WorldWideScience

Sample records for frequency high amplitude

  1. High Frequency Amplitude Detector for GMI Magnetic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktham Asfour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new concept of a high-frequency amplitude detector and demodulator for Giant-Magneto-Impedance (GMI sensors is presented. This concept combines a half wave rectifier, with outstanding capabilities and high speed, and a feedback approach that ensures the amplitude detection with easily adjustable gain. The developed detector is capable of measuring high-frequency and very low amplitude signals without the use of diode-based active rectifiers or analog multipliers. The performances of this detector are addressed throughout the paper. The full circuitry of the design is given, together with a comprehensive theoretical study of the concept and experimental validation. The detector has been used for the amplitude measurement of both single frequency and pulsed signals and for the demodulation of amplitude-modulated signals. It has also been successfully integrated in a GMI sensor prototype. Magnetic field and electrical current measurements in open- and closed-loop of this sensor have also been conducted.

  2. Frequency- and amplitude-transitioned waveforms mitigate the onset response in high-frequency nerve block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerges, Meana; Foldes, Emily L.; Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Narendra; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L.

    2010-12-01

    High-frequency alternating currents (HFAC) have proven to be a reversible and rapid method of blocking peripheral nerve conduction, holding promise for treatment of disorders associated with undesirable neuronal activity. The delivery of HFAC is characterized by a transient period of neural firing at its inception, termed the 'onset response'. The onset response is minimized for higher frequencies and higher amplitudes, but requires larger currents. However, the complete block can be maintained at lower frequencies and amplitudes, using lower currents. In this in vivo study on whole mammalian peripheral nerves, we demonstrate a method to minimize the onset response by initiating the block using a stimulation paradigm with a high frequency and large amplitude, and then transitioning to a low-frequency and low-amplitude waveform, reducing the currents required to maintain the conduction block. In five of six animals, it was possible to transition from a 30 kHz to a 10 kHz waveform without inducing any transient neural firing. The minimum transition time was 0.03 s. Transition activity was minimized or eliminated with longer transition times. The results of this study show that this method is feasible for achieving a nerve block with minimal onset responses and current amplitude requirements.

  3. Modulated convection at high frequencies and large modulation amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, J.B.; Hohenberg, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    Modulated Rayleigh-Benard convection is analyzed for high frequencies and large modulation amplitudes. The linear theory of Gershuni and Zhukhovitskii is generalized to the nonlinear domain, and a subcritical bifurcation to convection is found in agreement with the experiments of Niemela and Donnelly. The crossover between the high-frequency (''Stokes layer'') regime and the low-frequency regime studied previously is analyzed

  4. Amplitude modulation reduces loudness adaptation to high-frequency tones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Dwight P; George, Sahara E; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2015-07-01

    Long-term loudness perception of a sound has been presumed to depend on the spatial distribution of activated auditory nerve fibers as well as their temporal firing pattern. The relative contributions of those two factors were investigated by measuring loudness adaptation to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated 12-kHz tones. The tones had a total duration of 180 s and were either unmodulated or 100%-modulated at one of three frequencies (4, 20, or 100 Hz), and additionally varied in modulation depth from 0% to 100% at the 4-Hz frequency only. Every 30 s, normal-hearing subjects estimated the loudness of one of the stimuli played at 15 dB above threshold in random order. Without any amplitude modulation, the loudness of the unmodulated tone after 180 s was only 20% of the loudness at the onset of the stimulus. Amplitude modulation systematically reduced the amount of loudness adaptation, with the 100%-modulated stimuli, regardless of modulation frequency, maintaining on average 55%-80% of the loudness at onset after 180 s. Because the present low-frequency amplitude modulation produced minimal changes in long-term spectral cues affecting the spatial distribution of excitation produced by a 12-kHz pure tone, the present result indicates that neural synchronization is critical to maintaining loudness perception over time.

  5. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph with reduced amplitude zone detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as ''RAZs''. RAZs are displayed as ''go, no-go'' signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  6. Oscillations of non-isothermal N/S boundary with a high frequency and large amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezuglyj, A.I.; Shklovskij, V.A.

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the phenomenological approach based on the heat balance equation and the dependence of the critical temperature of the superconductor on the current value theoretically investigated the impact of high-frequency current of high amplitude and arbitrary shape on the non-isothermal balance of the oscillating N/S interface in a long superconductor. We introduce a self-consistent average temperature field of rapidly oscillating non-isothermal N/S boundary (heat kink), which allows to go beyond the well-known concept of mean-square heating and consider the impact of current waveform. With regard to experiments on the effects of microwave high-power radiation on the current-voltage characteristics (CVC) of superconducting films, we give the classification of the families of the CVC for inhomogeneous superconductors which carry a current containing a high frequency component of large amplitude. Several characteristics have hysteresis of thermal nature.

  7. Amplitude-to-frequency converter of radioisotope instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demchenkov, V.P.; Korobkov, I.N.

    1988-01-01

    An amplitude-to-frequency converter designed for signal processing of radioisotope relay devices is descibed. The basic elements of the converter are a scaling amplifier, an analog-to-digital converter, a code-to-frequency converter, a null-organ, a delay unit and a clock-pulse generator. The designed amplitude-to-frequency converter takes into account a prior information about the signal shape of the energy spectrum. The converter processes input pulses of 0.10 V amplitude and duration more than 2μs. The energy channel number is 64

  8. Source-Space Cross-Frequency Amplitude-Amplitude Coupling in Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Zobay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD model has been influential in the development of theoretical explanations for the neurological mechanisms of tinnitus. It asserts that thalamocortical oscillations lock a region in the auditory cortex into an ectopic slow-wave theta rhythm (4–8 Hz. The cortical area surrounding this region is hypothesized to generate abnormal gamma (>30 Hz oscillations (“edge effect” giving rise to the tinnitus percept. Consequently, the model predicts enhanced cross-frequency coherence in a broad range between theta and gamma. In this magnetoencephalography study involving tinnitus and control cohorts, we investigated this prediction. Using beamforming, cross-frequency amplitude-amplitude coupling (AAC was computed within the auditory cortices for frequencies (f1,f2 between 2 and 80 Hz. We find the AAC signal to decompose into two distinct components at low (f1,f230 Hz frequencies, respectively. Studying the correlation of AAC with several key covariates (age, hearing level (HL, tinnitus handicap and duration, and HL at tinnitus frequency, we observe a statistically significant association between age and low-frequency AAC. Contrary to the TCD predictions, however, we do not find any indication of statistical differences in AAC between tinnitus and controls and thus no evidence for the predicted enhancement of cross-frequency coupling in tinnitus.

  9. Amplitude modulation detection with concurrent frequency modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Naveen K

    2016-09-01

    Human speech consists of concomitant temporal modulations in amplitude and frequency that are crucial for speech perception. In this study, amplitude modulation (AM) detection thresholds were measured for 550 and 5000 Hz carriers with and without concurrent frequency modulation (FM), at AM rates crucial for speech perception. Results indicate that adding 40 Hz FM interferes with AM detection, more so for 5000 Hz carrier and for frequency deviations exceeding the critical bandwidth of the carrier frequency. These findings suggest that future cochlear implant processors, encoding speech fine-structures may consider limiting the FM to narrow bandwidth and to low frequencies.

  10. Lightweight Potential of Welded High-strength Steel Joints from S700 Under Constant and Variable Amplitude Loading by High-frequency Mechanical Impact (HFMI) Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldırım, Halid Can; Marquis, Gary; Sonsino, Cetin Morris

    2015-01-01

    Investigations with longitudinal stiffeners of the steel grade S700 under fully-reversed, constant amplitude loading and under variable amplitude loading with a straight-line spectrum show impressive fatigue strength improvement by high-frequency mechanical impact (HFMI) treatment. However, the degree of improvement was for variable amplitude loading lower when compared to constant amplitude loading due to local plasticity which occurs during larger load levels and consequently reduces the be...

  11. Theoretical treatment of high-frequency, large-amplitude ac voltammetry applied to ideal surface-confined redox systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Christopher G.; Anastassiou, Costas A.; O’Hare, Danny; Parker, Kim H.; Siggers, Jennifer H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Theory of ac voltammetry on ideal surface-confined redox systems. ► Analytical description of the harmonics and transient of the current response. ► Solution valid for high frequency, large-amplitude sinusoidal input voltage. ► Protocol for determining system parameters from experimental current responses. - Abstract: Large-amplitude ac voltammetry, where the applied voltage is a large-amplitude sinusoidal waveform superimposed onto a dc ramp, is a powerful method for investigating the reaction kinetics of surface-confined redox species. Here we consider the large-amplitude ac voltammetric current response of a quasi-reversible, ideal, surface-confined redox system, for which the redox reaction is described by Butler–Volmer theory. We derive an approximate analytical solution, which is valid whenever the angular frequency of the sine-wave is much larger than the rate of the dc ramp and the standard kinetic rate constant of the redox reaction. We demonstrate how the third harmonic and the initial transient of the current response can be used to estimate parameters of the electrochemical system, namely the kinetic rate constant, the electron transfer coefficient, the adsorption formal potential, the initial proportion of oxidised molecules and the linear double-layer capacitance.

  12. Separation of musical instruments based on amplitude and frequency comodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Barry D.; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Quatieri, Thomas F.

    2002-05-01

    In previous work, amplitude comodulation was investigated as a basis for monaural source separation. Amplitude comodulation refers to similarities in amplitude envelopes of individual spectral components emitted by particular types of sources. In many types of musical instruments, amplitudes of all resonant modes rise/fall, and start/stop together during the course of normal playing. We found that under certain well-defined conditions, a mixture of constant frequency, amplitude comodulated sources can unambiguously be decomposed into its constituents on the basis of these similarities. In this work, system performance was improved by relaxing the constant frequency requirement. String instruments, for example, which are normally played with vibrato, are both amplitude and frequency comodulated sources, and could not be properly tracked under the constant frequency assumption upon which our original algorithm was based. Frequency comodulation refers to similarities in frequency variations of individual harmonics emitted by these types of sources. The analytical difficulty is in defining a representation of the source which properly tracks frequency varying components. A simple, fixed filter bank can only track an individual spectral component for the duration in which it is within the passband of one of the filters. Alternatives are therefore explored which are amenable to real-time implementation.

  13. Source of low frequency modulation of ENSO amplitude in a CGCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Byung-Kwon [Chonbuk National University, Division of Science Education/Institute of Science Education, Jeonju (Korea); Yeh, Sang-Wook [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan (Korea); Dewitte, Boris [Laboratoire d' Etude en Geophysique et Oceanographie Spatiale, Toulouse (France); Jhun, Jong-Ghap [Seoul National University, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul (Korea); Kang, In-Sik [Seoul National University, Climate Environment System Research Center (CES), Seoul (Korea)

    2007-07-15

    We study the relationship between changes in equatorial stratification and low frequency El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) amplitude modulation in a coupled general circulation model (CGCM) that uses an anomaly coupling strategy to prevent climate drifts in the mean state. The stratification is intensified at upper levels in the western and central equatorial Pacific during periods of high ENSO amplitude. Furthermore, changes in equatorial stratification are connected with subsurface temperature anomalies originating from the central south tropical Pacific. The correlation analysis of ocean temperature anomalies against an index for the ENSO modulation supports the hypothesis of the existence of an oceanic ''tunnel'' that connects the south tropical Pacific to the equatorial wave guide. Further analysis of the wind stress projection coefficient onto the oceanic baroclinic modes suggests that the low frequency modulation of ENSO amplitude is associated with a significant contribution of higher-order modes in the western and central equatorial Pacific. In the light of these results, we suggest that, in the CGCM, change in the baroclinic mode energy distribution associated with low frequency ENSO amplitude modulation have its source in the central south tropical Pacific. (orig.)

  14. Frequency and amplitude dependences of molding accuracy in ultrasonic nanoimprint technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekaru, Harutaka; Takahashi, Masaharu

    2009-01-01

    We use neither a heater nor ultraviolet lights, and are researching and developing an ultrasonic nanoimprint as a new nano-patterning technology. In our ultrasonic nanoimprint technology, ultrasonic vibration is not used as a heat generator instead of the heater. A mold is connected with an ultrasonic generator, and mold patterns are pushed down and pulled up at a high speed into a thermoplastic. Frictional heat is generated by ultrasonic vibration between mold patterns and thermoplastic patterns formed by an initial contact force. However, because frictional heat occurs locally, the whole mold is not heated. Therefore, a molding material can be comprehensively processed at room temperature. A magnetostriction actuator was built into our ultrasonic nanoimprint system as an ultrasonic generator, and the frequency and amplitude can be changed between dc–10 kHz and 0–4 µm, respectively. First, the ultrasonic nanoimprint was experimented by using this system on polyethylene terephthalate (PET, T g = 69 °C), whose the glass transition temperature (T g ) is comparatively low in engineering plastics, and it was ascertained that the most suitable elastic material for this technique was an ethyl urethane rubber. In addition, we used a changeable frequency of the magnetostriction actuator, and nano-patterns in an electroformed-Ni mold were transferred to a 0.5 mm thick sheet of PET, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polycarbonate (PC), which are typical engineering plastics, under variable molding conditions. The frequency and amplitude dependence of ultrasonic vibration to the molding accuracy were investigated by measuring depth and width of imprinted patterns. As a result, regardless of the molding material, the imprinted depth was changed drastically when the frequency exceeded 5 kHz. On the other hand, when the amplitude of ultrasonic vibration grew, the imprinted depth gradually deepened. Influence of the frequency and amplitude of ultrasonic vibration was not

  15. MULTI-FLUID APPROACH TO HIGH-FREQUENCY WAVES IN PLASMAS. I. SMALL-AMPLITUDE REGIME IN FULLY IONIZED MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Gómez, David; Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume, E-mail: david.martinez@uib.es [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2016-12-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides an accurate description of low-frequency Alfvén waves in fully ionized plasmas. However, higher-frequency waves in many plasmas of the solar atmosphere cannot be correctly described by ideal MHD and a more accurate model is required. Here, we study the properties of small-amplitude incompressible perturbations in both the low- and the high-frequency ranges in plasmas composed of several ionized species. We use a multi-fluid approach and take into account the effects of collisions between ions and the inclusion of Hall’s term in the induction equation. Through the analysis of the corresponding dispersion relations and numerical simulations, we check that at high frequencies ions of different species are not as strongly coupled as in the low-frequency limit. Hence, they cannot be treated as a single fluid. In addition, elastic collisions between the distinct ionized species are not negligible for high-frequency waves, since an appreciable damping is obtained. Furthermore, Coulomb collisions between ions remove the cyclotron resonances and the strict cutoff regions, which are present when collisions are not taken into account. The implications of these results for the modeling of high-frequency waves in solar plasmas are discussed.

  16. Frequency and amplitude stabilization in MEMS and NEMS oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changyao; Lopez, Omar Daniel; Czaplewski, David A.

    2017-06-14

    This invention comprises a nonlinear micro- and nano-mechanical resonator that can maintain frequency of operation and amplitude of operation for a period of time after all external power has been removed from the device. Utilizing specific nonlinear dynamics of the micromechanical resonator, mechanical energy at low frequencies can be input and stored in higher frequencies modes, thus using the multiple degrees of freedom of the resonator to extend its energy storage capacity. Furthermore, the energy stored in multiple vibrational modes can be used to maintain the resonator oscillating for a fixed period of time, even without an external power supply. This is the first demonstration of an "autonomous" frequency source that can maintain a constant frequency and vibrating amplitude when no external power is provided, making it ideal for applications requiring an oscillator in low power, or limited and intermittent power supplies.

  17. Kepler observations of the high-amplitude δ Scuti star V2367 Cyg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balona, L. A.; Lenz, P.; Antoci, V.

    2012-01-01

    We analyse Kepler observations of the high-amplitude δ Scuti (HADS) star V2367 Cyg (KIC 9408694). The variations are dominated by a mode with frequency f1= 5.6611 d−1. Two other independent modes with f2= 7.1490 d−1 and f3= 7.7756 d−1 have amplitudes an order of magnitude smaller than f1. Nearly...... all the light variation is due to these three modes and their combination frequencies, but several hundred other frequencies of very low amplitude are also present. The amplitudes of the principal modes may vary slightly with time. The star has twice the projected rotational velocity of any other HADS...... star, which makes it unusual. We find a correlation between the phases of the combination frequencies and their pulsation frequencies, which is not understood. Since modes of highest amplitude in HADS stars are normally radial modes, we assumed that this would also be true in this star. However...

  18. Frequency-domain inversion using the amplitude of the derivative wavefield with respect to the angular frequency

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-01-01

    The instantaneous traveltime based inversion was developed to solve the phase wrapping problem, thus generating long-wavelength structures even for a high single-frequency. However, it required aggressive damping to insure proper convergence. A reason for that is the potential for unstable division in the calculation of the instantaneous traveltime for low damping factors. Thus, we propose an inversion algorithm using the amplitude of the derivative wavefield to avoid the unstable division process. Since the amplitude of the derivative wavefield contains the unwrapped-phase information, its inversion has the potential to provide robust inversion results. On the other hand, the damping term rapidly diminishes the amplitude of the derivative wavefield at far source-receiver offsets. As an alternative, we suggest using the logarithmic amplitude of the derivative wavefield. The gradient of this inversion algorithm is obtained by the back-propagation approach, based on the adjoint-state technique. Numerical examples show that the logarithmic-amplitude approach yields better convergent results than the instantaneous traveltime inversion, whereas the pure-amplitude approach does not show much convergence.

  19. Effect of frequency on amplitude-dependent internal friction in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Naoki; Atsumi, Tomohiro; Nishino, Yoichi

    2006-01-01

    Amplitude-dependent internal friction (ADIF) was measured in a polycrystalline niobium using four modes of flexural vibration from the fundamental to the third-order resonance at room temperature. The ADIF was detected in each vibration mode. The internal-friction versus strain-amplitude curve of the ADIF shifted to a larger strain-amplitude range as frequency increased. The stress-strain curves were derived from the ADIF data, and the microplastic flow stress defined as the stress required to produce a plastic strain of 1 x 10 -9 was read from the stress-strain curves. It was found that the microplastic flow stress was proportional to the frequency

  20. Effect of frequency on amplitude-dependent internal friction in niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, Naoki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: ide@nitech.ac.jp; Atsumi, Tomohiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nishino, Yoichi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2006-12-20

    Amplitude-dependent internal friction (ADIF) was measured in a polycrystalline niobium using four modes of flexural vibration from the fundamental to the third-order resonance at room temperature. The ADIF was detected in each vibration mode. The internal-friction versus strain-amplitude curve of the ADIF shifted to a larger strain-amplitude range as frequency increased. The stress-strain curves were derived from the ADIF data, and the microplastic flow stress defined as the stress required to produce a plastic strain of 1 x 10{sup -9} was read from the stress-strain curves. It was found that the microplastic flow stress was proportional to the frequency.

  1. External Ear Resonant Amplitude and Frequency of 3-7 Year Old Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Zare

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure external ear resonant amplitude and frequency in children (3-7 years old and to compare with adult measures. Method and materials: The external ear resonance peak amplitude and frequency of 63 children 3-7 years old were recorded. All of the children had normal tympanogram and there was no cerumen in external auditory canal. 20 adult of 21-24 years old (10 male , 10 female were selected in order to compare with children that had normal tympanogram. The tests included : 1-otoscopy 2- tympanometry 3-microphone probe tube test. Results: The average of resonance peak frequency for children and adult is 4200 Hz and 3200 Hz , respectively. The resonance frequency of children had significantly diffrence with average of resonance frequency in adults. The average of resonance peak amplitude for children and adult is 17.70 dB and 17.17 dB , respectively. Conclusion: Resonant frequency and amplitude affect the hearing aid prescription and fitting process and calculating insertion gain; so, this measures seem should be considered in children hearing aid fitting.

  2. Modulated Source Interferometry with Combined Amplitude and Frequency Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved interferometer is produced by modifying a conventional interferometer to include amplitude and/or frequency modulation of a coherent light source at radio or higher frequencies. The phase of the modulation signal can be detected in an interfering beam from an interferometer and can be used to determine the actual optical phase of the beam. As such, this improvement can be adapted to virtually any two-beam interferometer, including: Michelson, Mach-Zehnder, and Sagnac interferometers. The use of an amplitude modulated coherent tight source results in an interferometer that combines the wide range advantages of coherent interferometry with the precise distance measurement advantages of white light interferometry.

  3. Frequency-dependent changes in amplitude of low-frequency oscillations in depression: A resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Kong, Qingmei; Li, Ke; Su, Yunai; Zeng, Yawei; Zhang, Qinge; Dai, Wenji; Xia, Mingrui; Wang, Gang; Jin, Zhen; Yu, Xin; Si, Tianmei

    2016-02-12

    We conducted this fMRI study to examine whether the alterations in amplitudes of low-frequency oscillation (LFO) of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients were frequency dependent. The LFO amplitudes (as indexed by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation [ALFF] and fractional ALFF [fALFF]) within 4 narrowly-defined frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027Hz, slow-4: 0.027-0.073Hz, slow-3: 0.073-0.198Hz, and slow-2: 0.198-0.25Hz) were computed using resting-state fMRI data of 35 MDD patients and 32 healthy subjects. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on ALFF and fALFF both within the low frequency bands of slow-4 and slow-5 and within all of the four bands. We observed significant main effects of group and frequency on ALFF and fALFF in widely distributed brain regions. Importantly, significant group and frequency interaction effects were observed in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, in a left-sided fashion, the bilateral posterior cingulate and precuneus, during ANOVA both within slow-4 and slow-5 bands and within all the frequency bands. The results suggest that the alterations of LFO amplitudes in specific brain regions in MDD patients could be more sensitively detected in the slow-5 rather than the slow-4 bands. The findings may provide guidance for the frequency choice of future resting-state fMRI studies of MDD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dissociable neural response signatures for slow amplitude and frequency modulation in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Molly J; Obleser, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Natural auditory stimuli are characterized by slow fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. However, the degree to which the neural responses to slow amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) are capable of conveying independent time-varying information, particularly with respect to speech communication, is unclear. In the current electroencephalography (EEG) study, participants listened to amplitude- and frequency-modulated narrow-band noises with a 3-Hz modulation rate, and the resulting neural responses were compared. Spectral analyses revealed similar spectral amplitude peaks for AM and FM at the stimulation frequency (3 Hz), but amplitude at the second harmonic frequency (6 Hz) was much higher for FM than for AM. Moreover, the phase delay of neural responses with respect to the full-band stimulus envelope was shorter for FM than for AM. Finally, the critical analysis involved classification of single trials as being in response to either AM or FM based on either phase or amplitude information. Time-varying phase, but not amplitude, was sufficient to accurately classify AM and FM stimuli based on single-trial neural responses. Taken together, the current results support the dissociable nature of cortical signatures of slow AM and FM. These cortical signatures potentially provide an efficient means to dissect simultaneously communicated slow temporal and spectral information in acoustic communication signals.

  5. Nonlinear Vibration of Oscillation Systems using Frequency-Amplitude Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fereidoon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the periodic solutions of free vibration of mechanical systems with third and fifth-order nonlinearity for two examples using He's Frequency-Amplitude Formulation (HFAF.The effectiveness and convenience of the method is illustrated in these examples. It will be shown that the solutions obtained with current method have a fabulous conformity with those achieved from time marching solution. HFAF is easy with powerful concepts and the high accuracy, so it can be found widely applicable in vibrations, especially strong nonlinearity oscillatory problems.

  6. Calcium Input Frequency, Duration and Amplitude Differentially Modulate the Relative Activation of Calcineurin and CaMKII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Stefan, Melanie I.; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    NMDA receptor dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are two prominent forms of synaptic plasticity, both of which are triggered by post-synaptic calcium elevation. To understand how calcium selectively stimulates two opposing processes, we developed a detailed computational model and performed simulations with different calcium input frequencies, amplitudes, and durations. We show that with a total amount of calcium ions kept constant, high frequencies of calcium pulses stimulate calmodulin more efficiently. Calcium input activates both calcineurin and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) at all frequencies, but increased frequencies shift the relative activation from calcineurin to CaMKII. Irrespective of amplitude and duration of the inputs, the total amount of calcium ions injected adjusts the sensitivity of the system to calcium input frequencies. At a given frequency, the quantity of CaMKII activated is proportional to the total amount of calcium. Thus, an input of a small amount of calcium at high frequencies can induce the same activation of CaMKII as a larger amount, at lower frequencies. Finally, the extent of activation of CaMKII signals with high calcium frequency is further controlled by other factors, including the availability of calmodulin, and by the potency of phosphatase inhibitors. PMID:22962589

  7. Modal effects on amplitude perturbations on subionospheric signals (trimpis) deduced from two-frequency measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowden, R.L.; Adams, C.D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Interference between the first two modes of Earth-ionosphere waveguide propagation at the high end of the VLF band (> 18 kHz) increases with distance from the transmitter out to very large distances and can add amplitude perturbations to the phase perturbations (trimpis) produced by lightning-induced electron precipitation (LEP) on the great circle path. Since the two modes have slightly different phase velocities, an interference pattern or standing wave is formed which is shifted slightly along the propagation path by the LEP-induced change in differential phase velocity. The model effect at the receiver depends on the local gradient (along the great circle path) of amplitude with respect to the differential phase. Since this differential or mode beat phase varies with frequency, measurement of the resultant amplitude at two close frequencies enables an estimation of the modal effects. In this study, measurements were made at Dunedin at the two MSK frequencies, 22,250 Hz and 22,350 Hz, of the transmitter NWC, during a night of frequent one-dimensional trimpis (i.e., those produced by large-area LEP occurring close to the great circle path) and of strong and varying modal interference. Modal generation or modification of trimpi amplitude was related to the local gradient of amplitude as expected. From these results it was deduced that modal modification of echo trimpis (those produced by small area LEP occurring well off the great circle path), even under extreme conditions, is insignificant

  8. An amplitude modulated radio frequency plasma generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Fan; Li, Xiaoping; Liu, Yanming; Liu, Donglin; Yang, Min; Xie, Kai; Yao, Bo

    2017-04-01

    A glow discharge plasma generator and diagnostic system has been developed to study the effects of rapidly variable plasmas on electromagnetic wave propagation, mimicking the plasma sheath conditions encountered in space vehicle reentry. The plasma chamber is 400 mm in diameter and 240 mm in length, with a 300-mm-diameter unobstructed clear aperture. Electron densities produced are in the mid 1010 electrons/cm3. An 800 W radio frequency (RF) generator is capacitively coupled through an RF matcher to an internally cooled stainless steel electrode to form the plasma. The RF power is amplitude modulated by a waveform generator that operates at different frequencies. The resulting plasma contains electron density modulations caused by the varying power levels. A 10 GHz microwave horn antenna pair situated on opposite sides of the chamber serves as the source and detector of probe radiation. The microwave power feed to the source horn is split and one portion is sent directly to a high-speed recording oscilloscope. On mixing this with the signal from the pickup horn antenna, the plasma-induced phase shift between the two signals gives the path-integrated electron density with its complete time dependent variation. Care is taken to avoid microwave reflections and extensive shielding is in place to minimize electronic pickup. Data clearly show the low frequency modulation of the electron density as well as higher harmonics and plasma fluctuations.

  9. Numerical study of turbulent channel flow perturbed by spanwise topographic heterogeneity: Amplitude and frequency modulation within low- and high-momentum pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Ankit; Anderson, William

    2018-04-01

    We have studied the effects of topographically driven secondary flows on inner-outer interaction in turbulent channel flow. Recent studies have revealed that large-scale motions in the logarithmic region impose an amplitude and frequency modulation on the dynamics of small-scale structures near the wall. This led to development of a predictive model for near-wall dynamics, which has practical relevance for large-eddy simulations. Existing work on amplitude modulation has focused on smooth-wall flows; however, Anderson [J. Fluid Mech. 789, 567 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2015.744] addressed the problem of rough-wall turbulent channel flow in which the correlation profiles for amplitude modulation showed trends similar to those reported by Mathis et al. [Phys. Fluids 21, 111703 (2009), 10.1063/1.3267726]. For the present study, we considered flow over surfaces with a prominent spanwise heterogeneity, such that domain-scale turbulent secondary flows in the form of counter-rotating vortices are sustained within the flow. (We also show results for flow over a homogeneous roughness, which serves as a benchmark against the spanwise-perturbed cases.) The vortices are anchored to the topography such that prominent upwelling and downwelling occur above the low and high roughness, respectively. We have quantified the extent to which such secondary flows disrupt the distribution of spectral density across constituent wavelengths throughout the depth of the flow, which has direct implications for the existence of amplitude and frequency modulation. We find that the distinct outer peak associated with large-scale motions—the "modulators"—is preserved within the upwelling zone but vanishes in the downwelling zone. Within the downwelling zones, structures are steeper and shorter. Single- and two-point correlations for inner-outer amplitude and frequency modulation demonstrate insensitivity to resolution across cases. We also show a pronounced crossover between the single- and two

  10. New approach of determinations of earthquake moment magnitude using near earthquake source duration and maximum displacement amplitude of high frequency energy radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunawan, H.; Puspito, N. T.; Ibrahim, G.; Harjadi, P. J. P. [ITB, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Tecnology (Indonesia); BMKG (Indonesia)

    2012-06-20

    The new approach method to determine the magnitude by using amplitude displacement relationship (A), epicenter distance ({Delta}) and duration of high frequency radiation (t) has been investigated for Tasikmalaya earthquake, on September 2, 2009, and their aftershock. Moment magnitude scale commonly used seismic surface waves with the teleseismic range of the period is greater than 200 seconds or a moment magnitude of the P wave using teleseismic seismogram data and the range of 10-60 seconds. In this research techniques have been developed a new approach to determine the displacement amplitude and duration of high frequency radiation using near earthquake. Determination of the duration of high frequency using half of period of P waves on the seismograms displacement. This is due tothe very complex rupture process in the near earthquake. Seismic data of the P wave mixing with other wave (S wave) before the duration runs out, so it is difficult to separate or determined the final of P-wave. Application of the 68 earthquakes recorded by station of CISI, Garut West Java, the following relationship is obtained: Mw = 0.78 log (A) + 0.83 log {Delta}+ 0.69 log (t) + 6.46 with: A (m), d (km) and t (second). Moment magnitude of this new approach is quite reliable, time processing faster so useful for early warning.

  11. New approach of determinations of earthquake moment magnitude using near earthquake source duration and maximum displacement amplitude of high frequency energy radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, H.; Puspito, N. T.; Ibrahim, G.; Harjadi, P. J. P.

    2012-06-01

    The new approach method to determine the magnitude by using amplitude displacement relationship (A), epicenter distance (Δ) and duration of high frequency radiation (t) has been investigated for Tasikmalaya earthquake, on September 2, 2009, and their aftershock. Moment magnitude scale commonly used seismic surface waves with the teleseismic range of the period is greater than 200 seconds or a moment magnitude of the P wave using teleseismic seismogram data and the range of 10-60 seconds. In this research techniques have been developed a new approach to determine the displacement amplitude and duration of high frequency radiation using near earthquake. Determination of the duration of high frequency using half of period of P waves on the seismograms displacement. This is due tothe very complex rupture process in the near earthquake. Seismic data of the P wave mixing with other wave (S wave) before the duration runs out, so it is difficult to separate or determined the final of P-wave. Application of the 68 earthquakes recorded by station of CISI, Garut West Java, the following relationship is obtained: Mw = 0.78 log (A) + 0.83 log Δ + 0.69 log (t) + 6.46 with: A (m), d (km) and t (second). Moment magnitude of this new approach is quite reliable, time processing faster so useful for early warning.

  12. New approach of determinations of earthquake moment magnitude using near earthquake source duration and maximum displacement amplitude of high frequency energy radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunawan, H.; Puspito, N. T.; Ibrahim, G.; Harjadi, P. J. P.

    2012-01-01

    The new approach method to determine the magnitude by using amplitude displacement relationship (A), epicenter distance (Δ) and duration of high frequency radiation (t) has been investigated for Tasikmalaya earthquake, on September 2, 2009, and their aftershock. Moment magnitude scale commonly used seismic surface waves with the teleseismic range of the period is greater than 200 seconds or a moment magnitude of the P wave using teleseismic seismogram data and the range of 10-60 seconds. In this research techniques have been developed a new approach to determine the displacement amplitude and duration of high frequency radiation using near earthquake. Determination of the duration of high frequency using half of period of P waves on the seismograms displacement. This is due tothe very complex rupture process in the near earthquake. Seismic data of the P wave mixing with other wave (S wave) before the duration runs out, so it is difficult to separate or determined the final of P-wave. Application of the 68 earthquakes recorded by station of CISI, Garut West Java, the following relationship is obtained: Mw = 0.78 log (A) + 0.83 log Δ+ 0.69 log (t) + 6.46 with: A (m), d (km) and t (second). Moment magnitude of this new approach is quite reliable, time processing faster so useful for early warning.

  13. Amplitude and frequency stabilized solid-state lasers in the near infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laporta, P.; Taccheo, S.; Marano, M.; Svelto, O.; Bava, E.; Galzerano, G.; Svelto, C.

    2001-01-01

    In this article we present a comprehensive review of the work done by our group on the amplitude and frequency stabilization of diode-pumped near-infrared solid-state lasers. In particular, we describe experiments based on single-mode Nd:YAG (1064 nm), Er-Yb:glass (1530-1560 nm), and Tm-Ho:YAG (2097 nm) lasers, end-pumped by semiconductor laser diodes. Amplitude stabilization is achieved by means of optoelectronic control loops sensing the laser intensity fluctuations and feeding back the error signal to the current of the pump diodes. Frequency stabilization is pursued using rovibrational molecular lines as absolute frequency references by means of various frequency locking techniques. The most interesting stability results are described in some detail whereas the wide literature cited through the paper provides for a useful reference list of related topics and experiments. (author)

  14. Non-linear Vibration of Oscillation Systems using Frequency-Amplitude Formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereidoon, A.; Ghadimi, M.; Barari, Amin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the periodic solutions of free vibration of mechanical systems with third and fifthorder nonlinearity for two examples using He’s Frequency Amplitude Formulation (HFAF).The effectiveness and convenience of the method is illustrated in these examples. It will be shown that t...... that the solutions obtained with current method have a fabulous conformity with those achieved from time marching solution. HFAF is easy with powerful concepts and the high accuracy, so it can be found widely applicable in vibrations, especially strong nonlinearity oscillatory problems....

  15. Low- and high-frequency subcortical SEP amplitude reduction during pure passive movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insola, Angelo; Padua, Luca; Mazzone, Paolo; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effect of pure passive movement on both cortical and subcortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs). Median nerve SEPs were recorded in 8 patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) and two patients with essential tremor. PD patients underwent electrode implantation in the subthalamic (STN) nucleus (3 patients) and pedunculopontine (PPTg) nucleus (5 patients), while 2 patients with essential tremor were implanted in the ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM) of the thalamus. In anesthetized patients, SEPs were recorded at rest and during a passive movement of the thumb of the stimulated wrist from the intracranial electrode contacts and from the scalp. Also the high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) were analyzed. Amplitudes of both deep and scalp components were decreased during passive movement, but the reduction was higher at cortical than subcortical level. Also the HFOs were reduced by movement. The different amount of the movement-related decrease suggests that the cortical SEP gating is not only the result of a subcortical somatosensory volley attenuation, but a further mechanism acting at cortical level should be considered. Our results are important for understanding the physiological mechanism of the sensory-motor interaction during passive movement. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pulse amplitude and frequency effects in a pulsed packed column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, S H

    1954-04-15

    A study has been made of the effect on the efficiency and capacity of applying pulses of varying amplitude and frequency to a packed column. In the efficiency studies, the maximum efficiency was obtained with a pulse having an amplitude of 3/8'' and a frequency of 140 cycles per minute. Under these conditions, the column was about five times as efficient as a simple packed column. Two general types of results were obtained in the capacity studies. Under certain conditions, the capacity increased over that of a simple packed column, but under others, it decreased. Some of the factors causing this were investigated but the fundamental reasons were not determined due to a lack of personnel for the necessary experiments. (author)

  17. Pulse amplitude and frequency effects in a pulsed packed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, S.H.

    1954-04-01

    A study has been made of the effect on the efficiency and capacity of applying pulses of varying amplitude and frequency to a packed column. In the efficiency studies, the maximum efficiency was obtained with a pulse having an amplitude of 3/8'' and a frequency of 140 cycles per minute. Under these conditions, the column was about five times as efficient as a simple packed column. Two general types of results were obtained in the capacity studies. Under certain conditions, the capacity increased over that of a simple packed column, but under others, it decreased. Some of the factors causing this were investigated but the fundamental reasons were not determined due to a lack of personnel for the necessary experiments. (author)

  18. Computationally Efficient Amplitude Modulated Sinusoidal Audio Coding using Frequency-Domain Linear Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M. G.; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2006-01-01

    A method for amplitude modulated sinusoidal audio coding is presented that has low complexity and low delay. This is based on a subband processing system, where, in each subband, the signal is modeled as an amplitude modulated sum of sinusoids. The envelopes are estimated using frequency......-domain linear prediction and the prediction coefficients are quantized. As a proof of concept, we evaluate different configurations in a subjective listening test, and this shows that the proposed method offers significant improvements in sinusoidal coding. Furthermore, the properties of the frequency...

  19. Dynamic force microscopy with quartz tuning forks at high oscillation amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labardi, M

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic force microscopy (DFM) with the self-oscillator (SO) method allows reasonably high scanning rates even with high Q-factors of the resonant force sensor, typical of cantilevers in ultra-high vacuum and of quartz tuning forks. However, due to simpler interpretation of force spectroscopy measurements, small oscillation amplitudes (sub-nm level) are generally preferred. In applications like 'apertureless' scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), oscillation amplitudes of the order of 5-10 nm are needed to increase optical sensitivity and to apply standard optical artefact suppression methods. This motivates the study of the behaviour of tuning forks driven at such high amplitudes, as compared to usual air-operated cantilevers. Both constant-excitation-amplitude (CE) and constant-oscillation-amplitude (CA) modes of SO-DFM are analysed, since the CA mode is more convenient for SNOM applications, denoting remarkable differences. In particular, possible instability effects, previously found in CE mode, are not anticipated for CA mode. It is shown how resonance and approach ('isophase') curves in both modes can be conveniently described in terms of the usual 'normalized frequency shift' γ and of a 'normalized gain' η, defined as a measurement of surface dissipation

  20. High-frequency modulation of ion-acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, N. W.

    1972-01-01

    A large amplitude, high-frequency electromagnetic oscillation is impressed on a nonrelativistic, collisionless plasma from an external source. The frequency is chosen to be far from the plasma frequency (in fact, lower). The resulting electron velocity distribution function strongly modifies the propagation of ion-acoustic waves parallel to the oscillating electric field. The complex frequency is calculated numerically.

  1. Stable dynamics in forced systems with sufficiently high/low forcing frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartuccelli, M; Gentile, G; Wright, J A

    2016-08-01

    We consider parametrically forced Hamiltonian systems with one-and-a-half degrees of freedom and study the stability of the dynamics when the frequency of the forcing is relatively high or low. We show that, provided the frequency is sufficiently high, Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theorem may be applied even when the forcing amplitude is far away from the perturbation regime. A similar result is obtained for sufficiently low frequency, but in that case we need the amplitude of the forcing to be not too large; however, we are still able to consider amplitudes which are outside of the perturbation regime. In addition, we find numerically that the dynamics may be stable even when the forcing amplitude is very large, well beyond the range of validity of the analytical results, provided the frequency of the forcing is taken correspondingly low.

  2. Initial frequency shift of large amplitude plasma wave, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, K.; Sugihara, R.; Ohsawa, Y.; Kamimura, T.

    1979-07-01

    A nonlinear complex frequency shift of the ion acoustic wave in the initial phase defined by 0 0 and ωsub(s)/k as long as ωsub(s) >> γsub( l), where phi 0 , ωsub(s), γsub( l) and t sub(c) are the initial value of the potential, the frequency of the wave, the linear Landau damping coefficient and the time for the first minimum of the amplitude oscillation, respectively. A simulation study is also carried out. The results confirm the validity of the theory. (author)

  3. Sex-dependent alterations in resting-state cerebral blood flow, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and their coupling relationship in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaomei; Wang, Di; Zhou, Yujing; Zhuo, Chuanjun; Qin, Wen; Zhu, Jiajia; Yu, Chunshui

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate sex-dependent alterations in resting-state relative cerebral blood flow, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and relative cerebral blood flow-amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations coupling in patients with schizophrenia. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and three-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling imaging were performed to obtain resting-state amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and relative cerebral blood flow in 95 schizophrenia patients and 99 healthy controls. Sex differences in relative cerebral blood flow and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations were compared in both groups. Diagnostic group differences in relative cerebral blood flow, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and relative cerebral blood flow-amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations coupling were compared in male and female subjects, respectively. In both healthy controls and schizophrenia patients, the males had higher relative cerebral blood flow in anterior brain regions and lower relative cerebral blood flow in posterior brain regions than did the females. Compared with multiple regions exhibiting sex differences in relative cerebral blood flow, only the left middle frontal gyrus had a significant sex difference in amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations. In the females, schizophrenia patients exhibited increased relative cerebral blood flow and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the basal ganglia, thalamus and hippocampus and reduced relative cerebral blood flow and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the frontal, parietal and occipital regions compared with those of healthy controls. However, there were fewer brain regions with diagnostic group differences in the males than in the females. Brain regions with diagnostic group differences in relative cerebral blood flow and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations only partially overlapped. Only the female patients exhibited increased relative cerebral

  4. Utilizing time-frequency amplitude and phase synchrony measure to assess feedback processing in a gambling task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Adreanna T M; Tootell, Anne V; Fix, Spencer T; Aviyente, Selin; Bernat, Edward M

    2018-04-29

    The neurophysiological mechanisms involved in the evaluation of performance feedback have been widely studied in the ERP literature over the past twenty years, but understanding has been limited by the use of traditional time-domain amplitude analytic approaches. Gambling outcome valence has been identified as an important factor modulating event-related potential (ERP) components, most notably the feedback negativity (FN). Recent work employing time-frequency analysis has shown that processes indexed by the FN are confounded in the time-domain and can be better represented as separable feedback-related processes in the theta (3-7 Hz) and delta (0-3 Hz) frequency bands. In addition to time-frequency amplitude analysis, phase synchrony measures have begun to further our understanding of performance evaluation by revealing how feedback information is processed within and between various brain regions. The current study aimed to provide an integrative assessment of time-frequency amplitude, inter-trial phase synchrony, and inter-channel phase synchrony changes following monetary feedback in a gambling task. Results revealed that time-frequency amplitude activity explained separable loss and gain processes confounded in the time-domain. Furthermore, phase synchrony measures explained unique variance above and beyond amplitude measures and demonstrated enhanced functional integration between medial prefrontal and bilateral frontal, motor, and occipital regions for loss relative to gain feedback. These findings demonstrate the utility of assessing time-frequency amplitude, inter-trial phase synchrony, and inter-channel phase synchrony together to better elucidate the neurophysiology of feedback processing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Amplitude of Low-Frequency Fluctuations in Multiple-Frequency Bands in Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jie; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Fuqing; Bai, Lijun; Kuang, Hongmei; He, Laichang; Zeng, Xianjun; Gong, Honghan

    2016-01-01

    Functional disconnectivity during the resting state has been observed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients during the acute stage. However, it remains largely unknown whether the abnormalities are related to specific frequency bands of the low-frequency oscillations (LFO). Here, we used the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) to examine the amplitudes of LFO in different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.073 Hz; and typical: 0.01-0.08 Hz) in patients with acute mTBI. A total of 24 acute mTBI patients and 24 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls participated in this study. In the typical band, acute mTBI patients showed lower standardized ALFF in the right middle frontal gyrus and higher standardized ALFF in the right lingual/fusiform gyrus and left middle occipital gyrus. Further analyses showed that the difference between groups was concentrated in a narrower (slow-4) frequency band. In the slow-5 band, mTBI patients only exhibited higher standardized ALFF in the occipital areas. No significant correlation between the mini-mental state examination score and the standardized ALFF value was found in any brain region in the three frequency bands. Finally, no significant interaction between frequency bands and groups was found in any brain region. We concluded that the abnormality of spontaneous brain activity in acute mTBI patients existed in the frontal lobe as well as in distributed brain regions associated with integrative, sensory, and emotional roles, and the abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in different brain regions could be better detected by the slow-4 band. These findings might contribute to a better understanding of local neural psychopathology of acute mTBI. Future studies should take the frequency bands into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity of mTBI patients.

  6. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in multiple-frequency bands in acute mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie eZhan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional disconnectivity during the resting state has been observed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI patients during the acute stage. However, it remains largely unknown whether the abnormalities are related to specific frequency bands of the low-frequency oscillations (LFO. Here, we used the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF to examine the amplitudes of LFO in different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01–0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027–0.073 Hz; and typical: 0.01–0.08 Hz in patients with acute mTBI. A total of 24 acute mTBI patients and 24 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls (HC participated in this study. In the typical band, acute mTBI patients showed lower standardized ALFF in the right middle frontal gyrus and higher standardized ALFF in the right lingual/fusiform gyrus and left middle occipital gyrus. Further analyses showed that the difference between groups was concentrated in a narrower (slow-4 frequency band. In the slow-5 band, mTBI patients only exhibited higher standardized ALFF in the occipital areas. No significant correlation between the MMSE score and the standardized ALFF value was found in any brain region in the three frequency bands. Finally, no significant interaction between frequency bands and groups was found in any brain region. We concluded that the abnormality of spontaneous brain activity in acute mTBI patients existed in the frontal lobe as well as in distributed brain regions associated with integrative, sensory and emotional roles, and the abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in different brain regions could be better detected by the slow-4 band. These findings might contribute to a better understanding of local neural psychopathology of acute mTBI. Future studies should take the frequency bands into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity of mTBI patients.

  7. Anomalous high-frequency resistivity of a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruer, W.L.; Dawson, J.M.

    1971-06-01

    In one- and two-dimensional computer simulations we investigate anomalous high-frequency resistivity in a plasma driven by a large electric field oscillating near the electron plasma frequency. The large field excites the oscillating two-stream and the ion-acoustic decay instabilities in agreement with the linear theory. When the ion and electron fluctuations saturate, a strong anomalous heating of the plasma sets in. This strong heating is due to an efficient coupling of the externally imposed large electric field to the plasma by ion fluctuations. We determine the anomalous collision frequency and the saturation fluctuation amplitudes as a function of the external field amplitude and frequency, and the electron-ion mass ratio. A simple nonlinear theory gives results in reasonable agreement with simulations. 24 refs., 10 figs

  8. Calibration of semi-stochastic procedure for simulating high-frequency ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan, Emel; Stewart, Jonathan P.; Graves, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Broadband ground motion simulation procedures typically utilize physics-based modeling at low frequencies, coupled with semi-stochastic procedures at high frequencies. The high-frequency procedure considered here combines deterministic Fourier amplitude spectra (dependent on source, path, and site models) with random phase. Previous work showed that high-frequency intensity measures from this simulation methodology attenuate faster with distance and have lower intra-event dispersion than in empirical equations. We address these issues by increasing crustal damping (Q) to reduce distance attenuation bias and by introducing random site-to-site variations to Fourier amplitudes using a lognormal standard deviation ranging from 0.45 for Mw  100 km).

  9. Effects of large pressure amplitude low frequency noise in the parotid gland perivasculo-ductal connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Pedro; Brito, José; Mendes, João; da Fonseca, Jorge; Águas, Artur; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    In tissues and organs exposed to large pressure amplitude low frequency noise fibrosis occurs in the absence of inflammatory signs, which is thought to be a protective response. In the parotid gland the perivasculo-ductal connective tissue surrounds arteries, veins and the ductal tree. Perivasculo-ductal connective tissue is believed to function as a mechanical stabilizer of the glandular tissue. In order to quantify the proliferation of perivasculo-ductal connective tissue in large pressure amplitude low frequency noise-exposed rats we used sixty Wistar rats which were equally divided into 6 groups. One group kept in silence, and the remaining five exposed to continuous large pressure amplitude low frequency noise: g1-168h (1 week); g2-504h (3 weeks); g3-840h (5 weeks); g4-1512h (9 weeks); and g5-2184h (13 weeks). After exposure, parotid glands were removed and the perivasculo-ductal connective tissue area was measured in all groups. We applied ANOVA statistical analysis, using SPSS 13.0. The global trend is an increase in the average perivasculo-ductal connective tissue areas, that develops linearly and significantly with large pressure amplitude low frequency noise exposure time (p connective tissue. Hence, these results show that in response to large pressure amplitude low frequency noise exposure, rat parotid glands increase their perivasculo-ductal connective tissue.

  10. Nonlinear frequency shift of finite-amplitude electrostatic surface waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenflo, L.

    1989-01-01

    The problem concerning the appropriate form for the nonlinear frequency shift arising from slow density modulations of electrostatic surface waves in a semi-infinite unmagnetized plasma is reconsidered. The spatial dependence of the wave amplitude normal to the surface is kept general in order to allow for possible nonlinear attenuation behaviour of the surface waves. It is found that if the frequency shift is expressed as a function of the density and its gradient then the result is identical with that of Zhelyazkov, I. Proceedings International Conference on Plasma Physics, Kiev, 1987, Vol. 2, p. 694, who assumed a linear exponential attenuation behaviour. (author)

  11. Electrically-driven pure amplitude and frequency modulation in a quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehzad, Atif; Brochard, Pierre; Matthey, Renaud; Blaser, Stéphane; Gresch, Tobias; Maulini, Richard; Muller, Antoine; Südmeyer, Thomas; Schilt, Stéphane

    2018-04-30

    We present pure amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) achieved electrically in a quantum cascade laser (QCL) equipped with an integrated resistive heater (IH). The QCL output power scales linearly with the current applied to the active region (AR), but decreases with the IH current, while the emission frequency decreases with both currents. Hence, a simultaneous modulation applied to the current of the AR and IH sections with a proper relative amplitude and phase can suppress the AM, resulting in a pure FM, or vice-versa. The adequate modulation parameters depend on the applied modulation frequency. Therefore, they were first determined from the individual measurements of the AM and FM transfer functions obtained for a modulation applied to the current of the AR or IH section, respectively. By optimizing the parameters of the two modulations, we demonstrate a reduction of the spurious AM or FM by almost two orders of magnitude at characteristic frequencies of 1 and 10 kHz compared to the use of the AR current only.

  12. High frequency, high amplitude and low energy earthquake study of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernero, R.M.; Lee, A.J.H.; Sobel, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are designed for a seismic input spectrum based on U.S. acceleration time histories. However, data recorded near several earthquakes, mostly in the Eastern U.S., are richer in high frequency energy. This paper focuses on the evaluation of one of these events, i.e., the 1986 Ohio earthquake approximately 10 miles from the Perry nuclear power plant. The Perry Seismic Category I structures were reanalyzed using the in-structure recorded earthquake motions. The calculated in-structure response spectra and recorded response spectra have the same general trends, which shows the buildings are capable of responding to high frequency earthquake motion. Dynamic stresses calculated using the Ohio earthquake recorded motions are substantially lower than the design stresses. The seismic qualification of a wide sample of equipment was reassessed using the Ohio earthquake recorded motions and the margins were found to be larger than one. The 1986 Ohio earthquake was also shown to possess much lower energy content and ductility demand than the design spectra. For the Perry case, the seismic design was shown to have adequate safety margins to accommodate the 1986 Ohio earthquake, even though the design spectra were exceeded at about 20 Hz. The NRC is evaluating the need to generically modify design spectra in light of the recent high frequency recordings. (orig.)

  13. Contributions of contour frequency, amplitude, and luminance to the watercolor effect estimated by conjoint measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardin, Peggy; Devinck, Frédéric; Dojat, Michel; Knoblauch, Kenneth

    2014-04-10

    The watercolor effect is a long-range, assimilative, filling-in phenomenon induced by a pair of distant, wavy contours of different chromaticities. Here, we measured joint influences of the contour frequency and amplitude and the luminance of the interior contour on the strength of the effect. Contour pairs, each enclosing a circular region, were presented with two of the dimensions varying independently across trials (luminance/frequency, luminance/amplitude, frequency/amplitude) in a conjoint measurement paradigm (Luce & Tukey, 1964). In each trial, observers judged which of the stimuli evoked the strongest fill-in color. Control stimuli were identical except that the contours were intertwined and generated little filling-in. Perceptual scales were estimated by a maximum likelihood method (Ho, Landy, & Maloney, 2008). An additive model accounted for the joint contributions of any pair of dimensions. As shown previously using difference scaling (Devinck & Knoblauch, 2012), the strength increases with luminance of the interior contour. The strength of the phenomenon was nearly independent of the amplitude of modulation of the contour but increased with its frequency up to an asymptotic level. On average, the strength of the effect was similar along a given dimension regardless of the other dimension with which it was paired, demonstrating consistency of the underlying estimated perceptual scales.

  14. Noninvasive Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease Using 12-Lead High-Frequency Electrocardiograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian

    2006-01-01

    A noninvasive, sensitive method of diagnosing certain pathological conditions of the human heart involves computational processing of digitized electrocardiographic (ECG) signals acquired from a patient at all 12 conventional ECG electrode positions. In the processing, attention is focused on low-amplitude, high-frequency components of those portions of the ECG signals known in the art as QRS complexes. The unique contribution of this method lies in the utilization of signal features and combinations of signal features from various combinations of electrode positions, not reported previously, that have been found to be helpful in diagnosing coronary artery disease and such related pathological conditions as myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. The electronic hardware and software used to acquire the QRS complexes and perform some preliminary analyses of their high-frequency components were summarized in Real-Time, High-Frequency QRS Electrocardiograph (MSC- 23154), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 7 (July 2003), pp. 26-28. To recapitulate, signals from standard electrocardiograph electrodes are preamplified, then digitized at a sampling rate of 1,000 Hz, then analyzed by the software that detects R waves and QRS complexes and analyzes them from several perspectives. The software includes provisions for averaging signals over multiple beats and for special-purpose nonrecursive digital filters with specific low- and high-frequency cutoffs. These filters, applied to the averaged signal, effect a band-pass operation in the frequency range from 150 to 250 Hz. The output of the bandpass filter is the desired high-frequency QRS signal. Further processing is then performed in real time to obtain the beat-to-beat root mean square (RMS) voltage amplitude of the filtered signal, certain variations of the RMS voltage, and such standard measures as the heart rate and R-R interval at any given time. A key signal feature analyzed in the present

  15. Non-linear frequency and amplitude modulation of a nano-contact spin torque oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    Muduli, P. K.; Pogoryelov, Ye.; Bonetti, S.; Consolo, G.; Mancoff, Fred; Åkerman, Johan

    2009-01-01

    We study the current controlled modulation of a nano-contact spin torque oscillator. Three principally different cases of frequency non-linearity ($d^{2}f/dI^{2}_{dc}$ being zero, positive, and negative) are investigated. Standard non-linear frequency modulation theory is able to accurately describe the frequency shifts during modulation. However, the power of the modulated sidebands only agrees with calculations based on a recent theory of combined non-linear frequency and amplitude modulation.

  16. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S

    2016-03-15

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology.

  17. A New Approach to Eliminate High Amplitude Artifacts in EEG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Teixeira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available High amplitude artifacts represent a problem during EEG recordings in neuroscience research. Taking this into account, this paper proposes a method to identify high amplitude artifacts with no requirement for visual inspection, electrooscillogram (EOG reference channel or user assigned parameters. A potential solution to the high amplitude artifacts (HAA elimination is presented based on blind source separation methods. The assumption underlying the selection of components is that HAA are independent of the EEG signal and different HAA can be generated during the EEG recordings. Therefore, the number of components related to HAA is variable and depends on the processed signal, which means that the method is adaptable to the input signal. The results show, when removing the HAA artifacts, the delta band is distorted but all the other frequency bands are preserved. A case study with EEG signals recorded while participants performed on the Halstead Category Test (HCT is presented. After HAA removal, data analysis revealed, as expected, an error-related frontal ERP wave: the feedback-related negativity (FRN in response to feedback stimuli.

  18. High energy hadron spin-flip amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selyugin, O.V.

    2016-01-01

    The high-energy part of the hadron spin-flip amplitude is examined in the framework of the new high-energy general structure (HEGS) model of the elastic hadron scattering at high energies. The different forms of the hadron spin-flip amplitude are compared in the impact parameter representation. It is shown that the existing experimental data of the proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at high energy in the region of the diffraction minimum and at large momentum transfer give support in the presence of the energy-independent part of the hadron spin-flip amplitude with the momentum dependence proposed in the works by Galynskii-Kuraev. [ru

  19. Large Amplitude Low Frequency Waves in a Magnetized Nonuniform Electron-Positron-Ion Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Q. Haque; H. Saleem

    2004-01-01

    @@ It is shown that the large amplitude low-frequency electromagnetic drift waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas might give rise to dipolar vortices. A linear dispersion relation of several coupled electrostatic and electromagnetic low-frequency modes is obtained. The relevance of this work to both laboratory and astrophysical situations is pointed out.

  20. Amplitude-cyclic frequency decomposition of vibration signals for bearing fault diagnosis based on phase editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbini, L.; Eltabach, M.; Hillis, A. J.; du Bois, J. L.

    2018-03-01

    In rotating machine diagnosis different spectral tools are used to analyse vibration signals. Despite the good diagnostic performance such tools are usually refined, computationally complex to implement and require oversight of an expert user. This paper introduces an intuitive and easy to implement method for vibration analysis: amplitude cyclic frequency decomposition. This method firstly separates vibration signals accordingly to their spectral amplitudes and secondly uses the squared envelope spectrum to reveal the presence of cyclostationarity in each amplitude level. The intuitive idea is that in a rotating machine different components contribute vibrations at different amplitudes, for instance defective bearings contribute a very weak signal in contrast to gears. This paper also introduces a new quantity, the decomposition squared envelope spectrum, which enables separation between the components of a rotating machine. The amplitude cyclic frequency decomposition and the decomposition squared envelope spectrum are tested on real word signals, both at stationary and varying speeds, using data from a wind turbine gearbox and an aircraft engine. In addition a benchmark comparison to the spectral correlation method is presented.

  1. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siria, A; Schwartz, W; Chevrier, J [Institut Neel, CNRS-Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Dhez, O; Comin, F [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Torricelli, G [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  2. Study of High and Low Amplitude Wave Trains of Cosmic Ray ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Physics Department, Government T.R.S. College, Rewa (M.P.) 486 001, India. 2Physics Department, A.P.S. University, Rewa (M.P.) 486 003, India. ∗ e-mail: ambika.physics@gmail. .... stations are running parallel to each other. In Fig. 3, we show the frequency distribution of the occurrence of high and low amplitude wave ...

  3. Directional patterns of cross frequency phase and amplitude coupling within the resting state mimic patterns of fMRI functional connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kurt E.; Wander, Jeremiah D.; Ko, Andrew L.; Casimo, Kaitlyn; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Darvas, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Functional imaging investigations into the brain's resting state interactions have yielded a wealth of insight into the intrinsic and dynamic neural architecture supporting cognition and behavior. Electrophysiological studies however have highlighted the fact that synchrony across large-scale cortical systems is composed of spontaneous interactions occurring at timescales beyond the traditional resolution of fMRI, a feature that limits the capacity of fMRI to draw inference on the true directional relationship between network nodes. To approach the question of directionality in resting state signals, we recorded resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) and electrocorticography (ECoG) from four human subjects undergoing invasive epilepsy monitoring. Using a seed-point based approach, we employed phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) and biPhase Locking Values (bPLV), two measures of cross-frequency coupling (CFC) to explore both outgoing and incoming connections between the seed and all non-seed, site electrodes. We observed robust PAC between a wide range of low-frequency phase and high frequency amplitude estimates. However, significant bPLV, a CFC measure of phase-phase synchrony, was only observed at specific narrow low and high frequency bandwidths. Furthermore, the spatial patterns of outgoing PAC connectivity were most closely associated with the rsfMRI connectivity maps. Our results support the hypothesis that PAC is relatively ubiquitous phenomenon serving as a mechanism for coordinating high-frequency amplitudes across distant neuronal assemblies even in absence of overt task structure. Additionally, we demonstrate that the spatial distribution of a seed-point rsfMRI sensorimotor network is strikingly similar to specific patterns of directional PAC. Specifically, the high frequency activities of distal patches of cortex owning membership in a rsfMRI sensorimotor network were most likely to be entrained to the phase of a low frequency rhythm engendered from the

  4. Software for Displaying High-Frequency Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Jason L.

    2003-01-01

    An easy-to-use, intuitive computer program was written to satisfy a need of test operators and data requestors to quickly view and manipulate high-frequency test data recorded at the East and West Test Areas at Marshall Space Flight Center. By enabling rapid analysis, this program makes it possible to reduce times between test runs, thereby potentially reducing the overall cost of test operations. The program can be used to perform quick frequency analysis, using multiple fast- Fourier-transform windowing and amplitude options. The program can generate amplitude-versus-time plots with full zoom capabilities, frequency-component plots at specified time intervals, and waterfall plots (plots of spectral intensity versus frequency at successive small time intervals, showing the changing frequency components over time). There are options for printing of the plots and saving plot data as text files that can be imported into other application programs. The program can perform all of the aforementioned plotting and plot-data-handling functions on a relatively inexpensive computer; other software that performs the same functions requires computers with large amounts of power and memory.

  5. Multiphoton ionization in superintense, high-frequency laser fields. I. General developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pont, M.

    1991-01-01

    This is the first of two papers studying multiphoton ionization (MPI) in superintense, high-frequency laser fields. They are based on a general iteration scheme in increasing powers of the inverse frequency. To lowest order in the frequency, i.e., the high-frequency limit, the atom was shown to be stable against decay by MPI, though distorted. To next order in the iteration, an expression for the MPI amplitude was obtained. In the present paper, we present general developments from this expression, valid for arbitrary polarization, binding potential, intensity, and initial state. First we analyze the symmetry of the angular distributions of photoelectrons determined by this expression for the MPI amplitude. This expression can explain the asymmetries in the angular distributions of photoelectrons occurring in the case of elliptic polarization that were recently reported in experiments. In the radiation regime where our theory applies these asymmetries are, however, weak. In certain instances our theory yields asymmetries in cases where lowest-order perturbation theory (LOPT) fails to predict them. We prove that at low intensities our expression for the MPI amplitude yields results in agreement with LOPT evaluated at high frequencies. An important part of this paper consists, however, of the derivation of an alternative form for the MPI amplitude of atomic hydrogen, which is substantially simpler, though somewhat less accurate. We study the consequences of this simplified expression for the case of linearly polarized fields in the following paper [Phys. Rev. A 44, xxxx (1991)

  6. Relationships between gastric slow wave frequency, velocity, and extracellular amplitude studied by a joint experimental-theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T H-H; Du, P; Angeli, T R; Paskaranandavadivel, N; Erickson, J C; Abell, T L; Cheng, L K; O'Grady, G

    2018-01-01

    Gastric slow wave dysrhythmias are accompanied by deviations in frequency, velocity, and extracellular amplitude, but the inherent association between these parameters in normal activity still requires clarification. This study quantified these associations using a joint experimental-theoretical approach. Gastric pacing was conducted in pigs with simultaneous high-resolution slow wave mapping (32-256 electrodes; 4-7.6 mm spacing). Relationships between period, velocity, and amplitude were quantified and correlated for each wavefront. Human data from two existing mapping control cohorts were analyzed to extract and correlate these same parameters. A validated biophysically based ICC model was also applied in silico to quantify velocity-period relationships during entrainment simulations and velocity-amplitude relationships from membrane potential equations. Porcine pacing studies identified positive correlations for velocity-period (0.13 mm s -1 per 1 s, r 2 =.63, Prelationships and demonstrated dependence on the slow wave recovery phase. Simulated membrane potential relationships were close to these experimental results (100 μV per 1 mm s -1 ). These data quantify the relationships between slow wave frequency, velocity, and extracellular amplitude. The results from both human and porcine studies were in keeping with biophysical models, demonstrating concordance with ICC biophysics. These relationships are important in the regulation of gastric motility and will help to guide interpretations of dysrhythmias. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Nonlinear asteroseismology: insight from amplitude and frequency modulations of oscillation modes in compact pulsators from Kepler photometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong Weikai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear mode interactions are difficult to observe from ground-based telescopes as the typical periods of the modulations induced by those nonlinear phenomena are on timescales of weeks, months, even years. The launch of space telescopes, e.g., Kepler, has tremendously changed the situation and shredded new light on this research field. We present results from Kepler photometry showing evidence that nonlinear interactions between modes occur in the two compact pulsators KIC 8626021, a DB white dwarf, and KIC 10139564, a short period hot B subdwarf. KIC 8626021 and KIC 10139564 had been monitored by Kepler in short-cadence for nearly two years and more than three years without interruption, respectively. By analyzing these high-quality photometric data, we found that the modes within the triplets induced by rotation clearly reveal different behaviors: their frequencies and amplitudes may exhibit either periodic or irregular modulations, or remain constant. These various behaviors of the amplitude and of the frequency modulations of the oscillation modes observed in these two stars are in good agreement with those predicted within the amplitude equation formalism in the case of the nonlinear resonant mode coupling mechanism.

  8. CNV amplitude as a neural correlate for stuttering frequency: A case report of acquired stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoutte, Sarah; Van Borsel, John; Cosyns, Marjan; Batens, Katja; van Mierlo, Pieter; Hemelsoet, Dimitri; Van Roost, Dirk; Corthals, Paul; De Letter, Miet; Santens, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    A neural hallmark of developmental stuttering is abnormal articulatory programming. One of the neurophysiological substrates of articulatory preparation is the contingent negative variation (CNV). Unfortunately, CNV tasks are rarely performed in persons who stutter and mainly focus on the effect of task variation rather than on interindividual variation in stutter related variables. However, variations in motor programming seem to be related to variation in stuttering frequency. The current study presents a case report of acquired stuttering following stroke and stroke related surgery in the left superior temporal gyrus. A speech related CNV task was administered at four points in time with differences in stuttering severity and frequency. Unexpectedly, CNV amplitudes at electrode sites approximating bilateral motor and left inferior frontal gyrus appeared to be inversely proportional to stuttering frequency. The higher the stuttering frequency, the lower the activity for articulatory preparation. Thus, the amount of disturbance in motor programming seems to determine stuttering frequency. At right frontal electrodes, a relative increase in CNV amplitude was seen at the test session with most severe stuttering. Right frontal overactivation is cautiously suggested to be a compensation strategy. In conclusion, late CNV amplitude elicited by a relatively simple speech task seems to be able to provide an objective, neural correlate of stuttering frequency. The present case report supports the hypothesis that motor preparation has an important role in stuttering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Frequency-Specific Alternations in the Amplitude of Low-Frequency Fluctuations in Chronic Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen eChen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, a phantom ringing, buzzing or hissing sensation with potentially debilitating consequences, is thought to arise from aberrant spontaneous neural activity at one or more sites within the central nervous system; however, the location and specific features of these oscillations are poorly understood with respect to specific tinnitus features. Recent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies suggest that aberrant fluctuations in spontaneous low-frequency oscillations (LFO of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal may be an important factor in chronic tinnitus; however, the role that frequency-specific components of LFO play in subjective tinnitus remains unclear. A total of 39 chronic tinnitus patients and 41 well-matched healthy controls participated in the resting-state fMRI scans. The LFO amplitudes were investigated using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF and fractional ALFF (fALFF in two different frequency bands (slow-4: 0.027-0.073 Hz and slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz. We observed significant differences between tinnitus patients and normal controls in ALFF/fALFF in the two bands (slow-4 and slow-5 in several brain regions including the superior frontal gyrus (SFG, inferior frontal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, angular gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and middle occipital gyrus. Across the entire subject pool, significant differences in ALFF/fALFF between the two bands were found in the midbrain, basal ganglia, hippocampus and cerebellum (Slow 4>Slow 5, and in the middle frontal gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus (Slow 5>Slow 4. We also observed significant interaction between frequency bands and patient groups in the orbitofrontal gyrus. Furthermore, tinnitus distress was positively correlated with the magnitude of ALFF in right SFG and the magnitude of fALFF slow-4 band in left SFG, whereas tinnitus duration was positively correlated with the magnitude of ALFF in

  10. Interaural time sensitivity of high-frequency neurons in the inferior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, T C; Kuwada, S; Sujaku, Y

    1984-11-01

    Recent psychoacoustic experiments have shown that interaural time differences provide adequate cues for lateralizing high-frequency sounds, provided the stimuli are complex and not pure tones. We present here physiological evidence in support of these findings. Neurons of high best frequency in the cat inferior colliculus respond to interaural phase differences of amplitude modulated waveforms, and this response depends upon preservation of phase information of the modulating signal. Interaural phase differences were introduced in two ways: by interaural delays of the entire waveform and by binaural beats in which there was an interaural frequency difference in the modulating waveform. Results obtained with these two methods are similar. Our results show that high-frequency cells can respond to interaural time differences of amplitude modulated signals and that they do so by a sensitivity to interaural phase differences of the modulating waveform.

  11. Theoretical Study of Amplitude Modulation Application during Radio Frequency Electrocoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Karpuhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the investigation results of influence of the amplitude-modulated acting signal parameters on the thermoelectric characteristics of biological tissues for a specified geometry of the working electrode section during RF mono-polar electrocoagulation. The geometric model ‘electrode - a biological tissue’ was suggested to study the distribution of power and temperature fields in biological tissue during mono-polar coagulation. The model of biological tissue is represented as a cylinder and the needle electrode is an ellipsoid immersed in the biological tissue. The heat and quasi-electrostatics equations are used as a mathematical model. These equations are solved in Comsol Multiphysics environment.As a result, we have got the following findings: the technique of calculating parameters of the PAM acting signal which has a fixed carrier frequency for the needle electrode of a specified geometry and the immersion depth in biological tissues is suggested. Parameters of PAM signal are determined for this electrode geometry. These parameters provide a 60 ... 80°C heating range of biological tissues near the working part of the tool for different amplitudes of acting signal during RF coagulation. It has been found out that both the temperature and the relaxation frequency of biological tissue depend on exposure time for the needle electrode of a specified geometry and immersion depth of the working part of tool into biological tissue.It is shown that the relaxation frequency of the biological tissue, subjected to the radiofrequency pulses, linearly depends on its heating temperature and can be used as a numerical criterion for maintaining the specified temperature conditions. It is found that the relaxation frequency of the biological tissue depends on the contact area of the tool working part and biological tissues. To reduce this dependence it is necessary to provide automatic current control of the output action.

  12. Multi-fluid Approach to High-frequency Waves in Plasmas. II. Small-amplitude Regime in Partially Ionized Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Gómez, David; Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume, E-mail: david.martinez@uib.es [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2017-03-01

    The presence of neutral species in a plasma has been shown to greatly affect the properties of magnetohydrodynamic waves. For instance, the interaction between ions and neutrals through momentum transfer collisions causes the damping of Alfvén waves and alters their oscillation frequency and phase speed. When the collision frequencies are larger than the frequency of the waves, single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic approximations can accurately describe the effects of partial ionization, since there is a strong coupling between the various species. However, at higher frequencies, the single-fluid models are not applicable and more complex approaches are required. Here, we use a five-fluid model with three ionized and two neutral components, which takes into consideration Hall’s current and Ohm’s diffusion in addition to the friction due to collisions between different species. We apply our model to plasmas composed of hydrogen and helium, and allow the ionization degree to be arbitrary. By analyzing the corresponding dispersion relation and numerical simulations, we study the properties of small-amplitude perturbations. We discuss the effect of momentum transfer collisions on the ion-cyclotron resonances and compare the importance of magnetic resistivity, and ion–neutral and ion–ion collisions on the wave damping at various frequency ranges. Applications to partially ionized plasmas of the solar atmosphere are performed.

  13. Frequency-dependent squeeze-amplitude attenuation and squeeze-angle rotation by electromagnetically induced transparency for gravitational-wave interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.; Goda, Keisuke; Corbitt, Thomas; Mavalvala, Nergis

    2006-01-01

    We study the effects of frequency-dependent squeeze-amplitude attenuation and squeeze-angle rotation by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) on gravitational-wave (GW) interferometers. We propose the use of low-pass, bandpass, and high-pass EIT filters, an S-shaped EIT filter, and an intracavity EIT filter to generate frequency-dependent squeezing for injection into the antisymmetric port of GW interferometers. We find that the EIT filters have several advantages over the previous filter designs with regard to optical losses, compactness, and the tunability of the filter linewidth

  14. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in Internet gaming disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao eLin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies have revealed that the task-related functional brain activities are impaired in Internet gaming disorder (IGD subjects. However, little is known about the alternations in spontaneous brain activities about them. Recent studies have proposed that the brain activities of different frequency ranges are generated by different nervous activities and have different physiological and psychological functions. Thus, in this study, we set to explore the spontaneous brain activities in IGD subjects by measuring the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF, to investigate band-specific changes of resting-state fALFF. We subdivided the frequency range into five bands based on literatures. Comparing to healthy controls, the IGD group showed decreased fALFF values in the cerebellum posterior lobe and increased fALFF values in superior temporal gyrus. Significant interactions between frequency bands and groups were found in the cerebellum, the anterior cingulate, the lingual gyrus, the middle temporal gyrus and the middle frontal gyrus. Those brain regions are proved related to the executive function and decision-making. These results revealed the changed spontaneous brain activity of IGD, which contributed to understanding the underlying pathophysiology of IGD.

  15. Relaxation oscillations induced by amplitude-dependent frequency in dissipative trapped electron mode turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.; Ware, A.S.; Newman, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    A nonlinear frequency shift in dissipative trapped electron mode turbulence is shown to give rise to a relaxation oscillation in the saturated power density spectrum. A simple non-Markovian closure for the coupled evolution of ion momentum and electron density response is developed to describe the oscillations. From solutions of a nonlinear oscillator model based on the closure, it is found that the oscillation is driven by the growth rate, as modified by the amplitude-dependent frequency shift, with inertia provided by the memory of the growth rate of prior amplitudes. This memory arises from time-history integrals common to statistical closures. The memory associated with a finite time of energy transfer between coupled spectrum components does not sustain the oscillation in the simple model. Solutions of the model agree qualitatively with the time-dependent numerical solutions of the original dissipative trapped electron model, yielding oscillations with the proper phase relationship between the fluctuation energy and the frequency shift, the proper evolution of the wave number spectrum shape and particle flux, and a realistic period

  16. Sheath impedance effects in very high frequency plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzenbach, W.; Howling, A.A.; Fivaz, M.; Brunner, S.; Hollenstein, C.

    1995-05-01

    The frequency dependence (13.56 MHz to 70 MHz) of the ion energy distribution at the ground electrode was measured by mass spectrometry in a symmetrical capacitive argon discharge. Reduced sheath impedance at Very High Frequency allows high levels of plasma power and substrate ion flux whilst maintaining low levels of ion energy and electrode voltage. The lower limit of ion bombardment energy is fixed by the sheath floating potential at high frequency, in contrast to low frequencies where only the rf voltage amplitude is determinant. The capacitive sheaths are thinner at high frequencies which accentuates the high frequency reduction in sheath impedance. It is argued that the frequency dependence of sheath impedance is responsible for the principal characteristics of Very High Frequency plasmas. The measurements are summarised by simple physical descriptions and compared with a Particle-In-Cell simulation. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  17. Modulation of high frequency noise by engine tones of small boats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollara, Alexander; Sutin, Alexander; Salloum, Hady

    2017-07-01

    The effect of modulation of high frequency ship noise by propeller rotation frequencies is well known. This modulation is observed with the Detection of Envelope Modulation on Noise (DEMON) algorithm. Analysis of the DEMON spectrum allows the revolutions per minute and number of blades of the propeller to be determined. This work shows that the high frequency noise of a small boat can also be modulated by engine frequencies. Prior studies have not reported high frequency noise amplitude modulated at engine frequencies. This modulation is likely produced by bubbles from the engine exhaust system.

  18. Initial frequency shift of large amplitude plasma wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Ryo; Yamanaka, Kaoru.

    1979-04-01

    A distribution function which is an exact solution to the collisionless Boltzmann equation is obtained in an expansion form in terms of the potential phi(x, t). A complex nonlinear frequency shift ωsub( n)(t) is obtained by use of the Poisson equation and the expansion. The theory is valid for arbitrary phi 0 and v sub(p) as long as ωsub(p) >> γsub( l), and in the initial phase defined by 0 0 , v sub(p), ωsub(p), γsub( l) and t sub(c) are the initial value of phi, the phase velocity, the Langmuir frequency, the linear Landau damping coefficient and the time for the first minimum of the amplitude oscillation. The ωsub( n)(0) does not vanish and Reωsub( n)(0)/γsub( l) > 1 holds even for e phi 0 /T 1 in the initial phase for v sub( p) > v sub( t). The theory reproduces main features of experimental results and that of simulations. (author)

  19. Direct excitation of a high frequency wave by a low frequency wave in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takayasu

    1993-01-01

    A new mechanism is presented of an excitation of a high frequency wave by a low frequency wave in a plasma. This mechanism works when the low frequency wave varies in time in a manner deviated from a usual periodic motion with a constant amplitude. The conversion rate is usually not large but the conversion is done without time delay after the variation of the low frequency wave. The Manley Rowe relation in the usual sense does not hold in this mechanism. This mechanism can excite also waves with same or lower frequencies. (author)

  20. Computational Re-design of Synthetic Genetic Oscillators for Independent Amplitude and Frequency Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazou, Marios; Barahona, Mauricio; Polizzi, Karen M; Stan, Guy-Bart

    2018-04-25

    To perform well in biotechnology applications, synthetic genetic oscillators must be engineered to allow independent modulation of amplitude and period. This need is currently unmet. Here, we demonstrate computationally how two classic genetic oscillators, the dual-feedback oscillator and the repressilator, can be re-designed to provide independent control of amplitude and period and improve tunability-that is, a broad dynamic range of periods and amplitudes accessible through the input "dials." Our approach decouples frequency and amplitude modulation by incorporating an orthogonal "sink module" where the key molecular species are channeled for enzymatic degradation. This sink module maintains fast oscillation cycles while alleviating the translational coupling between the oscillator's transcription factors and output. We characterize the behavior of our re-designed oscillators over a broad range of physiologically reasonable parameters, explain why this facilitates broader function and control, and provide general design principles for building synthetic genetic oscillators that are more precisely controllable. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Recognition of Frequency Modulated Whistle-Like Sounds by a Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and Humans with Transformations in Amplitude, Duration and Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branstetter, Brian K.; DeLong, Caroline M.; Dziedzic, Brandon; Black, Amy; Bakhtiari, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) use the frequency contour of whistles produced by conspecifics for individual recognition. Here we tested a bottlenose dolphin’s (Tursiops truncatus) ability to recognize frequency modulated whistle-like sounds using a three alternative matching-to-sample paradigm. The dolphin was first trained to select a specific object (object A) in response to a specific sound (sound A) for a total of three object-sound associations. The sounds were then transformed by amplitude, duration, or frequency transposition while still preserving the frequency contour of each sound. For comparison purposes, 30 human participants completed an identical task with the same sounds, objects, and training procedure. The dolphin’s ability to correctly match objects to sounds was robust to changes in amplitude with only a minor decrement in performance for short durations. The dolphin failed to recognize sounds that were frequency transposed by plus or minus ½ octaves. Human participants demonstrated robust recognition with all acoustic transformations. The results indicate that this dolphin’s acoustic recognition of whistle-like sounds was constrained by absolute pitch. Unlike human speech, which varies considerably in average frequency, signature whistles are relatively stable in frequency, which may have selected for a whistle recognition system invariant to frequency transposition. PMID:26863519

  2. Recognition of Frequency Modulated Whistle-Like Sounds by a Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus and Humans with Transformations in Amplitude, Duration and Frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K Branstetter

    Full Text Available Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus use the frequency contour of whistles produced by conspecifics for individual recognition. Here we tested a bottlenose dolphin's (Tursiops truncatus ability to recognize frequency modulated whistle-like sounds using a three alternative matching-to-sample paradigm. The dolphin was first trained to select a specific object (object A in response to a specific sound (sound A for a total of three object-sound associations. The sounds were then transformed by amplitude, duration, or frequency transposition while still preserving the frequency contour of each sound. For comparison purposes, 30 human participants completed an identical task with the same sounds, objects, and training procedure. The dolphin's ability to correctly match objects to sounds was robust to changes in amplitude with only a minor decrement in performance for short durations. The dolphin failed to recognize sounds that were frequency transposed by plus or minus ½ octaves. Human participants demonstrated robust recognition with all acoustic transformations. The results indicate that this dolphin's acoustic recognition of whistle-like sounds was constrained by absolute pitch. Unlike human speech, which varies considerably in average frequency, signature whistles are relatively stable in frequency, which may have selected for a whistle recognition system invariant to frequency transposition.

  3. Tonal frequency affects amplitude but not topography of rhesus monkey cranial EEG components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    The rhesus monkey is an important model of human auditory function in general and auditory deficits in neuro-psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia in particular. Several rhesus monkey studies have described homologs of clinically relevant auditory evoked potentials such as pitch-based mismatch negativity, a fronto-central negativity that can be observed when a series of regularly repeating sounds is disrupted by a sound of different tonal frequency. As a result it is well known how differences of tonal frequency are represented in rhesus monkey EEG. However, to date there is no study that systematically quantified how absolute tonal frequency itself is represented. In particular, it is not known if frequency affects rhesus monkey EEG component amplitude and topography in the same way as previously shown for humans. A better understanding of the effect of frequency may strengthen inter-species homology and will provide a more solid foundation on which to build the interpretation of frequency MMN in the rhesus monkey. Using arrays of up to 32 cranial EEG electrodes in 4 rhesus macaques we identified 8 distinct auditory evoked components including the N85, a fronto-central negativity that is the presumed homolog of the human N1. In line with human data, the amplitudes of most components including the N85 peaked around 1000 Hz and were strongly attenuated above ∼1750 Hz. Component topography, however, remained largely unaffected by frequency. This latter finding may be consistent with the known absence of certain anatomical structures in the rhesus monkey that are believed to cause the changes in topography in the human by inducing a rotation of generator orientation as a function of tonal frequency. Overall, the findings are consistent with the assumption of a homolog representation of tonal frequency in human and rhesus monkey EEG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ground motion: frequency of occurrence versus amplitude of disturbing transient events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    Successful collider operation requires that ground motion not exceed certain tolerances. In this note it is pointed out that on occasion these tolerances are exceeded. The frequency of such events and their amplitudes, measured as a function of time of day, have been measured. An examination of the data leads one to conclude that most events are of cultural (i.e., man-made) origin. 2 references, 20 figures

  5. High frequency oscillations evoked by peripheral magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, S; Simon, L; Fiedler, P; Strohmeier, D; Haueisen, J

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and / or fields (SEF) is a well-established and important tool for investigating the functioning of the peripheral and central human nervous system. A standard technique to evoke SEPs / SEFs is the stimulation of the median nerve by using a bipolar electrical stimulus. We aim at an alternative stimulation technique enabling stimulation of deep nerve structures while reducing patient stress and error susceptibility. In the current study, we apply a commercial transcranial magnetic stimulation system for peripheral magnetic stimulation of the median nerve. We compare the results of simultaneously recorded EEG signals to prove applicability of our technique to evoke SEPs including low frequency components (LFC) as well as high frequency oscillations (HFO). Therefore, we compare amplitude, latency and time-frequency characteristics of the SEP of 14 healthy volunteers after electric and magnetic stimulation. Both low frequency components and high frequency oscillations were detected. The HFOs were superimposed onto the primary cortical response N20. Statistical analysis revealed significantly lower amplitudes and increased latencies for LFC and HFO components after magnetic stimulation. The differences indicate the inability of magnetic stimulation to elicit supramaximal responses. A psycho-perceptual evaluation showed that magnetic stimulation was less unpleasant for 12 out of the 14 volunteers. In conclusion, we showed that LFC and HFO components related to median nerve stimulation can be evoked by peripheral magnetic stimulation.

  6. Study of Bubble Size, Void Fraction, and Mass Transport in a Bubble Column under High Amplitude Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrouz Mohagheghian

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Vertical vibration is known to cause bubble breakup, clustering and retardation in gas-liquid systems. In a bubble column, vibration increases the mass transfer ratio by increasing the residence time and phase interfacial area through introducing kinetic buoyancy force (Bjerknes effect and bubble breakup. Previous studies have explored the effect of vibration frequency (f, but minimal effort has focused on the effect of amplitude (A on mass transfer intensification. Thus, the current work experimentally examines bubble size, void fraction, and mass transfer in a bubble column under relatively high amplitude vibration (1.5 mm < A <9.5 mm over a frequency range of 7.5–22.5 Hz. Results of the present work were compared with past studies. The maximum stable bubble size under vibration was scaled using Hinze theory for breakage. Results of this work indicate that vibration frequency exhibits local maxima in both mass transfer and void fraction. Moreover, an optimum amplitude that is independent of vibration frequency was found for mass transfer enhancements. Finally, this work suggests physics-based models to predict void fraction and mass transfer in a vibrating bubble column.

  7. The Influence of High-Frequency Envelope Information on Low-Frequency Vowel Identification in Noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Schubotz

    Full Text Available Vowel identification in noise using consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC logatomes was used to investigate a possible interplay of speech information from different frequency regions. It was hypothesized that the periodicity conveyed by the temporal envelope of a high frequency stimulus can enhance the use of the information carried by auditory channels in the low-frequency region that share the same periodicity. It was further hypothesized that this acts as a strobe-like mechanism and would increase the signal-to-noise ratio for the voiced parts of the CVCs. In a first experiment, different high-frequency cues were provided to test this hypothesis, whereas a second experiment examined more closely the role of amplitude modulations and intact phase information within the high-frequency region (4-8 kHz. CVCs were either natural or vocoded speech (both limited to a low-pass cutoff-frequency of 2.5 kHz and were presented in stationary 3-kHz low-pass filtered masking noise. The experimental results did not support the hypothesized use of periodicity information for aiding low-frequency perception.

  8. The Influence of High-Frequency Envelope Information on Low-Frequency Vowel Identification in Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubotz, Wiebke; Brand, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger; Ewert, Stephan D

    2016-01-01

    Vowel identification in noise using consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) logatomes was used to investigate a possible interplay of speech information from different frequency regions. It was hypothesized that the periodicity conveyed by the temporal envelope of a high frequency stimulus can enhance the use of the information carried by auditory channels in the low-frequency region that share the same periodicity. It was further hypothesized that this acts as a strobe-like mechanism and would increase the signal-to-noise ratio for the voiced parts of the CVCs. In a first experiment, different high-frequency cues were provided to test this hypothesis, whereas a second experiment examined more closely the role of amplitude modulations and intact phase information within the high-frequency region (4-8 kHz). CVCs were either natural or vocoded speech (both limited to a low-pass cutoff-frequency of 2.5 kHz) and were presented in stationary 3-kHz low-pass filtered masking noise. The experimental results did not support the hypothesized use of periodicity information for aiding low-frequency perception.

  9. Interactions between amplitude modulation and frequency modulation processing: Effects of age and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraouty, Nihaad; Ewert, Stephan D; Wallaert, Nicolas; Lorenzi, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Frequency modulation (FM) and amplitude modulation (AM) detection thresholds were measured for a 500-Hz carrier frequency and a 5-Hz modulation rate. For AM detection, FM at the same rate as the AM was superimposed with varying FM depth. For FM detection, AM at the same rate was superimposed with varying AM depth. The target stimuli always contained both amplitude and frequency modulations, while the standard stimuli only contained the interfering modulation. Young and older normal-hearing listeners, as well as older listeners with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss were tested. For all groups, AM and FM detection thresholds were degraded in the presence of the interfering modulation. AM detection with and without interfering FM was hardly affected by either age or hearing loss. While aging had an overall detrimental effect on FM detection with and without interfering AM, there was a trend that hearing loss further impaired FM detection in the presence of AM. Several models using optimal combination of temporal-envelope cues at the outputs of off-frequency filters were tested. The interfering effects could only be predicted for hearing-impaired listeners. This indirectly supports the idea that, in addition to envelope cues resulting from FM-to-AM conversion, normal-hearing listeners use temporal fine-structure cues for FM detection.

  10. Advance in ERG Analysis: From Peak Time and Amplitude to Frequency, Power, and Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Gauvin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare time domain (TD: peak time and amplitude analysis of the human photopic electroretinogram (ERG with measures obtained in the frequency domain (Fourier analysis: FA and in the time-frequency domain (continuous (CWT and discrete (DWT wavelet transforms. Methods. Normal ERGs n=40 were analyzed using traditional peak time and amplitude measurements of the a- and b-waves in the TD and descriptors extracted from FA, CWT, and DWT. Selected descriptors were also compared in their ability to monitor the long-term consequences of disease process. Results. Each method extracted relevant information but had distinct limitations (i.e., temporal and frequency resolutions. The DWT offered the best compromise by allowing us to extract more relevant descriptors of the ERG signal at the cost of lesser temporal and frequency resolutions. Follow-ups of disease progression were more prolonged with the DWT (max 29 years compared to 13 with TD. Conclusions. Standardized time domain analysis of retinal function should be complemented with advanced DWT descriptors of the ERG. This method should allow more sensitive/specific quantifications of ERG responses, facilitate follow-up of disease progression, and identify diagnostically significant changes of ERG waveforms that are not resolved when the analysis is only limited to time domain measurements.

  11. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland [Institute of Materials Physics, Graz University of Technology, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2016-07-15

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys.

  12. Amplitude-to-code converter for photomultipliers operating at high loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhangel'skij, B.V.; Evgrafov, G.N.; Pishchal'nikov, Yu.M.; Shuvalov, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    An 11-bit amplitude-to-code converter intended for the analysis of photomultiplier pulses under high loadings is described. To decrease the volume of digit electronics in the converter an analog memory on capacities is envisaged. A well-known bridge circuit with diodes on the main carriers is selected as a gating circuit. The gate control is realized by a switching circuit on fast-response transistors with boundary frequency of 1.2-1.5 GHz. The converter main characteristics are given, namely, maximum output signal amplitude equal to -1.5 V, minimum pulse selection duration of 10 ns, maximum number of counts at Usub(input)=-1.0 V and tsub(selection)=50 ns amounting to 1400, integral nonlinearity of +-0.1%, conversion temperature instability of 0.2%/deg C in the temperature range of (+10-+40) deg C, maximum time of data storage equal to 300 ms, conversion coefficient instability of 0.42 counts, number of channels in a unit CAMAC block equal to 12

  13. Study and realisation of a high frequency analyzer; Etude et realisation d'un analyseur de signaux a haute frequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourbigot, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    This device is designed for the amplitude and frequency analysis of electric or electromagnetic signals in the frequency range of 0 to 55 MHz. The frequency spectrum of a preset bandwidth is displayed on the screen of an oscilloscope. Conceived to analyse the electromagnetic oscillations that can be generated in a plasma, its main characteristics are the following: extended bandwidth of analysed frequencies, on both sides of the ion cyclotron frequency in a magnetic field up to 20 kGs; linear amplitude and frequency response; possibility of analysing a narrow band; high sensitivity; analysis repetition rate of 25 per second. The different parts of the analyzer are described after a discussion of the choice of the techniques used in their design. In addition to its present use, the device can be applied to perform all the functions of a commercial spectral analyzer. (author) [French] Cet appareil est destine a l'analyse en frequence et amplitude de signaux electriques ou electromagnetiques dans une gamme de frequences de 0 a 55 MHz. Couple a un oscillographe, il permet de faire apparaitre sur l'ecran, le spectre de frequences dans une gamme choisie. Etudie dans le but d'analyser les oscillations electromagnetiques pouvant apparaitre dans un plasma, ses principales caracteristiques sont les suivantes: une bande etendue de frequences analysees, de part et d'autre de la frequence cyclotronique des ions dans un champ magnetique pouvant atteindre 20 kGs (valeur maximum 55 MHz); une reponse lineaire en amplitude et en frequence; la possibilite d'analyser, une bande restreinte de frequences; une grande sensibilite La frequence d'analyse est de 25 periodes par seconde. Les diverses parties de l'analyseur sont decrites apres l'expose des motifs ayant guide le choix des solutions adoptees pour sa realisation. Les schemas electriques sont egalement presentes. En dehors du but precis qui a motive la realisation de cet appareil, son usage peut s'etendre a toutes les applications

  14. Cross-modal attention influences auditory contrast sensitivity: Decreasing visual load improves auditory thresholds for amplitude- and frequency-modulated sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaramitaro, Vivian M; Chow, Hiu Mei; Eglington, Luke G

    2017-03-01

    We used a cross-modal dual task to examine how changing visual-task demands influenced auditory processing, namely auditory thresholds for amplitude- and frequency-modulated sounds. Observers had to attend to two consecutive intervals of sounds and report which interval contained the auditory stimulus that was modulated in amplitude (Experiment 1) or frequency (Experiment 2). During auditory-stimulus presentation, observers simultaneously attended to a rapid sequential visual presentation-two consecutive intervals of streams of visual letters-and had to report which interval contained a particular color (low load, demanding less attentional resources) or, in separate blocks of trials, which interval contained more of a target letter (high load, demanding more attentional resources). We hypothesized that if attention is a shared resource across vision and audition, an easier visual task should free up more attentional resources for auditory processing on an unrelated task, hence improving auditory thresholds. Auditory detection thresholds were lower-that is, auditory sensitivity was improved-for both amplitude- and frequency-modulated sounds when observers engaged in a less demanding (compared to a more demanding) visual task. In accord with previous work, our findings suggest that visual-task demands can influence the processing of auditory information on an unrelated concurrent task, providing support for shared attentional resources. More importantly, our results suggest that attending to information in a different modality, cross-modal attention, can influence basic auditory contrast sensitivity functions, highlighting potential similarities between basic mechanisms for visual and auditory attention.

  15. Stiffness of sphere–plate contacts at MHz frequencies: dependence on normal load, oscillation amplitude, and ambient medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Vlachová

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The stiffness of micron-sized sphere–plate contacts was studied by employing high frequency, tangential excitation of variable amplitude (0–20 nm. The contacts were established between glass spheres and the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM, where the resonator surface had been coated with either sputtered SiO2 or a spin-cast layer of poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA. The results from experiments undertaken in the dry state and in water are compared. Building on the shifts in the resonance frequency and resonance bandwidth, the instrument determines the real and the imaginary part of the contact stiffness, where the imaginary part quantifies dissipative processes. The method is closely analogous to related procedures in AFM-based metrology. The real part of the contact stiffness as a function of normal load can be fitted with the Johnson–Kendall–Roberts (JKR model. The contact stiffness was found to increase in the presence of liquid water. This finding is tentatively explained by the rocking motion of the spheres, which couples to a squeeze flow of the water close to the contact. The loss tangent of the contact stiffness is on the order of 0.1, where the energy losses are associated with interfacial processes. At high amplitudes partial slip was found to occur. The apparent contact stiffness at large amplitude depends linearly on the amplitude, as predicted by the Cattaneo–Mindlin model. This finding is remarkable insofar, as the Cattaneo–Mindlin model assumes Coulomb friction inside the sliding region. Coulomb friction is typically viewed as a macroscopic concept, related to surface roughness. An alternative model (formulated by Savkoor, which assumes a constant frictional stress in the sliding zone independent of the normal pressure, is inconsistent with the experimental data. The apparent friction coefficients slightly increase with normal force, which can be explained by nanoroughness. In other words, contact splitting

  16. External amplitude and frequency modulation of a terahertz quantum cascade laser using metamaterial/graphene devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindness, S J; Jessop, D S; Wei, B; Wallis, R; Kamboj, V S; Xiao, L; Ren, Y; Braeuninger-Weimer, P; Aria, A I; Hofmann, S; Beere, H E; Ritchie, D A; Degl'Innocenti, R

    2017-08-09

    Active control of the amplitude and frequency of terahertz sources is an essential prerequisite for exploiting a myriad of terahertz applications in imaging, spectroscopy, and communications. Here we present a optoelectronic, external modulation technique applied to a terahertz quantum cascade laser which holds the promise of addressing a number of important challenges in this research area. A hybrid metamaterial/graphene device is implemented into an external cavity set-up allowing for optoelectronic tuning of feedback into a quantum cascade laser. We demonstrate powerful, all-electronic, control over the amplitude and frequency of the laser output. Full laser switching is performed by electrostatic gating of the metamaterial/graphene device, demonstrating a modulation depth of 100%. External control of the emission spectrum is also achieved, highlighting the flexibility of this feedback method. By taking advantage of the frequency dispersive reflectivity of the metamaterial array, different modes of the QCL output are selectively suppressed using lithographic tuning and single mode operation of the multi-mode laser is enforced. Side mode suppression is electrically modulated from ~6 dB to ~21 dB, demonstrating active, optoelectronic modulation of the laser frequency content between multi-mode and single mode operation.

  17. High accuracy amplitude and phase measurements based on a double heterodyne architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Danyang; Wang Guangwei; Pan Weimin

    2015-01-01

    In the digital low level RF (LLRF) system of a circular (particle) accelerator, the RF field signal is usually down converted to a fixed intermediate frequency (IF). The ratio of IF and sampling frequency determines the processing required, and differs in various LLRF systems. It is generally desirable to design a universally compatible architecture for different IFs with no change to the sampling frequency and algorithm. A new RF detection method based on a double heterodyne architecture for wide IF range has been developed, which achieves the high accuracy requirement of modern LLRF. In this paper, the relation of IF and phase error is systematically analyzed for the first time and verified by experiments. The effects of temperature drift for 16 h IF detection are inhibited by the amplitude and phase calibrations. (authors)

  18. Bilateral preictal signature of phase-amplitude coupling in canine epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, Laura; Bou Assi, Elie; Nguyen, Dang K; Rihana, Sandy; Sawan, Mohamad

    2018-01-01

    Seizure forecasting would improve the quality of life of patients with refractory epilepsy. Although early findings were optimistic, no single feature has been found capable of individually characterizing brain dynamics during transition to seizure. Cross-frequency phase amplitude coupling has been recently proposed as a precursor of seizure activity. This work evaluates the existence of a statistically significant difference in mean phase amplitude coupling distribution between the preictal and interictal states of seizures in dogs with bilaterally implanted intracranial electrodes. Results show a statistically significant change (p<0.05) of phase amplitude coupling during the preictal phase. This change is correlated with the position of implanted electrodes and is more significant within high-gamma frequency bands. These findings highlight the potential benefit of bilateral iEEG analysis and the feasibility of seizure forecasting based on slow modulation of high frequency amplitude. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Electronically Tunable Quadrature Sinusoidal Oscillator with Equal Output Amplitudes during Frequency Tuning Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Den Satipar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new configuration of voltage-mode quadrature sinusoidal oscillator is proposed. The proposed oscillator employs two voltage differencing current conveyors (VDCCs, two resistors, and two grounded capacitors. In this design, the use of multiple/dual output terminal active building block is not required. The tuning of frequency of oscillation (FO can be done electronically by adjusting the bias current of active device without affecting condition of oscillation (CO. The electronic tuning can be done by controlling the bias current using a digital circuit. The amplitude of two sinusoidal outputs is equal when the frequency of oscillation is tuned. This makes the sinusoidal output voltages meet good total harmonic distortions (THD. Moreover, the proposed circuit can provide the sinusoidal output current with high impedance which is connected to external load or to another circuit without the use of buffer device. To confirm that the oscillator can generate the quadrature sinusoidal output signal, the experimental results using VDCC constructed from commercially available ICs are also included. The experimental results agree well with theoretical anticipation.

  20. Evidence of resonant mode coupling and the relationship between low and high frequencies in a rapidly rotating a star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breger, M.; Montgomery, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    In the theory of resonant mode coupling, the parent and child modes are directly related in frequency and phase. The oscillations present in the fast rotating δ Sct star KIC 8054146 allow us to test the most general and generic aspects of such a theory. The only direct way to separate the parent and coupled (child) modes is to examine the correlations in amplitude variability between the different frequencies. For the dominant family of related frequencies, only a single mode and a triplet are the origins of nine dominant frequency peaks ranging from 2.93 to 66.30 cycles day –1 (as well as dozens of small-amplitude combination modes and a predicted and detected third high-frequency triplet). The mode-coupling model correctly predicts the large amplitude variations of the coupled modes as a product of the amplitudes of the parent modes, while the phase changes are also correctly modeled. This differs from the behavior of 'normal' combination frequencies in that the amplitudes are three orders of magnitude larger and may exceed even the amplitudes of the parent modes. We show that two dominant low frequencies at 5.86 and 2.93 cycles day –1 in the gravity-mode region are not harmonics of each other, and their properties follow those of the almost equidistant high-frequency triplet. We note that the previously puzzling situation of finding two strong peaks in the low-frequency region related by nearly a factor of two in frequency has been seen in other δ Sct stars as well.

  1. Evidence of resonant mode coupling and the relationship between low and high frequencies in a rapidly rotating a star

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breger, M.; Montgomery, M. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    In the theory of resonant mode coupling, the parent and child modes are directly related in frequency and phase. The oscillations present in the fast rotating δ Sct star KIC 8054146 allow us to test the most general and generic aspects of such a theory. The only direct way to separate the parent and coupled (child) modes is to examine the correlations in amplitude variability between the different frequencies. For the dominant family of related frequencies, only a single mode and a triplet are the origins of nine dominant frequency peaks ranging from 2.93 to 66.30 cycles day{sup –1} (as well as dozens of small-amplitude combination modes and a predicted and detected third high-frequency triplet). The mode-coupling model correctly predicts the large amplitude variations of the coupled modes as a product of the amplitudes of the parent modes, while the phase changes are also correctly modeled. This differs from the behavior of 'normal' combination frequencies in that the amplitudes are three orders of magnitude larger and may exceed even the amplitudes of the parent modes. We show that two dominant low frequencies at 5.86 and 2.93 cycles day{sup –1} in the gravity-mode region are not harmonics of each other, and their properties follow those of the almost equidistant high-frequency triplet. We note that the previously puzzling situation of finding two strong peaks in the low-frequency region related by nearly a factor of two in frequency has been seen in other δ Sct stars as well.

  2. A high-resolution two-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectrum using a spectral amplitude modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chenhui; Zhang, Shian; Wu, Meizhen; Jia, Tianqing; Sun, Zhenrong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2013-01-01

    Femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectra suffer from low spectral resolution because of the broadband laser spectrum. In this paper, we propose a feasible scheme to achieve a high-resolution two-pulse CARS spectrum by shaping both the pump and probe pulses using rectangular amplitude modulation. We show that a narrowband hole in the CARS spectrum can be created by the amplitude-shaped laser pulse, the position of which is correlated with the Raman resonant frequency of the molecule. Thus, by observing holes in the CARS spectrum, we are able to obtain a high-resolution CARS spectrum and the energy-level diagram of the molecule. (paper)

  3. Large scale modulation of high frequency acoustic waves in periodic porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Claude; Rallu, Antoine; Hans, Stephane

    2012-12-01

    This paper deals with the description of the modulation at large scale of high frequency acoustic waves in gas saturated periodic porous media. High frequencies mean local dynamics at the pore scale and therefore absence of scale separation in the usual sense of homogenization. However, although the pressure is spatially varying in the pores (according to periodic eigenmodes), the mode amplitude can present a large scale modulation, thereby introducing another type of scale separation to which the asymptotic multi-scale procedure applies. The approach is first presented on a periodic network of inter-connected Helmholtz resonators. The equations governing the modulations carried by periodic eigenmodes, at frequencies close to their eigenfrequency, are derived. The number of cells on which the carrying periodic mode is defined is therefore a parameter of the modeling. In a second part, the asymptotic approach is developed for periodic porous media saturated by a perfect gas. Using the "multicells" periodic condition, one obtains the family of equations governing the amplitude modulation at large scale of high frequency waves. The significant difference between modulations of simple and multiple mode are evidenced and discussed. The features of the modulation (anisotropy, width of frequency band) are also analyzed.

  4. Experimental investigation of the effects of high-frequency electroactive morphing on the shear-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Johannes; Rizzo, Karl-Joseph; Jodin, Gurvan; Duhayon, Eric; Rouchon, Jean-François; Hunt, Julian; Braza, Marianna

    2015-11-01

    Time-resolved PIV measurements are conducted at a Reynolds number of 270 . 000 downstream of the trailing edge of a NACA4412 airfoil equipped with trailing-edge piezoelectric tab actuators to investigate the high-frequency low-amplitude actuation's effect on the shear-layer. A comparison of the time-averaged Reynolds stress tensor components at different actuation frequency reveals a significant impact of the actuation on the shear-layer dynamics. A proper orthogonal decomposition analysis is conducted in order to investigate the actuation's impact on the vortex breakdown. It will be shown that a specific low-amplitude actuation frequency enables a reduction of the predominant shear-layer frequencies.

  5. Dynamic modulation of epileptic high frequency oscillations by the phase of slower cortical rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, George M; Wong, Simeon M; Anderson, Ryan A; Singh-Cadieux, Gabrielle; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Ochi, Ayako; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Okanishi, Tohru; Valiante, Taufik A; Donner, Elizabeth; Rutka, James T; Snead, O Carter; Doesburg, Sam M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological high frequency oscillations (pHFOs) have been proposed to be robust markers of epileptic cortex. Oscillatory activity below this frequency range has been shown to be modulated by phase of lower frequency oscillations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dynamic cross-frequency interactions involving pHFOs are concentrated within the epileptogenic cortex. Intracranial electroencephalographic recordings from 17 children with medically-intractable epilepsy secondary to focal cortical dysplasia were obtained. A time-resolved analysis was performed to determine topographic concentrations and dynamic changes in cross-frequency amplitude-to-phase coupling (CFC). CFC between pHFOs and the phase of theta and alpha rhythms was found to be significantly elevated in the seizure-onset zone compared to non-epileptic regions (pfrequency oscillations at which pHFO amplitudes were maximal was inconsistent at seizure initiation, yet consistently at the trough of the low frequency rhythm at seizure termination. Amplitudes of pHFOs were most significantly modulated by the phase of alpha-band oscillations (p<0.01). These results suggest that increased CFC between pHFO amplitude and alpha phase may constitute a marker of epileptogenic brain areas and may be relevant for understanding seizure dynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fiber lightguide-coupled high frequency analog data system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, T.J.; Nelson, M.A.; Morton, J.R.; Pruett, B.

    1976-06-01

    An experimental system is described for measuring the time history of a high voltage, high frequency electrical pulse from a radiation detector. The system employs several fibers of a 500-m graded index light-guide cable to carry modelocked laser pulses from a safe location to an electro-optical Kerr cell located near the detector. These 200-ps pulses are widened to 500 ps at the cell by fiber dispersion. They are intensity-modulated in the cell by the electrical signal and returned over other cable fibers to an optical detector and recorder located near the laser. System frequency response exceeds 500 MHz over an amplitude dynamic range of 1000:1

  7. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in patients with Wilson's disease: a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaopeng; Chen, Siyi; Huang, Chang-Bing; Qian, Yinfeng; Yu, Yongqiang

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in patients with Wilson's disease (WD). Resting-state function magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) were employed to measure the amplitude of ALFF in 28 patients with WD and 27 matched normal controls. Slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz) and slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) frequency bands were analyzed. Apart from the observation of atrophy in the cerebellum, basal ganglia, occipital gyrus, frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and paracentral lobule, we also found widespread differences in ALFF of the two bands in the medial frontal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, insula, basal ganglia, hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus, and thalamus bilaterally. Compared to normal controls, WD patients had increased ALFF in the posterior lobe of the cerebellum, inferior temporal gyrus, brain stem, basal ganglia, and decreased ALFF in the anterior lobe of the cerebellum and medial frontal gyrus. Specifically, we observed that the ALFF abnormalities in the cerebellum and middle frontal gyrus were greater in the slow-5 than in the slow-4 band. Correlation analysis showed consistently positive correlations between urinary copper excretion (Cu), serum ceruloplasmin (CP) and ALFFs in the cerebellum. Our study suggests the accumulation of copper profoundly impaired intrinsic brain activity and the impairments seem to be frequency-dependent. These results provide further insights into the understanding of the pathophysiology of WD.

  8. Temporal-spatial characteristics of phase-amplitude coupling in electrocorticogram for human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruihua; Ren, Ye; Liu, Chunyan; Xu, Na; Li, Xiaoli; Cong, Fengyu; Ristaniemi, Tapani; Wang, YuPing

    2017-09-01

    Neural activity of the epileptic human brain contains low- and high-frequency oscillations in different frequency bands, some of which have been used as reliable biomarkers of the epileptogenic brain areas. However, the relationship between the low- and high-frequency oscillations in different cortical areas during the period from pre-seizure to post-seizure has not been completely clarified. We recorded electrocorticogram data from the temporal lobe and hippocampus of seven patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The modulation index based on the Kullback-Leibler distance and the phase-amplitude coupling co-modulogram were adopted to quantify the coupling strength between the phase of low-frequency oscillations (0.2-10Hz) and the amplitude of high-frequency oscillations (11-400Hz) in different seizure epochs. The time-varying phase-amplitude modulogram was used to analyze the phase-amplitude coupling pattern during the entire period from pre-seizure to post-seizure in both the left and right temporal lobe and hippocampus. Channels with strong modulation index were compared with the seizure onset channels identified by the neurosurgeons and the resection channels in the clinical surgery. The phase-amplitude coupling strength (modulation index) increased significantly in the mid-seizure epoch and decrease significantly in seizure termination and post-seizure epochs (ptemporal cortex and hippocampus. The "fall-max" phase-amplitude modulation pattern, i.e., high-frequency amplitudes were largest in the low-frequency phase range [-π, 0], which corresponded to the falling edges of low-frequency oscillations, appeared in the middle period of the seizures at epileptic focus channels. Channels with strong modulation index appeared on the corresponding left or right temporal cortex of surgical resection and overlapped with the clinical resection zones in all patients. The "fall-max" pattern between the phase of low-frequency oscillation and amplitude of high-frequency

  9. Spatially distributed patterns of oscillatory coupling between high-frequency amplitudes and low-frequency phases in human iEEG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maris, Eric; van Vugt, Marieke; Kahana, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Spatially distributed coherent oscillations provide temporal windows of excitability that allow for interactions between distinct neuronal groups. It has been hypothesized that this mechanism for neuronal communication is realized by bursts of high-frequency oscillations that are phase-coupled to a

  10. High energy multi-gluon exchange amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaroszewicz, T.

    1980-11-01

    We examine perturbative high energy n-gluon exchange amplitudes calculated in the Coulomb gauge. If n exceeds the minimum required by the t-channel quantum numbers, such amplitudes are non-leading in lns. We derive a closed system of coupled integral equations for the corresponding two-particle n-gluon vertices, obtained by summing the leading powers of ln(N μ psup(μ)), where psup(μ) is the incident momentum and Nsup(μ) the gauge-defining vector. Our equations are infra-red finite, provided the external particles are colour singlets. (author)

  11. Low-frequency versus high-frequency synchronisation in chirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Gøtsche-Rasmussen, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the frequency specific contribution to the auditory brainstem response (ABR) of chirp stimuli. Frequency rising chirps were designed to compensate for the cochlear traveling wave delay, and lead to larger wave-V amplitudes than for click stimuli as more auditory nerve fibr...

  12. Articulated pipes conveying fluid pulsating with high frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    1999-01-01

    Stability and nonlinear dynamics of two articulated pipes conveying fluid with a high-frequency pulsating component is investigated. The non-autonomous model equations are converted into autonomous equations by approximating the fast excitation terms with slowly varying terms. The downward hanging...... pipe position will lose stability if the mean flow speed exceeds a certain critical value. Adding a pulsating component to the fluid flow is shown to stabilize the hanging position for high values of the ratio between fluid and pipe-mass, and to marginally destabilize this position for low ratios....... An approximate nonlinear solution for small-amplitude flutter oscillations is obtained using a fifth-order multiple scales perturbation method, and large-amplitude oscillations are examined by numerical integration of the autonomous model equations, using a path-following algorithm. The pulsating fluid component...

  13. Low amplitude rhythmic contraction frequency in human detrusor strips correlates with phasic intravesical pressure waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colhoun, Andrew F; Speich, John E; Cooley, Lauren F; Bell, Eugene D; Barbee, R Wayne; Guruli, Georgi; Ratz, Paul H; Klausner, Adam P

    2017-08-01

    Low amplitude rhythmic contractions (LARC) occur in detrusor smooth muscle and may play a role in storage disorders such as overactive bladder and detrusor overactivity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether LARC frequencies identified in vitro from strips of human urinary bladder tissue correlate with in vivo LARC frequencies, visualized as phasic intravesical pressure (p ves ) waves during urodynamics (UD). After IRB approval, fresh strips of human urinary bladder were obtained from patients. LARC was recorded with tissue strips at low tension (rhythmic frequency similar to the in vitro LARC frequency quantified in human urinary bladder tissue strips. Further refinements of this technique may help identify subsets of individuals with LARC-mediated storage disorders.

  14. Spectral-Amplitude-Coded OCDMA Optimized for a Realistic FBG Frequency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penon, Julien; El-Sahn, Ziad A.; Rusch, Leslie A.; Larochelle, Sophie

    2007-05-01

    We develop a methodology for numerical optimization of fiber Bragg grating frequency response to maximize the achievable capacity of a spectral-amplitude-coded optical code-division multiple-access (SAC-OCDMA) system. The optimal encoders are realized, and we experimentally demonstrate an incoherent SAC-OCDMA system with seven simultaneous users. We report a bit error rate (BER) of 2.7 x 10-8 at 622 Mb/s for a fully loaded network (seven users) using a 9.6-nm optical band. We achieve error-free transmission (BER < 1 x 10-9) for up to five simultaneous users.

  15. GENERAL APROACH TO MODELING NONLINEAR AMPLITUDE AND FREQUENCY DEPENDENT HYSTERESIS EFFECTS BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Heine

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A detailed description of the rubber parts’ properties is gaining in importance in the current simulation models of multi-body simulation. One application example is a multi-body simulation of the washing machine movement. Inside the washing machine, there are different force transmission elements, which consist completely or partly of rubber. Rubber parts or, generally, elastomers usually have amplitude-dependant and frequency-dependent force transmission properties. Rheological models are used to describe these properties. A method for characterization of the amplitude and frequency dependence of such a rheological model is presented within this paper. Within this method, the used rheological model can be reduced or expanded in order to illustrate various non-linear effects. An original result is given with the automated parameter identification. It is fully implemented in Matlab. Such identified rheological models are intended for subsequent implementation in a multi-body model. This allows a significant enhancement of the overall model quality.

  16. Thermally induced high frequency random amplitude fatigue damage at sharp notches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.W.J.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been performed using the SUPERSOMITE facility to investigate the initiation and growth of fatigue cracks at the tips of sharp surface notches subjected to random thermally-induced stress. The experimental situation is complex involving plasticity, random amplitude loading and heat transfer medium/surface coupling. Crack initiation and growth prediction have been considered using the Creager and Neuber methods to compute the strain ranges in the vicinity of the notch root. Good agreement has been obtained between the experimental results and theoretical predictions. The paper reports the results of the analysis of the notch behavior

  17. The MACHO Project Sample of Galactic Bulge High-Amplitude Scuti Stars: Pulsation Behavior and Stellar Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.P.; Cook, K.H.; Freeman, K.C.; Geha, M.; Griest, K.; Lehner, M.J.; Marshall, S.L.; McNamara, B.J.; Minniti, D.; Nelson, C.; Peterson, B.A.; Popowski, P.; Pratt, M.R.; Quinn, P.J.; Rodgers, A.W.; Sutherland, W.; Templeton, M.R.; Vandehei, T.; Welch, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    We have detected 90 objects with periods and lightcurve structure similar to those of field(delta) Scuti stars, using the Massive Compact Halo Object (MACHO) Project database of Galactic bulge photometry. If we assume similar extinction values for all candidates and absolute magnitudes similar to those of other field high-amplitude(delta) Scuti stars (HADS), the majority of these objects lie in or near the Galactic bulge. At least two of these objects are likely foreground(delta) Scuti stars, one of which may be an evolved nonradial pulsator, similar to other evolved, disk-population(delta) Scuti stars. We have analyzed the light curves of these objects and find that they are similar to the light curves of field(delta) Scuti stars and the(delta) Scuti stars found by the Optical Gravitational Lens Experiment (OGLE). However, the amplitude distribution of these sources lies between those of low- and high-amplitude(delta) Scuti stars, which suggests that they may be an intermediate population. We have found nine double-mode HADS with frequency ratios ranging from 0.75 to 0.79, four probable double- and multiple-mode objects, and another four objects with marginal detections of secondary modes. The low frequencies (5-14 cycles d(sup -1)) and the observed period ratios of(approx)0.77 suggest that the majority of these objects are evolved stars pulsating in fundamental or first overtone radial modes

  18. Resting-state functional MR changes in Alzheimer's disease patients visualized by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation and fraction of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Miaomiao; Ni Hongyan; Feng Jie; Zhang Hongtao; Liu Tie; Shen Wen; Qi Ji

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the difference of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and fraction of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) between Alzheimer's disease (AD)patients and normal aging (NA) controls by voxel-based analysis. Methods: Thirty-one AD patients and 44 NA controls were enrolled in the study. Blood oxygen level dependent functional (BOLD) EPI data were obtained during resting-state by using 32-channel head coil. Data were realigned, normalized and then smoothed with 8 mm FWHM kernel. Resting-state fMRI toolkit (version 1.6) was used to generate ALFF and fALFF images. Independent two sample t-test was performed with SPM5 to compare ALFF and fALFF of AD and NA controls. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to examine the relationship between MMSE score and ALFF, fALFF parameters. The significance level was set to be uncorrected O.001 on the voxel level and 0.05 on the cluster level. Results: AD patients showed increased ALFF in left temporal lobe (0.492 ± 0.119) and right cingulated cortex (0.434 ± 0.093) of AD patients, which were 0.443 ± 0.068 and 0.380 ± 0.081 in NA controls (t = 2.658, 2.227, P < 0.05). Decreased fALFF was found in bilateral posterior cingulate cortices (1.167 ± 0.203) and increased fALFF was found in bilateral temporal lobes (left 1.226 ± 0.127, right 1.146 ± 0.214) with left side dominance, which were 1.453 ± 0.269, 1.134 ± 0.088, 1.014 ± O.132 in NA controls (t =5.001, 3.695, 3.285, P < 0.05). Bilateral temporal ALFF and fALFF correlated with MMSE positively (r = 0.768-0.909, P < 0.05) with left dominance. Conclusion: AD patients showed increased resting-state functional MRI changes correlated with MMSE score in the temporal lobes with left dominance, which indicated left temporal lobe may be the best location for the observation of disease progression in AD patients. (authors)

  19. Frequency-Dependent Amplitude Panning for the Stereophonic Image Enhancement of Audio Recorded Using Two Closely Spaced Microphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Jun Chun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new frequency-dependent amplitude panning method for stereophonic image enhancement applied to a sound source recorded using two closely spaced omni-directional microphones. The ability to detect the direction of such a sound source is limited due to weak spatial information, such as the inter-channel time difference (ICTD and inter-channel level difference (ICLD. Moreover, when sound sources are recorded in a convolutive or a real room environment, the detection of sources is affected by reverberation effects. Thus, the proposed method first tries to estimate the source direction depending on the frequency using azimuth-frequency analysis. Then, a frequency-dependent amplitude panning technique is proposed to enhance the stereophonic image by modifying the stereophonic law of sines. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, we compare its performance with that of a conventional method based on the beamforming technique in terms of directivity pattern, perceived direction, and quality degradation under three different recording conditions (anechoic, convolutive, and real reverberant. The comparison shows that the proposed method gives us better stereophonic images in a stereo loudspeaker reproduction than the conventional method without any annoying effects.

  20. Double-wavelet approach to study frequency and amplitude modulation in renal autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovtseva, Olga; Pavlov, A N; Mosekilde, E

    2004-01-01

    Biological time series often display complex oscillations with several interacting rhythmic components. Renal autoregulation, for instance, involves at least two separate mechanisms both of which can produce oscillatory variations in the pressures and flows of the individual nephrons. Using double......-wavelet analysis we propose a method to examine how the instantaneous frequency and amplitude of a fast mode is modulated by the presence of a slower mode. Our method is applied both to experimental data from normotensive and hypertensive rats showing different oscillatory patterns and to simulation results...

  1. A novel smart rotor support with shape memory alloy metal rubber for high temperatures and variable amplitude vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Yanhong; Zhang, Qicheng; Zhang, Dayi; Hong, Jie; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Liu, Baolong

    2014-01-01

    The work describes the design, manufacturing and testing of a smart rotor support with shape memory alloy metal rubber (SMA-MR) elements, able to provide variable stiffness and damping characteristics with temperature, motion amplitude and excitation frequency. Differences in damping behavior and nonlinear stiffness between SMA-MR and more traditional metal rubber supports are discussed. The mechanical performance shown by the prototype demonstrates the feasibility of using the SMA-MR concept for active vibration control in rotordynamics, in particular at high temperatures and large amplitude vibrations. (paper)

  2. High-Energy String Scattering Amplitudes and Signless Stirling Number Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Chi Lee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We give a complete proof of a set of identities (7 proposed recently from calculation of high-energy string scattering amplitudes. These identities allow one to extract ratios among high-energy string scattering amplitudes in the fixed angle regime from high-energy amplitudes in the Regge regime. The proof is based on a signless Stirling number identity in combinatorial theory. The results are valid for arbitrary real values L rather than only for L=0,1 proved previously. The identities for non-integer real value L were recently shown to be realized in high-energy compactified string scattering amplitudes [He S., Lee J.C., Yang Y., arXiv:1012.3158]. The parameter L is related to the mass level of an excited string state and can take non-integer values for Kaluza-Klein modes.

  3. Assessment of dynamic mechanical properties of the respiratory system during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacà, Raffaele L; Zannin, Emanuela; Ventura, Maria L; Sancini, Giulio; Pedotti, Antonio; Tagliabue, Paolo; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    1) To investigate the possibility of estimating respiratory system impedance (Zrs, forced oscillation technique) by using high-amplitude pressure oscillations delivered during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation; 2) to characterize the relationship between Zrs and continuous distending pressure during an increasing/decreasing continuous distending pressure trial; 3) to evaluate how the optimal continuous distending pressure identified by Zrs relates to the point of maximal curvature of the deflation limb of the quasi-static pressure-volume curve. Prospective laboratory animal investigation. Experimental medicine laboratory. Eight New Zealand rabbits. The rabbits were ventilated with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. Zrs was measured while continuous distending pressure was increased and decreased between 2 and 26 cm H2O in 1-minute steps of 4 cm H2O. At each step, a low-amplitude (6 cm H2O) sinusoidal signal was alternated with a high-amplitude (18 cm H2O) asymmetric high-frequency oscillatory ventilation square pressure waveform. Pressure-volume curves were determined at the end of the continuous distending pressure trial. All measurements were repeated after bronchoalveolar lavage. Zrs was estimated from flow and pressure measured at the inlet of the tracheal tube and expressed as resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs). Linear correlation between the values, measured by applying the small-amplitude sinusoidal signal and the ventilator waveform, was good for Xrs (r = 0.95 ± 0.04) but not for Rrs (r = 0.60 ± 0.34). Following lavage, the Xrs-continuous distending pressure curves presented a maximum on the deflation limb, identifying an optimal continuous distending pressure that was, on average, 1.1 ± 1.7 cm H2O below the point of maximal curvature of the deflation limb of the pressure-volume curves. Xrs can be accurately measured during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation without interrupting ventilation and/or connecting additional devices. An optimal

  4. Amplitude dependent damping in single crystalline high purity molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelada-Lambri, G.I; Lambri, O.A; Garcia, J.A; Lomer, J.N

    2004-01-01

    Amplitude dependent damping measurements were performed on high purity single crystalline molybdenum at several different constant temperatures between room temperature and 1273K. The employed samples were single crystals with the orientation, having a residual resistivity ratio of about 8000. Previously to the amplitude dependent damping tests, the samples were subjected to different thermomechanical histories. Amplitude dependent damping effects appear only during the first heating run in temperature where the samples have the thermomechanical state of the deformation process at room temperature. In the subsequent run-ups in temperature, i.e, after subsequent annealings, amplitude dependent damping effects were not detected (au)

  5. Test the mergers of the primordial black holes by high frequency gravitational-wave detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Li-Li; Li, Jin [Chongqing University, Department of Physics, Chongqing (China)

    2017-09-15

    The black hole could have a primordial origin if its mass is less than 1M {sub CircleDot}. The mergers of these black hole binaries generate stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB). We investigate the SGWB in high frequency band 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} Hz. It can be detected by high frequency gravitational-wave detector. Energy density spectrum and amplitude of the SGWB are derived. The upper limit of the energy density spectrum is around 10{sup -7}. Also, the upper limit of the amplitude ranges from 10{sup -31.5} to 10{sup -29.5}. The fluctuation of spacetime origin from gravitational wave could give a fluctuation of the background electromagnetic field in a high frequency gravitational-wave detector. The signal photon flux generated by the SGWB in the high frequency band 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} Hz is derived, which ranges from 1 to 10{sup 2} s{sup -1}. The comparison between the signal photon flux generated by relic gravitational waves (RGWs) and the SGWB is also discussed in this paper. It is shown that the signal photon flux generated by the RGW, which is predicted by the canonical single-field slow-roll inflation models, is sufficiently lower than the one generated by the SGWB in the high frequency band 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} Hz. Our results indicate that the SGWB in the high frequency band 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} Hz is more likely to be detected by the high frequency gravitational-wave detector. (orig.)

  6. ULF wave effects on high frequency signal propagation through the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Waters

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Variations in the total electron content (TEC of the ionosphere alter the propagation characteristics of EM radiation for frequencies above a few megahertz (MHz. Spatial and temporal variations of the ionosphere TEC influence highly sensitive, ground based spatial measurements such as those used in radio astronomy and Global Positioning System (GPS applications. In this paper we estimate the magnitudes of the changes in TEC and the time delays of high frequency signals introduced by variations in the ionosphere electron density caused by the natural spectrum of ultra-low frequency (ULF wave activity that originates in near-Earth space. The time delays and associated phase shifts depend on the frequency, spatial structure and amplitude of the ULF waves.

  7. Representation of complex vocalizations in the Lusitanian toadfish auditory system: evidence of fine temporal, frequency and amplitude discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Raquel O.; Fonseca, Paulo J.; Amorim, M. Clara P.; Ladich, Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    Many fishes rely on their auditory skills to interpret crucial information about predators and prey, and to communicate intraspecifically. Few studies, however, have examined how complex natural sounds are perceived in fishes. We investigated the representation of conspecific mating and agonistic calls in the auditory system of the Lusitanian toadfish Halobatrachus didactylus, and analysed auditory responses to heterospecific signals from ecologically relevant species: a sympatric vocal fish (meagre Argyrosomus regius) and a potential predator (dolphin Tursiops truncatus). Using auditory evoked potential (AEP) recordings, we showed that both sexes can resolve fine features of conspecific calls. The toadfish auditory system was most sensitive to frequencies well represented in the conspecific vocalizations (namely the mating boatwhistle), and revealed a fine representation of duration and pulsed structure of agonistic and mating calls. Stimuli and corresponding AEP amplitudes were highly correlated, indicating an accurate encoding of amplitude modulation. Moreover, Lusitanian toadfish were able to detect T. truncatus foraging sounds and A. regius calls, although at higher amplitudes. We provide strong evidence that the auditory system of a vocal fish, lacking accessory hearing structures, is capable of resolving fine features of complex vocalizations that are probably important for intraspecific communication and other relevant stimuli from the auditory scene. PMID:20861044

  8. High frequency switched-mode stimulation can evoke postsynaptic responses in cerebellar principal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn Van Dongen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the efficacy of high frequency switched-mode neural stimulation. Instead of using a constant stimulation amplitude, the stimulus is switched on and off repeatedly with a high frequency (up to 100kHz duty cycled signal. By means of tissue modeling that includes the dynamic properties of both the tissue material as well as the axon membrane, it is first shown that switched-mode stimulation depolarizes the cell membrane in a similar way as classical constant amplitude stimulation.These findings are subsequently verified using in vitro experiments in which the response of a Purkinje cell is measured due to a stimulation signal in the molecular layer of the cerebellum of a mouse. For this purpose a stimulator circuit is developed that is able to produce a monophasic high frequency switched-mode stimulation signal. The results confirm the modeling by showing that switched-mode stimulation is able to induce similar responses in the Purkinje cell as classical stimulation using a constant current source. This conclusion opens up possibilities for novel stimulation designs that can improve the performance of the stimulator circuitry. Care has to be taken to avoid losses in the system due to the higher operating frequency.

  9. Development of a heterodyne laser interferometer for very small high frequency displacements detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baarmann, P.

    1992-10-01

    A heterodyne laser interferometer with detection electronics has been developed for measuring very small amplitude high frequency vibrations. A laser beam from HeNe-laser is focused and reflected in the vibrating surface and the generated phase shifts are after interference with a reference beam detected with a photo detector and evaluated in a demodulation system. The set-up is a prototype and techniques to improve the accuracy and sensitivity of the system are presented. The present system can detect vibration amplitude from around 1 Angstrom and is linear up to 250 Angstrom (±4%). Frequencies from a few tens of kHz up to tens of MHz are covered. The low frequency region can be greatly improved. The minimum detectable displacement may be improved by narrowing the bandwidth of the detection system to the region of interest

  10. Computation of High-Frequency Waves with Random Uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Malenova, Gabriela

    2016-01-06

    We consider the forward propagation of uncertainty in high-frequency waves, described by the second order wave equation with highly oscillatory initial data. The main sources of uncertainty are the wave speed and/or the initial phase and amplitude, described by a finite number of random variables with known joint probability distribution. We propose a stochastic spectral asymptotic method [1] for computing the statistics of uncertain output quantities of interest (QoIs), which are often linear or nonlinear functionals of the wave solution and its spatial/temporal derivatives. The numerical scheme combines two techniques: a high-frequency method based on Gaussian beams [2, 3], a sparse stochastic collocation method [4]. The fast spectral convergence of the proposed method depends crucially on the presence of high stochastic regularity of the QoI independent of the wave frequency. In general, the high-frequency wave solutions to parametric hyperbolic equations are highly oscillatory and non-smooth in both physical and stochastic spaces. Consequently, the stochastic regularity of the QoI, which is a functional of the wave solution, may in principle below and depend on frequency. In the present work, we provide theoretical arguments and numerical evidence that physically motivated QoIs based on local averages of |uE|2 are smooth, with derivatives in the stochastic space uniformly bounded in E, where uE and E denote the highly oscillatory wave solution and the short wavelength, respectively. This observable related regularity makes the proposed approach more efficient than current asymptotic approaches based on Monte Carlo sampling techniques.

  11. The MACHO Project Sample of Galactic Bulge High-Amplitude {delta} Scuti Stars: Pulsation Behavior and Stellar Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T. S.; Becker, A. C.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Freeman, K. C.; Geha, M.; Griest, K. (and others)

    2000-06-20

    We have detected 90 objects with periods and light-curve structures similar to those of field {delta} Scuti stars using the Massive Compact Halo Object (MACHO) Project database of Galactic bulge photometry. If we assume similar extinction values for all candidates and absolute magnitudes similar to those of other field high-amplitude {delta} Scuti stars (HADS), the majority of these objects lie in or near the Galactic bulge. At least two of these objects are likely foreground {delta} Scuti stars, one of which may be an evolved nonradial pulsator, similar to other evolved, disk-population {delta} Scuti stars. We have analyzed the light curves of these objects and find that they are similar to the light curves of field {delta} Scuti stars and the {delta} Scuti stars found by the Optical Gravitational Lens Experiment (OGLE). However, the amplitude distribution of these sources lies between those of low- and high-amplitude {delta} Scuti stars, which suggests that they may be an intermediate population. We have found nine double-mode HADS with frequency ratios ranging from 0.75 to 0.79, four probable double- and multiple-mode objects, and another four objects with marginal detections of secondary modes. The low frequencies (5-14 cycles day-1) and the observed period ratios of {approx}0.77 suggest that the majority of these objects are evolved stars pulsating in fundamental or first overtone radial modes. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  12. Dynamics of a nonlinear oscillator and a low-amplitude frequency-modulated wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.C.; McNamara, B.

    1987-01-01

    When the frequency of a small amplitude plane wave is varied slowly over a large enough bandwidth and this wave is incident upon a nonlinear oscillator, the resulting perturbed motion can exhibit stochastic behavior. Applications for the study of this system are wide and varied. We apply Lie-transform perturbation theory and mapping techniques in the analysis of the stochastic transition and the consequent induced diffusion in the oscillator phase space. A constant of the motion to the first order in a peturbation parameter is calculated, a mapping approximation is derived, and diffusion calculations from the mapping are given. Copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc

  13. Isolating spectral cues in amplitude and quasi-frequency modulation discrimination by reducing stimulus duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, Ewa; Berg, Bruce G

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the psychophysical effects of distortion products in a listening task traditionally used to estimate the bandwidth of phase sensitivity. For a 2000 Hz carrier, estimates of modulation depth necessary to discriminate amplitude modulated (AM) tones and quasi-frequency modulated (QFM) were measured in a two interval forced choice task as a function modulation frequency. Temporal modulation transfer functions were often non-monotonic at modulation frequencies above 300 Hz. This was likely to be due to a spectral cue arising from the interaction of auditory distortion products and the lower sideband of the stimulus complex. When the stimulus duration was decreased from 200 ms to 20 ms, thresholds for low-frequency modulators rose to near-chance levels, whereas thresholds in the region of non-monotonicities were less affected. The decrease in stimulus duration appears to hinder the listener's ability to use temporal cues in order to discriminate between AM and QFM, whereas spectral information derived from distortion product cues appears more resilient. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. VLF group delay of lightning-induced electron precipitation echoes from measurement of phase and amplitude perturbations at two frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, C.D.D.; Dowden, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of phase and amplitude perturbations (trimpis) of the NWC signal at Dunedin at both the NWC frequencies, 22,250 Hz and 22,350 Hz, enables measurement of the received phase of the echo signal (phasor difference of the perturbed and unperturbed signals) at each frequency and so the rate of decrease of phase with frequency. This, of course, is the group delay. The 100-Hz difference implies that measurement of echo group delays of up to 5 ms could be made without ambiguity, though other factors limit this to about 2.5 ms. Some 38 difference trimpis during May and June 1988 showed echo delays up to 2 ms corresponding to reflection from points displaced more than 1,000 km from the NWC-Dunedin great circle path. The echo amplitudes observed at such large displacements are much greater than expected from smooth circular depressions of the ionosphere modifying the waveguide phase velocity and so imply sharper discontinuities in the waveguide

  15. A New High Frequency Injection Method Based on Duty Cycle Shifting without Maximum Voltage Magnitude Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Dong; Lu, Kaiyuan; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2015-01-01

    The conventional high frequency signal injection method is to superimpose a high frequency voltage signal to the commanded stator voltage before space vector modulation. Therefore, the magnitude of the voltage used for machine torque production is limited. In this paper, a new high frequency...... amplitude. This may be utilized to develop new position estimation algorithm without involving the inductance in the medium to high speed range. As an application example, a developed inductance independent position estimation algorithm using the proposed high frequency injection method is applied to drive...... injection method, in which high frequency signal is generated by shifting the duty cycle between two neighboring switching periods, is proposed. This method allows injecting a high frequency signal at half of the switching frequency without the necessity to sacrifice the machine fundamental voltage...

  16. Different Stimulation Frequencies Alter Synchronous Fluctuations in Motor Evoked Potential Amplitude of Intrinsic Hand Muscles—a TMS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Martin V.; Rogasch, Nigel C.; Nordstrom, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The amplitude of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) varies from trial-to-trial. Synchronous oscillations in cortical neuronal excitability contribute to this variability, however it is not known how different frequencies of stimulation influence MEP variability, and whether these oscillations are rhythmic or aperiodic. We stimulated the motor cortex with TMS at different regular (i.e., rhythmic) rates, and compared this with pseudo-random (aperiodic) timing. In 18 subjects, TMS was applied at three regular frequencies (0.05 Hz, 0.2 Hz, 1 Hz) and one aperiodic frequency (mean 0.2 Hz). MEPs (n = 50) were recorded from three intrinsic hand muscles of the left hand with different functional and anatomical relations. MEP amplitude correlation was highest for the functionally related muscle pair, less for the anatomically related muscle pair and least for the functionally- and anatomically-unrelated muscle pair. MEP correlations were greatest with 1 Hz, and least for stimulation at 0.05 Hz. Corticospinal neuron synchrony is higher with shorter TMS intervals. Further, corticospinal neuron synchrony is similar irrespective of whether the stimulation is periodic or aperiodic. These findings suggest TMS frequency is a crucial consideration for studies using TMS to probe correlated activity between muscle pairs. PMID:27014031

  17. GENERAL APROACH TO MODELING NONLINEAR AMPLITUDE AND FREQUENCY DEPENDENT HYSTERESIS EFFECTS BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Heine; Markus Plagemann

    2014-01-01

    A detailed description of the rubber parts’ properties is gaining in importance in the current simulation models of multi-body simulation. One application example is a multi-body simulation of the washing machine movement. Inside the washing machine, there are different force transmission elements, which consist completely or partly of rubber. Rubber parts or, generally, elastomers usually have amplitude-dependant and frequency-dependent force transmission properties. Rheological models are u...

  18. Dependence of the frequency spectrum of small amplitude vibrations superimposed on finite deformations of a nonlinear, cylindrical elastic body on residual stress

    KAUST Repository

    Gorb, Yuliya

    2010-11-01

    We model and analyze the response of nonlinear, residually stressed elastic bodies subjected to small amplitude vibrations superimposed upon large deformations. The problem derives from modeling the use of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging to interrogate atherosclerotic plaques in vivo in large arteries. The goal of this investigation is twofold: (i) introduce a modeling framework for residual stress that unlike traditional Fung type classical opening angle models may be used for a diseased artery, and (ii) investigate the sensitivity of the spectra of small amplitude high frequency time harmonic vibrations superimposed on a large deformation to the details of the residual stress stored in arteries through a numerical simulation using physiologic parameter values under both low and high blood pressure loadings. The modeling framework also points the way towards an inverse problem using IVUS techniques to estimate residual stress in healthy and diseased arteries. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 3D Seismic Reflection Amplitude and Instantaneous Frequency Attributes in Mapping Thin Hydrocarbon Reservoir Lithofacies: Morrison NE Field and Morrison Field, Clark County, KS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raef, Abdelmoneam; Totten, Matthew; Vohs, Andrew; Linares, Aria

    2017-12-01

    Thin hydrocarbon reservoir facies pose resolution challenges and waveform-signature opportunities in seismic reservoir characterization and prospect identification. In this study, we present a case study, where instantaneous frequency variation in response to a thin hydrocarbon pay zone is analyzed and integrated with other independent information to explain drilling results and optimize future drilling decisions. In Morrison NE Field, some wells with poor economics have resulted from well-placement incognizant of reservoir heterogeneities. The study area in Clark County, Kanas, USA, has been covered by a surface 3D seismic reflection survey in 2010. The target horizon is the Viola limestone, which continues to produce from 7 of the 12 wells drilled within the survey area. Seismic attributes extraction and analyses were conducted with emphasis on instantaneous attributes and amplitude anomalies to better understand and predict reservoir heterogeneities and their control on hydrocarbon entrapment settings. We have identified a higher instantaneous frequency, lower amplitude seismic facies that is in good agreement with distinct lithofacies that exhibit better (higher porosity) reservoir properties, as inferred from well-log analysis and petrographic inspection of well cuttings. This study presents a pre-drilling, data-driven approach of identifying sub-resolution reservoir seismic facies in a carbonate formation. This workflow will assist in placing new development wells in other locations within the area. Our low amplitude high instantaneous frequency seismic reservoir facies have been corroborated by findings based on well logs, petrographic analysis data, and drilling results.

  20. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH FREQUENCIES IN δ SCUTI STARS: PHOTOMETRIC KEPLER AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF THE RAPID ROTATOR KIC 8054146

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breger, M.; Robertson, P.; Fossati, L.; Balona, L.; Kurtz, D. W.; Bohlender, D.; Lenz, P.; Müller, I.; Lüftinger, Th.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Hall, Jennifer R.; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A.

    2012-01-01

    Two years of Kepler data of KIC 8054146 (δ Sct/γ Dor hybrid) revealed 349 statistically significant frequencies between 0.54 and 191.36 cycles day –1 (6.3 μHz to 2.21 mHz). The 117 low frequencies cluster in specific frequency bands, but do not show the equidistant period spacings predicted for gravity modes of successive radial order, n, and reported for at least one other hybrid pulsator. The four dominant low frequencies in the 2.8-3.0 cycles day –1 (32-35 μHz) range show strong amplitude variability with timescales of months and years. These four low frequencies also determine the spacing of the higher frequencies in and beyond the δ Sct pressure-mode frequency domain. In fact, most of the higher frequencies belong to one of three families with spacings linked to a specific dominant low frequency. In the Fourier spectrum, these family regularities show up as triplets, high-frequency sequences with absolutely equidistant frequency spacings, side lobes (amplitude modulations), and other regularities in frequency spacings. Furthermore, within two families the amplitude variations between the low and high frequencies are related. We conclude that the low frequencies (gravity modes, rotation) and observed high frequencies (mostly pressure modes) are physically connected. This unusual behavior may be related to the very rapid rotation of the star: from a combination of high- and low-resolution spectroscopy we determined that KIC 8054146 is a very fast rotator (υ sin i = 300 ± 20 km s –1 ) with an effective temperature of 7600 ± 200 K and a surface gravity log g of 3.9 ± 0.3. Several astrophysical ideas explaining the origin of the relationship between the low and high frequencies are explored.

  1. On second order effects in a galvanic cell : Part I. Polarization by a sine wave modulated high frequency current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, F. van der; Sluyters-Rehbach, M.; Sluyters, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical study is presented concerning the application of a high-frequency alternating current, amplitude modulated by a low-frequency sine wave, to a galvanic cell. Based on the correlation with the faradaic rectification technique, expressions are given for the low-frequency demodulation

  2. A high frequency test bench for rapid single-flux-quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engseth, H; Intiso, S; Rafique, M R; Tolkacheva, E; Kidiyarova-Shevchenko, A

    2006-01-01

    We have designed and experimentally verified a test bench for high frequency testing of rapid single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) circuits. This test bench uses an external tunable clock signal that is stable in amplitude, phase and frequency. The high frequency external clock reads out the clock pattern stored in a long shift register. The clock pattern is consequently shifted out at high speed and split to feed both the circuit under test and an additional shift register in the test bench for later verification at low speed. This method can be employed for reliable high speed verification of RSFQ circuit operation, with use of only low speed read-out electronics. The test bench consists of 158 Josephson junctions and the occupied area is 3300 x 660 μm 2 . It was experimentally verified up to 33 GHz with ± 21.7% margins on the global bias supply current

  3. Vibration-induced particle formation during yogurt fermentation-Effect of frequency and amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körzendörfer, Adrian; Temme, Philipp; Schlücker, Eberhard; Hinrichs, Jörg; Nöbel, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    Machinery such as pumps used for the commercial production of fermented milk products cause vibrations that can spread to the fermentation tanks. During fermentation, such vibrations can disturb the gelation of milk proteins by causing texture defects including lumpiness and syneresis. To study the effect of vibrations on yogurt structure systematically, an experimental setup was developed consisting of a vibration exciter to generate defined vibrational states and accelerometers for monitoring. During the fermentation of skim milk, vibrations (frequency sweep: 25 to 1,005 Hz) were introduced at different pH (5.7 to 5.1, step width 0.1 units) for 200 s. Physical properties of set gels (syneresis, firmness) and resultant stirred yogurts (visible particles, rheology, laser diffraction) were analyzed. Vibrational treatments at pH 5.5 to 5.2 increased syneresis, gel firmness, and the number of large particles (d > 0.9 mm); hence, this period was considered critical. The particle number increased from 34 ± 5 to 242 ± 16 particles per 100 g of yogurt due to vibrations at pH 5.4. In further experiments, yogurts were excited with fixed frequencies (30, 300, and 1,000 Hz). All treatments increased syneresis, firmness, and particle formation. As the strongest effect was observed by applying 30 Hz, the amplitude was set to vibration accelerations of a = 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 m/s 2 in the final experiments. The number of large particles was increased due to each treatment and a positive correlation with the amplitude was found. We concluded that vibrations during gelation increase the collision probability of aggregating milk proteins, resulting in a compressed set gel with syneresis. Resultant stirred yogurts exhibit large particles with a compact structure leading to a reduced water-holding capacity and product viscosity. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prediction of broadband ground-motion time histories: Hybrid low/high-frequency method with correlated random source parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P.; Archuleta, R.J.; Hartzell, S.H.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new method for calculating broadband time histories of ground motion based on a hybrid low-frequency/high-frequency approach with correlated source parameters. Using a finite-difference method we calculate low- frequency synthetics (structure. We also compute broadband synthetics in a 1D velocity model using a frequency-wavenumber method. The low frequencies from the 3D calculation are combined with the high frequencies from the 1D calculation by using matched filtering at a crossover frequency of 1 Hz. The source description, common to both the 1D and 3D synthetics, is based on correlated random distributions for the slip amplitude, rupture velocity, and rise time on the fault. This source description allows for the specification of source parameters independent of any a priori inversion results. In our broadband modeling we include correlation between slip amplitude, rupture velocity, and rise time, as suggested by dynamic fault modeling. The method of using correlated random source parameters is flexible and can be easily modified to adjust to our changing understanding of earthquake ruptures. A realistic attenuation model is common to both the 3D and 1D calculations that form the low- and high-frequency components of the broadband synthetics. The value of Q is a function of the local shear-wave velocity. To produce more accurate high-frequency amplitudes and durations, the 1D synthetics are corrected with a randomized, frequency-dependent radiation pattern. The 1D synthetics are further corrected for local site and nonlinear soil effects by using a 1D nonlinear propagation code and generic velocity structure appropriate for the site’s National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classification. The entire procedure is validated by comparison with the 1994 Northridge, California, strong ground motion data set. The bias and error found here for response spectral acceleration are similar to the best results that have been published by

  5. A microfluidic device for studying cell signaling with multiple inputs and adjustable amplitudes and frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningsih, Zubaidah; Chon, James W. M.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Cell function is largely controlled by an intricate web of macromolecular interactions called signaling networks. It is known that the type and the intensity (concentration) of stimulus affect cell behavior. However, the temporal aspect of the stimulus is not yet fully understood. Moreover, the process of distinguishing between two stimuli by a cell is still not clear. A microfluidic device enables the delivery of a precise and exact stimulus to the cell due to the laminar flow established inside its micro-channel. The slow stream delivers a constant stimulus which is adjustable according to the experiment set up. Moreover, with controllable inputs, microfluidic facilitates the stimuli delivery according to a certain pattern with adjustable amplitude, frequency and phase. Several designs of PDMS microfluidic device has been produced in this project via photolithography and soft lithography processes. To characterize the microfluidic performance, two experiments has been conducted. First, by comparing the fluorescence intensity and the lifetime of fluorescein in the present of KI, mixing extent between two inputs was observed using Frequency Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). Furthermore, the input-output relationship of fluorescein concentration delivered was also drawn to characterize the amplitude, frequency and phase of the inputs. Second experiment involved the cell culturing inside microfluidic. Using NG108-15 cells, proliferation and differentiation were observed based on the cell number and cell physiological changes. Our results demonstrate that hurdle design gives 86% mixing of fluorescein and buffer. Relationship between inputoutput fluorescein concentrations delivered has also been demonstrated and cells were successfully cultured inside the microfluidic.

  6. Changes in mean plasma ACTH reflect changes in amplitude and frequency of secretory pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnes, M.; Lent, S.J.; Erisman, S.; Feyzi, J.

    1988-01-01

    ACTH is secreted in an episodic manner from the anterior pituitary. Unanesthetized rats with indwelling jugular and femoral venous cannulae were continuously bled and simultaneously infused with isotonic fluid by peristaltic pump. Two-minute blood samples were collected for up to five hours in 8 male rats. ACTH was measured by radioimmunoassay. The resulting time series were analyzed for significant secretory pulses with the PULSAR program. Elevations or declines in mean plasma ACTH levels were associated with significant changes in amplitude and frequency of secretory pulses

  7. Development and characterization of high-frequency resonance-enhanced microjet actuators for control of high-speed jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Puja; Gustavsson, Jonas P. R.; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2016-05-01

    For flow control applications requiring high-frequency excitation, very few actuators have sufficient dynamic response and/or control authority to be useful in high-speed flows. Due to this reason, experiments involving high-frequency excitation, attempted in the past, have been limited to either low-frequency actuation with reasonable control authority or moderate-frequency actuation with limited control authority. The current work expands on the previous development of the resonance-enhanced microactuators to design actuators that are capable of producing high-amplitude pulses at much higher frequencies [{O} (10 kHz)]. Using lumped element modeling, two actuators have been designed with nominal frequencies of 20 and 50 kHz. Extensive benchtop characterization using acoustic measurements as well as optical diagnostics using a high-resolution micro-schlieren setup is employed to characterize the dynamic response of these actuators. The actuators performed at a range of frequencies, 20.3-27.8 and 54.8-78.2 kHz, respectively. In addition to providing information on the actuator flow physics and performance at various operating conditions, this study serves to develop easy-to-integrate high-frequency actuators for active control of high-speed jets. Preliminary testing of these actuators is performed by implementing the 20-kHz actuator on a Mach 0.9 free jet flow field for noise reduction. Acoustic measurements in the jet near field demonstrate attenuation of radiated noise at all observation angles.

  8. Laser generated ultrasound sources using polymer nanocomposites for high frequency metrology

    KAUST Repository

    Rajagopal, Srinath

    2017-11-22

    Accurate characterisation of ultrasound fields generated by diagnostic and therapeutic transducers is critical for patient safety. This requires hydrophones calibrated to a traceable standard. The existing implementation of the primary standard at the National Measurement Institutes, e.g., NPL and PTB, can provide accurate calibration to a maximum frequency of 40MHz. However, the increasing use of high frequencies for both imaging and therapy necessitates calibrations to frequencies well beyond this range. For this to be possible, a source of high amplitude, broadband, quasi-planar and stable ultrasound fields is required. This is difficult to achieve using conventional piezoelectric sources, but laser generated ultrasound is a promising technique in this regard. In this study various polymer-carbon nanotube nanocomposites (PNC) were fabricated and tested for their suitability for such an application.

  9. High-Amplitude Atlantic Hurricanes Produce Disparate Mortality in Small, Low-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresser, Caleb; Allison, Jeroan; Broach, John; Smith, Mary-Elise; Milsten, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    Hurricanes cause substantial mortality, especially in developing nations, and climate science predicts that powerful hurricanes will increase in frequency during the coming decades. This study examined the association of wind speed and national economic conditions with mortality in a large sample of hurricane events in small countries. Economic, meteorological, and fatality data for 149 hurricane events in 16 nations between 1958 and 2011 were analyzed. Mortality rate was modeled with negative binomial regression implemented by generalized estimating equations to account for variable population exposure, sequence of storm events, exposure of multiple islands to the same storm, and nonlinear associations. Low-amplitude storms caused little mortality regardless of economic status. Among high-amplitude storms (Saffir-Simpson category 4 or 5), expected mortality rate was 0.72 deaths per 100,000 people (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.16-1.28) for nations in the highest tertile of per capita gross domestic product (GDP) compared with 25.93 deaths per 100,000 people (95% CI: 13.30-38.55) for nations with low per capita GDP. Lower per capita GDP and higher wind speeds were associated with greater mortality rates in small countries. Excessive fatalities occurred when powerful storms struck resource-poor nations. Predictions of increasing storm amplitude over time suggest increasing disparity between death rates unless steps are taken to modify the risk profiles of poor nations. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:832-837).

  10. Behavioral analysis of signals that guide learned changes in the amplitude and dynamics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J. L.; Lisberger, S. G.

    1996-01-01

    We characterized the dependence of motor learning in the monkey vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) on the duration, frequency, and relative timing of the visual and vestibular stimuli used to induce learning. The amplitude of the VOR was decreased or increased through training with paired head and visual stimulus motion in the same or opposite directions, respectively. For training stimuli that consisted of simultaneous pulses of head and target velocity 80-1000 msec in duration, brief stimuli caused small changes in the amplitude of the VOR, whereas long stimuli caused larger changes in amplitude as well as changes in the dynamics of the reflex. When the relative timing of the visual and vestibular stimuli was varied, brief image motion paired with the beginning of a longer vestibular stimulus caused changes in the amplitude of the reflex alone, but the same image motion paired with a later time in the vestibular stimulus caused changes in the dynamics as well as the amplitude of the VOR. For training stimuli that consisted of sinusoidal head and visual stimulus motion, low-frequency training stimuli induced frequency-selective changes in the VOR, as reported previously, whereas high-frequency training stimuli induced changes in the amplitude of the VOR that were more similar across test frequency. The results suggest that there are at least two distinguishable components of motor learning in the VOR. One component is induced by short-duration or high-frequency stimuli and involves changes in only the amplitude of the reflex. A second component is induced by long-duration or low-frequency stimuli and involves changes in the amplitude and dynamics of the VOR.

  11. CRAFT (complete reduction to amplitude frequency table)--robust and time-efficient Bayesian approach for quantitative mixture analysis by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Krish

    2013-12-01

    The intrinsic quantitative nature of NMR is increasingly exploited in areas ranging from complex mixture analysis (as in metabolomics and reaction monitoring) to quality assurance/control. Complex NMR spectra are more common than not, and therefore, extraction of quantitative information generally involves significant prior knowledge and/or operator interaction to characterize resonances of interest. Moreover, in most NMR-based metabolomic experiments, the signals from metabolites are normally present as a mixture of overlapping resonances, making quantification difficult. Time-domain Bayesian approaches have been reported to be better than conventional frequency-domain analysis at identifying subtle changes in signal amplitude. We discuss an approach that exploits Bayesian analysis to achieve a complete reduction to amplitude frequency table (CRAFT) in an automated and time-efficient fashion - thus converting the time-domain FID to a frequency-amplitude table. CRAFT uses a two-step approach to FID analysis. First, the FID is digitally filtered and downsampled to several sub FIDs, and secondly, these sub FIDs are then modeled as sums of decaying sinusoids using the Bayesian approach. CRAFT tables can be used for further data mining of quantitative information using fingerprint chemical shifts of compounds of interest and/or statistical analysis of modulation of chemical quantity in a biological study (metabolomics) or process study (reaction monitoring) or quality assurance/control. The basic principles behind this approach as well as results to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach in mixture analysis are presented. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Particle Distribution Modification by Low Amplitude Modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Modification of a high energy particle distribution by a spectrum of low amplitude modes is investigated using a guiding center code. Only through resonance are modes effective in modifying the distribution. Diagnostics are used to illustrate the mode-particle interaction and to find which effects are relevant in producing significant resonance, including kinetic Poincare plots and plots showing those orbits with time averaged mode-particle energy transfer. Effects of pitch angle scattering and drag are studied, as well as plasma rotation and time dependence of the equilibrium and mode frequencies. A specific example of changes observed in a DIII-D deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude experimentally validated Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes is examined in detail. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam profile modification, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold.

  13. Searches for high frequency variations in the 8-B neutrino flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rielage, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seibert, Stanley R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stonehill, L C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wouters, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aharmim, B [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Ahmed, S N [QUEEN' S UNIV; Anthony, A E [UNIV OF TEXAS; Barros, N [PORTUGAL; Beier, E W [UNIV OF PA; Bellerive, A [CARLETON UNIV; Belttran, B [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Bergevin, M [LBNL; Biller, S D [UNIV OF OXFORD; Boudjemline, K [CARLETON UNIV; Burritt, T H [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Cai, B [QUEEN' S UNIV; Chan, Y D [LBNL; Chauhan, D [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Chen, M [QUEEN' S UNIV; Cleveland, B T [UNIV OF OXFORD; Cox - Mobrand, G A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Dai, X [QUEEN' S UNIV; Deng, H [UNIV OF PA; Detwiler, J [LBNL; Dimarco, M [QUEEN' S UNIV; Doe, P J [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Drouin, P - L [CARLTON UNIV; Duba, C A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Duncan, F A [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Dunford, M [UNIV OF PA; Earle, E D [QUEEN' S UNIV; Evans, H C [QUEEN' S UNIV; Ewan, G T [QUEEN' S UNIV; Farine, J [LAURENTTIAN UNIV; Fergani, H [UNIV OF OXFORD; Fleurot, F [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Ford, R J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Formaggilo, J A [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Gagnon, N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Goon, J Tm [LOUISIANA STATE UNIV; Guillian, E [QUEEN' S UNIV; Habib, S [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Hahn, R L [BNL; Hallin, A L [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Hallman, E D [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Harvey, P J [QUEEN' S UNIV; Hazama, R [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Heintzelman, W J [UNIV OF PA; Heise, J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Helmer, R L [TRIUMF; Howard, C [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Howe, M A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Huang, M [UNIV OF TEXAS; Jamieson, B [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Jelley, N A [UNIV OF OXFORD; Keeter, K J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Klein, J R [UNIV OF TEXAS; Kos, M [QUEEN' S UNIV; Kraus, C [QUEEN' S UNIV; Krauss, C B [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Kutter, T [LOUISIANA STATE UNIV; Kyba, C C M [UNIV OF PA; Law, J [UNIV OF GUELPH; Lawson, I T [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Lesko, K T [LBNL; Leslie, J R [QUEEN' S UNIV; Loach, J C [UNIV OF OXFORD; Maclellan, R [QUEEN' S UNIV; Majerus, S [UNIV OF OXFORD; Mak, H B [QUEEN' S UNIV; Maneira, J [PORTUGAL; Martin, R [QUEEN' S UNIV; Mccauley, N [UNIV OF PA; Mc Donald, A B [QUEEN' S UNIV; Mcgee, S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Miffin, C [CARLETON UNIV; Miller, M L [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Monreal, B [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Monroe, J [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH; Morissette, B [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Nickel, B G [UNIV OF GUELPH; Noble, A J [QUEEN' S UNIV; O' Keeffe, H M [UNIV OF OXFORD; Oblath, N S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Orebi Gann, G D [UNIV OF OXFORD; Oser, S M [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Ott, R A [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Peeters, S J M [UNIV OF OXFORD; Poon, A W P [LBNL; Prior, G [LBNL; Reitzner, S D [UNIV OF GUELPH; Robertson, B C [QUEEN' S UNIV; Robertson, R G H [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Rollin, E [CARLETON UNIV; Schwendener, M H [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Secrest, J A [UNIV OF PA; Seibert, S R [UNIV OF TEXAS; Simard, O [CARLETON UNIV; Sinclair, D [CARLETON UNIV; Sinclair, L [CARLETON UNIV; Skensved, P [QUEEN' S UNIV; Sonley, T J [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Tesic, G [CARLETON UNIV; Tolich, N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Tsui, T [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Tunnell, C D [UNIV OF TEXAS; Van Berg, R [UNIV OF PA; Van Devender, B A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Virtue, C J [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Wall, B L [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Waller, D [CARLETON UNIV; Wan Chan Tseung, H [UNIV OF OXFORD; West, N [UNIV OF OXFORD; Wilkerson, J F [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Wilson, J R [UNIV OF OXFORD; Wright, A [QUEEN' S UNIV; Yeh, M [BNL; Zhang, F [CARLETON UNIV; Zuber, K [UNIV OF OXFORD

    2009-01-01

    We have peformed three searches for high-frequency signals in the solar neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), motivated by the possibility that solar g-mode oscillations could affect the production or propagation of solar {sup 8}B neutrinos. The first search looked for any significant peak in the frequency range l/day to 144/day, with a sensitivity to sinusoidal signals with amplitudes of 12% or greater. The second search focused on regions in which g-mode signals have been claimed by experiments aboard the SoHO satellite, and was sensitive to signals with amplitudes of 10% or greater. The third search looked for extra power across the entire frequency band. No statistically significant signal was detected in any of the three searches.

  14. Development of Multi-Physics Dynamics Models for High-Frequency Large-Amplitude Structural Response Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkevorkian, Armen; Peterson, Lee; Kolaini, Ali R.; Hendricks, Terry J.; Nesmith, Bill J.

    2016-01-01

    An analytic approach is demonstrated to reveal potential pyroshock -driven dynamic effects causing power losses in the Thermo -Electric (TE) module bars of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Multi -Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG). This study utilizes high- fidelity finite element analysis with SIERRA/PRESTO codes to estimate wave propagation effects due to large -amplitude suddenly -applied pyro shock loads in the MMRTG. A high fidelity model of the TE module bar was created with approximately 30 million degrees -of-freedom (DOF). First, a quasi -static preload was applied on top of the TE module bar, then transient tri- axial acceleration inputs were simultaneously applied on the preloaded module. The applied input acceleration signals were measured during MMRTG shock qualification tests performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. An explicit finite element solver in the SIERRA/PRESTO computational environment, along with a 3000 processor parallel super -computing framework at NASA -AMES, was used for the simulation. The simulation results were investigated both qualitatively and quantitatively. The predicted shock wave propagation results provide detailed structural responses throughout the TE module bar, and key insights into the dynamic response (i.e., loads, displacements, accelerations) of critical internal spring/piston compression systems, TE materials, and internal component interfaces in the MMRTG TE module bar. They also provide confidence on the viability of this high -fidelity modeling scheme to accurately predict shock wave propagation patterns within complex structures. This analytic approach is envisioned for modeling shock sensitive hardware susceptible to intense shock environments positioned near shock separation devices in modern space vehicles and systems.

  15. Rapid estimation of earthquake magnitude from the arrival time of the peak high‐frequency amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Shunta; Yamamoto, Shunroku; Ellsworth, William L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple approach to measure earthquake magnitude M using the time difference (Top) between the body‐wave onset and the arrival time of the peak high‐frequency amplitude in an accelerogram. Measured in this manner, we find that Mw is proportional to 2logTop for earthquakes 5≤Mw≤7, which is the theoretical proportionality if Top is proportional to source dimension and stress drop is scale invariant. Using high‐frequency (>2  Hz) data, the root mean square (rms) residual between Mw and MTop(M estimated from Top) is approximately 0.5 magnitude units. The rms residuals of the high‐frequency data in passbands between 2 and 16 Hz are uniformly smaller than those obtained from the lower‐frequency data. Top depends weakly on epicentral distance, and this dependence can be ignored for distances earthquake produces a final magnitude estimate of M 9.0 at 120 s after the origin time. We conclude that Top of high‐frequency (>2  Hz) accelerograms has value in the context of earthquake early warning for extremely large events.

  16. Active cancellation of residual amplitude modulation in a frequency-modulation based Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yinan; Wang, Yicheng; Pratt, Jon R

    2016-03-01

    Residual amplitude modulation (RAM) is one of the most common noise sources known to degrade the sensitivity of frequency modulation spectroscopy. RAM can arise as a result of the temperature dependent birefringence of the modulator crystal, which causes the orientation of the crystal's optical axis to shift with respect to the polarization of the incident light with temperature. In the fiber-based optical interferometer used on the National Institute of Standards and Technology calculable capacitor, RAM degrades the measured laser frequency stability and correlates with the environmental temperature fluctuations. We have demonstrated a simple approach that cancels out excessive RAM due to polarization mismatch between the light and the optical axis of the crystal. The approach allows us to measure the frequency noise of a heterodyne beat between two lasers individually locked to different resonant modes of a cavity with an accuracy better than 0.5 ppm, which meets the requirement to further determine the longitudinal mode number of the cavity length. Also, this approach has substantially mitigated the temperature dependency of the measurements of the cavity length and consequently the capacitance.

  17. Different stimulation frequencies alter synchronous fluctuations in motor evoked potential amplitude of intrinsic hand muscles – a TMS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Victor Sale

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The amplitude of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs elicited with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS varies from trial-to-trial. Synchronous oscillations in cortical neuronal excitability contribute to this variability, however it is not known how different frequencies of stimulation influence MEP variability, and whether these oscillations are rhythmic or aperiodic. We stimulated the motor cortex with TMS at different regular (i.e., rhythmic rates, and compared this with pseudo-random (aperiodic timing. In 18 subjects, TMS was applied at three regular frequencies (0.05 Hz, 0.2 Hz, 1 Hz and one aperiodic frequency (mean 0.2 Hz. MEPs (n = 50 were recorded from three intrinsic hand muscles of the left hand with different functional and anatomical relations. MEP amplitude correlation was highest for the functionally related muscle pair, less for the anatomically related muscle pair and least for the functionally- and anatomically-unrelated muscle pair. MEP correlations were greatest with 1 Hz, and least for stimulation at 0.05 Hz. Corticospinal neuron synchrony is higher with shorter TMS intervals. Further, corticospinal neuron synchrony is similar irrespective of whether the stimulation is periodic or aperiodic. These findings suggest TMS frequency is a crucial consideration for studies using TMS to probe correlated activity between muscle pairs.

  18. Method for generation of THz frequency radiation and sensing of large amplitude material strain waves in piezoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Evan J.; Armstrong, Michael R.

    2010-09-07

    Strain waves of THz frequencies can coherently generate radiation when they propagate past an interface between materials with different piezoelectric coefficients. Such radiation is of detectable amplitude and contains sufficient information to determine the time-dependence of the strain wave with unprecedented subpicosecond, nearly atomic time and space resolution.

  19. Extremum seeking to control the amplitude and frequency of a pulsed jet for bluff body drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackston, Rowan D.; Wynn, Andrew; Morrison, Jonathan F.

    2016-10-01

    Feedback control of fluid flows presents a challenging problem due to nonlinear dynamics and unknown optimal operating conditions. Extremum seeking control presents a suitable method for many flow control situations but involves its own challenges. In this paper, we provide a brief analysis of the extremum seeking method, with attention to modifications that we find to be advantageous. In particular, we present an adaptation for optimisation of the frequency of a harmonic input signal, a common scenario for open-loop flow control systems. We then present results from the experimental implementation of our modified method to the open-loop control system of Oxlade et al. (J Fluid Mech 770:305-318, 2015), an axisymmetric bluff-body wake, forced by a pulsed jet. We find that the system is able to achieve optimal operating conditions in both the amplitude and frequency of the harmonic input signal, and is able to largely reject the disturbances arising from measurements of a highly turbulent flow. We finally show the ability of the extremum seeking system to adapt to changing conditions.

  20. Electro-optic modulator with ultra-low residual amplitude modulation for frequency modulation and laser stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Zhaoyang; Yan, Lulu; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Xiaofei; Guo, Wenge; Zhang, Shougang; Jiang, Haifeng

    2016-12-01

    The reduction of the residual amplitude modulation (RAM) induced by electro-optic modulation is essential for many applications of frequency modulation spectroscopy requiring a lower system noise floor. Here, we demonstrate a simple passive approach employing an electro-optic modulator (EOM) cut at Brewster's angle. The proposed EOM exhibits a RAM of a few parts per million, which is comparable with that achieved by a common EOM under critical active temperature and bias voltage controls. The frequency instability of a 10 cm cavity-stabilized laser induced by the RAM effect of the proposed EOM is below 3×10-17 for integration times from 1 to 1000 s, and below 4×10-16 for comprehensive noise contributions for integration times from 1 to 100 s.

  1. Dual-tone optical vector millimeter wave signal generated by frequency-nonupling the radio frequency 16-star quadrature-amplitude-modulation signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tonggen; Ma, Jianxin

    2017-12-01

    This paper proposes an original scheme to generate the photonic dual-tone optical millimeter wave (MMW) carrying the 16-star quadrature-amplitude-modulation (QAM) signal via an optical phase modulator (PM) and an interleaver with adaptive photonic frequency-nonupling without phase precoding. To enable the generated optical vector MMW signal to resist the power fading effect caused by the fiber chromatic dispersion, the modulated -5th- and +4th-order sidebands are selected from the output of the PM, which is driven by the precoding 16-star QAM signal. The modulation index of the PM is optimized to gain the maximum opto-electrical conversion efficiency. A radio over fiber link is built by simulation, and the simulated constellations and the bit error rate graph demonstrate that the frequency-nonupling 16-star QAM MMW signal has good transmission performance. The simulation results agree well with our theoretical results.

  2. Spline-based high-accuracy piecewise-polynomial phase-to-sinusoid amplitude converters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrinović, Davor; Brezović, Marko

    2011-04-01

    We propose a method for direct digital frequency synthesis (DDS) using a cubic spline piecewise-polynomial model for a phase-to-sinusoid amplitude converter (PSAC). This method offers maximum smoothness of the output signal. Closed-form expressions for the cubic polynomial coefficients are derived in the spectral domain and the performance analysis of the model is given in the time and frequency domains. We derive the closed-form performance bounds of such DDS using conventional metrics: rms and maximum absolute errors (MAE) and maximum spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) measured in the discrete time domain. The main advantages of the proposed PSAC are its simplicity, analytical tractability, and inherent numerical stability for high table resolutions. Detailed guidelines for a fixed-point implementation are given, based on the algebraic analysis of all quantization effects. The results are verified on 81 PSAC configurations with the output resolutions from 5 to 41 bits by using a bit-exact simulation. The VHDL implementation of a high-accuracy DDS based on the proposed PSAC with 28-bit input phase word and 32-bit output value achieves SFDR of its digital output signal between 180 and 207 dB, with a signal-to-noise ratio of 192 dB. Its implementation requires only one 18 kB block RAM and three 18-bit embedded multipliers in a typical field-programmable gate array (FPGA) device. © 2011 IEEE

  3. Damping and Frequency Shift of Large Amplitude Electron Plasma Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kenneth; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1983-01-01

    The initial evolution of large-amplitude one-dimensional electron waves is investigated by applying a numerical simulation. The initial wave damping is found to be strongly enhanced relative to the linear damping and it increases with increasing amplitude. The temporal evolution of the nonlinear...

  4. Epileptic seizure detection from EEG signals with phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling and support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiang; Cai, Lihui; Chen, Yingyuan; Qin, Yingmei

    2018-03-01

    As a pattern of cross-frequency coupling (CFC), phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) depicts the interaction between the phase and amplitude of distinct frequency bands from the same signal, and has been proved to be closely related to the brain’s cognitive and memory activities. This work utilized PAC and support vector machine (SVM) classifier to identify the epileptic seizures from electroencephalogram (EEG) data. The entropy-based modulation index (MI) matrixes are used to express the strength of PAC, from which we extracted features as the input for classifier. Based on the Bonn database, which contains five datasets of EEG segments obtained from healthy volunteers and epileptic subjects, a 100% classification accuracy is achieved for identifying seizure ictal from healthy data, and an accuracy of 97.67% is reached in the classification of ictal EEG signals from inter-ictal EEGs. Based on the CHB-MIT database which is a group of continuously recorded epileptic EEGs by scalp electrodes, a 97.50% classification accuracy is obtained and a raising sign of MI value is found at 6s before seizure onset. The classification performance in this work is effective, and PAC can be considered as a useful tool for detecting and predicting the epileptic seizures and providing reference for clinical diagnosis.

  5. Retinal ganglion cells: mechanisms underlying depolarization block and differential responses to high frequency electrical stimulation of ON and OFF cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameneva, T.; Maturana, M. I.; Hadjinicolaou, A. E.; Cloherty, S. L.; Ibbotson, M. R.; Grayden, D. B.; Burkitt, A. N.; Meffin, H.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. ON and OFF retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are known to have non-monotonic responses to increasing amplitudes of high frequency (2 kHz) biphasic electrical stimulation. That is, an increase in stimulation amplitude causes an increase in the cell’s spike rate up to a peak value above which further increases in stimulation amplitude cause the cell to decrease its activity. The peak response for ON and OFF cells occurs at different stimulation amplitudes, which allows differential stimulation of these functional cell types. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms underlying the non-monotonic responses of ON and OFF brisk-transient RGCs and the mechanisms underlying their differential responses. Approach. Using in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat RGCs, together with simulations of single and multiple compartment Hodgkin-Huxley models, we show that the non-monotonic response to increasing amplitudes of stimulation is due to depolarization block, a change in the membrane potential that prevents the cell from generating action potentials. Main results. We show that the onset for depolarization block depends on the amplitude and frequency of stimulation and reveal the biophysical mechanisms that lead to depolarization block during high frequency stimulation. Our results indicate that differences in transmembrane potassium conductance lead to shifts of the stimulus currents that generate peak spike rates, suggesting that the differential responses of ON and OFF cells may be due to differences in the expression of this current type. We also show that the length of the axon’s high sodium channel band (SOCB) affects non-monotonic responses and the stimulation amplitude that leads to the peak spike rate, suggesting that the length of the SOCB is shorter in ON cells. Significance. This may have important implications for stimulation strategies in visual prostheses.

  6. Responses of Medullary Lateral Line Units of the Goldfish, Carassius auratus, to Amplitude-Modulated Sinusoidal Wave Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the responses of brainstem lateral line units in goldfish, Carassius auratus, to constant-amplitude and to amplitude-modulated sinusoidal water motions. If stimulated with constant-amplitude sinusoidal water motions, units responded with phasic (50% or with sustained (50% increases in dicharge rate. Based on isodisplacement curves, units preferred low (33 Hz, 12.5%, mid (50 Hz, 10% and 100 Hz, 30% or high (200 Hz, 47.5% frequencies. In most units, responses were weakly phase locked to the carrier frequency. However, at a carrier frequency of 50 Hz or 100 Hz, a substantial proportion of the units exhibited strong phase locking. If stimulated with amplitude-modulated water motions, units responded with a burst of discharge to each modulation cycle, that is, units phase locked to the amplitude modulation frequency. Response properties of brainstem units were in many respects comparable to those of midbrain units, suggesting that they emerge first in the lateral line brainstem.

  7. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach.

  8. Active Control of High-Speed Free Jets Using High-Frequency Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Puja

    work expands on the previous development of low-frequency (2-8 kHz) Resonance Enhanced Micro-actuators (REM) to design actuators that are capable of producing high amplitude pulses at much higher frequencies. Extensive benchtop characterization, using acoustic measurements as well as optical diagnostics using a high resolution micro-schlieren setup, is employed to characterize the flow properties and dynamic response of these actuators. The actuators produced high-amplitude output a range of frequencies, 20.3-27.8 kHz and 54.8-78.2 kHz, respectively. In addition to providing information on the actuator flow physics and performances at various operating conditions, the benchtop study serves to develop relatively easy-to-integrate, high-frequency actuators for active control of high-speed jets for noise reduction. Following actuator characterization studies, the nominally 25 kHz ( StDF ≈ 2.2) actuators are implemented on a Mach 0.9 free jet flow field. Eight actuators are azimuthally distributed at the nozzle exit to excite the initial shear layer at frequencies that are approximately an order of magnitude higher compared to the jet preferred frequency, StP ≈ 0.2-0.3. The influence of control on the mean and turbulent characteristics of the jet, especially the developing shear layer, is examined in great detail using planar and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Examination of cross-stream velocity profiles revealed that actuation leads to strong, spatially coherent streamwise vortex pairs which in turn significantly modify the mean flow field, resulting in a prominently undulated shear layer. These vortices grow as they convect downstream, enhancing local entrainment and significantly thickening the initial shear layer. Azimuthal inhomogeneity introduced in the jet shear layer is also evident in the simultaneous redistribution and reduction of peak turbulent fluctuations in the cross-plane near the nozzle exit. Further downstream, control results in a

  9. The effect of river fluctuation frequencies and amplitudes on the extent of the river-aquifer mixing zone and on the dilution of substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derx, Julia; Blaschke, Alfred Paul

    2010-05-01

    The river-aquifer mixing zone has been identified in the past by both observations in the field and by applying coupled groundwater models. Its implications are important e.g. for macrozoobenthos or fish eggs, which react sensitively to changes in flow velocities. The groundwater quality is also strongly affected due to the transport of substances from the river into the aquifer and can be altered due to these mixing processes. At a field site east of Vienna, we recently found that the Danube River surface level fluctuations induce circular flow patterns within the mixing zone and cause a greater dispersion of substances dissolved in groundwater. This has possibly important implications for river management, for example, in the case of anthropogenic river level fluctuations. In this paper, we investigate these findings more generally for groundwater-river interaction with different river fluctuation amplitudes and frequencies. We apply an unsaturated-saturated groundwater model and perform an extensive systematic model analysis to identify the effects of river fluctuation frequencies and amplitudes on the extent and location of the mixing zone. Thereby we investigate the influence of the river bank slopes, the hydraulic aquifer properties and the exchange conditions (infiltration and groundwater exfiltration). The estimated extents and locations of the mixing zone are presented for a range of river fluctuation frequencies and amplitudes, for aquifers of high to low permeabilities, for flat and steep riverbanks and for infiltration and groundwater exfiltration. These parameters demonstrate the significant correlation to the extent of the mixing zone and can help to give an estimate for management strategies. Furthermore, we give an overview of how much a non-reactive substance dissolved in groundwater is diluted, due to dispersion within the mixing zone, for the full set of scenarios performed during our systematic model analysis.

  10. Determination of optimal whole body vibration amplitude and frequency parameters with plyometric exercise and its influence on closed-chain lower extremity acute power output and EMG activity in resistance trained males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Nikki J.

    The optimal combination of Whole body vibration (WBV) amplitude and frequency has not been established. Purpose. To determine optimal combination of WBV amplitude and frequency that will enhance acute mean and peak power (MP and PP) output EMG activity in the lower extremity muscles. Methods. Resistance trained males (n = 13) completed the following testing sessions: On day 1, power spectrum testing of bilateral leg press (BLP) movement was performed on the OMNI. Days 2 and 3 consisted of WBV testing with either average (5.8 mm) or high (9.8 mm) amplitude combined with either 0 (sham control), 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Hz frequency. Bipolar surface electrodes were placed on the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), bicep femoris (BF) and gastrocnemius (GA) muscles for EMG analysis. MP and PP output and EMG activity of the lower extremity were assessed pre-, post-WBV treatments and after sham-controls on the OMNI while participants performed one set of five repetitions of BLP at the optimal resistance determined on Day 1. Results. No significant differences were found between pre- and sham-control on MP and PP output and on EMG activity in RF, VL, BF and GA. Completely randomized one-way ANOVA with repeated measures demonstrated no significant interaction of WBV amplitude and frequency on MP and PP output and peak and mean EMGrms amplitude and EMG rms area under the curve. RF and VL EMGrms area under the curve significantly decreased (p plyometric exercise does not induce alterations in subsequent MP and PP output and EMGrms activity of the lower extremity. Future studies need to address the time of WBV exposure and magnitude of external loads that will maximize strength and/or power output.

  11. Value of Frequency Domain Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Metrics Amplitude of Low-Frequency Fluctuation and Fractional Amplitude of Low-Frequency Fluctuation in the Assessment of Brain Tumor-Induced Neurovascular Uncoupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shruti; Lu, Hanzhang; Pillai, Jay J

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether the phenomenon of brain tumor-related neurovascular uncoupling (NVU) in resting-state blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) (rsfMRI) may also affect the resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) frequency domain metrics the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and fractional ALFF (fALFF). Twelve de novo brain tumor patients, who underwent clinical fMRI examinations, including task-based fMRI (tbfMRI) and rsfMRI, were included in this Institutional Review Board-approved study. Each patient displayed decreased/absent tbfMRI activation in the primary ipsilesional (IL) sensorimotor cortex in the absence of a corresponding motor deficit or suboptimal task performance, consistent with NVU. Z-score maps for the motor tasks were obtained from general linear model analysis (reflecting motor activation vs. rest). Seed-based correlation analysis (SCA) maps of sensorimotor network, ALFF, and fALFF were calculated from rsfMRI data. Precentral and postcentral gyri in contralesional (CL) and IL hemispheres were parcellated using an automated anatomical labeling template for each patient. Region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed on four maps: tbfMRI, SCA, ALFF, and fALFF. Voxel values in the CL and IL ROIs of each map were divided by the corresponding global mean of ALFF and fALFF in the cortical brain tissue. Group analysis revealed significantly decreased IL ALFF (p = 0.02) and fALFF (p = 0.03) metrics compared with CL ROIs, consistent with similar findings of significantly decreased IL BOLD signal for tbfMRI (p = 0.0005) and SCA maps (p = 0.0004). The frequency domain metrics ALFF and fALFF may be markers of lesion-induced NVU in rsfMRI similar to previously reported alterations in tbfMRI activation and SCA-derived resting-state functional connectivity maps.

  12. High-frequency instabilities of stationary crossflow vortices in a hypersonic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan; Paredes, Pedro; Duan, Lian

    2016-09-01

    Hypersonic boundary layer flows over a circular cone at moderate incidence angle can support strong crossflow instability in between the windward and leeward rays on the plane of symmetry. Due to more efficient excitation of stationary crossflow vortices by surface roughness, such boundary layer flows may transition to turbulence via rapid amplification of the high-frequency secondary instabilities of finite-amplitude stationary crossflow vortices. The amplification characteristics of these secondary instabilities are investigated for crossflow vortices generated by an azimuthally periodic array of roughness elements over a 7° half-angle circular cone in a Mach 6 free stream. The analysis is based on both quasiparallel stability theory in the form of a partial-differential-equation-based eigenvalue analysis and plane marching parabolized stability equations that account for the effects of the nonparallel basic state on the growth of secondary disturbances. Depending on the local amplitude of the stationary crossflow mode, the most unstable high-frequency disturbances either originate from the second (i.e., Mack) mode instabilities of the unperturbed boundary layer or correspond to genuine secondary instabilities that reduce to stable disturbances at sufficiently small amplitudes of the stationary crossflow vortex. The predicted frequencies of the dominant secondary disturbances of either type are similar to those measured during wind tunnel experiments at Purdue University and the Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany. Including transverse surface curvature within the quasiparallel predictions does not alter the topology of the unstable modes; however, the resulting changes in both mode shape and disturbance growth rate are rather significant and curvature can be either stabilizing or destabilizing depending on the disturbance frequency and mode type. Nonparallel effects are shown to be strongly destabilizing for secondary instabilities originating from

  13. ON THE HIGH-FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM BLACK HOLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkut, M. Hakan

    2011-01-01

    We apply the global mode analysis, which has been recently developed for the modeling of kHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) from neutron stars, to the inner region of an accretion disk around a rotating black hole. Within a pseudo-Newtonian approach that keeps the ratio of the radial epicyclic frequency κ to the orbital frequency Ω the same as the corresponding ratio for a Kerr black hole, we determine the innermost disk region where the hydrodynamic modes grow in amplitude. We find that the radiation flux emerging from the inner disk has the highest values within the same region. Using the flux-weighted averages of the frequency bands over this region we identify the growing modes with highest frequency branches Ω + κ and Ω to be the plausible candidates for the high-frequency QPO pairs observed in black hole systems. The observed frequency ratio around 1.5 can therefore be understood naturally in terms of the global free oscillations in the innermost region of a viscous accretion disk around a black hole without invoking a particular resonance to produce black hole QPOs. Although the frequency ratio (Ω + κ)/(Ω) is found to be not sensitive to the black hole's spin which is good for explaining the high-frequency QPOs, it may work as a limited diagnostic of the spin parameter to distinguish black holes with very large spin from the slowly rotating ones. Within our model we estimate the frequency ratio of a high-frequency QPO pair to be greater than 1.5 if the black hole is a slow rotator. For fast rotating black holes, we expect the same ratio to be less than 1.5.

  14. Frequency modulation spectroscopy with a THz quantum-cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichholz, R; Richter, H; Wienold, M; Schrottke, L; Hey, R; Grahn, H T; Hübers, H-W

    2013-12-30

    We report on a terahertz spectrometer for high-resolution molecular spectroscopy based on a quantum-cascade laser. High-frequency modulation (up to 50 MHz) of the laser driving current produces a simultaneous modulation of the frequency and amplitude of the laser output. The modulation generates sidebands, which are symmetrically positioned with respect to the laser carrier frequency. The molecular transition is probed by scanning the sidebands across it. In this way, the absorption and the dispersion caused by the molecular transition are measured. The signals are modeled by taking into account the simultaneous modulation of the frequency and amplitude of the laser emission. This allows for the determination of the strength of the frequency as well as amplitude modulation of the laser and of molecular parameters such as pressure broadening.

  15. Control of broadband optically generated ultrasound pulses using binary amplitude holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael D; Jaros, Jiri; Cox, Ben T; Treeby, Bradley E

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the use of binary amplitude holography is investigated as a mechanism to focus broadband acoustic pulses generated by high peak-power pulsed lasers. Two algorithms are described for the calculation of the binary holograms; one using ray-tracing, and one using an optimization based on direct binary search. It is shown using numerical simulations that when a binary amplitude hologram is excited by a train of laser pulses at its design frequency, the acoustic field can be focused at a pre-determined distribution of points, including single and multiple focal points, and line and square foci. The numerical results are validated by acoustic field measurements from binary amplitude holograms, excited by a high peak-power laser.

  16. The 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake: Investigation of rupture velocity, risetime, and high-frequency radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Liu, P.; Mendoza, C.

    1996-01-01

    A hybrid global search algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear problem of calculating slip amplitude, rake, risetime, and rupture time on a finite fault. Thirty-five strong motion velocity records are inverted by this method over the frequency band from 0.1 to 1.0 Hz for the Northridge earthquake. Four regions of larger-amplitude slip are identified: one near the hypocenter at a depth of 17 km, a second west of the hypocenter at about the same depth, a third updip from the hypocenter at a depth of 10 km, and a fourth updip from the hypocenter and to the northwest. The results further show an initial fast rupture with a velocity of 2.8 to 3.0 km/s followed by a slow termination of the rupture with velocities of 2.0 to 2.5 km/s. The initial energetic rupture phase lasts for 3 s, extending out 10 km from the hypocenter. Slip near the hypocenter has a short risetime of 0.5 s, which increases to 1.5 s for the major slip areas removed from the hypocentral region. The energetic rupture phase is also shown to be the primary source of high-frequency radiation (1-15 Hz) by an inversion of acceleration envelopes. The same global search algorithm is used in the envelope inversion to calculate high-frequency radiation intensity on the fault and rupture time. The rupture timing from the low- and high-frequency inversions is similar, indicating that the high frequencies are produced primarily at the mainshock rupture front. Two major sources of high-frequency radiation are identified within the energetic rupture phase, one at the hypocenter and another deep source to the west of the hypocenter. The source at the hypocenter is associated with the initiation of rupture and the breaking of a high-stress-drop asperity and the second is associated with stopping of the rupture in a westerly direction.

  17. Influence of dynamic dislocation drag on amplitude dependences of damping decrement and modulus defect in lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soifer, Y.M.; Golosovskii, M.A.; Kobelev, N.P.

    1981-01-01

    A study was made of the amplitude dependences of the damping decrement and the modulus defect in lead at low temperatures at frequencies of 100 kHz and 5 MHz. It was shown that in pure lead at high frequencies a change in the amplitude dependences of the damping decrement and the modulus defect under the superconducting transition is due mainly to the change in the losses caused by the dynamic drag of dislocations whereas in measurements at low frequencies the influence of the superconducting transition is due to the change in the conditions of dislocation unpinning from point defects. The influence of the dynamic dislocation drag on the amplitude dependences of the damping decrement and the modulus defect is calculated and a method is presented for experimental estimation of the contribution of dynamic effects to the amplitude-dependent internal friction

  18. Charge dynamics in graphene and graphene superlattices under a high-frequency electric field: a semiclassical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryuchkov, S V; Kukhar’, E I; Zav’yalov, D V

    2013-01-01

    The semiclassical theory of the dynamics of the charge carriers in graphene and in graphene superlattices exposed to a high-frequency electric field is developed. The dispersion law of the solid averaged over the period of the high-frequency electric field is found with the Kapitza method. The band gap in graphene is shown to arise under a high-frequency electric field polarized circularly. The effective mass of charge carriers in the center of the Brillouin band of the graphene superlattice is found to change sign under certain values of the amplitude of the high-frequency field. These values are shown to determine the bounds of the regions of the electromagnetic 2π-pulse stability. The dynamics of the π-pulse in a graphene superlattice is studied. (paper)

  19. High-frequency emissions during the propagation of an electron beam in a high-density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalita and Tripathi, V.K.

    1988-01-01

    A relativistic annular electron beam passing through a high-density plasma excites Langmuir waves via Cerenkov interaction. The Langmuir waves are backscattered off ions via nonlinear ion Landau damping. At moderately high amplitudes these waves are parametrically up-converted by the beam into high-frequency electromagnetic radiation, as observed in some recent experiments. A nonlocal theory of this process is developed in a cylindrical geometry. It is seen that the growth rate of the Langmuir wave scales as one-third power of beam density. The growth rate of parametric instability scales as one-fourth power of beam density and the square root of beam thickness

  20. Behavioral Correlates of 50-kHz Ultrasonic Vocalizations in Rats: Progressive Operant Discrimination Learning Reduces Frequency Modulation and Increases Overall Amplitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Yuki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs in rats are thought to contain ecological signals reflecting emotional states. These USVs are centered on 50-kHz, and frequency modulation (FM is hypothesized to indicate positive emotion; however, results from recent studies are inconsistent with this hypothesis. We suspected that such inconsistencies might result from ambiguity in defining frequency modulation, and problems with acoustic analyses and behavioral protocols. We addressed these problems by applying quantitative methods for USV analyses and using a food reward operant paradigm. Our results revealed that frequency modulation varied according to the degree of positive outcomes, but the direction of change was opposite to what had been observed in previous studies. The FM in 50-kHz USVs decreased as animals learned the task and obtained more reinforcement, while USV amplitude increased as learning progressed. To reconcile these results with those from prior studies, we suggest that FM in 50-kHz USVs should be taken as an index of reward prediction errors, and USV amplitude should be considered as an index of positive emotion.

  1. Anomalous effect of high-frequency ultrasound on radiation diffraction in deformed single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iolin, E.M.; Rajtman, Eh.A.; Kuvaldin, B.V.; Zolotoyabko, Eh.V.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented of a theoretical and experimental study of neutron and X-ray diffraction in defromed single crystals on high-frequency ultrasonic excitation. It is demonstrated theoretically that at a frequency exceeding a certain threshold value the ultrasound violates the adiabatic conditions for the excitation point motion on the dispersion surface branches. This leads to an anomalous (compared to diffraction for a perfect crystal) dependence of the diffraction intensity on the ultrasonic wave amplitude. The experimental data for Si crystals are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions

  2. Influence of nanoscale temperature rises on photoacoustic generation: Discrimination between optical absorbers based on thermal nonlinearity at high frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simandoux, Olivier; Prost, Amaury; Gateau, Jérôme; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigate thermal-based nonlinear photoacoustic generation as a mean to discriminate between different types of absorbing particles. The photoacoustic generation from solutions of dye molecules and gold nanospheres (same optical densities) was detected using a high frequency ultrasound transducer (20 MHz). Photoacoustic emission was observed with gold nanospheres at low fluence for an equilibrium temperature around 4 °C, where the linear photoacoustic effect in water vanishes, highlighting the nonlinear emission from the solution of nanospheres. The photoacoustic amplitude was also studied as a function of the equilibrium temperature from 2 °C to 20 °C. While the photoacoustic amplitude from the dye molecules vanished around 4 °C, the photoacoustic amplitude from the gold nanospheres remained significant over the whole temperature range. Our preliminary results suggest that in the context of high frequency photoacoustic imaging, nanoparticles may be discriminated from molecular absorbers based on nanoscale temperature rises.

  3. Laser generated ultrasound sources using polymer nanocomposites for high frequency metrology

    KAUST Repository

    Rajagopal, Srinath

    2017-11-22

    Accurate characterization of ultrasound fields generated by diagnostic and therapeutic transducers is critical for patient safety. This requires hydrophones calibrated to a traceable standard and currently the upper calibration frequency range available to the user community is limited to a frequency of 40 MHz. However, the increasing use of high frequencies for both imaging and therapy necessitates calibrations to frequencies well beyond this range. For this to be possible, a source of high amplitude, broadband, quasi-planar and stable ultrasound fields is required. This is difficult to achieve using conventional piezoelectric sources, but laser generated ultrasound is a promising technique in this regard. In this study, various polymer-carbon nanotube nanocomposites (PNC) were fabricated and tested for their suitability for such an application by varying the polymer type, carbon nanotubes weight content in the polymer, and PNC thickness. A broadband hydrophone was used to measure the peak pressure and bandwidth of the laser generated ultrasound pulse. Peak-positive pressures of up to 8 MPa and −6dB bandwidths of up to 40 MHz were recorded. There is a nonlinear dependence of the peak pressure on the laser fluence and the bandwidth scales inversely proportionally to the peak pressure. The high-pressure plane waves generated from this preliminary investigation has demonstrated that laser generated ultrasound sources are a promising technique for high frequency calibration of hydrophones.

  4. Numerical Simulation on Seismic Response of the Filled Joint under High Amplitude Stress Waves Using Finite-Discrete Element Method (FDEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper numerically investigates the seismic response of the filled joint under high amplitude stress waves using the combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM. A thin layer of independent polygonal particles are used to simulate the joint fillings. Each particle is meshed using the Delaunay triangulation scheme and can be crushed when the load exceeds its strength. The propagation of the 1D longitude wave through a single filled joint is studied, considering the influences of the joint thickness and the characteristics of the incident wave, such as the amplitude and frequency. The results show that the filled particles under high amplitude stress waves mainly experience three deformation stages: (i initial compaction stage; (ii crushing stage; and (iii crushing and compaction stage. In the initial compaction stage and crushing and compaction stage, compaction dominates the mechanical behavior of the joint, and the particle area distribution curve varies little. In these stages, the transmission coefficient increases with the increase of the amplitude, i.e., peak particle velocity (PPV, of the incident wave. On the other hand, in the crushing stage, particle crushing plays the dominant role. The particle size distribution curve changes abruptly with the PPV due to the fragments created by the crushing process. This process consumes part of wave energy and reduces the stiffness of the filled joint. The transmission coefficient decreases with increasing PPV in this stage because of the increased amount of energy consumed by crushing. Moreover, with the increase of the frequency of the incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases and fewer particles can be crushed. Under the same incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases when the filled thickness increases and the filled particles become more difficult to be crushed.

  5. Signal Transduction Mechanisms Underlying Group I mGluR-mediated Increase in Frequency and Amplitude of Spontaneous EPSCs in the Spinal Trigeminal Subnucleus Oralis of the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahn Dong-Kuk

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Group I mGluRs (mGluR1 and 5 pre- and/or postsynaptically regulate synaptic transmission at glutamatergic synapses. By recording spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs in the spinal trigeminal subnucleus oralis (Vo, we here investigated the regulation of glutamatergic transmission through the activation of group I mGluRs. Bath-applied DHPG (10 μM/5 min, activating the group I mGluRs, increased sEPSCs both in frequency and amplitude; particularly, the increased amplitude was long-lasting. The DHPG-induced increases of sEPSC frequency and amplitude were not NMDA receptor-dependent. The DHPG-induced increase in the frequency of sEPSCs, the presynaptic effect being further confirmed by the DHPG effect on paired-pulse ratio of trigeminal tract-evoked EPSCs, an index of presynaptic modulation, was significantly but partially reduced by blockades of voltage-dependent sodium channel, mGluR1 or mGluR5. Interestingly, PKC inhibition markedly enhanced the DHPG-induced increase of sEPSC frequency, which was mainly accomplished through mGluR1, indicating an inhibitory role of PKC. In contrast, the DHPG-induced increase of sEPSC amplitude was not affected by mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists although the long-lasting property of the increase was disappeared; however, the increase was completely inhibited by blocking both mGluR1 and mGluR5. Further study of signal transduction mechanisms revealed that PLC and CaMKII mediated the increases of sEPSC in both frequency and amplitude by DHPG, while IP3 receptor, NO and ERK only that of amplitude during DHPG application. Altogether, these results indicate that the activation of group I mGluRs and their signal transduction pathways differentially regulate glutamate release and synaptic responses in Vo, thereby contributing to the processing of somatosensory signals from orofacial region.

  6. BWR stability: analysis of cladding temperature for high amplitude oscillations - 146

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, P.; Wehle, F.

    2010-01-01

    Power oscillations associated with density waves in boiling water reactors (BWRs) have been studied widely. Industrial research in this area is active since the invention of the first BWR. Stability measurements have been performed in various plants during commissioning phase but especially the magnitude and divergent nature of the oscillations during the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant event on March 9, 1988, renewed concern about the state of knowledge on BWR instabilities and possible consequences to fuel rod integrity. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified stability tool, applicable for stability analysis in the non-linear regime, which extends to high amplitude oscillations where inlet reverse flow occurs. In case of high amplitude oscillations a cyclical dryout and rewetting process at the fuel rod may take place, which leads in turn to rapid changes of the heat transfer from the fuel rod to the coolant. The application of this stability tool allows for a conservative determination of the fuel rod cladding temperature in case of high amplitude oscillations during the dryout / re-wet phase. Moreover, it reveals in good agreement to experimental findings the stabilizing effect of the reverse bundle inlet flow, which might be obtained for large oscillation amplitudes. (authors)

  7. Investigation into high-frequency-vibration assisted micro-blanking of pure copper foils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chunju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The difficulties encountered during the manufacture of microparts are often associated with size effects relating to material, process and tooling. Utilizing acoustoplastic softening, achieved through a high-frequency vibration assisted micro-blanking process, was introduced to improve the surface finish in micro-blanking. A frequency of 1.0 kHz was chosen to activate the longitudinal vibration mode of the horn tip, using a piezoelectric actuator. A square hole with dimensions of 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm was made, successfully, from a commercial rolled T2 copper foil with 100 μm in thickness. It was found that the maximum blanking force could be reduced by 5% through utilizing the high-frequency vibration. Proportion of the smooth, burnished area in the cut cross-section increases with an increase of the plasticity to fracture, under the high-frequency vibration, which suggests that the vibration introduced is helpful for inhibiting evolution of the crack due to its acoustoplastic softening effect. During blanking, roughness of the burnished surface could be reduced by increasing the vibration amplitude of the punch, which played a role as surface polishing. The results obtained suggest that the high-frequency vibration can be adopted in micro-blanking in order to improve quality of the microparts.

  8. Suppression of Subsequent N1m Amplitude When the Masker Frequency is Different from the Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Uratani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When two tones are presented in a short interval of time, the presentation of the preceding tone (masker suppresses the response evoked by the subsequent tone (signal. To address the processing in forward suppression, we applied 2- and 4-kHz maskers, followed by a 1-kHz signal at varying signal delays (0 to 320 ms and measured the signal-evoked N1m. A two-way analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for signal delay in both masker presentation conditions. The N1m peak amplitude at the signal delay of 320 ms was significantly larger than those of 10, 20, 40, and 80 ms ( p < 0.05. No significant enhancement for the very short signal delay was observed. The results suggest that the enhancement of N1m peak amplitude for short signal delay conditions is maximized when the frequency of the masker is identical to that of the signal.

  9. Experimental investigation on the effects of non-cyclical frequency and amplitude variation on dynamic stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, Kyle C.

    An experimental study of a cambered airfoil undergoing non-cyclical, transient pitch trajectories and the resulting effects on the dynamic stall phenomenon is presented. Surface pressure measurements and airfoil incidence angle are acquired simultaneously to resolve instantaneous aerodynamic load coefficients at Mach numbers ranging from 0.2 to 0.4. Derived from these coefficients are various formulations of the aerodynamic damping factor, referred to copiously throughout. Using a two-motor mechanism, each providing independent frequency and amplitude input to the airfoil, unique pitch motions can be implemented by actively controlling the phase between inputs. This work primarily focuses on three pitch motion schemas, the first of which is a "chirp" style trajectory featuring concurrent exponential frequency growth and amplitude decay. Second, these parameters are tested separately to determine their individual contributions. Lastly, a novel dual harmonic pitch motion is devised which rapidly traverses dynamic stall regimes on an inter-cycle basis by modulating the static-stall penetration angle. Throughout all results presented, there is evidence that for consecutive pitch-cycles, the process of dynamic stall is affected when prior oscillations prior have undergone deeper stall-penetration angles. In other words when stall-penetration is descending, retreating from a regime of light or deep stall, statistics of load coefficients, such as damping coefficient, maximum lift, minimum quarter-chord moment, and their phase relationships, do not match the values seen when stall-penetration was growing. The outcomes herein suggest that the airfoil retains some memory of previous flow separation which has the potential to change the influence of the dynamic stall vortex.

  10. High Frequency Anodising of Aluminium-TiO2 Surface Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Bordo, Kirill; Jensen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    was also measured as a function of various anodising parameters. Anodic film growth, hardness, and total reflectance of the surface were found to be highly dependent on the anodising frequency and the anodic cycle potential. Longer exposure times to the anodising electrolyte at lower growth rates resulted......High frequency anodising of Al–TiO2 surface composites using pulse reverse pulse technique was investigated with an aim to understand the effect of the anodising parameters on the optical appearance, microstructure, hardness and growth rate of the anodic layer. Friction stir processing was employed...... to prepare the Al–TiO2 surface composites, which were anodised in a 20 wt.% sulphuric acid bath at 10 °C as a function of pulse frequency, pulse duty cycle, and anodic cycle voltage amplitudes. The optical appearance of the films was characterized and quantified using an integrating sphere-spectrometer setup...

  11. Humidification during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation for adults: a bench study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikata, Yusuke; Imanaka, Hideaki; Ueta, Masahiko; Nishimura, Masaji

    2010-12-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) has recently been applied to acute respiratory distress syndrome patients. However, the issue of humidification during HFOV has not been investigated. In a bench study, we evaluated humidification during HFOV for adults to test if adequate humidification was achieved in 2 different HFOV systems. We tested 2 brands of adult HFOV ventilators, the R100 (Metran, Japan) and the 3100B (SensorMedics, CA), under identical bias flow. A heated humidifier consisting of porous hollow fiber (Hummax II, Metran) was set for the R100, and a passover-type heated humidifier (MR850, Fisher & Paykel) was set for the 3100B, while inspiratory heating wire was applied to both systems. Each ventilator was connected to a lung model in an incubator. Absolute humidity, relative humidity and temperature at the airway opening were measured using a hygrometer under a variety of ventilatory settings: 3 stroke volumes/amplitudes, 3 frequencies, and 2 mean airway pressures. The R100 ventilator showed higher absolute humidity, higher relative humidity, and lower temperature than the 3100B. In the R100, as stroke volume and frequency increased, absolute humidity and temperature increased. In the 3100B, amplitude, frequency, and mean airway pressure minimally affected absolute humidity and temperature. Relative humidity was almost 100% in the R100, while it was 80.5±2.3% in the 3100B. Humidification during HFOV for adults was affected by stroke volume and frequency in the R100, but was not in the 3100B. Absolute humidity was above 33 mgH_2 O/L in these 2 systems under a range of settings.

  12. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and fractional ALFF in migraine patients: a resting-state functional MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.-J.; Chen, X.; Sah, S.K.; Zeng, C.; Li, Y.-M.; Li, N.; Liu, M.-Q.; Du, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the amplitude of low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) of the brain in migraine patients using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and fractional ALFF in the interictal period, in comparison to healthy controls (HCs). Materials and methods: A total of 54 subjects, including 30 migraineurs and 24 gender- and age-matched HCs completed the fMRI. All the data and ALFF, fALFF analyses were preprocessed with the Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI (DPARSF). All of the statistical analyses were performed using the REST software to explore the differences in ALFF and fALFF between migraine patients and HCs. Results: In contrast to HCs, migraine patients showed significant ALFF increase in the left medulla and pons, the bilateral cerebellum posterior lobe and right insula. The regions showing decreased ALFF in migraine patients included the bilateral cerebellum posterior lobe, left cerebellum anterior lobe, bilateral orbital cortex, right middle frontal gyrus, bilateral occipital lobe, right fusiform gyrus, and bilateral postcentral gyrus. The fALFFs in migraine patients were significantly increased in the bilateral insular and left orbital cortex, but were decreased in the left occipital lobe and bilateral cerebellum posterior lobe. Conclusion: These ALFF and fALFF alterations in the brain regions of migraineurs are in keeping with the domains associated with pain and cognition. Such brain functional alteration may contribute to further understanding of migraine-related network imbalances demonstrated in previous studies. - Highlights: • Migraine is a common, paroxysmal, highly disabling primary headache disorder. • Resting-state fMRI offers a novel approach to measure spontaneous brain activity in migraine patients • The ALFF and fALFF alterations in migraineurs' brain regions are in keeping with the domains associated with pain and cognition.

  13. Relationship Between Peripheral and Psychophysical Measures of Amplitude Modulation Detection in Cochlear Implant Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejani, Viral D; Abbas, Paul J; Brown, Carolyn J

    This study investigates the relationship between electrophysiological and psychophysical measures of amplitude modulation (AM) detection. Prior studies have reported both measures of AM detection recorded separately from cochlear implant (CI) users and acutely deafened animals, but no study has made both measures in the same CI users. Animal studies suggest a progressive loss of high-frequency encoding as one ascends the auditory pathway from the auditory nerve to the cortex. Because the CI speech processor uses the envelope of an ongoing acoustic signal to modulate pulse trains that are subsequently delivered to the intracochlear electrodes, it is of interest to explore auditory nerve responses to modulated stimuli. In addition, psychophysical AM detection abilities have been correlated with speech perception outcomes. Thus, the goal was to explore how the auditory nerve responds to AM stimuli and to relate those physiologic measures to perception. Eight patients using Cochlear Ltd. Implants participated in this study. Electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) were recorded using a 4000 pps pulse train that was sinusoidally amplitude modulated at 125, 250, 500, and 1000 Hz rates. Responses were measured for each pulse over at least one modulation cycle for an apical, medial, and basal electrode. Psychophysical modulation detection thresholds (MDTs) were also measured via a three-alternative forced choice, two-down, one-up adaptive procedure using the same modulation frequencies and electrodes. ECAPs were recorded from individual pulses in the AM pulse train. ECAP amplitudes varied sinusoidally, reflecting the sinusoidal variation in the stimulus. A modulated response amplitude (MRA) metric was calculated as the difference in the maximal and minimum ECAP amplitudes over the modulation cycles. MRA increased as modulation frequency increased, with no apparent cutoff (up to 1000 Hz). In contrast, MDTs increased as the modulation frequency increased. This

  14. Application of modified homotopy perturbation method and amplitude frequency formulation to strongly nonlinear oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyd ghasem enayati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two powerful analytical methods known as modified homotopy perturbation method and Amplitude Frequency Formulation called respectively MHPM and AFF, are introduced to derive approximate solutions of a system of ordinary differential equations appear in mechanical applications. These methods convert a difficult problem into a simple one, which can be easily handled. The obtained solutions are compared with numerical fourth order runge-kutta method to show the applicability and accuracy of both MHPM and AFF in solving this sample problem. The results attained in this paper confirm the idea that MHPM and AFF are powerful mathematical tools and they can be applied to linear and nonlinear problems.

  15. Scruncher phase and amplitude control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHaven, R.A.; Morris, C.L.; Johnson, R.; Davis, J.; O'Donnell, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The analog controller for phase and amplitude control of a 402.5 MHz super conducting cavity is described in this paper. The cavity is a single cell with niobium explosively bonded to a copper cavity. It is used as an energy compressor for pions at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The controller maintains cavity frequency to within 4 degrees in phase of the LAMPF beam frequency. Field amplitude is maintained to within 2 percent. This control is accomplished at critical coupling (Q load of 1 x 10 9 ) with the use of only a 30 watt rf amplifier for accelerating fields of 6 MV/m. The design includes the use of piezoelectric crystals for fast resonance control. Three types of control, self excited, VCO, and a reference frequency driven, were tried on this cavity and we present a comparison of their performance. (Author) 4 figs., ref

  16. SCRUNCHER phase and amplitude control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHaven, R.A.; Morris, C.L.; Johnson, R.; Davis, J.; O'Donnell, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The analog controller for phase and amplitude control of a 402.5 MHz super conducting cavity is described in this paper. The cavity is a single cell with niobium explosively bonded to a copper cavity. It is used as an energy compressor for pions at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The controller maintains cavity frequency to within 4 degrees in phase of the LAMPF beam frequency. Field amplitude is maintained to within 2 percent. This control is accomplished at critical coupling (Q loaded of 1 x 10 9 ) with the use of only a 30 watt rf amplifier for accelerating fields of 6 MV/m. The design includes the use of piezoelectric crystals for fast resonance control. Three types of control, self excited VCO, and a reference frequency driven, were tried on this cavity and we present a comparison of their performance

  17. Comparing the effects of age on amplitude modulation and frequency modulation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallaert, Nicolas; Moore, Brian C J; Lorenzi, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Frequency modulation (FM) and amplitude modulation (AM) detection thresholds were measured at 40 dB sensation level for young (22-28 yrs) and older (44-66 yrs) listeners with normal audiograms for a carrier frequency of 500 Hz and modulation rates of 2 and 20 Hz. The number of modulation cycles, N, varied between 2 and 9. For FM detection, uninformative AM at the same rate as the FM was superimposed to disrupt excitation-pattern cues. For both groups, AM and FM detection thresholds were lower for the 2-Hz than for the 20-Hz rate, and AM and FM detection thresholds decreased with increasing N. Thresholds were higher for older than for younger listeners, especially for FM detection at 2 Hz, possibly reflecting the effect of age on the use of temporal-fine-structure cues for 2-Hz FM detection. The effect of increasing N was similar across groups for both AM and FM. However, at 20 Hz, older listeners showed a greater effect of increasing N than younger listeners for both AM and FM. The results suggest that ageing reduces sensitivity to both excitation-pattern and temporal-fine-structure cues for modulation detection, but more so for the latter, while sparing temporal integration of these cues at low modulation rates.

  18. Assessing the Role of Place and Timing Cues in Coding Frequency and Amplitude Modulation as a Function of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteford, Kelly L; Kreft, Heather A; Oxenham, Andrew J

    2017-08-01

    Natural sounds can be characterized by their fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. Ageing may affect sensitivity to some forms of fluctuations more than others. The present study used individual differences across a wide age range (20-79 years) to test the hypothesis that slow-rate, low-carrier frequency modulation (FM) is coded by phase-locked auditory-nerve responses to temporal fine structure (TFS), whereas fast-rate FM is coded via rate-place (tonotopic) cues, based on amplitude modulation (AM) of the temporal envelope after cochlear filtering. Using a low (500 Hz) carrier frequency, diotic FM and AM detection thresholds were measured at slow (1 Hz) and fast (20 Hz) rates in 85 listeners. Frequency selectivity and TFS coding were assessed using forward masking patterns and interaural phase disparity tasks (slow dichotic FM), respectively. Comparable interaural level disparity tasks (slow and fast dichotic AM and fast dichotic FM) were measured to control for effects of binaural processing not specifically related to TFS coding. Thresholds in FM and AM tasks were correlated, even across tasks thought to use separate peripheral codes. Age was correlated with slow and fast FM thresholds in both diotic and dichotic conditions. The relationship between age and AM thresholds was generally not significant. Once accounting for AM sensitivity, only diotic slow-rate FM thresholds remained significantly correlated with age. Overall, results indicate stronger effects of age on FM than AM. However, because of similar effects for both slow and fast FM when not accounting for AM sensitivity, the effects cannot be unambiguously ascribed to TFS coding.

  19. Neurofeedback of SMR and Beta1 Frequencies: An Investigation of Learning Indices and Frequency-Specific Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Miguel G; van Run, Chris; de Fockert, Jan W; Gruzelier, John H

    2018-05-15

    Despite evidence that Sensorimotor Rhythm (SMR) and beta1 neurofeedback have distinct cognitive enhancement effects, it remains unclear whether their amplitudes can be independently enhanced. Furthermore, demands for top-down attention control, postural restraint and maintenance of cognitive set processes, all requiring low-beta frequencies, might masquerade as learning and confound interpretation. The feasibility of selectively enhancing SMR and beta1 amplitudes was investigated with the addition of a random frequency control condition that also requires the potentially confounding cognitive processes. A comprehensive approach to assessing neurofeedback learning was undertaken through the calculation of learning indices within- and across-session and pre-to-post baseline. Herein we provide the first demonstration of beta1 within-session amplitude learning that was not attributable to extraneous cognitive processes, for it was not found with random frequency training. On the other hand, within-session SMR learning might have been obscured by high interindividual variability and methodological limitations such as the type of feedback screen, the insufficient number of sessions, and the exclusion of simultaneous theta and high-beta inhibition. Interestingly, SMR and beta1 amplitude increased across sessions in the three groups suggesting unspecific effects of neurofeedback in the low beta frequency band. Moreover, there was no clear evidence of frequency specificity associated with either SMR or beta1 training. Some methodological limitations may underpin the divergent results with previous studies. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. All rights reserved.

  20. High-frequency harmonic imaging of the eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Ronald H.; Coleman, D. Jackson; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Lizzi, Frederic L.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Harmonic imaging has become a well-established technique for ultrasonic imaging at fundamental frequencies of 10 MHz or less. Ophthalmology has benefited from the use of fundamentals of 20 MHz to 50 MHz. Our aim was to explore the ability to generate harmonics for this frequency range, and to generate harmonic images of the eye. Methods: The presence of harmonics was determined in both water and bovine vitreous propagation media by pulse/echo and hydrophone at a series of increasing excitation pulse intensities and frequencies. Hydrophone measurements were made at the focal point and in the near- and far-fields of 20 MHz and 40 MHz transducers. Harmonic images of the anterior segment of the rabbit eye were obtained by a combination of analog filtering and digital post-processing. Results: Harmonics were generated nearly identically in both water and vitreous. Hydrophone measurements showed the maximum second harmonic to be -5 dB relative to the 35 MHz fundamental at the focus, while in pulse/echo the maximum harmonic amplitude was -15dB relative to the fundamental. Harmonics were absent in the near-field, but present in the far-field. Harmonic images of the eye showed improved resolution. Conclusion: Harmonics can be readily generated at very high frequencies, and at power levels compliant with FDA guidelines for ophthalmology. This technique may yield further improvements to the already impressive resolutions obtainable in this frequency range. Improved imaging of the macular region, in particular, may provide significant improvements in diagnosis of retinal disease.

  1. Frequency up-conversion and spectral breaking of a high power microwave pulse propagation in a self-generated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, S.P.; Ren, A.

    1993-01-01

    The main concern of the propagation of high power microwave pulse is the energy loss of the pulse before reaching the destination. The loss is caused by self-generated plasma. There are two processes which are responsible for the energy loss (so called tail erosion). They are collisional damping and cutoff reflection. In very high power region, the cutoff reflection is much more severe than the collisional damping. A frequency up-conversion process may help to avoid the cutoff reflection of powerful electromagnetic pulse propagating in a self-generated plasma. Both chamber experiments and numerical simulation are performed. When the field amplitude only slightly exceeds the breakdown threshold field of the background gas, the result shows that the carrier frequency ω of the pulse shifts upward during the growth of local plasma frequency ωpe 2 . Thus, the self-generated plasma remains underdense to the pulse. However, the spectrum of the pulse starts to break up into two major peaks when the amplitude of the pulse is further increased. The frequency of one of the peaks is lower than the original carrier frequency and that of the other peak is higher than the original carrier frequency. These phenomena are observed both experimentally and numerically. The frequency down shift result is believed to be caused by damping mechanisms. Good agreement between the experimental results and the numerical simulation is obtained

  2. Grid Cell Relaxation Effects on the High Frequency Vibration Characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Joo-Young; Eom, Kyong-Bo; Jeon, Sang-Youn; Kim, Jae-Ik

    2015-01-01

    The plate structure of the grid of fuel assembly is always exposed to serious vortex induced vibration. Also, High Frequency flow induced Vibration (HFV) is primarily generated by vortex-shedding effect. When it comes to grid design as a fuel assembly component, HFV should be considered in advance since it is one of the critical factors. Excessive HFV has a possibility of making degradation of the fuel reliability that is directly related to the fuel robustness and operating performance. KEPCO NF (KNF) has performed HFV tests with various grid designs. While studying the HFV characteristics through the HFV tests, it has been observed that HFV amplitudes show different levels according to grid cell relaxation. It means that the testing could give different interpretations due to the condition of grid cell. Since the amount of relaxation is different under operating conditions and environments in a reactor, test specimens should be modified as much as possible to the real state of the fuel. Therefore, in order to consider the grid cell relaxation effects on the HFV tests, it is important to use cell sized or non-cell sized grids. The main focus of this study is to find out how the HFV characteristics such as amplitude and frequency are affected by grid cell relaxation. Three cases of the grid cell sized specimen which is nickel alloy were prepared and tested. Through the comparison of the test results, it could be concluded that HFV amplitudes show decreasing trend according to the grid cell relaxation in the case of nickel alloy grid. It is also possible to expect the tendency of grid cell relaxation of a zirconium alloy grid based on test results

  3. Finite-Element Modeling of Viscoelastic Cells During High-Frequency Cyclic Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Holdsworth

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanotransduction refers to the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to local loads and forces. The process of mechanotransduction plays an important role both in maintaining tissue viability and in remodeling to repair damage; moreover, it may be involved in the initiation and progression of diseases such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. An understanding of the mechanisms by which cells respond to surrounding tissue matrices or artificial biomaterials is crucial in regenerative medicine and in influencing cellular differentiation. Recent studies have shown that some cells may be most sensitive to low-amplitude, high-frequency (i.e., 1–100 Hz mechanical stimulation. Advances in finite-element modeling have made it possible to simulate high-frequency mechanical loading of cells. We have developed a viscoelastic finite-element model of an osteoblastic cell (including cytoskeletal actin stress fibers, attached to an elastomeric membrane undergoing cyclic isotropic radial strain with a peak value of 1,000 µstrain. The results indicate that cells experience significant stress and strain amplification when undergoing high-frequency strain, with peak values of cytoplasmic strain five times higher at 45 Hz than at 1 Hz, and peak Von Mises stress in the nucleus increased by a factor of two. Focal stress and strain amplification in cells undergoing high-frequency mechanical stimulation may play an important role in mechanotransduction.

  4. High-precision and low-cost vibration generator for low-frequency calibration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui-Jun; Lei, Ying-Jun; Zhang, Lian-Sheng; Chang, Zhen-Xin; Fan, Kuang-Chao; Cheng, Zhen-Ying; Hu, Peng-Hao

    2018-03-01

    Low-frequency vibration is one of the harmful factors that affect the accuracy of micro-/nano-measuring machines because its amplitude is significantly small and it is very difficult to avoid. In this paper, a low-cost and high-precision vibration generator was developed to calibrate an optical accelerometer, which is self-designed to detect low-frequency vibration. A piezoelectric actuator is used as vibration exciter, a leaf spring made of beryllium copper is used as an elastic component, and a high-resolution, low-thermal-drift eddy current sensor is applied to investigate the vibrator’s performance. Experimental results demonstrate that the vibration generator can achieve steady output displacement with frequency range from 0.6 Hz to 50 Hz, an analytical displacement resolution of 3.1 nm and an acceleration range from 3.72 mm s-2 to 1935.41 mm s-2 with a relative standard deviation less than 1.79%. The effectiveness of the high-precision and low-cost vibration generator was verified by calibrating our optical accelerometer.

  5. Radial convection of finite ion temperature, high amplitude plasma blobs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiesenberger, M.; Madsen, Jens; Kendl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We present results from simulations of seeded blob convection in the scrape-off-layer of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We consistently incorporate high fluctuation amplitude levels and finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects using a fully nonlinear global gyrofluid model. This is in line......-field transport compared to blobs simulated with the local model. The maximal blob amplitude is significantly higher in the global simulations than in the local ones. When the ion temperature is comparable to the electron temperature, global blob simulations show a reduced blob coherence and a decreased cross...

  6. Increased low-frequency oscillation amplitude of sensorimotor cortex associated with the severity of structural impairment in cervical myelopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqing Zhou

    Full Text Available Decreases in metabolites and increased motor-related, but decreased sensory-related activation of the sensorimotor cortex (SMC have been observed in patients with cervical myelopathy (CM using advanced MRI techniques. However, the nature of intrinsic neuronal activity in the SMC, and the relationship between cerebral function and structural damage of the spinal cord in patients with CM are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to assess intrinsic neuronal activity by calculating the regional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF using resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI, and correlations with clinical and imaging indices. Nineteen patients and 19 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects underwent rs-fMRI scans. ALFF measurements were performed in the SMC, a key brain network likely to impaired or reorganized patients with CM. Compared with healthy subjects, increased amplitude of cortical low-frequency oscillations (LFO was observed in the right precentral gyrus, right postcentral gyrus, and left supplementary motor area. Furthermore, increased z-ALFF values in the right precentral gyrus and right postcentral gyrus correlated with decreased fractional anisotropy values at the C2 level, which indicated increased intrinsic neuronal activity in the SMC corresponding to the structural impairment in the spinal cord of patients with CM. These findings suggest a complex and diverging relationship of cortical functional reorganization and distal spinal anatomical compression in patients with CM and, thus, add important information in understanding how spinal cord integrity may be a factor in the intrinsic covariance of spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations of BOLD signals involved in cortical plasticity.

  7. Amplitude Modulation of Pulsation Modes in Delta Scuti Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Dominic M.

    2017-10-01

    The pulsations in δ Sct stars are excited by a heat engine driving mechanism caused by increased opacity in their surface layers, and have pulsation periods of order a few hours. Space based observations in the last decade have revealed a diverse range of pulsational behaviour in these stars, which is investigated using an ensemble of 983 δ Sct stars observed continuously for 4 yr by the Kepler Space Telescope. A statistical search for amplitude modulation of pulsation modes is carried out and it is shown that 61.3 per cent of the 983 δ Sct stars exhibit significant amplitude modulation in at least a single pulsation mode, and that this is uncorrelated with effective temperature and surface gravity. Hence, the majority of δ Sct stars exhibit amplitude modulation, with time-scales of years and longer demonstrated to be significant in these stars both observationally and theoretically. An archetypal example of amplitude modulation in a δ Sct star is KIC 7106205, which contains only a single pulsation mode that varies significantly in amplitude whilst all other pulsation modes stay constant in amplitude and phase throughout the 4-yr Kepler data set. Therefore, the visible pulsational energy budget in this star, and many others, is not conserved over 4 yr. Models of beating of close-frequency pulsation modes are used to identify δ Sct stars with frequencies that lie closer than 0.001 d^{-1}, which are barely resolved using 4 yr of Kepler observations, and maintain their independent identities over 4 yr. Mode coupling models are used to quantify the strength of coupling and distinguish between non-linearity in the form of combination frequencies and non-linearity in the form of resonant mode coupling for families of pulsation modes in several stars. The changes in stellar structure caused by stellar evolution are investigated for two high amplitude δ Sct (HADS) stars in the Kepler data set, revealing a positive quadratic change in phase for the fundamental and

  8. Length-extension resonator as a force sensor for high-resolution frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Hannes; Wagner, Tino; Stemmer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy has turned into a well-established method to obtain atomic resolution on flat surfaces, but is often limited to ultra-high vacuum conditions and cryogenic temperatures. Measurements under ambient conditions are influenced by variations of the dew point and thin water layers present on practically every surface, complicating stable imaging with high resolution. We demonstrate high-resolution imaging in air using a length-extension resonator operating at small amplitudes. An additional slow feedback compensates for changes in the free resonance frequency, allowing stable imaging over a long period of time with changing environmental conditions.

  9. Is the effect of tinnitus on auditory steady-state response amplitude mediated by attention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen eDiesch

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The amplitude of the auditory steady-state response (ASSR is enhanced in tinnitus. As ASSR ampli¬tude is also enhanced by attention, the effect of tinnitus on ASSR amplitude could be interpreted as an effect of attention mediated by tinnitus. As attention effects on the N1 are signi¬fi¬cantly larger than those on the ASSR, if the effect of tinnitus on ASSR amplitude were due to attention, there should be similar amplitude enhancement effects in tinnitus for the N1 component of the auditory evoked response. Methods: MEG recordings of auditory evoked responses which were previously examined for the ASSR (Diesch et al. 2010 were analysed with respect to the N1m component. Like the ASSR previously, the N1m was analysed in the source domain (source space projection. Stimuli were amplitude-modulated tones with one of three carrier fre¬quen¬cies matching the tinnitus frequency or a surrogate frequency 1½ octaves above the audio¬metric edge frequency in con¬trols, the audiometric edge frequency, and a frequency below the audio¬metric edgeResults: In the earlier ASSR study (Diesch et al., 2010, the ASSR amplitude in tinnitus patients, but not in controls, was significantly larger in the (surrogate tinnitus condition than in the edge condition. In the present study, both tinnitus patients and healthy controls show an N1m-amplitude profile identical to the one of ASSR amplitudes in healthy controls. N1m amplitudes elicited by tonal frequencies located at the audiometric edge and at the (surrogate tinnitus frequency are smaller than N1m amplitudes elicited by sub-edge tones and do not differ among each other.Conclusions: There is no N1-amplitude enhancement effect in tinnitus. The enhancement effect of tinnitus on ASSR amplitude cannot be accounted for in terms of attention induced by tinnitus.

  10. High frequency write head measurement with the phase detection magnetic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, M.; Tanaka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrated the measurement of the high frequency (HF) magnetic field of a write head with the phase detection magnetic force microscope. An amplitude-modulated current was applied to the head coil to detect the force gradient induced by the HF magnetic field. Spatial resolution of this method was higher than that of the deflection detection method previously proposed. By the phase detection method, dynamic HF magnetic fields at the poles of the write heads were clearly imaged. HF magnetic field leakage was observed along the P2 pole shape on the air-bearing surface. The frequency dependence of the write head dynamics up to 350 MHz was also investigated. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  11. Responses to amplitude modulated infrared stimuli in the guinea pig inferior colliculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Young, Hunter

    2013-03-01

    Responses of units in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the guinea pig were recorded with tungsten electrodes. The set of data presented here is limited to high stimulus levels. The effect of changing the modulation frequency and the modulation depth was explored for acoustic and laser stimuli. The selected units responded to sinusoidal amplitude modulated (AM) tones, AM trains of clicks, and AM trains of laser pulses with a modulation of their spike discharge. At modulation frequencies of 20 Hz, some units tended to respond with 40 Hz to the acoustic stimuli, but only at 20 Hz for the trains of laser pulses. For all modes of stimulation the responses revealed a dominant response to the first cycle of the modulation, with decreasing number of action potential during successive cycles. While amplitude modulated tone bursts and amplitude modulated trains of acoustic clicks showed similar patterns, the response to trains of laser pulses was different.

  12. Are All Oscillators Created Equal? In vitro Performance Characteristics of Eight High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingay, David G; John, Jubal; Harcourt, Edward R; Black, Don; Dargaville, Peter A; Mills, John F; Davis, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    The mode of waveform generation and circuit characteristics differ between high-frequency oscillators. It is unknown if this influences performance. To describe the relationships between set and delivered pressure amplitude (x0394;P), and the interaction with frequency and endotracheal tube (ETT) diameter, in eight high-frequency oscillators. Oscillators were evaluated using a 70-ml test lung at 1.0 and 2.0 ml/cm H2O compliance, with mean airway pressures (PAW) of 10 and 20 cm H2O, frequencies of 5, 10 and 15 Hz, and an ETT diameter of 2.5 and 3.5 mm. At each permutation of PAW, frequency and ETT, the set x0394;P was sequentially increased from 15 to 50 cm H2O, or from 20 to 100% maximum amplitude (10% increments) depending on the oscillator design. The x0394;P at the ventilator (x0394;PVENT), airway opening (x0394;PAO) and within the test lung (x0394;PTRACH), and tidal volume (V(T)) at the airway opening were determined at each set x0394;P. In two oscillators the relationships between set and delivered x0394;P were non-linear, with a plateau in x0394;P thresholds noted at all frequencies (Dräger Babylog 8000) or ≥10 Hz (Dräger VN500). In all other devices there was a linear relationship between x0394;PVENT, x0394;PAO and x0394;PTRACH (all r2 >0.93), with differing attenuation of the pressure wave. Delivered V(T) at the different settings tested varied between devices, with some unable to deliver V(T) >3 ml at 15 Hz, and others generating V(T)>20 ml at 5 Hz and a 1:1 inspiratory-to-expiratory time ratio. Clinicians should be aware that modern high-frequency oscillators exhibit important differences in the delivered x0394;P and V(T). © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Graphene based plasmonic terahertz amplitude modulator operating above 100 MHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessop, D. S., E-mail: dsj23@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: rd448@cam.ac.uk; Kindness, S. J.; Ren, Y.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Degl' Innocenti, R., E-mail: dsj23@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: rd448@cam.ac.uk [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Xiao, L.; Braeuninger-Weimer, P.; Hofmann, S. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, 9 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Lin, H.; Zeitler, J. A. [Department of Chemical Engineering & Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Ren, C. X. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-25

    The terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic spectrum holds great potential in many fields of study, from spectroscopy to biomedical imaging, remote gas sensing, and high speed communication. To fully exploit this potential, fast optoelectronic devices such as amplitude and phase modulators must be developed. In this work, we present a room temperature external THz amplitude modulator based on plasmonic bow-tie antenna arrays with graphene. By applying a modulating bias to a back gate electrode, the conductivity of graphene is changed, which modifies the reflection characteristics of the incoming THz radiation. The broadband response of the device was characterized by using THz time-domain spectroscopy, and the modulation characteristics such as the modulation depth and cut-off frequency were investigated with a 2.0 THz single frequency emission quantum cascade laser. An optical modulation cut-off frequency of 105 ± 15 MHz is reported. The results agree well with a lumped element circuit model developed to describe the device.

  14. Graphene based plasmonic terahertz amplitude modulator operating above 100 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessop, D. S.; Kindness, S. J.; Ren, Y.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Degl'Innocenti, R.; Xiao, L.; Braeuninger-Weimer, P.; Hofmann, S.; Lin, H.; Zeitler, J. A.; Ren, C. X.

    2016-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic spectrum holds great potential in many fields of study, from spectroscopy to biomedical imaging, remote gas sensing, and high speed communication. To fully exploit this potential, fast optoelectronic devices such as amplitude and phase modulators must be developed. In this work, we present a room temperature external THz amplitude modulator based on plasmonic bow-tie antenna arrays with graphene. By applying a modulating bias to a back gate electrode, the conductivity of graphene is changed, which modifies the reflection characteristics of the incoming THz radiation. The broadband response of the device was characterized by using THz time-domain spectroscopy, and the modulation characteristics such as the modulation depth and cut-off frequency were investigated with a 2.0 THz single frequency emission quantum cascade laser. An optical modulation cut-off frequency of 105 ± 15 MHz is reported. The results agree well with a lumped element circuit model developed to describe the device.

  15. Low frequency phase signal measurement with high frequency squeezing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Zehui; Gao, Jiangrui

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the utility of high-frequency squeezed-state enhanced two-frequency interferometry for low-frequency phase measurement. To use the high-frequency sidebands of the squeezed light, a two-frequency intense laser is used in the interferometry instead of a single-frequency laser as usual. We find that the readout signal can be contaminated by the high-frequency phase vibration, but this is easy to check and avoid. A proof-of-principle experiment is in the reach of modern quantum optic...

  16. Modeling of Pulses Having Arbitrary Amplitude and Frequency Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    function, fi(t), has been discussed in great detail in Section II. The linearized amplitude modulation, 1(t), is given by: (IV-6) vo A +h( -) TO’ # where "A...10. LCDR Francis Martin Lunney, USN 6143 Gatsby Green Columbia, Maryland 21045 149

  17. Biasing vector network analyzers using variable frequency and amplitude signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, J. E.; Zagorodnii, V.; Hutchison, A.; Celinski, Z.

    2016-08-01

    We report the development of a test setup designed to provide a variable frequency biasing signal to a vector network analyzer (VNA). The test setup is currently used for the testing of liquid crystal (LC) based devices in the microwave region. The use of an AC bias for LC based devices minimizes the negative effects associated with ionic impurities in the media encountered with DC biasing. The test setup utilizes bias tees on the VNA test station to inject the bias signal. The square wave biasing signal is variable from 0.5 to 36.0 V peak-to-peak (VPP) with a frequency range of DC to 10 kHz. The test setup protects the VNA from transient processes, voltage spikes, and high-frequency leakage. Additionally, the signals to the VNA are fused to ½ amp and clipped to a maximum of 36 VPP based on bias tee limitations. This setup allows us to measure S-parameters as a function of both the voltage and the frequency of the applied bias signal.

  18. Efficient Ultra-High Speed Communication with Simultaneous Phase and Amplitude Regenerative Sampling (SPARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlowitz, Christian; Girg, Thomas; Ghaleb, Hatem; Du, Xuan-Quang

    2017-09-01

    For ultra-high speed communication systems at high center frequencies above 100 GHz, we propose a disruptive change in system architecture to address major issues regarding amplifier chains with a large number of amplifier stages. They cause a high noise figure and high power consumption when operating close to the frequency limits of the underlying semiconductor technologies. Instead of scaling a classic homodyne transceiver system, we employ repeated amplification in single-stage amplifiers through positive feedback as well as synthesizer-free self-mixing demodulation at the receiver to simplify the system architecture notably. Since the amplitude and phase information for the emerging oscillation is defined by the input signal and the oscillator is only turned on for a very short time, it can be left unstabilized and thus come without a PLL. As soon as gain is no longer the most prominent issue, relaxed requirements for all the other major components allow reconsidering their implementation concepts to achieve further improvements compared to classic systems. This paper provides the first comprehensive overview of all major design aspects that need to be addressed upon realizing a SPARS-based transceiver. At system level, we show how to achieve high data rates and a noise performance comparable to classic systems, backed by scaled demonstrator experiments. Regarding the transmitter, design considerations for efficient quadrature modulation are discussed. For the frontend components that replace PA and LNA amplifier chains, implementation techniques for regenerative sampling circuits based on super-regenerative oscillators are presented. Finally, an analog-to-digital converter with outstanding performance and complete interfaces both to the analog baseband as well as to the digital side completes the set of building blocks for efficient ultra-high speed communication.

  19. Application of CRAFT (complete reduction to amplitude frequency table) in nonuniformly sampled (NUS) 2D NMR data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Krish; Hari, Natarajan

    2017-09-15

    The recently published CRAFT (complete reduction to amplitude frequency table) technique converts the raw FID data (i.e., time domain data) into a table of frequencies, amplitudes, decay rate constants, and phases. It offers an alternate approach to decimate time-domain data, with minimal preprocessing step. It has been shown that application of CRAFT technique to process the t 1 dimension of the 2D data significantly improved the detectable resolution by its ability to analyze without the use of ubiquitous apodization of extensively zero-filled data. It was noted earlier that CRAFT did not resolve sinusoids that were not already resolvable in time-domain (i.e., t 1 max dependent resolution). We present a combined NUS-IST-CRAFT approach wherein the NUS acquisition technique (sparse sampling technique) increases the intrinsic resolution in time-domain (by increasing t 1 max), IST fills the gap in the sparse sampling, and CRAFT processing extracts the information without loss due to any severe apodization. NUS and CRAFT are thus complementary techniques to improve intrinsic and usable resolution. We show that significant improvement can be achieved with this combination over conventional NUS-IST processing. With reasonable sensitivity, the models can be extended to significantly higher t 1 max to generate an indirect-DEPT spectrum that rivals the direct observe counterpart. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Direct generation of all-optical random numbers from optical pulse amplitude chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pu; Wang, Yun-Cai; Wang, An-Bang; Yang, Ling-Zhen; Zhang, Ming-Jiang; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2012-02-13

    We propose and theoretically demonstrate an all-optical method for directly generating all-optical random numbers from pulse amplitude chaos produced by a mode-locked fiber ring laser. Under an appropriate pump intensity, the mode-locked laser can experience a quasi-periodic route to chaos. Such a chaos consists of a stream of pulses with a fixed repetition frequency but random intensities. In this method, we do not require sampling procedure and external triggered clocks but directly quantize the chaotic pulses stream into random number sequence via an all-optical flip-flop. Moreover, our simulation results show that the pulse amplitude chaos has no periodicity and possesses a highly symmetric distribution of amplitude. Thus, in theory, the obtained random number sequence without post-processing has a high-quality randomness verified by industry-standard statistical tests.

  1. [Amplitude Changes of Low Frequency Fluctuation in Brain Spontaneous Nervous Activities Induced by Needling at Hand Taiyin Lung Channel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You-long; Su, Cheng-guo; Liu, Shou-fang; Jin, Xiang-yu; Duan, Yan-li; Chen, Xiao-yan; Zhao, Shu-hua; Wang, Quan-liang; Dang, Chang-lin

    2016-05-01

    To observe amplitude changes of low frequency fluctuation in brain spontaneous nervous activities induced by needling at Hand Taiyin Lung Channel, and to preliminarily explore the possible brain function network of Hand Taiyin Lung Channel. By using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), 16 healthy volunteers underwent resting-state scanning (R1) and scanning with retained acupuncture at Hand Taiyin Lung Channel (acupuncture, AP). Data of fMRI collected were statistically calculated using amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF). Under R1 significantly enhanced ALFF occurred in right precuneus, left inferior parietal lobule, bilateral superior temporal gyrus, bilateral middle frontal gyrus, left superior frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, left medial frontal gyrus. Under AP significantly enhanced ALFF occurred in right precuneus, bilateral superior frontal gyrus, cerebellum, bilateral middle frontal gyrus, right medial frontal gyrus, and so on. Compared with R1, needing at Hand Taiyin Lung Channel could significantly enhance ALFF in right gyrus subcallosum and right inferior frontal gyrus. Significant decreased ALFF appeared in right postcentral gyrus, left precuneus, left superior temporal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, and so on. Needing at Hand Taiyin Lung Channel could significantly change fixed activities of cerebral cortex, especially in right subcallosal gyrus, right inferior frontal gyrus, and so on.

  2. Amplitude modulator of radio frequency system for 1.3 GeV Electron Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, T.

    1977-01-01

    The amplitude modulator for the 8F68 VHF high power tetrode tube has been designed and constructed. The modulator was constructed with solid components such as transistors and integrated circuits. In case of changing circuit elements of the modulator to solid components from tubes, many attentions are paid for preventing the noise and the over load, due to connection between the low power circuits (modulator) and high power circuits (VHF amplifier). The new modulator is constructed with taking careful consideration into selection of the method of the power control and the protection system. (auth.)

  3. Nasal high-frequency oscillatory ventilation impairs heated humidification: A neonatal bench study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Tim L; Czernik, Christoph; Bührer, Christoph; Schmalisch, Gerd; Fischer, Hendrik S

    2017-11-01

    Nasal high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (nHFOV) is a novel mode of non-invasive ventilation used in neonates. However, upper airway obstructions due to viscous secretions have been described as specific adverse effects. We hypothesized that high-frequency oscillations reduce air humidity in the oropharynx, resulting in upper airway desiccation. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of nHFOV ventilatory settings on oropharyngeal gas conditions. NHFOV or nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) was applied, along with heated humidification, to a previously established neonatal bench model that simulates oropharyngeal gas conditions during spontaneous breathing through an open mouth. A digital thermo-hygro sensor measured oropharyngeal temperature (T) and humidity at various nHFOV frequencies (7, 10, 13 Hz), amplitudes (10, 20, 30 cmH 2 O), and inspiratory-to-expiratory (I:E) ratios (25:75, 33:66, 50:50), and also during nCPAP. Relative humidity was always >99%, but nHFOV resulted in lower mean T and absolute humidity (AH) in comparison to nCPAP (P humidification during nHFOV. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A daily oscillation in the fundamental frequency and amplitude of harmonic syllables of zebra finch song.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Wood

    Full Text Available Complex motor skills are more difficult to perform at certain points in the day (for example, shortly after waking, but the daily trajectory of motor-skill error is more difficult to predict. By undertaking a quantitative analysis of the fundamental frequency (FF and amplitude of hundreds of zebra finch syllables per animal per day, we find that zebra finch song follows a previously undescribed daily oscillation. The FF and amplitude of harmonic syllables rises across the morning, reaching a peak near mid-day, and then falls again in the late afternoon until sleep. This oscillation, although somewhat variable, is consistent across days and across animals and does not require serotonin, as animals with serotonergic lesions maintained daily oscillations. We hypothesize that this oscillation is driven by underlying physiological factors which could be shared with other taxa. Song production in zebra finches is a model system for studying complex learned behavior because of the ease of gathering comprehensive behavioral data and the tractability of the underlying neural circuitry. The daily oscillation that we describe promises to reveal new insights into how time of day affects the ability to accomplish a variety of complex learned motor skills.

  5. Relative amplitude preservation processing utilizing surface consistent amplitude correction. Part 3; Surface consistent amplitude correction wo mochiita sotai shinpuku hozon shori. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, T [Japan National Oil Corporation, Tokyo (Japan). Technology Research Center

    1996-10-01

    For the seismic reflection method conducted on the ground surface, generator and geophone are set on the surface. The observed waveforms are affected by the ground surface and surface layer. Therefore, it is required for discussing physical properties of the deep underground to remove the influence of surface layer, preliminarily. For the surface consistent amplitude correction, properties of the generator and geophone were removed by assuming that the observed waveforms can be expressed by equations of convolution. This is a correction method to obtain records without affected by the surface conditions. In response to analysis and correction of waveforms, wavelet conversion was examined. Using the amplitude patterns after correction, the significant signal region, noise dominant region, and surface wave dominant region would be separated each other. Since the amplitude values after correction of values in the significant signal region have only small variation, a representative value can be given. This can be used for analyzing the surface consistent amplitude correction. Efficiency of the process can be enhanced by considering the change of frequency. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Nuclear-Mechanical Coupling: Small Amplitude Mechanical Vibrations and High Amplitude Power Oscillations in Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2008-11-01

    The cores of nuclear reactors, including its structural parts and cooling fluids, are complex mechanical systems able to vibrate in a set of normal modes and frequencies, if suitable perturbed. The cyclic variations in the strain state of the core materials may produce changes in density. Changes in density modify the reactivity. Changes in reactivity modify thermal power. Modifications in thermal power produce variations in temperature fields. Variations in temperature produce variations in strain due to thermal-elastic effects. If the variation of the temperature field is fast enough and if the Doppler Effect and other stabilizing prompt effects in the fuel are weak enough, a fast oscillatory instability could be produced, coupled with mechanical vibrations of small amplitude. A recently constructed, simple mathematical model of nuclear reactor kinetics, that improves the one due to A.S. Thompson, is reviewed. It was constructed in order to study, in a first approximation, the stability of the reactor: a nonlinear nuclear-thermal oscillator (that corresponds to reactor point kinetics with thermal-elastic feedback and with frozen delayed neutron effects) is coupled nonlinearly with a linear mechanical-thermal oscillator (that corresponds to the first normal mode of mechanical vibrations excited by thermo-elastic effects). This mathematical model is studied here from the standpoint of mechanical vibrations. It is shown how, under certain conditions, a suitable mechanical perturbation could elicit fast and growing oscillatory instabilities in the reactor power. Applying the asymptotic method due to Krylov, Bogoliubov and Mitropolsky, analytical formulae that may be used in the calculation of the time varying amplitude and phase of the mechanical oscillations are given, as functions of the mechanical, thermal and nuclear parameters of the reactor. The consequences for the mechanical integrity of the reactor are assessed. Some conditions, mainly, but not exclusively

  7. Quasi-B-mode generated by high-frequency gravitational waves and corresponding perturbative photon fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fangyu, E-mail: cqufangyuli@hotmail.com [Institute of Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wen, Hao [Institute of Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fang, Zhenyun [Institute of Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wei, Lianfu; Wang, Yiwen; Zhang, Miao [Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Interaction of very low-frequency primordial (relic) gravitational waves (GWs) to cosmic microwave background (CMB) can generate B-mode polarization. Here, for the first time we point out that the electromagnetic (EM) response to high-frequency GWs (HFGWs) would produce quasi-B-mode distribution of the perturbative photon fluxes. We study the duality and high complementarity between such two B-modes, and it is shown that such two effects are from the same physical origin: the tensor perturbation of the GWs and not the density perturbation. Based on this quasi-B-mode in HFGWs and related numerical calculation, it is shown that the distinguishing and observing of HFGWs from the braneworld would be quite possible due to their large amplitude, higher frequency and very different physical behaviors between the perturbative photon fluxes and background photons, and the measurement of relic HFGWs may also be possible though face to enormous challenge.

  8. 2D fluid-analytical simulation of electromagnetic effects in low pressure, high frequency electronegative capacitive discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, E; Lichtenberg, A J; Lieberman, M A; Marakhtanov, A M

    2016-01-01

    A fast 2D axisymmetric fluid-analytical multifrequency capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) reactor code is used to study center high nonuniformity in a low pressure electronegative chlorine discharge. In the code, a time-independent Helmholtz wave equation is used to solve for the capacitive fields in the linearized frequency domain. This eliminates the time dependence from the electromagnetic (EM) solve, greatly speeding up the simulations at the cost of neglecting higher harmonics. However, since the code allows up to three driving frequencies, we can add the two most important harmonics to the CCP simulations as the second and third input frequencies. The amplitude and phase of these harmonics are estimated by using a recently developed 1D radial nonlinear transmission line (TL) model of a highly asymmetric cylindrical discharge (Lieberman et al 2015 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 24 055011). We find that at higher applied frequencies, the higher harmonics contribute significantly to the center high nonuniformity due to their shorter plasma wavelengths. (paper)

  9. Holographic wavefront characterization of a frequency-tripled high-peak-power neodymium:glass laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Near-field amplitude and phase distributions from a high-peak-power, frequency converted Nd:glass laser (lambda = 351 nm) have been holographically recorded on silver-halide emulsions. Conventionally, the absence of a suitable reference beam forces one to use some type of shearing interferometry to obtain phasefront information, while the near-field and far-field distributions are recorded as intensity profiles. In this study, a spatially filtered, locally generated reference beam was created to holographically store the complex amplitude distribution of the pulsed laser beam, while reconstruction of the original wavefront was achieved with a continuous-wave laser. Reconstructed near-field and quasi-far-field intensity distributions closely resembled those obtained from conventional techniques, and accurate phasefront reconstruction was achieved. Furthermore, several two-beam interferometric techniques, not practicable with a high-peak-power laser, have been successfully implemented on a continuous-wave reconstruction of the pulsed laser beam. 46 refs., 40 figs., 1 tab

  10. Effect of high frequency content of uniform hazard response spectra on nuclear power plant structures, systems and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usmani, A. [Amec Foster Wheeler, Toronto, ON (Canada); Baughman, P.D. [Paul D. Baughman Consulting, Exeter, NH (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The Uniform Hazard Spectrum (UHS) is developed from a probabilistic seismic hazard assessment and represents a response spectrum for which the amplitude at each frequency has a specified and uniform (equal) probability of exceedance. The high spectral acceleration at high frequencies in the UHS can result mainly from small non-damaging low energy earthquakes. Historically Canadian and U.S. nuclear power plants have been designed using the standard shape spectrum given in CSA N289.3 or USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.60, which have maximum spectral accelerations in the lower (2-10 Hz.) frequency range. The impact of the high frequency content of UHS on the nuclear power plant SSCs is required to be assessed. This paper briefly describes the methodologies used for screening and evaluation of the effects of UHS high frequency content on the nuclear power SSCs that have been designed using the CSA N289.3 standard shape spectrum. (author)

  11. Major enhancement of extra-low-frequency radiation by increasing the high-frequency heating wave power in electrojet modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, S.P.; Lee, S.H.; Kossey, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Extra-low-frequency (ELF) wave generation by modulated polar electrojet currents is studied. The amplitude-modulated high-frequency (HF) heating wave excites a stimulated thermal instability to enhance the electrojet current modulation by the passive Ohmic heating process. Inelastic collisions of electrons with neutral particles (mainly due to vibrational excitation of N 2 ) damp nonlinearly this instability, which is normally saturated at low levels. However, the electron's inelastic collision loss rate drops rapidly to a low value in the energy regime from 3.5 to 6 eV. As the power of the modulated HF heating wave exceeds a threshold level, it is shown that significant electron heating enhanced by the stimulated thermal instability can indeed cause a steep drop in the electron inelastic collision loss rate. Consequently, this instability saturates at a much higher level, resulting to a near step increase (of about 10-13 dB, depending on the modulation wave form) in the spectral intensity of ELF radiation. The dependence of the threshold power of the HF heating wave on the modulation frequency is determined

  12. High-frequency, high-intensity photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, H. R.

    1996-02-01

    Two analytical methods for computing ionization by high-frequency fields are compared. Predicted ionization rates compare well, but energy predictions for the onset of ionization differ radically. The difference is shown to arise from the use of a transformation in one of the methods that alters the zero from which energy is measured. This alteration leads to an apparent energy threshold for ionization that can, especially in the stabilization regime, differ strongly from the laboratory measurement. It is concluded that channel closings in intense-field ionization can occur at high as well as low frequencies. It is also found that the stabilization phenomenon at high frequencies, very prominent for hydrogen, is absent in a short-range potential.

  13. Thermo-acoustic instabilities of high-frequency combustion in rocket engines; Instabilites thermo-acoustiques de combustion haute-frequence dans les moteurs fusees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheuret, F

    2005-10-15

    Rocket motors are confined environments where combustion occurs in extreme conditions. Combustion instabilities can occur at high frequencies; they are tied to the acoustic modes of the combustion chamber. A common research chamber, CRC, allows us to study the response of a turbulent two-phase flame to acoustic oscillations of low or high amplitudes. The chamber is characterised under cold conditions to obtain, in particular, the relative damping coefficient of acoustic oscillations. The structure and frequency of the modes are determined in the case where the chamber is coupled to a lateral cavity. We have used a powder gun to study the response to a forced acoustic excitation at high amplitude. The results guide us towards shorter flames. The injectors were then modified to study the combustion noise level as a function of injection conditions. The speed of the gas determines whether the flames are attached or lifted. The noise level of lifted flames is higher. That of attached flames is proportional to the Weber number. The shorter flames whose length is less than the radius of the CRC, necessary condition to obtain an effective coupling, are the most sensitive to acoustic perturbations. The use of a toothed wheel at different positions in the chamber allowed us to obtain informations on the origin of the thermo-acoustic coupling, main objective of this thesis. The flame is sensitive to pressure acoustic oscillations, with a quasi-zero response time. These observations suggest that under the conditions of the CRC, we observe essentially the response of chemical kinetics to pressure oscillations. (author)

  14. White-crowned sparrow males show immediate flexibility in song amplitude but not in song minimum frequency in response to changes in noise levels in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derryberry, Elizabeth P; Gentry, Katherine; Derryberry, Graham E; Phillips, Jennifer N; Danner, Raymond M; Danner, Julie E; Luther, David A

    2017-07-01

    The soundscape acts as a selective agent on organisms that use acoustic signals to communicate. A number of studies document variation in structure, amplitude, or timing of signal production in correspondence with environmental noise levels thus supporting the hypothesis that organisms are changing their signaling behaviors to avoid masking. The time scale at which organisms respond is of particular interest. Signal structure may evolve across generations through processes such as cultural or genetic transmission. Individuals may also change their behavior during development (ontogenetic change) or in real time (i.e., immediate flexibility). These are not mutually exclusive mechanisms, and all must be investigated to understand how organisms respond to selection pressures from the soundscape. Previous work on white-crowned sparrows ( Zonotrichia leucophrys ) found that males holding territories in louder areas tend to sing higher frequency songs and that both noise levels and song frequency have increased over time (30 years) in urban areas. These previous findings suggest that songs are changing across generations; however, it is not known if this species also exhibits immediate flexibility. Here, we conducted an exploratory, observational study to ask whether males change the minimum frequency of their song in response to immediate changes in noise levels. We also ask whether males sing louder, as increased minimum frequency may be physiologically linked to producing sound at higher amplitudes, in response to immediate changes in environmental noise. We found that territorial males adjust song amplitude but not minimum frequency in response to changes in environmental noise levels. Our results suggest that males do not show immediate flexibility in song minimum frequency, although experimental manipulations are needed to test this hypothesis further. Our work highlights the need to investigate multiple mechanisms of adaptive response to soundscapes.

  15. Pulsations of the High-Amplitude δ Scuti star YZ Bootis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao-Zhi; Esamdin, Ali; Fu, Jian-Ning; Niu, Hu-Biao; Feng, Guo-Jie; Song, Fang-Fang; Liu, Jin-Zhong; Ma, Lu

    2018-01-01

    We present a study on pulsations of the high-amplitude δ Scuti star YZ Boo based on photometric observations in Johnson V and R bands with both the Nanshan 1-m telescope of Xinjiang AstronomicalObservatory (XAO) and the Xinglong 85-cmtelescope of NationalAstronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC). Fourier analysis of the light curves reveals the fundamental radial mode and its five harmonics, with the fourth and fifth being newly detected. Thirty-nine new times of maximum light are determined from the light curves, and combined with those in the literature, we construct the O ‑ C diagram, derive a new ephemeris and determine a new value for the updated period of 0.104091579(2). In addition, the O ‑ C diagram reveals an increasing rate of period change for YZ Boo. Theoretical models are calculated and constrained with the observationally determined parameters of YZ Boo. The mass and age of YZ Boo are hence derived as M = 1.61±0.05 M ⊙ and age = (1.44±0.14)×109 yr, respectively.With both the frequency of the fundamental radial mode and the rate of period change, YZ Boo is located at the post main sequence stage.

  16. Thermal Mechanisms for High Amplitude Aerodynamic Flow Control (YIP 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    transport aircraft , much less cruise. The search for a perfect actuator continues, but progress has been limited by the often proprietary nature these...wave generation as a mechanism for high amplitude, high bandwidth actuation has been demonstrated, but the fundamental physics of how this...moving forward with such a definition. 15. SUBJECT TERMS active flow control, energy deposition, plasma actuation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  17. Frequency-dependent changes in the regional amplitude and synchronization of resting-state functional MRI in stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfang Zhu

    Full Text Available Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI has been intensively used to assess alterations of inter-regional functional connectivity in patients with stroke, but the regional properties of brain activity in stroke have not yet been fully investigated. Additionally, no study has examined a frequency effect on such regional properties in stroke patients, although this effect has been shown to play important roles in both normal brain functioning and functional abnormalities. Here we utilized R-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF and regional homogeneity (ReHo, two major methods for characterizing the regional properties of R-fMRI, in three different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.73 Hz; and typical band: 0.01-0.1 Hz in 19 stroke patients and 15 healthy controls. Both the ALFF and ReHo analyses revealed changes in brain activity in a number of brain regions, particularly the parietal cortex, in stroke patients compared with healthy controls. Remarkably, the regions with changed activity as detected by the slow-5 band data were more extensive, and this finding was true for both the ALFF and ReHo analyses. These results not only confirm previous studies showing abnormality in the parietal cortex in patients with stroke, but also suggest that R-fMRI studies of stroke should take frequency effects into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity.

  18. Recovery of amplitude dependent internal friction in plastically deformed LiF single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshimizu, S.

    1977-01-01

    The internal friction due to is studied interactions between point defects and dislocations produced in pure LiF single crystais by plastic deformation. The recovery of amplitude dependent damping is investigated in these crystais in the low frequency range. The logarithmic decrement is measured as a function of strain amplitude at several different temperatures in the range 8C - 35C in order to observe thermal breakaway. The results were interpred according to the theory developed by Granato and Lucke. Systematic measurements are also been carried out to determine the logarithmic decrement as a function of time at different temperatures, after driving the specimens at high strains amplitudes, yelding the following results: I) there is a recovery of the amplitude dependent damping upon removal of the high strain excitations, and II) the Kinetic of the recovery follows initially a t sup(2/3) ageing law, changing to tsup(1/3) afterwards [pt

  19. Phenomenological study of helicity amplitudes of high energy exclusive leptoproduction of the ρ meson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, I. V.; Besse, A.; Ivanov, D. Yu.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2011-01-01

    We apply a previously developed scheme to consistently include the twist-3 distribution amplitudes for transversely polarized ρ mesons in order to evaluate, in the framework of k T factorization, the helicity amplitudes for exclusive leptoproduction of a light vector meson, at leading order in α s . We compare our results with high energy experimental data for the ratios of helicity amplitudes T 11 /T 00 and T 01 /T 00 and get a good description of the data.

  20. Quasi-B-mode generated by high-frequency gravitational waves and corresponding perturbative photon fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Y. Fangyu Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of very low-frequency primordial (relic gravitational waves (GWs to cosmic microwave background (CMB can generate B-mode polarization. Here, for the first time we point out that the electromagnetic (EM response to high-frequency GWs (HFGWs would produce quasi-B-mode distribution of the perturbative photon fluxes. We study the duality and high complementarity between such two B-modes, and it is shown that such two effects are from the same physical origin: the tensor perturbation of the GWs and not the density perturbation. Based on this quasi-B-mode in HFGWs and related numerical calculation, it is shown that the distinguishing and observing of HFGWs from the braneworld would be quite possible due to their large amplitude, higher frequency and very different physical behaviors between the perturbative photon fluxes and background photons, and the measurement of relic HFGWs may also be possible though face to enormous challenge.

  1. Frequency-domain inversion using the amplitude of the derivative wavefield with respect to the angular frequency

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2012-01-01

    The instantaneous traveltime based inversion was developed to solve the phase wrapping problem, thus generating long-wavelength structures even for a high single-frequency. However, it required aggressive damping to insure proper convergence. A

  2. High frequency components of tracheal sound are emphasized during prolonged flow limitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenhunen, M; Huupponen, E; Saastamoinen, A; Kulkas, A; Himanen, S-L; Rauhala, E

    2009-01-01

    A nasal pressure transducer, which is used to study nocturnal airflow, also provides information about the inspiratory flow waveform. A round flow shape is presented during normal breathing. A flattened, non-round shape is found during hypopneas and it can also appear in prolonged episodes. The significance of this prolonged flow limitation is still not established. A tracheal sound spectrum has been analyzed further in order to achieve additional information about breathing during sleep. Increased sound frequencies over 500 Hz have been connected to obstruction of the upper airway. The aim of the present study was to examine the tracheal sound signal content of prolonged flow limitation and to find out whether prolonged flow limitation would consist of abundant high frequency activity. Sleep recordings of 36 consecutive patients were examined. The tracheal sound spectral analysis was performed on 10 min episodes of prolonged flow limitation, normal breathing and periodic apnea-hypopnea breathing. The highest total spectral amplitude, implicating loudest sounds, occurred during flow-limited breathing which also presented loudest sounds in all frequency bands above 100 Hz. In addition, the tracheal sound signal during flow-limited breathing constituted proportionally more high frequency activities compared to normal breathing and even periodic apnea-hypopnea breathing

  3. Digital pulse processing techniques for high resolution amplitude measurement of radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhai, P.; Roy, A.; Dhara, P.; Chatterjee, S.

    2012-01-01

    The digital pulse processing techniques for high resolution amplitude measurement of radiation detector pulse is an effective replacement of expensive and bulky analog processing as the digital domain offers higher channel density and at the same time it is cheaper. We have demonstrated a prototype digital setup with highspeed sampling ADC with sampling frequency of 80-125 MHz followed by series of IIR filters for pulse shaping in a trigger-less acquisition mode. The IIR filters, peak detection algorithm and the data write-out logic was written on VHDL and implemented on FPGA. We used CAMAC as the read out platform. In conjunction with the full hardware implementation we also used a mixed platform with VME digitizer card with raw-sample read out using C code. The rationale behind this mixed platform is to test out various filter algorithms quickly on C and also to benchmark the performance of the chip level ADCs against the standard commercial digitizer in terms of noise or resolution. The paper describes implementation of both the methods with performance obtained in both the methods. (author)

  4. Finite Amplitude Electron Plasma Waves in a Cylindrical Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1978-01-01

    The nonlinear behaviour of the electron plasma wave propagating in a cylindrical plasma waveguide immersed in an infinite axial magnetic field is investigated using the Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky perturbation method, by means of which is deduced the nonlinear Schrodinger equation governing...... the long-time slow modulation of the wave amplitude. From this equation the amplitude-dependent frequency and wavenumber shifts are calculated, and it is found that the electron waves with short wavelengths are modulationally unstable with respect to long-wavelength, low-frequency perturbations...

  5. New generation neonatal high frequency ventilators: effect of oscillatory frequency and working principles on performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazioli, Serge; Karam, Oliver; Rimensberger, Peter C

    2015-03-01

    Several new generation neonatal ventilators that incorporate conventional as well as high frequency ventilation (HFOV) have appeared on the market. Most of them offer the possibility to use HFOV in a volume-targeted mode, despite absence of any preclinical data. With a bench test, we evaluated the performances of 4 new neonatal HFOV devices and compared them to the SensorMedics HFOV device. Expiratory tidal volumes (V(T)) were measured for various ventilator settings and lung characteristics (ie, modifications of compliance and resistance of the system), to mimic several clinical conditions of pre-term and term infants. Increasing the frequency proportionally decreased the V(T) for all the ventilators, although the magnitude of the decrease was highly variable between ventilators. At 15 Hz and a pressure amplitude of 60 cm H2O, the delivered V(T) ranged from 3.5 to 5.9 mL between devices while simulating pre-term infant conditions and from 2.6 to 6.3 mL while simulating term infant conditions. Activating the volume-targeted mode in the 3 machines that offer this mode allowed the V(T) to remain constant over the range of frequencies and with changes of lung mechanical properties, for pre-term infant settings only while targeting a V(T) of 1 mL. These new generation neonatal ventilators were able to deliver adequate V(T) under pre-term infant, but not term infant respiratory system conditions. The clinical relevance of these findings will need to be determined by further studies. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  6. Planck 2015 results. VIII. High Frequency Instrument data processing: Calibration and maps

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J.J.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J.P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macías-Pérez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P.G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G.W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I.K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) cleaned, time-ordered information to produce photometrically calibrated maps in temperature and (for the first time) in polarization. The data from the 2.5 year full mission include almost five independent full-sky surveys. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To get the best accuracy on the calibration over such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have been used. The 545 and 857 GHz data are calibrated using models of planetary atmospheric emission. The lower frequencies (from 100 to 353 GHz) are calibrated using the time-variable cosmological microwave background dipole which we call the orbital dipole. This source of calibration only depends on the satellite velocity with respect to the solar system and permits an independent measurement of the amplitude of the CMB solar dipole (3364.5 +/- 0.8 \\mu K) which is 1\\sigma\\ higher than the WMAP measurement wit...

  7. Generating an AC amplitude magnetic flux density value up to 150 μT at a frequency up to 100 kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvr, Michal; Polonský, Jakub

    2017-05-01

    AC magnetic field analyzers with a triaxial coil probe are widely used by health and safety professionals, in manufacturing, and in service industries. For traceable calibration of these analyzers, it is important to be able to generate a stable, homogeneous reference AC magnetic flux density (MFD). In this paper, the generating of AC amplitude MFD value of 150 μT by single-layer Helmholtz type solenoid, described in previous work, was expanded up to a frequency of 100 kHz using the effect of serial resonance. A programmable capacitor array has been developed with a range of adjustable values from 50 pF to 51225 pF. In addition, the multi-layer search coil with a nominal area turns value of 1.3m2, used for adjusting AC MFD in the solenoid, has been modified by a transimpedance amplifier for use in a wider frequency range than up to 3 kHz. The possibility of using the programmable capacitor array up to 150 kHz has also been tested. An AC amplitude MFD value of 150 μT can be generated with expanded uncertainty better than 0.6% up to 100 kHz.

  8. Gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission line generator of high voltage pulses modulated at 4 GHz frequency with 1000 Hz pulse repetition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmasculov, M R; Sharypov, K A; Shunailov, S A; Shpak, V G; Yalandin, M I; Pedos, M S; Rukin, S N

    2017-01-01

    Results of testing of a generator based on a solid-state drive and the parallel gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission lines with external bias are presented. Stable rf-modulated high-voltage nanosecond pulses were shaped in each of the four channels in 1 s packets with 1000 Hz repetition frequencies. Pulse amplitude reaches -175 kV, at a modulation depth of rf-oscillations to 50 % and the effective frequency ∼4 GHz. (paper)

  9. High speed ultra-broadband amplitude modulators with ultrahigh extinction >65 dB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S; Cai, H; DeRose, C T; Davids, P; Pomerene, A; Starbuck, A L; Trotter, D C; Camacho, R; Urayama, J; Lentine, A

    2017-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate ultrahigh extinction ratio (>65 dB) amplitude modulators (AMs) that can be electrically tuned to operate across a broad spectral range of 160 nm from 1480 - 1640 nm and 95 nm from 1280 - 1375 nm. Our on-chip AMs employ one extra coupler compared with conventional Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZI), thus form a cascaded MZI (CMZI) structure. Either directional or adiabatic couplers are used to compose the CMZI AMs and experimental comparisons are made between these two different structures. We investigate the performance of CMZI AMs under extreme conditions such as using 95:5 split ratio couplers and unbalanced waveguide losses. Electro-optic phase shifters are also integrated in the CMZI AMs for high-speed operation. Finally, we investigate the output optical phase when the amplitude is modulated, which provides us valuable information when both amplitude and phase are to be controlled. Our demonstration not only paves the road to applications such as quantum information processing that requires high extinction ratio AMs but also significantly alleviates the tight fabrication tolerance needed for large-scale integrated photonics.

  10. Corrections to the leading eikonal amplitude for high-energy scattering and quasipotential approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Suan Hani; Nguyen Duy Hung

    2003-12-01

    Asymptotic behaviour of the scattering amplitude for two scalar particle at high energy and fixed momentum transfers is reconsidered in quantum field theory. In the framework of the quasipotential approach and the modified perturbation theory a systematic scheme of finding the leading eikonal scattering amplitudes and its corrections is developed and constructed. The connection between the solutions obtained by quasipotential and functional approaches is also discussed. (author)

  11. Braids and phase gates through high-frequency virtual tunneling of Majorana zero modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorantla, Pranay; Sensarma, Rajdeep

    2018-05-01

    Braiding of non-Abelian Majorana anyons is a first step towards using them in quantum computing. We propose a protocol for braiding Majorana zero modes formed at the edges of nanowires with strong spin-orbit coupling and proximity-induced superconductivity. Our protocol uses high-frequency virtual tunneling between the ends of the nanowires in a trijunction, which leads to an effective low-frequency coarse-grained dynamics for the system, to perform the braid. The braiding operation is immune to amplitude noise in the drives and depends only on relative phase between the drives, which can be controlled by the usual phase-locking techniques. We also show how a phase gate, which is necessary for universal quantum computation, can be implemented with our protocol.

  12. The effect of airway pressure and oscillation amplitude on ventilation in pre-term infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, M.; de Jongh, Franciscus H.C.; Frerichs, I.; van Veenendaal, M.B.; van Kaam, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    We determined the effect of lung recruitment and oscillation amplitude on regional oscillation volume and functional residual capacity (FRC) in high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) used in pre-term infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Changes in lung volume, oscillation volume

  13. Low drive field amplitude for improved image resolution in magnetic particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Laura R; Goodwill, Patrick W; Konkle, Justin J; Arami, Hamed; Price, Daniel A; Li, Ada X; Saritas, Emine U; Conolly, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging technology that directly detects superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The technique has potential medical applications in angiography, cell tracking, and cancer detection. In this paper, the authors explore how nanoparticle relaxation affects image resolution. Historically, researchers have analyzed nanoparticle behavior by studying the time constant of the nanoparticle physical rotation. In contrast, in this paper, the authors focus instead on how the time constant of nanoparticle rotation affects the final image resolution, and this reveals nonobvious conclusions for tailoring MPI imaging parameters for optimal spatial resolution. The authors first extend x-space systems theory to include nanoparticle relaxation. The authors then measure the spatial resolution and relative signal levels in an MPI relaxometer and a 3D MPI imager at multiple drive field amplitudes and frequencies. Finally, these image measurements are used to estimate relaxation times and nanoparticle phase lags. The authors demonstrate that spatial resolution, as measured by full-width at half-maximum, improves at lower drive field amplitudes. The authors further determine that relaxation in MPI can be approximated as a frequency-independent phase lag. These results enable the authors to accurately predict MPI resolution and sensitivity across a wide range of drive field amplitudes and frequencies. To balance resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, specific absorption rate, and magnetostimulation requirements, the drive field can be a low amplitude and high frequency. Continued research into how the MPI drive field affects relaxation and its adverse effects will be crucial for developing new nanoparticles tailored to the unique physics of MPI. Moreover, this theory informs researchers how to design scanning sequences to minimize relaxation-induced blurring for better spatial resolution or to exploit relaxation-induced blurring for MPI with

  14. Multi-frequency excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-03-10

    Embodiments of multi-frequency excitation are described. In various embodiments, a natural frequency of a device may be determined. In turn, a first voltage amplitude and first fixed frequency of a first source of excitation can be selected for the device based on the natural frequency. Additionally, a second voltage amplitude of a second source of excitation can be selected for the device, and the first and second sources of excitation can be applied to the device. After applying the first and second sources of excitation, a frequency of the second source of excitation can be swept. Using the methods of multi- frequency excitation described herein, new operating frequencies, operating frequency ranges, resonance frequencies, resonance frequency ranges, and/or resonance responses can be achieved for devices and systems.

  15. Long-distance pulse propagation on high-frequency dissipative nonlinear transmission lines/resonant tunneling diode line cascaded maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klofai, Yerima; Essimbi, B Z; Jaeger, D

    2011-01-01

    Pulse propagation on high-frequency dissipative nonlinear transmission lines (NLTLs)/resonant tunneling diode line cascaded maps is investigated for long-distance propagation of short pulses. Applying perturbative analysis, we show that the dynamics of each line is reduced to an expanded Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation. Moreover, it is found by computer experiments that the soliton developed in NLTLs experiences an exponential amplitude decay on the one hand and an exponential amplitude growth on the other. As a result, the behavior of a pulse in special electrical networks made of concatenated pieces of lines is closely similar to the transmission of information in optical/electrical communication systems.

  16. Long-distance pulse propagation on high-frequency dissipative nonlinear transmission lines/resonant tunneling diode line cascaded maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klofai, Yerima [Department of Physics, Higher Teacher Training College, University of Maroua, PO Box 46 Maroua (Cameroon); Essimbi, B Z [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde 1, PO Box 812 Yaounde (Cameroon); Jaeger, D, E-mail: bessimb@yahoo.fr [ZHO, Optoelectronik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Pulse propagation on high-frequency dissipative nonlinear transmission lines (NLTLs)/resonant tunneling diode line cascaded maps is investigated for long-distance propagation of short pulses. Applying perturbative analysis, we show that the dynamics of each line is reduced to an expanded Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation. Moreover, it is found by computer experiments that the soliton developed in NLTLs experiences an exponential amplitude decay on the one hand and an exponential amplitude growth on the other. As a result, the behavior of a pulse in special electrical networks made of concatenated pieces of lines is closely similar to the transmission of information in optical/electrical communication systems.

  17. Investigation of air-assisted sprays submitted to high frequency transverse acoustic fields: Droplet clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficuciello, A.; Blaisot, J. B.; Richard, C.; Baillot, F.

    2017-06-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of a high amplitude transverse acoustic field on coaxial jets is presented in this paper. Water and air are used as working fluids at ambient pressure. The coaxial injectors are placed on the top of a semi-open resonant cavity where the acoustic pressure fluctuations of the standing wave can reach a maximum peak-to-peak amplitude of 12 kPa at the forcing frequency of 1 kHz. Several test conditions are considered in order to quantify the influence of injection conditions, acoustic field amplitude, and injector position with respect to the standing wave acoustic field. A high speed back-light visualization technique is used to characterize the jet response. Image processing is used to obtain valuable information about the jet behavior. It is shown that the acoustic field drastically affects the atomization process for all atomization regimes. The position of the injector in the acoustic field determines the jet response, and a droplet-clustering phenomenon is highlighted in multi-point injection conditions and quantified by determining discrete droplet location distributions. A theoretical model based on nonlinear acoustics related to the spatial distribution of the radiation pressure exerted on an object explains the behavior observed.

  18. Frequency-dependent changes in local intrinsic oscillations in chronic primary insomnia: A study of the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the resting state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fuqing; Huang, Suhua; Zhuang, Ying; Gao, Lei; Gong, Honghan

    2017-01-01

    New neuroimaging techniques have led to significant advancements in our understanding of cerebral mechanisms of primary insomnia. However, the neuronal low-frequency oscillation remains largely uncharacterized in chronic primary insomnia (CPI). In this study, the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF), a data-driven method based on resting-state functional MRI, was used to examine local intrinsic activity in 27 patients with CPI and 27 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls. We examined neural activity in two frequency bands, slow-4 (between 0.027 and 0.073 Hz) and slow-5 (0.010-0.027 Hz), because blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fluctuations in different low-frequency bands may present different neurophysiological manifestations that pertain to a spatiotemporal organization. The ALFF associated with the primary disease effect was widely distributed in the cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL), dorsal and ventral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, somatosensory cortex, and several default-mode sub-regions. Several brain regions (i.e., the right cerebellum, anterior lobe, and left putamen) exhibited an interaction between the frequency band and patient group. In the slow-5 band, increased ALFF of the right postcentral gyrus/inferior parietal lobule (PoCG/IPL) was enhanced in association with the sleep quality (ρ = 0.414, P  = 0.044) and anxiety index (ρ = 0.406, P  = 0.049) of the CPI patients. These findings suggest that during chronic insomnia, the intrinsic functional plasticity primarily responds to the hyperarousal state, which is the loss of inhibition in sensory-informational processing. Our findings regarding an abnormal sensory input and intrinsic processing mechanism might provide novel insight into the pathophysiology of CPI. Furthermore, the frequency factor should be taken into consideration when exploring ALFF-related clinical manifestations.

  19. Unitarity and amplitudes for high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, G.V.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that in the quantum field theory of scalar particles with mass m the following inequalities for the upper bound for the amplitude of elastic scattering Μ(s,t) |Μ(s,t)| 0 )s, (|t|≥|t 0 |>0) and for the total cross section of scalar particles σ tot (s)≤C|d/dt ln Im Μ(s,t)| t=0 , (s → ∞) are valid. This result is based on the unitarity of the S-matrix on the mass shell and on a natural assumption that the imaginary part of the elastic scattering Im Μ(s,t) is a differentiable and convex down function in some vicinity of t=0. The locality of the theory and the analyticity of the elastic amplitude in the Martin-Lehmann ellipse are not used in proving these inequalities

  20. Evoked responses of the superior olive to amplitude-modulated signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, N G; Lang, T T

    1977-01-01

    Evoked potentials of some auditory centers of Rhinolophidae bats to amplitude-modulated signals were studied. A synchronization response was found in the cochlear nuclei (with respect to the fast component of the response) and in the superior olivary complex (with respect to both fast and slow components of the response) within the range of frequency modulation from 50 to 2000 Hz. In the inferior colliculus a synchronized response was recorded at modulation frequencies below 150 Hz, but in the medial geniculate bodies no such response was found. Evoked responses of the superior olivary complex were investigated in detail. The lowest frequencies of synchronization were recorded within the carrier frequency range of 15-30 and 80-86 kHz. The amplitude of the synchronized response is a function of the frequency and coefficient of modulation and also of the angle of stimulus presentation.

  1. Flow motion waves with high and low frequency in severe ischaemia before and after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, U; Schneider, E; Bollinger, A

    1990-09-01

    STUDY OF OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate skin flux and prevalence of low and high frequency flow motion waves in patients with severe ischaemia due to peripheral arterial occlusive disease before and after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with and without local thrombolysis. Flow motion was recorded by the laser Doppler technique at the dorsum of the foot before, one day, and one month after PTA. The results were separately analysed in patients with successful and unsuccessful treatment. 18 patients with rest pain or incipient gangrene were included. Mean pretreatment systolic ankle pressure was 55.8(SD 25.5) mm Hg, and mean transcutaneous PO2 at 43 degrees C was 5.2(9.4) mm Hg. Arteriography revealed relevant stenoses or occlusions of the femoropopliteal and calf arteries. Before treatment two patterns of flow motion with characteristic frequency ranges were observed at the foot dorsum and at a probe temperature of 32 degrees C: low frequency (LF) waves with a mean frequency of 2.2(0.5) cycles.min-1 and a mean amplitude of 0.73(0.42) arbitrary units (AU) and high frequency (HF) waves with a mean frequency of 22.6(4.2) cycles.min-1 and a mean amplitude of 0.39(0.33) AU. PTA was successful in 11 of the 18 patients. After successful treatment, prevalence of HF waves decreased from 10/11 to 4/11 cases (p less than 0.001), but remained nearly unchanged after failed procedure. Prevalence of LF waves before and after PTA did not differ significantly. Our data support the hypothesis that HF waves represent a reaction of skin microcirculation to severe ischaemia. With reference to animal studies it is proposed that HF waves originate from terminal arterioles. They may function as a compensatory mechanism of flow regulation involved in pathophysiology of ischaemia.

  2. Atmospheric-radiation boundary conditions for high-frequency waves in time-distance helioseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, D.; Leguèbe, M.; Hanson, C. S.; Gizon, L.; Barucq, H.; Chabassier, J.; Duruflé, M.

    2017-12-01

    The temporal covariance between seismic waves measured at two locations on the solar surface is the fundamental observable in time-distance helioseismology. Above the acoustic cut-off frequency ( 5.3 mHz), waves are not trapped in the solar interior and the covariance function can be used to probe the upper atmosphere. We wish to implement appropriate radiative boundary conditions for computing the propagation of high-frequency waves in the solar atmosphere. We consider recently developed and published radiative boundary conditions for atmospheres in which sound-speed is constant and density decreases exponentially with radius. We compute the cross-covariance function using a finite element method in spherical geometry and in the frequency domain. The ratio between first- and second-skip amplitudes in the time-distance diagram is used as a diagnostic to compare boundary conditions and to compare with observations. We find that a boundary condition applied 500 km above the photosphere and derived under the approximation of small angles of incidence accurately reproduces the "infinite atmosphere" solution for high-frequency waves. When the radiative boundary condition is applied 2 Mm above the photosphere, we find that the choice of atmospheric model affects the time-distance diagram. In particular, the time-distance diagram exhibits double-ridge structure when using a Vernazza Avrett Loeser atmospheric model.

  3. Note: Decoupling design for high frequency piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers with their clamping connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, F. J., E-mail: wangfujun@tju.edu.cn; Liang, C. M.; Tian, Y. L.; Zhao, X. Y.; Zhang, D. W. [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Equipment Design and Manufacturing Technology, School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, H. J. [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Modern Mechatronics Equipment Technology, School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2015-12-15

    This work presents the flexure-mechanism based decoupling design between high frequency piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers and their clamping connections to improve ultrasonic energy transmission efficiency. The ring, prismatic beam, and circular notched hinge based flanges were presented, and the crucial geometric dimensions of the transducers with the flexure decoupling flanges were determined. Finite element analysis (FEA) was carried out to investigate the dynamic characteristics of the transducers. Finally, experiments were conducted to examine and verify the effects of the proposed decoupling flanges. FEA and experimental results show that smaller frequency deviations and larger tip displacement amplitudes have been achieved by using the transducers with the flexure flanges compared with the transducer with a rigid ring-type flange, and thus the ultrasonic transmission efficiency can be improved through the flexure flanges.

  4. Diode-pumped, single frequency Nd:YLF laser for 60-beam OMEGA laser pulse-shaping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okishev, A.V.; Seka, W.

    1997-01-01

    The operational conditions of the OMEGA pulse-shaping system require an extremely reliable and low-maintenance master oscillator. The authors have developed a diode-pumped, single-frequency, pulsed Nd:YLF laser for this application. The laser generates Q-switched pulses of ∼160-ns duration and ∼10-microJ energy content at the 1,053-nm wavelength with low amplitude fluctuations (<0.6% rms) and low temporal jitter (<7 ns rms). Amplitude and frequency feedback stabilization systems have been used for high long-term amplitude and frequency stability

  5. A Sparse Stochastic Collocation Technique for High-Frequency Wave Propagation with Uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Malenova, G.

    2016-09-08

    We consider the wave equation with highly oscillatory initial data, where there is uncertainty in the wave speed, initial phase, and/or initial amplitude. To estimate quantities of interest related to the solution and their statistics, we combine a high-frequency method based on Gaussian beams with sparse stochastic collocation. Although the wave solution, uϵ, is highly oscillatory in both physical and stochastic spaces, we provide theoretical arguments for simplified problems and numerical evidence that quantities of interest based on local averages of |uϵ|2 are smooth, with derivatives in the stochastic space uniformly bounded in ϵ, where ϵ denotes the short wavelength. This observable related regularity makes the sparse stochastic collocation approach more efficient than Monte Carlo methods. We present numerical tests that demonstrate this advantage.

  6. A Sparse Stochastic Collocation Technique for High-Frequency Wave Propagation with Uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Malenova, G.; Motamed, M.; Runborg, O.; Tempone, Raul

    2016-01-01

    We consider the wave equation with highly oscillatory initial data, where there is uncertainty in the wave speed, initial phase, and/or initial amplitude. To estimate quantities of interest related to the solution and their statistics, we combine a high-frequency method based on Gaussian beams with sparse stochastic collocation. Although the wave solution, uϵ, is highly oscillatory in both physical and stochastic spaces, we provide theoretical arguments for simplified problems and numerical evidence that quantities of interest based on local averages of |uϵ|2 are smooth, with derivatives in the stochastic space uniformly bounded in ϵ, where ϵ denotes the short wavelength. This observable related regularity makes the sparse stochastic collocation approach more efficient than Monte Carlo methods. We present numerical tests that demonstrate this advantage.

  7. Frequency Response Studies using Receptance Coupling Approach in High Speed Spindles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Jakeer Hussain; Ramakotaiah, K.; Srinivas, J.

    2018-01-01

    In order to assess the stability of high speed machining, estimate the frequency response at the end of tool tip is of great importance. Evaluating dynamic response of several combinations of integrated spindle-tool holder-tool will consume a lot of time. This paper presents coupled field dynamic response at tool tip for the entire integrated spindle tool unit. The spindle unit is assumed to be relying over the front and rear bearings and investigated using the Timoshenko beam theory to arrive the receptances at different locations of the spindle-tool unit. The responses are further validated with conventional finite element model as well as with the experiments. This approach permits quick outputs without losing accuracy of solution and further these methods are utilized to analyze the various design variables on system dynamics. The results obtained through this analysis are needed to design the better spindle unit in an attempt to reduce the frequency amplitudes at the tool tip to improvise the milling stability during cutting process.

  8. The origin of high frequency radiation in earthquakes and the geometry of faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madariaga, R.

    2004-12-01

    In a seminal paper of 1967 Kei Aki discovered the scaling law of earthquake spectra and showed that, among other things, the high frequency decay was of type omega-squared. This implies that high frequency displacement amplitudes are proportional to a characteristic length of the fault, and radiated energy scales with the cube of the fault dimension, just like seismic moment. Later in the seventies, it was found out that a simple explanation for this frequency dependence of spectra was that high frequencies were generated by stopping phases, waves emitted by changes in speed of the rupture front as it propagates along the fault, but this did not explain the scaling of high frequency waves with fault length. Earthquake energy balance is such that, ignoring attenuation, radiated energy is the change in strain energy minus energy released for overcoming friction. Until recently the latter was considered to be a material property that did not scale with fault size. Yet, in another classical paper Aki and Das estimated in the late 70s that energy release rate also scaled with earthquake size, because earthquakes were often stopped by barriers or changed rupture speed at them. This observation was independently confirmed in the late 90s by Ide and Takeo and Olsen et al who found that energy release rates for Kobe and Landers were in the order of a MJ/m2, implying that Gc necessarily scales with earthquake size, because if this was a material property, small earthquakes would never occur. Using both simple analytical and numerical models developed by Addia-Bedia and Aochi and Madariaga, we examine the consequence of these observations for the scaling of high frequency waves with fault size. We demonstrate using some classical results by Kostrov, Husseiny and Freund that high frequency energy flow measures energy release rate and is generated when ruptures change velocity (both direction and speed) at fault kinks or jogs. Our results explain why super shear ruptures are

  9. Detection of superparamagnetic particles in soils developed on basalts using frequency- and amplitude-dependent magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, H.; Petrovsky, E.; Kapicka, A.

    2016-12-01

    In rock, soil and environmental studies dealing with magnetic methods, the frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility (κFD%) is parameter generally accepted as a tool for identification of ultrafine superparamagnetic (SP) particles. This parameter became an indicator of pedogenic magnetic fraction (increased pedogenesis). Despite the number of studies using this parameter, knowledge about threshold values of κFD% is not clear enough and this parameter may be misinterpreted. Moreover, in strongly magnetic soils, magnetic signal of the SP (mostly pedogenic) minerals may be masked by dominant lithological signal, carried by coarse-grain mineral fraction; therefore, influence of pedogenesis is hard to detect. The aim of this contribution is to compare results in determination of ultrafine SP magnetic particles in soils determined using different instruments: (a) Bartington MS2B dual-frequency meter, and (b) more sensitive AGICO Kappameter MFK1-FA. The values of the κFD % obtained by the Bartington MS2B varied from 0.9 to 5.8% (mass-specific magnetic susceptibility from 119 to 1533 × 10-8 m3/kg) while the AGICO MFK1-FA varied from 3.7 to 8.2% (mass-specific magnetic susceptibility from 295 to 1843 × 10-8 m3/kg). Although both instruments suggest significant portion of SP magnetic particles, the results can't be interpreted using the generally accepted threshold values based on Bartington data. However, our results suggest that relation between the mass-specific magnetic susceptibility and κFD% along whole soil profile may serve as suitable tool in discriminating between lithogenic and pedogenic control of magnetic fraction in the soil profile. Moreover, we propose new concept of identification of SP particles, based on field-dependent magnetic susceptibility. Its behaviour shows distinct features with significant change at amplitudes of about 100 A/m. Below this value, susceptibility decreases with increasing amplitude, reflecting saturation of magnetization due

  10. Diphoton generalized distribution amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Beiyad, M.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the leading order diphoton generalized distribution amplitudes by calculating the amplitude of the process γ*γ→γγ in the low energy and high photon virtuality region at the Born order and in the leading logarithmic approximation. As in the case of the anomalous photon structure functions, the γγ generalized distribution amplitudes exhibit a characteristic lnQ 2 behavior and obey inhomogeneous QCD evolution equations.

  11. Pulsed-High Field/High-Frequency EPR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhs, Michael; Moebius, Klaus

    Pulsed high-field/high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is used to disentangle many kinds of different effects often obscured in continuous wave (cw) EPR spectra at lower magnetic fields/microwave frequencies. While the high magnetic field increases the resolution of G tensors and of nuclear Larmor frequencies, the high frequencies allow for higher time resolution for molecular dynamics as well as for transient paramagnetic intermediates studied with time-resolved EPR. Pulsed EPR methods are used for example for relaxation-time studies, and pulsed Electron Nuclear DOuble Resonance (ENDOR) is used to resolve unresolved hyperfine structure hidden in inhomogeneous linewidths. In the present article we introduce the basic concepts and selected applications to structure and mobility studies on electron transfer systems, reaction centers of photosynthesis as well as biomimetic models. The article concludes with an introduction to stochastic EPR which makes use of an other concept for investigating resonance systems in order to increase the excitation bandwidth of pulsed EPR. The limited excitation bandwidth of pulses at high frequency is one of the main limitations which, so far, made Fourier transform methods hardly feasible.

  12. The role of temporal fine structure information for the low pitch of high-frequency complex tones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    The fused low pitch evoked by complex tones containing only unresolved high-frequency components demonstrates the ability of the human auditory system to extract pitch using a temporal mechanism in the absence of spectral cues. However, the temporal features used by such a mechanism have been...... amplitude fluctuations, or temporal fine structure (TFS), of the conveyed signal can be processed. Using a pitch-matching paradigm, the present study found that the low pitch of inharmonic transposed tones with unresolved components was consistent with the timing between the most prominent TFS maxima...... coding as such, and that TFS representation might persist at higher frequencies than previously thought....

  13. Digital dynamic amplitude-frequency spectra analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinnikov, V.A.; )

    2006-01-01

    The spectra analyzer is intended for the dynamic spectral analysis of signals physical installations and noise filtering. The recurrence Fourier transformation algorithm is used in the digital dynamic analyzer. It is realized on the basis of the fast logic FPGA matrix and the special signal ADSP microprocessor. The discretization frequency is 2 kHz-10 MHz. The number of calculated spectral coefficients is not less 512. The functional fast-action is 20 ns [ru

  14. Exploring the time-frequency content of high frequency oscillations for automated identification of seizure onset zone in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Sha, Zhiyi; Sencer, Altay; Aydoseli, Aydin; Bebek, Nerse; Abosch, Aviva; Henry, Thomas; Gurses, Candan; Ince, Nuri Firat

    2016-04-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFOs) in intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) recordings are considered as promising clinical biomarkers of epileptogenic regions in the brain. The aim of this study is to improve and automatize the detection of HFOs by exploring the time-frequency content of iEEG and to investigate the seizure onset zone (SOZ) detection accuracy during the sleep, awake and pre-ictal states in patients with epilepsy, for the purpose of assisting the localization of SOZ in clinical practice. Ten-minute iEEG segments were defined during different states in eight patients with refractory epilepsy. A three-stage algorithm was implemented to detect HFOs in these segments. First, an amplitude based initial detection threshold was used to generate a large pool of HFO candidates. Then distinguishing features were extracted from the time and time-frequency domain of the raw iEEG and used with a Gaussian mixture model clustering to isolate HFO events from other activities. The spatial distribution of HFO clusters was correlated with the seizure onset channels identified by neurologists in seven patient with good surgical outcome. The overlapping rates of localized channels and seizure onset locations were high in all states. The best result was obtained using the iEEG data during sleep, achieving a sensitivity of 81%, and a specificity of 96%. The channels with maximum number of HFOs identified epileptogenic areas where the seizures occurred more frequently. The current study was conducted using iEEG data collected in realistic clinical conditions without channel pre-exclusion. HFOs were investigated with novel features extracted from the entire frequency band, and were correlated with SOZ in different states. The results indicate that automatic HFO detection with unsupervised clustering methods exploring the time-frequency content of raw iEEG can be efficiently used to identify the epileptogenic zone with an accurate and efficient manner.

  15. Effect of surface roughness on ultrasonic echo amplitude in aluminium-copper alloy castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambardar, R.; Pathak, S.D.; Prabhakar, O.; Jayakumar, T.

    1996-01-01

    In the present investigation, the influence of test surface roughness on ultrasonic back-wall echo (BWE) amplitude in Al-4.5%Cu alloy cast specimens has been studied. The results indicate that as the value of surface roughness of the specimen increases, the value of relating BWE amplitude at a given probe frequency decreases. However, under the present set of experimental conditions, the decrease in BWE amplitude with the increase in surface roughness of the test specimen is found to be appreciable at 10 MHz probe frequency. (author)

  16. On the origin of amplitude reduction mechanism in tapping mode atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvani, Aliasghar; Sadeghian, Hamed; Goosen, Hans; van Keulen, Fred

    2018-04-01

    The origin of amplitude reduction in Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TM-AFM) is typically attributed to the shift in resonance frequency of the cantilever due to the nonlinear tip-sample interactions. In this paper, we present a different insight into the same problem which, besides explaining the amplitude reduction mechanism, provides a simple reasoning for the relationship between tip-sample interactions and operation parameters (amplitude and frequency). The proposed formulation, which attributes the amplitude reduction to an interference between the tip-sample and dither force, only deals with the linear part of the system; however, it fully agrees with experimental results and numerical solutions of the full nonlinear model of TM-AFM.

  17. INTERACTION OF RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Increase in the amplitude of hf currents during exposure of a neutral target to microsecond CO2 laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, A. A.; Losev, Leonid L.; Meshalkin, E. A.

    1988-09-01

    High-frequency electric currents were generated by irradiation of a metal target with CO2 laser pulses. It was found that the region where the ambient gas was photoionized had a decisive influence on the hf current amplitude. A method for increasing the amplitude of the current by creating an auxiliary laser jet on the target was proposed and used. An hf current of up to 1 A amplitude was observed at a frequency of 75 MHz and this current lasted for 1.5 μs.

  18. High frequency variations of Earth Rotation Parameters from GPS and GLONASS observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Erhu; Jin, Shuanggen; Wan, Lihua; Liu, Wenjie; Yang, Yali; Hu, Zhenghong

    2015-01-28

    The Earth's rotation undergoes changes with the influence of geophysical factors, such as Earth's surface fluid mass redistribution of the atmosphere, ocean and hydrology. However, variations of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) are still not well understood, particularly the short-period variations (e.g., diurnal and semi-diurnal variations) and their causes. In this paper, the hourly time series of Earth Rotation Parameters are estimated using Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), and combining GPS and GLONASS data collected from nearly 80 sites from 1 November 2012 to 10 April 2014. These new observations with combining different satellite systems can help to decorrelate orbit biases and ERP, which improve estimation of ERP. The high frequency variations of ERP are analyzed using a de-trending method. The maximum of total diurnal and semidiurnal variations are within one milli-arcseconds (mas) in Polar Motion (PM) and 0.5 milli-seconds (ms) in UT1-UTC. The semidiurnal and diurnal variations are mainly related to the ocean tides. Furthermore, the impacts of satellite orbit and time interval used to determinate ERP on the amplitudes of tidal terms are analyzed. We obtain some small terms that are not described in the ocean tide model of the IERS Conventions 2010, which may be caused by the strategies and models we used or the signal noises as well as artifacts. In addition, there are also small differences on the amplitudes between our results and IERS convention. This might be a result of other geophysical excitations, such as the high-frequency variations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and hydrological angular momentum (HAM), which needs more detailed analysis with more geophysical data in the future.

  19. High-energy hadron spin-flip amplitude at small momentum transfer and new AN data from RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudell, J.-R.; Selyugin, O.V.; Predazzi, E.

    2004-01-01

    In the case of elastic high-energy hadron-hadron scattering, the impact of the large-distance contributions on the behaviour of the slopes of the spin-non-flip and of the spin-flip amplitudes is analysed. It is shown that the long tail of the hadronic potential in impact parameter space leads to a value of the slope of the reduced spin-flip amplitude larger than that of the spin-non-flip amplitude. This effect is taken into account in the calculation of the analysing power in proton-nucleus reactions at high energies. It is shown that the preliminary measurement of A N for p 12 C obtained by the E950 Collaboration indeed favours a spin-flip amplitude with a large slope. Predictions for A N at p L =250/ GeV/c are given. (orig.)

  20. 75 FR 81284 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment and... Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) for the Nationwide Use of High Frequency (HF) and Ultra High... potential impacts of each alternative on the human and natural environments. DATES: Comments and related...

  1. Influence of spatial frequency and emotion expression on face processing in patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Miseon; Kim, Do-Won; Yoon, Sunkyung; Park, Gewnhi; Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Deficits in facial emotion processing is a major characteristic of patients with panic disorder. It is known that visual stimuli with different spatial frequencies take distinct neural pathways. This study investigated facial emotion processing involving stimuli presented at broad, high, and low spatial frequencies in patients with panic disorder. Eighteen patients with panic disorder and 19 healthy controls were recruited. Seven event-related potential (ERP) components: (P100, N170, early posterior negativity (EPN); vertex positive potential (VPP), N250, P300; and late positive potential (LPP)) were evaluated while the participants looked at fearful and neutral facial stimuli presented at three spatial frequencies. When a fearful face was presented, panic disorder patients showed a significantly increased P100 amplitude in response to low spatial frequency compared to high spatial frequency; whereas healthy controls demonstrated significant broad spatial frequency dependent processing in P100 amplitude. Vertex positive potential amplitude was significantly increased in high and broad spatial frequency, compared to low spatial frequency in panic disorder. Early posterior negativity amplitude was significantly different between HSF and BSF, and between LSF and BSF processing in both groups, regardless of facial expression. The possibly confounding effects of medication could not be controlled. During early visual processing, patients with panic disorder prefer global to detailed information. However, in later processing, panic disorder patients overuse detailed information for the perception of facial expressions. These findings suggest that unique spatial frequency-dependent facial processing could shed light on the neural pathology associated with panic disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The attenuation of Fourier amplitudes for rock sites in eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Gail M.; Boore, David M.

    2014-01-01

    We develop an empirical model of the decay of Fourier amplitudes for earthquakes of M 3–6 recorded on rock sites in eastern North America and discuss its implications for source parameters. Attenuation at distances from 10 to 500 km may be adequately described using a bilinear model with a geometric spreading of 1/R1.3 to a transition distance of 50 km, with a geometric spreading of 1/R0.5 at greater distances. For low frequencies and distances less than 50 km, the effective geometric spreading given by the model is perturbed using a frequency‐ and hypocentral depth‐dependent factor defined in such a way as to increase amplitudes at lower frequencies near the epicenter but leave the 1 km source amplitudes unchanged. The associated anelastic attenuation is determined for each event, with an average value being given by a regional quality factor of Q=525f 0.45. This model provides a match, on average, between the known seismic moment of events and the inferred low‐frequency spectral amplitudes at R=1  km (obtained by correcting for the attenuation model). The inferred Brune stress parameters from the high‐frequency source terms are about 600 bars (60 MPa), on average, for events of M>4.5.

  3. Note: Measuring breakdown characteristics during the hot re-ignition of high intensity discharge lamps using high frequency alternating current voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bos, R A J M; Sobota, A; Manders, F; Kroesen, G M W

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the cold and hot re-ignition properties of High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps in more detail an automated setup was designed in such a way that HID lamps of various sizes and under different background pressures can be tested. The HID lamps are ignited with a ramped sinusoidal voltage signal with frequencies between 60 and 220 kHz and with amplitude up to 7.5 kV. Some initial results of voltage and current measurements on a commercially available HID lamp during hot and cold re-ignition are presented.

  4. Use of amplitude modulation cues recovered from frequency modulation for cochlear implant users when original speech cues are severely degraded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jong Ho; Shim, Hyun Joon; Lorenzi, Christian; Rubinstein, Jay T

    2014-06-01

    Won et al. (J Acoust Soc Am 132:1113-1119, 2012) reported that cochlear implant (CI) speech processors generate amplitude-modulation (AM) cues recovered from broadband speech frequency modulation (FM) and that CI users can use these cues for speech identification in quiet. The present study was designed to extend this finding for a wide range of listening conditions, where the original speech cues were severely degraded by manipulating either the acoustic signals or the speech processor. The manipulation of the acoustic signals included the presentation of background noise, simulation of reverberation, and amplitude compression. The manipulation of the speech processor included changing the input dynamic range and the number of channels. For each of these conditions, multiple levels of speech degradation were tested. Speech identification was measured for CI users and compared for stimuli having both AM and FM information (intact condition) or FM information only (FM condition). Each manipulation degraded speech identification performance for both intact and FM conditions. Performance for the intact and FM conditions became similar for stimuli having the most severe degradations. Identification performance generally overlapped for the intact and FM conditions. Moreover, identification performance for the FM condition was better than chance performance even at the maximum level of distortion. Finally, significant correlations were found between speech identification scores for the intact and FM conditions. Altogether, these results suggest that despite poor frequency selectivity, CI users can make efficient use of AM cues recovered from speech FM in difficult listening situations.

  5. High-Frequency Guided Wave Scattering by a Partly Through-Thickness Hole Based on 3D Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hai-Yan; Xu Jian; Ma Shi-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the scattering of high frequency S0 Lamb mode from a circular blind hole defect in a plate based on the 3D theory. The S0 wave is incident at the frequency above the A1 mode cut-off frequency, in which the popular approximate plate theories are inapplicable. Due to the non-symmetric blind hole defect, the scattered fields will contain higher order converted modes in addition to the fundamental S0 and A0 modes. The far-field scattering amplitudes of various propagating Lamb modes for different hole sizes are inspected. The results are compared with those of lower frequencies and some different phenomena are found. Two-dimensional Fourier transform (2DFT) results of transient scattered Lamb and SH wave signals agree well with the analytical dispersion curves, which check the validity of the solutions from another point of view. (paper)

  6. High-frequency sarcomeric auto-oscillations induced by heating in living neonatal cardiomyocytes of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shintani, Seine A.; Oyama, Kotaro [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Fukuda, Norio, E-mail: noriof@jikei.ac.jp [Department of Cell Physiology, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ishiwata, Shin’ichi, E-mail: ishiwata@waseda.jp [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); WASEDA Bioscience Research Institute in Singapore (WABIOS) (Singapore)

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • We tested the effects of infra-red laser irradiation on cardiac sarcomere dynamics. • A rise in temperature (>∼38 °C) induced high-frequency sarcomeric auto-oscillations. • These oscillations occurred with and without blockade of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores. • Cardiac sarcomeres can play a role as a temperature-dependent rhythm generator. - Abstract: In the present study, we investigated the effects of infra-red laser irradiation on sarcomere dynamics in living neonatal cardiomyocytes of the rat. A rapid increase in temperature to >∼38 °C induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-independent high-frequency (∼5–10 Hz) sarcomeric auto-oscillations (Hyperthermal Sarcomeric Oscillations; HSOs). In myocytes with the intact sarcoplasmic reticular functions, HSOs coexisted with [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent spontaneous beating in the same sarcomeres, with markedly varying frequencies (∼10 and ∼1 Hz for the former and latter, respectively). HSOs likewise occurred following blockade of the sarcoplasmic reticular functions, with the amplitude becoming larger and the frequency lower in a time-dependent manner. The present findings suggest that in the mammalian heart, sarcomeres spontaneously oscillate at higher frequencies than the sinus rhythm at temperatures slightly above the physiologically relevant levels.

  7. Determination of partition coefficients using 1 H NMR spectroscopy and time domain complete reduction to amplitude-frequency table (CRAFT) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulsby, David; Chica, Jeryl A M

    2017-08-01

    We have developed a simple, direct and novel method for the determination of partition coefficients and partitioning behavior using 1 H NMR spectroscopy combined with time domain complete reduction to amplitude-frequency tables (CRAFT). After partitioning into water and 1-octanol using standard methods, aliquots from each layer are directly analyzed using either proton or selective excitation NMR experiments. Signal amplitudes for each compound from each layer are then extracted directly from the time domain data in an automated fashion and analyzed using the CRAFT software. From these amplitudes, log P and log D 7.4 values can be calculated directly. Phase, baseline and internal standard issues, which can be problematic when Fourier transformed data are used, are unimportant when using time domain data. Furthermore, analytes can contain impurities because only a single resonance is examined and need not be UV active. Using this approach, we examined a variety of pharmaceutically relevant compounds and determined partition coefficients that are in excellent agreement with literature values. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, we also examined salicylic acid in more detail demonstrating an aggregation effect as a function of sample loading and partition coefficient behavior as a function of pH value. This method provides a valuable addition to the medicinal chemist toolbox for determining these important constants. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Hypersynchrony in MEG spectral amplitude in prospectively-identified 6-month-old infants prenatally exposed to alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of children who experience developmental delays due to prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE remains a challenge for individuals who do not exhibit facial dysmorphia. It is well-established that children with PAE may still exhibit the cognitive and behavioral difficulties, and individuals without facial dysmorphia make up the majority of individuals affected by PAE. This study employed a prospective cohort design to capture alcohol consumption patterns during pregnancy and then followed the infants to 6 months of age. Infants were assessed using magnetoencephalography to capture neurophysiological indicators of brain development and the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-III to measure behavioral development. To account for socioeconomic and family environmental factors, we employed a two-by-two design with pregnant women who were or were not using opioid maintenance therapy (OMT and did or did not consume alcohol during pregnancy. Based on prior studies, we hypothesized that infants with PAE would exhibit broad increased spectral amplitude relative to non-PAE infants. We also hypothesized that the developmental shift from low to high frequency spectral amplitude would be delayed in infants with PAE relative to controls. Our results demonstrated broadband increased spectral amplitude, interpreted as hypersynchrony, in PAE infants with no significant interaction with OMT. Unlike prior EEG studies in neonates, our results indicate that this hypersynchrony was highly lateralized to left hemisphere and primarily focused in temporal/lateral frontal regions. Furthermore, there was a significant positive correlation between estimated number of drinks consumed during pregnancy and spectral amplitude revealing a dose-response effect of increased hypersynchrony corresponding to greater alcohol consumption. Contrary to our second hypothesis, we did not see a significant group difference in the contribution of low frequency to high frequency

  9. Dust grain dynamics due to nonuniform and nonstationary high-frequency radiations in cold magnetoplasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Nekrasov

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A general nonlinear theory for low-frequency electromagnetic field generation due to high-frequency nonuniform and nonstationary electromagnetic radiations in cold, uniform, multicomponent, dusty magnetoplasmas is developed. This theory permits us to consider the nonlinear action of all waves that can exist in such plasmas. The equations are derived for the dust grain velocities in the low-frequency nonlinear electric fields arising due to the presence of electromagnetic cyclotron waves travelling along the background magnetic field. The dust grains are considered to be magnetized as well as unmagnetized. Different regimes for the dust particle dynamics, depending on the spatio-temporal change of the wave amplitudes and plasma parameters, are discussed. It is shown that induced nonlinear electric fields can have both an electrostatic and electromagnetic nature. Conditions for maximum dust acceleration are found. The results obtained may be useful for understanding the possible mechanisms of dust grain dynamics in astrophysical, cosmic and laboratory plasmas under the action of nonuniform and nonstationary electromagnetic waves.

  10. High frequency energy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotlar, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    High-frequency (> 100 MHz) energy measurements present special problems to the experimenter. Environment or available electronics often limit the applicability of a given detector type. The physical properties of many detectors are frequency dependent and in some cases, the physical effect employed can be frequency dependent. State-of-the-art measurements generally involve a detection scheme in association with high-speed electronics and a method of data recording. Events can be single or repetitive shot requiring real time, sampling, or digitizing data recording. Potential modification of the pulse by the detector and the associated electronics should not be overlooked. This presentation will review typical applications, methods of choosing a detector, and high-speed detectors. Special considerations and limitations of some applications and devices will be described

  11. Multi-frequency excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of multi-frequency excitation are described. In various embodiments, a natural frequency of a device may be determined. In turn, a first voltage amplitude and first fixed frequency of a first source of excitation can be selected

  12. Effect of high-frequency excitation on natural frequencies of spinning discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2000-01-01

    The effect of high-frequency, non-resonant parametric excitation on the low-frequency response of spinning discs is considered. The parametric excitation is obtained through a non-constant rotation speed, where the frequency of the pulsating overlay is much higher than the lowest natural frequenc......The effect of high-frequency, non-resonant parametric excitation on the low-frequency response of spinning discs is considered. The parametric excitation is obtained through a non-constant rotation speed, where the frequency of the pulsating overlay is much higher than the lowest natural...

  13. Parametric resonances in the amplitude-modulated probe-field absorption spectrum of a two-level atom driven by a resonance amplitude- and phase-modulated pumping field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushilov, N.V.; Kholodkevich, E.D.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical expression is derived for the polarization induced by a weak probe field with periodically modulated amplitude in a two-level medium saturated by a strong amplitude-and phase-modulated resonance field. It is shown that the absorption spectrum of the probe field includes parametric resonances, the maxima corresponding to the condition δ= 2nΓ-Ω w and the minima to that of δ= (2n + 1)Γ- w , where δ is the probe-field detuning front the resonance frequency, Ω w is the modulation frequency of the probe-field amplitude, and Γ is the transition line width, n = 1, 2, 3, hor-ellipsis. At the specific modulation parameters, a substantial region of negative values (i.e., the region of amplification without the population inversion) exists in the absorption spectrum of the probe field

  14. Altered spontaneous brain activity pattern in patients with high myopia using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation: a resting-state fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang X

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Xin Huang,1,2,* Fu-Qing Zhou,3,* Yu-Xiang Hu,1 Xiao-Xuan Xu,1 Xiong Zhou,4 Yu-Lin Zhong,1 Jun Wang,4 Xiao-Rong Wu1 1Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The First People’s Hospital of Jiujiang City, Jiujiang, 3Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi Province Medical Imaging Research Institute, 4Second Department of Respiratory Disease, Jiangxi Provincial People’s Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Many previous reports have demonstrated significant neural anatomy changes in the brain of high myopic (HM patients, whereas the spontaneous brain activity changes in the HM patients at rest are not well studied. Our objective was to use amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF method to investigate the changes in spontaneous brain activity in HM patients and their relationships with clinical features. Methods: A total of 38 patients with HM (17 males and 21 females and 38 healthy controls (HCs (17 males and 21 females closely matched in age, sex, and education underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The ALFF method was used to assess local features of spontaneous brain activity. The relationship between the mean ALFF signal values in many brain regions and the clinical features in HM patients was calculated by correlation analysis. Results: Compared with HCs, the HM patients had significantly lower ALFF in the right inferior and middle temporal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus/putamen, right inferior frontal gyrus/putamen/insula, right middle frontal gyrus, and right inferior parietal lobule and higher ALFF values in the bilateral midcingulate cortex, left postcentral gyrus, and left precuneus/inferior parietal lobule. However, no relationship was found between the mean ALFF

  15. Geographies of High Frequency Trading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the geographies of high frequency trading. Today shares shift hands within micro seconds, giving rise to a form of financial geographies termed algorithmic capitalism. This notion refers to the different spatio-temporalities produced by high frequency trading, under...... the valuation of time. As high frequency trading accelerates financial markets, the paper examines the spatio-temporalities of automated trading by the ways in which the speed of knowledge exploitation in financial markets is not only of interest, but also the expansion between different temporalities....... The paper demonstrates how the intensification of time-space compression produces radical new dynamics in the financial market and develops information rent in HFT as convertible to a time rent and a spatio-temporal rent. The final section discusses whether high frequency trading only responds to crises...

  16. Amplitude Modulation in the δ Sct star KIC 7106205

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowman Dominic. M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The δ Sct star KIC 7106205 showed amplitude modulation in a single p mode, whilst all other p and g modes remained stable in amplitude and phase over 1470 d of the Kepler dataset. The data were divided into 30 time bins of equal length and a series of consecutive Fourier transforms was calculated. A fixed frequency, calculated from a least-squares fit of all data, allowed amplitude and phase for every mode in each time bin to be tracked. The missing p mode energy was not transferred to any other visible modes.

  17. Structured waves near the plasma frequency observed in three auroral rocket flights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Samara

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of waves at and just above the plasma frequency (fpe from three high frequency electric field experiments on three recent rockets launched to altitudes of 300–900 km in active aurora. The predominant observed HF waves just above fpe are narrowband, short-lived emissions with amplitudes ranging from <1 mV/m to 20 mV/m, often associated with structured electron density. The nature of these HF waves, as determined from frequency-time spectrograms, is highly variable: in some cases, the frequency decreases monotonically with time as in the "HF-chirps" previously reported (McAdams and LaBelle, 1999, but in other cases rising frequencies are observed, or features which alternately rise and fall in frequency. They exhibit two timescales of amplitude variation: a short timescale, typically 50–100 ms, associated with individual discrete features, and a longer timescale associated with the general decrease in the amplitudes of the emissions as the rocket moves away from where the condition f~fpe holds. The latter timescale ranges from 0.6 to 6.0 s, corresponding to distances of 2–7 km, assuming the phenomenon to be stationary and using the rocket velocity to convert time to distance.

  18. Development and Application of Plasma Actuators for Active Control of High-Speed and High Reynolds Number Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammy, Mo

    2010-01-01

    Active flow control is often used to manipulate flow instabilities to achieve a desired goal (e.g. prevent separation, enhance mixing, reduce noise, etc.). Instability frequencies normally scale with flow velocity scale and inversely with flow length scale (U/l). In a laboratory setting for such flow experiments, U is high, but l is low, resulting in high instability frequency. In addition, high momentum and high background noise & turbulence in the flow necessitate high amplitude actuation. Developing a high amplitude and high frequency actuator is a major challenge. Ironically, these requirements ease up in application (but other issues arise).

  19. Mixed Stimulus-Induced Mode Selection in Neural Activity Driven by High and Low Frequency Current under Electromagnetic Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrical activities of neurons are dependent on the complex electrophysiological condition in neuronal system, the three-variable Hindmarsh-Rose (HR neuron model is improved to describe the dynamical behaviors of neuronal activities with electromagnetic induction being considered, and the mode transition of electrical activities in neuron is detected when external electromagnetic radiation is imposed on the neuron. In this paper, different types of electrical stimulus impended with a high-low frequency current are imposed on new HR neuron model, and mixed stimulus-induced mode selection in neural activity is discussed in detail. It is found that mode selection of electrical activities stimulated by high-low frequency current, which also changes the excitability of neuron, can be triggered owing to adding the Gaussian white noise. Meanwhile, the mode selection of the neuron electrical activity is much dependent on the amplitude B of the high frequency current under the same noise intensity, and the high frequency response is selected preferentially by applying appropriate parameters and noise intensity. Our results provide insights into the transmission of complex signals in nerve system, which is valuable in engineering prospective applications such as information encoding.

  20. Decoding a combined amplitude modulated and frequency modulated signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a method for decoding a combined AM/FM encoded signal, comprising the steps of: combining said encoded optical signal with light from a local oscillator configured with a local oscillator frequency; converting the combined local oscillator and encoded optical...... signal into one or more electrical signals by means of at least one opto-electrical converter having a predefined frequency bandwidth, thereby providing an amplified and encoded electrical signal having one or more encoded signal current(s), where one type of states have a higher oscillation frequency...... than other type of states; rectifying the encoded signal current(s), thereby obtaining an encoded power spectrum, wherein said power spectrum has different states, such as "0"-states and "1"-states, with different power levels such that they can be discriminated, said local oscillator frequency...

  1. Low and High-Frequency Field Potentials of Cortical Networks ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural networks grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have become an important, high content in vitro assay for assessing neuronal function. MEA experiments typically examine high- frequency (HF) (>200 Hz) spikes, and bursts which can be used to discriminate between different pharmacological agents/chemicals. However, normal brain activity is additionally composed of integrated low-frequency (0.5-100 Hz) field potentials (LFPs) which are filtered out of MEA recordings. The objective of this study was to characterize the relationship between HF and LFP neural network signals, and to assess the relative sensitivity of LFPs to selected neurotoxicants. Rat primary cortical cultures were grown on glass, single-well MEA chips. Spontaneous activity was sampled at 25 kHz and recorded (5 min) (Multi-Channel Systems) from mature networks (14 days in vitro). HF (spike, mean firing rate, MFR) and LF (power spectrum, amplitude) components were extracted from each network and served as its baseline (BL). Next, each chip was treated with either 1) a positive control, bicuculline (BIC, 25μM) or domoic acid (DA, 0.3μM), 2) or a negative control, acetaminophen (ACE, 100μM) or glyphosate (GLY, 100μM), 3) a solvent control (H2O or DMSO:EtOH), or 4) a neurotoxicant, (carbaryl, CAR 5, 30μM ; lindane, LIN 1, 10μM; permethrin, PERM 25, 50μM; triadimefon, TRI 5, 65μM). Post treatment, 5 mins of spontaneous activity was recorded and analyzed. As expected posit

  2. High Frequency Variations of Earth Rotation Parameters from GPS and GLONASS Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhu Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Earth’s rotation undergoes changes with the influence of geophysical factors, such as Earth’s surface fluid mass redistribution of the atmosphere, ocean and hydrology. However, variations of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP are still not well understood, particularly the short-period variations (e.g., diurnal and semi-diurnal variations and their causes. In this paper, the hourly time series of Earth Rotation Parameters are estimated using Global Positioning System (GPS, Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS, and combining GPS and GLONASS data collected from nearly 80 sites from 1 November 2012 to 10 April 2014. These new observations with combining different satellite systems can help to decorrelate orbit biases and ERP, which improve estimation of ERP. The high frequency variations of ERP are analyzed using a de-trending method. The maximum of total diurnal and semidiurnal variations are within one milli-arcseconds (mas in Polar Motion (PM and 0.5 milli-seconds (ms in UT1-UTC. The semidiurnal and diurnal variations are mainly related to the ocean tides. Furthermore, the impacts of satellite orbit and time interval used to determinate ERP on the amplitudes of tidal terms are analyzed. We obtain some small terms that are not described in the ocean tide model of the IERS Conventions 2010, which may be caused by the strategies and models we used or the signal noises as well as artifacts. In addition, there are also small differences on the amplitudes between our results and IERS convention. This might be a result of other geophysical excitations, such as the high-frequency variations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM and hydrological angular momentum (HAM, which needs more detailed analysis with more geophysical data in the future.

  3. Interferometric Imaging Directly with Closure Phases and Closure Amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chael, Andrew A.; Johnson, Michael D.; Bouman, Katherine L.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; Akiyama, Kazunori; Narayan, Ramesh

    2018-04-01

    Interferometric imaging now achieves angular resolutions as fine as ∼10 μas, probing scales that are inaccessible to single telescopes. Traditional synthesis imaging methods require calibrated visibilities; however, interferometric calibration is challenging, especially at high frequencies. Nevertheless, most studies present only a single image of their data after a process of “self-calibration,” an iterative procedure where the initial image and calibration assumptions can significantly influence the final image. We present a method for efficient interferometric imaging directly using only closure amplitudes and closure phases, which are immune to station-based calibration errors. Closure-only imaging provides results that are as noncommittal as possible and allows for reconstructing an image independently from separate amplitude and phase self-calibration. While closure-only imaging eliminates some image information (e.g., the total image flux density and the image centroid), this information can be recovered through a small number of additional constraints. We demonstrate that closure-only imaging can produce high-fidelity results, even for sparse arrays such as the Event Horizon Telescope, and that the resulting images are independent of the level of systematic amplitude error. We apply closure imaging to VLBA and ALMA data and show that it is capable of matching or exceeding the performance of traditional self-calibration and CLEAN for these data sets.

  4. Strain amplitude-dependent anelasticity in Cu-Ni solid solution due to thermally activated and athermal dislocation-point obstacle interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustov, S.; Gremaud, G.; Benoit, W.; Golyandin, S.; Sapozhnikov, K.; Nishino, Y.; Asano, S.

    1999-02-01

    Experimental investigations of the internal friction and the Young's modulus defect in single crystals of Cu-(1.3-7.6) at. % Ni have been performed for 7-300 K over a wide range of oscillatory strain amplitudes. Extensive data have been obtained at a frequency of vibrations around 100 kHz and compared with the results obtained for the same crystals at a frequency of ˜1 kHz. The strain amplitude dependence of the anelastic strain amplitude and the average friction stress acting on a dislocation due to solute atoms are also analyzed. Several stages in the strain amplitude dependence of the internal friction and the Young's modulus defect are revealed for all of the alloy compositions, at different temperatures and in different frequency ranges. For the 100 kHz frequency, low temperatures and low strain amplitudes (˜10-7-10-5), the amplitude-dependent internal friction and the Young's modulus defect are essentially temperature independent, and are ascribed to a purely hysteretic internal friction component. At higher strain amplitudes, a transition stage and a steep strain amplitude dependence of the internal friction and the Young's modulus defect are observed, followed by saturation at the highest strain amplitudes employed. These stages are temperature and frequency dependent and are assumed to be due to thermally activated motion of dislocations. We suggest that the observed regularities in the entire strain amplitude, temperature and frequency ranges correspond to a motion of dislocations in a two-component system of obstacles: weak but long-range ones, due to the elastic interaction of dislocations with solute atoms distributed in the bulk of the crystal; and strong short-range ones, due to the interaction of dislocations with solute atoms distributed close to dislocation glide planes. Based on these assumptions, a qualitative explanation is given for the variety of experimental observations.

  5. Anomalous resistivity due to low-frequency turbulence. [of collisionless plasma with limited acceleration of high velocity runaway electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, H. L.; Palmadesso, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    Large amplitude ion cyclotron waves have been observed on auroral field lines. In the presence of an electric field parallel to the ambient magnetic field these waves prevent the acceleration of the bulk of the plasma electrons leading to the formation of a runaway tail. It is shown that low-frequency turbulence can also limit the acceleration of high-velocity runaway electrons via pitch angle scattering at the anomalous Doppler resonance.

  6. High-Amplitude, Rapid Photometric Variation of the New Polar Master OT J132104.0+560957.8

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-05

    HIGH-AMPLITUDE, RAPID PHOTOMETRIC VARIATION OF THE NEW POLAR MASTER OT J132104.04+560957.8 LITTLEFIELD, COLIN;1,2 GARNAVICH, PETER;1 MAGNO, KATRINA;1...18.5 during each photometric cycle, becoming so faint that we could no longer detect it. The data showed a period of roughly 91 minutes with each...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High-Amplitude, Rapid Photometric Variation Of The New Polar Master OT

  7. Amplitude-dependent topological edge states in nonlinear phononic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Raj Kumar; Vila, Javier; Leamy, Michael; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates the effect of nonlinearities on topologically protected edge states in one- and two-dimensional phononic lattices. We first show that localized modes arise at the interface between two spring-mass chains that are inverted copies of each other. Explicit expressions derived for the frequencies of the localized modes guide the study of the effect of cubic nonlinearities on the resonant characteristics of the interface, which are shown to be described by a Duffing-like equation. Nonlinearities produce amplitude-dependent frequency shifts, which in the case of a softening nonlinearity cause the localized mode to migrate to the bulk spectrum. The case of a hexagonal lattice implementing a phononic analog of a crystal exhibiting the quantum spin Hall effect is also investigated in the presence of weakly nonlinear cubic springs. An asymptotic analysis provides estimates of the amplitude dependence of the localized modes, while numerical simulations illustrate how the lattice response transitions from bulk-to-edge mode-dominated by varying the excitation amplitude. In contrast with the interface mode of the first example studies, this occurs both for hardening and softening springs. The results of this study provide a theoretical framework for the investigation of nonlinear effects that induce and control topologically protected wave modes through nonlinear interactions and amplitude tuning.

  8. Phase-amplitude coupling supports phase coding in human ECoG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrous, Andrew J; Deuker, Lorena; Fell, Juergen; Axmacher, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that high-frequency activity (HFA) is modulated by the phase of low-frequency activity. This phenomenon of phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is often interpreted as reflecting phase coding of neural representations, although evidence for this link is still lacking in humans. Here, we show that PAC indeed supports phase-dependent stimulus representations for categories. Six patients with medication-resistant epilepsy viewed images of faces, tools, houses, and scenes during simultaneous acquisition of intracranial recordings. Analyzing 167 electrodes, we observed PAC at 43% of electrodes. Further inspection of PAC revealed that category specific HFA modulations occurred at different phases and frequencies of the underlying low-frequency rhythm, permitting decoding of categorical information using the phase at which HFA events occurred. These results provide evidence for categorical phase-coded neural representations and are the first to show that PAC coincides with phase-dependent coding in the human brain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07886.001 PMID:26308582

  9. Two Photon Distribution Amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Beiyad, M.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2008-01-01

    The factorization of the amplitude of the process γ*γ→γγ in the low energy and high photon virtuality region is demonstrated at the Born order and in the leading logarithmic approximation. The leading order two photon (generalized) distribution amplitudes exhibit a characteristic ln Q 2 behaviour and obey new inhomogeneous evolution equations

  10. Rydberg-atom based radio-frequency electrometry using frequency modulation spectroscopy in room temperature vapor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Kübler, Harald; Jahangiri, Akbar J; Shaffer, James P

    2017-04-17

    Rydberg atom-based electrometry enables traceable electric field measurements with high sensitivity over a large frequency range, from gigahertz to terahertz. Such measurements are particularly useful for the calibration of radio frequency and terahertz devices, as well as other applications like near field imaging of electric fields. We utilize frequency modulated spectroscopy with active control of residual amplitude modulation to improve the signal to noise ratio of the optical readout of Rydberg atom-based radio frequency electrometry. Matched filtering of the signal is also implemented. Although we have reached similarly, high sensitivity with other read-out methods, frequency modulated spectroscopy is advantageous because it is well-suited for building a compact, portable sensor. In the current experiment, ∼3 µV cm-1 Hz-1/2 sensitivity is achieved and is found to be photon shot noise limited.

  11. Dopamine Modulates Delta-Gamma Phase-Amplitude Coupling in the Prefrontal Cortex of Behaving Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino-Pavlovsky, Victoria; Souza, Annie C.; Scheffer-Teixeira, Robson; Tort, Adriano B. L.; Etchenique, Roberto; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine release and phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling (CFC) have independently been implicated in prefrontal cortex (PFC) functioning. To causally investigate whether dopamine release affects phase-amplitude comodulation between different frequencies in local field potentials (LFP) recorded from the medial PFC (mPFC) of behaving rats, we used RuBiDopa, a light-sensitive caged compound that releases the neurotransmitter dopamine when irradiated with visible light. LFP power did not change in any frequency band after the application of light-uncaged dopamine, but significantly strengthened phase-amplitude comodulation between delta and gamma oscillations. Saline did not exert significant changes, while injections of dopamine and RuBiDopa produced a slow increase in comodulation for several minutes after the injection. The results show that dopamine release in the medial PFC shifts phase-amplitude comodulation from theta-gamma to delta-gamma. Although being preliminary results due to the limitation of the low number of animals present in this study, our findings suggest that dopamine-mediated modification of the frequencies involved in comodulation could be a mechanism by which this neurotransmitter regulates functioning in mPFC. PMID:28536507

  12. High-frequency source radiation during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, Japan, inferred from KiK-net strong-motion seismograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Pulido, Nelson; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Aoi, Shin

    2013-01-01

    investigate source processes of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, we utilized a source location method using high-frequency (5-10 Hz) seismic amplitudes. In this method, we assumed far-field isotropic radiation of S waves, and conducted a spatial grid search to find the best fitting source locations along the subducted slab in each successive time window. Our application of the method to the Tohoku-Oki earthquake resulted in artifact source locations at shallow depths near the trench caused by limited station coverage and noise effects. We then assumed various source node distributions along the plate, and found that the observed seismograms were most reasonably explained when assuming deep source nodes. This result suggests that the high-frequency seismic waves were radiated at deeper depths during the earthquake, a feature which is consistent with results obtained from teleseismic back-projection and strong-motion source model studies. We identified three high-frequency subevents, and compared them with the moment-rate function estimated from low-frequency seismograms. Our comparison indicated that no significant moment release occurred during the first high-frequency subevent and the largest moment-release pulse occurred almost simultaneously with the second high-frequency subevent. We speculated that the initial slow rupture propagated bilaterally from the hypocenter toward the land and trench. The landward subshear rupture propagation consisted of three successive high-frequency subevents. The trenchward propagation ruptured the strong asperity and released the largest moment near the trench.

  13. Amplitude various angles (AVA) phenomena in thin layer reservoir: Case study of various reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B., E-mail: bagusnur@bdg.centrin.net.id, E-mail: bagusnur@rock-fluid.com [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Basic Science Center A 4" t" hfloor, Physics Dept., FMIPA, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Bandung (Indonesia); Susilowati, E-mail: bagusnur@bdg.centrin.net.id, E-mail: bagusnur@rock-fluid.com [Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    Amplitude various offset is widely used in petroleum exploration as well as in petroleum development field. Generally, phenomenon of amplitude in various angles assumes reservoir’s layer is quite thick. It also means that the wave is assumed as a very high frequency. But, in natural condition, the seismic wave is band limited and has quite low frequency. Therefore, topic about amplitude various angles in thin layer reservoir as well as low frequency assumption is important to be considered. Thin layer reservoir means the thickness of reservoir is about or less than quarter of wavelength. In this paper, I studied about the reflection phenomena in elastic wave which considering interference from thin layer reservoir and transmission wave. I applied Zoeppritz equation for modeling reflected wave of top reservoir, reflected wave of bottom reservoir, and also transmission elastic wave of reservoir. Results show that the phenomena of AVA in thin layer reservoir are frequency dependent. Thin layer reservoir causes interference between reflected wave of top reservoir and reflected wave of bottom reservoir. These phenomena are frequently neglected, however, in real practices. Even though, the impact of inattention in interference phenomena caused by thin layer in AVA may cause inaccurate reservoir characterization. The relation between classes of AVA reservoir and reservoir’s character are different when effect of ones in thin reservoir and ones in thick reservoir are compared. In this paper, I present some AVA phenomena including its cross plot in various thin reservoir types based on some rock physics data of Indonesia.

  14. Amplitude various angles (AVA) phenomena in thin layer reservoir: Case study of various reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    thfloor, Physics Dept., FMIPA, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Bandung (Indonesia))" data-affiliation=" (Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Basic Science Center A 4thfloor, Physics Dept., FMIPA, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Bandung (Indonesia))" >Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Susilowati

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude various offset is widely used in petroleum exploration as well as in petroleum development field. Generally, phenomenon of amplitude in various angles assumes reservoir’s layer is quite thick. It also means that the wave is assumed as a very high frequency. But, in natural condition, the seismic wave is band limited and has quite low frequency. Therefore, topic about amplitude various angles in thin layer reservoir as well as low frequency assumption is important to be considered. Thin layer reservoir means the thickness of reservoir is about or less than quarter of wavelength. In this paper, I studied about the reflection phenomena in elastic wave which considering interference from thin layer reservoir and transmission wave. I applied Zoeppritz equation for modeling reflected wave of top reservoir, reflected wave of bottom reservoir, and also transmission elastic wave of reservoir. Results show that the phenomena of AVA in thin layer reservoir are frequency dependent. Thin layer reservoir causes interference between reflected wave of top reservoir and reflected wave of bottom reservoir. These phenomena are frequently neglected, however, in real practices. Even though, the impact of inattention in interference phenomena caused by thin layer in AVA may cause inaccurate reservoir characterization. The relation between classes of AVA reservoir and reservoir’s character are different when effect of ones in thin reservoir and ones in thick reservoir are compared. In this paper, I present some AVA phenomena including its cross plot in various thin reservoir types based on some rock physics data of Indonesia

  15. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuation abnormalities in adolescents with online gaming addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai; Jin, Chenwang; Cheng, Ping; Yang, Xuejuan; Dong, Tao; Bi, Yanzhi; Xing, Lihong; von Deneen, Karen M; Yu, Dahua; Liu, Junyu; Liang, Jun; Cheng, Tingting; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    The majority of previous neuroimaging studies have demonstrated both structural and task-related functional abnormalities in adolescents with online gaming addiction (OGA). However, few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies focused on the regional intensity of spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) during the resting state and fewer studies investigated the relationship between the abnormal resting-state properties and the impaired cognitive control ability. In the present study, we employed the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) method to explore the local features of spontaneous brain activity in adolescents with OGA and healthy controls during resting-state. Eighteen adolescents with OGA and 18 age-, education- and gender-matched healthy volunteers participated in this study. Compared with healthy controls, adolescents with OGA showed a significant increase in ALFF values in the left medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), the left precuneus, the left supplementary motor area (SMA), the right parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) and the bilateral middle cingulate cortex (MCC). The abnormalities of these regions were also detected in previous addiction studies. More importantly, we found that ALFF values of the left medial OFC and left precuneus were positively correlated with the duration of OGA in adolescents with OGA. The ALFF values of the left medial OFC were also correlated with the color-word Stroop test performance. Our results suggested that the abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of OGA.

  16. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuation abnormalities in adolescents with online gaming addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yuan

    Full Text Available The majority of previous neuroimaging studies have demonstrated both structural and task-related functional abnormalities in adolescents with online gaming addiction (OGA. However, few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies focused on the regional intensity of spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD during the resting state and fewer studies investigated the relationship between the abnormal resting-state properties and the impaired cognitive control ability. In the present study, we employed the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF method to explore the local features of spontaneous brain activity in adolescents with OGA and healthy controls during resting-state. Eighteen adolescents with OGA and 18 age-, education- and gender-matched healthy volunteers participated in this study. Compared with healthy controls, adolescents with OGA showed a significant increase in ALFF values in the left medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, the left precuneus, the left supplementary motor area (SMA, the right parahippocampal gyrus (PHG and the bilateral middle cingulate cortex (MCC. The abnormalities of these regions were also detected in previous addiction studies. More importantly, we found that ALFF values of the left medial OFC and left precuneus were positively correlated with the duration of OGA in adolescents with OGA. The ALFF values of the left medial OFC were also correlated with the color-word Stroop test performance. Our results suggested that the abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of OGA.

  17. Binaural beats at high frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, D; Pasanen, E G

    1975-10-24

    Binaural beats have long been believed to be audible only at low frequencies, but an interaction reminiscent of a binaural beat can sometimes be heard when different two-tone complexes of high frequency are presented to the two ears. The primary requirement is that the frequency separation in the complex at one ear be slightly different from that in the other--that is, that there be a small interaural difference in the envelope periodicities. This finding is in accord with other recent demonstrations that the auditory system is not deaf to interaural time differences at high frequencies.

  18. Servo-controlled pneumatic pressure oscillator for respiratory impedance measurements and high-frequency ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczka, David W; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2004-04-01

    The ability to provide forced oscillatory excitation of the respiratory system can be useful in mechanical impedance measurements as well as high frequency ventilation (HFV). Experimental systems currently used for generating forced oscillations are limited in their ability to provide high amplitude flows or maintain the respiratory system at a constant mean pressure during excitation. This paper presents the design and implementation of a pneumatic pressure oscillator based on a proportional solenoid valve. The device is capable of providing forced oscillatory excitations to the respiratory system over a bandwidth suitable for mechanical impedance measurements and HVF. It delivers high amplitude flows (> 1.4 l/s) and utilizes a servo-control mechanism to maintain a load at a fixed mean pressure during simultaneous oscillation. Under open-loop conditions, the device exhibited a static hysteresis of approximately 7%, while its dynamic magnitude and phase responses were flat out to 10 Hz. Broad-band measurement of total harmonic distortion was approximately 19%. Under closed-loop conditions, the oscillator was able to maintain a mechanical test load at both positive and negative mean pressures during oscillatory excitations from 0.1 to 10.0 Hz. Impedance of the test load agreed closely with theoretical predictions. We conclude that this servo-controlled oscillator can be a useful tool for respiratory impedance measurements as well as HFV.

  19. Anterior Thalamic High Frequency Band Activity Is Coupled with Theta Oscillations at Rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Sweeney-Reed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cross-frequency coupling (CFC between slow and fast brain rhythms, in the form of phase–amplitude coupling (PAC, is proposed to enable the coordination of neural oscillatory activity required for cognitive processing. PAC has been identified in the neocortex and mesial temporal regions, varying according to the cognitive task being performed and also at rest. PAC has also been observed in the anterior thalamic nucleus (ATN during memory processing. The thalamus is active during the resting state and has been proposed to be involved in switching between task-free cognitive states such as rest, in which attention is internally-focused, and externally-focused cognitive states, in which an individual engages with environmental stimuli. It is unknown whether PAC is an ongoing phenomenon during the resting state in the ATN, which is modulated during different cognitive states, or whether it only arises during the performance of specific tasks. We analyzed electrophysiological recordings of ATN activity during rest from seven patients who received thalamic electrodes implanted for treatment of pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy. PAC was identified between theta (4–6 Hz phase and high frequency band (80–150 Hz amplitude during rest in all seven patients, which diminished during engagement in tasks involving an external focus of attention. The findings are consistent with the proposal that theta–gamma coupling in the ATN is an ongoing phenomenon, which is modulated by task performance.

  20. Effects of the amplitude and frequency of salinity fluctuations on antioxidant responses in juvenile tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khairnar, S.A.; Tian, X.; Dong, S.; Fang, Z.; Solanki, B.V.; Shanthanagouda, H.A.

    2016-11-01

    To understand the tolerance of tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis, to varying salinities, the effects of the amplitude (2, 4, 6 and 8 g/L) and frequency (2, 4 and 8 days) of salinity fluctuations on the activities of antioxidant responses, including acidic phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) from antioxidant system in liver, muscle, gills and kidney were investigated in this study. The results showed that the antioxidant responses of tongue sole were highly tissue-specific during the varying salinity fluctuations. In all tissues, ACP and AKP activity was found to be highest at moderate salinity fluctuations compared to the control, low and high salinity treatments (p<0.05). SOD and CAT activities had significant effect due to salinity fluctuations in all tissues (p<0.05), except in hepatic and renal tissues. Variations in branchial SOD activity proved that salinity fluctuations had greater impact on tongue sole at moderate and high fluctuating salinities compared to the control and low fluctuating salinities, whereas the branchial CAT activities showed contrasting trend. Further, cortisol levels were significantly affected in lower and higher salinity fluctuations. However, plasma cortisol levels remained low in moderate salinity fluctuations and control (p<0.05). Taken together, the results indicated that salinity fluctuations could effectively stimulate and enhance the antioxidant enzyme activity in the liver, kidney, gills and muscle of the juvenile tongue sole, thus effectively eliminating the excessive reactive oxygen species and minimizing the body damage in tongue sole or could be for any other euryhaline teleosts. (Author)

  1. ALMA High Frequency Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J. D.; Mason, B.; Impellizzeri, V.; Kameno, S.; Fomalont, E.; Chibueze, J.; Takahashi, S.; Remijan, A.; Wilson, C.; ALMA Science Team

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the ALMA High Frequency Campaign is to improve the quality and efficiency of science observing in Bands 8, 9, and 10 (385-950 GHz), the highest frequencies available to the ALMA project. To this end, we outline observing modes which we have demonstrated to improve high frequency calibration for the 12m array and the ACA, and we present the calibration of the total power antennas at these frequencies. Band-to-band (B2B) transfer and bandwidth switching (BWSW), techniques which improve the speed and accuracy of calibration at the highest frequencies, are most necessary in Bands 8, 9, and 10 due to the rarity of strong calibrators. These techniques successfully enable increased signal-to-noise on the calibrator sources (and better calibration solutions) by measuring the calibrators at lower frequencies (B2B) or in wider bandwidths (BWSW) compared to the science target. We have also demonstrated the stability of the bandpass shape to better than 2.4% for 1 hour, hidden behind random noise, in Band 9. Finally, total power observing using the dual sideband receivers in Bands 9 and 10 requires the separation of the two sidebands; this procedure has been demonstrated in Band 9 and is undergoing further testing in Band 10.

  2. Calculation of the real part of the nuclear amplitude at high s and small t from the Coulomb amplitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauron, P.; Nicolescu, B. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Theory Group, Lab. de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies (LPNHE), CNRS 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    A new method for the determination of the real part of the elastic scattering amplitude is examined for high energy proton-proton at small momentum transfer. This method allows us to decrease the number of model assumptions, to obtain the real part in a narrow region of momentum transfer and to test different models. The possible non-exponential behavior of the real part was found on the base of the analysis of the ISR experimental data. (authors)

  3. Neurokinin B receptor antagonism decreases luteinising hormone pulse frequency and amplitude and delays puberty onset in the female rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S Y; Li, X F; Hu, M H; Shao, B; Poston, L; Lightman, S L; O'Byrne, K T

    2014-08-01

    The neural mechanisms controlling puberty onset remain enigmatic. Humans with loss of function mutations in TAC3 or TACR3, the genes encoding neurokinin B (NKB) or its receptor, neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R), respectively, present with severe congenital gonadotrophin deficiency and pubertal failure. Animal studies have shown ambiguous actions of NKB-NK3R signalling with respect to controlling puberty onset. The present study aimed to determine the role of endogenous NKB-NK3R signalling in the control of pulsatile luteinising hormone (LH) secretion and the timing of puberty onset, and also whether precocious pubertal onset as a result of an obesogenic diet is similarly regulated by this neuropeptide system. Prepubertal female rats, chronically implanted with i.c.v. cannulae, were administered SB222200, a NK3R antagonist, or artificial cerebrospinal fluid via an osmotic mini-pump for 14 days. SB222200 significantly delayed the onset of vaginal opening and first oestrus (as markers of puberty) compared to controls in both normal and high-fat diet fed animals. Additionally, serial blood sampling, via chronic indwelling cardiac catheters, revealed that the increase in LH pulse frequency was delayed and that the LH pulse amplitude was reduced in response to NK3R antagonism, regardless of dietary status. These data suggest that endogenous NKB-NK3R signalling plays a role in controlling the timing of puberty and the associated acceleration of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone pulse generator frequency in the female rat. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  4. Smart wing rotation and trailing-edge vortices enable high frequency mosquito flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomphrey, Richard J.; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Phillips, Nathan; Walker, Simon M.

    2017-03-01

    Mosquitoes exhibit unusual wing kinematics; their long, slender wings flap at remarkably high frequencies for their size (>800 Hz)and with lower stroke amplitudes than any other insect group. This shifts weight support away from the translation-dominated, aerodynamic mechanisms used by most insects, as well as by helicopters and aeroplanes, towards poorly understood rotational mechanisms that occur when pitching at the end of each half-stroke. Here we report free-flight mosquito wing kinematics, solve the full Navier-Stokes equations using computational fluid dynamics with overset grids, and validate our results with in vivo flow measurements. We show that, although mosquitoes use familiar separated flow patterns, much of the aerodynamic force that supports their weight is generated in a manner unlike any previously described for a flying animal. There are three key features: leading-edge vortices (a well-known mechanism that appears to be almost ubiquitous in insect flight), trailing-edge vortices caused by a form of wake capture at stroke reversal, and rotational drag. The two new elements are largely independent of the wing velocity, instead relying on rapid changes in the pitch angle (wing rotation) at the end of each half-stroke, and they are therefore relatively immune to the shallow flapping amplitude. Moreover, these mechanisms are particularly well suited to high aspect ratio mosquito wings.

  5. Seismic imaging of the shallow subsurface with high frequency seismic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaelin, B.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1998-07-01

    Elastic wave propagation in highly heterogeneous media is investigated and theoretical calculations and field measurements are presented. In the first part the dynamic composite elastic medium (DYCEM) theory is derived for one-dimensional stratified media. A self-consistent method using the scattering functions of the individual layers is formulated, which allows the calculation of phase velocity, attenuation and waveform. In the second part the DYCEM theory has been generalized for three-dimensional inclusions. The specific case of spherical inclusions is calculated with the exact scattering functions and compared with several low frequency approximations. In the third part log and VSP data of partially water saturated tuffs in the Yucca Mountain region of Nevada are analyzed. The anomalous slow seismic velocities can be explained by combining self-consistent theories for pores and cracks. The fourth part analyzes an air injection experiment in a shallow fractured limestone, which has shown large effects on the amplitude, but small effects on the travel time of the transmitted seismic waves. The large amplitude decrease during the experiment is mainly due to the impedance contrast between the small velocities of gas-water mixtures inside the fracture and the formation. The slow velocities inside the fracture allow an estimation of aperture and gas concentration profiles

  6. Langevin modelling of high-frequency Hang-Seng index data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lei-Han

    2003-06-01

    Accurate statistical characterization of financial time series, such as compound stock indices, foreign currency exchange rates, etc., is fundamental to investment risk management, pricing of derivative products and financial decision making. Traditionally, such data were analyzed and modeled from a purely statistics point of view, with little concern on the specifics of financial markets. Increasingly, however, attention has been paid to the underlying economic forces and the collective behavior of investors. Here we summarize a novel approach to the statistical modeling of a major stock index (the Hang Seng index). Based on mathematical results previously derived in the fluid turbulence literature, we show that a Langevin equation with a variable noise amplitude correctly reproduces the ubiquitous fat tails in the probability distribution of intra-day price moves. The form of the Langevin equation suggests that, despite the extremely complex nature of financial concerns and investment strategies at the individual's level, there exist simple universal rules governing the high-frequency price move in a stock market.

  7. WEATHER ON OTHER WORLDS. III. A SURVEY FOR T DWARFS WITH HIGH-AMPLITUDE OPTICAL VARIABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinze, Aren N.; Metchev, Stanimir; Kellogg, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    We have monitored 12 T dwarfs with the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope using an F814W filter (0.7-0.95 μm) to place in context the remarkable 10%-20% variability exhibited by the nearby T dwarf Luhman 16B in this wavelength regime. The motivation was the poorly known red optical behavior of T dwarfs, which have been monitored almost exclusively at infrared wavelengths, where variability amplitudes greater than 10% have been found to be very rare. We detect highly significant variability in two T dwarfs. The T2.5 dwarf 2MASS 13243559+6358284 shows consistent ∼17% variability on two consecutive nights. The T2 dwarf 2MASS J16291840+0335371 exhibits ∼10% variability that may evolve from night to night, similarly to Luhman 16B. Both objects were previously known to be variable in the infrared, but with considerably lower amplitudes. We also find evidence for variability in the T6 dwarf J162414.37+002915.6, but since it has lower significance, we conservatively refrain from claiming this object as a variable. We explore and rule out various telluric effects, demonstrating that the variations we detect are astrophysically real. We suggest that high-amplitude photometric variability for T dwarfs is likely more common in the red optical than at longer wavelengths. The two new members of the growing class of high-amplitude variable T dwarfs offer excellent prospects for further study of cloud structures and their evolution

  8. WEATHER ON OTHER WORLDS. III. A SURVEY FOR T DWARFS WITH HIGH-AMPLITUDE OPTICAL VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinze, Aren N.; Metchev, Stanimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Kellogg, Kendra, E-mail: aren.heinze@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: smetchev@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2015-03-10

    We have monitored 12 T dwarfs with the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope using an F814W filter (0.7-0.95 μm) to place in context the remarkable 10%-20% variability exhibited by the nearby T dwarf Luhman 16B in this wavelength regime. The motivation was the poorly known red optical behavior of T dwarfs, which have been monitored almost exclusively at infrared wavelengths, where variability amplitudes greater than 10% have been found to be very rare. We detect highly significant variability in two T dwarfs. The T2.5 dwarf 2MASS 13243559+6358284 shows consistent ∼17% variability on two consecutive nights. The T2 dwarf 2MASS J16291840+0335371 exhibits ∼10% variability that may evolve from night to night, similarly to Luhman 16B. Both objects were previously known to be variable in the infrared, but with considerably lower amplitudes. We also find evidence for variability in the T6 dwarf J162414.37+002915.6, but since it has lower significance, we conservatively refrain from claiming this object as a variable. We explore and rule out various telluric effects, demonstrating that the variations we detect are astrophysically real. We suggest that high-amplitude photometric variability for T dwarfs is likely more common in the red optical than at longer wavelengths. The two new members of the growing class of high-amplitude variable T dwarfs offer excellent prospects for further study of cloud structures and their evolution.

  9. Analytical approximations for stick-slip vibration amplitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel; Fidlin, A.

    2003-01-01

    , the amplitudes, and the base frequencies of friction-induced stick¿slip and pure-slip oscillations. For stick¿slip oscillations, this is accomplished by using perturbation analysis for the finite time interval of the stick phase, which is linked to the subsequent slip phase through conditions of continuity...

  10. Gearbox Vibration Signal Amplitude and Frequency Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakher Chaari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gearboxes usually run under fluctuating load conditions during service, however most of papers available in the literature describe models of gearboxes under stationary load conditions. Main task of published papers is fault modeling for their detection. Considering real situation from industry, the assumption of stationarity of load conditions cannot be longer kept. Vibration signals issued from monitoring in maintenance operations differ from mentioned models (due to load non-stationarity and may be difficult to analyze which lead to erroneous diagnosis of the system. The objective of this paper is to study the influence of time varying load conditions on a gearbox dynamic behavior. To investigate this, a simple spur gear system without defects is modeled. It is subjected to a time varying load. The speed-torque characteristic of the driving motor is considered. The load variation induces speed variation, which causes a variation in the gearmesh stiffness period. Computer simulation shows deep amplitude modulations with sidebands that don't differ from those obtained when there is a defective tooth. In order to put in evidence the time varying load effects, Short Time Fourier Transform and then Smoothed Wigner-Ville distribution are used. Results show that the last one is well suited for the studied case.

  11. High-frequency Trader Subjectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian; Lange, Ann-Christina

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we examine the recent shift in financial markets toward high-frequency trading (HFT). This turn is being legitimized with reference to how algorithms are allegedly more rational and efficient than human traders, and less prone to emotionally motivated decisions. We argue......-techniques of the ideal high-frequency trader. We demonstrate that these traders face the challenge of avoiding emotional interference in their algorithms and that they deploy a set of disciplinary self-techniques to curb the importance of emotional attachment....

  12. Relationship between BOLD amplitude and pattern classification of orientation-selective activity in the human visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Frank; Harrison, Stephenie A.; Dewey, John A.; Kamitani, Yukiyasu

    2012-01-01

    Orientation-selective responses can be decoded from fMRI activity patterns in the human visual cortex, using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA). To what extent do these feature-selective activity patterns depend on the strength and quality of the sensory input, and might the reliability of these activity patterns be predicted by the gross amplitude of the stimulus-driven BOLD response? Observers viewed oriented gratings that varied in luminance contrast (4, 20 or 100%) or spatial frequency (0.25, 1.0 or 4.0 cpd). As predicted, activity patterns in early visual areas led to better discrimination of orientations presented at high than low contrast, with greater effects of contrast found in area V1 than in V3. A second experiment revealed generally better decoding of orientations at low or moderate as compared to high spatial frequencies. Interestingly however, V1 exhibited a relative advantage at discriminating high spatial frequency orientations, consistent with the finer scale of representation in the primary visual cortex. In both experiments, the reliability of these orientation-selective activity patterns was well predicted by the average BOLD amplitude in each region of interest, as indicated by correlation analyses, as well as decoding applied to a simple model of voxel responses to simulated orientation columns. Moreover, individual differences in decoding accuracy could be predicted by the signal-to-noise ratio of an individual's BOLD response. Our results indicate that decoding accuracy can be well predicted by incorporating the amplitude of the BOLD response into simple simulation models of cortical selectivity; such models could prove useful in future applications of fMRI pattern classification. PMID:22917989

  13. Structured waves near the plasma frequency observed in three auroral rocket flights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Samara

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of waves at and just above the plasma frequency (fpe from three high frequency electric field experiments on three recent rockets launched to altitudes of 300–900 km in active aurora. The predominant observed HF waves just above fpe are narrowband, short-lived emissions with amplitudes ranging from <1 mV/m to 20 mV/m, often associated with structured electron density. The nature of these HF waves, as determined from frequency-time spectrograms, is highly variable: in some cases, the frequency decreases monotonically with time as in the "HF-chirps" previously reported (McAdams and LaBelle, 1999, but in other cases rising frequencies are observed, or features which alternately rise and fall in frequency. They exhibit two timescales of amplitude variation: a short timescale, typically 50–100 ms, associated with individual discrete features, and a longer timescale associated with the general decrease in the amplitudes of the emissions as the rocket moves away from where the condition f~fpe holds. The latter timescale ranges from 0.6 to 6.0 s, corresponding to distances of 2–7 km, assuming the phenomenon to be stationary and using the rocket velocity to convert time to distance.

  14. Automatic frequency control system for driving a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgesson, A.L.

    1976-01-01

    An automatic frequency control system is described for maintaining the drive frequency applied to a linear accelerator to produce maximum particle output from the accelerator. The particle output amplitude is measured and the frequency of the radio frequency source powering the linear accelerator is adjusted to maximize particle output amplitude

  15. Intensity noise properties of Nd:YVO 4 microchip lasers pumped with an amplitude squeezed diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, C.; Boller, K.-J.

    1998-02-01

    We report on intensity noise measurements of single-frequency Nd:YVO 4 microchip lasers optically pumped with amplitude squeezed light from an injection-locked diode laser. Calibrated homodyne measurements show a minimum intensity noise of 10.1 dB above the SQL at a frequency of 100 kHz. The measured intensity noise spectra are described with high accuracy by a theoretical model based on the quantum mechanical Langevin rate equations, including classical and quantum noise sources.

  16. Propagation of Finite Amplitude Sound in Multiple Waveguide Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doren, Thomas Walter

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation describes a theoretical and experimental investigation of the propagation of finite amplitude sound in multiple waveguide modes. Quasilinear analytical solutions of the full second order nonlinear wave equation, the Westervelt equation, and the KZK parabolic wave equation are obtained for the fundamental and second harmonic sound fields in a rectangular rigid-wall waveguide. It is shown that the Westervelt equation is an acceptable approximation of the full nonlinear wave equation for describing guided sound waves of finite amplitude. A system of first order equations based on both a modal and harmonic expansion of the Westervelt equation is developed for waveguides with locally reactive wall impedances. Fully nonlinear numerical solutions of the system of coupled equations are presented for waveguides formed by two parallel planes which are either both rigid, or one rigid and one pressure release. These numerical solutions are compared to finite -difference solutions of the KZK equation, and it is shown that solutions of the KZK equation are valid only at frequencies which are high compared to the cutoff frequencies of the most important modes of propagation (i.e., for which sound propagates at small grazing angles). Numerical solutions of both the Westervelt and KZK equations are compared to experiments performed in an air-filled, rigid-wall, rectangular waveguide. Solutions of the Westervelt equation are in good agreement with experiment for low source frequencies, at which sound propagates at large grazing angles, whereas solutions of the KZK equation are not valid for these cases. At higher frequencies, at which sound propagates at small grazing angles, agreement between numerical solutions of the Westervelt and KZK equations and experiment is only fair, because of problems in specifying the experimental source condition with sufficient accuracy.

  17. Comparison of Amplitude-Integrated EEG and Conventional EEG in a Cohort of Premature Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meledin, Irina; Abu Tailakh, Muhammad; Gilat, Shlomo; Yogev, Hagai; Golan, Agneta; Novack, Victor; Shany, Eilon

    2017-03-01

    To compare amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) and conventional EEG (EEG) activity in premature neonates. Biweekly aEEG and EEG were simultaneously recorded in a cohort of infants born less than 34 weeks gestation. aEEG recordings were visually assessed for lower and upper border amplitude and bandwidth. EEG recordings were compressed for visual evaluation of continuity and assessed using a signal processing software for interburst intervals (IBI) and frequencies' amplitude. Ten-minute segments of aEEG and EEG indices were compared using regression analysis. A total of 189 recordings from 67 infants were made, from which 1697 aEEG/EEG pairs of 10-minute segments were assessed. Good concordance was found for visual assessment of continuity between the 2 methods. EEG IBI, alpha and theta frequencies' amplitudes were negatively correlated to the aEEG lower border while conceptional age (CA) was positively correlated to aEEG lower border ( P continuity and amplitude.

  18. High-frequency energy in singing and speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Brian Bruce

    While human speech and the human voice generate acoustical energy up to (and beyond) 20 kHz, the energy above approximately 5 kHz has been largely neglected. Evidence is accruing that this high-frequency energy contains perceptual information relevant to speech and voice, including percepts of quality, localization, and intelligibility. The present research was an initial step in the long-range goal of characterizing high-frequency energy in singing voice and speech, with particular regard for its perceptual role and its potential for modification during voice and speech production. In this study, a database of high-fidelity recordings of talkers was created and used for a broad acoustical analysis and general characterization of high-frequency energy, as well as specific characterization of phoneme category, voice and speech intensity level, and mode of production (speech versus singing) by high-frequency energy content. Directionality of radiation of high-frequency energy from the mouth was also examined. The recordings were used for perceptual experiments wherein listeners were asked to discriminate between speech and voice samples that differed only in high-frequency energy content. Listeners were also subjected to gender discrimination tasks, mode-of-production discrimination tasks, and transcription tasks with samples of speech and singing that contained only high-frequency content. The combination of these experiments has revealed that (1) human listeners are able to detect very subtle level changes in high-frequency energy, and (2) human listeners are able to extract significant perceptual information from high-frequency energy.

  19. Assessing the high frequency behavior of non-polarizable electrodes for spectral induced polarization measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsamad, Feras; Florsch, Nicolas; Schmutz, Myriam; Camerlynck, Christian

    2016-12-01

    During the last decades, the usage of spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements in hydrogeology and detecting environmental problems has been extensively increased. However, the physical mechanisms which are responsible for the induced polarization response over the usual frequency range (typically 1 mHz to 10-20 kHz) require better understanding. The phase shift observed at high frequencies is sometimes attributed to the so-called Maxwell-Wagner polarization which takes place when charges cross an interface. However, SIP measurements of tap water show a phase shift at frequencies higher than 1 kHz, where no Maxwell-Wagner polarization may occur. In this paper, we enlighten the possible origin of this phase shift and deduce its likely relationship with the types of the measuring electrodes. SIP Laboratory measurements of tap water using different types of measuring electrodes (polarizable and non-polarizable electrodes) are carried out to detect the origin of the phase shift at high frequencies and the influence of the measuring electrodes types on the observed complex resistivity. Sodium chloride is used to change the conductivity of the medium in order to quantify the solution conductivity role. The results of these measurements are clearly showing the impact of the measuring electrodes type on the measured phase spectrum while the influence on the amplitude spectrum is negligible. The phenomenon appearing on the phase spectrum at high frequency (> 1 kHz) whatever the electrode type is, the phase shows an increase compared to the theoretical response, and the discrepancy (at least in absolute value) increases with frequency, but it is less severe when medium conductivity is larger. Additionally, the frequency corner is shifted upward in frequency. The dependence of this phenomenon on the conductivity and the measuring electrodes type (electrode-electrolyte interface) seems to be due to some dielectric effects (as an electrical double layer of small

  20. Multiband carrierless amplitude/phase modulation for ultra-wideband high data rate wireless communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puerta Ramírez, Rafael; Rommel, Simon; Altabas, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first experimental demonstration of carrierless amplitude/phase modulation in a flexible multiband approach for ultrawideband high-data-rate wireless communications. An effective bitrate of 2 GB/s is achieved while complying with the restrictions on the effective radiated power...

  1. Measurements of acoustic pressure at high amplitudes and intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, L A; Bailey, M R; Kaczkowski, P; McAteer, J A; Pishchalnikov, Y A; Sapozhnikov, O A

    2004-01-01

    In our research group, we desire measurements of the large pressure amplitudes generated by the shock waves used in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and the large acoustic intensities used in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Conventional piezoelectric or PVDF hydrophones can not be used for such measurements as they are damaged either by cavitation, in SWL applications, or heat, in HIFU applications. In order to circumvent these difficulties, we have utilized optical fiber hydrophones in SWL that do not cavitate, and small glass probes and a scattering technique for measurements of large HIFU intensities. Descriptions of these techniques will be given as well as some typical data

  2. High frequency flow-structural interaction in dense subsonic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baw-Lin; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of the detailed dynamic behavior in rocket propellant feed systems and engines and other such high-energy fluid systems requires precise analysis to assure structural performance. Designs sometimes require placement of bluff bodies in a flow passage. Additionally, there are flexibilities in ducts, liners, and piping systems. A design handbook and interactive data base have been developed for assessing flow/structural interactions to be used as a tool in design and development, to evaluate applicable geometries before problems develop, or to eliminate or minimize problems with existing hardware. This is a compilation of analytical/empirical data and techniques to evaluate detailed dynamic characteristics of both the fluid and structures. These techniques have direct applicability to rocket engine internal flow passages, hot gas drive systems, and vehicle propellant feed systems. Organization of the handbook is by basic geometries for estimating Strouhal numbers, added mass effects, mode shapes for various end constraints, critical onset flow conditions, and possible structural response amplitudes. Emphasis is on dense fluids and high structural loading potential for fatigue at low subsonic flow speeds where high-frequency excitations are possible. Avoidance and corrective measure illustrations are presented together with analytical curve fits for predictions compiled from a comprehensive data base.

  3. Amplitude Modulation Detection and Speech Recognition in Late-Implanted Prelingually and Postlingually Deafened Cochlear Implant Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ruiter, Anke M; Debruyne, Joke A; Chenault, Michelene N; Francart, Tom; Brokx, Jan P L

    2015-01-01

    Many late-implanted prelingually deafened cochlear implant (CI) patients struggle to obtain open-set speech understanding. Because it is known that low-frequency temporal-envelope information contains important cues for speech understanding, the goal of this study was to compare the temporal-envelope processing abilities of late-implanted prelingually and postlingually deafened CI users. Furthermore, the possible relation between temporal processing abilities and speech recognition performances was investigated. Amplitude modulation detection thresholds were obtained in eight prelingually and 18 postlingually deafened CI users, by means of a sinusoidally modulated broadband noise carrier, presented through a loudspeaker to the CI user's clinical device. Thresholds were determined with a two-down-one-up three-interval oddity adaptive procedure, at seven modulation frequencies. Phoneme recognition (consonant-nucleus-consonant [CNC]) scores (percentage correct at 65 dB SPL) were gathered for all CI users. For the prelingually deafened group, scores on two additional speech tests were obtained: (1) a closed-set monosyllable-trochee-spondee test (percentage correct scores at 65 dB SPL on word recognition and categorization of the suprasegmental word patterns), and (2) a speech tracking test (number of correctly repeated words per minute) with texts specifically designed for this population. The prelingually deafened CI users had a significantly lower sensitivity to amplitude modulations than the postlingually deafened CI users, and the attenuation rate of their temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) was greater. None of the prelingually deafened CI users were able to detect modulations at 150 and 200 Hz. High and significant correlations were found between the results on the amplitude modulation detection test and CNC phoneme scores, for the entire group of CI users. In the prelingually deafened group, CNC phoneme scores, word scores on the monosyllable

  4. Mechanism of High Frequency Shallow Earthquake Source in Mount Soputan, North Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasa Suparman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v6i3.122Moment tensor analysis had been conducted to understand the source mechanism of earthquakes in Soputan Volcano during October - November 2010 period. The record shows shallow earthquakes with frequency about 5 - 9 Hz. Polarity distribution of P-wave first onset indicates that the recorded earthquakes are predominated by earthquakes where almost at all stations have the same direction of P-wave first motions, and earthquakes with upward first motions.In this article, the source mechanism is described as the second derivative of moment tensor, approached with first motion amplitude inversion of P-wave at some seismic stations. The result of moment tensor decomposition are predominated by earthquakes with big percentage in ISO and CLVD component. Focal mechanism shows that the recorded earthquakes have the same strike in northeast-southwest direction with dip about 400 - 600. The sources of the high frequency shallow earthquakes are in the form of tensile-shear cracks or a combination between crack and tensile faulting.

  5. Visualization of frequency-modulated electric field based on photonic frequency tracking in asynchronous electro-optic measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisatake, Shintaro; Yamaguchi, Koki; Uchida, Hirohisa; Tojyo, Makoto; Oikawa, Yoichi; Miyaji, Kunio; Nagatsuma, Tadao

    2018-04-01

    We propose a new asynchronous measurement system to visualize the amplitude and phase distribution of a frequency-modulated electromagnetic wave. The system consists of three parts: a nonpolarimetric electro-optic frequency down-conversion part, a phase-noise-canceling part, and a frequency-tracking part. The photonic local oscillator signal generated by electro-optic phase modulation is controlled to track the frequency of the radio frequency (RF) signal to significantly enhance the measurable RF bandwidth. We demonstrate amplitude and phase measurement of a quasi-millimeter-wave frequency-modulated continuous-wave signal (24 GHz ± 80 MHz with a 2.5 ms period) as a proof-of-concept experiment.

  6. Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.; Johnson, A.C.; Thigpen, L.T.

    1999-10-05

    A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  7. Fault healing promotes high-frequency earthquakes in laboratory experiments and on natural faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Thomas, Amanda M.; Glaser, Steven D.; Nadeau, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Faults strengthen or heal with time in stationary contact and this healing may be an essential ingredient for the generation of earthquakes. In the laboratory, healing is thought to be the result of thermally activated mechanisms that weld together micrometre-sized asperity contacts on the fault surface, but the relationship between laboratory measures of fault healing and the seismically observable properties of earthquakes is at present not well defined. Here we report on laboratory experiments and seismological observations that show how the spectral properties of earthquakes vary as a function of fault healing time. In the laboratory, we find that increased healing causes a disproportionately large amount of high-frequency seismic radiation to be produced during fault rupture. We observe a similar connection between earthquake spectra and recurrence time for repeating earthquake sequences on natural faults. Healing rates depend on pressure, temperature and mineralogy, so the connection between seismicity and healing may help to explain recent observations of large megathrust earthquakes which indicate that energetic, high-frequency seismic radiation originates from locations that are distinct from the geodetically inferred locations of large-amplitude fault slip

  8. MONITORING HIGH-FREQUENCY OCEAN SIGNALS USING LOW-COST GNSS/IMU BUOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-L. Huang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In oceans there are different ocean signals covering the multi-frequencies including tsunami, meteotsunami, storm surge, as sea level change, and currents. These signals have the direct and significant impact on the economy and life of human-beings. Therefore, measuring ocean signals accurately becomes more and more important and necessary. Nowadays, there are many techniques and methods commonly used for monitoring oceans, but each has its limitation. For example, tide gauges only measure sea level relative to benchmarks and are disturbed unevenly, and satellite altimeter measurements are not continuous and inaccurate near coastal oceans. In addition, high-frequency ocean signals such as tsunami and meteotsunami cannot be sufficiently detected by 6-minutes tide gauge measurements or 10-day sampled altimetry data. Moreover, traditional accelerometer buoy is heavy, expensive and the low-frequency noise caused by the instrument is unavoidable. In this study, a small, low-cost and self-assembly autonomous Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU that independently collects continuous acceleration and angular velocity data is mounted on a GNSS buoy to provide the positions and tilts of the moving buoy. The main idea is to integrate the Differential GNSS (DGNSS or Precise Point Positioning (PPP solutions with IMU data, and then evaluate the performance by comparing with in situ tide gauges. The validation experiments conducted in the NCKU Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory showed that GNSS and IMU both can detect the simulated regular wave frequency and height, and the field experiments in the Anping Harbor, Tainan, Taiwan showed that the low-cost GNSS buoy has an excellent ability to observe significant wave heights in amplitude and frequency.

  9. Tip radius preservation for high resolution imaging in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Jorge R., E-mail: jorge.rr@cea.cu [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Canto Blanco, 28049 Madrid, España (Spain)

    2014-07-28

    The acquisition of high resolution images in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is correlated to the cantilever's tip shape, size, and imaging conditions. In this work, relative tip wear is quantified based on the evolution of a direct experimental observable in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, i.e., the critical amplitude. We further show that the scanning parameters required to guarantee a maximum compressive stress that is lower than the yield/fracture stress of the tip can be estimated via experimental observables. In both counts, the optimized parameters to acquire AFM images while preserving the tip are discussed. The results are validated experimentally by employing IgG antibodies as a model system.

  10. Econometrics of financial high-frequency data

    CERN Document Server

    Hautsch, Nikolaus

    2011-01-01

    This book covers major approaches in high-frequency econometrics. It discusses implementation details, provides insights into properties of high-frequency data as well as institutional settings and presents applications.

  11. High Frequency Longitudinal Damped Vibrations of a Cylindrical Ultrasonic Transducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Valentin Predoi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic piezoelectric transducers used in classical nondestructive testing are producing in general longitudinal vibrations in the MHz range. A simple mechanical model of these transducers would be very useful for wave propagation numerical simulations, avoiding the existing complicated models in which the real components of the transducer are modeled by finite elements. The classical model for longitudinal vibrations is not adequate because the generated longitudinal wave is not dispersive, the velocity being the same at any frequency. We have adopted the Rayleigh-Bishop model, which avoids these limitations, even if it is not converging to the first but to the second exact longitudinal mode in an elastic rod, as obtained from the complicated Pochhammer-Chree equations. Since real transducers have significant vibrations damping, we have introduced a damping term in the Rayleigh-Bishop model, increasing the imaginary part and keeping almost identical real part of the wavenumber. Common transducers produce amplitude modulated signals, completely attenuated after several periods. This can be modeled by two close frequencies, producing a “beat” phenomenon, superposed on the high damping. For this reason, we introduce a two-rod Rayleigh-Bishop model with damping. Agreement with measured normal velocity on the transducer free surface is encouraging for continuation of the research.

  12. Low Frequency Turbulence as the Source of High Frequency Waves in Multi-Component Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, George V.; Krivorutsky, Emmanuel N.; Uritsky, Vadim M.

    2011-01-01

    Space plasmas support a wide variety of waves, and wave-particle interactions as well as wavewave interactions are of crucial importance to magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma behavior. High frequency wave turbulence generation by the low frequency (LF) turbulence is restricted by two interconnected requirements: the turbulence should be strong enough and/or the coherent wave trains should have the appropriate length. These requirements are strongly relaxed in the multi-component plasmas, due to the heavy ions large drift velocity in the field of LF wave. The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs), in particular, is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. It is demonstrated that large-amplitude Alfven waves, in particular those associated with LF turbulence, may generate LHW s in the auroral zone and ring current region and in some cases (particularly in the inner magnetosphere) this serves as the Alfven wave saturation mechanism. We also argue that the described scenario can playa vital role in various parts of the outer magnetosphere featuring strong LF turbulence accompanied by LHW activity. Using the data from THEMIS spacecraft, we validate the conditions for such cross-scale coupling in the near-Earth "flow-braking" magnetotail region during the passage of sharp injection/dipolarization fronts, as well as in the turbulent outflow region of the midtail reconnection site.

  13. Test research of consistency for amplitude calibration coefficients of pulsed electric field sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Cui; Guo Xiaoqiang; Chen Xiangyue; Nie Xin; Mao Congguang; Xiang Hui; Cheng Jianping

    2007-01-01

    The amplitude calibration of an electric field sensor is important in the measurement of electromagnetic pulse. In this paper, an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) is used to generate multi-waveform electric field in the TEM cell and the dipole antenna pulsed electric field sensor is calibrated. In the frequency band of the sensor, the calibrated amplitude coefficients with different waveforms are identical. The coefficient derived from the TEM cell calibration system suits to the measurement of unknown electric field pulse within the frequency band. (authors)

  14. An Analysis of Fundamental Mode Surface Wave Amplitude Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardong, L.; Ferreira, A. M.; van Heijst, H. J.; Ritsema, J.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic tomography is a powerful tool to decipher the Earth's interior structure at various scales. Traveltimes of seismic waves are widely used to build velocity models, whereas amplitudes are still only seldomly accounted for. This mainly results from our limited ability to separate the various physical effects responsible for observed amplitude variations, such as focussing/defocussing, scattering and source effects. We present new measurements from 50 global earthquakes of fundamental-mode Rayleigh and Love wave amplitude anomalies measured in the period range 35-275 seconds using two different schemes: (i) a standard time-domain amplitude power ratio technique; and (ii) a mode-branch stripping scheme. For minor-arc data, we observe amplitude anomalies with respect to PREM in the range of 0-4, for which the two measurement techniques show a very good overall agreement. We present here a statistical analysis and comparison of these datasets, as well as comparisons with theoretical calculations for a variety of 3-D Earth models. We assess the geographical coherency of the measurements, and investigate the impact of source, path and receiver effects on surface wave amplitudes, as well as their variations with frequency in a wider range than previously studied.

  15. Mind-Body Practice Changes Fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations in Intrinsic Control Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao-Xia Wei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive control impairment is a typical symptom largely reported in populations with neurological disorders. Previous studies have provided evidence about the changes in cognitive control induced by mind-body training. However, the neural correlates underlying the effect of extensive mind-body practice on cognitive control remain largely unknown. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we characterized dynamic fluctuations in large-scale intrinsic connectivity networks associated with mind-body practice, and examined their differences between healthy controls and Tai Chi Chuan (TCC practitioners. Compared with a control group, the TCC group revealed significantly decreased fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations (fALFF in the bilateral frontoparietal network, default mode network and dorsal prefrontal-angular gyri network. Furthermore, we detected a significant association between mind-body practice experience and fALFF in the default mode network, as well as an association between cognitive control performance and fALFF of the frontoparietal network. This provides the first evidence of large-scale functional connectivity in brain networks associated with mind-body practice, shedding light on the neural network changes that accompany intensive mind-body training. It also highlights the functionally plastic role of the frontoparietal network in the context of the “immune system” of mental health recently developed in relation to flexible hub theory.

  16. Mind-Body Practice Changes Fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations in Intrinsic Control Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gao-Xia; Gong, Zhu-Qing; Yang, Zhi; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive control impairment is a typical symptom largely reported in populations with neurological disorders. Previous studies have provided evidence about the changes in cognitive control induced by mind-body training. However, the neural correlates underlying the effect of extensive mind-body practice on cognitive control remain largely unknown. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we characterized dynamic fluctuations in large-scale intrinsic connectivity networks associated with mind-body practice, and examined their differences between healthy controls and Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) practitioners. Compared with a control group, the TCC group revealed significantly decreased fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations (fALFF) in the bilateral frontoparietal network, default mode network and dorsal prefrontal-angular gyri network. Furthermore, we detected a significant association between mind-body practice experience and fALFF in the default mode network, as well as an association between cognitive control performance and fALFF of the frontoparietal network. This provides the first evidence of large-scale functional connectivity in brain networks associated with mind-body practice, shedding light on the neural network changes that accompany intensive mind-body training. It also highlights the functionally plastic role of the frontoparietal network in the context of the "immune system" of mental health recently developed in relation to flexible hub theory.

  17. Cosmic ray nucleonic intensity in low-amplitude days during the passage of high-speed solar wind streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, R.; Mishra, R.K.; Tiwari, S.; or rm_jbp@yahoo.co.in

    2008-01-01

    One of the most striking features of solar wind is its organization into high- and low- speed streams. It is now well established that the passage over the Earth of high-speed solar wind streams leads to geomagnetic disturbances. The high-speed plasma streams are thus a key element in the complex chain of events that link geomagnetic activity to the solar activity and are therefore of great interest to the solar terrestrial physics. Two types of high-speed solar wind streams - coronal-hole-associated (or corotating) and flare-generated - were studied based on magnetic field and solar wind plasma parameters. In the work, the dependence was obtained for cosmic ray (CR) depressions due to high-speed solar wind streams during low-amplitude days. The CR nucleonic intensity data were subjected to the superposed epoch analysis with respect to the start time of high-speed solar wind streams. It was found that streams of both types produce significant deviations in the CR intensity during low-amplitude anisotropic wave train events. At the onset of such streams the CR intensity reaches its minimum during low-amplitude events and then increases statistically. (Authors)

  18. The Influence of Second Harmonic Phase and Amplitude Variation in Cyclically Pitching Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Ethan; Farnsworth, John

    2017-11-01

    From wind tunnel testing of a cyber-physical wing model, it has been found that the pitch trajectory for stall flutter is described by an array of higher harmonic frequencies with decaying energy content. These frequencies distort the stall flutter motion from that of a pure sinusoidal oscillation in pitch and can have a significant effect on the resulting force production. In order to understand how these higher harmonic frequencies contribute to the overall pitching moment characteristics of a wing in stall flutter, a rigid finite span wing model, with aspect ratio four, was pitched in the wind tunnel. The prescribed motion of the pitch cycle was varied by changing the amplitude ratio and phase of the second harmonic of the oscillation frequency. The second harmonic represents the second highest energy mode in the pitching cycle spectra. Pitching moment and planar particle image velocimetry data was collected. From these pitching trajectories, a significant dependence of pitching moment on both the phase and amplitude of the prescribed waveforms was found. Specifically, for the same amplitude ratio, variations in the phase produced changes of approximately 30 percent in the phase averaged pitching moment.

  19. Amplitude death in a ring of nonidentical nonlinear oscillators with unidirectional coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jung-Wan; Kim, Jong-Ho; Son, Woo-Sik; Hwang, Dong-Uk

    2017-08-01

    We study the collective behaviors in a ring of coupled nonidentical nonlinear oscillators with unidirectional coupling, of which natural frequencies are distributed in a random way. We find the amplitude death phenomena in the case of unidirectional couplings and discuss the differences between the cases of bidirectional and unidirectional couplings. There are three main differences; there exists neither partial amplitude death nor local clustering behavior but an oblique line structure which represents directional signal flow on the spatio-temporal patterns in the unidirectional coupling case. The unidirectional coupling has the advantage of easily obtaining global amplitude death in a ring of coupled oscillators with randomly distributed natural frequency. Finally, we explain the results using the eigenvalue analysis of the Jacobian matrix at the origin and also discuss the transition of dynamical behavior coming from connection structure as the coupling strength increases.

  20. Pump pulse duration dependence of coherent phonon amplitudes in antimony

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misochko, O. V., E-mail: misochko@issp.ac.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    Coherent optical phonons of A{sub 1k} and E{sub k} symmetry in antimony have been studied using the femtosecond pump–probe technique. By varying the pump-pulse duration and keeping the probe duration constant, it was shown that the amplitude of coherent phonons of both symmetries exponentially decreases with increasing pulse width. It was found that the amplitude decay rate for the fully symmetric phonons with larger frequency is greater than that of the doubly degenerate phonons, whereas the frequency and lifetime for coherent phonons of both symmetries do not depend on the pump-pulse duration. Based on this data, the possibility of separation between dynamic and kinematic contributions to the generation mechanism of coherent phonons is discussed.

  1. Photoacoustic microbeam-oscillator with tunable resonance direction and amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingjun; Li, Fanghao; Wang, Bo; Yi, Futing; Jiang, J. Z.; Zhang, Dongxian

    2018-01-01

    We successfully design one photoacoustic microbeam-oscillator actuated by nanosecond laser, which exhibits tunable resonance direction and amplitude. The mechanism of laser induced oscillation is systematically analyzed. Both simulation and experimental results reveal that the laser induced acoustic wave propagates in a multi-reflected mode, resulting in resonance in the oscillator. This newly-fabricated micrometer-sized beam-oscillator has an excellent actuation function, i.e., by tuning the laser frequency, the direction and amplitude of actuation can be efficiently altered, which will have potential industrial applications.

  2. Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17, Annex A.1, Pulse Amplitude Modulation Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Standard 106-17 Annex A.1, July 2017 A.1-iii Acronyms dB decibel FM frequency modulation IF intermediate frequency PAM pulse amplitude...premodulation filter when employed. b. One-fifth of the intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidth (3 dB points) selected from the IF bandwidths listed in

  3. High-frequency homogenization of zero frequency stop band photonic and phononic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Antonakakis, Tryfon; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    We present an accurate methodology for representing the physics of waves, for periodic structures, through effective properties for a replacement bulk medium: This is valid even for media with zero frequency stop-bands and where high frequency phenomena dominate. Since the work of Lord Rayleigh in 1892, low frequency (or quasi-static) behaviour has been neatly encapsulated in effective anisotropic media. However such classical homogenization theories break down in the high-frequency or stop band regime. Higher frequency phenomena are of significant importance in photonics (transverse magnetic waves propagating in infinite conducting parallel fibers), phononics (anti-plane shear waves propagating in isotropic elastic materials with inclusions), and platonics (flexural waves propagating in thin-elastic plates with holes). Fortunately, the recently proposed high-frequency homogenization (HFH) theory is only constrained by the knowledge of standing waves in order to asymptotically reconstruct dispersion curves an...

  4. Pyroelectric detectors with integrated operational amplifier for high modulation frequencies; Pyroelektrische Detektoren mit integriertem Operationsverstaerker fuer hohe Modulationsfrequenzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, N.; Saenze, H.; Heinze, M. [InfraTec GmbH Dresden (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    In order to use the advantages of the current mode operation a pyroelectric detector family with integrated transimpedance amplifier (TIA) was developed particularly for modulation frequencies up to the kHz range with a simplified external circuitry for new application fields, e.g. absorption spectroscopy using quantum-cascade-laser. The essential advantages of the TIA arise from the small electrical time constant {tau}{sub E} and the short-circuiting of the pyroelectric element. A flat amplitude response up to some kHz was aimed at for a sufficiently high response of 7500 V/W, appr., also at high modulation frequencies. This can be achieved through a electrical time constant of 1 ms or less and a wide bandwidth of the op amp. The article describes in detail how these demands were accomplished and which compromises had to be accepted. (orig.)

  5. The transmission of finite amplitude sound beam in multi-layered biological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaozhou; Li, Junlun; Yin, Chang; Gong, Xiufen; Zhang, Dong; Xue, Honghui

    2007-02-01

    Based on the Khokhlov Zabolotskaya Kuznetsov (KZK) equation, a model in the frequency domain is given to describe the transmission of finite amplitude sound beam in multi-layered biological media. Favorable agreement between the theoretical analyses and the measured results shows this approach could effectively describe the transmission of finite amplitude sound wave in multi-layered biological media.

  6. The transmission of finite amplitude sound beam in multi-layered biological media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaozhou [Key Lab of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)]. E-mail: xzliu@nju.edu.cn; Li, Junlun [Key Lab of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Yin, Chang [Key Lab of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Gong, Xiufen [Key Lab of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Dong [Key Lab of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xue, Honghui [Key Lab of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2007-02-19

    Based on the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation, a model in the frequency domain is given to describe the transmission of finite amplitude sound beam in multi-layered biological media. Favorable agreement between the theoretical analyses and the measured results shows this approach could effectively describe the transmission of finite amplitude sound wave in multi-layered biological media.

  7. The transmission of finite amplitude sound beam in multi-layered biological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaozhou; Li, Junlun; Yin, Chang; Gong, Xiufen; Zhang, Dong; Xue, Honghui

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation, a model in the frequency domain is given to describe the transmission of finite amplitude sound beam in multi-layered biological media. Favorable agreement between the theoretical analyses and the measured results shows this approach could effectively describe the transmission of finite amplitude sound wave in multi-layered biological media

  8. Towards the Realization of Graphene Based Flexible Radio Frequency Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruthi N. Yogeesh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on our progress and development of high speed flexible graphene field effect transistors (GFETs with high electron and hole mobilities (~3000 cm2/V·s, and intrinsic transit frequency in the microwave GHz regime. We also describe the design and fabrication of flexible graphene based radio frequency system. This RF communication system consists of graphite patch antenna at 2.4 GHz, graphene based frequency translation block (frequency doubler and AM demodulator and graphene speaker. The communication blocks are utilized to demonstrate graphene based amplitude modulated (AM radio receiver operating at 2.4 GHz.

  9. Inhibition of Salmonella typhi growth using extremely low frequency electromagnetic (ELF-EM) waves at resonance frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, M A; Mohamed, S A; Abdelbacki, A M; El-Sharkawy, A H

    2014-08-01

    Typhoid is a serious disease difficult to be treated with conventional drugs. The aim of this study was to demonstrate a new method for the control of Salmonella typhi growth, through the interference with the bioelectric signals generated from the microbe during cell division by extremely low frequency electromagnetic waves (ELF-EMW-ELF-EM) at resonance frequency. Isolated Salmonella typhi was subjected to square amplitude modulated waves (QAMW) with different modulation frequencies from two generators with constant carrier frequency of 10 MHz, amplitude of 10 Vpp, modulating depth ± 2 Vpp and constant field strength of 200 V m(-1) at 37°C. Both the control and exposed samples were incubated at the same conditions during the experiment. The results showed that there was highly significant inhibition effect for Salm. typhi exposed to 0·8 Hz QAMW for a single exposure for 75 min. Dielectric relaxation, TEM and DNA results indicated highly significant changes in the molecular structure of the DNA and cellular membrane resulting from the exposure to the inhibiting EM waves. It was concluded that finding out the inhibiting resonance frequency of ELF-EM waves that deteriorates Salm. typhi growth will be promising method for the treatment of Salm. typhi infection either in vivo or in vitro. This new non-invasive technique for treatment of bacterial infections is of considerable interest for the use in medical and biotechnological applications. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Amplitude modulation reflectometer for FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbini, M.; Buratti, P.; Centioli, C.; Amadeo, P.

    1995-06-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) reflectometry is a modification of the classical frequency sweep technique which allows to perform unambiguous phase delay measurements. An eight-channel AM reflectometer has been realized for the measurement of density profiles on the FTU tokamak in the range. The characteristics of the instrument have been determined in extensive laboratory tests; particular attention has been devoted to the effect of interference with parasitic reflections. The reflectometer is now operating on FTU. Some examples of the first experimental data are discussed

  11. Generation of constant-amplitude radio-frequency sweeps at a tunnel junction for spin resonance STM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, William; Lutz, Christopher P.; Heinrich, Andreas J.; Baumann, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    We describe the measurement and successful compensation of the radio-frequency transfer function of a scanning tunneling microscope over a wide frequency range (15.5–35.5 GHz) and with high dynamic range (>50 dB). The precise compensation of cabling resonances and attenuations is critical for the production of constant-voltage frequency sweeps for electric-field driven electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments. We also demonstrate that a well-calibrated tunnel junction voltage is necessary to avoid spurious ESR peaks that can arise due to a non-flat transfer function.

  12. Generation of constant-amplitude radio-frequency sweeps at a tunnel junction for spin resonance STM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, William; Lutz, Christopher P.; Heinrich, Andreas J. [IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Baumann, Susanne [IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-07-15

    We describe the measurement and successful compensation of the radio-frequency transfer function of a scanning tunneling microscope over a wide frequency range (15.5–35.5 GHz) and with high dynamic range (>50 dB). The precise compensation of cabling resonances and attenuations is critical for the production of constant-voltage frequency sweeps for electric-field driven electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments. We also demonstrate that a well-calibrated tunnel junction voltage is necessary to avoid spurious ESR peaks that can arise due to a non-flat transfer function.

  13. Nanoliter-droplet acoustic streaming via ultra high frequency surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilton, Richie J; Travagliati, Marco; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2014-08-06

    The relevant length scales in sub-nanometer amplitude surface acoustic wave-driven acoustic streaming are demonstrated. We demonstrate the absence of any physical limitations preventing the downscaling of SAW-driven internal streaming to nanoliter microreactors and beyond by extending SAW microfluidics up to operating frequencies in the GHz range. This method is applied to nanoliter scale fluid mixing. © 2014 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. High-frequency EPR on high-spin transition-metal sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathies, Guinevere

    2012-01-01

    The electronic structure of transition-metal sites can be probed by electron-paramagnetic-resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The study of high-spin transition-metal sites benefits from EPR spectroscopy at frequencies higher than the standard 9.5 GHz. However, high-frequency EPR is a developing field. In

  15. Fatigue-induced changes in group IV muscle afferent activity: differences between high- and low-frequency electrically induced fatigues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darques, J L; Jammes, Y

    1997-03-07

    Recordings of group IV afferent activity of tibialis anterior muscle were performed in paralysed rabbits during runs of electrically induced fatigue produced by direct muscle stimulation at a high (100 Hz, high-frequency fatigue HFF) or a low rate (10 Hz, low-frequency fatigue LFF). In addition to analysis of afferent nerve action potentials, muscle force and compound muscle action potentials (M waves) elicited by direct muscle stimulation with single shocks were recorded. Changes in M wave configuration were used as an index of the altered propagation of membrane potentials and the associated efflux of potassium from muscle fibers. The data show that increased group IV afferent activity occurred during LFF as well as HFF trials and developed parallel with force failure. Enhanced afferent activity was significantly higher during LFF (maximal delta f(impulses) = 249 +/- 35%) than HFF (147 +/- 45%). No correlation was obtained between the responses of group IV afferents to LFF or to pressure exerted on tibialis anterior muscle. On the other hand, decreased M wave amplitude was minimal with LFF while it was pronounced with HFF. Close correlations were found between fatigue-induced activation of group IV afferents and decreases in force or M wave amplitude, but their strength was significantly higher with LFF compared to HFF. Thus, electrically induced fatigue activates group IV muscle afferents with a prominent effect of low-frequency stimulation. The mechanism of muscle afferent stimulation does not seem to be due to the sole increase in extracellular potassium concentration, but also by the efflux of muscle metabolites, present during fatiguing contractions at low rate of stimulation.

  16. Phase-Amplitude Coupling and Long-Range Phase Synchronization Reveal Frontotemporal Interactions during Visual Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daume, Jonathan; Gruber, Thomas; Engel, Andreas K; Friese, Uwe

    2017-01-11

    It has been suggested that cross-frequency phase-amplitude coupling (PAC), particularly in temporal brain structures, serves as a neural mechanism for coordinated working memory storage. In this magnetoencephalography study, we show that during visual working memory maintenance, temporal cortex regions, which exhibit enhanced PAC, interact with prefrontal cortex via enhanced low-frequency phase synchronization. Healthy human participants were engaged in a visual delayed match-to-sample task with pictures of natural objects. During the delay period, we observed increased spectral power of beta (20-28 Hz) and gamma (40-94 Hz) bands as well as decreased power of theta/alpha band (7-9 Hz) oscillations in visual sensory areas. Enhanced PAC between the phases of theta/alpha and the amplitudes of beta oscillations was found in the left inferior temporal cortex (IT), an area known to be involved in visual object memory. Furthermore, the IT was functionally connected to the prefrontal cortex by increased low-frequency phase synchronization within the theta/alpha band. Together, these results point to a mechanism in which the combination of PAC and long-range phase synchronization subserves enhanced large-scale brain communication. They suggest that distant brain regions might coordinate their activity in the low-frequency range to engage local stimulus-related processing in higher frequencies via the combination of long-range, within-frequency phase synchronization and local cross-frequency PAC. Working memory maintenance, like other cognitive functions, requires the coordinated engagement of brain areas in local and large-scale networks. However, the mechanisms by which spatially distributed brain regions share and combine information remain primarily unknown. We show that the combination of long-range, low-frequency phase synchronization and local cross-frequency phase-amplitude coupling might serve as a mechanism to coordinate memory processes across distant brain areas

  17. Amplitude and frequency modulation control of sound production in a mechanical model of the avian syrinx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elemans, Coen; Muller, Mees; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2009-01-01

    membrane and generate a wide variety of ‘syllables' with simple sweeps of the control parameters. We show that the membrane exhibits high frequency, self-sustained oscillations in the audio range (>600 Hz fundamental frequency) using laser Doppler vibrometry, and systematically explore the conditions...... for sound production of the model in its control space. The fundamental frequency of the sound increases with tension in three membranes with different stiffness and mass. The lowerbound fundamental frequency increases with membrane mass. The membrane vibrations are strongly coupled to the resonance...

  18. Characterizing Alzheimer's disease severity via resting-awake EEG amplitude modulation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Fraga

    Full Text Available Changes in electroencephalography (EEG amplitude modulations have recently been linked with early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD. Existing tools available to perform such analysis (e.g., detrended fluctuation analysis, however, provide limited gains in discriminability power over traditional spectral based EEG analysis. In this paper, we explore the use of an innovative EEG amplitude modulation analysis technique based on spectro-temporal signal processing. More specifically, full-band EEG signals are first decomposed into the five well-known frequency bands and the envelopes are then extracted via a Hilbert transform. Each of the five envelopes are further decomposed into four so-called modulation bands, which were chosen to coincide with the delta, theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. Experiments on a resting-awake EEG dataset collected from 76 participants (27 healthy controls, 27 diagnosed with mild-AD, and 22 with moderate-AD showed significant differences in amplitude modulations between the three groups. Most notably, i delta modulation of the beta frequency band disappeared with an increase in disease severity (from mild to moderate AD, ii delta modulation of the theta band appeared with an increase in severity, and iii delta modulation of the beta frequency band showed to be a reliable discriminant feature between healthy controls and mild-AD patients. Taken together, it is hoped that the developed tool can be used to assist clinicians not only with early detection of Alzheimer's disease, but also to monitor its progression.

  19. Laser amplitude stabilization for advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, B W; Strain, K A; Killow, C J

    2005-01-01

    We present results of experiments into the stabilization of the amplitude of Nd:YAG lasers for use in advanced gravitational wave detectors. By feeding back directly to the pump-diode driving current we achieved shot-noise-limited stabilization at frequencies up to several kHz with some residual noise at lower frequencies (sub ∼100 Hz). The method used is applicable to higher powered laser systems planned for advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors

  20. Modeling Encapsulated Microbubble Dynamics at High Pressure Amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyse, Jan F.; Bose, Sanjeeb; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2017-11-01

    Encapsulated microbubbles are commonly used in ultrasound contrast imaging and are of growing interest in therapeutic applications where local cavitation creates temporary perforations in cell membranes allowing for enhanced drug delivery. Clinically used microbubbles are encapsulated by a shell commonly consisting of protein, polymer, or phospholipid; the response of these bubbles to externally imposed ultrasound waves is sensitive to the compressibility of the encapsulating shell. Existing models approximate the shell compressibility via an effective surface tension (Marmottant et al. 2005). We present simulations of microbubbles subjected to high amplitude ultrasound waves (on the order of 106 Pa) and compare the results with the experimental measurements of Helfield et al. (2016). Analysis of critical points (corresponding to maximum and minimum expansion) in the governing Rayleigh-Plesset equation is used to make estimates of the parameters used to characterize the effective surface tension of the encapsulating shell. Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  1. Fatique of Copper Polycrystals at Low Plastic Strain Amplitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K. V.; Pedersen, Ole Bøcker

    1980-01-01

    Single crystals and polycrystals of pure copper were fatigued in tension-compression at constant low amplitudes of plastic strain and low cycling frequencies at room temperature in air. Surface patterns of persistent slip bands were quantitatively examined by optical microscopy. Bulk dislocation...

  2. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  3. Adaptive frequency-difference matched field processing for high frequency source localization in a noisy shallow ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthmann, Brian M; Song, H C; Dowling, David R

    2017-01-01

    Remote source localization in the shallow ocean at frequencies significantly above 1 kHz is virtually impossible for conventional array signal processing techniques due to environmental mismatch. A recently proposed technique called frequency-difference matched field processing (Δf-MFP) [Worthmann, Song, and Dowling (2015). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 138(6), 3549-3562] overcomes imperfect environmental knowledge by shifting the signal processing to frequencies below the signal's band through the use of a quadratic product of frequency-domain signal amplitudes called the autoproduct. This paper extends these prior Δf-MFP results to various adaptive MFP processors found in the literature, with particular emphasis on minimum variance distortionless response, multiple constraint method, multiple signal classification, and matched mode processing at signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) from -20 to +20 dB. Using measurements from the 2011 Kauai Acoustic Communications Multiple University Research Initiative experiment, the localization performance of these techniques is analyzed and compared to Bartlett Δf-MFP. The results show that a source broadcasting a frequency sweep from 11.2 to 26.2 kHz through a 106 -m-deep sound channel over a distance of 3 km and recorded on a 16 element sparse vertical array can be localized using Δf-MFP techniques within average range and depth errors of 200 and 10 m, respectively, at SNRs down to 0 dB.

  4. Frequency encoding in renal blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, D.J.; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Pavlov, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    With a model of renal blood flow regulation, we examined consequences of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) coupling to the myogenic mechanism via voltage-gated Ca channels. The model reproduces the characteristic oscillations of the two mechanisms and predicts frequency and amplitude modulation...... of the myogenic oscillation by TGF. Analysis by wavelet transforms of single-nephron blood flow confirms that both amplitude and frequency of the myogenic oscillation are modulated by TGF. We developed a double-wavelet transform technique to estimate modulation frequency. Median value of the ratio of modulation...... TGF cycle to the next. We used a blood pressure signal recorded by telemetry from a conscious rat as the input to the model. Blood pressure fluctuations induced variability in the modulation records similar to those found in the nephron blood flow results. Frequency and amplitude modulation can...

  5. Controlling runaway vortex via externally injected high-frequency electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zehua; McDevitt, Chris; Tang, Xianzhu

    2017-10-01

    One way of mitigating runaway damage of the plasma-facing components in a tokamak fusion reactor is by limiting the runaway electron energy under a few MeV, while not necessarily reducing the runaway current appreciably. Here we describe a physics mechanism by which such momentum space engineering of the runaway distribution can be facilitated by externally injected high-frequency electromagnetic waves such as the whistler waves. The drastic impact that wave-induced scattering can have on the runaway energy distribution is fundamentally the result of its ability to control the runaway vortex in the momentum space. The runaway vortex, which is a local circulation of runaways in momentum space, is the outcome of the competition between Coulomb collisions, synchrotron radiation damping, and runaway acceleration by parallel electric field. By introducing a wave that resonantly interacts with runaways at a particular range of energy that is mildly relativistic, the enhanced scattering would reshape the vortex by cutting off the part that is highly relativistic. The efficiency of resonant scattering accentuates the requirement that the wave amplitude can be small so the power requirement from external wave injection is practical for the mitigation scheme.

  6. High Frequency Components Recovery in Music Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sebesta

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available A new technique is presented which improves the subjective quality of band-limited music by recovery of high frequency components. Sequences of harmonics are found in the band-limited signal and these sequences are expanded to the high frequency band to estimate the lost part of spectrum. High frequency signal is generated to match this estimation and is added to the band-limited signal.

  7. Amplitude by peak interaction but no evidence of auditory mismatch response deficits to frequency change in preschool age children with FASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabella, Danielle M; Flynn, Lucinda; Peters, Amanda; Kodituwakku, Piyadasa; Stephen, Julia M

    2018-05-24

    Prior studies indicate that the auditory mismatch response is sensitive to early alterations in brain development in multiple developmental disorders. Prenatal alcohol exposure is known to impact early auditory processing. The current study hypothesized alterations in the mismatch response in young children with FASD. Participants in this study were 9 children with a fetal alcohol spectrum disorder and 17 control children (Control) aged 3 to 6 years. Participants underwent MEG and structural MRI scans separately. We compared groups on neurophysiological Mismatch Negativity (MMN) responses to auditory stimuli measured using the auditory oddball paradigm. Frequent (1000 Hz) and rare (1200Hz) tones were presented at 72 dB. There was no significant group difference in MMN response latency or amplitude represented by the peak located ~200 ms after stimulus presentation in the difference timecourse between frequent and infrequent tones. Examining the timecourses to the frequent and infrequent tones separately, RM-ANOVA with condition (frequent vs. rare), peak (N100m and N200m), and hemisphere as within-subject factors and diagnosis and sex as the between-subject factors showed a significant interaction of peak by diagnosis (p = 0.001), with a pattern of decreased amplitude from N100m to N200m in Control children and the opposite pattern in children with FASD. However, no significant difference was found with the simple effects comparisons. No group differences were found in the response latencies of the rare auditory evoked fields (AEFs). The results indicate that there was no detectable effect of alcohol exposure on the amplitude or latency of the MMNm response to simple tones modulated by frequency change in preschool-age children with FASD. However, while discrimination abilities to simple tones may be intact, early auditory sensory processing revealed by the interaction between N100m and N200m amplitude indicates that auditory sensory processing may be altered in

  8. High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Darrell R

    2007-01-01

    High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics is the first book in a new series sponsored by the Office of Naval Research on the latest research in underwater acoustics. This exciting new title provides ready access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics. The physical characteristics of the seafloor affecting acoustic propagation and scattering are covered, including physical and geoacoustic properties and surface roughness. Current theories for acoustic propagation in sediments are presented along with corresponding models for reflection, scattering, and seafloor penetration. The main text is backed up by an extensive bibliography and technical appendices.

  9. The Analysis for Activations in the Brain during Hearing the Amplitude-Modulated Tone by fMRI Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Tadanori; Shimada, Takamasa; Akatsuka, Takao; Saito, Yoichi

    In audiometry, ABR (Auditory Brainstem Response) is widely used. However, it shows low accuracy in low frequency band. Meanwhile, AMFR (Amplitude-Modulation-Following Response), the response during hearing an amplitude-modulated tone, has high frequency specificity and is brought to attention. As the first step to clinical application of AMFR, we investigated the activated areas in a brain when the subjects hear SAM tone (Sinusoidally Amplitude-Modulated tone) with both ears. We measured following two signals. One is the difference of BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) signal between hearing SAM tone vs. silence, the other is the difference of BOLD signal between hearing SAM tone vs. unmodulated tone. As a result, in the case of SAM vs. silence, the bilaterally auditory cortex (Broadmann Area 41, 42), the biratelally BA 10, left superior frontal gyrus and right superior temporal gyrus were activated (pvs. unmodulated tone, the bilaterally superior frontal gyrus (BA 6) and precuneus (BA 7), neighboring area including the bilaterally inferior parietal lobule (BA 40), the bilaterally medial frontal gyrus and superior frontal gyrus were activated (p<0.021, uncorrected). Activations of visual perception due to eye-opened state were detected in some parts of activations. As a result, we inferred that modulated tone was recognized in the medial frontal gyrus and inferior parietal lobule was the part related to perception of amplitude-modulation.

  10. Origin of the low-frequency internal friction background of gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, J.; Benoit, W.

    1986-11-01

    The internal friction (IF) background of gold is studied in the kHz frequency range. Systematic measurements of IF as a function of frequency, strain amplitude, and temperature show that the IF is due to the superposition of two contributions: the thermoelastic effect and a dislocation effect. The thermoelastic effect is responsible for the IF background observed when the strain amplitude tends to zero. It is the only contribution to the IF background which is strain amplitude independent. On the contrary, the dislocation effect contributes only to the strain amplitude-dependent IF background. This effect is proportional to the strain amplitude. In particular, it is zero when the strain amplitude tends to zero. Furthermore, the dislocation contribution is frequency independent. The experimental results show that the dislocation effect cannot be explained by a viscous damping of dislocation motion, but must be related to an hysteretic and athermal motion of dislocations.

  11. Dynamic pressure probe response tests for robust measurements in periodic flows close to probe resonating frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhun Şahin, Fatma; Schiffmann, Jürg

    2018-02-01

    A single-hole probe was designed to measure steady and periodic flows with high fluctuation amplitudes and with minimal flow intrusion. Because of its high aspect ratio, estimations showed that the probe resonates at a frequency two orders of magnitude lower than the fast response sensor cut-off frequencies. The high fluctuation amplitudes cause a non-linear behavior of the probe and available models are neither adequate for a quantitative estimation of the resonating frequencies nor for predicting the system damping. Instead, a non-linear data correction procedure based on individual transfer functions defined for each harmonic contribution is introduced for pneumatic probes that allows to extend their operating range beyond the resonating frequencies and linear dynamics. This data correction procedure was assessed on a miniature single-hole probe of 0.35 mm inner diameter which was designed to measure flow speed and direction. For the reliable use of such a probe in periodic flows, its frequency response was reproduced with a siren disk, which allows exciting the probe up to 10 kHz with peak-to-peak amplitudes ranging between 20%-170% of the absolute mean pressure. The effect of the probe interior design on the phase lag and amplitude distortion in periodic flow measurements was investigated on probes with similar inner diameters and different lengths or similar aspect ratios (L/D) and different total interior volumes. The results suggest that while the tube length consistently sets the resonance frequency, the internal total volume affects the non-linear dynamic response in terms of varying gain functions. A detailed analysis of the introduced calibration methodology shows that the goodness of the reconstructed data compared to the reference data is above 75% for fundamental frequencies up to twice the probe resonance frequency. The results clearly suggest that the introduced procedure is adequate to capture non-linear pneumatic probe dynamics and to

  12. Applying Low-Frequency Vibration for the Experimental Investigation of Clutch Hub Forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De’an Meng

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A vibration-assisted plastic-forming method was proposed, and its influence on clutch hub forming process was investigated. The experiments were conducted on a vibration-assisted hydraulic extrusion press with adjustable frequency and amplitude. Vibration frequency and amplitude were considered in investigating the effect of vibration on forming load and surface quality. Results showed that applying vibration can effectively reduce forming force and improve surface quality. The drop in forming load was proportional to the vibration frequency and amplitude, and the load decreased by up to 25%. Such reduction in forming load raised with amplitude increase because the increase in amplitude would accelerate punch relative speed, which then weakened the adhesion between workpiece and dies. By increasing the vibration frequency, the punch movement was enhanced, and the number of attempts to drag the lubricant out of the pits was increased. In this manner, the lubrication condition was improved greatly. The 3D surface topography testing confirmed the assumption. Moreover, vibration frequency exerted a more significant effect on the forming load reduction than vibration amplitude.

  13. Analytic properties of high energy production amplitudes in N=4 SUSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatov, L.N.; Hamburg Univ.

    2010-08-01

    We investigate analytic properties of the six point planar amplitude in N=4 SUSY at the multi-Regge kinematics for final state particles. For inelastic processes the Steinmann relations play an important role because they give a possibility to fix the phase structure of the Regge pole and Mandelstam cut contributions. The analyticity and factorization constraints allow us to reproduce the two-loop correction to the 6- point BDS amplitude in N=4 SUSY obtained earlier in the leading logarithmic approximation with the use of the s-channel unitarity. The cut contribution has the Moebius invariant form in the transverse momentum subspace. The exponentiation hypothesis for the amplitude in the multi-Regge kinematics is also investigated in LLA. (orig.)

  14. Analytic properties of high energy production amplitudes in N=4 SUSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatov, L.N. [St. Petersburg Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 1. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2010-08-15

    We investigate analytic properties of the six point planar amplitude in N=4 SUSY at the multi-Regge kinematics for final state particles. For inelastic processes the Steinmann relations play an important role because they give a possibility to fix the phase structure of the Regge pole and Mandelstam cut contributions. The analyticity and factorization constraints allow us to reproduce the two-loop correction to the 6- point BDS amplitude in N=4 SUSY obtained earlier in the leading logarithmic approximation with the use of the s-channel unitarity. The cut contribution has the Moebius invariant form in the transverse momentum subspace. The exponentiation hypothesis for the amplitude in the multi-Regge kinematics is also investigated in LLA. (orig.)

  15. Effect of Stress Amplitude on the Damping of Recycled Aggregate Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chaofeng; Liu, Tiejun; Xiao, Jianzhuang; Zou, Dujian; Yang, Qiuwei

    2015-08-14

    Damping characterizes the energy dissipation capacity of materials and structures, and it is affected by several external factors such as vibrating frequency, stress history, temperature, and stress amplitude. This study investigates the relationship between the damping and the stress amplitude of environment-friendly recycled aggregate concrete (RAC). First, a function model of a member's loss factor and stress amplitude was derived based on Lazan's damping-stress function. Then, the influence of stress amplitude on the loss tangent of RAC was experimentally investigated. Finally, parameters used to determine the newly derived function were obtained by numerical fitting. It is shown that the member's loss factor is affected not only by the stress amplitude but also by factors such as the cross section shapes, boundary conditions, load types, and loading positions. The loss tangent of RAC increases with the stress amplitude, even at low stress amplitude. The damping energy exponent of RAC is not identically equal to 2.0, indicating that the damping is nonlinear. It is also found that the energy dissipation capacity of RAC is superior to that of natural aggregate concrete (NAC), and the energy dissipation capacity can be further improved by adding modified admixtures.

  16. Modulation of microsaccades by spatial frequency during object categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Matt; Oppermann, Frank; Müller, Matthias M; Martinovic, Jasna

    2017-01-01

    The organization of visual processing into a coarse-to-fine information processing based on the spatial frequency properties of the input forms an important facet of the object recognition process. During visual object categorization tasks, microsaccades occur frequently. One potential functional role of these eye movements is to resolve high spatial frequency information. To assess this hypothesis, we examined the rate, amplitude and speed of microsaccades in an object categorization task in which participants viewed object and non-object images and classified them as showing either natural objects, man-made objects or non-objects. Images were presented unfiltered (broadband; BB) or filtered to contain only low (LSF) or high spatial frequency (HSF) information. This allowed us to examine whether microsaccades were modulated independently by the presence of a high-level feature - the presence of an object - and by low-level stimulus characteristics - spatial frequency. We found a bimodal distribution of saccades based on their amplitude, with a split between smaller and larger microsaccades at 0.4° of visual angle. The rate of larger saccades (⩾0.4°) was higher for objects than non-objects, and higher for objects with high spatial frequency content (HSF and BB objects) than for LSF objects. No effects were observed for smaller microsaccades (<0.4°). This is consistent with a role for larger microsaccades in resolving HSF information for object identification, and previous evidence that more microsaccades are directed towards informative image regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeling and Mitigation for High Frequency Switching Transients Due to Energization in Offshore Wind Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Xin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive investigation on high frequency (HF switching transients due to energization of vacuum circuit breakers (VCBs in offshore wind farms (OWFs. This research not only concerns the modeling of main components in collector grids of an OWF for transient analysis (including VCBs, wind turbine transformers (WTTs, submarine cables, but also compares the effectiveness between several mainstream switching overvoltage (SOV protection methods and a new mitigation method called smart choke. In order to accurately reproduce such HF switching transients considering the current chopping, dielectric strength (DS recovery capability and HF quenching capability of VCBs, three models are developed, i.e., a user–defined VCB model, a HF transformer terminal model and a three-core (TC frequency dependent model of submarine cables, which are validated through simulations and compared with measurements. Based on the above models and a real OWF configuration, a simulation model is built and several typical switching transient cases are investigated to analyze the switching transient process and phenomena. Subsequently, according to the characteristics of overvoltages, appropriate parameters of SOV mitigation methods are determined to improve their effectiveness. Simulation results indicate that the user–defined VCB model can satisfactorily simulate prestrikes and the proposed component models display HF characteristics, which are consistent with onsite measurement behaviors. Moreover, the employed protection methods can suppress induced SOVs, which have a steep front, a high oscillation frequency and a high amplitude, among which the smart choke presents a preferable HF damping effect.

  18. The frequency dependence of friction in experiment, theory, and observations of low frequency earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A.; Beeler, N. M.; Burgmann, R.; Shelly, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) are small amplitude, short duration events composing tectonic tremor, probably generated by shear slip on asperities downdip of the seismogenic zone. In Parkfield, Shelly and Hardebeck [2010] have identified 88 LFE families, or hypocentral locations, that contain over half a million LFEs since 2001 on a 160-km-long section of the San Andreas fault between 16 and 30 km depth. A number of studies have demonstrated the extreme sensitivity of low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) near Parkfield to stress changes ranging from contingent upon the amplitude and frequency content of the applied stress. We attempt to test this framework by comparing observations of LFEs triggered in response to stresses spanning several orders of magnitude in both frequency and amplitude (e.g. tides, teleseismic surface waves, static stress changes, etc.) to the predicted response of a single degree of freedom slider block model with rate and state dependent strength. The sensitivity of failure time in the friction model as developed in previous studies does not distinguish between shear and normal stresses; laboratory experiments show a more complicated sensitivity of failure time to normal stress change than in the published model. Because the shear and normal tidal stresses at Parkfield have different amplitudes and are not in phase, we have modified the model to include the expected sensitivity to normal stress. Our prior investigations of the response of both regular and low frequency earthquakes to tidal stresses [Thomas et al., 2009; Shelly and Johnson, 2011] are qualitatively consistent with the predictions of the friction model , as both the timing and degree (probability) of correlation are in agreement.

  19. Gender Identification Using High-Frequency Speech Energy: Effects of Increasing the Low-Frequency Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donai, Jeremy J; Halbritter, Rachel M

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of normal-hearing listeners to use high-frequency energy for gender identification from naturally produced speech signals. Two experiments were conducted using a repeated-measures design. Experiment 1 investigated the effects of increasing high-pass filter cutoff (i.e., increasing the low-frequency spectral limit) on gender identification from naturally produced vowel segments. Experiment 2 studied the effects of increasing high-pass filter cutoff on gender identification from naturally produced sentences. Confidence ratings for the gender identification task were also obtained for both experiments. Listeners in experiment 1 were capable of extracting talker gender information at levels significantly above chance from vowel segments high-pass filtered up to 8.5 kHz. Listeners in experiment 2 also performed above chance on the gender identification task from sentences high-pass filtered up to 12 kHz. Cumulatively, the results of both experiments provide evidence that normal-hearing listeners can utilize information from the very high-frequency region (above 4 to 5 kHz) of the speech signal for talker gender identification. These findings are at variance with current assumptions regarding the perceptual information regarding talker gender within this frequency region. The current results also corroborate and extend previous studies of the use of high-frequency speech energy for perceptual tasks. These findings have potential implications for the study of information contained within the high-frequency region of the speech spectrum and the role this region may play in navigating the auditory scene, particularly when the low-frequency portion of the spectrum is masked by environmental noise sources or for listeners with substantial hearing loss in the low-frequency region and better hearing sensitivity in the high-frequency region (i.e., reverse slope hearing loss).

  20. Amplitude and phase dynamics associated with acoustically paced finger tapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, T.W.; Daffertshofer, A.; Peper, C.E.; Beek, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    To gain insight into the brain activity associated with the performance of an acoustically paced synchronization task, we analyzed the amplitude and phase dynamics inherent in magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals across frequency bands in order to discriminate between evoked and induced responses.

  1. Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Henn, Johannes M

    2014-01-01

    At the fundamental level, the interactions of elementary particles are described by quantum gauge field theory. The quantitative implications of these interactions are captured by scattering amplitudes, traditionally computed using Feynman diagrams. In the past decade tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of and computational abilities with regard to scattering amplitudes in gauge theories, going beyond the traditional textbook approach. These advances build upon on-shell methods that focus on the analytic structure of the amplitudes, as well as on their recently discovered hidden symmetries. In fact, when expressed in suitable variables the amplitudes are much simpler than anticipated and hidden patterns emerge.   These modern methods are of increasing importance in phenomenological applications arising from the need for high-precision predictions for the experiments carried out at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in foundational mathematical physics studies on the S-matrix in quantum ...

  2. Prediction of Intelligibility of Noisy and Time-Frequency Weighted Speech based on Mutual Information Between Amplitude Envelopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper; Taal, C.H.

    2013-01-01

    of Shannon information the critical-band amplitude envelopes of the noisy/processed signal convey about the corresponding clean signal envelopes. The resulting intelligibility predictor turns out to be a simple function of the correlation between noisy/processed and clean amplitude envelopes. The proposed...

  3. Numerical investigations of single bubble oscillations generated by a dual frequency excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guédra, Matthieu; Inserra, Claude; Gilles, Bruno; Béra, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The oscillations of a single bubble excited with a dual frequency acoustic field are numerically investigated. Computations are made for an air bubble in water exposed to an acoustic field with a linearly varying amplitude. The bubble response to an excitation containing two frequencies f 1 = 500 kHz and f 2 = 400 kHz at the same amplitude is compared to the monofrequency case where only f 1 is present. Time-frequency representations show a sharp transition in the bifrequency case, for which the low frequency component f 2 becomes resonant while the high frequency component f 1 is strongly attenuated. The temporal evolution of the power spectra reveals that the resonance of the low frequency component is correlated with the time varying mean radius of the bubble. It is also observed that the total power of the bubble response in the bifrequency case can reach almost twice the power obtained in the monofrequency case, which indicates a strong enhancement of the cavitating behavior of the bubble for this specific frequency combination. (paper)

  4. Near-source attenuation of high-frequency body waves beneath the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshk, Shahram; Sedaghati, Farhad; Nazemi, Nima

    2018-03-01

    Attenuation characteristics in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) are estimated from 157 local seismograph recordings out of 46 earthquakes of 2.6 ≤ M ≤ 4.1 with hypocentral distances up to 60 km and focal depths down to 25 km. Digital waveform seismograms were obtained from local earthquakes in the NMSZ recorded by the Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at the University of Memphis. Using the coda normalization method, we tried to determine Q values and geometrical spreading exponents at 13 center frequencies. The scatter of the data and trade-off between the geometrical spreading and the quality factor did not allow us to simultaneously derive both these parameters from inversion. Assuming 1/ R 1.0 as the geometrical spreading function in the NMSZ, the Q P and Q S estimates increase with increasing frequency from 354 and 426 at 4 Hz to 729 and 1091 at 24 Hz, respectively. Fitting a power law equation to the Q estimates, we found the attenuation models for the P waves and S waves in the frequency range of 4 to 24 Hz as Q P = (115.80 ± 1.36) f (0.495 ± 0.129) and Q S = (161.34 ± 1.73) f (0.613 ± 0.067), respectively. We did not consider Q estimates from the coda normalization method for frequencies less than 4 Hz in the regression analysis since the decay of coda amplitude was not observed at most bandpass filtered seismograms for these frequencies. Q S/ Q P > 1, for 4 ≤ f ≤ 24 Hz as well as strong intrinsic attenuation, suggest that the crust beneath the NMSZ is partially fluid-saturated. Further, high scattering attenuation indicates the presence of a high level of small-scale heterogeneities inside the crust in this region.

  5. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abukari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ωB for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ωB for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  6. A portable, differential amplifier for recording high frequency EEG signals and evoked potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donos, Cristian; Giurgiu, Liviu; Popescu, Aurel; Mocanu, Marian

    2010-01-01

    In a clinical context, EEG refers to recording the brain's spontaneous electric activity, using small electrodes placed on the scalp. The signals collected are electric 'potentials' measured between two electrodes. Usually, for a healthy adult, these signals have small voltage (10 μV to 100 μV) and frequencies in the 0-40 Hz range. In the scientific literature, there are mentioned EEG signals and evoked potentials that have higher frequencies (up to 600 Hz) and amplitudes lower than 500 ηV. For this reason, building an amplifier capable of recording EEG signals in the ηV range and with frequencies up to couple of kHz is necessary to continue research beyond 600 Hz. We designed a very low noise amplifier that is able to measure/record EEG signals in the ηV range over a very large frequency bandwidth (0.09 Hz -385 kHz).(Author)

  7. Cascaded Amplitude Modulations in Sound Texture Perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McWalter, Richard Ian; Dau, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    . In this study, we investigated the perception of sound textures that contain rhythmic structure, specifically second-order amplitude modulations that arise from the interaction of different modulation rates, previously described as "beating" in the envelope-frequency domain. We developed an auditory texture...... model that utilizes a cascade of modulation filterbanks that capture the structure of simple rhythmic patterns. The model was examined in a series of psychophysical listening experiments using synthetic sound textures-stimuli generated using time-averaged statistics measured from real-world textures....... In a texture identification task, our results indicated that second-order amplitude modulation sensitivity enhanced recognition. Next, we examined the contribution of the second-order modulation analysis in a preference task, where the proposed auditory texture model was preferred over a range of model...

  8. High-frequency conductivity of photoionized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anakhov, M. V.; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The tensor of the high-frequency conductivity of a plasma created via tunnel ionization of atoms in the field of linearly or circularly polarized radiation is derived. It is shown that the real part of the conductivity tensor is highly anisotropic. In the case of a toroidal velocity distribution of photoelectrons, the possibility of amplification of a weak high-frequency field polarized at a sufficiently large angle to the anisotropy axis of the initial nonequilibrium distribution is revealed.

  9. Effects of equilibrium point displacement in limit cycle oscillation amplitude, critical frequency and prediction of critical input angular velocity in minimal brake system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Hamed Faghanpour; Ganji, Davood Domiri

    2017-04-01

    In the present paper, brake squeal phenomenon as a noise resource in automobiles was studied. In most cases, the modeling work is carried out assuming that deformations were small; thus, equilibrium point is set zero and linearization is performed at this point. However, the equilibrium point under certain circumstances is not zero; therefore, huge errors in prediction of brake squeal may occur. In this work, large motion domains with respect to linearization importance were subjected to investigation. Nonlinear equations of motion were considered and behavior of system for COF's model was analyzed by studying amplitude and frequency of limited cycle oscillation.

  10. Task-induced frequency modulation features for brain-computer interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Vinay; Hohmann, Matthias; Just, Jennifer; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Grosse-Wentrup, Moritz

    2017-10-01

    Task-induced amplitude modulation of neural oscillations is routinely used in brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) for decoding subjects' intents, and underlies some of the most robust and common methods in the field, such as common spatial patterns and Riemannian geometry. While there has been some interest in phase-related features for classification, both techniques usually presuppose that the frequencies of neural oscillations remain stable across various tasks. We investigate here whether features based on task-induced modulation of the frequency of neural oscillations enable decoding of subjects' intents with an accuracy comparable to task-induced amplitude modulation. We compare cross-validated classification accuracies using the amplitude and frequency modulated features, as well as a joint feature space, across subjects in various paradigms and pre-processing conditions. We show results with a motor imagery task, a cognitive task, and also preliminary results in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as well as using common spatial patterns and Laplacian filtering. The frequency features alone do not significantly out-perform traditional amplitude modulation features, and in some cases perform significantly worse. However, across both tasks and pre-processing in healthy subjects the joint space significantly out-performs either the frequency or amplitude features alone. This result only does not hold for ALS patients, for whom the dataset is of insufficient size to draw any statistically significant conclusions. Task-induced frequency modulation is robust and straight forward to compute, and increases performance when added to standard amplitude modulation features across paradigms. This allows more information to be extracted from the EEG signal cheaply and can be used throughout the field of BCIs.

  11. Task-induced frequency modulation features for brain-computer interfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Vinay; Hohmann, Matthias; Just, Jennifer; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Grosse-Wentrup, Moritz

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Task-induced amplitude modulation of neural oscillations is routinely used in brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) for decoding subjects’ intents, and underlies some of the most robust and common methods in the field, such as common spatial patterns and Riemannian geometry. While there has been some interest in phase-related features for classification, both techniques usually presuppose that the frequencies of neural oscillations remain stable across various tasks. We investigate here whether features based on task-induced modulation of the frequency of neural oscillations enable decoding of subjects’ intents with an accuracy comparable to task-induced amplitude modulation. Approach. We compare cross-validated classification accuracies using the amplitude and frequency modulated features, as well as a joint feature space, across subjects in various paradigms and pre-processing conditions. We show results with a motor imagery task, a cognitive task, and also preliminary results in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as well as using common spatial patterns and Laplacian filtering. Main results. The frequency features alone do not significantly out-perform traditional amplitude modulation features, and in some cases perform significantly worse. However, across both tasks and pre-processing in healthy subjects the joint space significantly out-performs either the frequency or amplitude features alone. This result only does not hold for ALS patients, for whom the dataset is of insufficient size to draw any statistically significant conclusions. Significance. Task-induced frequency modulation is robust and straight forward to compute, and increases performance when added to standard amplitude modulation features across paradigms. This allows more information to be extracted from the EEG signal cheaply and can be used throughout the field of BCIs.

  12. Subharmonic frequency locking in the resistive Josephson thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Veldhuizen, M.; Fowler, H.A.

    1985-01-01

    Phase-locked oscillatory solutions are examined as a basis for the dc impedance of the resistive superconducting quantum-interference device Josephson thermometer. The calculations are based on the resistively shunted junction model in the limit 2πL/sub s/I/sub c//Phi 0 > or =1, where L/sub s/ is the loop inductance and I/sub c/ is the junction critical current, and for a junction resistance large compared with the external shunt resistance. An algorithm for representing frequency entrainment in (kappa,ω) space (drive amplitude, frequency) leads to zones with rotation number p/q having the form of leaf-shaped regions joined and overlapping at their tips. High-resonance zones are very thin and locally similar. No chaotic behavior has been observed. The model can simulate the ''rising'' curves of dc impedance as a function of drive amplitude

  13. 78 FR 70567 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ... Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and... each alternative on the human and natural environments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have... Programmatic Environmental Assessment The scope of the PEA focuses on potential impacts associated with the...

  14. Time-amplitude converter; Convertisseur temps-amplitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banner, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    It is normal in high energy physics to measure the time of flight of a particle in order to determine its mass. This can be done by the method which consists in transforming the time measurement into an analysis of amplitude, which is easier; a time-amplitude converter has therefore been built for this purpose. The apparatus here described uses a double grid control tube 6 BN 6 whose resolution time, as measured with a pulse generator, is 5 x 10{sup -11} s. The analysis of the response of a particle counter, made up of a scintillator and a photomultiplier, indicates that a time of resolution of 5 x 10{sup -10} s. can be obtained. A time of this order of magnitude is obtained experimentally with the converter. This converter has been used in the study of the time of flight of particles in a secondary beam of the accelerator Saturne. It has thus been possible to measure the energy spectrum of {pi}-mesons, of protons, and of deutons emitted from a polyethylene target bombarded by 1,4 and 2 GeV protons. (author) [French] Pour determiner la masse d'une particule, il est courant, en physique des hautes energies, de mesurer le temps de vol de cette particule. Cela peut etre fait par la methode qui consiste a transformer la mesure d'un temps en une analyse d'amplitude, plus aisee; aussi a-t-on, a cet effet, cree un convertisseur temps-amplitude. L'appareillage decrit dans cet article utilise un tube a double grille de commande 6 BN 6 dont le temps de resolution mesure avec un generateur d'impulsion est de 5.10{sup -11} s. L'analyse de la reponse d'un compteur de particules, constitue par un scintillateur et un photomultiplicateur, indique qu'un temps de resolution de 5.10{sup -10} s peut etre obtenu. Un temps de cet ordre est atteint experimentalement avec le convertisseur. Ce convertisseur a servi a l'etude du temps de vol des particules dans un faisceau secondaire de l'accelerateur Saturne. On a mesure ainsi le spectre d'energie des mesons {pi}, des protons, des deutons

  15. High-frequency performance for a spiral-shaped piezoelectric bimorph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fang Sheng; Feng, Zhi Hua; Ma, Yu Ting; Pan, Qiao Sheng; Zhang, Lian Sheng; Liu, Yong Bin; He, Liang Guo

    2018-04-01

    Piezoelectric cantilever is suitable as an actuator for micro-flapping-wing aircraft. Higher resonant frequency brings about stronger flight energy, and the flight amplitude can be compensated by displacement-amplification mechanism, such as lever. To obtain a higher resonant frequency, straight piezoelectric bimorph was rolled into spiral-shaped piezoelectric bimorph with identical effective length in this study, which is verified in COMSOL simulations. Simulation results show that compared with the straight piezoelectric bimorph, the spiral-shaped piezoelectric bimorph with two turns has higher inherent frequencies (from 204.79 Hz to 504.84 Hz in terms of axial oscillation mode, and from 319.77 Hz to 704.48 Hz in terms of tangential torsional mode). The spiral-shaped piezoelectric bimorph is fabricated by a precise laser cutting process and consists of two turns with effective length of 60 mm, width of 2.5 mm, and thickness of 1.6 mm, respectively. With the excitation voltage of 100 Vpp applying an electric field across the thickness of the bimorph, the tip displacement of the actuator in the axial oscillation and tangential torsional modes are 85 μm and 15 μm, respectively.

  16. Adjusting Pulse Amplitude During Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Does Not Provide Greater Hypoalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron-Vézina, Kayla; Filion, Camille; Couture, Chantal; Vallée, Élisabeth; Laroche, Sarah; Léonard, Guillaume

    2018-03-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is an electrotherapeutic modality commonly used in rehabilitation to relieve pain. Adjusting pulse amplitude (intensity) during TENS treatment has been suggested to overcome nerve habituation. However, it is still unclear if this procedure leads to greater hypoalgesia. The aim of this study was to determine if the hypoalgesic effect of TENS is greater when pulse amplitude is adjusted throughout the TENS treatment session in chronic low-back pain patients. Randomized double-blind crossover study. Recruitment and assessment were conducted at the Clinique universitaire de réadaptation de l'Estrie (CURE) of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the Université de Sherbrooke. Twenty-one volunteers with chronic low-back pain were enrolled and completed this investigation. Each patient received two high-frequency TENS treatments on two separate sessions: (1) with adjustment of pulse amplitude and (2) without pulse amplitude adjustment. Pain intensity and unpleasantness were assessed before, during, and after TENS application with a 10 cm visual analog scale. Both TENS conditions (with and without adjustment of intensity) decreased pain intensity and unpleasantness when compared with baseline. No difference was observed between the two stimulation conditions for both pain intensity and unpleasantness. The current results suggest that adjustment of pulse amplitude during TENS application does not provide greater hypoalgesia in individuals with chronic low-back pain. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings in other pain populations.

  17. The high energy behavior of the forward scattering parameters - an amplitude analysis update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, M.M.; Margolis, B.; White, A.R.

    1995-01-01

    Utilizing the most recent experimental data, we reanalyze high energy pp and pp data, using the asymptotic amplitude analysis, under the assumption that we have reached open-quotes asymptopiaclose quotes. This analysis gives strong evidence for a log (s/s 0 ) dependence at current energies and not log 2 (s/s 0 ), and also demonstrates that odderons are not necessary to explain the experimental data

  18. Note: A versatile radio-frequency source for cold atom experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Na; Wu, Yu-Ping; Min, Hao; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Xiao, E-mail: jiangx@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); CAS Center for Excellence and Synergetic Innovation Center in Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2016-08-15

    A radio-frequency (RF) source designed for cold atom experiments is presented. The source uses AD9858, a direct digital synthesizer, to generate the sine wave directly, up to 400 MHz, with sub-Hz resolution. An amplitude control circuit consisting of wideband variable gain amplifier and high speed digital to analog converter is integrated into the source, capable of 70 dB off isolation and 4 ns on-off keying. A field programmable gate array is used to implement a versatile frequency and amplitude co-sweep logic. Owing to modular design, the RF sources have been used on many cold atom experiments to generate various complicated RF sequences, enriching the operation schemes of cold atoms, which cannot be done by standard RF source instruments.

  19. Cooking Appliances Using High-Frequency Heating

    OpenAIRE

    木村, 秀行; Hideyuki, KIMURA; (株)日立製作所機械研究所

    2007-01-01

    We have produced a guide suitable for people with no technical knowledge of cooking appliances that use high-frequency heating. In general, cooking appliances that use an electric heat source are popular since, they are simple to use because the offer easy heat control, are safe because they do not have naked flames, and do not make kitchens dirty because there is no exhaust. In recent years, high-efficiency cooking appliances using high-frequency heating technology have surged in popularity....

  20. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics.

  1. Using a heterodyne vibrometer in combination with pulse excitation for primary calibration of ultrasonic hydrophones in amplitude and phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Martin; Wilkens, Volker

    2017-08-01

    A high-frequency vibrometer was used with ultrasonic pulse excitation in order to perform a primary hydrophone calibration. This approach enables the simultaneous characterization of the amplitude and phase transfer characteristic of ultrasonic hydrophones. The method allows a high frequency resolution in a considerably short time for the measurement. Furthermore, the uncertainty contributions of this approach were investigated and quantified. A membrane hydrophone was calibrated and the uncertainty budget for this measurement was determined. The calibration results are presented up to 70~\\text{MHz} . The measurement results show good agreement with the results obtained by sinusoidal burst excitation through the use of the vibrometer and by a homodyne laser interferometer, with RMS deviation of approximately 3% -4% in the frequency range from 1 to 60~\\text{MHz} . Further hydrophones were characterized up to 100~\\text{MHz} with this procedure to demonstrate the suitability for very high frequency calibration.

  2. High frequency oscillations in brain hemodynamic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Ata; Bolay, Hayrunnisa

    2007-07-01

    Tight autoregulation of vessel tone guarantees proper delivery of nutrients to the tissues. This regulation is maintained at a more delicate level in the brain since any decrease in the supply of glucose and oxygen to neuronal tissues might lead to unrecoverable injury. Functional near infrared spectroscopy has been proposed as a new tool to monitor the cerebrovascular response during cognitive activity. We have observed that during a Stroop task three distinct oscillatory patterns govern the control of the cerebrovascular reactivity: very low frequency (0.02-0.05 Hz), low frequency (0.08-0.12 Hz) and high frequency (0.12-0.18 Hz). High frequency oscillations have been shown to be related to stress level of the subjects. Our findings indicate that as the stress level is increased so does the energy of the high frequency component indicating a higher stimulation from the autonomic nervous system.

  3. Frequency Preference Response to Oscillatory Inputs in Two-dimensional Neural Models: A Geometric Approach to Subthreshold Amplitude and Phase Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, Horacio G

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dynamic mechanisms of generation of subthreshold and phase resonance in two-dimensional linear and linearized biophysical (conductance-based) models, and we extend our analysis to account for the effect of simple, but not necessarily weak, types of nonlinearities. Subthreshold resonance refers to the ability of neurons to exhibit a peak in their voltage amplitude response to oscillatory input currents at a preferred non-zero (resonant) frequency. Phase-resonance refers to the ability of neurons to exhibit a zero-phase (or zero-phase-shift) response to oscillatory input currents at a non-zero (phase-resonant) frequency. We adapt the classical phase-plane analysis approach to account for the dynamic effects of oscillatory inputs and develop a tool, the envelope-plane diagrams, that captures the role that conductances and time scales play in amplifying the voltage response at the resonant frequency band as compared to smaller and larger frequencies. We use envelope-plane diagrams in our analysis. We explain why the resonance phenomena do not necessarily arise from the presence of imaginary eigenvalues at rest, but rather they emerge from the interplay of the intrinsic and input time scales. We further explain why an increase in the time-scale separation causes an amplification of the voltage response in addition to shifting the resonant and phase-resonant frequencies. This is of fundamental importance for neural models since neurons typically exhibit a strong separation of time scales. We extend this approach to explain the effects of nonlinearities on both resonance and phase-resonance. We demonstrate that nonlinearities in the voltage equation cause amplifications of the voltage response and shifts in the resonant and phase-resonant frequencies that are not predicted by the corresponding linearized model. The differences between the nonlinear response and the linear prediction increase with increasing levels of the time scale separation between

  4. High-frequency applications of high-temperature superconductor thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, N.

    2002-10-01

    High-temperature superconducting thin films offer unique properties which can be utilized for a variety of high-frequency device applications in many areas related to the strongly progressing market of information technology. One important property is an exceptionally low level of microwave absorption at temperatures attainable with low power cryocoolers. This unique property has initiated the development of various novel type of microwave devices and commercialized subsystems with special emphasis on application in advanced microwave communication systems. The second important achievement related to efforts in oxide thin and multilayer technology was the reproducible fabrication of low-noise Josephson junctions in high-temperature superconducting thin films. As a consequence of this achievement, several novel nonlinear high-frequency devices, most of them exploiting the unique features of the ac Josephson effect, have been developed and found to exhibit challenging properties to be utilized in basic metrology and Terahertz technology. On the longer timescale, the achievements in integrated high-temperature superconductor circuit technology may offer a strong potential for the development of digital devices with possible clock frequencies in the range of 100 GHz.

  5. High-frequency applications of high-temperature superconductor thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, N.

    2002-01-01

    High-temperature superconducting thin films offer unique properties which can be utilized for a variety of high-frequency device applications in many areas related to the strongly progressing market of information technology. One important property is an exceptionally low level of microwave absorption at temperatures attainable with low power cryocoolers. This unique property has initiated the development of various novel type of microwave devices and commercialized subsystems with special emphasis on application in advanced microwave communication systems. The second important achievement related to efforts in oxide thin and multilayer technology was the reproducible fabrication of low-noise Josephson junctions in high-temperature superconducting thin films. As a consequence of this achievement, several novel nonlinear high-frequency devices, most of them exploiting the unique features of the ac Josephson effect, have been developed and found to exhibit challenging properties to be utilized in basic metrology and Terahertz technology. On the longer timescale, the achievements in integrated high-temperature superconductor circuit technology may offer a strong potential for the development of digital devices with possible clock frequencies in the range of 100 GHz. (author)

  6. N=4 supersymmetric Yang Mills scattering amplitudes at high energies. The Regge cut contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, J.; Sabio Vera, A.

    2008-07-01

    We further investigate, in N=4 supersymmetric Yang Mills theories, the high energy Regge behavior of six-point scattering amplitudes. In particular, for the new Regge cut contribution found in our previous paper, we compute in the leading logarithmic approximation (LLA) the energy spectrum of the BFKL equation in the color octet channel, and we calculate explicitly the two loop corrections to the discontinuities of the amplitudes for the transitions 2→4 and 3→3. We find an explicit solution of the BFKL equation for the octet channel for arbitrary momentum transfers and investigate the intercepts of the Regge singularities in this channel. As an important result we find that the universal collinear and infrared singularities of the BDS formula are not affected by this Regge-cut contribution. (orig.)

  7. Investigation of a high frequency pulse tube cryocooler driven by a standing wave thermoacoustic engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroujerdi, A.A.; Ziabasharhagh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A nonlinear numerical model of a high frequency TADPTC has been developed. • The finite volume method has been used for discretization of governing equations. • The self-excitation process has been simulated very well. • The effects of APAT on the performance of the device have been investigated. • Lagrangian approach has been used to trace the thermodynamic cycle of gas parcels. - Abstract: In this work, a typical thermoacoustically driven pulse tube cooler as a no-moving part device has been investigated by a numerical method. A standing wave thermoacoustic engine as a prime mover in coupled with an inertance tube pulse tube cryocooler has been modeled. Nonlinear equations of unsteady one-dimensional compressible flow have been solved by the finite volume method. The model presents an important step towards the development of nonlinear simulation tools for the high amplitude thermoacoustic systems that are needed for practical use. The results of the computations show that the self-excited oscillations are well accompanied by the increasing of the pressure amplitude. The necessity of implementation of a nonlinear model to investigate such devices has been proven. The effect of APAT length as an amplifier coupler on the performance of the cooler has been investigated. Furthermore, by using Lagrangian approach, thermodynamic cycle of gas parcels has been attained

  8. Band Width of Acoustic Resonance Frequency Relatively Natural Frequency of Fuel Rod Vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proskuryakov, Konstantin Nicolaevich; Moukhine, V.S.; Novikov, K.S.; Galivets, E.Yu. [MPEI - TU, 14, Krasnokazarmennaya str., Moscow, 111250 (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    In flow induced vibrations the fluid flow is the energy source that causes vibration. Acoustic resonance in piping may lead to severe problems due to over-stressing of components or significant losses of efficiency. Steady oscillatory flow in NPP primary loop can be induced by the pulsating flow introduced by reactor circulating pump or may be set up by self-excitation. Dynamic forces generated by the turbulent flow of coolant in reactor cores cause fuel rods (FR) and fuel assembly (FA) to vibrate. Flow-induced FR and FA vibrations can generally be broken into three groups: large amplitude 'resonance type' vibrations, which can cause immediate rod failure or severe damage to the rod and its support structure, middle amplitude 'within bandwidth of resonance frequency type' vibrations responsible for more gradual wear and fatigue at the contact surface between the fuel cladding and rod support and small amplitude vibrations, 'out of bandwidth of resonance frequency type' responsible for permissible wear and fatigue at the contact surface between the fuel cladding and rod support. Ultimately, these vibration types can result in a cladding breach, and therefore must be accounted for in the thermal hydraulic design of FR and FA and reactor internals. In paper the technique of definition of quality factor (Q) of acoustic contour of the coolant is presented. The value of Q defines a range of frequencies of acoustic fluctuations of the coolant within which the resonance of oscillations of the structure and the coolant is realized. Method of evaluation of so called band width (BW) of acoustic resonance frequency is worked out and presented in the paper. BW characterises the range of the frequency of coolant pressure oscillations within which the frequency of coolant pressure oscillations matches the fuel assembly's natural frequency of vibration (its resonance frequency). Paper show the way of detuning acoustic resonance from natural

  9. Passive Super-Low Frequency electromagnetic prospecting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Zhao, Shanshan; Hui, Jian; Qin, Qiming

    2017-03-01

    The Super-Low Frequency (SLF) electromagnetic prospecting technique, adopted as a non-imaging remote sensing tool for depth sounding, is systematically proposed for subsurface geological survey. In this paper, we propose and theoretically illustrate natural source magnetic amplitudes as SLF responses for the first step. In order to directly calculate multi-dimensional theoretical SLF responses, modeling algorithms were developed and evaluated using the finite difference method. The theoretical results of three-dimensional (3-D) models show that the average normalized SLF magnetic amplitude responses were numerically stable and appropriate for practical interpretation. To explore the depth resolution, three-layer models were configured. The modeling results prove that the SLF technique is more sensitive to conductive objective layers than high resistive ones, with the SLF responses of conductive objective layers obviously showing uprising amplitudes in the low frequency range. Afterwards, we proposed an improved Frequency-Depth transformation based on Bostick inversion to realize the depth sounding by empirically adjusting two parameters. The SLF technique has already been successfully applied in geothermal exploration and coalbed methane (CBM) reservoir interpretation, which demonstrates that the proposed methodology is effective in revealing low resistive distributions. Furthermore, it siginificantly contributes to reservoir identification with electromagnetic radiation anomaly extraction. Meanwhile, the SLF interpretation results are in accordance with dynamic production status of CBM reservoirs, which means it could provide an economical, convenient and promising method for exploring and monitoring subsurface geo-objects.

  10. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  11. Calculation of Leakage Inductance for High Frequency Transformers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouyang, Ziwei; Jun, Zhang; Hurley, William Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Frequency dependent leakage inductance is often observed. High frequency eddy current effects cause a reduction in leakage inductance. The proximity effect between adjacent layers is responsible for the reduction of leakage inductance. This paper gives a detailed analysis of high frequency leakag...

  12. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  13. High-efficiency water-loaded microwave antenna in ultra-high-frequency band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zilun; Bartone, Chris; Yang, Fuyi; Yao, Jie

    2018-03-01

    High-index dielectrics are widely used in microwave antennas to control the radiation characteristics. Liquid water, with a high dielectric index at microwave frequency, is an interesting material to achieving tunable functionalities. Here, we demonstrate a water-loaded microwave antenna system that has high loss-tolerance and wideband tunability enabled by fluidity. Our simulation and experimental results show that the resonance frequency can be effectively tuned by the size of loading water. Furthermore, the antenna systems with water loading can achieve high radiation efficiency (>90%) in the ultra-high-frequency (0.3-3 GHz) band. This work brings about opportunities in realistic tunable microwave antenna designs enabled by liquid.

  14. High-Frequency Percussive Ventilation Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    be implemented. ‡ Follow the reverse of the ventilation sequence if respiratory alkalosis develops—however, start at ventilation goal sequence 1 not at...High-frequency percussive ventilation (HFPV) has demonstrated a potential role as a rescue option for refractory acute respiratory distress syndrome...frequency percussive ventilation (HFPV) has demon- strated a potential role as a salvage option for refrac- tory acute respiratory distress syndrome

  15. High frequency system project implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, L.L.

    1976-01-01

    The High Frequency System is a new mobile, digital diagnostic recording system for use at the Nevada Test Site. Many different kinds of event data will be digitized in real-time by this system, and these data will be recorded and stored for later read-out and transmission to NADCEN. The hardware and software requirements of the High Frequency System are examined, and the parameters of the system are proposed

  16. A multi-site resting state fMRI study on the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Turner

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. This multi-site study compares resting state fMRI amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF and fractional ALFF (fALFF between patients with schizophrenia (SZ and healthy controls (HC. Methods. Eyes-closed resting fMRI scans (5:38 minutes; n=306, 146 SZ were collected from 6 Siemens 3T scanners and one GE 3T scanner. Imaging data were pre-processed using an SPM pipeline. Power in the low frequency band (0.01 to 0.08 Hz was calculated both for the original pre-processed data as well as for the pre-processed data after regressing out the six rigid-body motion parameters, mean white matter and CSF signals. Both original and regressed ALFF and fALFF measures were modeled with site, diagnosis, age, and diagnosis × age interactions. Results. Regressing out motion and non-gray matter signals significantly decreased fALFF throughout the brain as well as ALFF in the cortical edge, but significantly increased ALFF in subcortical regions. Regression had little effect on site, age, and diagnosis effects on ALFF, other than to reduce diagnosis effects in subcortical regions. There were significant effects of site across the brain in all the analyses, largely due to vendor differences. HC showed greater ALFF in the occipital, posterior parietal, and superior temporal lobe, while SZ showed smaller clusters of greater ALFF in the frontal and temporal/insular regions as well as in the caudate, putamen, and hippocampus. HC showed greater fALFF compared with SZ in all regions, though subcortical differences were only significant for original fALFF. Conclusions. SZ show greater eyes-closed resting state low frequency power in frontal cortex, and less power in posterior lobes than do HC; fALFF, however, is lower in SZ than HC throughout the cortex. These effects are robust to multi-site variability. Regressing out physiological noise signals significantly affects both total and fractional ALFF measures, but does not affect the pattern of case

  17. Frontal delta-beta cross-frequency coupling in high and low social anxiety: An index of stress regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppelaars, Eefje S; Harrewijn, Anita; Westenberg, P Michiel; van der Molen, Melle J W

    2018-05-17

    Cross-frequency coupling (CFC) between frontal delta (1-4 Hz) and beta (14-30 Hz) oscillations has been suggested as a candidate neural correlate of social anxiety disorder, a disorder characterized by fear and avoidance of social and performance situations. Prior studies have used amplitude-amplitude correlation (AAC) as a CFC measure and hypothesized it as a candidate neural mechanism of affective control. However, using this metric has yielded inconsistent results regarding the direction of CFC, and the functional significance of coupling strength is uncertain. To offer a better understanding of CFC in social anxiety, we compared frontal delta-beta AAC with phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) - a mechanism for information transfer through neural circuits. Twenty high socially anxious (HSA) and 32 low socially anxious (LSA) female undergraduates participated in a social performance task (SPT). Delta-beta PAC and AAC were estimated during the resting state, as well as the anticipation and recovery conditions. Results showed significantly more AAC in LSA than HSA participants during early anticipation, as well as significant values during all conditions in LSA participants only. PAC did not distinguish between LSA and HSA participants, and instead was found to correlate with state nervousness during early anticipation, but in LSA participants only. Together, these findings are interpreted to suggest that delta-beta AAC is a plausible neurobiological index of adaptive stress regulation and can distinguish between trait high and low social anxiety during stress, while delta-beta PAC might be sensitive enough to reflect mild state anxiety in LSA participants.

  18. An output amplitude configurable wideband automatic gain control with high gain step accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaofeng; Ye Tianchun; Mo Taishan; Ma Chengyan

    2012-01-01

    An output amplitude configurable wideband automatic gain control (AGC) with high gain step accuracy for the GNSS receiver is presented. The amplitude of an AGC is configurable in order to cooperate with baseband chips to achieve interference suppression and be compatible with different full range ADCs. And what's more, the gain-boosting technology is introduced and the circuit is improved to increase the step accuracy. A zero, which is composed by the source feedback resistance and the source capacity, is introduced to compensate for the pole. The AGC is fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The AGC shows a 62 dB gain control range by 1 dB each step with a gain error of less than 0.2 dB. The AGC provides 3 dB bandwidth larger than 80 MHz and the overall power consumption is less than 1.8 mA, and the die area is 800 × 300 μm 2 . (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  19. Calibration and fluctuation of the secular frequency peak amplitude versus initial condition distribution of the ion cloud confined into a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap using a fourier transform operating mode and a steady ion flow injection mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janulyte, A.; Andre, J.; Carette, M.; Mercury, M.; Reynard, C; Zerega, Y.

    2009-01-01

    A specific Fourier transform operating mode is applied to a 3-dimensional quadrupolar ion trap for mass analysis (Fourier Transform Quadrupolar Ion Trap (FTQIT) Operating Mode or Mass Spectrometer). With this operating mode, an image signal, which is representative of the collective motion of simultaneously confined ions, is made up from a set of recorded time-of-flight histograms. In an ion trap, the secular frequency of ion motion depends on m/Z ratio of the ion. By Fourier transformation of the image signal, one observes the frequency peak of each confined ionic species. When only one ionic species is confined, the peak amplitude is proportional to the maximal amplitude of the image signal. The maximal amplitude of the image signal is expressed according to the operating parameters, the initial conditions of the ions and the number of ions. Simulation tools lead to fluctuation calculation of the maximal amplitude of the image signal. Two origins are explored: (1) the fluctuation of the numbers of ions according to the steady ion flow injection mode (SIFIM) used with this operating mode and (2) the distribution fluctuation of the initial positions and velocities. Initial confinement conditions, obtained with SIFIM injection mode, lead to optimal detection with small fluctuations of the peak amplitude for Fourier transform operating mode applied to an ion trap. (authors)

  20. Forecasting Value-at-Risk Using High-Frequency Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyu Huang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available in the prediction of quantiles of daily Standard&Poor’s 500 (S&P 500 returns we consider how to use high-frequency 5-minute data. We examine methods that incorporate the high frequency information either indirectly, through combining forecasts (using forecasts generated from returns sampled at different intraday interval, or directly, through combining high frequency information into one model. We consider subsample averaging, bootstrap averaging, forecast averaging methods for the indirect case, and factor models with principal component approach, for both direct and indirect cases. We show that in forecasting the daily S&P 500 index return quantile (Value-at-Risk or VaR is simply the negative of it, using high-frequency information is beneficial, often substantially and particularly so, in forecasting downside risk. Our empirical results show that the averaging methods (subsample averaging, bootstrap averaging, forecast averaging, which serve as different ways of forming the ensemble average from using high-frequency intraday information, provide an excellent forecasting performance compared to using just low-frequency daily information.

  1. Research on the range side lobe suppression method for modulated stepped frequency radar signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinkai; Shan, Tao; Feng, Yuan

    2018-05-01

    The magnitude of time-domain range sidelobe of modulated stepped frequency radar affects the imaging quality of inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR). In this paper, the cause of high sidelobe in modulated stepped frequency radar imaging is analyzed first in real environment. Then, the chaos particle swarm optimization (CPSO) is used to select the amplitude and phase compensation factors according to the minimum sidelobe criterion. Finally, the compensated one-dimensional range images are obtained. Experimental results show that the amplitude-phase compensation method based on CPSO algorithm can effectively reduce the sidelobe peak value of one-dimensional range images, which outperforms the common sidelobe suppression methods and avoids the coverage of weak scattering points by strong scattering points due to the high sidelobes.

  2. New rigorous asymptotic theorems for inverse scattering amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomsadze, Sh.Yu.; Lomsadze, Yu.M.

    1984-01-01

    The rigorous asymptotic theorems both of integral and local types obtained earlier and establishing logarithmic and in some cases even power correlations aetdeen the real and imaginary parts of scattering amplitudes Fsub(+-) are extended to the inverse amplitudes 1/Fsub(+-). One also succeeds in establishing power correlations of a new type between the real and imaginary parts, both for the amplitudes themselves and for the inverse ones. All the obtained assertions are convenient to be tested in high energy experiments when the amplitudes show asymptotic behaviour

  3. Characterization of deep nanoscale surface trenches with AFM using thin carbon nanotube probes in amplitude-modulation and frequency-force-modulation modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solares, Santiago D

    2008-01-01

    The characterization of deep surface trenches with atomic force microscopy (AFM) presents significant challenges due to the sharp step edges that disturb the instrument and prevent it from faithfully reproducing the sample topography. Previous authors have developed AFM methodologies to successfully characterize semiconductor surface trenches with dimensions on the order of tens of nanometers. However, the study of imaging fidelity for features with dimensions smaller than 10 nm has not yet received sufficient attention. Such a study is necessary because small features in some cases lead to apparently high-quality images that are distorted due to tip and sample mechanical deformation. This paper presents multi-scale simulations, illustrating common artifacts affecting images of nanoscale trenches taken with fine carbon nanotube probes within amplitude-modulation and frequency-force-modulation AFM (AM-AFM and FFM-AFM, respectively). It also describes a methodology combining FFM-AFM with a step-in/step-out algorithm analogous to that developed by other groups for larger trenches, which can eliminate the observed artifacts. Finally, an overview of the AFM simulation methods is provided. These methods, based on atomistic and continuum simulation, have been previously used to study a variety of samples including silicon surfaces, carbon nanotubes and biomolecules

  4. Intrinsic Patterns of Coupling between Correlation and Amplitude of Low-Frequency fMRI Fluctuations Are Disrupted in Degenerative Dementia Mainly due to Functional Disconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascali, Daniele; DiNuzzo, Mauro; Gili, Tommaso; Moraschi, Marta; Fratini, Michela; Maraviglia, Bruno; Serra, Laura; Bozzali, Marco; Giove, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency fluctuations (LFFs) of the BOLD signal are a major discovery in the study of the resting brain with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Two fMRI-based measures, functional connectivity (FC), a measure of signal synchronicity, and the amplitude of LFFs (ALFF), a measure of signal periodicity, have been proved to be sensitive to changes induced by several neurological diseases, including degenerative dementia. In spite of the increasing use of these measures, whether and how they are related to each other remains to be elucidated. In this work we used voxel-wise FC and ALFF computed in different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.073 Hz; and full-band: 0.01-0.073 Hz), in order to assess their relationship in healthy elderly as well as the relevant changes induced by Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). We found that in healthy elderly subjects FC and ALFF are positively correlated in anterior and posterior cingulate cortex (full-band, slow-4 and slow-5), temporal cortex (full-band and slow-5), and in a set of subcortical regions (full-band and slow-4). These correlation patterns between FC and ALFF were absent in either AD or MCI patients. Notably, the loss of correlation between FC and ALFF in the AD group was primarily due to changes in FC rather than in ALFF. Our results indicate that degenerative dementia is characterized by a loss of global connection rather than by a decrease of fluctuation amplitude. PMID:25844531

  5. Implementation of PLL and FLL trackers for signals with high harmonic content and low sampling frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathe, Laszlo; Iov, Florin; Sera, Dezso

    2014-01-01

    The accurate tracking of phase, frequency, and amplitude of different frequency components from a measured signal is an essential requirement for many digitally controlled equipment. The accurate and robust tracking of a frequency component from a complex signal was successfully applied for example...... in: grid connected inverters, sensorless motor control for rotor position estimation, grid voltage monitoring for ac-dc converters etc. Usually, the design of such trackers is done in continuous time domain. The discretization introduces errors which change the performance, especially when the input...... signal is rich in harmonics and the sampling frequency is close to the tracked frequency component. In this paper different discretization methods and implementation issues, such as Tustin, Backward-Forward Euler, are discussed and compared. A special case is analyzed, when the input signal is reach...

  6. Corrections to the large-angle scattering amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goloskokov, S.V.; Kudinov, A.V.; Kuleshov, S.P.

    1979-01-01

    High-energy behaviour of scattering amplitudes is considered within the frames of Logunov-Tavchelidze quasipotential approach. The representation of scattering amplitude of two scalar particles, convenient for the study of its asymptotic properties is given. Obtained are corrections of the main value of scattering amplitude of the first and the second orders in 1/p, where p is the pulse of colliding particles in the system of the inertia centre. An example of the obtained formulas use for a concrete quasipotential is given

  7. Instantaneous amplitude and frequency dynamics of coherent wave mixing in semiconductor quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemla, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews recent investigations of nonlinear optical processes in semiconductors. Section II discusses theory of coherent wave mixing in semiconductors, with emphasis on resonant excitation with only one exciton state. Section III reviews recent experimental investigations of amplitude and phase of coherent wave-mixing resonant with quasi-2d excitons in GaAs quantum wells

  8. Adhesive bond strength evaluation in composite materials by laser-generated high amplitude ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perton, M; Blouin, A; Monchalin, J-P

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of composites laminates is highly efficient but is not used for joining primary aircraft structures, since there is presently no nondestructive inspection technique to ensure the quality of the bond. We are developing a technique based on the propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves to evaluate the adhesive bond strength. Large amplitude compression waves are generated by a short pulse powerful laser under water confinement and are converted after reflection by the assembly back surface into tensile waves. The resulting tensile stresses can cause a delamination inside the laminates or at the bond interfaces. The adhesion strength is evaluated by increasing the laser pulse energy until disbond. A good bond is unaffected by a certain level of stress whereas a weaker one is damaged. The method is shown completely non invasive throughout the whole composite assembly. The sample back surface velocity is measured by an optical interferometer and used to estimate stress history inside the sample. The depth and size of the disbonds are revealed by a post-test inspection by the well established laser-ultrasonic technique. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to differentiate weak bond from strong bonds and to estimate quantitatively their bond strength.

  9. Frequency spectrum analysis of finger photoplethysmographic waveform variability during haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Faizan; Middleton, Paul M; Malouf, Philip; Chan, Gregory S H; Savkin, Andrey V; Lovell, Nigel H; Steel, Elizabeth; Mackie, James

    2010-09-01

    This study investigates the peripheral circulatory and autonomic response to volume withdrawal in haemodialysis based on spectral analysis of photoplethysmographic waveform variability (PPGV). Frequency spectrum analysis was performed on the baseline and pulse amplitude variabilities of the finger infrared photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveform and on heart rate variability extracted from the ECG signal collected from 18 kidney failure patients undergoing haemodialysis. Spectral powers were calculated from the low frequency (LF, 0.04-0.145 Hz) and high frequency (HF, 0.145-0.45 Hz) bands. In eight stable fluid overloaded patients (fluid removal of >2 L) not on alpha blockers, progressive reduction in relative blood volume during haemodialysis resulted in significant increase in LF and HF powers of PPG baseline and amplitude variability (P analysis of finger PPGV may provide valuable information on the autonomic vascular response to blood volume reduction in haemodialysis, and can be potentially utilized as a non-invasive tool for assessing peripheral circulatory control during routine dialysis procedure.

  10. Available pressure amplitude of linear compressor based on phasor triangle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, C. X.; Jiang, X.; Zhi, X. Q.; You, X. K.; Qiu, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    The linear compressor for cryocoolers possess the advantages of long-life operation, high efficiency, low vibration and compact structure. It is significant to study the match mechanisms between the compressor and the cold finger, which determines the working efficiency of the cryocooler. However, the output characteristics of linear compressor are complicated since it is affected by many interacting parameters. The existing matching methods are simplified and mainly focus on the compressor efficiency and output acoustic power, while neglecting the important output parameter of pressure amplitude. In this study, a phasor triangle model basing on analyzing the forces of the piston is proposed. It can be used to predict not only the output acoustic power, the efficiency, but also the pressure amplitude of the linear compressor. Calculated results agree well with the measurement results of the experiment. By this phasor triangle model, the theoretical maximum output pressure amplitude of the linear compressor can be calculated simply based on a known charging pressure and operating frequency. Compared with the mechanical and electrical model of the linear compressor, the new model can provide an intuitionistic understanding on the match mechanism with faster computational process. The model can also explain the experimental phenomenon of the proportional relationship between the output pressure amplitude and the piston displacement in experiments. By further model analysis, such phenomenon is confirmed as an expression of the unmatched design of the compressor. The phasor triangle model may provide an alternative method for the compressor design and matching with the cold finger.

  11. A novel oscillation control for MEMS vibratory gyroscopes using a modified electromechanical amplitude modulation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Wei; Lin, Yiyu; Liu, Siqi; Zheng, Xudong; Jin, Zhonghe

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a novel oscillation control algorithm for MEMS vibratory gyroscopes using a modified electromechanical amplitude modulation (MEAM) technique, which enhances the robustness against the frequency variation of the driving mode, compared to the conventional EAM (CEAM) scheme. In this approach, the carrier voltage exerted on the proof mass is frequency-modulated by the drive resonant frequency. Accordingly, the pick-up signal from the interface circuit involves a constant-frequency component that contains the amplitude and phase information of the vibration displacement. In other words, this informational detection signal is independent of the mechanical resonant frequency, which varies due to different batches, imprecise micro-fabrication and changing environmental temperature. In this paper, the automatic gain control loop together with the phase-locked loop are simultaneously analyzed using the averaging method and Routh–Hurwitz criterion, deriving the stability condition and the parameter optimization rules of the transient response. Then, a simulation model based on the real system is set up to evaluate the control algorithm. Further, the proposed MEAM method is tested using a field-programmable-gate-array based digital platform on a capacitive vibratory gyroscope. By optimizing the control parameters, the transient response of the drive amplitude reveals a settling time of 45.2 ms without overshoot, according well with the theoretical prediction and simulation results. The first measurement results show that the amplitude variance of the drive displacement is 12 ppm in an hour while the phase standard deviation is as low as 0.0004°. The mode-split gyroscope operating under atmospheric pressure demonstrates an outstanding performance. By virtue of the proposed MEAM method, the bias instability and angle random walk are measured to be 0.9° h −1 (improved by 2.4 times compared to the CEAM method) and 0.068° (√h) −1 (improved by 1

  12. Phase and amplitude feedback control system for the Los Alamos free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.; Higgins, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    Phase and amplitude feedback control systems for the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) are described. Beam-driven voltages are very high in the buncher cavity because the electron gun is pulsed at the fifth subharmonic of the buncher resonant frequency. The high beam loading necessitated a novel feedback and drive configuration for the buncher. A compensation cirucit has been added to the gun/driver system to reduce observed drift. Extremely small variations in the accelerator gradients had dramatic effects on the laser output power. These problems and how they were solved are described and plans for improvements in the feedback control system are discussed. 5 refs., 7 figs

  13. High Frequency Acoustic Propagation using Level Set Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    solution of the high frequency approximation to the wave equation. Traditional solutions to the Eikonal equation in high frequency acoustics are...the Eikonal equation derived from the high frequency approximation to the wave equation, ucuH ∇±=∇ )(),( xx , with the nonnegative function c(x...For simplicity, we only consider the case ucuH ∇+=∇ )(),( xx . Two difficulties must be addressed when solving the Eikonal equation in a fixed

  14. Effect of ischemia and cooling on the response to high frequency stimulation in rat tail nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.; Nielsen, J.F.; Sørensen, B.

    2000-01-01

    In normal rat tail nerves the effect of temperature and ischemia on the response to long-term high frequency stimulation (HFS) (143 Hz) was studied. The effect of temperature was studied in two consecutive tests at 14 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Prior to the HFS the peak-to-peak amplitude (PP......-amp) of the compound nerve action potential was 139 +/- 20 microV (mean +/- SD) and 127 +/- 37 microV at 35 degrees C and 14 degrees C, respectively (NS). After 15 min of HFS the PP-amp was reduced to 45.3 +/- 20.5% of baseline level at 14 degrees C as compared with 80.8 +/- 10.2% at 35 degrees C (p

  15. High energy behaviour of the scattering amplitude in the presence of confined channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehlen, G.; Rittenberg, V.

    1977-09-01

    The two-channel potential scattering problem in three space-dimensions is considered in the case when one channel is permanently confined. Two examples of confining potentials are considered: the harmonic oscillator and the infinite well. The two cases give radically different results: for the infinite well there is no high energy limit; in the case of the harmonic oscillator the amplitude has properties similar to that of dual absorptive models. (orig.) [de

  16. High frequency dynamics in centrifugal compressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twerda, A.; Meulendijks, D.; Smeulers, J.P.M.; Handel, R. van den; Lier, L.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Problems with centrifugal compressors relating to high frequency, i.e. Blade passing frequency (BPF) are increasing. Pulsations and vibrations generated in centrifugal compressors can lead to nuisance, due to strong tonal noise, and even breakdown. In several cases the root cause of a failure or a

  17. High and low spatial frequencies in website evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielsch, Meinald T; Hirschfeld, Gerrit

    2010-08-01

    Which features of websites are important for users' perceptions regarding aesthetics or usability? This study investigates how evaluations of aesthetic appeal and usability depend on high vs. low spatial frequencies. High spatial frequencies convey information on fine details, whereas low spatial frequencies convey information about the global layout. Participants rated aesthetic appeal and usability of 50 website screenshots from different domains. Screenshots were presented unfiltered, low-pass filtered with blurred targets or high-pass filtered with high-pass filtered targets. The main result is that low spatial frequencies can be seen to have a unique contribution in perceived website aesthetics, thus confirming a central prediction from processing fluency theory. There was no connection between low spatial frequencies and usability evaluations, whereas strong correlations were found between ratings of high-pass filtered websites and those of unfiltered websites in aesthetics and usability. This study thus offers a new perspective on the biological basis of users' website perceptions. This research links ergonomics to neurocognitive models of visual processing. This paper investigates how high and low spatial frequencies, which are neurologically processed in different visual pathways, independently contribute to users' perceptions of websites. This is very relevant for theories of website perceptions and for practitioners of web design.

  18. A simple optical method for measuring the vibration amplitude of a speaker

    OpenAIRE

    UEDA, Masahiro; YAMAGUCHI, Toshihiko; KAKIUCHI, Hiroki; SUGA, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    A simple optical method has been proposed for measuring the vibration amplitude of a speaker vibrating with a frequency of approximately 10 kHz. The method is based on a multiple reflection between a vibrating speaker plane and a mirror parallel to that speaker plane. The multiple reflection can magnify a dispersion of the laser beam caused by the vibration, and easily make a measurement of the amplitude. The measuring sensitivity ranges between sub-microns and 1 mm. A preliminary experim...

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of a thin liquid film on an axially oscillating cylindrical surface subjected to double-frequency forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimovich, Ory; Oron, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a thin axisymmetric liquid film on a horizontal cylindrical substrate subjected to an axial double-frequency forcing that consists of two components of different amplitudes and frequencies and a possible phase shift is considered in this paper. A nonlinear evolution equation governing the spatiotemporal dynamics of the film interface has been derived in the long-wave limit. Similar to the case of a single-frequency forcing considered in our earlier work, there exists a critical forcing amplitude below which the film undergoes a long-time capillary rupture typical for a static cylinder, whereas above it the film remains continuous. We find that it is possible to arrest the rupture even if the forcing parameters of each of the two components correspond separately to the domain where rupture takes place. It is shown that the critical forcing amplitude is easily determined via a single-frequency case when the two forcing frequencies are equal. In the case of different forcing amplitudes and frequencies, the variation of the critical forcing amplitude as a function of the frequency ratio exhibits a unique behavior displaying the emergence of spikes. A related case of an amplitude-modulated single-frequency forcing is also addressed here. For a sufficiently small frequency of the amplitude modulation, a significant increase of the pattern amplitude is observed. In the case of commensurate forcing frequencies, the flow is found to be quasiperiodic.

  20. Resection of ictal high-frequency oscillations leads to favorable surgical outcome in pediatric epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hisako; Greiner, Hansel M.; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Holland-Bouley, Katherine D.; Seo, Joo Hee; Arthur, Todd; Mangano, Francesco T.; Leach, James L.; Rose, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Purpose Intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) is performed as part of an epilepsy surgery evaluation when noninvasive tests are incongruent or the putative seizure-onset zone is near eloquent cortex. Determining the seizure-onset zone using intracranial EEG has been conventionally based on identification of specific ictal patterns with visual inspection. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs, >80 Hz) have been recognized recently as highly correlated with the epileptogenic zone. However, HFOs can be difficult to detect because of their low amplitude. Therefore, the prevalence of ictal HFOs and their role in localization of epileptogenic zone on intracranial EEG are unknown. Methods We identified 48 patients who underwent surgical treatment after the surgical evaluation with intracranial EEG, and 44 patients met criteria for this retrospective study. Results were not used in surgical decision making. Intracranial EEG recordings were collected with a sampling rate of 2,000 Hz. Recordings were first inspected visually to determine ictal onset and then analyzed further with time-frequency analysis. Forty-one (93%) of 44 patients had ictal HFOs determined with time-frequency analysis of intracranial EEG. Key Findings Twenty-two (54%) of the 41 patients with ictal HFOs had complete resection of HFO regions, regardless of frequency bands. Complete resection of HFOs (n = 22) resulted in a seizure-free outcome in 18 (82%) of 22 patients, significantly higher than the seizure-free outcome with incomplete HFO resection (4/19, 21%). Significance Our study shows that ictal HFOs are commonly found with intracranial EEG in our population largely of children with cortical dysplasia, and have localizing value. The use of ictal HFOs may add more promising information compared to interictal HFOs because of the evidence of ictal propagation and followed by clinical aspect of seizures. Complete resection of HFOs is a favorable prognostic indicator for surgical outcome. PMID

  1. Location of long-period events below Kilauea Volcano using seismic amplitudes and accurate relative relocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, J.; Got, J.-L.; Okubo, P.

    2003-01-01

    We present methods for improving the location of long-period (LP) events, deep and shallow, recorded below Kilauea Volcano by the permanent seismic network. LP events might be of particular interest to understanding eruptive processes as their source mechanism is assumed to directly involve fluid transport. However, it is usually difficult or impossible to locate their source using traditional arrival time methods because of emergent wave arrivals. At Kilauea, similar LP waveform signatures suggest the existence of LP multiplets. The waveform similarity suggests spatially close sources, while catalog solutions using arrival time estimates are widely scattered beneath Kilauea's summit caldera. In order to improve estimates of absolute LP location, we use the distribution of seismic amplitudes corrected for station site effects. The decay of the amplitude as a function of hypocentral distance is used for inferring LP location. In a second stage, we use the similarity of the events to calculate their relative positions. The analysis of the entire LP seismicity recorded between January 1997 and December 1999 suggests that a very large part of the LP event population, both deep and shallow, is generated by a small number of compact sources. Deep events are systematically composed of a weak high-frequency onset followed by a low-frequency wave train. Aligning the low-frequency wave trains does not lead to aligning the onsets indicating the two parts of the signal are dissociated. This observation favors an interpretation in terms of triggering and resonance of a magmatic conduit. Instead of defining fault planes, the precise relocation of similar LP events, based on the alignment of the high-energy low-frequency wave trains, defines limited size volumes. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Planck 2015 results: VIII. High Frequency Instrument data processing: Calibration and maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the cleaned, time-ordered information obtained from the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) with the aim of producing photometrically calibrated maps in temperature and (for the first time) in polarization. The data from the entire 2.5-year HFI....... Using a CMB temperature of TCMB = 2.7255 ± 0.0006 K, it permits an independent measurement of the amplitude of the CMB solar dipole (3364.3 ± 1.5 μK), which is approximatively 1σ higher than the WMAP measurement with a direction that is consistent between the two experiments. We describe the pipeline...... used to produce the maps ofintensity and linear polarization from the HFI timelines, and the scheme used to set the zero level of the maps a posteriori. We also summarize the noise characteristics of the HFI maps in the 2015 Planck data release and present some null tests to assess their quality...

  3. Sources for high frequency heating. Performance and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gardeur, R.

    1976-01-01

    The various problems encountered in high frequency heating of plasmas can be decomposed into three spheres of action: theoretical development, antenna designing, and utilization of power sources. By classifying heating into three spectral domains, present and future needs are enumerated. Several specific antenna designs are treated. High frequency power sources are reviewed. The actual development of the gyratron is discussed in view of future needs in very high frequency heating of plasmas [fr

  4. The effect of drive frequency and set point amplitude on tapping forces in atomic force microscopy: simulation and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legleiter, Justin

    2009-01-01

    In tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM), a sharp probe tip attached to an oscillating cantilever is allowed to intermittently strike a surface. By raster scanning the probe while monitoring the oscillation amplitude of the cantilever via a feedback loop, topographical maps of surfaces with nanoscale resolution can be acquired. While numerous studies have employed numerical simulations to elucidate the time-resolved tapping force between the probe tip and surface, until recent technique developments, specific read-outs from such models could not be experimentally verified. In this study, we explore, via numerical simulation, the impact of imaging parameters, i.e. set point ratio and drive frequency as a function of resonance, on time-varying tip-sample force interactions, which are directly compared to reconstructed tapping forces from real AFM experiments. As the AFM model contains a feedback loop allowing for the simulation of the entire scanning process, we further explore the impact that various tip-sample force have on the entire imaging process.

  5. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kye-Si, E-mail: kskwon@sch.ac.kr; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Soonchunhyang University 22, Soonchunhyang-Ro, Shinchang, Asan Chungnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Hyun-Seok [Department of Electrical and Robot Engineering, Soonchunhyang University, 22, Soonchunhyang-Ro, Shinchang, Asan Chungnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  6. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance

  7. Complex demodulation in VLBI estimation of high frequency Earth rotation components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, S.; Brzeziński, A.; Schuh, H.

    2012-12-01

    The spectrum of high frequency Earth rotation variations contains strong harmonic signal components mainly excited by ocean tides along with much weaker non-harmonic fluctuations driven by irregular processes like the diurnal thermal tides in the atmosphere and oceans. In order to properly investigate non-harmonic phenomena a representation in time domain is inevitable. We present a method, operating in time domain, which is easily applicable within Earth rotation estimation from Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). It enables the determination of diurnal and subdiurnal variations, and is still effective with merely diurnal parameter sampling. The features of complex demodulation are used in an extended parameterization of polar motion and universal time which was implemented into a dedicated version of the Vienna VLBI Software VieVS. The functionality of the approach was evaluated by comparing amplitudes and phases of harmonic variations at tidal periods (diurnal/semidiurnal), derived from demodulated Earth rotation parameters (ERP), estimated from hourly resolved VLBI ERP time series and taken from a recently published VLBI ERP model to the terms of the conventional model for ocean tidal effects in Earth rotation recommended by the International Earth Rotation and Reference System Service (IERS). The three sets of tidal terms derived from VLBI observations extensively agree among each other within the three-sigma level of the demodulation approach, which is below 6 μas for polar motion and universal time. They also coincide in terms of differences to the IERS model, where significant deviations primarily for several major tidal terms are apparent. An additional spectral analysis of the as well estimated demodulated ERP series of the ter- and quarterdiurnal frequency bands did not reveal any significant signal structure. The complex demodulation applied in VLBI parameter estimation could be demonstrated a suitable procedure for the reliable reproduction of

  8. Study on resting-state fMRI based on amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation in patients with major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-jie PAN

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe characteristics of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI in patients with major depression and explore the possible pathogenesis. Methods A total of 24 major depression patients and 26 sex-, age- and education-matched healthy controls were scanned with rs-fMRI based on amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF. The correlation between mALFF values of brain regions and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 (HAMD-17 score was analyzed by Spearman rank correlation analysis. Results Compared with control group, mALFF values in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, right orbital superior frontal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, left operculum inferior frontal gyrus, left medial superior frontal gyrus and left gyrus rectus in major depression group were significantly increased (P 0.05, for all. Conclusions Abnormal brain spontaneous activity within default mode network (DMN and limbic system could emerge in major depression patients during resting-state, which may be neurobiological substrate of major depression. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2018.03.005

  9. Neural plasticity in amplitude of low frequency fluctuation, cortical hub construction, regional homogeneity resulting from working memory training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Nouchi, Rui; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Makoto Miyauchi, Carlos; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2017-05-03

    Working memory training (WMT) induces changes in cognitive function and various neurological systems. Here, we investigated changes in recently developed resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging measures of global information processing [degree of the cortical hub, which may have a central role in information integration in the brain, degree centrality (DC)], the magnitude of intrinsic brain activity [fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF)], and local connectivity (regional homogeneity) in young adults, who either underwent WMT or received no intervention for 4 weeks. Compared with no intervention, WMT increased DC in the anatomical cluster, including anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Furthermore, WMT increased fALFF in the anatomical cluster including the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), frontopolar area and mPFC. WMT increased regional homogeneity in the anatomical cluster that spread from the precuneus to posterior cingulate cortex and posterior parietal cortex. These results suggest WMT-induced plasticity in spontaneous brain activity and global and local information processing in areas of the major networks of the brain during rest.

  10. High frequency electromagnetic dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Hernández, David A

    2009-01-01

    Along with the growth of RF and microwave technology applications, there is a mounting concern about the possible adverse effects over human health from electromagnetic radiation. Addressing this issue and putting it into perspective, this groundbreaking resource provides critical details on the latest advances in high frequency electromagnetic dosimetry.

  11. Hybrid Broadband Ground-Motion Simulations: Combining Long-Period Deterministic Synthetics with High-Frequency Multiple S-to-S Backscattering

    KAUST Repository

    Mai, Paul Martin; Imperatori, W.; Olsen, K. B.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new approach for computing broadband (0-10 Hz) synthetic seismograms by combining high-frequency (HF) scattering with low-frequency (LF) deterministic seismograms, considering finite-fault earthquake rupture models embedded in 3D earth structure. Site-specific HF-scattering Green's functions for a heterogeneous medium with uniformly distributed random isotropic scatterers are convolved with a source-time function that characterizes the temporal evolution of the rupture process. These scatterograms are then reconciled with the LF-deterministic waveforms using a frequency-domain optimization to match both amplitude and phase spectra around the target intersection frequency. The scattering parameters of the medium, scattering attenuation ηs, intrinsic attenuation ηi, and site-kappa, as well as frequency-dependent attenuation, determine waveform and spectral character of the HF-synthetics and thus affect the hybrid broadband seismograms. Applying our methodology to the 1994 Northridge earthquake and validating against near-field recordings at 24 sites, we find that our technique provides realistic broadband waveforms and consistently reproduces LF ground-motion intensities for two independent source descriptions. The least biased results, compared to recorded strong-motion data, are obtained after applying a frequency-dependent site-amplification factor to the broadband simulations. This innovative hybrid ground-motion simulation approach, applicable to any arbitrarily complex earthquake source model, is well suited for seismic hazard analysis and ground-motion estimation.

  12. Hybrid Broadband Ground-Motion Simulations: Combining Long-Period Deterministic Synthetics with High-Frequency Multiple S-to-S Backscattering

    KAUST Repository

    Mai, Paul Martin

    2010-09-20

    We present a new approach for computing broadband (0-10 Hz) synthetic seismograms by combining high-frequency (HF) scattering with low-frequency (LF) deterministic seismograms, considering finite-fault earthquake rupture models embedded in 3D earth structure. Site-specific HF-scattering Green\\'s functions for a heterogeneous medium with uniformly distributed random isotropic scatterers are convolved with a source-time function that characterizes the temporal evolution of the rupture process. These scatterograms are then reconciled with the LF-deterministic waveforms using a frequency-domain optimization to match both amplitude and phase spectra around the target intersection frequency. The scattering parameters of the medium, scattering attenuation ηs, intrinsic attenuation ηi, and site-kappa, as well as frequency-dependent attenuation, determine waveform and spectral character of the HF-synthetics and thus affect the hybrid broadband seismograms. Applying our methodology to the 1994 Northridge earthquake and validating against near-field recordings at 24 sites, we find that our technique provides realistic broadband waveforms and consistently reproduces LF ground-motion intensities for two independent source descriptions. The least biased results, compared to recorded strong-motion data, are obtained after applying a frequency-dependent site-amplification factor to the broadband simulations. This innovative hybrid ground-motion simulation approach, applicable to any arbitrarily complex earthquake source model, is well suited for seismic hazard analysis and ground-motion estimation.

  13. The strange physics of low frequency mirror mode turbulence in the high temperature plasma of the magnetosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror mode turbulence is the lowest frequency perpendicular magnetic excitation in magnetized plasma proposed already about half a century ago by Rudakov and Sagdeev (1958 and Chandrasekhar et al. (1958 from fluid theory. Its experimental verification required a relatively long time. It was early recognized that mirror modes for being excited require a transverse pressure (or temperature anisotropy. In principle mirror modes are some version of slow mode waves. Fluid theory, however, does not give a correct physical picture of the mirror mode. The linear infinitesimally small amplitude physics is described correctly only by including the full kinetic theory and is modified by existing spatial gradients of the plasma parameters which attribute a small finite frequency to the mode. In addition, the mode is propagating only very slowly in plasma such that convective transport is the main cause of flow in it. As the lowest frequency mode it can be expected that mirror modes serve as one of the dominant energy inputs into plasma. This is however true only when the mode grows to large amplitude leaving the linear stage. At such low frequencies, on the other hand, quasilinear theory does not apply as a valid saturation mechanism. Probably the dominant processes are related to the generation of gradients in the plasma which serve as the cause of drift modes thus transferring energy to shorter wavelength propagating waves of higher nonzero frequency. This kind of theory has not yet been developed as it has not yet been understood why mirror modes in spite of their slow growth rate usually are of very large amplitudes indeed of the order of |B/B0|2~O(1. It is thus highly reasonable to assume that mirror modes are instrumental for the development of stationary turbulence in high temperature plasma. Moreover, since the magnetic field in mirror turbulence forms extended though slightly oblique magnetic bottles, low parallel energy particles can be trapped

  14. Laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbert, Gaylen V.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to a laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity. It is known in the prior art to utilize a PZT (piezoelectric transducer) element in combination with a mirror to change the cavity length of a laser cavity (which changes the laser frequency). Using a PZT element to drive the mirror directly is adequate at frequencies below 10 kHz. However, in high frequency applications (100 kHz and higher) PZT elements alone do not provide a sufficient change in the cavity length. The present invention utilizes an ultrasonic concentrator with a PZT element and mirror to provide modulation of the laser cavity. With an ultrasonic concentrator, the mirror element at the end of a laser cavity can move at larger amplitudes and higher frequencies.

  15. A Study on Scattered Wave Amplitude Closed-Form Solution Calculation of Torsional Wave Mode by Reciprocity Theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaesun; Cho, Younho; Achenbach, Jan D.

    2016-01-01

    Guided waves can be used for the inspection of long range pipelines. Surface corrosion is often found as a major defect type in pipelines. The reciprocity relation is a well-established theorem by which one can simplify complicated mathematical expressions. The approach has been already applied to plate and half-space structures to obtain the closed-form solutions of scattered amplitude. However, results for the case of cylindrical structures have not been reported yet. In this paper, the scattering of torsional waves, which is widely used in commercial applications, is explored by the reciprocity theorem approach. Obtaining closed-form solutions of the amplitudes of propagating waves is much simplified by using the reciprocal relation. The scattered amplitudes for elliptical and rectangular defect shapes are calculated with respect to defect depth and width, at frequencies between 0 and 500 kHz. The amplitude shows the periodic result as a function of frequency. The derived closed-form solutions can play a significant role in quantitative signal interpretation

  16. A Study on Scattered Wave Amplitude Closed-Form Solution Calculation of Torsional Wave Mode by Reciprocity Theorem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jaesun; Cho, Younho [Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Achenbach, Jan D. [Northwestern Univ., Everston (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Guided waves can be used for the inspection of long range pipelines. Surface corrosion is often found as a major defect type in pipelines. The reciprocity relation is a well-established theorem by which one can simplify complicated mathematical expressions. The approach has been already applied to plate and half-space structures to obtain the closed-form solutions of scattered amplitude. However, results for the case of cylindrical structures have not been reported yet. In this paper, the scattering of torsional waves, which is widely used in commercial applications, is explored by the reciprocity theorem approach. Obtaining closed-form solutions of the amplitudes of propagating waves is much simplified by using the reciprocal relation. The scattered amplitudes for elliptical and rectangular defect shapes are calculated with respect to defect depth and width, at frequencies between 0 and 500 kHz. The amplitude shows the periodic result as a function of frequency. The derived closed-form solutions can play a significant role in quantitative signal interpretation.

  17. Potential damage to DC superconducting magnets due to the high frequency electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data are presented in support of the hypothesis that a dc superconducting magnet coil does not behave strictly as an inductor, but as a complicated electrodynamic device capable of supporting electromagnetic waves. Travel times of nanosecond pulses and evidence of sinusoidal standing waves were observed on a prototype four-layer solenoidal coil at room temperature. Ringing observed during switching transients appears as a sequence of multiple reflected square pulses whose durations are related to the layer lengths. With sinusoidal excitation of the coil, the voltage amplitude between a pair of points on the coil exhibits maxima at those frequencies such that the distance between these points is an odd multiple of half wavelength in free space. Evidence indicates that any disturbance, such as that resulting from switching or sudden fault, initiates multiple reflections between layers, thus raising the possibility for sufficiently high voltages to cause breakdown.

  18. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  19. Detection of small-amplitude periodic surface pressure fluctuation by pressure-sensitive paint measurements using frequency-domain methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Takahiro; Nakakita, Kazuyki; Wakahara, Masaki; Kameda, Masaharu

    2018-06-01

    Image measurement using pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is an effective tool for analyzing the unsteady pressure field on the surface of a body in a low-speed air flow, which is associated with wind noise. In this study, the surface pressure fluctuation due to the tonal trailing edge (TE) noise for a two-dimensional NACA 0012 airfoil was quantitatively detected using a porous anodized aluminum PSP (AA-PSP). The emission from the PSP upon illumination by a blue laser diode was captured using a 12-bit high-speed complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera. The intensities of the captured images were converted to pressures using a standard intensity-based method. Three image-processing methods based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT) were tested to determine their efficiency in improving the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the unsteady PSP data. In addition to two fundamental FFT techniques (the full data and ensemble averaging FFTs), a technique using the coherent output power (COP), which involves the cross correlation between the PSP data and the signal measured using a pointwise sound-level meter, was tested. Preliminary tests indicated that random photon shot noise dominates the intensity fluctuations in the captured PSP emissions above 200 Hz. Pressure fluctuations associated with the TE noise, whose dominant frequency is approximately 940 Hz, were successfully measured by analyzing 40,960 sequential PSP images recorded at 10 kfps. Quantitative validation using the power spectrum indicates that the COP technique is the most effective method of identification of the pressure fluctuation directly related to TE noise. It is possible to distinguish power differences with a resolution of 10 Pa^2 (4 Pa in amplitude) when the COP was employed without use of another wind-off data. This resolution cannot be achieved by the ensemble averaging FFT because of an insufficient elimination of the background noise.

  20. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  1. Explosion Amplitude Reduction due to Fractures in Water-Saturated and Dry Granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroujkova, A. F.; Leidig, M.; Bonner, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Empirical observations made at the Semipalatinsk Test Site suggest that nuclear tests in the fracture zones left by previous explosions ('repeat shots') show reduced seismic amplitudes compared to the nuclear tests in virgin rocks. Likely mechanisms for the amplitude reduction in the repeat shots include increased porosity and reduced strength and elastic moduli, leading to pore closing and frictional sliding. Presence of pore water significantly decreases rock compressibility and strength, thus affecting seismic amplitudes. A series of explosion experiments were conducted in order to define the physical mechanism responsible for the amplitude reduction and to quantify the degree of the amplitude reduction in fracture zones of previously detonated explosions. Explosions in water-saturated granite were conducted in central New Hampshire in 2011 and 2012. Additional explosions in dry granite were detonated in Barre, VT in 2013. The amplitude reduction is different between dry and water-saturated crystalline rocks. Significant reduction in seismic amplitudes (by a factor of 2-3) in water-saturated rocks was achieved only when the repeat shot was detonated in the extensive damage zone created by a significantly larger (by a factor of 5) explosion. In case where the first and the second explosions were similar in yield, the amplitude reduction was relatively modest (5-20%). In dry rocks the amplitude reduction reached a factor of 2 even in less extensive damage zones. In addition there are differences in frequency dependence of the spectral amplitude ratios between explosions in dry and water-saturated rocks. Thus the amplitude reduction is sensitive to the extent of the damage zone as well as the pore water content.

  2. Association between pain episodes and high amplitude propagated pressure waves in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clemens, C. H. M.; Samsom, M.; Roelofs, J. M. M.; van Berge Henegouwen, G. P.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), both increased visceral sensitivity and altered colonic motility seem to play a role. The aim of this study was to quantify the temporal relationship between pain episodes and the occurrence of high amplitude propagated pressure

  3. Assessment of network perturbation amplitudes by applying high-throughput data to causal biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Florian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput measurement technologies produce data sets that have the potential to elucidate the biological impact of disease, drug treatment, and environmental agents on humans. The scientific community faces an ongoing challenge in the analysis of these rich data sources to more accurately characterize biological processes that have been perturbed at the mechanistic level. Here, a new approach is built on previous methodologies in which high-throughput data was interpreted using prior biological knowledge of cause and effect relationships. These relationships are structured into network models that describe specific biological processes, such as inflammatory signaling or cell cycle progression. This enables quantitative assessment of network perturbation in response to a given stimulus. Results Four complementary methods were devised to quantify treatment-induced activity changes in processes described by network models. In addition, companion statistics were developed to qualify significance and specificity of the results. This approach is called Network Perturbation Amplitude (NPA scoring because the amplitudes of treatment-induced perturbations are computed for biological network models. The NPA methods were tested on two transcriptomic data sets: normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells treated with the pro-inflammatory signaling mediator TNFα, and HCT116 colon cancer cells treated with the CDK cell cycle inhibitor R547. Each data set was scored against network models representing different aspects of inflammatory signaling and cell cycle progression, and these scores were compared with independent measures of pathway activity in NHBE cells to verify the approach. The NPA scoring method successfully quantified the amplitude of TNFα-induced perturbation for each network model when compared against NF-κB nuclear localization and cell number. In addition, the degree and specificity to which CDK

  4. High-frequency and microwave circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Charles

    2007-01-01

    An integral part of any communications system, high-frequency and microwave design stimulates major progress in the wireless world and continues to serve as a foundation for the commercial wireless products we use every day. The exceptional pace of advancement in developing these systems stipulates that engineers be well versed in multiple areas of electronics engineering. With more illustrations, examples, and worked problems, High-Frequency and Microwave Circuit Design, Second Edition provides engineers with a diverse body of knowledge they can use to meet the needs of this rapidly progressi

  5. Generation of tunable, high repetition rate frequency combs with equalized spectra using carrier injection based silicon modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarjun, K. P.; Selvaraja, Shankar Kumar; Supradeepa, V. R.

    2016-03-01

    High repetition-rate frequency combs with tunable repetition rate and carrier frequency are extensively used in areas like Optical communications, Microwave Photonics and Metrology. A common technique for their generation is strong phase modulation of a CW-laser. This is commonly implemented using Lithium-Niobate based modulators. With phase modulation alone, the combs have poor spectral flatness and significant number of missing lines. To overcome this, a complex cascade of multiple intensity and phase modulators are used. A comb generator on Silicon based on these principles is desirable to enable on-chip integration with other functionalities while reducing power consumption and footprint. In this work, we analyse frequency comb generation in carrier injection based Silicon modulators. We observe an interesting effect in these comb generators. Enhanced absorption accompanying carrier injection, an undesirable effect in data modulators, shapes the amplitude here to enable high quality combs from a single modulator. Thus, along with reduced power consumption to generate a specific number of lines, the complexity has also been significantly reduced. We use a drift-diffusion solver and mode solver (Silvaco TCAD) along with Soref-Bennett relations to calculate the variations in refractive indices and absorption of an optimized Silicon PIN - waveguide modulator driven by an unbiased high frequency (10 Ghz) voltage signal. Our simulations demonstrate that with a device length of 1 cm, a driving voltage of 2V and minor shaping with a passive ring-resonator filter, we obtain 37 lines with a flatness better than 5-dB across the band and power consumption an order of magnitude smaller than Lithium-Niobate modulators.

  6. Tuning of spinal networks to frequency components of spike trains in individual afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerber, H R; Seymour, A W; Mendell, L M

    1991-10-01

    Cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) evoked by primary afferent fiber stimulation reflect the response of postsynaptic dorsal horn neurons. The properties of these CDPs have been shown to vary in accordance with the type of primary afferent fiber stimulated. The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationships between frequency modulation of the afferent input trains, the amplitude modulation of the evoked CDPs, and the type of primary afferent stimulated. The somata of individual primary afferent fibers were impaled in the L7 dorsal root ganglion of alpha-chloralose-anesthetized cats. Action potentials (APs) were evoked in single identified afferents via the intracellular microelectrode while simultaneously recording the response of dorsal horn neurons as CDPs, or activity of individual target interneurons recorded extracellularly or intracellularly. APs were evoked in afferents using temporal patterns identical to the responses of selected afferents to natural stimulation of their receptive fields. Two such physiologically realistic trains, one recorded from a hair follicle and the other from a slowly adapting type 1 receptor, were chosen as standard test trains. Modulation of CDP amplitude in response to this frequency-modulated afferent activity varied according to the type of peripheral mechanoreceptor innervated. Dorsal horn networks driven by A beta afferents innervating hair follicles, rapidly adapting pad (Krause end bulb), and field receptors seemed "tuned" to amplify the onset of activity in single afferents. Networks driven by afferents innervating down hair follicles and pacinian corpuscles required more high-frequency activity to elicit their peak response. Dorsal horn networks driven by afferents innervating slowly adapting receptors including high-threshold mechanoreceptors exhibited some sensitivity to the instantaneous frequency, but in general they reproduced the activity in the afferent fiber much more faithfully. Responses of

  7. Color guided amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broedel, Johannes [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Dixon, Lance J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Amplitudes in gauge thoeries obtain contributions from color and kinematics. While these two parts of the amplitude seem to exhibit different symmetry structures, it turns out that they can be reorganized in a way to behave equally, which leads to the so-called color-kinematic dual representations of amplitudes. Astonishingly, the existence of those representations allows squaring to related gravitational theories right away. Contrary to the Kawaii-Levellen-Tye relations, which have been used to relate gauge theories and gravity previously, this method is applicable not only to tree amplitudes but also at loop level. In this talk, the basic technique is introduced followed by a discussion of the existence of color-kinematic dual representations for amplitudes derived from gauge theory actions which are deformed by higher-operator insertions. In addition, it is commented on the implications for deformed gravitational theories.

  8. Nonlinear ultrasound propagation through layered liquid and tissue-equivalent media: computational and experimental results at high frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Ross; Cherin, Emmanuel; Lam, Toby Y J; Tavakkoli, Jahangir; Zemp, Roger J; Foster, F Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear propagation has been demonstrated to have a significant impact on ultrasound imaging. An efficient computational algorithm is presented to simulate nonlinear ultrasound propagation through layered liquid and tissue-equivalent media. Results are compared with hydrophone measurements. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of nonlinear propagation in high frequency ultrasound micro-imaging. The acoustic field of a focused transducer (20 MHz centre frequency, f-number 2.5) was simulated for layered media consisting of water and tissue-mimicking phantom, for several wide-bandwidth source pulses. The simulation model accounted for the effects of diffraction, attenuation and nonlinearity, with transmission and refraction at layer boundaries. The parameter of nonlinearity, B/A, of the water and tissue-mimicking phantom were assumed to be 5.2 and 7.4, respectively. The experimentally measured phantom B/A value found using a finite-amplitude insert-substitution method was shown to be 7.4 ± 0.6. Relative amounts of measured second and third harmonic pressures as a function of the fundamental pressures at the focus were in good agreement with simulations. Agreement within 3% was found between measurements and simulations of the beam widths of the fundamental and second harmonic signals following propagation through the tissue phantom. The results demonstrate significant nonlinear propagation effects for high frequency imaging beams

  9. A General Method to Estimate Earthquake Moment and Magnitude using Regional Phase Amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasyanos, M E

    2009-11-19

    This paper presents a general method of estimating earthquake magnitude using regional phase amplitudes, called regional M{sub o} or regional M{sub w}. Conceptually, this method uses an earthquake source model along with an attenuation model and geometrical spreading which accounts for the propagation to utilize regional phase amplitudes of any phase and frequency. Amplitudes are corrected to yield a source term from which one can estimate the seismic moment. Moment magnitudes can then be reliably determined with sets of observed phase amplitudes rather than predetermined ones, and afterwards averaged to robustly determine this parameter. We first examine in detail several events to demonstrate the methodology. We then look at various ensembles of phases and frequencies, and compare results to existing regional methods. We find regional M{sub o} to be a stable estimator of earthquake size that has several advantages over other methods. Because of its versatility, it is applicable to many more events, particularly smaller events. We make moment estimates for earthquakes ranging from magnitude 2 to as large as 7. Even with diverse input amplitude sources, we find magnitude estimates to be more robust than typical magnitudes and existing regional methods and might be tuned further to improve upon them. The method yields a more meaningful quantity of seismic moment, which can be recast as M{sub w}. Lastly, it is applied here to the Middle East region using an existing calibration model, but it would be easy to transport to any region with suitable attenuation calibration.

  10. Investigation of non-uniform airflow signal oscillation during high frequency chest compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jongwon

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High frequency chest compression (HFCC is a useful and popular therapy for clearing bronchial airways of excessive or thicker mucus. Our observation of respiratory airflow of a subject during use of HFCC showed the airflow oscillation by HFCC was strongly influenced by the nonlinearity of the respiratory system. We used a computational model-based approach to analyse the respiratory airflow during use of HFCC. Methods The computational model, which is based on previous physiological studies and represented by an electrical circuit analogue, was used for simulation of in vivo protocol that shows the nonlinearity of the respiratory system. Besides, airflow was measured during use of HFCC. We compared the simulation results to either the measured data or the previous research, to understand and explain the observations. Results and discussion We could observe two important phenomena during respiration pertaining to the airflow signal oscillation generated by HFCC. The amplitudes of HFCC airflow signals varied depending on spontaneous airflow signals. We used the simulation results to investigate how the nonlinearity of airway resistance, lung capacitance, and inertance of air characterized the respiratory airflow. The simulation results indicated that lung capacitance or the inertance of air is also not a factor in the non-uniformity of HFCC airflow signals. Although not perfect, our circuit analogue model allows us to effectively simulate the nonlinear characteristics of the respiratory system. Conclusion We found that