density matrix of a T = 0 pure quantum state and the thermal density matrix of an effective entanglement Hamiltonian. Using large scale DMRG and QMC simulations, we investigate the conformal structure of the spectra, the entanglement Hamiltonian, and temperature. We then introduce the notion of spin-resolved entanglement entropies, which display interesting scaling features. (paper)

  6. Time-resolved spectroscopy of laser-induced breakdown in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Robert J.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Roach, William P.

    1996-05-01

    Laser pulses of 60-ps and 80-ps at a wavelength of 532-nm and 1064-nm respectively were used to produce laser induced breakdown in triple-distilled water. The resulting luminescent flash from the plasma was captured with an imaging spectrograph coupled to a streak camera with a 5-ps time resolution. The wavelength range was 350 to 900-nm. We present the resulting experimental data which gives plasma duration and time-resolved spectral information. Plasma temperature is also computed from the data. All parameters are presented at a pulse energy of 1-mJ and are compared with time-integrated spectra at the same pulse duration and at 5 to 7-ns pulse duration in a similar energy range.

  7. Chromatic-free spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics for microplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Liguo; Chen Wencong; Zhu Ximing; Pu Yikang; Li Zeren

    2009-01-01

    A chromatic-free spatially resolved diagnostic system for microplasma measurement is proposed and demonstrated, which consists of an optical chromatic-free microscope mirror system, an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD), and bandpass filters. The diagnostic system free of chromatic aberrations with a spatial resolution of about 6 μm is achieved. The factors that limit the resolution of this diagnostic system have been analyzed, which are optical diffraction, the pixel size of the EMCCD, and the thickness of the microplasma. In this paper, the optimal condition for achieving a maximum resolution power has been analyzed. With this diagnostic system, we revealed the spatial nonuniformity of a microwave atmospheric-pressure argon microplasma. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of the time-averaged effective electron temperature has been estimated from the intensity distributions of 750.4 and 415.8 nm emissions.

  8. Surface investigations using monolayer-resolvable high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kenji; Ohtsuka, Hisashi; Ohshima, Kazuomi; Mannami, Michi-hiko

    1994-01-01

    Energy spectra of scattered 0.5 MeV He ions from a clean (001) surface of SnTe are measured with a 90 sector magnetic spectrometer (ΔE/E ∼ 0.1%). The ions scattered from successive atomic layers can be resolved in the energy spectra. Inelastic energy losses and charge state distributions of 0.5 MeV He ions scattered from the topmost atomic layer of the SnTe(001) are measured. A position-dependent stopping power at the surface is proposed from the observed energy losses. The observed charge state distribution shows the importance of the charge-exchange processes with valence electrons in the tail of the electron distribution at the surface. (orig.)

  9. Collimated dual species oven source and its characterisation via spatially resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, N.; Da Ros, E.; Nute, J.; Baldolini, D.; Jouve, P.; Hackermüller, L.; Langer, M.

    2018-03-01

    We describe the design, construction and characterisation of a collimated, dual-species oven source for generating intense beams of lithium and caesium in UHV environments. Our design produces full beam overlap for the two species. Using an aligned microtube array the FWHM of the output beam is restricted to  ˜75 milliradians, with an estimated axial brightness of 3.6× 1014 atoms s-1 sr-1 for Li and 7.4× 1015 atoms s-1 sr-1 for Cs. We measure the properties of the output beam using a spatially-resolved fluorescence technique, which allows for the extraction of additional information not accessible without spatial resolution.

  10. Metalation of positively charged water soluble mesoporphyrins studied via time-resolved SERRS spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procházka, Marek; Hanzliková, Jana; Štěpánek, Josef; Baumruk, Vladimir

    1997-06-01

    Time-resolved SERRS spectra of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]21 H,23 H-porphine (TMAP) were recorded (using a multichannel Raman spectrometer) in various SERS-active Ag colloid/porphyrin systems. Data treatment based on a factor analysis was used to decompose all the SERRS spectra into two main components: SERRS spectrum of the free base TMAP and that of its Ag metalated form. The metalation kinetics obtained in this way was found to be highly dependent on the presence of phosphate anions, citrate and/or Triton X-100 in the colloidal system. The results are analogous to those previously obtained for 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)21 H,23 H-porphine, a porphyrin with a substantially stronger tendency towards metalation.

  11. Polymorph characterization of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) using low-frequency Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Peter J; Dabros, Marta; Sarsfield, Beth; Chan, Eric; Carriere, James T; Smith, Brian C

    2014-01-01

    Polymorph detection, identification, and quantitation in crystalline materials are of great importance to the pharmaceutical industry. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques used for this purpose include Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT-MIR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and terahertz (THz) and far-infrared (FIR) spectroscopy. Typically, the fundamental molecular vibrations accessed using high-frequency Raman and MIR spectroscopy or the overtone and combination of bands in the NIR spectra are used to monitor the solid-state forms of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). The local environmental sensitivity of the fundamental molecular vibrations provides an indirect probe of the long-range order in molecular crystals. However, low-frequency vibrational spectroscopy provides access to the lattice vibrations of molecular crystals and, hence, has the potential to more directly probe intermolecular interactions in the solid state. Recent advances in filter technology enable high-quality, low-frequency Raman spectra to be acquired using a single-stage spectrograph. This innovation enables the cost-effective collection of high-quality Raman spectra in the 200-10 cm(-1) region. In this study, we demonstrate the potential of low-frequency Raman spectroscopy for the polymorphic characterization of APIs. This approach provides several benefits over existing techniques, including ease of sampling and more intense, information-rich band structures that can potentially discriminate among crystalline forms. An improved understanding of the relationship between the crystalline structure and the low-frequency vibrational spectrum is needed for the more widespread use of the technique.

  12. In situ time-resolved X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy of selenite reduction by siderite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badaut, V.; Schlegel, M.L.; Descostes, M.; Moutiers, G.

    2012-01-01

    The reduction oxidation-reaction between aqueous selenite (SeO 3 2- ) and siderite (FeCO 3 (s)) was monitored by in situ, time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the selenium K edge in a controlled electrochemical environment. Spectral evolutions showed that more than 60% of selenite was reduced at the siderite surface after 20 h of experiment, at which time the reaction was still incomplete. Fitting of XANES spectra by linear combination of reference spectra showed that selenite reaction with siderite is essentially a two-step process, selenite ions being immobilized on siderite surface prior to their reduction. A kinetic model of the reduction step is proposed, allowing to identify the specific contribution of surface reduction. These results have strong implications for the retention of selenite by corrosion products in nuclear waste repositories and in a larger extent for the fate of selenium in the environment. (authors)

  13. Direct Structural and Chemical Characterization of the Photolytic Intermediates of Methylcobalamin Using Time-Resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Ganesh; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Kodis, Gerdenis; Kong, Qingyu; Liu, Cunming; Chizmeshya, Andrew; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John

    2018-04-05

    Cobalt−carbon bond cleavage is crucial to most natural and synthetic applications of the cobalamin class of compounds, and here we present the first direct electronic and geometric structural characteristics of intermediates formed following photoexcitation of methylcobalamin (MeCbl) using time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). We catch transients corresponding to two intermediates, in the hundreds of picoseconds and a few microseconds. Highlights of the picosecond intermediate, which is reduced in comparison to the ground state, are elongation of the upper axial Co−C bond and relaxation of the corrin ring. This is not so with the recombining photocleaved products captured at a few microseconds, where the Co−C bond almost (yet not entirely) reverts to its ground state configuration and a substantially elongated lower axial Co−NIm bond is observed. The reduced cobalt site here confirms formation of methyl radical as the photoproduct.

  14. Wide-field time-resolved luminescence imaging and spectroscopy to decipher obliterated documents in forensic science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mototsugu; Akiba, Norimitsu; Kurosawa, Kenji; Kuroki, Kenro; Akao, Yoshinori; Higashikawa, Yoshiyasu

    2016-01-01

    We applied a wide-field time-resolved luminescence (TRL) method with a pulsed laser and a gated intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) for deciphering obliterated documents for use in forensic science. The TRL method can nondestructively measure the dynamics of luminescence, including fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetimes, which prove to be useful parameters for image detection. First, we measured the TRL spectra of four brands of black porous-tip pen inks on paper to estimate their luminescence lifetimes. Next, we acquired the TRL images of 12 obliterated documents at various delay times and gate times of the ICCD. The obliterated contents were revealed in the TRL images because of the difference in the luminescence lifetimes of the inks. This method requires no pretreatment, is nondestructive, and has the advantage of wide-field imaging, which makes it is easy to control the gate timing. This demonstration proves that TRL imaging and spectroscopy are powerful tools for forensic document examination.

  15. A Polarization-Adjustable Picosecond Deep-Ultraviolet Laser for Spin- and Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Feng-Feng; Yang Feng; Zhang Shen-Jin; Wang Zhi-Min; Xu Feng-Liang; Peng Qin-Jun; Zhang Jing-Yuan; Xu Zu-Yan; Wang Xiao-Yang; Chen Chuang-Tian

    2012-01-01

    We report on a polarization-adjustable picosecond deep-ultraviolet (DUV) laser at 177.3 nm. The DUV laser was produced by second harmonic generation from a mode-locked laser at 355 nm in nonlinear optical crystal KBBF. The laser delivered a maximum average output power of 1.1 mW at 177.3 nm. The polarization of the 177.3 nm beam was adjusted with linear and circular polarization by means of λ/4 and λ/2 wave plates. To the best of our knowledge, the laser has been employed as the circularly polarized and linearly polarized DUV light source for a spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with high resolution for the first time. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  16. Quantifying electronic band interactions in van der Waals materials using angle-resolved reflected-electron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Johannes; van der Torren, Alexander J H; Krasovskii, Eugene E; Balgley, Jesse; Dean, Cory R; Tromp, Rudolf M; van der Molen, Sense Jan

    2016-11-29

    High electron mobility is one of graphene's key properties, exploited for applications and fundamental research alike. Highest mobility values are found in heterostructures of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, which consequently are widely used. However, surprisingly little is known about the interaction between the electronic states of these layered systems. Rather pragmatically, it is assumed that these do not couple significantly. Here we study the unoccupied band structure of graphite, boron nitride and their heterostructures using angle-resolved reflected-electron spectroscopy. We demonstrate that graphene and boron nitride bands do not interact over a wide energy range, despite their very similar dispersions. The method we use can be generally applied to study interactions in van der Waals systems, that is, artificial stacks of layered materials. With this we can quantitatively understand the 'chemistry of layers' by which novel materials are created via electronic coupling between the layers they are composed of.

  17. Time-resolved pump and probe x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 at PETRA III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Göries, D., E-mail: dennis.goeries@desy.de; Roedig, P.; Stübe, N.; Meyer, J.; Warmer, M.; Weckert, E.; Meents, A., E-mail: alke.meents@desy.de [DESY Photon Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Dicke, B.; Naumova, M.; Rübhausen, M. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Galler, A.; Gawelda, W.; Geßler, P.; Sotoudi Namin, H.; Beckmann, A. [European XFEL, Albert-Einstein Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Britz, A.; Bressler, C. [European XFEL, Albert-Einstein Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Schlie, M. [Institut für Experimentalphysik, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    We report about the development and implementation of a new setup for time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 utilizing the outstanding source properties of the low-emittance PETRA III synchrotron storage ring in Hamburg. Using a high intensity micrometer-sized X-ray beam in combination with two positional feedback systems, measurements were performed on the transition metal complex fac-Tris[2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N]iridium(III) also referred to as fac-Ir(ppy){sub 3}. This compound is a representative of the phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes, which play an important role in organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology. The experiment could directly prove the anticipated photoinduced charge transfer reaction. Our results further reveal that the temporal resolution of the experiment is limited by the PETRA III X-ray bunch length of ∼103 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM).

  18. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Radiobiology, Babes National Institute, Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: lilianajradu@yahoo.fr; Mihailescu, I. [Department of Lasers, Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics Institute, Bucharest (Romania); Radu, S. [Department of Computer Science, Polytechnics University, Bucharest (Romania); Gazdaru, D. [Department of Biophysics, Bucharest University (Romania)

    2007-09-21

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m{sup 2} was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy.

  19. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, L.; Mihailescu, I.; Radu, S.; Gazdaru, D.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m 2 was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy

  20. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Boreham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  1. Space-resolved analysis of trace elements in fresh vegetables using ultraviolet nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juve, Vincent; Portelli, Richard; Boueri, Myriam; Baudelet, Matthieu; Yu Jin

    2008-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to analyze trace elements contained in fresh vegetables. A quadrupled Nd:YAG laser is used in the experiments for ablation. Analyzed samples come from local markets and represent frequently consumed vegetables. For a typical root vegetable, such as potato, spectral analysis of the plasma emission reveals more than 400 lines emitted by 27 elements and 2 molecules, C 2 and CN. Among these species, one can find trace as well as ultra-trace elements. A space-resolved analysis of several trace elements with strong emissions is then applied to typical root, stem and fruit vegetables. The results from this study demonstrate the potential of an interesting tool for botanical and agricultural studies as well for food quality/safety and environment pollution assessment and control

  2. Temporally resolved characterization of shock-heated foam target with Al absorption spectroscopy for fast electron transport study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabuuchi, T.; Sawada, H.; Wei, M. S.; Beg, F. N. [Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Anderson, K.; Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hund, J.; Paguio, R. R.; Saito, K. M.; Stephens, R. B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    The CH foam plasma produced by a laser-driven shock wave has been characterized by a temporally resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy technique. A 200 mg/cm{sup 3} foam target with Al dopant was developed for this experiment, which used an OMEGA EP [D. D. Meyerhofer et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 244, 032010 (2010)] long pulse beam with an energy of 1.2 kJ and 3.5 ns pulselength. The plasma temperatures were inferred with the accuracy of 5 eV from the fits to the measurements using an atomic physics code. The results show that the inferred temperature is sustained at 40-45 eV between 6 and 7 ns and decreases to 25 eV at 8 ns. 2-D radiation hydrodynamic simulations show a good agreement with the measurements. Application of the shock-heated foam plasma platform toward fast electron transport experiments is discussed.

  3. Direct observation of superconducting gaps in MgB{sub 2} by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souma, S.; Machida, Y.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Matsui, H.; Wang, S.-C.; Ding, H.; Kaminski, A.; Campuzano, J.C.; Sasaki, S.; Kadowaki, K

    2004-08-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been carried out to clarify the anomalous superconductivity of MgB{sub 2}. We observed three bands crossing the Fermi level, which are ascribed to B2p-{sigma}, {pi} and surface bands. We have succeeded for the first time in directly observing the superconducting gaps of these bands separately. We have found that the superconducting-gap sizes of {sigma} and surface bands are 6.5 {+-} 0.5 and 6.0 {+-} 0.5 meV, respectively, while that of the {pi} band is much smaller (1.5 {+-} 0.5 meV). The present experimental result unambiguously demonstrates the validity of the two-band superconductivity in MgB{sub 2}.

  4. Revealing the ultrafast charge carrier dynamics in organo metal halide perovskite solar cell materials using time resolved THz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponseca, C. S., Jr.; Sundström, V.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast charge carrier dynamics in organo metal halide perovskite has been probed using time resolved terahertz (THz) spectroscopy (TRTS). Current literature on its early time characteristics is unanimous: sub-ps charge carrier generation, highly mobile charges and very slow recombination rationalizing the exceptionally high power conversion efficiency for a solution processed solar cell material. Electron injection from MAPbI3 to nanoparticles (NP) of TiO2 is found to be sub-ps while Al2O3 NPs do not alter charge dynamics. Charge transfer to organic electrodes, Spiro-OMeTAD and PCBM, is sub-ps and few hundreds of ps respectively, which is influenced by the alignment of energy bands. It is surmised that minimizing defects/trap states is key in optimizing charge carrier extraction from these materials.

  5. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreham, Alexander; Brodwolf, Robert; Walker, Karolina; Haag, Rainer; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2016-12-24

    The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  6. Distortion dependent intersystem crossing: A femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy study of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne B. Stephansen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The competition between ultrafast intersystem crossing and internal conversion in benzene, toluene, and p-xylene is investigated with time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. By exciting to S2 out-of-plane symmetry breaking, distortions are activated at early times whereupon spin-forbidden intersystem crossing becomes (partly allowed. Natural bond orbital analysis suggests that the pinnacle carbon atoms distorting from the aromatic plane change hybridization between the planar Franck-Condon geometry and the deformed (boat-shaped S2 equilibrium geometry. The effect is observed to increase in the presence of methyl-groups on the pinnacle carbon-atoms, where largest extents of σ and π orbital-mixing are observed. This is fully consistent with the time-resolved spectroscopy data: Toluene and p-xylene show evidence for ultrafast triplet formation competing with internal conversion, while benzene appears to only decay via internal conversion within the singlet manifold. For toluene and p-xylene, internal conversion to S1 and intersystem crossing to T3 occur within the time-resolution of our instrument. The receiver triplet state (T3 is found to undergo internal conversion in the triplet manifold within ≈100–150 fs (toluene or ≈180–200 fs (p-xylene as demonstrated by matching rise and decay components of upper and lower triplet states. Overall, the effect of methylation is found to both increase the intersystem crossing probability and direct the molecular axis of the excited state dynamics.

  7. In vivo spatial frequency domain spectroscopy of two layer media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nguyen, John Quan M.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring of tissue blood volume and local oxygen saturation can inform the assessment of tissue health, healing, and dysfunction. These quantities can be estimated from the contribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin to the absorption spectrum of the dermis. However, estimation of blood related absorption in skin can be confounded by the strong absorption of melanin in the epidermis and epidermal thickness and pigmentation varies with anatomic location, race, gender, and degree of disease progression. Therefore, a method is desired that decouples the effect of melanin absorption in the epidermis from blood absorption in the dermis for a large range of skin types and thicknesses. A previously developed inverse method based on a neural network forward model was applied to simulated spatial frequency domain reflectance of skin for multiple wavelengths in the near infrared. It is demonstrated that the optical thickness of the epidermis and absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of the dermis can be determined independently and with minimal coupling. Then, the same inverse method was applied to reflectance measurements from a tissue simulating phantom and in vivo human skin. Oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin concentrations were estimated from the volar forearms of weakly and strongly pigmented subjects using a standard homogeneous model and the present two layer model.

  8. Challenge for real-time and real-space resolved spectroscopy of surface chemical reactions. Aiming at trace of irreversible and inhomogeneous reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    A novel experimental technique, time-resolved wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray imaging spectroscopy, is proposed in order to achieve real-time and real-space resolved spectroscopy for the observation of irreversible and inhomogeneous surface chemical reactions. By combining the wavelength-dispersed soft X rays, in which the X-ray wavelength (photon energy) changes as a function of position on the sample, with the photoelectron emission microscope, the soft X-ray absorption spectra are separately obtained at different positions on the sample without scanning the X-ray monochromator. Therefore, the real-time resolved measurement of site-selective soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy is realized in one event without repeating the chemical reaction. It is expected that the spatial distribution of different chemical species is traced during the surface chemical reaction, which is essential to understand the reaction mechanism. (author)

  9. Efficient calculation of open quantum system dynamics and time-resolved spectroscopy with distributed memory HEOM (DM-HEOM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Tobias; Noack, Matthias; Reinefeld, Alexander; Rodríguez, Mirta; Zelinskyy, Yaroslav

    2018-06-11

    Time- and frequency-resolved optical signals provide insights into the properties of light-harvesting molecular complexes, including excitation energies, dipole strengths and orientations, as well as in the exciton energy flow through the complex. The hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) provide a unifying theory, which allows one to study the combined effects of system-environment dissipation and non-Markovian memory without making restrictive assumptions about weak or strong couplings or separability of vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom. With increasing system size the exact solution of the open quantum system dynamics requires memory and compute resources beyond a single compute node. To overcome this barrier, we developed a scalable variant of HEOM. Our distributed memory HEOM, DM-HEOM, is a universal tool for open quantum system dynamics. It is used to accurately compute all experimentally accessible time- and frequency-resolved processes in light-harvesting molecular complexes with arbitrary system-environment couplings for a wide range of temperatures and complex sizes. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Magnetometry of buried layers—Linear magnetic dichroism and spin detection in angular resolved hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloskovskii, Andrei; Stryganyuk, Gregory; Fecher, Gerhard H.; Felser, Claudia; Thiess, Sebastian; Schulz-Ritter, Heiko; Drube, Wolfgang; Berner, Götz; Sing, Michael; Claessen, Ralph; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Newly commissioned HAXPES instrument at P09 beamline of the PETRA III ring at DESY. ► We report HAXPES studies on buried magnetic nanolayers in a multi-layer sample. ► Linear magnetic dichroism of photoelectrons from buried CoFe–Ir 78 Mn 22 layers. ► Spin-resolved HAXPES measurements on buried magnetic multilayers using Mott detector. - Abstract: The electronic properties of buried magnetic nano-layers were studied using the linear magnetic dichroism in the angular distribution of photoemitted Fe, Co, and Mn 2p electrons from a CoFe–Ir 78 Mn 22 multi-layered sample. The buried layers were probed using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, HAXPES, at the undulator beamline P09 of the 3rd generation storage ring PETRA III. The results demonstrate that this magnetometry technique can be used as a sensitive element specific probe for magnetic properties suitable for application to buried ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic magnetic materials and multilayered spintronics devices. Using the same instrument, spin-resolved Fe 2p HAXPES spectra were obtained from the buried layer with good signal quality.

  11. Quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow in a juvenile porcine model by depth-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Diop, Mamadou; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lawrence, Keith St.

    2010-05-01

    Nearly half a million children and young adults are affected by traumatic brain injury each year in the United States. Although adequate cerebral blood flow (CBF) is essential to recovery, complications that disrupt blood flow to the brain and exacerbate neurological injury often go undetected because no adequate bedside measure of CBF exists. In this study we validate a depth-resolved, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique that provides quantitative CBF measurement despite significant signal contamination from skull and scalp tissue. The respiration rates of eight anesthetized pigs (weight: 16.2+/-0.5 kg, age: 1 to 2 months old) are modulated to achieve a range of CBF levels. Concomitant CBF measurements are performed with NIRS and CT perfusion. A significant correlation between CBF measurements from the two techniques is demonstrated (r2=0.714, slope=0.92, p<0.001), and the bias between the two techniques is -2.83 mL.min-1.100 g-1 (CI0.95: -19.63 mL.min-1.100 g-1-13.9 mL.min-1.100 g-1). This study demonstrates that accurate measurements of CBF can be achieved with depth-resolved NIRS despite significant signal contamination from scalp and skull. The ability to measure CBF at the bedside provides a means of detecting, and thereby preventing, secondary ischemia during neurointensive care.

  12. Fermi Surface and Band Structure of (Ca,La)FeAs2 Superconductor from Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xu; Liu De-Fa; Zhao Lin; Guo Qi; Mu Qing-Ge; Chen Dong-Yun; Shen Bing; Yi He-Mian; Huang Jian-Wei; He Jun-Feng; Peng Ying-Ying; Liu Yan; He Shao-Long; Liu Guo-Dong; Dong Xiao-Li; Zhang Jun; Ren Zhi-An; Zhou Xing-Jiang; Chen Chuang-Tian; Xu Zu-Yan

    2013-01-01

    The (Ca,R)FeAs 2 (R=La, Pr, etc.) superconductors with a signature of superconductivity transition above 40 K possess a new kind of block layers that consist of zig-zag As chains. We report the electronic structure of the new (Ca,La)FeAs 2 superconductor investigated by both band structure calculations and high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements. Band structure calculations indicate that there are four hole-like bands around the zone center Γ(0,0) and two electron-like bands near the zone corner M(π, π) in CaFeAs 2 . In our angle-resolved photoemission measurements on (Ca 0.9 La 0.1 )FeAs 2 , we have observed three hole-like bands around the Γ point and one electron-like Fermi surface near the M(π, π) point. These results provide important information to compare and contrast with the electronic structure of other iron-based compounds in understanding the superconductivity mechanism in the iron-based superconductors. (express letter)

  13. Dissociation dynamics of CH3I in electric spark induced breakdown revealed by time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Wei-long; Song, Yun-fei; Duo, Li-ping; Liu, Yu-qiang; Yang, Yan-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Emission of electric spark dissociation of CH 3 I is similar to its fs LIBS. • We use fs laser induced breakdown as a simulation for electric spark dissociation. • The I 2 molecule formation is directly observed in the time-resolved LIBS. • Bimolecular collision of I ∗ and CH 3 I is responsible for the formation of I 2 . - Abstract: The electric discharge spark dissociation of gas CH 3 I is found to be similar to its femtosecond laser photodissociation. The almost identical spectra of the two processes show that their initial ionization conditions are very similar. The initial ionization followed by molecular fragmentation is proposed as the dissociation mechanism, in which the characteristic emissions of I + , CH 3 , CH 2 , CH, H, and I 2 are identified as the dissociation products. The emission band of 505 nm I 2 is clearly observed in the time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The dynamic curve indicates that I 2 ∗ molecules are formed after the delay time of ∼4.7 ns. The formation of I 2 ∗ molecule results from the bimolecular collision of the highly excited iodine atom I ∗ ( 4 P) and CH 3 I molecule. This dynamical information can help understand the process of electric discharge spark dissociation of CH 3 I

  14. Resolving fine spectral features in lattice vibrational modes using femtosecond coherent spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Card

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We show resolution of fine spectral features within several Raman active vibrational modes in potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP crystal. Measurements are performed using a femtosecond time-domain coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy technique that is capable of delivering equivalent spectral resolution of 0.1 cm−1. The Raman spectra retrieved from our measurements show several spectral components corresponding to vibrations of different symmetry with distinctly different damping rates. In particular, linewidths for unassigned optical phonon mode triplet centered at around 820 cm−1 are found to be 7.5 ± 0.2 cm−1, 9.1 ± 0.3 cm−1, and 11.2 ± 0.3 cm−1. Results of our experiments will ultimately help to design an all-solid-state source for sub-optical-wavelength waveform generation that is based on stimulated Raman scattering.

  15. Catalysts at work: From integral to spatially resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Kimmerle, B.; Baiker, A.

    2009-01-01

    available techniques, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a well-suited tool for this purpose as the different selected examples highlight. Two different techniques, scanning and full-field X-ray microscopy/tomography, are described and compared. At first, the tomographic structure of impregnated alumina...... pellets is presented using full-field transmission microtomography and compared to the results obtained with a scanning X-ray microbeam technique to analyse the catalyst bed inside a catalytic quartz glass reactor. On the other hand, by using XAS in scanning microtomography, the structure...... metal-based catalysts. In order to obtain spectroscopic information on the spatial variation of the oxidation state of the catalyst inside the reactor XAS spectra were recorded by scanning with a micro-focussed beam along the catalyst bed. Alternatively, full-field transmission imaging was used...

  16. Spatially Resolved HST Grism Spectroscopy of a Lensed Emission Line Galaxy at z ~ 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Brenda L.; Hurley, Mairead; Bowen, David V.; Meurer, Gerhardt; Sharon, Keren; Straughn, Amber; Coe, Dan; Broadhurst, Tom; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-07-01

    We take advantage of gravitational lensing amplification by A1689 (z = 0.187) to undertake the first space-based census of emission line galaxies (ELGs) in the field of a massive lensing cluster. Forty-three ELGs are identified to a flux of i 775 = 27.3 via slitless grism spectroscopy. One ELG (at z = 0.7895) is very bright owing to lensing magnification by a factor of ≈4.5. Several Balmer emission lines (ELs) detected from ground-based follow-up spectroscopy signal the onset of a major starburst for this low-mass galaxy (M * ≈ 2 × 109 M ⊙) with a high specific star formation rate (≈20 Gyr-1). From the blue ELs we measure a gas-phase oxygen abundance consistent with solar (12+log(O/H) = 8.8 ± 0.2). We break the continuous line-emitting region of this giant arc into seven ~1 kpc bins (intrinsic size) and measure a variety of metallicity-dependent line ratios. A weak trend of increasing metal fraction is seen toward the dynamical center of the galaxy. Interestingly, the metal line ratios in a region offset from the center by ~1 kpc have a placement on the blue H II region excitation diagram with f ([O III])/f (Hβ) and f ([Ne III])/f (Hβ) that can be fitted by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). This asymmetrical AGN-like behavior is interpreted as a product of shocks in the direction of the galaxy's extended tail, possibly instigated by a recent galaxy interaction. Based, in part, on data obtained with the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  17. Resolved Dual-Frequency Observations of the Debris Disk Around AU Mic: Strengths of Bodies in the Collisional Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Evan; Hughes, A. Meredith; Daley, Cail; Flaherty, Kevin; Pan, Margaret; Schlichting, Hilke; Chiang, Eugene; MacGregor, Meredith Ann; Wilner, David; Dent, Bill; Carpenter, John; Andrews, Sean; Moor, Attila; Kospal, Agnes

    2018-01-01

    Debris disks are hallmarks of mature planetary systems, with second-generation dust produced via collisions between pluto-like planetesimals. The vertical structure of a debris disk encodes unique information about the dynamical state of the system, particularly at millimeter wavelengths where gravitational effects dominate over the effects of stellar radiation. We present 450 μm Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the edge-on debris disk around AU Mic, a nearby (d = 9.91 ± 0.10 pc) M1-type star. The 0.3'' angular resolution of the data allows us to spatially resolve the scale height of the disk, complementing previous observations at a wavelength of 1.3 mm. By resolving the vertical structure of the disk at these two widely-separated frequencies, we are able to spatially resolve the spectral index and study variations in the grain size distribution as a function of disk radius. The comparison of scale heights for two different wavelengths and therefore particle sizes also constrains the velocity dispersion as a function of grain size, which allows us to probe the strengths of bodies in the collisional cascade for the first time outside the Solar System.

  18. Time-resolved blood flow measurement in the in vivo mouse model by optical frequency domain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Julia; Mueller, Gregor; Meissner, Sven; Cimalla, Peter; Homann, Hanno; Morawietz, Henning; Koch, Edmund

    2009-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that phase-resolved Doppler optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) is very suitable to quantify the pulsatile blood flow within a vasodynamic measurement in the in vivo mouse model. For this, an OFDI-system with a read-out rate of 20 kHz and a center wavelength of 1320 nm has been used to image the time-resolved murine blood flow in 300 μμm vessels. Because OFDI is less sensitive to fringe washout due to axial sample motion, it is applied to analyze the blood flow velocities and the vascular dynamics in six-week-old C57BL/6 mice compared to one of the LDLR knockout strain kept under sedentary conditions or with access to voluntary wheel running. We have shown that the systolic as well as the diastolic phase of the pulsatile arterial blood flow can be well identified at each vasodynamic state. Furthermore, the changes of the flow velocities after vasoconstriction and -dilation were presented and interpreted in the entire physiological context. With this, the combined measurement of time-resolved blood flow and vessel diameter provides the basis to analyze the vascular function and its influence on the blood flow of small arteries of different mouse strains in response to different life styles.

  19. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy for accurate and well resolved analysis of coatings and thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Wilke, Marcus

    2011-12-01

    In the last years, glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) gained more and more acceptance in the analysis of functional coatings. GDOES thereby represents an interesting alternative to common depth profiling techniques like AES and SIMS, based on its unique combination of high erosion rates and erosion depths, sensitivity, analysis of nonconductive layers and easy quantification even for light elements such as C, N, O and H. Starting with the fundamentals of GDOES, a short overview on new developments in instrument design for accurate and well resolved thin film analyses is presented. The article focuses on the analytical capabilities of glow discharge optical emission spectrometry in the analysis of metallic coatings and thin films. Results illustrating the high depth resolution, confirmation of stoichiometry, the detection of light elements in coatings as well as contamination on the surface or interfaces will be demonstrated by measurements of: a multilayer system Cr/Ti on silicon, interface contamination on silicon during deposition of aluminum, Al2O3-nanoparticle containing conversion coatings on zinc for corrosion resistance, Ti3SiC2 MAX-phase coatings by pulsed laser deposition and hydrogen detection in a V/Fe multilayer system. The selected examples illustrate that GDOES can be successfully adopted as an analytical tool in the development of new materials and coatings. A discussion of the results as well as of the limitations of GDOES is presented. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  20. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF EUROPA: THE DISTINCT SPECTRUM OF LARGE-SCALE CHAOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, P. D.; Brown, M. E.; Hand, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of spatially resolved moderate spectral resolution near-infrared spectra obtained with the adaptive optics system at the Keck Observatory. We identify three compositionally distinct end member regions: the trailing hemisphere bullseye, the leading hemisphere upper latitudes, and a third component associated with leading hemisphere chaos units. We interpret the composition of the three end member regions to be dominated by irradiation products, water ice, and evaporite deposits or salt brines, respectively. The third component is associated with geological features and distinct from the geography of irradiation, suggesting an endogenous identity. Identifying the endogenous composition is of particular interest for revealing the subsurface composition. However, its spectrum is not consistent with linear mixtures of the salt minerals previously considered relevant to Europa. The spectrum of this component is distinguished by distorted hydration features rather than distinct spectral features, indicating hydrated minerals but making unique identification difficult. In particular, it lacks features common to hydrated sulfate minerals, challenging the traditional view of an endogenous salty component dominated by Mg-sulfates. Chloride evaporite deposits are one possible alternative

  1. Picosecond Time-Resolved Temperature and Density Measurements with K-Shell Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Ivancic, S. T.; Mileham, C.; Froula, D. H.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2017-10-01

    The thermal x-ray emission from rapidly heated solid targets containing a buried-aluminum layer was measured to track the evolution of the bulk plasma conditions. The targets were driven by high-contrast 1 ω laser pulses at focused intensities up to 1 × 1019 W/cm2. A streaked x-ray spectrometer recorded the AlHeα and lithium-like satellite lines with 2-ps temporal resolution and moderate resolving power (E E ΔE 1000 ΔE 1000) . Time-integrated measurements over the same spectral range were used to correct the streaked data for variations in photocathode sensitivity. Linewidths and intensity ratios from the streaked data were interpreted using a collisional radiative atomic kinetics model to provide the average plasma conditions in the buried layer as a function of time. Experimental uncertainties in the measured plasma conditions are quantified within a consistent model-dependent framework. The data demonstrate the production of a 330 +/-56 eV, 0.9 +/-0.3 g/cm3 plasma that evolves slowly during peak Heα emission. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Time-resolved UV spectroscopy on ammonia excited by a pulsed CO2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holbach, H.

    1980-07-01

    This work investigates the excitation of ammonia by a pulsed CO 2 laser, in particular the processes associated with collisions with argon. It was prompted by two previous observations: the previously reported infrared multiphoton dissociation of NH 3 under nearly collisionless conditions, and the ill understood excitation mechanism of apparently nonresonant low vibrational levels in the presence of Ar. Based on recent spectroscopic data, all vibrational-rotational levels were determined which are simultaneously excited by different CO 2 laser lines. Transitions between the 1 + and 2 - vibrational levels were also taken into account. The linewidth in these calculations was dominated by power broadening, which generates a half width at half maximum of 0.36 cm -1 at the typical power density of 10 MW/cm 2 . In order to reproduce published experimental absorption data, it proved necessary to take account all transitions within a distance of 20 cm -1 from the laser line. This fact implies in most cases the simultaneous population of a large number of vibrational-rotational levels. The population of levels by absorption or by subsequent collisional processes was probed by time-resolved absorption measurement of vibrational bands and their rotational envelope in the near UV. Time resolution (5...10) was sufficient to observe rotational relaxation within individual vibrational levels. Characteristic differences were found for the various excitation lines. (orig.) [de

  3. TIME-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE POLAR EU CANCRI IN THE OPEN CLUSTER MESSIER 67

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Kurtis A.; Howell, Steve B.; Liebert, James; Smith, Paul S.; Bellini, Andrea; Rubin, Kate H. R.; Bolte, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We present time-resolved spectroscopic and polarimetric observations of the AM Her system EU Cnc. EU Cnc is located near the core of the old open cluster Messier 67; new proper motion measurements indicate that EU Cnc is indeed a member of the star cluster, and this system therefore is useful to constrain the formation and evolution of magnetic cataclysmic variables. The spectra exhibit two-component emission features with independent radial velocity variations as well as time-variable cyclotron emission indicating a magnetic field strength of 41 MG. The period of the radial velocity and cyclotron hump variations are consistent with the previously known photometric period, and the spectroscopic flux variations are consistent in amplitude with previous photometric amplitude measurements. The secondary star is also detected in the spectrum. We also present polarimetric imaging measurements of EU Cnc that show a clear detection of polarization, and the degree of polarization drops below our detection threshold at phases when the cyclotron emission features are fading or not evident. The combined data are all consistent with the interpretation that EU Cnc is a low-state polar in the cluster Messier 67. The mass function of the system gives an estimate of the accretor mass of M WD ≥ 0.68 M ☉ with M WD ≈ 0.83 M ☉ for an average inclination. We are thus able to place a lower limit on the progenitor mass of the accreting white dwarf of ≥1.43 M ☉ .

  4. Time-resolved photoion imaging spectroscopy: Determining energy distribution in multiphoton absorption experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, D. B.; Shi, F. D.; Chen, L.; Martin, S.; Bernard, J.; Yang, J.; Zhang, S. F.; Chen, Z. Q.; Zhu, X. L.; Ma, X.

    2018-04-01

    We propose an approach to determine the excitation energy distribution due to multiphoton absorption in the case of excited systems following decays to produce different ion species. This approach is based on the measurement of the time-resolved photoion position spectrum by using velocity map imaging spectrometry and an unfocused laser beam with a low fluence and homogeneous profile. Such a measurement allows us to identify the species and the origin of each ion detected and to depict the energy distribution using a pure Poisson's equation involving only one variable which is proportional to the absolute photon absorption cross section. A cascade decay model is used to build direct connections between the energy distribution and the probability to detect each ionic species. Comparison between experiments and simulations permits the energy distribution and accordingly the absolute photon absorption cross section to be determined. This approach is illustrated using C60 as an example. It may therefore be extended to a wide variety of molecules and clusters having decay mechanisms similar to those of fullerene molecules.

  5. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF EUROPA: THE DISTINCT SPECTRUM OF LARGE-SCALE CHAOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, P. D.; Brown, M. E. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hand, K. P., E-mail: pfischer@caltech.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of spatially resolved moderate spectral resolution near-infrared spectra obtained with the adaptive optics system at the Keck Observatory. We identify three compositionally distinct end member regions: the trailing hemisphere bullseye, the leading hemisphere upper latitudes, and a third component associated with leading hemisphere chaos units. We interpret the composition of the three end member regions to be dominated by irradiation products, water ice, and evaporite deposits or salt brines, respectively. The third component is associated with geological features and distinct from the geography of irradiation, suggesting an endogenous identity. Identifying the endogenous composition is of particular interest for revealing the subsurface composition. However, its spectrum is not consistent with linear mixtures of the salt minerals previously considered relevant to Europa. The spectrum of this component is distinguished by distorted hydration features rather than distinct spectral features, indicating hydrated minerals but making unique identification difficult. In particular, it lacks features common to hydrated sulfate minerals, challenging the traditional view of an endogenous salty component dominated by Mg-sulfates. Chloride evaporite deposits are one possible alternative.

  6. Rotationally resolved spectroscopy of Jupiter Trojans (624) Hektor and (911) Agamemnon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, D.; Bott, N.; Hromakina, T.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Dotto, E.; Doressoundiram, A.

    2018-03-01

    We present the first-ever rotationally resolved spectroscopic investigation of (624) Hektor and (911) Agamemnon, the two largest Jupiter Trojans. The visible and near-infrared spectra that we have obtained at the TNG telescope (La Palma, Spain) do not show any feature or hints of heterogeneity. In particular, we found no hints of water-related absorptions. No cometary activity was detected down to ˜23.5 R mag arcsec-2 based on the complementary photometric data. We estimated upper limits on the dust production rates of Hektor and Agamemnon to be ≈30 and ≈24 kg s-1, respectively. We modelled complete visible and near-infrared spectra of our targets using the Shkuratov formalism to define the upper limit to the presence of water ice and more in general to constrain their surface composition. For both objects, successful models include amorphous carbon, magnesium-rich pyroxene, and kerogen, with an upper limit to the amount of water ice of a few per cent.

  7. Multiplexed measurements by time resolved spectroscopy using colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, U.; Jimenez de Aberasturi, D.; Malinowski, R.; Amin, F.; Parak, W. J.; Heimbrodt, W., E-mail: Wolfram.Heimbrodt@physik.uni-marburg.de [Department of Physics and Materials Sciences Center, Philipps-University of Marburg, Renthof 5, D-35032 Marburg (Germany)

    2014-01-27

    Multiplexed measurements of analytes in parallel is a topical demand in bioanalysis and bioimaging. An interesting alternative to commonly performed spectral multiplexing is lifetime multiplexing. In this Letter, we present a proof of principle of single-color lifetime multiplexing by coupling the same fluorophore to different nanoparticles. The effective lifetime of the fluorophores can be tuned by more than one order of magnitude due to resonance energy transfer from donor states. Measurements have been done on a model systems consisting of ATTO-590 dye molecules linked to either gold particles or to CdSe/ZnS core shell quantum dots. Both systems show the same luminescence spectrum of ATTO-590 dye emission in continuous wave excitation, but can be distinguished by means of time resolved measurements. The dye molecules bound to gold particles exhibit a mono-exponential decay with a lifetime of 4.5 ns, whereas the dye molecules bound to CdSe/ZnS dots show a nonexponential decay with a slow component of about 135 ns due to the energy transfer from the quantum dots. We demonstrate the fundamental possibility to determine the mixing ratio for dyes with equal luminescence spectra but very different transients. This opens up a pathway independent of the standard optical multiplexing with many different fluorophores emitting from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared spectral region.

  8. Vibrational frequencies and dephasing times in excited electronic states by femtosecond time-resolved four-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Taiha; Albrecht, A. C.

    1993-06-01

    Time-resolved degenerate four-wave mixing (TRDFWM) for an electronically resonant system in a phase-matching configuration that measures population decay is reported. Because the spectral width of input light exceeds the vibrational Bohr frequency of a strong Raman active mode, the vibrational coherence produces strong oscillations in the TRDFWM signal together with the usual population decay from the excited electronic state. The data are analyzed in terms of a four-level system: ground and excited electronic states each split by a vibrational quantum of a Raman active mode. Absolute frequencies and their dephasing times of the vibrational modes at ≈590 cm -1 are obtained for the excited as well as the ground electronic state. The vibrational dephasing rate in the excited electronic state is about an order of magnitude faster than that in the ground state, the origin of which is speculated upon.

  9. Dual analyzer system for surface analysis dedicated for angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at liquid surfaces and interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedermaier, Inga; Kolbeck, Claudia; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Maier, Florian, E-mail: florian.maier@fau.de [Lehrstuhl für Physikalische Chemie II, FAU Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Egerlandstraße 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    The investigation of liquid surfaces and interfaces with the powerful toolbox of ultra-high vacuum (UHV)-based surface science techniques generally has to overcome the issue of liquid evaporation within the vacuum system. In the last decade, however, new classes of liquids with negligible vapor pressure at room temperature—in particular, ionic liquids (ILs)—have emerged for surface science studies. It has been demonstrated that particularly angle-resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS) allows for investigating phenomena that occur at gas-liquid and liquid-solid interfaces on the molecular level. The results are not only relevant for IL systems but also for liquids in general. In all of these previous ARXPS studies, the sample holder had to be tilted in order to change the polar detection angle of emitted photoelectrons, which restricted the liquid systems to very thin viscous IL films coating a flat solid support. We now report on the concept and realization of a new and unique laboratory “Dual Analyzer System for Surface Analysis (DASSA)” which enables fast ARXPS, UV photoelectron spectroscopy, imaging XPS, and low-energy ion scattering at the horizontal surface plane of macroscopically thick non-volatile liquid samples. It comprises a UHV chamber equipped with two electron analyzers mounted for simultaneous measurements in 0° and 80° emission relative to the surface normal. The performance of DASSA on a first macroscopic liquid system will be demonstrated.

  10. Dual analyzer system for surface analysis dedicated for angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at liquid surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermaier, Inga; Kolbeck, Claudia; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Maier, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of liquid surfaces and interfaces with the powerful toolbox of ultra-high vacuum (UHV)-based surface science techniques generally has to overcome the issue of liquid evaporation within the vacuum system. In the last decade, however, new classes of liquids with negligible vapor pressure at room temperature—in particular, ionic liquids (ILs)—have emerged for surface science studies. It has been demonstrated that particularly angle-resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS) allows for investigating phenomena that occur at gas-liquid and liquid-solid interfaces on the molecular level. The results are not only relevant for IL systems but also for liquids in general. In all of these previous ARXPS studies, the sample holder had to be tilted in order to change the polar detection angle of emitted photoelectrons, which restricted the liquid systems to very thin viscous IL films coating a flat solid support. We now report on the concept and realization of a new and unique laboratory “Dual Analyzer System for Surface Analysis (DASSA)” which enables fast ARXPS, UV photoelectron spectroscopy, imaging XPS, and low-energy ion scattering at the horizontal surface plane of macroscopically thick non-volatile liquid samples. It comprises a UHV chamber equipped with two electron analyzers mounted for simultaneous measurements in 0° and 80° emission relative to the surface normal. The performance of DASSA on a first macroscopic liquid system will be demonstrated.

  11. Noninvasive observation of skeletal muscle contraction using near-infrared time-resolved reflectance and diffusing-wave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belau, Markus; Ninck, Markus; Hering, Gernot; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Contini, Davide; Torricelli, Alessandro; Gisler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    We introduce a method for noninvasively measuring muscle contraction in vivo, based on near-infrared diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS). The method exploits the information about time-dependent shear motions within the contracting muscle that are contained in the temporal autocorrelation function g(1)(τ,t) of the multiply scattered light field measured as a function of lag time, τ, and time after stimulus, t. The analysis of g(1)(τ,t) measured on the human M. biceps brachii during repetitive electrical stimulation, using optical properties measured with time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, shows that the tissue dynamics giving rise to the speckle fluctuations can be described by a combination of diffusion and shearing. The evolution of the tissue Cauchy strain e(t) shows a strong correlation with the force, indicating that a significant part of the shear observed with DWS is due to muscle contraction. The evolution of the DWS decay time shows quantitative differences between the M. biceps brachii and the M. gastrocnemius, suggesting that DWS allows to discriminate contraction of fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers.

  12. Factors affecting measurement of optic parameters by time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Nobuko; Ueda, Yukio; Mimura, Tetsuya; Ohmae, Etsuko; Yoshimoto, Kenji; Wada, Hiroko; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Sakahara, Harumi

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the thickness and depth of tumors on hemoglobin measurements in breast cancer by optical spectroscopy and to demonstrate tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) and reduced scattering coefficient (μs‧) in breast tissue and breast cancer in relation to the skin-to-chest wall distance. We examined 53 tumors from 44 patients. Total hemoglobin concentration (tHb), SO2, and μs‧ were measured by time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS). The skin-to-chest wall distance and the size and depth of tumors were measured by ultrasonography. There was a positive correlation between tHb and tumor thickness, and a negative correlation between tHb and tumor depth. SO2 in breast tissue decreased when the skin-to-chest wall distance decreased, and SO2 in tumors tended to be lower than in breast tissue. In breast tissue, there was a negative correlation between μs‧ and the skin-to-chest wall distance, and μs‧ in tumors was higher than in breast tissue. Measurement of tHb in breast cancer by TRS was influenced by tumor thickness and depth. Although SO2 seemed lower and μs‧ was higher in breast cancer than in breast tissue, the skin-to-chest wall distance may have affected the measurements.

  13. Dynamic Time-Resolved Chirped-Pulse Rotational Spectroscopy of Vinyl Cyanide Photoproducts in a Room Temperature Flow Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Daniel P.; Prozument, Kirill

    2017-06-01

    Chirped-pulsed (CP) Fourier transform rotational spectroscopy invented by Brooks Pate and coworkers a decade ago is an attractive tool for gas phase chemical dynamics and kinetics studies. A good reactor for such a purpose would have well-defined (and variable) temperature and pressure conditions to be amenable to accurate kinetic modeling. Furthermore, in low pressure samples with large enough number of molecular emitters, reaction dynamics can be observable directly, rather than mediated by supersonic expansion. In the present work, we are evaluating feasibility of in situ time-resolved CP spectroscopy in a room temperature flow tube reactor. Vinyl cyanide (CH_2CHCN), neat or mixed with inert gasses, flows through the reactor at pressures 1-50 μbar (0.76-38 mTorr) where it is photodissociated by a 193 nm laser. Millimeter-wave beam of the CP spectrometer co-propagates with the laser beam along the reactor tube and interacts with nascent photoproducts. Rotational transitions of HCN, HNC, and HCCCN are detected, with ≥10 μs time-steps for 500 ms following photolysis of CH_2CHCN. The post-photolysis evolution of the photoproducts' rotational line intensities is investigated for the effects of rotational and vibrational thermalization of energized photoproducts. Possible contributions from bimolecular and wall-mediated chemistry are evaluated as well.

  14. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of FEL pulse

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-30

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of

  16. A picosecond widely tunable deep-ultraviolet laser for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Feng-Feng; Yang Feng; Zhang Shen-Jin; Xu Zhi; Wang Zhi-Min; Xu Feng-Liang; Peng Qin-Jun; Zhang Jing-Yuan; Xu Zu-Yan; Wang Xiao-Yang; Chen Chuang-Tian

    2013-01-01

    We develop a picosecond widely tunable laser in a deep-ultraviolet region from 175 nm to 210 nm, generated by two stages of frequency doubling of a 80-MHz mode-locked picosecond Ti:sapphire laser. A β-BaB 2 O 4 walk-off compensation configuration and a KBe 2 BO 3 F 2 prism-coupled device are adopted for the generation of second harmonic and fourth harmonics, respectively. The highest power is 3.72 mW at 193 nm, and the fluctuation at 2.85 mW in 130 min is less than ±2%

  17. Rare Earth Elements as Potential Biosignatures on Mars in SuperCam Time Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, A.; Beyssac, O.; Sharma, S. K.; Misra, A. K.; Clegg, S. M.; Gauthier, M.; Wiens, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Gasnault, O.; Lanza, N.

    2017-12-01

    The rare earth elements (REE, La to Lu) are a group of elements with similar chemical properties that are generally present in geologic materials at trace concentrations. REEs may be concentrated via processes such as igneous fractional crystallization in accessory minerals, e.g. apatite, zircon, and titanite. Additionally, however, concentrations of REE may serve to identify regions of high astrobiological interest. For example, Fe-oxyhydroxide deposits in hydrothermal vent systems and biologically related manganese nodules may be enriched in REEs. REEs have not been measured in situ on Mars, therefore their prevalence and distribution on Mars is as yet unknown, except as observed in martian meteorites. SuperCam is a survey instrument that will analyze materials around the Mars 2020 rover using a variety of spectral techniques including laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), Raman, VIS-IR, and time-resolved laser fluorescence (TRLF) spectroscopy. Recently, the SuperCam Engineering Development Unit was tested at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for its capabilities to detect REEs in minerals using TRLF spectroscopy. While this instrument was not designed to precisely replicate the flight model, the spectral resolution and light transmission was sufficient to obtain TRLF spectra on a number of minerals demonstrating a variety of REE luminescent centers. These include apatite (Sm3+, Nd3+, Eu3+, Dy3+), fluorite (Ho3+, Sm3+, Dy3+, Nd3+), and zircon (Er3+, Pr3+, Nd3+). Future work includes expanding this suite to include minerals associated with biological activities, for example Mn-oxides (desert varnish and manganese nodules), hydrothermal Fe-oxides, and stromatolite-associated carbonates. In this way and in combination with its other techniques, SuperCam may direct the rover team to perform further analyses of similar samples by the in situ chemical and mineralogical suite of instruments, or aid in prioritization for sample return.

  18. Photophysical characterization and time-resolved spectroscopy of a anthradithiophene dimer: exploring the role of conformation in singlet fission

    KAUST Repository

    Dean, Jacob C.

    2017-08-18

    Quantitative singlet fission has been observed for a variety of acene derivatives such as tetracene and pentacene, and efforts to extend the library of singlet fission compounds is of current interest. Preliminary calculations suggest anthradithiophenes exhibit significant exothermicity between the first optically-allowed singlet state, S1, and 2 × T1 with an energy difference of >5000 cm−1. Given the fulfillment of this ingredient for singlet fission, here we investigate the singlet fission capability of a difluorinated anthradithiophene dimer (2ADT) covalently linked by a (dimethylsilyl)ethane bridge and derivatized by triisobutylsilylethynyl (TIBS) groups. Photophysical characterization of 2ADT and the single functionalized ADT monomer were carried out in toluene and acetone solution via absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and their photo-initiated dynamics were investigated with time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. In accordance with computational predictions, two conformers of 2ADT were observed via fluorescence spectroscopy and were assigned to structures with the ADT cores trans or cis to one another about the covalent bridge. The two conformers exhibited markedly different excited state deactivation mechanisms, with the minor trans population being representative of the ADT monomer showing primarily radiative decay, while the dominant cis population underwent relaxation into an excimer geometry before internally converting to the ground state. The excimer formation kinetics were found to be solvent dependent, yielding time constants of ∼1.75 ns in toluene, and ∼600 ps in acetone. While the difference in rates elicits a role for the solvent in stabilizing the excimer structure, the rate is still decidedly long compared to most singlet fission rates of analogous dimers, suggesting that the excimer is neither a kinetic nor a thermodynamic trap, yet singlet fission was still not observed. The result

  19. Infrared absorption of CH3OSO detected with time-resolved Fourier-transform spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Dah; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2011-03-07

    A step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a multipass absorption cell was employed to detect temporally resolved infrared absorption spectra of CH(3)OSO produced upon irradiation of a flowing gaseous mixture of CH(3)OS(O)Cl in N(2) or CO(2) at 248 nm. Two intense transient features with origins near 1152 and 994 cm(-1) are assigned to syn-CH(3)OSO; the former is attributed to overlapping bands at 1154 ± 3 and 1151 ± 3 cm(-1), assigned to the S=O stretching mixed with CH(3) rocking (ν(8)) and the S=O stretching mixed with CH(3) wagging (ν(9)) modes, respectively, and the latter to the C-O stretching (ν(10)) mode at 994 ± 6 cm(-1). Two weak bands at 2991 ± 6 and 2956 ± 3 cm(-1) are assigned as the CH(3) antisymmetric stretching (ν(2)) and symmetric stretching (ν(3)) modes, respectively. Observed vibrational transition wavenumbers agree satisfactorily with those predicted with quantum-chemical calculations at level B3P86∕aug-cc-pVTZ. Based on rotational parameters predicted at that level, the simulated rotational contours of these bands agree satisfactorily with experimental results. The simulation indicates that the S=O stretching mode of anti-CH(3)OSO near 1164 cm(-1) likely makes a small contribution to the observed band near 1152 cm(-1). A simple kinetic model of self-reaction is employed to account for the decay of CH(3)OSO and yields a second-order rate coefficient k=(4 ± 2)×10(-10) cm(3)molecule(-1)s(-1). © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Phase-Resolved Spectroscopy of the Low-Mass X-ray Binary V801 Ara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Kaley; Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil; Peris, Charith; McCollough, Michael

    2018-06-01

    We present phase-resolved optical spectra of the low mass X-ray binary system V801 Ara. The spectra, obtained in 2014 with IMACS on the Magellan/Baade telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, cover the full binary orbit of 3.8 hours. They contain strong emission features allowing us to map the emission of Hα, Hβ, He II λ4686, and the Bowen blend at λ4640. The radial velocity curves of the Bowen blend shows significantly stronger modulation at the orbital period than Hα as expected for the former originating on the secondary with the latter consistent with emission dominated by the disk. Our tomograms of Hα and Hβ are the most detailed studies of these lines for V801 to date and they clearly detect the accretion disk. The Hβ emission extends to higher velocities than Hα, suggesting emission from closer to the neutron star and differentiating temperature variance in the accretion disk for the first time. The center of the accretion disk appears offset from the center-of-mass of the neutron star as has been seen in several other X-ray binaries. This is often interpreted to imply disk eccentricity. Our tomograms do not show strong evidence for a hot spot at the point where the accretion stream hits the disk. This could imply a reduced accretion rate or could be due to the spot being drowned out by bright accretion flow around it. There is enhanced emission further along the disk, however, which implies gas stream interaction downstream of the hot spot.

  1. Improved instrumentation for intensity-, wavelength-, temperature-, and magnetic field-resolved photoconductivity spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottingham, Patrick; Morey, Jennifer R.; Lemire, Amanda; Lemire, Penny; McQueen, Tyrel M.

    2016-01-01

    We report instrumentation for photovoltage and photocurrent spectroscopy over a larger continuous range of wavelengths, temperatures, and applied magnetic fields than other instruments described in the literature: 350 nm≤λ≤1700 nm, 1.8 K≤T≤300 K, and B≤9 T. This instrument uses a modulated monochromated incoherent light source with total power<30 μW in combination with an LED in order to probe selected regions of non-linear responses while maintaining low temperatures and avoiding thermal artifacts. The instrument may also be used to measure a related property, the photomagnetoresistance. We demonstrate the importance of normalizing measured responses for variations in light power and describe a rigorous process for performing these normalizations. We discuss several circuits suited to measuring different types of samples and provide analysis for converting measured values into physically relevant properties. Uniform approaches to measurement of these photoproperties are essential for reliable quantitative comparisons between emerging new materials with energy applications. - Highlights: • A novel instrument for measuring photoconductivity and photocurrents of materials and devices. • Continuous parameter space: 350 nm≤λ≤1700, 1.8 K≤T≤300 K, and B≤9 T. • Methodology for treating non-linear responses and variable lamp intensity. • Mathematical detail for extracting properties of materials from measured values is provided.

  2. Proximity Effect between Two Superconductors Spatially Resolved by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Cherkez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the proximity effect in an atomic-scale controlled junction between two different superconductors. Elaborated on a Si(111 surface, the junction comprises a Pb nanocrystal with an energy gap Δ_{1}=1.2  meV, connected to a crystalline atomic monolayer of lead with Δ_{2}=0.23  meV. Using in situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we probe the local density of states of this hybrid system both in space and in energy, at temperatures below and above the critical temperature of the superconducting monolayer. Direct and inverse proximity effects are revealed with high resolution. Our observations are precisely explained with the help of a self-consistent solution of the Usadel equations. In particular, our results demonstrate that in the vicinity of the Pb islands, the Pb monolayer locally develops a finite proximity-induced superconducting order parameter, well above its own bulk critical temperature. This leads to a giant proximity effect where the superconducting correlations penetrate inside the monolayer a distance much larger than in a nonsuperconducting metal.

  3. Spatially resolved localized vibrational mode spectroscopy of carbon in liquid encapsulated Czochralski grown gallium arsenide wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau, Waifan.

    1988-04-01

    Substitutional carbon on an arsenic lattice site is the shallowest and one of the most dominant acceptors in semi-insulating Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) GaAs. However, the role of this acceptor in determining the well known ''W'' shape spatial variation of neutral EL2 concentration along the diameter of a LEC wafer is not known. In this thesis, we attempt to clarify the issue of the carbon acceptor's effect on this ''W'' shaped variation by measuring spatial profiles of this acceptor along the radius of three different as-grown LEC GaAs wafers. With localized vibrational mode absorption spectroscopy, we find that the profile of the carbon acceptor is relatively constant along the radius of each wafer. Average values of concentration are 8 x 10E15 cm -3 , 1.1 x 10E15 cm -3 , and 2.2 x 10E15 cm -3 , respectively. In addition, these carbon acceptor LVM measurements indicate that a residual donor with concentration comparable to carbon exists in these wafers and it is a good candidate for the observed neutral EL2 concentration variation. 22 refs., 39 figs

  4. Time-resolved monitoring of enzyme activity with ultrafast Hyper-CEST spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döpfert, Jörg; Schnurr, Matthias; Kunth, Martin; Rose, Honor May; Hennig, Andreas; Schröder, Leif

    2017-12-23

    We propose a method to dynamically monitor the progress of an enzymatic reaction using NMR of hyperpolarized 129 Xe in a host-guest system. It is based on a displacement assay originally designed for fluorescence experiments that exploits the competitive binding of the enzymatic product on the one hand and a reporter dye on the other hand to a supramolecular host. Recently, this assay has been successfully transferred to NMR, using xenon as a reporter, cucurbit[6]uril as supramolecular host, and chemical exchange saturation transfer with hyperpolarized Xe (Hyper-CEST) as detection technique. Its advantage is that the enzyme acts on the unmodified substrate and that only the product is detected through immediate inclusion into the host. We here apply a method that drastically accelerates the acquisition of Hyper-CEST spectra in vitro using magnetic field gradients. This allows monitoring the dynamic progress of the conversion of lysine to cadaverine with a temporal resolution of ~30 s. Moreover, the method only requires to sample the very early onset of the reaction (Hyper-CEST results correlate with xenon T 2 measurements performed during the enzymatic reaction. This suggests that ultrafast Hyper-CEST spectroscopy can be used for dynamically monitoring enzymatic activity with NMR. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Variation in LOV Photoreceptor Activation Dynamics Probed by Time Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Iuliano, James N.

    2017-12-14

    The light, oxygen, voltage (LOV) domain proteins are blue light photoreceptors that utilize a non-covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor as the chromophore. The modular nature of these proteins has led to their wide adoption in the emerging fields of optogenetics and optobiology, where the LOV domain has been fused to a variety of output domains leading to novel light-controlled applications. In the present work, we extend our studies of the sub-picosecond to several hundred microsecond transient infrared spectroscopy of the isolated LOV domain AsLOV2 to three full-length photoreceptors in which the LOV domain is fused to an output domain: the LOV-STAS protein, YtvA, the LOV-HTH transcription factor, EL222, and the LOV-histidine kinase, LovK. Despite differences in tertiary structure, the overall pathway leading to cysteine adduct formation from the FMN triplet state is highly conserved, although there are slight variations in rate. However significant differences are observed in the vibrational spectra and kinetics after adduct formation, which are directly linked to the specific output function of the LOV domain. While the rate of adduct formation varies by only 3.6-fold amongst the proteins, the subsequent large-scale structural changes in the full-length LOV photoreceptors occur over the micro- to sub-millisecond timescales and vary by orders of magnitude depending on the different output function of each LOV domain.

  6. Variation in LOV Photoreceptor Activation Dynamics Probed by Time Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Iuliano, James N.; Gil, Agnieszka A.; Laptenok, Sergey P.; Hall, Christopher R.; Tolentino Collado, Jinnette; Lukacs, Andras; Hag Ahmed, Safaa A; Abyad, Jenna; Daryaee, Taraneh; Greetham, Gregory M.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Illarionov, Boris; Bacher, Adelbert; Fischer, Markus; Towrie, Michael; French, Jarrod B.; Meech, Stephen R.; Tonge, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    The light, oxygen, voltage (LOV) domain proteins are blue light photoreceptors that utilize a non-covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor as the chromophore. The modular nature of these proteins has led to their wide adoption in the emerging fields of optogenetics and optobiology, where the LOV domain has been fused to a variety of output domains leading to novel light-controlled applications. In the present work, we extend our studies of the sub-picosecond to several hundred microsecond transient infrared spectroscopy of the isolated LOV domain AsLOV2 to three full-length photoreceptors in which the LOV domain is fused to an output domain: the LOV-STAS protein, YtvA, the LOV-HTH transcription factor, EL222, and the LOV-histidine kinase, LovK. Despite differences in tertiary structure, the overall pathway leading to cysteine adduct formation from the FMN triplet state is highly conserved, although there are slight variations in rate. However significant differences are observed in the vibrational spectra and kinetics after adduct formation, which are directly linked to the specific output function of the LOV domain. While the rate of adduct formation varies by only 3.6-fold amongst the proteins, the subsequent large-scale structural changes in the full-length LOV photoreceptors occur over the micro- to sub-millisecond timescales and vary by orders of magnitude depending on the different output function of each LOV domain.

  7. Ultrafast time-resolved absorption spectroscopy of geometric isomers of xanthophylls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Enriquez, Miriam M.; LaFountain, Amy M.; Frank, Harry A.

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an ultrafast optical spectroscopic investigation of the excited state energies, lifetimes and spectra of specific geometric isomers of neoxanthin, violaxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin. All- trans- and 15,15'- cis-β-carotene were also examined. The spectroscopy was done on molecules purified by HPLC frozen immediately to inhibit isomerization. The spectra were taken at 77 K to maintain the configurations and to provide better spectral resolution than seen at room temperature. The kinetics reveal that for all of the molecules except neoxanthin, the S 1 state lifetime of the cis isomers is shorter than that of the all- trans isomers. The S 1 excited state energies of all the isomers were determined by recording S 1 → S 2 transient absorption spectra. The results obtained in this manner at cryogenic temperatures provide an unprecedented level of precision in the measurement of the S 1 energies of these xanthophylls, which are critical components in light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of green plants.

  8. Resolving the Origins of Crystalline Anharmonicity Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy and ab Initio Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Michael T; Zeitler, J Axel

    2016-11-17

    Anharmonicity has been shown to be an important piece of the fundamental framework that dictates numerous observable phenomena. In particular, anharmonicity is the driving force of vibrational relaxation processes, mechanisms that are integral to the proper function of numerous chemical processes. However, elucidating its origins has proven difficult due to experimental and theoretical challenges, specifically related to separating the anharmonic contributions from other unrelated effects. While no one technique is particularly suited for providing a complete picture of anharmonicity, by combining multiple complementary methods such a characterization can be made. In this study the role of individual atomic interactions on the anharmonic properties of crystalline purine, the building block of many DNA and RNA nucleobases, is studied by experimental terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations (AIMD). In particular, the detailed vibrational information provided by the DFT calculations is used to interpret the atomic origins of anharmonic-related effects as determined by the AIMD calculations, which are in good agreement with the experimental data. The results highlight that anharmonicity is especially pronounced in the intermolecular interactions, particularly along the amine hydrogen bond coordinate, and yields valuable insight into what is similarly observed complex biosystems and crystalline solids.

  9. Time-Resolved Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of The M-Dwarf GJ 876 Exoplanetary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Tian, Feng; Froning, Cynthia S.; Roberge, Aki

    2012-01-01

    Extrasolar planets orbiting M-stars may represent our best chance to discover habitable worlds in the coming decade. The ultraviolet spectrum incident upon both Earth-like and Jovian planets is critically important for proper modeling of their atmospheric heating and chemistry. In order to provide more realistic inputs for atmospheric models of planets orbiting low-mass stars, we present new near- and far-ultraviolet (NUV and FUV) spectroscopy of the M-dwarf exoplanet host GJ 876 (M4V). Using the COS and STIS spectrographs on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have measured the 1150-3140 A spectrum of GJ 876. We have reconstructed the stellar H1 Ly alpha emission line profile, and find that the integrated Ly alpha flux is roughly equal to the rest of the integrated flux (1150-1210 A + 1220-3140 A) in the entire ultraviolet bandpass (F(Ly alpha)/F(FUV+NUV) equals approximately 0.7). This ratio is approximately 2500x greater than the solar value. We describe the ultraviolet line spectrum and report surprisingly strong fluorescent emission from hot H2 (T(H2) greater than 2000 K). We show the light curve of a chromospheric + transition region flare observed in several far-UV emission lines, with flare/quiescent flux ratios greater than or equal to 10. The strong FUV radiation field of an M-star (and specifically Ly alpha) is important for determining the abundance of O2--and the formation of biomarkers-in the lower atmospheres of Earth-like planets in the habitable zones of low-mass stars.

  10. TIME-RESOLVED ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF THE M-DWARF GJ 876 EXOPLANETARY SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Tian, Feng; Roberge, Aki

    2012-01-01

    Extrasolar planets orbiting M-stars may represent our best chance to discover habitable worlds in the coming decade. The ultraviolet spectrum incident upon both Earth-like and Jovian planets is critically important for proper modeling of their atmospheric heating and chemistry. In order to provide more realistic inputs for atmospheric models of planets orbiting low-mass stars, we present new near- and far-ultraviolet (NUV and FUV) spectroscopy of the M-dwarf exoplanet host GJ 876 (M4V). Using the COS and STIS spectrographs on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have measured the 1150-3140 Å spectrum of GJ 876. We have reconstructed the stellar H I Lyα emission line profile, and find that the integrated Lyα flux is roughly equal to the rest of the integrated flux (1150-1210 Å + 1220-3140 Å) in the entire ultraviolet bandpass (F(Lyα)/F(FUV+NUV) ≈ 0.7). This ratio is ∼2500× greater than the solar value. We describe the ultraviolet line spectrum and report surprisingly strong fluorescent emission from hot H 2 (T(H 2 ) > 2000 K). We show the light curve of a chromospheric + transition region flare observed in several far-UV emission lines, with flare/quiescent flux ratios ≥10. The strong FUV radiation field of an M-star (and specifically Lyα) is important for determining the abundance of O 2 —and the formation of biomarkers—in the lower atmospheres of Earth-like planets in the habitable zones of low-mass stars.

  11. State-Resolved Metal Nanoparticle Dynamics Viewed through the Combined Lenses of Ultrafast and Magneto-optical Spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tian; Herbert, Patrick J; Zheng, Hongjun; Knappenberger, Kenneth L

    2018-05-08

    Electronic carrier dynamics play pivotal roles in the functional properties of nanomaterials. For colloidal metals, the mechanisms and influences of these dynamics are structure dependent. The coherent carrier dynamics of collective plasmon modes for nanoparticles (approximately 2 nm and larger) determine optical amplification factors that are important to applied spectroscopy techniques. In the nanocluster domain (sub-2 nm), carrier coupling to vibrational modes affects photoluminescence yields. The performance of photocatalytic materials featuring both nanoparticles and nanoclusters also depends on the relaxation dynamics of nonequilibrium charge carriers. The challenges for developing comprehensive descriptions of carrier dynamics spanning both domains are multifold. Plasmon coherences are short-lived, persisting for only tens of femtoseconds. Nanoclusters exhibit discrete carrier dynamics that can persist for microseconds in some cases. On this time scale, many state-dependent processes, including vibrational relaxation, charge transfer, and spin conversion, affect carrier dynamics in ways that are nonscalable but, rather, structure specific. Hence, state-resolved spectroscopy methods are needed for understanding carrier dynamics in the nanocluster domain. Based on these considerations, a detailed understanding of structure-dependent carrier dynamics across length scales requires an appropriate combination of spectroscopic methods. Plasmon mode-specific dynamics can be obtained through ultrafast correlated light and electron microscopy (UCLEM), which pairs interferometric nonlinear optical (INLO) with electron imaging methods. INLO yields nanostructure spectral resonance responses, which capture the system's homogeneous line width and coherence dynamics. State-resolved nanocluster dynamics can be obtained by pairing ultrafast with magnetic-optical spectroscopy methods. In particular, variable-temperature variable-field (VTVH) spectroscopies allow quantification

  12. Ultrafast time-resolved absorption spectroscopy of geometric isomers of carotenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Sandberg, Daniel J.; Cong, Hong; Sandberg, Megan N.; Gibson, George N.; Birge, Robert R.; Frank, Harry A.

    2009-01-01

    The structures of a number of stereoisomers of carotenoids have been revealed in three-dimensional X-ray crystallographic investigations of pigment-protein complexes from photosynthetic organisms. Despite these structural elucidations, the reason for the presence of stereoisomers in these systems is not well understood. An important unresolved issue is whether the natural selection of geometric isomers of carotenoids in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes is determined by the structure of the protein binding site or by the need for the organism to accomplish a specific physiological task. The association of cis isomers of a carotenoid with reaction centers and trans isomers of the same carotenoid with light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes has led to the hypothesis that the stereoisomers play distinctly different physiological roles. A systematic investigation of the photophysics and photochemistry of purified, stable geometric isomers of carotenoids is needed to understand if a relationship between stereochemistry and biological function exists. In this work we present a comparative study of the spectroscopy and excited state dynamics of cis and trans isomers of three different open-chain carotenoids in solution. The molecules are neurosporene (n = 9), spheroidene (n = 10), and spirilloxanthin (n = 13), where n is the number of conjugated π-electron double bonds. The spectroscopic experiments were carried out on geometric isomers of the carotenoids purified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then frozen to 77 K to inhibit isomerization. The spectral data taken at 77 K provide a high resolution view of the spectroscopic differences between geometric isomers. The kinetic data reveal that the lifetime of the lowest excited singlet state of a cis-isomer is consistently shorter than that of its corresponding all-trans counterpart despite the fact that the excited state energy of the cis molecule is typically higher than that of the trans

  13. Tunable All Reflective Spatial Heterodyne Spectroscopy, A Technique For High Resolving Power Observation OI Defused Emission Line Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyedeh Sona

    The solar system presents a challenge to spectroscopic observers, because it is an astrophysically low energy environment populated with often angularly extended targets (e.g, interplanetary medium, comets, planetary upper atmospheres, and planet and satellite near space environments). Spectroscopy is a proven tool for determining compositional and other properties of remote objects. Narrow band imaging and low resolving spectroscopic measurements provide information about composition, photochemical evolution, energy distribution and density. The extension to high resolving power provides further access to temperature, velocity, isotopic ratios, separation of blended sources, and opacity effects. The drawback of high-resolution spectroscopy comes from the instrumental limitations of lower throughput, the necessity of small entrance apertures, sensitivity, field of view, and large physical instrumental size. These limitations quickly become definitive for faint and/or extended targets and for spacecraft encounters. An emerging technique with promise for the study of faint, extended sources at high resolving power is the all-reflective form of the Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS). SHS instruments are compact and naturally possess both high etendue and high resolving power. To achieve similar spectral grasp, grating spectrometers require big telescopes. SHS is a common-path beam Fourier transform interferometer that produces Fizeau fringe pattern for all other wavelengths except the tuned wavelength. Compared to similar Fourier transform Spectrometers (FTS), SHS has considerably relaxed optical tolerances that make it easier to use in the visible and UV spectral ranges. The large etendue of SHS instruments makes them ideal for observations of extended, low surface brightness, isolated emission line sources, while their intrinsically high spectral resolution enables the study of the dynamical and spectral characteristics described above. SHS also combines very

  14. Investigation of Co nanoparticle formation using time-dependent and spatially-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinoveva, S.

    2008-04-15

    A crucial step towards controlled synthesis of nanoparticles is the detailed understanding of the various chemical processes that take place during the synthesis. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) is especially suitable for elucidating the type and structure of the intermediate metal species. It is applicable to materials that have no long range order and provides information on both electronic and geometric structures. Here a comparative study is reported of the formation of cobalt nanoparticles via thermolysis of two organometallic precursors dicobalt octacarbonyl (DCO) and alkyne-bridged dicobalt hexacarbonyl (ADH) in the presence of aluminum organics. Using time-dependent XAS a reaction pathway different from both the atom based La Mer model and the Watzky and Finsky autocatalytic surface growth model is observed. Where prior to the nucleation several intermediates are formed and the initial nucleus is composed of Co atoms coordinated with ligands Co{sub n}(CO){sub m} with n=2-3, m=3-5. The formation of Co nanoparticles was also investigated using a reaction different from thermolysis of cobalt carbonyls, namely reduction of Co (II) acetate by sodium borohydrate. Here the combination of microreactor system and spatially resolved XAS allowed ''in situ'' monitoring of the wet chemical synthesis. Several steps of the reaction were spatially resolved in the microreactor. The vertical size of the X-ray beam (50 {mu}m) focused with Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror system, determines the time resolution (better than 2 ms). The results provide direct insight into rapid process of nanoparticles formation and demonstrate the potential of this new technique for the fundamental studies of such type of processes where miniaturization and timeresolution are important. Like in the carbonyls thermolysis no evidence for the reduction of the starting complex to isolated Co{sup 0} atoms followed by nucleation of Co{sup 0} atoms was observed. (orig.)

  15. Investigation of Co nanoparticle formation using time-dependent and spatially-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinoveva, S

    2008-04-15

    A crucial step towards controlled synthesis of nanoparticles is the detailed understanding of the various chemical processes that take place during the synthesis. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) is especially suitable for elucidating the type and structure of the intermediate metal species. It is applicable to materials that have no long range order and provides information on both electronic and geometric structures. Here a comparative study is reported of the formation of cobalt nanoparticles via thermolysis of two organometallic precursors dicobalt octacarbonyl (DCO) and alkyne-bridged dicobalt hexacarbonyl (ADH) in the presence of aluminum organics. Using time-dependent XAS a reaction pathway different from both the atom based La Mer model and the Watzky and Finsky autocatalytic surface growth model is observed. Where prior to the nucleation several intermediates are formed and the initial nucleus is composed of Co atoms coordinated with ligands Co{sub n}(CO){sub m} with n=2-3, m=3-5. The formation of Co nanoparticles was also investigated using a reaction different from thermolysis of cobalt carbonyls, namely reduction of Co (II) acetate by sodium borohydrate. Here the combination of microreactor system and spatially resolved XAS allowed ''in situ'' monitoring of the wet chemical synthesis. Several steps of the reaction were spatially resolved in the microreactor. The vertical size of the X-ray beam (50 {mu}m) focused with Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror system, determines the time resolution (better than 2 ms). The results provide direct insight into rapid process of nanoparticles formation and demonstrate the potential of this new technique for the fundamental studies of such type of processes where miniaturization and timeresolution are important. Like in the carbonyls thermolysis no evidence for the reduction of the starting complex to isolated Co{sup 0} atoms followed by nucleation of Co{sup 0} atoms was observed. (orig.)

  16. Insights into the charge carrier terahertz mobility in polyfluorenes from large-scale atomistic simulations and time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vukmirović, N.; Ponseca, C.S.; Němec, Hynek; Yartsev, A.; Sundström, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 37 (2012), s. 19665-1972 ISSN 1932-7447 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : charge carrier mobility * time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy * multiscale atomistic calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.814, year: 2012

  17. Chlorine levels and species in fine and size resolved atmospheric particles by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy analysis in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jie; Yang, Guo-Sheng; Ma, Ling-Ling; Luo, Min; Zheng, Lei; Huo, Qing; Zhao, Yi-Dong; Hu, Tian-Dou; Cai, Zhen-Feng; Xu, Dian-Dou

    2018-04-01

    An understanding of the species of chlorine is crucial in the metropolis-Beijing, which is suffering serious haze pollution with high frequency. Particulate Matters (PMs) with five different sizes were collected in Beijing from July 2009 to March 2016, and characterized non-destructively by X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. PM 2.5 contributed for the major PMs mass in spring and summer, PM 0.5-1.0 and PM 1.0-2.5 contributed for the major PMs mass in autumn and winter. The concentrations of the three chlorine species were in the order of inorganic chlorine (Cl inorg ) > aliphatic chlorine (Cl ali ) > aromatic chlorine (Cl aro ), indicating that Cl inorg constituted the primary chlorine fraction and less toxic Cl ali constituted the primary total organic chlorine (Cl ali  + Cl aro , abbreviated as Cl org ) in the PMs in Beijing. In addition, these three chlorine species exhibited identical seasonal variation in PM 2.5 : winter > autumn > spring > summer. Wet precipitation is an important factor to result in the lower mass concentrations of these three chlorine species in summer. The temporal variations of both size resolved PM mass concentrations and chlorine species concentrations suggested that the air pollution prevention and control in Beijing has just won initial success. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of electrically conductive metal-organic frameworks doped with redox active species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberding, Brian G.; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2015-09-01

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are three-dimensional coordination polymers that are well known for large pore surface area and their ability to adsorb molecules from both the gaseous and solution phases. In general, MOFs are electrically insulating, but promising opportunities for tuning the electronic structure exist because MOFs possess synthetic versatility; the metal and organic ligand subunits can be exchanged or dopant molecules can be introduced into the pore space. Two such MOFs with demonstrated electrical conductivity are Cu3(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate)2, a.k.a HKUST-1, and Cu[Ni(pyrazine-2,3-dithiolate)2]. Herein, these two MOFs have been infiltrated with the redox active species 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and iodine under solution phase conditions and shown to produce redox products within the MOF pore space. Vibrational bands assignable to TCNQ anion and triiodide anion have been observed in the Mid-IR and Terahertz ranges using FTIR Spectroscopy. The MOF samples have been further investigated by Time-Resolved Terehertz Spectroscopy (TRTS). Using this technique, the charge mobility, separation, and recombination dynamics have been followed on the picosecond time scale following photoexcitation with visible radiation. The preliminary results show that the MOF samples have small inherent photoconductivity with charge separation lifetimes on the order of a few picoseconds. In the case of HKUST-1, the MOF can also be supported by a TiO2 film and initial results show that charge injection into the TiO2 layer occurs with a comparable efficiency to the dye sensitizer N3, [cis-Bis(isothiocyanato)-bis(2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylato ruthenium(II)], and therefore this MOF has potential as a new light absorbing and charge conducting material in photovoltaic devices.

  19. Time-resolved and steady-state studies of biologically and chemically relevant systems using laser, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Charles Ashley [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    In Chapter 2 several experimental and data analysis methods used in this thesis are described. In Chapter 3 steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration of the efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs), pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a, in the feces of animals and it was found that their levels far exceed those reported to be inhibitory to efflux pumps. In Chapter 4 the solvation dynamics of 6-Propionyl-2-(N,Ndimethyl) aminonaphthalene (PRODAN) was studied in reverse micelles. The two fluorescent states of PRODAN solvate on different time scales and as such care must be exercised in solvation dynamic studies involving it and its analogs. In Chapter 5 we studied the experimental and theoretical solvation dynamics of coumarin 153 (C153) in wild-type (WT) and modified myoglobins. Based on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence studies, we have concluded that it is important to thoroughly characterize the structure of a protein and probe system before comparing the theoretical and experimental results. In Chapter 6 the photophysical and spectral properties of a derivative of the medically relevant compound curcumin called cyclocurcumin was studied. Based on NMR, fluorescence, and absorption studies, the ground- and excited-states of cyclocurcumin are complicated by the existence of multiple structural isomers. In Chapter 7 the hydrolysis of cellulose by a pure form of cellulase in an ionic liquid, HEMA, and its aqueous mixtures at various temperatures were studied with the goal of increasing the cellulose to glucose conversion for biofuel production. It was found that HEMA imparts an additional stability to cellulase and can allow for faster conversion of cellulose to glucose using a pre-treatment step in comparison to only buffer.

  20. Influence of cutaneous and muscular circulation on spatially resolved versus standard Beer-Lambert near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messere, Alessandro; Roatta, Silvestro

    2013-12-01

    The potential interference of cutaneous circulation on muscle blood volume and oxygenation monitoring by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) remains an important limitation of this technique. Spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) was reported to minimize the contribution of superficial tissue layers in cerebral monitoring but this characteristic has never been documented in muscle tissue monitoring. This study aims to compare SRS with the standard Beer-Lambert (BL) technique in detecting blood volume changes selectively induced in muscle and skin. In 16 healthy subjects, the biceps brachii was investigated during isometric elbow flexion at 70% of the maximum voluntary contractions lasting 10 sec, performed before and after exposure of the upper arm to warm air flow. From probes applied over the muscle belly the following variables were recorded: total hemoglobin index (THI, SRS-based), total hemoglobin concentration (tHb, BL-based), tissue oxygenation index (TOI, SRS-based), and skin blood flow (SBF), using laser Doppler flowmetry. Blood volume indices exhibited similar changes during muscle contraction but only tHb significantly increased during warming (+5.2 ± 0.7 μmol/L·cm, an effect comparable to the increase occurring in postcontraction hyperemia), accompanying a 10-fold increase in SBF. Contraction-induced changes in tHb and THI were not substantially affected by warming, although the tHb tracing was shifted upward by (5.2 ± 3.5 μmol/L·cm, P < 0.01). TOI was not affected by cutaneous warming. In conclusion, SRS appears to effectively reject interference by SBF in both muscle blood volume and oxygenation monitoring. Instead, BL-based parameters should be interpreted with caution, whenever changes in cutaneous perfusion cannot be excluded.

  1. Influence of cutaneous and muscular circulation on spatially resolved versus standard Beer–Lambert near‐infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messere, Alessandro; Roatta, Silvestro

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The potential interference of cutaneous circulation on muscle blood volume and oxygenation monitoring by near‐infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) remains an important limitation of this technique. Spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) was reported to minimize the contribution of superficial tissue layers in cerebral monitoring but this characteristic has never been documented in muscle tissue monitoring. This study aims to compare SRS with the standard Beer–Lambert (BL) technique in detecting blood volume changes selectively induced in muscle and skin. In 16 healthy subjects, the biceps brachii was investigated during isometric elbow flexion at 70% of the maximum voluntary contractions lasting 10 sec, performed before and after exposure of the upper arm to warm air flow. From probes applied over the muscle belly the following variables were recorded: total hemoglobin index (THI, SRS‐based), total hemoglobin concentration (tHb, BL‐based), tissue oxygenation index (TOI, SRS‐based), and skin blood flow (SBF), using laser Doppler flowmetry. Blood volume indices exhibited similar changes during muscle contraction but only tHb significantly increased during warming (+5.2 ± 0.7 μmol/L·cm, an effect comparable to the increase occurring in postcontraction hyperemia), accompanying a 10‐fold increase in SBF. Contraction‐induced changes in tHb and THI were not substantially affected by warming, although the tHb tracing was shifted upward by (5.2 ± 3.5 μmol/L·cm, P < 0.01). TOI was not affected by cutaneous warming. In conclusion, SRS appears to effectively reject interference by SBF in both muscle blood volume and oxygenation monitoring. Instead, BL‐based parameters should be interpreted with caution, whenever changes in cutaneous perfusion cannot be excluded. PMID:24744858

  2. In situ monitoring of cocrystals in formulation development using low-frequency Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Takashi; Tanabe, Yuta; Kojima, Takashi; Miura, Masaru; Ikeda, Yukihiro; Koide, Tatsuo; Fukami, Toshiro

    2018-05-05

    In recent years, to guarantee a quality-by-design approach to the development of pharmaceutical products, it is important to identify properties of raw materials and excipients in order to determine critical process parameters and critical quality attributes. Feedback obtained from real-time analyses using various process analytical technology (PAT) tools has been actively investigated. In this study, in situ monitoring using low-frequency (LF) Raman spectroscopy (10-200 cm -1 ), which may have higher discriminative ability among polymorphs than near-infrared spectroscopy and conventional Raman spectroscopy (200-1800 cm -1 ), was investigated as a possible application to PAT. This is because LF-Raman spectroscopy obtains information about intermolecular and/or lattice vibrations in the solid state. The monitoring results obtained from Furosemide/Nicotinamide cocrystal indicate that LF-Raman spectroscopy is applicable to in situ monitoring of suspension and fluidized bed granulation processes, and is an effective technique as a PAT tool to detect the conversion risk of cocrystals. LF-Raman spectroscopy is also used as a PAT tool to monitor reactions, crystallizations, and manufacturing processes of drug substances and products. In addition, a sequence of conversion behaviors of Furosemide/Nicotinamide cocrystals was determined by performing in situ monitoring for the first time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Combined angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, density functional theory and kinetic study of nitridation of gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, H.; Monier, G.; Hoggan, P. E.; Bideux, L.; Robert-Goumet, C.; Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2018-01-01

    The high density of interface and surface states that cause the strong Fermi pinning observed on GaAs surfaces can be reduced by depositing GaN ultra-thin films on GaAs. To further improve this passivation, it is necessary to investigate the nitridation phenomena by identifying the distinct steps occurring during the process and to understand and quantify the growth kinetics of GaAs nitridation under different conditions. Nitridation of the cleaned GaAs substrate was performed using N2 plasma source. Two approaches have been combined. Firstly, an AR-XPS (Angle Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) study is carried out to determine the chemical environments of the Ga, As and N atoms and the composition depth profile of the GaN thin film which allow us to summarize the nitridation process in three steps. Moreover, the temperature and time treatment have been investigated and show a significant impact on the formation of the GaN layer. The second approach is a refined growth kinetic model which better describes the GaN growth as a function of the nitridation time. This model clarifies the exchange mechanism of arsenic with nitrogen atoms at the GaN/GaAs interface and the phenomenon of quasi-saturation of the process observed experimentally.

  4. Probing specific molecular processes and intermediates by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: application to the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A; Kandori, Hideki; Padrós, Esteve

    2011-06-23

    We present a general approach for probing the kinetics of specific molecular processes in proteins by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Using bacteriorhodopsin (bR) as a model we demonstrate that by appropriately monitoring some selected IR bands it is possible obtaining the kinetics of the most important events occurring in the photocycle, namely changes in the chromophore and the protein backbone conformation, and changes in the protonation state of the key residues implicated in the proton transfers. Besides confirming widely accepted views of the bR photocycle, our analysis also sheds light into some disputed issues: the degree of retinal torsion in the L intermediate to respect the ground state; the possibility of a proton transfer from Asp85 to Asp212; the relationship between the protonation/deprotonation of Asp85 and the proton release complex; and the timing of the protein backbone dynamics. By providing a direct way to estimate the kinetics of photocycle intermediates the present approach opens new prospects for a robust quantitative kinetic analysis of the bR photocycle, which could also benefit the study of other proteins involved in photosynthesis, in phototaxis, or in respiratory chains.

  5. Sol-to-Gel Transition in Fast Evaporating Systems Observed by in Situ Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenzi, Plinio; Malfatti, Luca; Carboni, Davide; Takahashi, Masahide

    2015-06-22

    The in situ observation of a sol-to-gel transition in fast evaporating systems is a challenging task and the lack of a suitable experimental design, which includes the chemistry and the analytical method, has limited the observations. We synthesise an acidic sol, employing only tetraethylorthosilicate, SiCl4 as catalyst and deuterated water; the absence of water added to the sol allows us to follow the absorption from the external environment and the evaporation of deuterated water. The time-resolved data, obtained by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy on an evaporating droplet, enables us to identify four different stages during evaporation. They are linked to specific hydrolysis and condensation rates that affect the uptake of water from external environment. The second stage is characterized by a decrease in hydroxyl content, a fast rise of condensation rate and an almost stationary absorption of water. This stage has been associated with the sol-to-gel transition. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Extended wavelength anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES) measurements: better filters, validation standards, and Rayleigh scatter removal methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamayou-Boucau, Yannick; Ryder, Alan G.

    2017-09-01

    Anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES) provides valuable insights into multi-fluorophore proteins (Groza et al 2015 Anal. Chim. Acta 886 133-42). Fluorescence anisotropy adds to the multidimensional fluorescence dataset information about the physical size of the fluorophores and/or the rigidity of the surrounding micro-environment. The first ARMES studies used standard thin film polarizers (TFP) that had negligible transmission between 250 and 290 nm, preventing accurate measurement of intrinsic protein fluorescence from tyrosine and tryptophan. Replacing TFP with pairs of broadband wire grid polarizers enabled standard fluorescence spectrometers to accurately measure anisotropies between 250 and 300 nm, which was validated with solutions of perylene in the UV and Erythrosin B and Phloxine B in the visible. In all cases, anisotropies were accurate to better than ±1% when compared to literature measurements made with Glan Thompson or TFP polarizers. Better dual wire grid polarizer UV transmittance and the use of excitation-emission matrix measurements for ARMES required complete Rayleigh scatter elimination. This was achieved by chemometric modelling rather than classical interpolation, which enabled the acquisition of pure anisotropy patterns over wider spectral ranges. In combination, these three improvements permit the accurate implementation of ARMES for studying intrinsic protein fluorescence.

  7. Interaction of europium and nickel with calcite studied by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, A. [Agence Nationale pour la gestion des Déchets RAdioactifs, 1-7 rue J. Monnet, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Pipon, Y., E-mail: pipon@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) Lyon-1, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CEA/DEN, Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Lomenech, C. [Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Jordan, N. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Barkleit, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); and others

    2014-08-01

    This study aims at elucidating the mechanisms regulating the interaction of Eu and Ni with calcite (CaCO{sub 3}). Calcite powders or single crystals (some mm sized) were put into contact with Eu or Ni solutions at concentrations ranging from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} for Eu and 10{sup −3} mol L{sup −1} for Ni. The sorption durations ranged from 1 week to 1 month. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) well adapted to discriminate incorporation processes such as: (i) adsorption or co precipitation at the mineral surfaces or, (ii) incorporation into the mineral structure (through diffusion for instance), has been carried out. Moreover, using the fluorescence properties of europium, the results have been compared to those obtained by Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) on calcite powders. For the single crystals, complementary SEM observations of the mineral surfaces at low voltage were also performed. Results showed that Ni accumulates at the calcite surface whereas Eu is also incorporated at a greater depth. Eu seems therefore to be incorporated into two different states in calcite: (i) heterogeneous surface accumulation and (ii) incorporation at depth greater than 160 nm after 1 month of sorption. Ni was found to accumulate at the surface of calcite without incorporation.

  8. Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging Using Solid-State Detectors: Characteristics, Present Status, and Research Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayed, Mrwan; Deen, M Jamal

    2017-09-14

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and diffuse optical imaging (DOI) are emerging non-invasive imaging modalities that have wide spread potential applications in many fields, particularly for structural and functional imaging in medicine. In this article, we review time-resolved diffuse optical imaging (TR-DOI) systems using solid-state detectors with a special focus on Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) and Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). These TR-DOI systems can be categorized into two types based on the operation mode of the detector (free-running or time-gated). For the TR-DOI prototypes, the physical concepts, main components, figures-of-merit of detectors, and evaluation parameters are described. The performance of TR-DOI prototypes is evaluated according to the parameters used in common protocols to test DOI systems particularly basic instrumental performance (BIP). In addition, the potential features of SPADs and SiPMs to improve TR-DOI systems and expand their applications in the foreseeable future are discussed. Lastly, research challenges and future developments for TR-DOI are discussed for each component in the prototype separately and also for the entire system.

  9. Fluctuating Charge-Order in Optimally Doped Bi- 2212 Revealed by Momentum-resolved Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Ali; Vig, Sean; Kogar, Anshul; Mishra, Vivek; Rak, Melinda; Mitrano, Matteo; Johnson, Peter; Gu, Genda; Fradkin, Eduardo; Norman, Michael; Abbamonte, Peter

    Static charge order is a ubiquitous feature of the underdoped cuprates. However, at optimal doping, charge-order has been thought to be completely suppressed, suggesting an interplay between the charge-ordering and superconducting order parameters. Using Momentum-resolved Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (M-EELS) we show the existence of diffuse fluctuating charge-order in the optimally doped cuprate Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) at low-temperature. We present full momentum-space maps of both elastic and inelastic scattering at room temperature and below the superconducting transition with 4meV resolution. We show that the ``rods'' of diffuse scattering indicate nematic-like fluctuations, and the energy width defines a fluctuation timescale of 160 fs. We discuss the implications of fluctuating charge-order on the dynamics at optimal doping. This work was supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's EPiQS Initiative through Grant GBMF-4542. An early prototype of the M-EELS instrument was supported by the DOE Center for Emergent Superconductivity under Award No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  10. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of N-methylpyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Guorong; Neville, Simon P.; Schalk, Oliver; Sekikawa, Taro; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Worth, Graham A.; Stolow, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of N-methylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range 241.5-217.0 nm were studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES), ab initio quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method, as well as high-level photoionization cross section calculations. Excitation at 241.5 and 236.2 nm results in population of the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state, in agreement with previous studies. Excitation at 217.0 nm prepares the previously neglected B 1 (π3p y ) Rydberg state, followed by prompt internal conversion to the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state. In contrast with the photoinduced dynamics of pyrrole, the lifetime of the wavepacket in the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state was found to vary with excitation wavelength, decreasing by one order of magnitude upon tuning from 241.5 nm to 236.2 nm and by more than three orders of magnitude when excited at 217.0 nm. The order of magnitude difference in lifetimes measured at the longer excitation wavelengths is attributed to vibrational excitation in the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state, facilitating wavepacket motion around the potential barrier in the N–CH 3 dissociation coordinate

  11. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of N-methylpyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guorong [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information & Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Neville, Simon P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Schalk, Oliver [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Sekikawa, Taro [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ashfold, Michael N. R. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Worth, Graham A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Stolow, Albert, E-mail: astolow@uottawa.ca [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2016-01-07

    The dynamics of N-methylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range 241.5-217.0 nm were studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES), ab initio quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method, as well as high-level photoionization cross section calculations. Excitation at 241.5 and 236.2 nm results in population of the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, in agreement with previous studies. Excitation at 217.0 nm prepares the previously neglected B{sub 1}(π3p{sub y}) Rydberg state, followed by prompt internal conversion to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state. In contrast with the photoinduced dynamics of pyrrole, the lifetime of the wavepacket in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state was found to vary with excitation wavelength, decreasing by one order of magnitude upon tuning from 241.5 nm to 236.2 nm and by more than three orders of magnitude when excited at 217.0 nm. The order of magnitude difference in lifetimes measured at the longer excitation wavelengths is attributed to vibrational excitation in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, facilitating wavepacket motion around the potential barrier in the N–CH{sub 3} dissociation coordinate.

  12. Pump laser-induced space-charge effects in HHG-driven time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oloff, L.-P., E-mail: oloff@physik.uni-kiel.de; Hanff, K.; Stange, A.; Rohde, G.; Diekmann, F.; Bauer, M.; Rossnagel, K., E-mail: rossnagel@physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-06-14

    With the advent of ultrashort-pulsed extreme ultraviolet sources, such as free-electron lasers or high-harmonic-generation (HHG) sources, a new research field for photoelectron spectroscopy has opened up in terms of femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments. The impact of the high peak brilliance of these novel sources on photoemission spectra, so-called vacuum space-charge effects caused by the Coulomb interaction among the photoemitted probe electrons, has been studied extensively. However, possible distortions of the energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons caused by the low photon energy pump pulse due to the nonlinear emission of electrons have not been studied in detail yet. Here, we systematically investigate these pump laser-induced space-charge effects in a HHG-based experiment for the test case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Specifically, we determine how the key parameters of the pump pulse—the excitation density, wavelength, spot size, and emitted electron energy distribution—affect the measured time-dependent energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons. The results are well reproduced by a simple mean-field model, which could open a path for the correction of pump laser-induced space-charge effects and thus toward probing ultrafast electron dynamics in strongly excited materials.

  13. Site-Specific Measurement of Water Dynamics in the Substrate Pocket of Ketosteroid Isomerase Using Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Santosh Kumar; Ji, Minbiao; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the reorganization capacity of water molecules at the active sites of enzymes and how this couples to the catalytic reaction. Here, we study the dynamics of water molecules at the active site of a highly proficient enzyme, Δ5-3-ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), during a light-activated mimic of its catalytic cycle. Photo-excitation of a nitrile containing photo-acid, coumarin183 (C183), mimics the change in charge density that occurs at the active site of KSI during the first step of the catalytic reaction. The nitrile of C183 is exposed to water when bound to the KSI active site, and we used time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy as a site-specific probe to study the solvation dynamics of water molecules in the vicinity of the nitrile. We observed that water molecules at the active site of KSI are highly rigid, during the light-activated catalytic cycle, compared to the solvation dynamics observed in bulk water. Based upon this result we hypothesize that rigid water dipoles at the active site might help in the maintenance of the pre-organized electrostatic environment required for efficient catalysis. The results also demonstrate the utility of nitrile probes in measuring the dynamics of local (H-bonded) water molecules in contrast to the commonly used fluorescence methods which measure the average behavior of primary and subsequent spheres of solvation. PMID:22931297

  14. SmB6 electron-phonon coupling constant from time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterzi, A.; Crepaldi, A.; Cilento, F.; Manzoni, G.; Frantzeskakis, E.; Zacchigna, M.; van Heumen, E.; Huang, Y. K.; Golden, M. S.; Parmigiani, F.

    2016-08-01

    SmB6 is a mixed valence Kondo system resulting from the hybridization between localized f electrons and delocalized d electrons. We have investigated its out-of-equilibrium electron dynamics by means of time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The transient electronic population above the Fermi level can be described by a time-dependent Fermi-Dirac distribution. By solving a two-temperature model that well reproduces the relaxation dynamics of the effective electronic temperature, we estimate the electron-phonon coupling constant λ to range from 0.13 ±0.03 to 0.04 ±0.01 . These extremes are obtained assuming a coupling of the electrons with either a phonon mode at 10 or 19 meV. A realistic value of the average phonon energy will give an actual value of λ within this range. Our results provide an experimental report on the material electron-phonon coupling, contributing to both the electronic transport and the macroscopic thermodynamic properties of SmB6.

  15. Effects of aging on working memory performance and prefrontal cortex activity:A time-resolved spectroscopy study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Shi; Wenjing Zhou; Tongchao Geng; Huancong Zuo; Masahiro Tanida; Kaoru Sakatani

    2016-01-01

    Objective:This study aimed to employ time‐resolved spectroscopy (TRS) to explore age‐related differences in prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity while subjects performed a working memory task. Methods:We employed TRS to measure PFC activity in ten healthy younger and ten healthy older subjects while they performed a working memory (WM) task. All subjects performed the Sternberg test (ST) in which the memory‐set size varied between one and six digits. Using TRS, we recorded changes in cerebral blood oxygenation as a measure of changes in PFC activity during the task. In order to identify left/right asymmetry of PFC activity during the working memory task, we calculated the laterality score, i.e.,Δoxy‐Hb (rightΔoxy‐Hb—leftΔoxy‐Hb);positive values indicate greater activity in the right PFC, while negative values indicate greater activity in the left PFC. Results:During the ST, statistical analyses showed no significant differences between the younger and older groups in accuracy for low memory‐load and high memory‐load. In high memory‐load tasks, however, older subjects were slower than younger subjects (P Conclusions: The present results are consistent with the hemispheric asymmetry reduction in older adults (HAROLD) model;working memory tasks cause asymmetrical PFC activation in younger adults, while older adults tend to show reduced hemispheric lateralization.

  16. Studies on Ternary Complex Formation of U(VI)-salicylate by Using Time-resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Wan Sik; Cho, H. R.; Park, K. K.; Kim, W. H.; Jung, E. C. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Organic ligands containing carboxylic and phenolic functional groups naturally occur in groundwater environment, particularly in forms of polyelectrolytes such as humic and fulvic acids, from microbial degradation of biomass, e.g., plant and animal tissues. These ligands play important roles in dissolution and migration of actinide radionuclide species since they can form stable ternary actinide complexes with common inorganic ions like hydroxides and carbonates. Therefore, model ternary complexes of lanthanides and actinides have been targets of studies to understand their chemical behaviors under near-neutral pH groundwater conditions. Previous model carboxylic ligands include phthalates, maleic acids, or alpha- substituted carboxylic acids. However, majority of previous studies investigated binary systems or used potentiometric titration method that requires high ligand concentration in mM levels. Recently, highly sensitive time-resolved laserinduced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) has been used to investigate lower concentration (e.g., a few {mu}M levels) reactions of binary complexes between of ligands and metal ions. This technique provides information regarding electronic structures and complexation constants as well as fluorescence quenching mechanism. In the present study, we studied the U(VI)-OH-salicylate (SA) ternary complex formation at higher pH (> 4) via TRLF spectrum and UV-Vis absorbance measurement. Preliminary studies show that the fluorescence (FL) intensity of hydroxouranyl species at pH 4.5 decreases as SA concentration elevates in aqueous solution. Fluorescence quenching mechanism by SA is suggested based on FL intensity (I) and lifetime (tau) measurement via TRLFS

  17. A diode-laser optical frequency standard based on laser-cooled Ca atoms: sub-kilohertz spectroscopy by optical shelving detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, C.W.; Bondu, F.; Fox, R.W.; Hollberg, L.

    1999-01-01

    We report an optical frequency standard at 657 nm based on laser-cooled/trapped Ca atoms. The system consists of a novel, compact magneto-optic trap which uses 50 mW of frequency-doubled diode laser light at 423 nm and can trap >10 7 Ca atoms in 20 ms. High resolution spectroscopy on this atomic sample using the narrow 657 nm intercombination line resolves linewidths (FWHM) as narrow as 400 Hz, the natural linewidth of the transition. The spectroscopic signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced by an order of magnitude with the implementation of a ''shelving'' detection scheme on the 423 nm transition. Our present apparatus achieves a fractional frequency instability of 5 x 10 -14 in 1 s with a potential atom shot-noise-limited performance of 10 -16 τ -1/2 and excellent prospects for high accuracy. (orig.)

  18. High-Frequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Nitroxide-Functionalized Nanodiamonds in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiel, R D; Stepanov, V; Takahashi, S

    2017-06-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) is an attractive class of nanomaterial for fluorescent labeling, magnetic sensing of biological molecules, and targeted drug delivery. Many of those applications require tethering of target biological molecules on the ND surface. Even though many approaches have been developed to attach macromolecules to the ND surface, it remains challenging to characterize dynamics of tethered molecule. Here, we show high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HF EPR) spectroscopy of nitroxide-functionalized NDs. Nitroxide radical is a commonly used spin label to investigate dynamics of biological molecules. In the investigation, we developed a sample holder to overcome water absorption of HF microwave. Then, we demonstrated HF EPR spectroscopy of nitroxide-functionalized NDs in aqueous solution and showed clear spectral distinction of ND and nitroxide EPR signals. Moreover, through EPR spectral analysis, we investigate dynamics of nitroxide radicals on the ND surface. The demonstration sheds light on the use of HF EPR spectroscopy to investigate biological molecule-functionalized nanoparticles.

  19. Radio frequency scanning tunneling spectroscopy for single-molecule spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllegger, Stefan; Tebi, Stefano; Das, Amal K; Schöfberger, Wolfgang; Faschinger, Felix; Koch, Reinhold

    2014-09-26

    We probe nuclear and electron spins in a single molecule even beyond the electromagnetic dipole selection rules, at readily accessible magnetic fields (few mT) and temperatures (5 K) by resonant radio-frequency current from a scanning tunneling microscope. We achieve subnanometer spatial resolution combined with single-spin sensitivity, representing a 10 orders of magnitude improvement compared to existing magnetic resonance techniques. We demonstrate the successful resonant spectroscopy of the complete manifold of nuclear and electronic magnetic transitions of up to ΔI(z)=±3 and ΔJ(z)=±12 of single quantum spins in a single molecule. Our method of resonant radio-frequency scanning tunneling spectroscopy offers, atom-by-atom, unprecedented analytical power and spin control with an impact on diverse fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  20. Quantitative, depth-resolved determination of particle motion using multi-exposure, spatial frequency domain laser speckle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Tyler B; Kwan, Elliott; Hayakawa, Carole K; Durkin, Anthony J; Choi, Bernard; Tromberg, Bruce J

    2013-01-01

    Laser Speckle Imaging (LSI) is a simple, noninvasive technique for rapid imaging of particle motion in scattering media such as biological tissue. LSI is generally used to derive a qualitative index of relative blood flow due to unknown impact from several variables that affect speckle contrast. These variables may include optical absorption and scattering coefficients, multi-layer dynamics including static, non-ergodic regions, and systematic effects such as laser coherence length. In order to account for these effects and move toward quantitative, depth-resolved LSI, we have developed a method that combines Monte Carlo modeling, multi-exposure speckle imaging (MESI), spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI), and careful instrument calibration. Monte Carlo models were used to generate total and layer-specific fractional momentum transfer distributions. This information was used to predict speckle contrast as a function of exposure time, spatial frequency, layer thickness, and layer dynamics. To verify with experimental data, controlled phantom experiments with characteristic tissue optical properties were performed using a structured light speckle imaging system. Three main geometries were explored: 1) diffusive dynamic layer beneath a static layer, 2) static layer beneath a diffuse dynamic layer, and 3) directed flow (tube) submerged in a dynamic scattering layer. Data fits were performed using the Monte Carlo model, which accurately reconstructed the type of particle flow (diffusive or directed) in each layer, the layer thickness, and absolute flow speeds to within 15% or better.

  1. Dual-comb coherent Raman spectroscopy with lasers of 1-GHz pulse repetition frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, Kathrin J; Bohn, Bernhard J; Yan, Ming; Mélen, Gwénaëlle; Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2017-01-15

    We extend the technique of multiplex coherent Raman spectroscopy with two femtosecond mode-locked lasers to oscillators of a pulse repetition frequency of 1 GHz. We demonstrate a spectra of liquids, which span 1100  cm-1 of Raman shifts. At a resolution of 6  cm-1, their measurement time may be as short as 5 μs for a refresh rate of 2 kHz. The waiting period between acquisitions is improved 10-fold compared to previous experiments with two lasers of 100-MHz repetition frequencies.

  2. Absolute frequency atlas from 915 nm to 985 nm based on laser absorption spectroscopy of iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölleke, Christian; Raab, Christoph; Neuhaus, Rudolf; Falke, Stephan

    2018-04-01

    This article reports on laser absorption spectroscopy of iodine gas between 915 nm and 985 nm. This wavelength range is scanned utilizing a narrow linewidth and mode-hop-free tunable diode-laser whose frequency is actively controlled using a calibrated wavelength meter. This allows us to provide an iodine atlas that contains almost 10,000 experimentally observed reference lines with an uncertainty of 50 MHz. For common lines, good agreement is found with a publication by Gerstenkorn and Luc (1978). The new rich dataset allows existing models of the iodine molecule to be refined and can serve as a reference for laser frequency calibration and stabilization.

  3. High-resolution broadband terahertz spectroscopy via electronic heterodyne detection of photonically generated terahertz frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelyev, D G; Skryl, A S; Bakunov, M I

    2014-10-01

    We report an alternative approach to the terahertz frequency-comb spectroscopy (TFCS) based on nonlinear mixing of a photonically generated terahertz pulse train with a continuous wave signal from an electronic synthesizer. A superlattice is used as a nonlinear mixer. Unlike the standard TFCS technique, this approach does not require a complex double-laser system but retains the advantages of TFCS-high spectral resolution and wide bandwidth.

  4. Josephson admittance spectroscopy application for frequency analysis of broadband THz antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, O Yu; Divin, Yu Yu; Gubankov, V N; Gundareva, I I; Pavlovskiy, V V

    2010-01-01

    Application of Josephson admittance spectroscopy for the spectral analysis of a broad-band log-periodic superconducting antenna was demonstrated at the frequency range from 50 to 700 GHz. The [001]-tilt YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x bicrystal Josephson junctions, integrated with sinuous log-periodic YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x antennas, were fabricated on NdGaO 3 bicrystal substrates. A real part of the antenna admittance ReY(f) as a function of the frequency f was reconstructed from the modification of the dc current-voltage characteristic of the junction, induced by the antenna. Resonance features were observed in the recovered ReY(f)-spectra with a periodicity in the logarithmic frequency scale, corresponding to log-periodic geometry of the antenna. The ReY(f)-spectra, recovered by Josephson spectroscopy, were compared with the ReY(f)-spectra, obtained by CAD simulation, and both spectra were shown to be similar in their main features. A value of 23 was obtained for an effective permittivity of the NdGaO3 bicrystal substrates by fitting simulated data to those obtained from Josephson spectroscopy.

  5. Spectral characterization of crude oil using fluorescence (synchronous and time-resolved) and NIR (Near Infrared Spectroscopy); Caracterizacao espectral do petroleo utilizando fluorescencia (sincronizada e resolvida no tempo) e NIR (Near Infrared Spectroscopy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falla Sotelo, F.; Araujo Pantoja, P.; Lopez-Gejo, J.; Le Roux, G.A.C.; Nascimento, C.A.O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Simulacao e Controle de Processos; Quina, F.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Centro de Capacitacao e Pesquisa em Meio Ambiente (CEPEMA)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present work is to evaluate the performance of two spectroscopic techniques employed in the crude oil characterization: NIR spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy (Synchronous fluorescence - SF and Time Resolved Fluorescence - TRF) for the development of correlation models between spectral profiles of crude oil samples and both physical properties (viscosity and API density) and physico-chemical properties (SARA analysis: Saturated, Aromatic, Resins and Asphaltenes). The better results for viscosity and density were obtained using NIR whose prediction capacity was good (1.5 cP and 0.5 deg API, respectively). For SARA analysis, fluorescence spectroscopy revealed its potential in the model calibration showing good results (R2 coefficients greater than 0.85). TRF spectroscopy had better performance than SF spectroscopy. (author)

  6. Visualizing chemical states and defects induced magnetism of graphene oxide by spatially-resolved-X-ray microscopy and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y F; Singh, Shashi B; Limaye, Mukta V; Shao, Y C; Hsieh, S H; Chen, L Y; Hsueh, H C; Wang, H T; Chiou, J W; Yeh, Y C; Chen, C W; Chen, C H; Ray, Sekhar C; Wang, J; Pong, W F; Takagi, Y; Ohigashi, T; Yokoyama, T; Kosugi, N

    2015-10-20

    This investigation studies the various magnetic behaviors of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) and elucidates the relationship between the chemical states that involve defects therein and their magnetic behaviors in GO sheets. Magnetic hysteresis loop reveals that the GO is ferromagnetic whereas photo-thermal moderately reduced graphene oxide (M-rGO) and heavily reduced graphene oxide (H-rGO) gradually become paramagnetic behavior at room temperature. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and corresponding X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy were utilized to investigate thoroughly the variation of the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups, as well as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states in flat and wrinkle regions to clarify the relationship between the spatially-resolved chemical states and the magnetism of GO, M-rGO and H-rGO. The results of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism further support the finding that C 2p(σ*)-derived states are the main origin of the magnetism of GO. Based on experimental results and first-principles calculations, the variation in magnetic behavior from GO to M-rGO and to H-rGO is interpreted, and the origin of ferromagnetism is identified as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states that involve defects/vacancies rather than the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups on GO sheets.

  7. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY AND CHEMICAL HISTORY OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES IN THE HERCULES CLUSTER: THE EFFECTS OF THE ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petropoulou, V.; Vilchez, J.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Cedres, B.; Papaderos, P.; Magrini, L.; Reverte, D.

    2011-01-01

    Spatially resolved spectroscopy has been obtained for a sample of 27 star-forming (SF) galaxies selected from our deep Hα survey of the Hercules cluster. We have applied spectral synthesis models to all emission-line spectra of this sample using the population synthesis code STARLIGHT and have obtained fundamental parameters of stellar components such as mean metallicity and age. The emission-line spectra were corrected for underlying stellar absorption using these spectral synthesis models. Line fluxes were measured and O/H and N/O gas chemical abundances were obtained using the latest empirical calibrations. We have derived the masses and total luminosities of the galaxies using available Sloan Digital Sky Survey broadband photometry. The effects of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of galaxies and on their mass-metallicity (MZ) and luminosity-metallicity (LZ) relations were studied by combining the derived gas metallicities, the mean stellar metallicities and ages, the masses and luminosities of the galaxies, and their existing H I data. Our Hercules SF galaxies are divided into three main subgroups: (1) chemically evolved spirals with truncated ionized-gas disks and nearly flat oxygen gradients, demonstrating the effect of ram-pressure stripping; (2) chemically evolved dwarfs/irregulars populating the highest local densities, possible products of tidal interactions in preprocessing events; and (3) less metallic dwarf galaxies that appear to be 'newcomers' to the cluster and are experiencing pressure-triggered star formation. Most Hercules SF galaxies follow well-defined MZ and LZ sequences (for both O/H and N/O), though the dwarf/irregular galaxies located at the densest regions appear to be outliers to these global relations, suggesting a physical reason for the dispersion in these fundamental relations. The Hercules cluster appears to be currently assembling via the merger of smaller substructures, providing an ideal laboratory where the local

  8. Angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) analysis of lanthanum oxide for micro-flexography printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, S., E-mail: suhaimihas@uthm.edu.my; Yusof, M. S., E-mail: mdsalleh@uthm.edu.my; Maksud, M. I., E-mail: midris1973@gmail.com [Faculty of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia); Embong, Z., E-mail: zaidi@uthm.edu.my [Faculty of Science, Technology and Human Development, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Micro-flexography printing was developed in patterning technique from micron to nano scale range to be used for graphic, electronic and bio-medical device on variable substrates. In this work, lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has been used as a rare earth metal candidate as depositing agent. This metal deposit was embedded on Carbon (C) and Silica (Si) wafer substrate using Magnetron Sputtering technique. The choose of Lanthanum as a target is due to its wide application in producing electronic devices such as thin film battery and printed circuit board. The La{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposited on the surface of Si wafer substrate was then analyzed using Angle Resolve X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS). The position for each synthetic component in the narrow scan of Lanthanum (La) 3d and O 1s are referred to the electron binding energy (eV). The La 3d narrow scan revealed that the oxide species of this particular metal is mainly contributed by La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and La(OH){sub 3}. The information of oxygen species, O{sup 2-} component from O 1s narrow scan indicated that there are four types of species which are contributed from the bulk (O{sup 2−}), two chemisorb component (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and La(OH){sub 3} and physisorp component (OH). Here, it is proposed that from the adhesive and surface chemical properties of La, it is suitable as an alternative medium for micro-flexography printing technique in printing multiple fine solid lines at nano scale. Hence, this paper will describe the capability of this particular metal as rare earth metal for use in of micro-flexography printing practice. The review of other parameters contributing to print fine lines will also be described later.

  9. Effects of aging on working memory performance and prefrontal cortex activity: A time-resolved spectroscopy study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Shi; Wenjing Zhou; Tongchao Geng; Huancong Zuo; Masahiro Tanida; Kaoru Sakatani

    2016-01-01

    Objective:This study aimed to employ time‐resolved spectroscopy(TRS)to explore age‐related differences in prefrontal cortex(PFC)activity while subjects performed a working memory task.Methods:We employed TRS to measure PFC activity in ten healthy younger and ten healthy older subjects while they performed a working memory(WM)task.All subjects performed the Sternberg test(ST)in which the memory‐set size varied between one and six digits.Using TRS,we recorded changes in cerebral blood oxygenation as a measure of changes in PFC activity during the task.In order to identify left/right asymmetry of PFC activity during the working memory task,we calculated the laterality score,i.e.,Δoxy‐Hb(rightΔoxy‐Hb—leftΔoxy‐Hb);positive values indicate greater activity in the right PFC,while negative values indicate greater activity in the left PFC.Results:During the ST,statistical analyses showed no significant differences between the younger and older groups in accuracy for low memory‐load and high memory‐load.In high memory‐load tasks,however,older subjects were slower than younger subjects(P<0.05).We found that the younger group showed right lateral responses with a stronger right than left activation in the frontal pole,whereas the older group showed bilateral responses(P<0.05).Conclusions:The present results are consistent with the hemispheric asymmetry reduction in older adults(HAROLD)model;working memory tasks cause asymmetrical PFC activation in younger adults,while older adults tend to show reduced hemispheric lateralization.

  10. Angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) analysis of lanthanum oxide for micro-flexography printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S.; Yusof, M. S.; Embong, Z.; Maksud, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    Micro-flexography printing was developed in patterning technique from micron to nano scale range to be used for graphic, electronic and bio-medical device on variable substrates. In this work, lanthanum oxide (La2O3) has been used as a rare earth metal candidate as depositing agent. This metal deposit was embedded on Carbon (C) and Silica (Si) wafer substrate using Magnetron Sputtering technique. The choose of Lanthanum as a target is due to its wide application in producing electronic devices such as thin film battery and printed circuit board. The La2O3 deposited on the surface of Si wafer substrate was then analyzed using Angle Resolve X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS). The position for each synthetic component in the narrow scan of Lanthanum (La) 3d and O 1s are referred to the electron binding energy (eV). The La 3d narrow scan revealed that the oxide species of this particular metal is mainly contributed by La2O3 and La(OH)3. The information of oxygen species, O2- component from O 1s narrow scan indicated that there are four types of species which are contributed from the bulk (O2-), two chemisorb component (La2O3) and La(OH)3 and physisorp component (OH). Here, it is proposed that from the adhesive and surface chemical properties of La, it is suitable as an alternative medium for micro-flexography printing technique in printing multiple fine solid lines at nano scale. Hence, this paper will describe the capability of this particular metal as rare earth metal for use in of micro-flexography printing practice. The review of other parameters contributing to print fine lines will also be described later.

  11. Orientations of nonlocal vibrational modes from combined experimental and theoretical sum frequency spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, Hilary M.; Chen, Shunli; Fu, Li; Upshur, Mary Alice; Rudshteyn, Benjamin; Thomson, Regan J.; Wang, Hong-Fei; Batista, Victor S.; Geiger, Franz M.

    2017-09-01

    Inferring molecular orientations from vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra is challenging in polarization combinations that result in low signal intensities, or when the local point group symmetry approximation fails. While combining experiments with density functional theory (DFT) could overcome this problem, the scope of the combined method has yet to be established. Here, we assess its feasibility of determining the distributions of molecular orientations for one monobasic ester, two epoxides and three alcohols at the vapor/fused silica interface. We find that molecular orientations of nonlocal vibrational modes cannot be determined using polarization-resolved SFG measurements alone.

  12. Bulk electronic state of high-Tc cuprate La2-xSrxCuO4 observed by high-energy angle integrated and resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, S.; Sekiyama, A.; Tsunekawa, M.; Ernst, P.T.; Shigemoto, A.; Yamasaki, A.; Irizawa, A.; Imada, S.; Sing, M.; Muro, T.; Sasagawa, T.; Takagi, H.; Suga, S.

    2005-01-01

    The high-energy core-level photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements have been performed for La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 (LSCO). Polar-angle dependence of the Cu 2p core-level PES has revealed a discrepancy between bulk and surface. We have observed by the high-energy ARPES that the Fermi surface of LSCO with x=0.16 is electron-like, in contrast to previous low-energy ARPES results

  13. Size effects in van der Waals clusters studied by spin and angle-resolved electron spectroscopy and multi-coincidence ion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolles, D; Pesic, Z D; Zhang, H; Bilodeau, R C; Bozek, J D; Berrah, N

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the valence and inner-shell photoionization of free rare-gas clusters by means of angle and spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and momentum resolving electron-multi-ion coincidence spectroscopy. The electron measurements probe the evolution of the photoelectron angular distribution and spin polarization parameters as a function of photon energy and cluster size, and reveal a strong cluster size dependence of the photoelectron angular distributions in certain photon energy regions. In contrast, the spin polarization parameter of the cluster photoelectrons is found to be very close to the atomic value for all covered photon energies and cluster sizes. The ion imaging measurements, which probe the fragmentation dynamics of multiply charged van der Waals clusters, also exhibit a pronounced cluster size dependence

  14. a Thz Photomixing Synthesizer Based on a Fiber Frequency Comb for High Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Cuisset, Arnaud; Yang, Chun; Eliet, Sophie; Bocquet, Robin

    2010-06-01

    To date the principal application for photomixing sources has been for high resolution spectroscopy of gases due to the large tuning range and spectral purity. New Developments of the Opto-Electronic THz Spectrometer have been performed in order to obtain a powerful tool for High-Resolution Spectroscopy. The combination of two extended cavity laser diodes and fast charge carrier lifetime semiconductor materials has allowed a continuous-wave THz spectrometer to be constructed based on optical heterodyning. Unlike many THz sources, this instrument gives access to all frequencies in the range 0.3 to 3.5 THz with a resolution of 1 MHz. The main spectroscopic applications of this spectrometer were dedicated to line profile analysis of rotational transitions referenced in the spectroscopic databases. One limitation of the THz spectrometer was accuracy with which the generated frequency is known. Recently, this obstacle has been circled with the construction of a photomixing spectrometer where the two pump lasers are phase locked to two modes of a repetition rate stabilized frequency doubled fiber laser frequency comb. In order to achieve a tuning range in excess to 100 MHz a third cw laser was required in the new configuration of the THz spectrometer. To assess the performances of this instrument, the frequencies of the pure rotational transitions of OCS molecules have been measured between 0,8 to 1,2 THz. A rms inferior to 100 kHz, deduced from the frequencies measured, demonstrates that the THz photomixing synthesizer is now able to be competitive with microwave and submillimeter techniques. S. Matton, F. Rohart, R. Bocquet, D. Bigourd, A. Cuisset, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 2006, 239: 182. C. Yang, J. Buldyreva, I. E. Gordon, F. Rohart, A. Cuisset, G. Mouret, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 2008, 109: 2857. G. Mouret, F. Hindle, A. Cuisset, C. Yang, R. Bocquet, M. Lours, D. Rovera, Opt. Express, 2009, 17: 22031.

  15. Equilibrium constants in aqueous lanthanide and actinide chemistry from time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy: The role of ground and excited state reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billard, I.; Luetzenkirchen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Equilibrium constants for aqueous reactions between lanthanide or actinide ions and (in-) organic ligands contain important information for various radiochemical problems, such as nuclear reprocessing or the migration of radioelements in the geosphere. We study the conditions required to determine equilibrium constants by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. Based on a simulation study it is shown that the possibility to determine equilibrium constants depends upon the reaction rates in the photoexcited states of the lanthanide or actinide ions. (orig.)

  16. Dynamics of Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MIC combustion from short single-pulse photothermal initiation and time-resolved spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiegman, Albert E.; Park, Chi-Dong; Mileham, Melissa; Van de Burgt, Lambertus J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University Tallahassee, FL (United States); Kramer, Michael P. [AFRL/MNME Eglin AFB, FL (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Time-resolved spectroscopy was used to study the dynamics of the photothermal ignition of Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} metastable intermolecular composites after single short-pulse laser initiation. The dynamics were recorded in several time domains from nanosecond to microsecond to quantify the dynamics from initial laser excitation to combustion. Time-averaged spectral data were also collected for the overall emission occurring during combustion. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Angle-resolved environmental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: A new laboratory setup for photoemission studies at pressures up to 0.4 Torr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangolini, F.; Wabiszewski, G. E.; Egberts, P.; Åhlund, J.; Backlund, K.; Karlsson, P. G.; Adiga, V. P.; Streller, F.; Wannberg, B.; Carpick, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the development and demonstrates the capabilities of a new laboratory-based environmental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy system incorporating an electrostatic lens and able to acquire spectra up to 0.4 Torr. The incorporation of a two-dimensional detector provides imaging capabilities and allows the acquisition of angle-resolved data in parallel mode over an angular range of 14° without tilting the sample. The sensitivity and energy resolution of the spectrometer have been investigated by analyzing a standard Ag foil both under high vacuum (10 −8 Torr) conditions and at elevated pressures of N 2 (0.4 Torr). The possibility of acquiring angle-resolved data at different pressures has been demonstrated by analyzing a silicon/silicon dioxide (Si/SiO 2 ) sample. The collected angle-resolved spectra could be effectively used for the determination of the thickness of the native silicon oxide layer.

  18. Quantitative frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy in tissues and tissue-like media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert Edward

    1999-09-01

    In the never-ending quest for improved medical technology at lower cost, modern near-infrared optical spectroscopy offers the possibility of inexpensive technology for quantitative and non-invasive diagnoses. Hemoglobin is the dominant chromophore in the 700-900 nm spectral region and as such it allows for the optical assessment of hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygenation by absorption spectroscopy. However, there are many other important physiologically relevant compounds or physiological states that cannot be effectively sensed via optical methods because of poor optical contrast. In such cases, contrast enhancements are required. Fluorescence spectroscopy is an attractive component of optical tissue spectroscopy. Exogenous fluorophores, as well as some endogenous ones, may furnish the desperately needed sensitivity and specificity that is lacking in near-infrared optical tissue spectroscopy. The main focus of this thesis was to investigate the generation and propagation of fluorescence photons inside tissues and tissue-like media (i.e., scattering dominated media). The standard concepts of fluorescence spectroscopy have been incorporated into a diffusion-based picture that is sometimes referred to as photon migration. The novelty of this work lies in the successful quantitative recovery of fluorescence lifetimes, absolute fluorescence quantum yields, fluorophore concentrations, emission spectra, and both scattering and absorption coefficients at the emission wavelength from a tissue-like medium. All of these parameters are sensitive to the fluorophore local environment and hence are indicators of the tissue's physiological state. One application demonstrating the capabilities of frequency-domain lifetime spectroscopy in tissue-like media is a study of the binding of ethidium bromide to bovine leukocytes in fresh milk. Ethidium bromide is a fluorescent dye that is commonly used to label DNA, and hence visualize chromosomes in cells. The lifetime of

  19. Frequency stabilization of a 1083 nm fiber laser to {sup 4}He transition lines with optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, W.; Peng, X., E-mail: xiangpeng@pku.edu.cn; Li, W.; Guo, H., E-mail: hongguo@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Center for Quantum Information Technology, and Center for Computational Science and Engineering (CCSE), Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Two kinds of optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies, namely, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) and modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS), are demonstrated for locking a fiber laser to the transition lines of metastable {sup 4}He atoms around 1083 nm. The servo-loop error signals of FMS and MTS for stabilizing laser frequency are optimized by studying the dependence of the peak-to-peak amplitude and slope on the optical power of pump and probe beams. A comparison of the stabilization performances of FMS/MTS and polarization spectroscopy (PS) is presented, which shows that MTS exhibits relatively superior performance with the least laser frequency fluctuation due to its flat-background dispersive signal, originated from the four-wave mixing process. The Allan deviation of the stabilized laser frequency is 5.4 × 10{sup −12}@100 s with MTS for data acquired in 1000 s, which is sufficiently applicable for fields like laser cooling, optical pumping, and optical magnetometry.

  20. Use of low-frequency Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics for the quantification of crystallinity in amorphous griseofulvin tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mah, Pei T.; Fraser, Sara J.; Reish, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    in stored amorphous samples earlier than the mid-frequency 785 nm Raman system. Overall, this study suggests that low-frequency Raman spectroscopy has at least equally good performance compared to mid-frequency Raman for quantitative analysis of crystallinity in the pharmaceutical setting. More generally......Low-frequency Raman spectroscopy, which directly probes phonon lattice modes of crystal structures, has much unexplored potential for sensitive qualitative and quantitative analysis of crystallinity in drugs and excipients. In this study, the level of crystallinity in tablets containing amorphous...

  1. The structural and magnetic properties of Fe/native-oxide systems resolved by x-ray scattering and spectroscopy methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couet, Sebastien

    2008-12-01

    Since the discovery of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect in metallic magnetic multilayers and its industrial application in magnetic read heads, the data storage density and reading speed of hard disks steadily increased. But now the point is reached where conventional conductive multilayer structures suffer from parasitic eddy currents which decrease the signal to noise ratio of the system. To tackle this problem, new classes of materials have to be studied. One approach is to introduce ultra thin oxide layers in a metallic iron structure to reduce the conductivity while keeping a high net magnetization. This can be achieved by alternating metal deposition and controlled oxidation to produce metal/metal-oxide multilayers. However, the magnetic structure that forms in such multilayer is still rather unexplored. The aim of this work was to achieve a better understanding of the magnetic structure that forms in such iron/native-oxide multilayers. For that purpose, X-ray and neutron scattering experiments were carried out to determine the magnetic structure and its evolution in ex-situ and in-situ experiments, respectively. It was found that a non-collinear magnetic coupling appears between the metal layers, which is mediated by the antiferromagnetically ordered oxide layer in between. The use of isotope sensitive scattering techniques (namely nuclear resonant scattering and neutron reflectometry) allowed to resolve the magnetic depth profile of the system, showing that the buried oxide carries a net magnetic moment. The chemical and magnetic structure of the buried oxide was studied by in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and nuclear resonant scattering. After oxidation, the layer exhibits a mixture of different oxide phases and incorporates 10 to 15% of Fe with metallic character. Upon deposition of only one atomic layer of metallic Fe, the layer reduces to a single phase FeO-like oxide. This structural change does not lead to a magnetically ordered oxide

  2. The structural and magnetic properties of Fe/native-oxide systems resolved by x-ray scattering and spectroscopy methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couet, Sebastien

    2008-12-15

    Since the discovery of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect in metallic magnetic multilayers and its industrial application in magnetic read heads, the data storage density and reading speed of hard disks steadily increased. But now the point is reached where conventional conductive multilayer structures suffer from parasitic eddy currents which decrease the signal to noise ratio of the system. To tackle this problem, new classes of materials have to be studied. One approach is to introduce ultra thin oxide layers in a metallic iron structure to reduce the conductivity while keeping a high net magnetization. This can be achieved by alternating metal deposition and controlled oxidation to produce metal/metal-oxide multilayers. However, the magnetic structure that forms in such multilayer is still rather unexplored. The aim of this work was to achieve a better understanding of the magnetic structure that forms in such iron/native-oxide multilayers. For that purpose, X-ray and neutron scattering experiments were carried out to determine the magnetic structure and its evolution in ex-situ and in-situ experiments, respectively. It was found that a non-collinear magnetic coupling appears between the metal layers, which is mediated by the antiferromagnetically ordered oxide layer in between. The use of isotope sensitive scattering techniques (namely nuclear resonant scattering and neutron reflectometry) allowed to resolve the magnetic depth profile of the system, showing that the buried oxide carries a net magnetic moment. The chemical and magnetic structure of the buried oxide was studied by in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and nuclear resonant scattering. After oxidation, the layer exhibits a mixture of different oxide phases and incorporates 10 to 15% of Fe with metallic character. Upon deposition of only one atomic layer of metallic Fe, the layer reduces to a single phase FeO-like oxide. This structural change does not lead to a magnetically ordered oxide

  3. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of strontium lanthanum copper oxide thin films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, John Wallace

    Among the multitude of known cuprate material families and associated structures, the archetype is "infinite-layer" ACuO2, where perfectly square and flat CuO2 planes are separated by layers of alkaline earth atoms. The infinite-layer structure is free of magnetic rare earth ions, oxygen chains, orthorhombic distortions, incommensurate superstructures, ordered vacancies, and other complications that abound among the other material families. Furthermore, it is the only cuprate that can be made superconducting by both electron and hole doping, making it a potential platform for decoding the complex many-body interactions responsible for high-temperature superconductivity. Research on the infinite-layer compound has been severely hindered by the inability to synthesize bulk single crystals, but recent progress has led to high-quality superconducting thin film samples. Here we report in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of epitaxially-stabilized Sr1-chiLa chiCuO2 thin films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. At low doping, the material exhibits a dispersive lower Hubbard band typical of other cuprate parent compounds. As carriers are added to the system, a continuous evolution from Mott insulator to superconducting metal is observed as a coherent low-energy band develops on top of a concomitant remnant lower Hubbard band, gradually filling in the Mott gap. For chi = 0.10, our results reveal a strong coupling between electrons and (pi,pi) anti-ferromagnetism, inducing a Fermi surface reconstruction that pushes the nodal states below the Fermi level and realizing nodeless superconductivity. Electron diffraction measurements indicate the presence of a surface reconstruction that is consistent with the polar nature of Sr1-chiLachiCuO2. Most knowledge about the electron-doped side of the cuprate phase diagram has been deduced by generalizing from a single material family, Re2-chi CechiCuO4, where robust antiferromagnetism has been observed past chi

  4. Atmospheric pressure reaction cell for operando sum frequency generation spectroscopy of ultrahigh vacuum grown model catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiaz, Matteo; Pramhaas, Verena; Li, Xia; Rameshan, Christoph; Rupprechter, Günther

    2018-04-01

    A new custom-designed ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber coupled to a UHV and atmospheric-pressure-compatible spectroscopic and catalytic reaction cell is described, which allows us to perform IR-vis sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy during catalytic (kinetic) measurements. SFG spectroscopy is an exceptional tool to study vibrational properties of surface adsorbates under operando conditions, close to those of technical catalysis. This versatile setup allows performing surface science, SFG spectroscopy, catalysis, and electrochemical investigations on model systems, including single crystals, thin films, and deposited metal nanoparticles, under well-controlled conditions of gas composition, pressure, temperature, and potential. The UHV chamber enables us to prepare the model catalysts and to analyze their surface structure and composition by low energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy, respectively. Thereafter, a sample transfer mechanism moves samples under UHV to the spectroscopic cell, avoiding air exposure. In the catalytic cell, SFG spectroscopy and catalytic tests (reactant/product analysis by mass spectrometry or gas chromatography) are performed simultaneously. A dedicated sample manipulation stage allows the model catalysts to be examined from LN2 temperature to 1273 K, with gaseous reactants in a pressure range from UHV to atmospheric. For post-reaction analysis, the SFG cell is rapidly evacuated and samples are transferred back to the UHV chamber. The capabilities of this new setup are demonstrated by benchmark results of CO adsorption on Pt and Pd(111) single crystal surfaces and of CO adsorption and oxidation on a ZrO2 supported Pt nanoparticle model catalyst grown by atomic layer deposition.

  5. Dual-Comb Coherent Raman Spectroscopy with Lasers of 1-GHz Pulse Repetition Frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Mohler, Kathrin J.; Bohn, Bernhard J.; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    We extend the technique of multiplex coherent Raman spectroscopy with two femtosecond mode-locked lasers to oscillators of a pulse repetition frequency of 1 GHz. We demonstrate spectra of liquids, which span 1100 cm$^{-1}$ of Raman shifts. At a resolution of 6 cm$^{-1}$, their measurement time may be as short as 5 microseconds for a refresh rate of 2 kHz. The waiting period between acquisitions is improved ten-fold compared to previous experiments with two lasers of 100-MHz repetition frequen...

  6. Probing a molecular electronic transition by two-colour sum-frequency generation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, C.; Dreesen, L.; Nihonyanagi, S.; Masuda, T.; Kondo, T.; Mani, A.A.; Uosaki, K.; Thiry, P.A.; Peremans, A.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that a new emerging technique, two-colour sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy, can be used to probe the molecular electronic properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). In the CH spectral range (2800-3200 cm -1 ), we show that the sum-frequency generation signal of a porphyrin alkanethiol derivative adsorbed on Pt(1 1 1) reaches a maximum intensity at ∼435 nm SFG wavelength. This wavelength corresponds to the porphyrin moiety specific π-π* molecular electronic transition which is called the Soret or B band. This resonant behaviour is not observed for 1-dodecanethiol SAMs, which are devoid of molecular electronic transition in the investigated visible spectral range

  7. Metastable Magnesium fluorescence spectroscopy using a frequency-stabilized 517 nm laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ming; Jensen, Brian B; Therkildsen, Kasper T

    2009-01-01

    We present a laser operating at 517 nm for our Magnesium laser-cooling and atomic clock project. A two-stage Yb-doped fiber amplifier (YDFA) system generates more than 1.5 W of 1034 nm light when seeded with a 15 mW diode laser. Using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide, we obta...... obtained more than 40 mW of 517 nm output power by single pass frequency doubling. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy of metastable magnesium atoms could be used to stabilize the 517 nm laser to an absolute frequency within 1 MHz.......We present a laser operating at 517 nm for our Magnesium laser-cooling and atomic clock project. A two-stage Yb-doped fiber amplifier (YDFA) system generates more than 1.5 W of 1034 nm light when seeded with a 15 mW diode laser. Using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide, we...

  8. Angle resolved mass spectrometry of positive ions transmitted through high aspect ratio channels in a radio frequency discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels - Adamowicz, E.; Stoffels, W.W.; Tachibana, K.; Imai, S.

    1997-01-01

    The behavior of positive ions in high aspect ratio structures, relevant to the reactive ion etching of deep trenches, has been studied by means of energy resolved mass spectrometry. High aspect ratio trenches are simulated by capillary plates with various aspect ratios. Angle resolved measurements

  9. Effect of Sampling Frequency for Real-Time Tablet Coating Monitoring Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igne, Benoît; Arai, Hiroaki; Drennen, James K; Anderson, Carl A

    2016-09-01

    While the sampling of pharmaceutical products typically follows well-defined protocols, the parameterization of spectroscopic methods and their associated sampling frequency is not standard. Whereas, for blending, the sampling frequency is limited by the nature of the process, in other processes, such as tablet film coating, practitioners must determine the best approach to collecting spectral data. The present article studied how sampling practices affected the interpretation of the results provided by a near-infrared spectroscopy method for the monitoring of tablet moisture and coating weight gain during a pan-coating experiment. Several coating runs were monitored with different sampling frequencies (with or without co-adds (also known as sub-samples)) and with spectral averaging corresponding to processing cycles (1 to 15 pan rotations). Beyond integrating the sensor into the equipment, the present work demonstrated that it is necessary to have a good sense of the underlying phenomena that have the potential to affect the quality of the signal. The effects of co-adds and averaging was significant with respect to the quality of the spectral data. However, the type of output obtained from a sampling method dictated the type of information that one can gain on the dynamics of a process. Thus, different sampling frequencies may be needed at different stages of process development. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Far off-resonance laser frequency stabilization using multipass cells in Faraday rotation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Wei; Li, Yang; Li, Rujie; Shang, Huining; Fang, Zishan; Qin, Jie; Wan, Shuangai

    2016-04-01

    We propose a far off-resonance laser frequency stabilization method by using multipass cells in Rb Faraday rotation spectroscopy. Based on the detuning equation, if multipass cells with several meters optical path length are used in the conventional Faraday spectroscopy, the detuning of the lock point can be extended much further from the alkali metal resonance. A plate beam splitter was used to generate two different Faraday signals at the same time. The transmitted optical path length was L=50  mm and the reflected optical path length was 2L=100  mm. When the optical path length doubled, the detuning of the lock points moved further away from the atomic resonance. The temperature dependence of the detuning of the lock point was also analyzed. A temperature-insensitive lock point was found near resonance when the cell temperature was between 110°C and 130°C. We achieved an rms fluctuation of 0.9 MHz/23 h at a detuning of 0.5 GHz. A frequency drift of 16 MHz/h at a detuning of -5.6  GHz and 4 MHz/h at a detuning of -5.2  GHz were also obtained for the transmitted and reflected light Faraday signal.

  11. Electronic structure studies of ferro-pnictide superconductors and their parent compounds using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setti, Thirupathaiah

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of high temperature superconductivity in the iron pnictide compound LaO 1-x F x FeAs with T c = 26 K as created enormous interest in the high-T c superconductor community. So far, four prototypes of crystal structures have been found in the Fe-pnictide family. All four show a structural deformation followed or accompanied by a magnetic transition from a high temperature paramagnetic conductor to a low temperature antiferromagnetic metal whose transition temperature T N varies between the compounds. Charge carrier doping, isovalent substitution of the As atoms or the application of pressure suppresses the antiferromagnetic spin density wave (SDW) order and leads to a superconducting phase. More recently high Tc superconductivity has been also detected in iron chalchogenides with similar normal state properties. Since superconductivity is instability of the normal state, the study of normal state electronic structure in comparison with superconducting state could reveal important information on the pairing mechanism. Therefore, it is most important to study the electronic structure of these new superconductors, i.e., to determine Fermi surfaces and band dispersions near the Fermi level at the high symmetry points in order to obtain a microscopic understanding of the superconducting properties. Using the technique angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) one measures the electrons ejected from a sample when photons impinge on it. In this way one can map the Fermi surface which provides useful information regarding the physics behind the Fermi surface topology of high T c superconductors. Furthermore, this technique provides information on the band dispersion, the orbital character of the bands, the effective mass, the coupling to bosonic excitations, and the superconducting gap. This emphasizes the importance of studying the electronic structure of the newly discovered Fe-pnictides using ARPES. In this work we have studied the electronic

  12. Electronic structure studies of ferro-pnictide superconductors and their parent compounds using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setti, Thirupathaiah

    2011-07-14

    The discovery of high temperature superconductivity in the iron pnictide compound LaO{sub 1-x}F{sub x}FeAs with T{sub c} = 26 K as created enormous interest in the high-T{sub c} superconductor community. So far, four prototypes of crystal structures have been found in the Fe-pnictide family. All four show a structural deformation followed or accompanied by a magnetic transition from a high temperature paramagnetic conductor to a low temperature antiferromagnetic metal whose transition temperature T{sub N} varies between the compounds. Charge carrier doping, isovalent substitution of the As atoms or the application of pressure suppresses the antiferromagnetic spin density wave (SDW) order and leads to a superconducting phase. More recently high Tc superconductivity has been also detected in iron chalchogenides with similar normal state properties. Since superconductivity is instability of the normal state, the study of normal state electronic structure in comparison with superconducting state could reveal important information on the pairing mechanism. Therefore, it is most important to study the electronic structure of these new superconductors, i.e., to determine Fermi surfaces and band dispersions near the Fermi level at the high symmetry points in order to obtain a microscopic understanding of the superconducting properties. Using the technique angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) one measures the electrons ejected from a sample when photons impinge on it. In this way one can map the Fermi surface which provides useful information regarding the physics behind the Fermi surface topology of high T{sub c} superconductors. Furthermore, this technique provides information on the band dispersion, the orbital character of the bands, the effective mass, the coupling to bosonic excitations, and the superconducting gap. This emphasizes the importance of studying the electronic structure of the newly discovered Fe-pnictides using ARPES. In this work we have

  13. Rapid high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with pulsed laser source and time-of-flight spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlieb, K.; Hussain, Z.; Bostwick, A.; Lanzara, A.; Jozwiak, C.

    2013-09-01

    A high-efficiency spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) spectrometer is coupled with a laboratory-based laser for rapid high-resolution measurements. The spectrometer combines time-of-flight (TOF) energy measurements with low-energy exchange scattering spin polarimetry for high detection efficiencies. Samples are irradiated with fourth harmonic photons generated from a cavity-dumped Ti:sapphire laser that provides high photon flux in a narrow bandwidth, with a pulse timing structure ideally matched to the needs of the TOF spectrometer. The overall efficiency of the combined system results in near-EF spin-resolved ARPES measurements with an unprecedented combination of energy resolution and acquisition speed. This allows high-resolution spin measurements with a large number of data points spanning multiple dimensions of interest (energy, momentum, photon polarization, etc.) and thus enables experiments not otherwise possible. The system is demonstrated with spin-resolved energy and momentum mapping of the L-gap Au(111) surface states, a prototypical Rashba system. The successful integration of the spectrometer with the pulsed laser system demonstrates its potential for simultaneous spin- and time-resolved ARPES with pump-probe based measurements.

  14. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberger, H.; Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Liu, H.; Calegari, F.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Cavalleri, A.; Travers, J. C.; Gierz, I.

    2015-08-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  15. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromberger, H.; Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I.; Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C.; Calegari, F.; Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T.; Cavalleri, A.

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi 2 Se 3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials

  16. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberger, H., E-mail: Hubertus.Bromberger@mpsd.mpg.de; Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C. [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Günther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Calegari, F. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Cavalleri, A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Rd. Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-31

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  17. Time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of excited argon and ground-state titanium atoms in pulsed magnetron discharges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sushkov, V.; Do, H.T.; Čada, Martin; Hubička, Zdeněk; Hippler, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2013), 1-10 ISSN 0963-0252 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/0386; GA ČR GAP108/12/2104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : absorption spectroscopy * diode laser * magnetron * argon metastable * HiPIMS * titanium * time-resolved Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.056, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/0963-0252/22/1/015002/

  18. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Bromberger, H.; Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Liu, H.; Calegari, F.; Chavez-Cervantes, M.; Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Cavalleri, A.; Travers, J. C.; Gierz, I.

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few {\\mu}J energy generate vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to ...

  19. Kinetics of the F+NO2+M->FNO2+M reaction studied by pulse radiolysis combined with time-resolved IR and UV spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn; Sillesen, A.; Jodkowski, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    was studied with SF6 pressures of 5-1000 mbar at 298 K. Comparative studies were carried out by monitoring the decay kinetics of NO2 at 445 nm using pressures of 100-1000 mbar at 295 and 341 K. The observed pressure dependence is represented in terms of a fall-off curve with the following values......The title reaction was initiated by the pulse radiolysis of SF6/NO2 gas mixtures, and the formation of FNO2 was studied by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy employing strong rotational transitions within the nu(1) and nu(4) bands of FNO2. The pressure dependence of the formation kinetics...

  20. Analysis of electronic structure of amorphous InGaZnO/SiO2 interface by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueoka, Y.; Ishikawa, Y.; Maejima, N.; Matsui, F.; Matsui, H.; Yamazaki, H.; Urakawa, S.; Horita, M.; Daimon, H.; Uraoka, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The electronic structures of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) on a SiO 2 layers before and after annealing were observed by constant final state X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (CFS-XPS) and X-ray adsorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). From the results of angle-resolved CFS-XPS, the change in the electronic state was clearly observed in the a-IGZO bulk rather than in the a-IGZO/SiO 2 interface. This suggests that the electronic structures of the a-IGZO bulk strongly affected the thin-film transistor characteristics. The results of XANES indicated an increase in the number of tail states upon atmospheric annealing (AT). We consider that the increase in the number of tail states decreased the channel mobility of AT samples

  1. Probing long-range structural order in SnPc/Ag(111) by umklapp process assisted low-energy angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauernik, Stephan; Hein, Petra; Gurgel, Max; Falke, Julian; Bauer, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is performed on tin-phthalocyanine (SnPc) adsorbed on silver Ag(111). Upon adsorption of SnPc, strongly dispersing bands are observed which are identified as secondary Mahan cones formed by surface umklapp processes acting on photoelectrons from the silver substrate as they transit through the ordered adsorbate layer. We show that the photoemission data carry quantitative structural information on the adsorbate layer similar to what can be obtained from a conventional low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) study. More specifically, we compare photoemission data and LEED data probing an incommensurate-to-commensurate structural phase transition of the adsorbate layer. Based on our results we propose that Mahan-cone spectroscopy operated in a pump-probe configuration can be used in the future to probe structural dynamics at surfaces with a temporal resolution in the sub-100-fs regime.

  2. Frequency-resolved measurement of the orbital angular momentum spectrum of femtosecond ultra-broadband optical-vortex pulses based on field reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Keisaku; Yang, Zhili; Toda, Yasunori; Morita, Ryuji

    2014-01-01

    We propose a high-precision method for measuring the orbital angular momentum (OAM) spectrum of ultra-broadband optical-vortex (OV) pulses from fork-like interferograms between OV pulses and a reference plane-wave pulse. It is based on spatial reconstruction of the electric fields of the pulses to be measured from the frequency-resolved interference pattern. Our method is demonstrated experimentally by obtaining the OAM spectra for different spectral components of the OV pulses, enabling us to characterize the frequency dispersion of the topological charge of the OAM spectrum by a simple experimental setup. Retrieval is carried out in quasi-real time, allowing us to investigate OAM spectra dynamically. Furthermore, we determine the relative phases (including the sign) of the topological-charge-resolved electric-field amplitudes, which are significant for evaluating OVs or OV pulses with arbitrarily superposed modes. (paper)

  3. Approximate relationship between frequency-dependent skin depth resolved from geoelectromagnetic pedotransfer function and depth of investigation resolved from geoelectrical measurements: A case study of coastal formation, southern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, N. J.; Obiora, D. N.; Ekanem, A. M.; Akpan, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    The task involved in the interpretation of Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) data is how to get unique results in the absence/limited number of borehole information, which is usually limited to information on the spot. Geological and geochemical mapping of electrical properties are usually limited to direct observations on the surface and therefore, conclusions and extrapolations that can be drawn about the system electrical characteristics and possible underlying structures may be masked as geology changes with positions. The electrical resistivity study pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been linked with the electromagnetic (EM) resolved PTFs at chosen frequencies of skin/penetration depth corresponding to the VES resolved investigation depth in order to determine the local geological attributes of hydrogeological repository in the coastal formation dominated with fine sand. The illustrative application of effective skin depth depicts that effective skin depth has direct relation with the EM response of the local source over the layered earth and thus, can be linked to the direct current earth response functions as an aid for estimating the optimum depth and electrical parameters through comparative analysis. Though the VES and EM resolved depths of investigation at appropriate effective and theoretical frequencies have wide gaps, diagnostic relations characterising the subsurface depth of interest have been established. The determining factors of skin effect have been found to include frequency/period, resistivity/conductivity, absorption/attenuation coefficient and energy loss factor. The novel diagnostic relations and their corresponding constants between 1-D resistivity data and EM skin depth are robust PTFs necessary for checking the accuracy associated with the non-unique interpretations that characterise the 1-D resistivity data, mostly when lithostratigraphic data are not available.

  4. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A.J.; Stoffels, W.W.; Haverlag, M.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.; Pupat, N.B.M.

    2006-01-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved

  5. Optical Frequency Comb Fourier Transform Spectroscopy with Resolution Exceeding the Limit Set by the Optical Path Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltynowicz, Aleksandra; Rutkowski, Lucile; Johanssson, Alexandra C.; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Maslowski, Piotr; Kowzan, Grzegorz; Lee, Kevin; Fermann, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) based on optical frequency combs (OFC) allow detection of broadband molecular spectra with high signal-to-noise ratios within acquisition times orders of magnitude shorter than traditional FTIRs based on thermal sources. Due to the pulsed nature of OFCs the interferogram consists of a series of bursts rather than a single burst at zero optical path difference (OPD). The comb mode structure can be resolved by acquiring multiple bursts, in both mechanical FTS systems and dual-comb spectroscopy. However, in all existing demonstrations the resolution was ultimately limited either by the maximum available OPD between the interferometer arms or by the total acquisition time enabled by the storage memory. We present a method that provides spectral resolution exceeding the limit set by the maximum OPD using an interferogram containing only a single burst. The method allows measurements of absorption lines narrower than the OPD-limited resolution without any influence of the instrumental lineshape function. We demonstrate this by measuring undistorted CO2 and CO absorption lines with linewidth narrower than the OPD-limited resolution using OFC-based mechanical FTS in the near- and mid-infrared wavelength ranges. The near-infrared system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a high finesse cavity, while the mid-infrared system is based on a Tm:fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator coupled to a multi-pass cell. We show that the method allows acquisition of high-resolution molecular spectra with interferometer length orders of magnitude shorter than traditional FTIR. Mandon, J., G. Guelachvili, and N. Picque, Nat. Phot., 2009. 3(2): p. 99-102. Zeitouny, M., et al., Ann. Phys., 2013. 525(6): p. 437-442. Zolot, A.M., et al., Opt. Lett., 2012. 37(4): p. 638-640.

  6. Combined IR-Raman vs vibrational sum-frequency heterospectral correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sandra; Beutier, Clémentine; Hore, Dennis K.

    2018-06-01

    Vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy is a valuable probe of surface structure, particularly when the same molecules are present in one of the adjacent bulk solid or solution phases. As a result of the non-centrosymmetric requirement of SFG, the signal generated is a marker of the extent to which the molecules are ordered in an arrangement that breaks the up-down symmetry at the surface. In cases where the accompanying changes in the bulk are of interest in understanding and interpreting the surface structure, simultaneous analysis of the bulk IR absorption or bulk Raman scattering is helpful, and may be used in heterospectral surface-bulk two-dimensional correlation. We demonstrate that, in such cases, generating a new type of bulk spectrum that combines the IR and Raman amplitudes is a better candidate than the individual IR and Raman spectra for the purpose of correlation with the SFG signal.

  7. Circularly polarized infrared and visible sum-frequency-generation spectroscopy: Vibrational optical activity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, Sangheon; Cho, Minhaeng

    2005-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies utilizing either circularly polarized ir or circularly polarized visible beams were theoretically investigated by considering the infrared and visible sum-frequency-generation (IV-SFG) schemes. In addition to the purely electric dipole-allowed chiral component of the IV-SFG susceptibility, the polarizability-electric quadrupole hyperpolarizability term also contributes to the vibrationally resonant IV-SFG susceptibility. The circular-intensity-difference signal is shown to be determined by the interferences between the all-electric dipole-allowed chiral component and the polarizability-electric-dipole or electric-dipole-electric-quadrupole Raman optical activity tensor components. The circularly polarized SFG methods are shown to be potentially useful coherent spectroscopic tools for determining absolute configurations of chiral molecules in condensed phases

  8. Theoretical study of sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy on limonene surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Ren-Hui; Liu, Hao; Jing, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Bo-Yang; Shi, Qiang; Wei, Wen-Mei

    2014-01-01

    By combining molecule dynamics (MD) simulation and quantum chemistry computation, we calculate the surface sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS) of R-limonene molecules at the gas-liquid interface for SSP, PPP, and SPS polarization combinations. The distributions of the Euler angles are obtained using MD simulation, the ψ-distribution is between isotropic and Gaussian. Instead of the MD distributions, different analytical distributions such as the δ-function, Gaussian and isotropic distributions are applied to simulate surface SFVS. We find that different distributions significantly affect the absolute SFVS intensity and also influence on relative SFVS intensity, and the δ-function distribution should be used with caution when the orientation distribution is broad. Furthermore, the reason that the SPS signal is weak in reflected arrangement is discussed

  9. Theoretical study of sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy on limonene surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ren-Hui, E-mail: zrh@iccas.ac.cn; Liu, Hao; Jing, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Bo-Yang; Shi, Qiang [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei, Wen-Mei [Department of Chemistry, College of Basic Medicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China)

    2014-03-14

    By combining molecule dynamics (MD) simulation and quantum chemistry computation, we calculate the surface sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS) of R-limonene molecules at the gas-liquid interface for SSP, PPP, and SPS polarization combinations. The distributions of the Euler angles are obtained using MD simulation, the ψ-distribution is between isotropic and Gaussian. Instead of the MD distributions, different analytical distributions such as the δ-function, Gaussian and isotropic distributions are applied to simulate surface SFVS. We find that different distributions significantly affect the absolute SFVS intensity and also influence on relative SFVS intensity, and the δ-function distribution should be used with caution when the orientation distribution is broad. Furthermore, the reason that the SPS signal is weak in reflected arrangement is discussed.

  10. Combining total internal reflection sum frequency spectroscopy spectral imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgeyer, Edward S; Sterling, Sarah M; Gunewardene, Mudalige S; Hess, Samuel T; Neivandt, David J; Mason, Michael D

    2015-01-27

    Understanding surface and interfacial lateral organization in material and biological systems is critical in nearly every field of science. The continued development of tools and techniques viable for elucidation of interfacial and surface information is therefore necessary to address new questions and further current investigations. Sum frequency spectroscopy (SFS) is a label-free, nonlinear optical technique with inherent surface specificity that can yield critical organizational information on interfacial species. Unfortunately, SFS provides no spatial information on a surface; small scale heterogeneities that may exist are averaged over the large areas typically probed. Over the past decade, this has begun to be addressed with the advent of SFS microscopy. Here we detail the construction and function of a total internal reflection (TIR) SFS spectral and confocal fluorescence imaging microscope directly amenable to surface investigations. This instrument combines, for the first time, sample scanning TIR-SFS imaging with confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  11. Terahertz Frequency-Domain Spectroscopy of Low-Pressure Acetonitrile Gas by a Photomixing Terahertz Synthesizer Referenced to Dual Optical Frequency Combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Kimura, Hiroto; Hayashi, Kenta; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Inaba, Hajime; Minoshima, Kaoru; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    A terahertz (THz) frequency synthesizer based on photomixing of two near-infrared lasers with a sub-THz to THz frequency offset is a powerful tool for spectroscopy of polar gas molecules due to its broad spectral coverage; however, its frequency accuracy and resolution are relatively low. To tune the output frequency continuously and widely while maintaining its traceability to a frequency standard, we developed a photomixing THz synthesizer phase-locked to dual optical frequency combs (OFCs). While the phase-locking to dual OFCs ensured continuous tuning within a spectral range of 120 GHz, in addition to the traceability to the frequency standard, use of a broadband uni-traveling carrier photodiode for photomixing enabled the generation of CW-THz radiation within a frequency range from 0.2 to 1.5 THz. We demonstrated THz frequency-domain spectroscopy of gas-phase acetonitrile CH3CN and its isotope CH3 13CN in the frequency range of 0.600-0.720 THz using this THz synthesizer. Their rotational transitions were assigned with a frequency accuracy of 8.42 × 10-8 and a frequency resolution of 520 kHz. Furthermore, the concentration of the CH3CN gas at 20 Pa was determined to be (5.41 ± 0.05) × 1014 molecules/cm3 by curve fitting analysis of the measured absorbance spectrum, and the mixture ratio of the mixed CH3CN/CH3 13CN gas was determined to be 1:2.26 with a gas concentration of 1014-1015 molecules/cm3. The developed THz synthesizer is highly promising for high-precision THz-FDS of low-pressure molecular gases and will enable the qualitative and quantitative analyses of multiple gases.

  12. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty , a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org. (paper)

  13. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts: Disordering versus Removal of Organic Capping

    KAUST Repository

    Krier, James M.

    2012-08-23

    Recent work with nanoparticle catalysts shows that size and shape control on the nanometer scale influences reaction rate and selectivity. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying heterogeneous catalysis because it enables the observation of surface intermediates during catalytic reactions. To control the size and shape of catalytic nanoparticles, an organic ligand was used as a capping agent to stabilize nanoparticles during synthesis. However, the presence of an organic capping agent presents two major challenges in SFG and catalytic reaction studies: it blocks a significant fraction of active surface sites and produces a strong signal that prevents the detection of reaction intermediates with SFG. Two methods for cleaning Pt nanoparticles capped with poly (vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) are examined in this study: solvent cleaning and UV cleaning. Solvent cleaning leaves more PVP intact and relies on disordering with hydrogen gas to reduce the SFG signal of PVP. In contrast, UV cleaning depends on nearly complete removal of PVP to reduce SFG signal. Both UV and solvent cleaning enable the detection of reaction intermediates by SFG. However, solvent cleaning also yields nanoparticles that are stable under reaction conditions, whereas UV cleaning results in aggregation during reaction. The results of this study indicate that solvent cleaning is more advantageous for studying the effects of nanoparticle size and shape on catalytic selectivity by SFG vibrational spectroscopy. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. Characterization of Crystal Chirality in Amino Acids Using Low-Frequency Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviv, Hagit; Nemtsov, Irena; Mastai, Yitzhak; Tischler, Yaakov R

    2017-10-19

    We present a new method for differentiating racemic crystals from enantiopure crystals. Recently, developments in optical filters have enabled the facile use of Raman spectroscopy to detect low-frequency vibrational (LFV) modes. Here, for the first time, we use Raman spectroscopy to characterize the LFV modes for crystalline organic materials composed of chiral molecules. The LF-Raman spectra of racemic and enantiopure crystals exhibit a significant variation, which we attribute to different hydrogen-bond networks in the chiral crystal structures. Across a representative set of amino acids, we observed that when comparing racemic versus enantiopure crystals, the available LFV modes and their relative scattering intensity are strong functions of side chain polarity. Thus, LF-Raman can be used as a method that is complementary to the currently used methods for characterizing crystal chirality due to simpler, faster, and more sensitive measurements, along with the small sample size required, which is limited by the laser-beam diameter in the focus.

  15. Effects of three-mode field interactions in laser instabilities and in beat-frequency spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herdow, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    Population pulsations are fluctuations in the population difference (of a two level system) due to the presence of two or more coherent waves interfering in the medium. In this work, the author shows that population pulsations generated by three waves, a central wave and two mode-locked sidebands, are responsible for both the multiwavelength and the single-wavelength instabilities of single-mode lasers containing homgeneously-broadened media. The role of the population pulsations in establishing these instabilities, however, diminish as the central mode is detuned away from the atomic resonance frequency. For homogeneously-broadened lasers, the author finds two regions of single-wavelength instability. The first is at line center, for which population pulsations are solely responsible, and the second is off line center where the unsaturated medium provides the required gain and anomalous dispersion. For the case of inhomogeneously-broadened lasers, the author shows that population pulsations significantly increase the instability range over that predicted by Casperson for single-mode bad-cavity lasers. Both the unidirectional ring and the standing-wave cavities are treated. The Fourier expansion technique, used in this work, for treating three-frequency operation in saturation spectroscopy is shown to be equivalent (in appropriate limits) to the linear stability analysis in laser theory and optical bistability. The author also shows, in single-sideband saturation spectroscopy, that for long interaction lengths propagation effects can significantly influence the absorption and dispersion coefficients of the medium. Finally, the author shows that under certain conditions the pronounced splitting effects of the population pulsations develop into regions of intense absorption

  16. Probing the influence of X-rays on aqueous copper solutions using time-resolved in situ combined video/X-ray absorption near-edge/ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesu, J. Gerbrand; Beale, Andrew M.; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved in situ video monitoring and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy in combination with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) have been used for the first time in a combined manner to study the effect of synchrotron radiation on a series of homogeneous aqueous copper solutions in a

  17. Spatially resolved analyses of uranium species using a coupled system made up of confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, S.; Grossmann, K.; Arnold, T.

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescent properties of uranium when excited by UV light are used increasingly for spectroscope analyses of uranium species within watery samples. Here, alongside the fluorescent properties of the hexavalent oxidation phases, the tetra and pentavalent oxidation phases also play an increasingly important role. The detection of fluorescent emission spectrums on solid and biological samples using (time-resolved) laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS or LIFS respectively) has, however, the disadvantage that no statements regarding the spatial localisation of the uranium can be made. However, particularly in complex, biological samples, such statements on the localisation of the uranium enrichment in the sample are desired, in order to e.g. be able to distinguish between intra and extra-cellular uranium bonds. The fluorescent properties of uranium (VI) compounds and minerals can also be used to detect their localisation within complex samples. So the application of fluorescent microscopic methods represents one possibility to localise and visualise uranium precipitates and enrichments in biological samples, such as biofilms or cells. The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) is especially well suited to this purpose. Coupling confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) with laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) makes it possible to localise and visualise fluorescent signals spatially and three-dimensionally, while at the same time being able to detect spatially resolved, fluorescent-spectroscopic data. This technology is characterised by relatively low detection limits from up to 1.10 -6 M for uranium (VI) compounds within the confocal volume. (orig.)

  18. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser assisted nanosecond time-resolved T-jump transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Deyong; Li, Yunliang; Li, Hao; Weng, Yuxiang, E-mail: yxweng@iphy.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, Xianyou [Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, Qingxu [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, No. 2, Linggong Road, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Knowledge of dynamical structure of protein is an important clue to understand its biological function in vivo. Temperature-jump (T-jump) time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy is a powerful tool in elucidating the protein dynamical structures and the folding/unfolding kinetics of proteins in solution. A home-built setup of T-jump time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity is developed, which is composed of a Q-switched Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser with an output wavelength at 2.09 μm as the T-jump heating source, and a continuous working CO laser tunable from 1580 to 1980 cm{sup −1} as the IR probe. The results demonstrate that this system has a sensitivity of 1 × 10{sup −4} ΔOD for a single wavelength detection, and 2 × 10{sup −4} ΔOD for spectral detection in amide I′ region, as well as a temporal resolution of 20 ns. Moreover, the data quality coming from the CO laser is comparable to the one using the commercial quantum cascade laser.

  19. Portable (handheld) clinical device for quantitative spectroscopy of skin, utilizing spatial frequency domain reflectance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saager, Rolf B.; Dang, An N.; Huang, Samantha S.; Kelly, Kristen M.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2017-09-01

    Spatial Frequency Domain Spectroscopy (SFDS) is a technique for quantifying in-vivo tissue optical properties. SFDS employs structured light patterns that are projected onto tissues using a spatial light modulator, such as a digital micromirror device. In combination with appropriate models of light propagation, this technique can be used to quantify tissue optical properties (absorption, μa, and scattering, μs', coefficients) and chromophore concentrations. Here we present a handheld implementation of an SFDS device that employs line (one dimensional) imaging. This instrument can measure 1088 spatial locations that span a 3 cm line as opposed to our original benchtop SFDS system that only collects a single 1 mm diameter spot. This imager, however, retains the spectral resolution (˜1 nm) and range (450-1000 nm) of our original benchtop SFDS device. In the context of homogeneous turbid media, we demonstrate that this new system matches the spectral response of our original system to within 1% across a typical range of spatial frequencies (0-0.35 mm-1). With the new form factor, the device has tremendously improved mobility and portability, allowing for greater ease of use in a clinical setting. A smaller size also enables access to different tissue locations, which increases the flexibility of the device. The design of this portable system not only enables SFDS to be used in clinical settings but also enables visualization of properties of layered tissues such as skin.

  20. Quantitative Surface Chirality Detection with Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy: Twin Polarization Angle Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Feng; Xu, Yanyan; Guo, Yuan; Liu, Shi-lin; Wang, Hongfei

    2009-01-01

    Here we report a novel twin polarization angle (TPA) approach in the quantitative chirality detection with the surface sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS). Generally, the achiral contribution dominates the surface SFG-VS signal, and the pure chiral signal is usually two or three orders of magnitude smaller. Therefore, it has been difficult to make quantitative detection and analysis of the chiral contributions to the surface SFG-VS signal. In the TPA method, by varying together the polarization angles of the incoming visible light and the sum frequency signal at fixed s or p polarization of the incoming infrared beam, the polarization dependent SFG signal can give not only direct signature of the chiral contribution in the total SFG-VS signal, but also the accurate measurement of the chiral and achiral components in the surface SFG signal. The general description of the TPA method is presented and the experiment test of the TPA approach is also presented for the SFG-VS from the S- and R-limonene chiral liquid surfaces. The most accurate degree of chiral excess values thus obtained for the 2878 cm -1 spectral peak of the S- and R-limonene liquid surfaces are (23.7±0.4)% and (25.4±1.3)%, respectively.

  1. Electronic structure of heavy fermion system CePt2In7 from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Bing; Yu Li; Lyu Shou-Peng; Jia Xiao-Wen; Zhang Yan; Wang Chen-Lu; Hu Cheng; Ding Ying; Sun Xuan; Hu Yong; Liu Jing; Gao Qiang; Zhao Lin; Liu Guo-Dong; Liu Kai; Lu Zhong-Yi; Bauer, E D; Thompson, J D; Xu Zu-Yan; Chen Chuang-Tian

    2017-01-01

    We have carried out high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements on the Ce-based heavy fermion compound CePt 2 In 7 that exhibits stronger two-dimensional character than the prototypical heavy fermion system CeCoIn 5 . Multiple Fermi surface sheets and a complex band structure are clearly resolved. We have also performed detailed band structure calculations on CePt 2 In 7 . The good agreement found between our measurements and the calculations suggests that the band renormalization effect is rather weak in CePt 2 In 7 . A comparison of the common features of the electronic structure of CePt 2 In 7 and CeCoIn 5 indicates that CeCoIn 5 shows a much stronger band renormalization effect than CePt 2 In 7 . These results provide new information for understanding the heavy fermion behaviors and unconventional superconductivity in Ce-based heavy fermion systems. (paper)

  2. Spatially-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of CdSe quantum dots synthesized in ionic liquid crystal matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magaryan, K.A.; Mikhailov, M.A.; Karimullin, K.R.; Knyazev, M.V.; Eremchev, I.Y.; Naumov, A.V.; Vasilieva, I.A.; Klimusheva, G.V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of luminescence properties of new quantum dot (QD)-doped materials. We studied CdSe QDs (1.8 nm and 2.3 nm) grown inside of a liquid crystalline cadmium alcanoate matrix. Temperature dependence of parameters of fluorescence spectra obtained in a wide temperature range using epi-luminescence microscopy technique was analyzed. Spatially-resolved luminescence images were measured for the areas of the samples of 150×150 µm 2 . Strong correlation between fluorescence spectra and sample structure was observed. - Highlights: • Glassy matrix with CdSe quantum dots inside fabricated in liquid crystalline mesophase. • Study of luminescence properties in a wide range of low temperatures. • Strong dependence of the luminescence spectra on spatial inhomogeneities. • Spatially-resolved luminescence imaging of quantum dots in liquid crystalline matrix.

  3. Spatially-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of CdSe quantum dots synthesized in ionic liquid crystal matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magaryan, K.A., E-mail: xmagaros@gmail.com [Moscow State Pedagogical University, 29 Malaya Pirogovskaya Str., Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Mikhailov, M.A. [Moscow State Pedagogical University, 29 Malaya Pirogovskaya Str., Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Karimullin, K.R. [Moscow State Pedagogical University, 29 Malaya Pirogovskaya Str., Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Institute for Spectroscopy of RAS, 5 Fizicheskaya Str., Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); E.K. Zavoyski Kazan Physical-Technical Institute of RAS, 10/7 Sibirski trakt Str., Kazan 420029 (Russian Federation); Knyazev, M.V.; Eremchev, I.Y. [Institute for Spectroscopy of RAS, 5 Fizicheskaya Str., Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Naumov, A.V. [Moscow State Pedagogical University, 29 Malaya Pirogovskaya Str., Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Institute for Spectroscopy of RAS, 5 Fizicheskaya Str., Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Vasilieva, I.A. [Moscow State Pedagogical University, 29 Malaya Pirogovskaya Str., Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Klimusheva, G.V. [Institute of Physics, NAS of Ukraine, 46 Prospect Nauki, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine)

    2016-01-15

    The paper is devoted to investigation of luminescence properties of new quantum dot (QD)-doped materials. We studied CdSe QDs (1.8 nm and 2.3 nm) grown inside of a liquid crystalline cadmium alcanoate matrix. Temperature dependence of parameters of fluorescence spectra obtained in a wide temperature range using epi-luminescence microscopy technique was analyzed. Spatially-resolved luminescence images were measured for the areas of the samples of 150×150 µm{sup 2}. Strong correlation between fluorescence spectra and sample structure was observed. - Highlights: • Glassy matrix with CdSe quantum dots inside fabricated in liquid crystalline mesophase. • Study of luminescence properties in a wide range of low temperatures. • Strong dependence of the luminescence spectra on spatial inhomogeneities. • Spatially-resolved luminescence imaging of quantum dots in liquid crystalline matrix.

  4. Determination of blood oxygenation in the brain by time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy: influence of the skin, skull, and meninges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Liu, Hanli; Wang, Lihong; Tittel, Frank K.; Chance, Britton; Jacques, Steven L.

    1994-07-01

    Near infrared light has been used for the determination of blood oxygenation in the brain but little attention has been paid to the fact that the states of blood oxygenation in arteries, veins, and capillaries differ substantially. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations for a heterogeneous system were conducted, and near infrared time-resolved reflectance measurements were performed on a heterogeneous tissue phantom model. The model was made of a solid polyester resin, which simulates the tissue background. A network of tubes was distributed uniformly through the resin to simulate the blood vessels. The time-resolved reflectance spectra were taken with different absorbing solutions filled in the network. Based on the simulation and experimental results, we investigated the dependence of the absorption coefficient obtained from the heterogeneous system on the absorption of the actual absorbing solution filled in the tubes. We show that light absorption by the brain should result from the combination of blood and blood-free tissue background.

  5. Band structure and Fermi surface of UPd2Al3 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Saitoh, Yuji; Okane, Tetsuo; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Fujimori, Atsushi; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Onuki, Yoshichika

    2007-01-01

    We have observed the band structure and Fermi surfaces of the heavy Fermion superconductor UPd 2 Al 3 by angle-resolved photoemission experiments in the soft X-ray region. We observed renormalized quasi-particle bands in the vicinity of the Fermi level and strongly dispersive bands on the higher binding energy side. Our observation suggests that the structure previously assigned to contributions from localized states in the U 5f spectrum has strong energy dispersions

  6. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of IR-driven electron dynamics in a charge transfer model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falge, Mirjam; Fröbel, Friedrich Georg; Engel, Volker; Gräfe, Stefanie

    2017-08-02

    If the adiabatic approximation is valid, electrons smoothly adapt to molecular geometry changes. In contrast, as a characteristic of diabatic dynamics, the electron density does not follow the nuclear motion. Recently, we have shown that the asymmetry in time-resolved photoelectron spectra serves as a tool to distinguish between these dynamics [Falge et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 2012, 3, 2617]. Here, we investigate the influence of an additional, moderately intense infrared (IR) laser field, as often applied in attosecond time-resolved experiments, on such asymmetries. This is done using a simple model for coupled electronic-nuclear motion. We calculate time-resolved photoelectron spectra and their asymmetries and demonstrate that the spectra directly map the bound electron-nuclear dynamics. From the asymmetries, we can trace the IR field-induced population transfer and both the field-driven and intrinsic (non-)adiabatic dynamics. This holds true when considering superposition states accompanied by electronic coherences. The latter are observable in the asymmetries for sufficiently short XUV pulses to coherently probe the coupled states. It is thus documented that the asymmetry is a measure for phases in bound electron wave packets and non-adiabatic dynamics.

  7. Spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet light pulses from high-order harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plötzing, M.; Adam, R., E-mail: r.adam@fz-juelich.de; Weier, C.; Plucinski, L.; Schneider, C. M. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-6), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Eich, S.; Emmerich, S.; Rollinger, M.; Aeschlimann, M. [University of Kaiserslautern and Research Center OPTIMAS, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Mathias, S. [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, I. Physikalisches Institut, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    The fundamental mechanism responsible for optically induced magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic thin films has been under intense debate since almost two decades. Currently, numerous competing theoretical models are in strong need for a decisive experimental confirmation such as monitoring the triggered changes in the spin-dependent band structure on ultrashort time scales. Our approach explores the possibility of observing femtosecond band structure dynamics by giving access to extended parts of the Brillouin zone in a simultaneously time-, energy- and spin-resolved photoemission experiment. For this purpose, our setup uses a state-of-the-art, highly efficient spin detector and ultrashort, extreme ultraviolet light pulses created by laser-based high-order harmonic generation. In this paper, we present the setup and first spin-resolved spectra obtained with our experiment within an acquisition time short enough to allow pump-probe studies. Further, we characterize the influence of the excitation with femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses by comparing the results with data acquired using a continuous wave light source with similar photon energy. In addition, changes in the spectra induced by vacuum space-charge effects due to both the extreme ultraviolet probe- and near-infrared pump-pulses are studied by analyzing the resulting spectral distortions. The combination of energy resolution and electron count rate achieved in our setup confirms its suitability for spin-resolved studies of the band structure on ultrashort time scales.

  8. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Zhitao [Georgia Tech Research Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0826 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Banishev, Alexandr A.; Christensen, James; Dlott, Dana D. [School of Chemical Sciences and Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Summers, Christopher J.; Thadhani, Naresh N., E-mail: naresh.thadhani@mse.gatech.edu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Xiao, Pan [LNM, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Zhou, Min [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  9. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Zhitao; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Christensen, James; Dlott, Dana D.; Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Summers, Christopher J.; Thadhani, Naresh N.; Xiao, Pan; Zhou, Min

    2016-01-01

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  10. Intrinsic spin polarized electronic structure of CrO2 epitaxial film revealed by bulk-sensitive spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Sunagawa, Masanori; Kittaka, Tomoko; Terashima, Kensei; Wakita, Takanori; Muraoka, Yuji; Yokoya, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    We have performed bulk-sensitive spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in order to clarify the intrinsic spin-resolved electronic states of half-metallic ferromagnet CrO 2 . We used CrO 2 epitaxial films on TiO 2 (100), which shows a peak at 1 eV with a clear Fermi edge, consistent with the bulk-sensitive PES spectrum for CrO 2 . In spin-resolved spectra at 40 K, while the Fermi edge was observed in the spin up (majority spin) state, no states at the Fermi level (E F ) with an energy gap of 0.5 eV below E F were observed in the spin down (minority spin) state. At 300 K, the gap in the spin down state closes. These results are consistent with resistivity measurements and magnetic hysteresis curves of the fabricated CrO 2 film, constituting spectroscopic evidence for the half-metallicity of CrO 2 at low temperature and reducing the spin polarization at room temperature. We also discuss the electron correlation effects of Cr 3d

  11. Decay time shortening of fluorescence from donor-acceptor pair proteins using ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Motoyoshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Ganeev, Rashid A.; Kuroda, Hiroto; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Hamakubo, Takao; Masuda, Kazuyuki; Hayashi, Masahiro; Sakihama, Toshiko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Kozasa, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    We improved an ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy system and measured directly the decrease in the fluorescence decay time of the FRET signal, without any entanglement of components in the picosecond time scale from the donor-acceptor protein pairs (such as cameleon protein for calcium ion indicator, and ligand-activated GRIN-Go proteins pair). The drastic decrease in lifetime of the donor protein fluorescence under the FRET condition (e.g. a 47.8% decrease for a GRIN-Go protein pair) proves the deformation dynamics between donor and acceptor fluorescent proteins in an activated state of a mixed donor-acceptor protein pair. This study is the first clear evidence of physical contact of the GRIN-Go proteins pair using time-resolved FRET system. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most important protein family for the recognition of many chemical substances at the cell surface. They are the targets of many drugs. Simultaneously, we were able to observe the time-resolved spectra of luminous proteins at the initial stage under the FRET condition, within 10 ns from excitation. This new FRET system allows us to trace the dynamics of the interaction between proteins at the ligand-induced activated state, molecular structure change and combination or dissociation. It will be a key technology for the development of protein chip technology

  12. Real-time monitoring of airborne beryllium, at OSHA limit levels, by time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziemski, L.J.; Loree, T.R.; Cremers, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Real-time detection of beryllium particulate is being investigated by the new technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. For beryllium detection we monitor the 313.1-nm feature of once ionized beryllium (Be II). Numerous publications describe the technique, our beryllium results, and other applications. Here we summarize the important points and describe our experiments with beryllium

  13. Time-resolved study of a pulsed dc discharge using quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy : NO and gas temperature kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welzel, S.; Gatilova, L.; Röpcke, J.; Rousseau, A.

    2007-01-01

    In a pulsed dc discharge of an Ar–N2 mixture containing 0.91% of NO the kinetics of the destruction of NO has been studied under static and flowing conditions, i.e. in a closed and open discharge tube (p = 266 Pa). For this purpose quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) in the

  14. Electronic structure of the dilute magnetic semiconductor G a1 -xM nxP from hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keqi, A.; Gehlmann, M.; Conti, G.; Nemšák, S.; Rattanachata, A.; Minár, J.; Plucinski, L.; Rault, J. E.; Rueff, J. P.; Scarpulla, M.; Hategan, M.; Pálsson, G. K.; Conlon, C.; Eiteneer, D.; Saw, A. Y.; Gray, A. X.; Kobayashi, K.; Ueda, S.; Dubon, O. D.; Schneider, C. M.; Fadley, C. S.

    2018-04-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of the dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) G a0.98M n0.02P and compared it to that of an undoped GaP reference sample, using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HXPS) and hard x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (HARPES) at energies of about 3 keV. We present experimental data, as well as theoretical calculations, to understand the role of the Mn dopant in the emergence of ferromagnetism in this material. Both core-level spectra and angle-resolved or angle-integrated valence spectra are discussed. In particular, the HARPES experimental data are compared to free-electron final-state model calculations and to more accurate one-step photoemission theory. The experimental results show differences between G a0.98M n0.02P and GaP in both angle-resolved and angle-integrated valence spectra. The G a0.98M n0.02P bands are broadened due to the presence of Mn impurities that disturb the long-range translational order of the host GaP crystal. Mn-induced changes of the electronic structure are observed over the entire valence band range, including the presence of a distinct impurity band close to the valence-band maximum of the DMS. These experimental results are in good agreement with the one-step photoemission calculations and a prior HARPES study of G a0.97M n0.03As and GaAs [Gray et al., Nat. Mater. 11, 957 (2012), 10.1038/nmat3450], demonstrating the strong similarity between these two materials. The Mn 2 p and 3 s core-level spectra also reveal an essentially identical state in doping both GaAs and GaP.

  15. Optical spectroscopy of rubidium Rydberg atoms with a 297 nm frequency doubled dye laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Th.; Germann, Th.; Thoumany, P.; Stania, G.; Urbonas, L.; Haensch, T.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Rydberg atoms have played an important role in atomic physics and optical spectroscopy since many years. Due to their long lifetime and the big dipole matrix element between neighbouring Rydberg levels they are an essential tool in microwave cavity-qed experiments. Ultracold Rydberg gases are a promising candidate for realizing controlled quantum gates in atomic ensembles. In most experiments Rydberg atoms are detected destructively, where the optically excited atoms are first ionized followed by an electronic detection of the ionization products. A Doppler-free purely optical detection was reported in a room temperature cell and in an atomic beam apparatus using the technique of electromagnetically induced transparency. In all these experiments the Rydberg atoms are excited with two lasers in a two-step ladder configuration. Here we show that Doppler-free purely optical spectroscopy is also possible with a one step excitation scheme involving a UV laser at 297 nm. We excite the 85 Rb isotope from the 5S 1/2 ground state to the 63P 3/2 state with a frequency doubled dye laser in a room temperature gas cell without buffer gas. Rydberg transitions are detected by monitoring the absorption of 780 nm laser light which is superimposed on the UV light and resonant with one hyperfine component of the Rubidium D2 line. With these two lasers we realize a V-scheme and utilize the quantum amplification effect due to the different natural lifetimes of the upper levels of the two transitions: an excitation into the 63P level hinders many absorption-emission cycles of the D2 transition and leads to a reduced absorption on that line. We discuss the shape of the observed spectra in the context of electron shelving and EIT experiments. By applying a frequency modulation to the UV laser, we can obtain dispersive signals which can be used to stabilize the laser to a specific Rydberg transition. By shifting the frequency of the 780 nm laser to crossover resonances in the

  16. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  17. Chemical transitions of Areca semen during the thermal processing revealed by temperature-resolved ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibiao; Wang, Xu; Pei, Wenxuan; Li, Sen; Sun, Suqin; Zhou, Qun; Chen, Jianbo

    2018-03-01

    Areca semen is a common herb used in traditional Chinese medicine, but alkaloids in this herb are categorized as Group I carcinogens by IARC. It has been proven that the stir-baking process can reduce alkaloids in Areca semen while keep the activity for promoting digestion. However, the changes of compositions other than alkaloids during the thermal processing are unclear. Understanding the thermal chemical transitions of Areca semen is necessary to explore the processing mechanisms and optimize the procedures. In this research, FTIR spectroscopy with a temperature-controlled ATR accessory is employed to study the heating process of Areca semen. Principal component analysis and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy are used to interpret the spectra to reveal the chemical transitions of Areca semen in different temperature ranges. The loss of a few volatile compounds in the testa and sperm happens below 105 °C, while some esters in the sperm decreases above 105 °C. As the heating temperature is close to 210 °C, Areca semen begins to be scorched and the decomposition of many compounds can be observed. This research shows the potential of the temperature-resolved ATR-FTIR spectroscopy in exploring the chemical transitions of the thermal processing of herbal materials.

  18. Guest–Host Interactions Investigated by Time-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopies and Scattering at MHz Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer; Vanko, G.; Gawelda, W.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the photoinduced low spin (LS) to high spin (HS) conversion of [Fe(bipy)3]2+ in aqueous solution. In a laser pump/X-ray probe synchrotron setup permitting simultaneous, time-resolved X-ray diffuse scattering (XDS) and X-ray spectroscopic measurements at a 3.26 MHz repetition rate...... lifetime, allowing the detection of an ultrafast change in bulk solvent density. An analysis approach directly utilizing the spectroscopic data in the XDS analysis effectively reduces the number of free parameters, and both combined permit extraction of information about the ultrafast structural dynamics...

  19. Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Richard J.; Light, Roger A.; Johnston, Nicholas S.; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Mike G.; Sharples, Steve D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

  20. Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Richard J.; Light, Roger A.; Johnston, Nicholas S.; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Mike G. [Institute of Biophysics, Imaging and Optical Science, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Sharples, Steve D. [Applied Optics Group, Electrical Systems and Optics Research Division, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

  1. Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy for laser-ablated silicon particles in xenon gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makimura, Tetsuya; Sakuramoto, Tamaki; Murakami, Kouichi

    1996-01-01

    We developed a laboratory-scale in situ apparatus for soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy with a time resolution of 10 ns and a space resolution of 100 μm. Utilizing this spectrometer, we have investigated the dynamics of silicon atoms formed by laser ablation in xenon gas. It was found that 4d-electrons in the xenon atoms are excited through collision with electrons in the laser-generated silicon plasma. (author)

  2. Time-Resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy of He/CH4 in a Positive Column Discharge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Kubelík, Petr; Ferus, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 12 (2012), s. 3137-3147 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903; GA ČR GAP208/10/2302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : infrared-laser spectroscopy * high-temperature pyrolysis * amorphous-carbon films Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.771, year: 2012

  3. Mechanistic Insights into Growth of Surface‐Mounted Metal‐Organic Framework Films Resolved by Infrared (Nano‐) Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Delen, Guusje; Ristanović, Zoran; Mandemaker, Laurens D. B.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Control over assembly, orientation, and defect‐free growth of metal‐organic framework (MOF) films is crucial for their future applications. A layer‐by‐layer approach is considered a suitable method to synthesize highly oriented films of numerous MOF topologies, but the initial stages of the film growth remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of infrared (IR) reflection absorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM)‐IR imaging to investigate the assembly and gro...

  4. Quantitative spectral and orientational analysis in surface sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Fei; Gan, Wei; Lu, Rong; Rao, Yi; Wu, Bao-Hua

    Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) has been proven to be a uniquely effective spectroscopic technique in the investigation of molecular structure and conformations, as well as the dynamics of molecular interfaces. However, the ability to apply SFG-VS to complex molecular interfaces has been limited by the ability to abstract quantitative information from SFG-VS experiments. In this review, we try to make assessments of the limitations, issues and techniques as well as methodologies in quantitative orientational and spectral analysis with SFG-VS. Based on these assessments, we also try to summarize recent developments in methodologies on quantitative orientational and spectral analysis in SFG-VS, and their applications to detailed analysis of SFG-VS data of various vapour/neat liquid interfaces. A rigorous formulation of the polarization null angle (PNA) method is given for accurate determination of the orientational parameter D = /, and comparison between the PNA method with the commonly used polarization intensity ratio (PIR) method is discussed. The polarization and incident angle dependencies of the SFG-VS intensity are also reviewed, in the light of how experimental arrangements can be optimized to effectively abstract crucial information from the SFG-VS experiments. The values and models of the local field factors in the molecular layers are discussed. In order to examine the validity and limitations of the bond polarizability derivative model, the general expressions for molecular hyperpolarizability tensors and their expression with the bond polarizability derivative model for C3v, C2v and C∞v molecular groups are given in the two appendixes. We show that the bond polarizability derivative model can quantitatively describe many aspects of the intensities observed in the SFG-VS spectrum of the vapour/neat liquid interfaces in different polarizations. Using the polarization analysis in SFG-VS, polarization selection rules or

  5. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  6. Continuous wave and time resolved spectroscopy of InAsN/GaAsN based quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taliercio, T.; Valvin, P.; Intartaglia, R.; Guillet, T.; Lefebvre, P.; Bretagnon, T.; Gil, B.; Sallet, V.; Harmand, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    We present a study of the optical properties of quantum dots based on a new family of semiconductors: III-V dilute nitrides such as (In,Ga)(N,As). Continuous wave and time resolved photoluminescence (PL) experiments allowed us to evaluate the impact of N incorporation during the growth of InAs/GaAs quantum dots. Previous work [V. Sallet et al., to be submitted to J. Cryst. Growth (2005); O. Schumann et al., J. Appl. Phys. 96, 2832 (2004)] showed that increasing the flux of N atoms into the growth chamber modifies drastically the size of the dots which leads to a bimodal growth. Two populations of dots with different sizes appear. The quantum dot PL line broadens and a second PL line appears at higher energy. Time resolved PL allows us to identify the nature of this second PL line: second population of quantum dots. A second decay time is observed which we interpret as being the consequence of the perturbation of the electronic states of the quantum dots. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Fast spatially resolved exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) distribution measurements in an internal combustion engine using absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P

    2015-09-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines is an effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency. However, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder non-uniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. A sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in the intake manifold. The study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz.

  8. Classification of thyroid nodules using a resonance-frequency-based electrical impedance spectroscopy: progress assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Tublin, Mitchell E.; Lederman, Dror; Klym, Amy H.; Brown, Erica D.; Gur, David

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer is rising faster than other malignancies and has nearly doubled in the United States (U.S.) in the last 30 years. However, classifying between malignant and benign thyroid nodules is often difficult. Although ultrasound guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy (FNAB) is considered an excellent tool for triaging patients, up to 25% of FNABs are inconclusive. As a result, definitive diagnosis requires an exploratory surgery and a large number of these are performed in the U.S. annually. It would be extremely beneficial to develop a non-invasive tool or procedure that could assist in assessing the likelihood of malignancy of otherwise indeterminate thyroid nodules, thereby reducing the number of exploratory thyroidectomies that are performed under general anesthesia. In this preliminary study we demonstrate a unique hand-held Resonance-frequency based Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (REIS) device with six pairs of detection probes to detect and classify thyroid nodules using multi-channel EIS output signal sweeps. Under an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved case collection protocol, this REIS device is being tested in our clinical facility and we have been collecting an initial patient data set since March of this year. Between March and August of 2011, 65 EIS tests were conducted on 65 patients. Among these cases, six depicted pathology-verified malignant cells. Our initial assessment indicates the feasibility of easily applying this REIS device and measurement approach in a very busy clinical setting. The measured resonance frequency differences between malignant and benign nodules could potentially make it possible to accurately classify indeterminate thyroid nodules.

  9. Characterization of polymer surface structure and surface mechanical behaviour by sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opdahl, Aric; Koffas, Telly S; Amitay-Sadovsky, Ella; Kim, Joonyeong; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2004-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to study polymer surface structure and surface mechanical behaviour, specifically to study the relationships between the surface properties of polymers and their bulk compositions and the environment to which the polymer is exposed. The combination of SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM has been used to study surface segregation behaviour of polyolefin blends at the polymer/air and polymer/solid interfaces. SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM experiments have also been performed to characterize the properties of polymer/liquid and polymer/polymer interfaces, focusing on hydrogel materials. A method was developed to study the surface properties of hydrogel contact lens materials at various hydration conditions. Finally, the effect of mechanical stretching on the surface composition and surface mechanical behaviour of phase-separated polyurethanes, used in biomedical implant devices, has been studied by both SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM. (topical review)

  10. Space and phase resolved ion energy and angular distributions in single- and dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yiting; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States); Moore, Nathaniel; Pribyl, Patrick; Gekelman, Walter [Department of Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The control of ion energy and angular distributions (IEADs) is critically important for anisotropic etching or deposition in microelectronic fabrication processes. With single frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), the narrowing in angle and spread in energy of ions as they cross the sheath are definable functions of frequency, sheath width, and mean free path. With increases in wafer size, single frequency CCPs are finding difficulty in meeting the requirement of simultaneously controlling plasma densities, ion fluxes, and ion energies. Dual-frequency CCPs are being investigated to provide this flexible control. The high frequency (HF) is intended to control the plasma density and ion fluxes, while the ion energies are intended to be controlled by the low frequency (LF). However, recent research has shown that the LF can also influence the magnitude of ion fluxes and that IEADs are determined by both frequencies. Hence, separate control of fluxes and IEADs is complex. In this paper, results from a two-dimensional computational investigation of Ar/O{sub 2} plasma properties in an industrial reactor are discussed. The IEADs are tracked as a function of height above the substrate and phase within the rf cycles from the bulk plasma to the presheath and through the sheath with the goal of providing insights to this complexity. Comparison is made to laser-induced fluorescence experiments. The authors found that the ratios of HF/LF voltage and driving frequency are critical parameters in determining the shape of the IEADs, both during the transit of the ion through the sheath and when ions are incident onto the substrate. To the degree that contributions from the HF can modify plasma density, sheath potential, and sheath thickness, this may provide additional control for the IEADs.

  11. Charge carrier mobility in poly[methyl(phenyl)silylene] studied by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy and molecular modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Hynek; Kratochvílová, Irena; Kužel, Petr; Šebera, Jakub; Kochalska, Anna; Nožár, Juraj; Nešpůrek, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 7 (2011), s. 2850-2856 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP202/09/P099; GA ČR GA203/08/1594; GA AV ČR KAN401770651; GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/10/1951 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : molecular electronics * THz spectroscopy * charge carrier mobility Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.573, year: 2011

  12. Time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of electronic cooling and localization in CH3NH3PbI3 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhesheng; Lee, Min-i.; Zhang, Zailan; Diab, Hiba; Garrot, Damien; Lédée, Ferdinand; Fertey, Pierre; Papalazarou, Evangelos; Marsi, Marino; Ponseca, Carlito; Deleporte, Emmanuelle; Tejeda, Antonio; Perfetti, Luca

    2017-09-01

    We measure the surface of CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals by making use of two-photon photoemission spectroscopy. Our method monitors the electronic distribution of photoexcited electrons, explicitly discriminating the initial thermalization from slower dynamical processes. The reported results disclose the fast-dissipation channels of hot carriers (0.25 ps), set an upper bound to the surface-induced recombination velocity (PbI3 samples is consistent with the progressive reduction of photoconversion efficiency in operating devices. Minimizing the density of shallow traps and solving the aging problem may boost the macroscopic efficiency of solar cells to the theoretical limit.

  13. Observation of the low frequency vibrational modes of bacteriophage M13 in water by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsen Shaw-Wei D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a technique which departs radically from conventional approaches has been proposed. This novel technique utilizes biological objects such as viruses as nano-templates for the fabrication of nanostructure elements. For example, rod-shaped viruses such as the M13 phage and tobacco mosaic virus have been successfully used as biological templates for the synthesis of semiconductor and metallic nanowires. Results and discussion Low wave number (≤ 20 cm-1 acoustic vibrations of the M13 phage have been studied using Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations based on an elastic continuum model and appropriate Raman selection rules derived from a bond polarizability model. The observed Raman mode has been shown to belong to one of the Raman-active axial torsion modes of the M13 phage protein coat. Conclusion It is expected that the detection and characterization of this low frequency vibrational mode can be used for applications in nanotechnology such as for monitoring the process of virus functionalization and self-assembly. For example, the differences in Raman spectra can be used to monitor the coating of virus with some other materials and nano-assembly process, such as attaching a carbon nanotube or quantum dots.

  14. Sum frequency generation spectroscopy of tetraalkylphosphonium ionic liquids at the air-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñalber-Johnstone, Chariz; Adamová, Gabriela; Plechkova, Natalia V.; Bahrami, Maryam; Ghaed-Sharaf, Tahereh; Ghatee, Mohammad Hadi; Seddon, Kenneth R.; Baldelli, Steven

    2018-05-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is a nonlinear vibrational spectroscopic technique used in the study of interfaces, due to its unique ability to distinguish surface molecules that have preferential ordering compared to the isotropic bulk. Here, a series of alkyltrioctylphosphonium chloride ionic liquids, systematically varied by cation structure, were characterized at the air-liquid interface by SFG. The effect on surface structure resulting from molecular variation (i.e., addition of cyano- and methoxy-functional groups) of the cation alkyl chain was investigated. SFG spectra in the C—H stretching region (2750-3100 cm-1) for [P8 8 8 n][Cl], where n = 4, 5, 8, 10, 12, or 14, showed characteristic changes as the alkyl chain length was increased. Spectral profiles for n = 4, 5, 8, or 10 appeared similar; however, when the fourth alkyl chain was sufficiently long (as in the case of n = 12 or n = 14), abrupt changes occurred in the spectra. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of a slab of each ionic liquid (with n = 8, 10, or 12) confirmed gauche defects, with enhancement for the long alkyl chain and an abrupt increase of gauche occurrence from n = 8 to n = 10. A comparison of the tilt angle distribution from the simulation and the SFG analysis show a broad distribution of angles. Using experimental SFG spectra in conjunction with MD simulations, a comprehensive molecular picture at the surface of this unique class of liquids is presented.

  15. Structure and orientation of interfacial proteins determined by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy: method and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuji; Wei, Feng; Li, Hongchun; Tian, Kangzhen; Luo, Yi

    2013-01-01

    In situ and real-time characterization of molecular structures and orientation of proteins at interfaces is essential to understand the nature of interfacial protein interaction. Such work will undoubtedly provide important clues to control biointerface in a desired manner. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) has been demonstrated to be a powerful technique to study the interfacial structures and interactions at the molecular level. This paper first systematically introduced the methods for the calculation of the Raman polarizability tensor, infrared transition dipole moment, and SFG molecular hyperpolarizability tensor elements of proteins/peptides with the secondary structures of α-helix, 310-helix, antiparallel β-sheet, and parallel β-sheet, as well as the methodology to determine the orientation of interfacial protein secondary structures using SFG amide I spectra. After that, recent progresses on the determination of protein structure and orientation at different interfaces by SFG-VS were then reviewed, which provides a molecular-level understanding of the structures and interactions of interfacial proteins, specially understanding the nature of driving force behind such interactions. Although this review has focused on analysis of amide I spectra, it will be expected to offer a basic idea for the spectral analysis of amide III SFG signals and other complicated molecular systems such as RNA and DNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Perspective: Watching low-frequency vibrations of water in biomolecular recognition by THz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Havenith, Martina

    2015-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy has turned out to be a powerful tool which is able to shed new light on the role of water in biomolecular processes. The low frequency spectrum of the solvated biomolecule in combination with MD simulations provides deep insights into the collective hydrogen bond dynamics on the sub-ps time scale. The absorption spectrum between 1 THz and 10 THz of solvated biomolecules is sensitive to changes in the fast fluctuations of the water network. Systematic studies on mutants of antifreeze proteins indicate a direct correlation between biological activity and a retardation of the (sub)-ps hydration dynamics at the protein binding site, i.e., a "hydration funnel." Kinetic THz absorption studies probe the temporal changes of THz absorption during a biological process, and give access to the kinetics of the coupled protein-hydration dynamics. When combined with simulations, the observed results can be explained in terms of a two-tier model involving a local binding and a long range influence on the hydration bond dynamics of the water around the binding site that highlights the significance of the changes in the hydration dynamics at recognition site for biomolecular recognition. Water is shown to assist molecular recognition processes.

  17. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy of planar phosphatidylethanolamine hybrid bilayer membranes under water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kett, Peter J N; Casford, Michael T L; Davies, Paul B

    2010-06-15

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy has been used to study the structure of phosphatidylethanolamine hybrid bilayer membranes (HBMs) under water at ambient temperatures. The HBMs were formed using a modified Langmuir-Schaefer technique and consisted of a layer of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) physisorbed onto an octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) at a series of surface pressures from 1 to 40 mN m(-1). The DPPE and ODT were selectively deuterated so that the contributions to the SFG spectra from the two layers could be determined separately. SFG spectra in both the C-H and C-D stretching regions confirmed that a monolayer of DPPE had been adsorbed to the ODT SAM and that there were gauche defects within the alkyl chains of the phospholipid. On adsorption of a layer of DPPE, methylene modes from the ODT SAM were detected, indicating that the phospholipid had partially disordered the alkanethiol monolayer. SFG spectra recorded in air indicated that removal of water from the surface of the HBM resulted in disruption of the DPPE layer and the formation of phospholipid bilayers.

  18. Plume Characterization of a Laboratory Model 22 N GPIM Thruster via High-Frequency Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Kinzbach, McKenzie I.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the capability of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive areas of the spacecraft from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. Plume characterization of a laboratory-model 22 N thruster via optical diagnostics was conducted at NASA GRC in a space-simulated environment. A high-frequency pulsed laser was coupled with an electron-multiplied ICCD camera to perform Raman spectroscopy in the near-field, low-pressure plume. The Raman data yielded plume constituents and temperatures over a range of thruster chamber pressures and as a function of thruster (catalyst) operating time. Schlieren images of the near-field plume enabled calculation of plume velocities and revealed general plume structure of the otherwise invisible plume. The measured velocities are compared to those predicted by a two-dimensional, kinetic model. Trends in data and numerical results are presented from catalyst mid-life to end-of-life. The results of this investigation were coupled with the Raman and Schlieren data to provide an anchor for plume impingement analysis presented in a companion paper. The results of both analyses will be used to improve understanding of the nature of AF-M315E plumes and their impacts to GPIM and other future missions.

  19. Sum-Frequency-Generation-Based Laser Sidebands for Tunable Femtosecond Raman Spectroscopy in the Ultraviolet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangdong Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS is an emerging molecular structural dynamics technique for functional materials characterization typically in the visible to near-IR range. To expand its applications we have developed a versatile FSRS setup in the ultraviolet region. We use the combination of a narrowband, ~400 nm Raman pump from a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor and a tunable broadband probe pulse from sum-frequency-generation-based cascaded four-wave mixing (SFG-CFWM laser sidebands in a thin BBO crystal. The ground state Raman spectrum of a laser dye Quinolon 390 in methanol that strongly absorbs at ~355 nm is systematically studied as a standard sample to provide previously unavailable spectroscopic characterization in the vibrational domain. Both the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra can be collected by selecting different orders of SFG-CFWM sidebands as the probe pulse. The stimulated Raman gain with the 402 nm Raman pump is >21 times larger than that with the 550 nm Raman pump when measured at the 1317 cm−1 peak for the aromatic ring deformation and ring-H rocking mode of the dye molecule, demonstrating that pre-resonance enhancement is effectively achieved in the unique UV-FSRS setup. This added tunability in the versatile and compact optical setup enables FSRS to better capture transient conformational snapshots of photosensitive molecules that absorb in the UV range.

  20. Theoretical vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of water near lipid and surfactant monolayer interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, S.; Gruenbaum, S. M.; Skinner, J. L. [Theoretical Chemistry Institute and Department of Chemistry, 1101 University Ave., University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    Understanding the structure of water near cell membranes is crucial for characterizing water-mediated events such as molecular transport. To obtain structural information of water near a membrane, it is useful to have a surface-selective technique that can probe only interfacial water molecules. One such technique is vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. As model systems for studying membrane headgroup/water interactions, in this paper we consider lipid and surfactant monolayers on water. We adopt a theoretical approach combining molecular dynamics simulations and phase-sensitive VSFG to investigate water structure near these interfaces. Our simulated spectra are in qualitative agreement with experiments and reveal orientational ordering of interfacial water molecules near cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic interfaces. OH bonds of water molecules point toward an anionic interface leading to a positive VSFG peak, whereas the water hydrogen atoms point away from a cationic interface leading to a negative VSFG peak. Coexistence of these two interfacial water species is observed near interfaces between water and mixtures of cationic and anionic lipids, as indicated by the presence of both negative and positive peaks in their VSFG spectra. In the case of a zwitterionic interface, OH orientation is toward the interface on the average, resulting in a positive VSFG peak.

  1. High-Throughput, Protein-Targeted Biomolecular Detection Using Frequency-Domain Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Richard J; Putnam, Shawn A; Das, Soumen; Gupta, Ankur; Chase, Elyse D Z; Seal, Sudipta

    2017-03-01

    A clinically relevant magneto-optical technique (fd-FRS, frequency-domain Faraday rotation spectroscopy) for characterizing proteins using antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is demonstrated. This technique distinguishes between the Faraday rotation of the solvent, iron oxide core, and functionalization layers of polyethylene glycol polymers (spacer) and model antibody-antigen complexes (anti-BSA/BSA, bovine serum albumin). A detection sensitivity of ≈10 pg mL -1 and broad detection range of 10 pg mL -1 ≲ c BSA ≲ 100 µg mL -1 are observed. Combining this technique with predictive analyte binding models quantifies (within an order of magnitude) the number of active binding sites on functionalized MNPs. Comparative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) studies are conducted, reproducing the manufacturer advertised BSA ELISA detection limits from 1 ng mL -1 ≲ c BSA ≲ 500 ng mL -1 . In addition to the increased sensitivity, broader detection range, and similar specificity, fd-FRS can be conducted in less than ≈30 min, compared to ≈4 h with ELISA. Thus, fd-FRS is shown to be a sensitive optical technique with potential to become an efficient diagnostic in the chemical and biomolecular sciences. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Lifetime measurements of odd-parity high-excitation levels of Sn I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wei; Feng, Yanyan; Xu, Jiaxin; Dai, Zhenwen; Palmeri, Patrick; Quinet, Pascal; Biemont, Emile

    2010-01-01

    Natural radiative lifetimes of 38 odd-parity highly excited levels in neutral tin in the energy range from 43 682.737 to 56 838.68 cm -1 have been measured by a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique in an atomic beam produced by laser ablation on a solid tin sample. All the levels were excited from the metastable 3 P 1, 2 and 1 D 2 levels in the ground configuration. The second and third harmonics of a dye laser were adopted as the tunable exciting source (207-250 nm). The lifetime results obtained in this paper are in the range from 4.6 to 292 ns and will be useful in extending the set of oscillator strengths available in Sn I.

  3. Lifetime measurements of odd-parity high-excitation levels of Sn I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei; Feng, Yanyan; Xu, Jiaxin; Dai, Zhenwen [College of Physics, Jilin University and Key Lab of Coherent Light, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy, Ministry of Education, Changchun 130021 (China); Palmeri, Patrick; Quinet, Pascal; Biemont, Emile, E-mail: dai@jlu.edu.c [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Mons-UMONS, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2010-10-28

    Natural radiative lifetimes of 38 odd-parity highly excited levels in neutral tin in the energy range from 43 682.737 to 56 838.68 cm{sup -1} have been measured by a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique in an atomic beam produced by laser ablation on a solid tin sample. All the levels were excited from the metastable {sup 3}P{sub 1,} {sub 2} and {sup 1}D{sub 2} levels in the ground configuration. The second and third harmonics of a dye laser were adopted as the tunable exciting source (207-250 nm). The lifetime results obtained in this paper are in the range from 4.6 to 292 ns and will be useful in extending the set of oscillator strengths available in Sn I.

  4. Time resolved emission spectroscopy investigations of pulsed laser ablated plasmas of ZrO2 and Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadoko, A D; Lee, P S; Lee, P; Mohanty, S R; Rawat, R S

    2006-01-01

    With the rising trend of synthesizing ultra thin films and/or quantum-confined materials using laser ablation, optimization of deposition parameters plays an essential role in obtaining desired film characteristics. This paper presents the initial step of plasma optimization study by examining temporal distribution of the plasma formation by pulsed laser ablation of materials. The emitted spectra of ZrO 2 and Al 2 O 3 are obtained ∼3mm above the ablated target to derive the ablated plasma characteristics. The plasma temperature is estimated to be at around 2.35 eV, with electron density of 1.14 x 10 16 (cm -3 ). Emission spectra with different gate delay time (40-270 ns) are captured to study the time resolved plume characteristics. Transitory elemental species are identified

  5. On the course of fusion processes occurring in the plasma focus - an investigation by using time-resolved neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.

    1987-01-01

    The plasma focus POSEIDON emits up to 2x10 11 neutrons during some 100 ns, if it is operated with deuterium. This very high neutron production cannot be explained by a thermal neutron production mechanism starting out from the measured values of temperature (about 1 KeV) and deuteron density (10 18 cm -3 ). There is no doubt, that there exist strong ''beam-target''-processes of the deuterons, which cause such a high suprathermal neutron production. The neutron emission of the plasma focus POSEIDON appears in two pulses, which are associated to the two main phases of the hot and dense plasma. The first is the pinch or quiescent phase, in which a stable plasma column over 100 or 150 ns exists. The second phase is characterized by turbulence processes and starts with the end of the stable phase with the on-set of the m=0-instabilities and ends with the decay of the plasma. Both phases of neutron production are studied by time-resolved analysis of the neutron anisotropy factor and by time and spatial-resolved measurements of the neutron emission. Hence it follows, that there exist during both phases different non thermal neutron production processes, which are caused by different deuteron acceleration mechanisms. To get information on these deuteron acceleration mechanisms it is appropriate to analyse the neutron spectra of the plasma focus, because the half-width and the shape of the measured spectra are related to the energy and the angular distribution of the accelerated deuterons. (orig./GG) [de

  6. Investigation of verbal and visual working memory by multi-channel time-resolved functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contini, D.; Caffini, M.; Re, R.; Zucchelli, L.; Spinelli, L.; Basso Moro, S.; Bisconti, S.; Ferrari, M.; Quaresima, V.; Cutini, S.; Torricelli, A.

    2013-03-01

    Working memory (WM) is fundamental for a number of cognitive processes, such as comprehension, reasoning and learning. WM allows the short-term maintenance and manipulation of the information selected by attentional processes. The goal of this study was to examine by time-resolved fNIRS neural correlates of the verbal and visual WM during forward and backward digit span (DF and DB, respectively) tasks, and symbol span (SS) task. A neural dissociation was hypothesised between the maintenance and manipulation processes. In particular, a dorsolateral/ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC/VLPFC) recruitment was expected during the DB task, whilst a lateralised involvement of Brodmann Area (BA) 10 was expected during the execution of the DF task. Thirteen subjects were monitored by a multi-channel, dual-wavelength (690 and 829 nm) time-resolved fNIRS system during 3 minutes long DF and DB tasks and 4 minutes long SS task. The participants' mean memory span was calculated for each task: DF: 6.46+/-1.05 digits; DB: 5.62+/-1.26 digits; SS: 4.69+/-1.32 symbols. No correlation was found between the span level and the heart rate data (measured by pulse oximeter). As expected, DB elicited a broad activated area, in the bilateral VLPFC and the right DLPFC, whereas a more localised activation was observed over the right hemisphere during either DF (BA 10) or SS (BA 10 and 44). The robust involvement of the DLPFC during DB, compared to DF, is compatible with previous findings and with the key role of the central executive subserving in manipulating processes.

  7. Excitation dynamics of dye doped tris(8-hydroxy quinoline) aluminum films studied using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, K.; Karlsson, H. S.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.; Haight, R.

    2001-01-01

    In this work, we use excite-probe photoelectron spectroscopy to study the decay of electronic excitation in tris(8-hydroxy quinoline) aluminum (Alq) doped with the organic dye 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM). Ultrashort laser pulses are used to photoexcite electrons into unoccupied molecular orbitals, and the ensuing decay rate is directly observed using photoelectron spectroscopy. Decay of the electronic excitation is studied as a function of DCM doping percentage and excitation intensity. The decay rate is seen to increase with both doping percentage and excitation intensity. These data are explained using a model including Foerster transfer, stimulated emission, concentration quenching, and bimolecular singlet - singlet exciton annihilation. In this model, we find that it is necessary to include a very fast (faster than predicted in standard Foerster transfer theory) excitation transfer of a fraction of the excitation from the Alq to the DCM, where that fraction corresponds to the approximate nearest-neighbor population. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  8. Spatially resolved investigation of the oil composition in single intact hyphae of Mortierella spp. with micro-Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münchberg, Ute; Wagner, Lysett; Spielberg, Eike T; Voigt, Kerstin; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-02-01

    Zygomycetes are well known for their ability to produce various secondary metabolites. Fungi of the genus Mortierella can accumulate highly unsaturated lipids in large amounts as lipid droplets. However, no information about the spatial distribution or homogeneity of the oil inside the fungi is obtainable to date due to the invasive and destructive analytical techniques applied so far. Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be well suited to investigate biological samples on a micrometre scale. It also has been shown that the degree of unsaturation of lipids can be determined from Raman spectra. We applied micro-Raman spectroscopy to investigate the spatial distribution and composition of lipid vesicles inside intact hyphae. For Mortierella alpina and Mortierella elongata distinct differences in the degree of unsaturation and even the impact of growth conditions are determined from the Raman spectra. In both species we found that the fatty acid saturation in the vesicles is highly variable in the first 600 μm of the growing hyphal tip and fluctuates towards a constant composition and saturation ratio in all of the remaining mycelium. Our approach facilitates in vivo monitoring of the lipid production and allows us to investigate the impact of cultivation parameters on the oil composition directly in the growing hyphae without the need for extensive extraction procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of strain on the electronic structure, superconductivity, and nematicity in FeSe studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, G. N.; Nakayama, K.; Sugawara, K.; Sato, T.; Urata, T.; Tanabe, Y.; Tanigaki, K.; Nabeshima, F.; Imai, Y.; Maeda, A.; Takahashi, T.

    2017-06-01

    One of central issues in iron-based superconductors is the role of structural change to the superconducting transition temperature (Tc). It was found in FeSe that the lattice strain leads to a drastic increase in Tc, accompanied by suppression of nematic order. By angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on tensile- or compressive-strained and strain-free FeSe, we experimentally show that the in-plane strain causes a marked change in the energy overlap (Δ Eh -e ) between the hole and electron pockets in the normal state. The change in Δ Eh -e modifies the Fermi-surface volume, leading to a change in Tc. Furthermore, the strength of nematicity is also found to be characterized by Δ Eh -e . These results suggest that the key to understanding the phase diagram is the fermiology and interactions linked to the semimetallic band overlap.

  10. Photodissociation of CH3CHO at 248 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Verification of roaming and triple fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kai-Chan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Li, Hou-Kuan; Lin, King-Chuen

    2014-02-01

    By using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy, the HCO fragment dissociated from acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) at 248 nm is found to partially decompose to H and CO. The fragment yields are enhanced by the Ar addition that facilitates the collision-induced internal conversion. The channels to CH2CO + H2 and CH3CO + H are not detected significantly. The rotational population distribution of CO, after removing the Ar collision effect, shows a bimodal feature comprising both low- and high-rotational (J) components, sharing a fraction of 19% and 81%, respectively, for the vibrational state v = 1. The low-J component is ascribed to both roaming pathway and triple fragmentation. They are determined to have a branching ratio of 0.06, respectively, relative to the whole v = 1 population. The CO roaming is accompanied by a highly vibrational population of CH4 that yields a vibrational bimodality.

  11. Electronic structure investigation of MoS2 and MoSe2 using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and ab initio band structure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahatha, S K; Patel, K D; Menon, Krishnakumar S R

    2012-11-28

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and ab initio band structure calculations have been used to study the detailed valence band structure of molybdenite, MoS(2) and MoSe(2). The experimental band structure obtained from ARPES has been found to be in good agreement with the theoretical calculations performed using the linear augmented plane wave (LAPW) method. In going from MoS(2) to MoSe(2), the dispersion of the valence bands decreases along both k(parallel) and k(perpendicular), revealing the increased two-dimensional character which is attributed to the increasing interlayer distance or c/a ratio in these compounds. The width of the valence band and the band gap are also found to decrease, whereas the valence band maxima shift towards the higher binding energy from MoS(2) to MoSe(2).

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy of the electronically excited state. 4. Nanosecond and picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of carotenoid excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallinger, R.F.; Farquharson, S.; Woodruff, W.H.; Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra are reported for the S 0 and T 1 states of the carotenoids β-carotene, zeaxanthin, echinenone, canthaxanthin, dihydroxylycopene, astaxanthin, decapreno(C 50 )-β-carotene, β-apo-8'-carotenal, and ethyl β-apo-8'-carotenoate. The results reveal qualitatively similar ground-state spectra and similar frequency shifts in all observed resonance Raman modes between S 0 and T 1 , regardless of carotenoid structure. Examinations of the relationship of the putative C--C and C==C frequencies in S 0 and T 1 reveals anomalous shifts to lower frequency in the ''single-bond'' mode upon electronic excitation. These shifts may be due to molecular distortions in the excited state which force changes in molecular motions comprising the observed modes. However, another possibility requiring no distortion is that the interaction (off-diagonal) force constants connecting the C--C and C==C modes change sign upon electronic excitation. This latter phenomenon may provide a unitary explanation for the ''anomalous'' frequency shifts in the C--C and C==C modes, both in the T 1 states of carotenoids and in the S 1 states of simpler polyenes, without postulating large, unpredicted structural changes upon excitation or general errors in existing vibrational or theoretical analyses. Resonance Raman and absorbance studies with 35-ps time resolution suggest that S 1 lifetime (of the 1 B/sub u/ and/or the 1 A/sub g/* states) of β-carotene in benzene is less than 1 ps

  13. Static and time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy of Hg0.95Cd0.05Cr2Se4 spinel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsaume, S; Telegin, A V; Sukhorukov, Yu P; Stavrias, N; Fedorov, V A; Menshchikova, T K; Kimel, A V

    2017-08-16

    Static and time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy of ferromagnetic single crystal Hg 0.95 Cd 0.05 Cr 2 Se 4 was performed below the absorption edge, in order to reveal the origin of the electronic transitions contributing to the magneto-optical properties of this material. The mid-infrared spectroscopy reveals a strong absorption peak around 0.236 eV which formerly was assigned to a transition within the selenide-chromium complexes ([Formula: see text] Se -Cr 2+ ). To reveal the sensitivity of the transition to the magnetic order, we performed the studies in a temperature range across the Curie temperature and magnetic fields across the value at which the saturation of ferromagnetic magnetization occurs. Despite the fact that the Curie temperature of this ferromagnetic semiconductor is around 107 K, the intensity of the mid-infrared transition reduces substantially increasing the temperature, so that already at 70 K the absorption peak is hardly visible. Such a dramatic decrease of the oscillator strength is observed simultaneously with the strong red-shift of the absorption edge in the magnetic semiconductor. Employing a time-resolved pump-and-probe technique enabled us to determine the lifetime of the electrons in the excited state of this optical transition. In the temperature range from 7 K to 80 K, the lifetime changes from 3 ps to 6 ps. This behavior agrees with the phenomenon of giant oscillator strength described earlier for weakly bound excitons in nonmagnetic semiconductors.

  14. High-resolution metallic magnetic calorimeters for {beta}-spectroscopy on {sup 187}rhenium and position resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porst, Jan-Patrick

    2011-02-01

    This thesis describes the development of metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) for high resolution spectroscopy. MMCs are energy dispersive particle detectors based on the calorimetric principle which are typically operated at temperatures below 100 mK. The detectors make use of a paramagnetic temperature sensor to transform the temperature rise upon the absorption of a particle in the detector into a measurable magnetic flux change in a dc-SQUID. The application of MMCs for neutrino mass measurements and their advantages with respect to other approaches are discussed. In view of this application the development of an MMC optimized for {beta}-endpoint spectroscopy on {sup 187}rhenium is presented. A fully micro-fabricated X-ray detector is characterized and performs close to design values. Furthermore, a new technique to more efficiently couple rhenium absorbers mechanically and thermally to the sensor was developed and successfully tested. By employing a metallic contact, signal rise times faster than 5 {mu}s could be observed with superconducting rhenium absorbers. In addition to the single pixel detectors, an alternative approach of reading out multiple pixels was developed in this work, too. Here, the individual absorbers have a different thermal coupling to only one temperature sensor resulting in a distribution of different pulse shapes. Straightforward position discrimination by means of rise time analysis is demonstrated for a four pixel MMC and a thermal model of the detector is provided. Unprecedented so far, an energy resolution of less than {delta}E{sub FWHM}<5 eV for 5.9 keV X-rays was achieved across all absorbers. (orig.)

  15. Mapping of calf muscle oxygenation and haemoglobin content during dynamic plantar flexion exercise by multi-channel time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Quaresima, Valentina; Pifferi, Antonio; Biscotti, Giovanni; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Taroni, Paola; Ferrari, Marco; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2004-01-01

    A compact and fast multi-channel time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy system for tissue oximetry was developed. It employs semiconductor laser and fibre optics for delivery of optical signals. Photons are collected by eight 1 mm fibres and detected by a multianode photomultiplier. A time-correlated single photon counting board is used for the parallel acquisition of time-resolved reflectance curves. Estimate of the reduced scattering coefficient is achieved by fitting with a standard model of diffusion theory, while the modified Lambert-Beer law is used to assess the absorption coefficient. In vivo measurements were performed on five healthy volunteers to monitor spatial changes in calf muscle (medial and lateral gastrocnemius; MG, LG) oxygen saturation (SmO 2 ) and total haemoglobin concentration (tHb) during dynamic plantar flexion exercise performed at 50% of the maximal voluntary contraction. At rest SmO 2 was 73.0 ± 0.9 and 70.5 ± 1.7% in MG and LG, respectively (P = 0.045). At the end of the exercise, SmO 2 decreased (69.1 ± 1.8 and 63.8 ± 2.1% in MG and LG, respectively; P 2 and tHb

  16. Photodissociation of gaseous CH3COSH at 248 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Observation of three dissociation channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, En-Lan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen

    2013-01-01

    Upon one-photon excitation at 248 nm, gaseous CH 3 C(O)SH is dissociated following three pathways with the products of (1) OCS + CH 4 , (2) CH 3 SH + CO, and (3) CH 2 CO + H 2 S that are detected using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The excited state 1 (n O , π * CO ) has a radiative lifetime of 249 ± 11 ns long enough to allow for Ar collisions that induce internal conversion and enhance the fragment yields. The rate constant of collision-induced internal conversion is estimated to be 1.1 × 10 −10 cm 3 molecule −1 s −1 . Among the primary dissociation products, a fraction of the CH 2 CO moiety may undergo further decomposition to CH 2 + CO, of which CH 2 is confirmed by reaction with O 2 producing CO 2 , CO, OH, and H 2 CO. Such a secondary decomposition was not observed previously in the Ar matrix-isolated experiments. The high-resolution spectra of CO are analyzed to determine the ro-vibrational energy deposition of 8.7 ± 0.7 kcal/mol, while the remaining primary products with smaller rotational constants are recognized but cannot be spectrally resolved. The CO fragment detected is mainly ascribed to the primary production. A prior distribution method is applied to predict the vibrational distribution of CO that is consistent with the experimental findings.

  17. Investigations of lateral and vertical compositional gradients in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} by highly spatially, spectrally and time resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Mathias; Ribbe, Stefan; Hempel, Thomas; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Juergen [Institute for Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany); Witte, Wolfram; Hariskos, Dimitrios [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Wuerttemberg (ZSW), Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Luminescence properties of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) layers with different thicknesses were investigated by means of highly spatially, spectrally and time resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperature (T=5 K). A polycrystalline CIGS thin film with a thickness of 2.4 {mu}m was grown using an in-line co-evaporation process with a final Cu-poor composition on top of a sputtered Mo layer on a soda lime glass substrate. The layer thickness was then reduced by highly controlled bromine methanol etching. The typical grainy (d{sub average}=3 {mu}m) structure of the untouched sample develops thin longish structures under the influence of the etchant. Integral CL spectra of the samples are dominated by donor-acceptor pair (DAP) luminescence. The peak energies of these spectra are ranging from 1.13 eV to 1.22 eV with decreasing layer thickness. The lateral distribution of the luminescence is inhomogeneous regarding the intensity as well as the peak energy. Time resolved CL shows a strong dependence of the initial lifetime from the emission energy.

  18. Nuclear spin state-resolved cavity ring-down spectroscopy diagnostics of a low-temperature H3+ -dominated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejduk, Michal; Dohnal, Petr; Varju, Jozef; Rubovič, Peter; Plašil, Radek; Glosík, Juraj

    2012-01-01

    We have applied a continuous-wave near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy method to study the parameters of a H 3 + -dominated plasma at temperatures in the range 77–200 K. We monitor populations of three rotational states of the ground vibrational state corresponding to para and ortho nuclear spin states in the discharge and the afterglow plasma in time and conclude that abundances of para and ortho states and rotational temperatures are well defined and stable. The non-trivial dependence of a relative population of para- H 3 + on a relative population of para-H 2 in a source H 2 gas is described. The results described in this paper are valuable for studies of state-selective dissociative recombination of H 3 + ions with electrons in the afterglow plasma and for the design of sources of H 3 + ions in a specific nuclear spin state. (paper)

  19. Nuclear spin state-resolved cavity ring-down spectroscopy diagnostics of a low-temperature H_3^+ -dominated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, Michal; Dohnal, Petr; Varju, Jozef; Rubovič, Peter; Plašil, Radek; Glosík, Juraj

    2012-04-01

    We have applied a continuous-wave near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy method to study the parameters of a H_3^+ -dominated plasma at temperatures in the range 77-200 K. We monitor populations of three rotational states of the ground vibrational state corresponding to para and ortho nuclear spin states in the discharge and the afterglow plasma in time and conclude that abundances of para and ortho states and rotational temperatures are well defined and stable. The non-trivial dependence of a relative population of para- H_3^+ on a relative population of para-H2 in a source H2 gas is described. The results described in this paper are valuable for studies of state-selective dissociative recombination of H_3^+ ions with electrons in the afterglow plasma and for the design of sources of H_3^+ ions in a specific nuclear spin state.

  20. Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of quinine sulfate dication bound to sodium dodecylsulfate micelles: Fluorescent complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Sunita; Pant, Debi D., E-mail: ddpant@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2014-01-15

    Interaction of quinine sulfate dication (QSD) with anionic, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) surfactant has been studied at different premicellar, micellar and postmicellar concentrations in aqueous phase using steady state, time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence anisotropy techniques. At premicellar concentrations of SDS, the decrease in absorbance, appearance of an extra fluorescence band at lower wavelengths and tri-exponential decay behavior of fluorescence, are attributed to complex formation between QSD molecules and surfactant monomers. At postmicellar concentrations the red shift in fluorescence spectrum, increase in quantum yield and increase in fluorescence lifetimes are attributed to incorporation of solute molecules to micelles. At lower concentrations of SDS, a large shift in fluorescence is observed on excitation at the red edge of absorption spectrum and this is explained in terms of distribution of ion pairs of different energies in the ground state and the observed fluorescence lifetime behavior corroborates with this model. The temporal fluorescence anisotropy decay of QSD in SDS micelles allowed determination of restriction on the motion of the fluorophore. All the different techniques used in this study reveal that the photophysics of QSD is very sensitive to the microenvironments of SDS micelles and QSD molecules reside at the water-micelle interface. -- Highlights: • Probe molecule is very sensitive to microenvironment of micelles. • Highly fluorescent ion-pair formation has been observed. • Modulated photophysics of probe molecule in micellar solutions has been observed. • Probe molecules strongly bind with micelles and reside at probe–micelle interface.