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Sample records for fracture risk rate

  1. Fracture risk assessed by Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) compared with fracture risk derived from population fracture rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, Katrine Hass; Abrahamsen, Bo; Hermann, Anne Pernille

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of the Swedish version of Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX)) without bone mass density (BMD) in a Danish population to examine the possibility of applying this version to Danish women. METHODS: From the Danish National Register of social security numbers, we...

  2. Increased fracture rate in women with breast cancer: a review of the hidden risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Body Jean-Jacques

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women with breast cancer, particularly individuals diagnosed at a relatively early age, have an increased incidence of fractures. Fractures can have serious clinical consequences including the need for major surgery, increased morbidity and mortality, increased cost of disease management, and reduced quality of life for patients. The primary cause of the increased fracture risk appears to be an accelerated decrease in bone mineral density (BMD resulting from the loss of estrogenic signaling that occurs with most treatments for breast cancer, including aromatase inhibitors. However, factors other than BMD levels alone may influence treatment decisions to reduce fracture risk in this setting. Our purpose is to review current evidence for BMD loss and fracture risk during treatment for breast cancer and discuss pharmacologic means to reduce this risk. Results Fracture risk during treatment for breast cancer may be influenced by the rate of BMD loss and the consequent rapid alterations in bone microarchitecture, in addition to the established fracture risk factors in postmenopausal osteoporosis. The rapid decrease in BMD during adjuvant chemoendocrine therapy for breast cancer may necessitate more aggressive pharmacotherapy than is indicated for healthy postmenopausal women who develop osteoporosis. Over the last few years, clinical trials have established the effectiveness of bisphosphonates and other antiresorptive agents to preserve BMD during adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer. In addition, some bisphosphonates (eg, zoledronic acid may also delay disease recurrence in women with hormone-responsive tumors, thereby providing an adjuvant benefit in addition to preserving BMD and potentially preventing fractures. Conclusions It is likely that a combined fracture risk assessment (eg, as in the WHO FRAX algorithm will more accurately identify both women with postmenopausal osteoporosis and women with breast cancer who require

  3. Assessment of fracture risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanis, John A.; Johansson, Helena; Oden, Anders; McCloskey, Eugene V.

    2009-01-01

    Fractures are a common complication of osteoporosis. Although osteoporosis is defined by bone mineral density at the femoral neck, other sites and validated techniques can be used for fracture prediction. Several clinical risk factors contribute to fracture risk independently of BMD. These include age, prior fragility fracture, smoking, excess alcohol, family history of hip fracture, rheumatoid arthritis and the use of oral glucocorticoids. These risk factors in conjunction with BMD can be integrated to provide estimates of fracture probability using the FRAX tool. Fracture probability rather than BMD alone can be used to fashion strategies for the assessment and treatment of osteoporosis.

  4. Effect of Birth Cohort on Risk of Hip Fracture: Age-Specific Incidence Rates in the Framingham Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelson, Elizabeth J.; Zhang, Yuqing; Kiel, Douglas P.; Hannan, Marian T.; Felson, David T.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. This study examined the effect of birth cohort on incidence rates of hip fracture among women and men in the Framingham Study. Methods. Age-specific incidence rates of first hip fracture were presented according to tertile of year of birth for 5209 participants of the Framingham Study, a population-based cohort followed since 1948. Sex-specific incidence rate ratios were calculated by Cox regression to assess the relation between birth cohort and hip fracture incidence. Results. An increasing trend in hip fracture incidence rates was observed with year of birth for women (trend, P = .05) and men (trend, P = .03). Relative to those born from 1887 to 1900 (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.0), age-specific incidence rates were greatest in the most recent birth cohort, born from 1911 to 1921 (IRR = 1.4 for women, IRR = 2.0 for men), and intermediate in those born from 1901 to 1910 (IRR = 1.2 for women, IRR = 1.5 for men). Conclusions. Results suggest risk of hip fracture is increasing for successive birth cohorts. Projections that fail to account for the increase in rates associated with birth cohort underestimate the future public health impact of hip fracture in the United States. PMID:11988460

  5. Incidence rate of mild traumatic brain injury among patients who have suffered from an isolated limb fracture: Upper limb fracture patients are more at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodoin, Marianne; Rouleau, Dominique M; Charlebois-Plante, Camille; Benoit, Benoit; Leduc, Stéphane; Laflamme, G-Yves; Gosselin, Nadia; Larson-Dupuis, Camille; De Beaumont, Louis

    2016-08-01

    This study compares the incidence rate of mild traumatic brain injury (mild TBI) detected at follow-up visits (retrospective diagnosis) in patients suffering from an isolated limb trauma, with the incidence rate held by the hospital records (prospective diagnosis) of the sampled cohort. This study also seeks to determine which types of fractures present with the highest incidence of mild TBI. Retrospective assessment of mild TBI among orthopaedic monotrauma patients, randomly selected for participation in an Orthopaedic clinic of a Level I Trauma Hospital. Patients in the remission phase of a limb fracture were recruited between August 2014 and May 2015. No intervention was done (observational study). Standardized semi-structured interviews were conducted with all patients to retrospectively assess for mild TBI at the time of the fracture. Emergency room related medical records of all patients were carefully analyzed to determine whether a prospective mild TBI diagnosis was made following the accident. A total of 251 patients were recruited (54% females, Mean age=49). Study interview revealed a 23.5% incidence rate of mild TBI compared to an incidence rate of 8.8% for prospective diagnosis (χ(2)=78.47; plimb monotrauma (29.6%; n=42/142) are significantly more at risk of sustaining a mild TBI compared to lower limb fractures (15.6%; n=17/109) (χ(2)=6.70; p=0.010). More specifically, patients with a proximal upper limb injury were significantly more at risk of sustaining concomitant mild TBI (40.6%; 26/64) compared to distal upper limb fractures (20.25%; 16/79) (χ(2)=7.07; p=0.008). Results suggest an important concomitance of mild TBI among orthopaedic trauma patients, the majority of which go undetected during acute care. Patients treated for an upper limb fracture are particularly at risk of sustaining concomitant mild TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Obesity and fracture risk

    OpenAIRE

    Gonnelli, Stefano; Caffarelli, Carla; Nuti, Ranuccio

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and osteoporosis are two common diseases with an increasing prevalence and a high impact on morbidity and mortality. Obese women have always been considered protected against osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. However, several recent studies have challenged the widespread belief that obesity is protective against fracture and have suggested that obesity is a risk factor for certain fractures.

  7. The impact of lifestyle risk factors on the rate of infection after surgery for a fracture of the ankle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, L L; Møller, A M; Brorson, S

    2017-01-01

    .PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients who underwent internal fixation of a fracture of the ankle between 2008 and 2013. The primary outcome was the rate of deep infection and the secondary outcome was any surgical site infection (SSI). Associations with the risk factors and possible.......032) in all analyses. Alcohol overuse was similarly associated, though significant only in unadjusted analyses. Surprisingly, smoking did not yield statistically significant associations with infections.CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that obesity and possibly alcohol overuse are independent risk factors...

  8. Risk factors for stress fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, K; Matheson, G; Meeuwisse, W; Brukner, P

    1999-08-01

    Preventing stress fractures requires knowledge of the risk factors that predispose to this injury. The aetiology of stress fractures is multifactorial, but methodological limitations and expediency often lead to research study designs that evaluate individual risk factors. Intrinsic risk factors include mechanical factors such as bone density, skeletal alignment and body size and composition, physiological factors such as bone turnover rate, flexibility, and muscular strength and endurance, as well as hormonal and nutritional factors. Extrinsic risk factors include mechanical factors such as surface, footwear and external loading as well as physical training parameters. Psychological traits may also play a role in increasing stress fracture risk. Equally important to these types of analyses of individual risk factors is the integration of information to produce a composite picture of risk. The purpose of this paper is to critically appraise the existing literature by evaluating study design and quality, in order to provide a current synopsis of the known scientific information related to stress fracture risk factors. The literature is not fully complete with well conducted studies on this topic, but a great deal of information has accumulated over the past 20 years. Although stress fractures result from repeated loading, the exact contribution of training factors (volume, intensity, surface) has not been clearly established. From what we do know, menstrual disturbances, caloric restriction, lower bone density, muscle weakness and leg length differences are risk factors for stress fracture. Other time-honoured risk factors such as lower extremity alignment have not been shown to be causative even though anecdotal evidence indicates they are likely to play an important role in stress fracture pathogenesis.

  9. An increased rate of falling leads to a rise in fracture risk in postmenopausal women with self-reported osteoarthritis: a prospective multinational cohort study (GLOW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Nogues, Xavier; Javaid, M Kassim; Wyman, Allison; Arden, Nigel K; Azagra, Rafael; Cooper, Cyrus; Adachi, Jonathan D; Boonen, Steven; Chapurlat, Roland D; Compston, Juliet E; Gehlbach, Stephen H; Greenspan, Susan L; Hooven, Frederick H; Netelenbos, J Coen; Pfeilschifter, Johannes; Rossini, Maurizio; Sambrook, Philip N; Silverman, Stuart; Siris, Ethel S; Watts, Nelson B; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo

    2013-06-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis have increased bone mass but no decrease in fractures. The association between self-reported osteoarthritis and incident falls and fractures was studied in postmenopausal women. The Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women is a prospective multinational cohort of 60,393 non-institutionalised women aged ≥55 years who had visited primary care practices within the previous 2 years. Questionnaires were mailed at yearly intervals. Patients were classified as having osteoarthritis if they answered yes to the question, 'Has a doctor or other health provider ever said that you had osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease?', and this was validated against primary care records in a subsample. Information on incident falls, fractures and covariates was self-reported. Cox and Poisson models were used for incident fractures and number of falls, respectively, to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and rate ratios (RRs) for baseline osteoarthritis status. Of 51 386 women followed for a median of 2.9 years (interquartile range 2.1-3.0), 20 409 (40%) reported osteoarthritis. The adjusted HR for osteoarthritis predicting fracture was 1.21 (95% CI 1.13 to 1.30; pfalls was 1.24 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.26; pfalls (HR 1.06 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.15; p=0.13)). Postmenopausal women with self-reported osteoarthritis have a 20% increased risk of fracture and experience 25% more falls than those without osteoarthritis. These data suggest that increased falls are the causal pathway of the association between osteoarthritis and fractures.

  10. Fractures and the increased risk of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C-F; Lai, E C-C; Yeh, M-K

    2018-06-01

    Aims A high rate of suicide has been reported in patients who sustain fractures, but the association remains uncertain in the context of other factors. The aim of this study was to examine the association between fractures and the risk of suicide in this contextual setting. Patients and Methods We performed a case-control study of patients aged 40 years or older who died by suicide between 2000 and 2011. We included patients' demographics, physical and mental health problems, and socioeconomic factors. We performed conditional logistic regression to evaluate the associations between fractures and the risk of suicide. Results We included a total of 34 794 patients who died by suicide and 139 176 control patients. We found that fractures as a homogenous group (adjusted odds ratios (aOR), 1.48; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.43 to 1.53), and specifically pelvic (aOR 2.04; 95% CI 1.68 to 2.47) and spinal fractures (aOR 1.53; 95% CI 1.43 to 1.64), were associated with a higher risk of suicide. In addition, we found that patients who had a lower income, had never married, had lower levels of educational attainment, or had coexistent physical and mental conditions such as anxiety, mood disorders, and psychosis-related disorders had a higher risk of suicide. Conclusion Fractures, specifically those of the hip and spine, were associated with an increased risk of suicide. The findings suggest that greater clinical attention should be given to this risk in patients with fractures, especially for those with additional risk factors. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:780-6.

  11. Fracture Risk and Risk Factors for Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürer, Christian; Wallaschofski, Henri; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry; Schober, Hans-Christof; Hannemann, Anke

    2015-05-25

    As the population ages, diseases of the elderly are becoming more common, including osteoporosis. Ways to assess the risk of fracture and the distribution and effects of known risk factors for osteoporosis will be important in planning for future healthcare needs, as well as in the development of preventive strategies. The study population included 6029 men and women aged 20-90 who underwent examination in the second follow-up wave of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-2) or in the basal SHIP-Trend Study. The risk of fracture was estimated on the basis of quantitative ultrasonography of the calcaneus. Prior fractures and risk factors for osteoporosis were ascertained in standardized interviews. 4.6% of the male subjects and 10.6% of the female subjects were judged to have an elevated risk of fracture. The corresponding percentages among subjects over age 65 were 8.8% for men and 28.2% for women. Even among subjects under age 55, risk factors for osteoporosis were associated with lower bone stiffness: the mean stiffness index was 103/98 (men/women) without risk factors, 99/96 with one risk factor, and 93/95 with more than one risk factor. Logistic regression analysis yielded an odds ratio of 1.89 (95% confidence interval: 1.44-2.50; p<0.01) for prevalent fractures among subjects aged 75 and older compared to subjects under age 55. The data indicate a high prevalence of osteoporosis from age 65 onward. These findings are consistent with those of other studies from Germany and across Europe. Younger men and women should already begin taking steps to counteract modifiable risk factors.

  12. Lithium use and the risk of fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilting, Ingeborg; de Vries, Frank; Thio, Brahm M. K. S.; Cooper, Cyrus; Heerdink, Eibert R.; Leutkens, Hubert G. M.; Nolen, Willem A.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.; van Staa, Tjeerd P.

    A recent study reported a decreased risk of fractures among lithium users. We conducted a case-control study within the UK General Practice Research Database, comparing never, ever, current, recent and past lithium use in 231,778 fracture cases to matched controls. In addition, the risk of fractures

  13. Methodology for identifying patients at high risk for osteoporotic fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, G; Littlefield, R; Heaton, A; Martin, S

    2001-09-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. The purpose of this paper is to present and validate a mathematical model that managed care organizations can apply to administrative claims data to help locate members at risk for osteoporotic fracture and estimate future fracture rates. Using known risk factors from previous clinical studies, 92,000 members of a large Midwest health plan were placed in 1 of 4 risk categories based on historical claims markers: demographic/lifestyle (age, sex, smoking, alcoholism); steroid use; medical history (previous osteoporotic fracture, ordinary bone fracture, osteoporosis diagnosis, bone mineral density test); or steroid use with medical history. Logistic regression was used to assign a probability of fracture for the 4 groups over the next 2 years. These predictions were compared with actual fracture rates, and refined models were produced. The models were then validated by applying them to current data and comparing the predicted fracture rate for each group to known results. The model predicted that 1.26% of the study members would experience osteoporotic fracture over the next 2 years; the actual result was 1.27%. Within the 4 risk groups, the predicted fracture rates were lower than the actual rates for the demographic risk group (0.87% predicted vs 0.97% actual) and higher than the actual rates for the steroid use (1.78% predicted vs 1.58% actual), medical history (5.90% predicted vs 4.94% actual), and the steroid use with medical history groups (7.80% predicted vs 6.42% actual). The application of this risk model to an administrative claims database successfully identified plan members at risk for osteoporotic fracture.

  14. Prolonged operative time increases infection rate in tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Matthew; Wright, Adam; Gruen, Gary; Siska, Peter; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Tarkin, Ivan

    2013-02-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau present a treatment challenge and are susceptible to both prolonged operative times and high postoperative infection rates. For those fractures treated with open plating, we sought to identify the relationship between surgical site infection and prolonged operative time as well as to identify other surgical risk factors. We performed a retrospective controlled analysis of 309 consecutive unicondylar and bicondylar tibial plateau fractures treated with open plate osteosynthesis at our institution's level I trauma centre during a recent 5-year period. We recorded operative times, injury characteristics, surgical treatment, and need for operative debridement due to infection. Operative times of infected cases were compared to uncomplicated surgical cases. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent risk factors for postoperative infection. Mean operative time in the infection group was 2.8h vs. 2.2h in the non-infected group (p=0.005). 15 fractures (4.9%) underwent four compartment fasciotomies as part of their treatment, with a significantly higher infection rate than those not undergoing fasciotomy (26.7% vs. 6.8%, p=0.01). Open fracture grade was also significantly related to infection rate (closed fractures: 5.3%, grade 1: 14.3%, grade 2: 40%, grade 3: 50%, pinfection rates (13.9% vs. 8.7%, p=0.36). Multivariable logistic regression analysis of the entire study group identified longer operative times (OR 1.78, p=0.013) and open fractures (OR 7.02, psite infection. Operative times approaching 3h and open fractures are related to an increased overall risk for surgical site infection after open plating of the tibial plateau. Dual incision approaches with bicolumnar plating do not appear to expose the patient to increased risk compared to single incision approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Subclinical Thyroid Dysfunction and Fracture Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Manuel R; Bauer, Douglas C; Collet, Tinh-Hai

    2015-01-01

    . Levels of thyroid function were defined as euthyroidism (thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], 0.45-4.49 mIU/L), subclinical hyperthyroidism (TSH hypothyroidism (TSH ≥4.50-19.99 mIU/L) with normal thyroxine concentrations. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES: The primary outcome was hip...... fracture. Any fractures, nonspine fractures, and clinical spine fractures were secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Among 70,298 participants, 4092 (5.8%) had subclinical hypothyroidism and 2219 (3.2%) had subclinical hyperthyroidism. During 762,401 person-years of follow-up, hip fracture occurred in 2975...... hyperthyroidism (excluding thyroid medication users) was associated with HRs of 1.52 (95% CI, 1.19-1.93) for hip fracture, 1.42 (95% CI, 1.16-1.74) for any fracture, and 1.74 (95% CI, 1.01-2.99) for spine fracture. No association was found between subclinical hypothyroidism and fracture risk. CONCLUSIONS...

  16. Pressure ulcer risk in hip fracture patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, R. H.; Rozendaal, M; Wouters-Wesseling, W; Buskens, E.; Keller, P; Haalboom, JRE

    Hip fracture patients have a high risk of pressure ulcers (PU). We followed 121 hip fracture patients for the development of pressure ulcers and evaluated a risk assessment tool for sensitivity and specificity. More than half of the patients presented with PU, mostly stage I. Risk factors for PU

  17. Analysis on the risk factors of second fracture in osteoporosis-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RUAN Wen-dong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: To explore the clinical characteristics and risk factors of refracture in patients suffering from osteoporosis-related fractures as well as effective interventions. Methods: From January 2006 to January 2008, both out-patients and in-patients in our hospital who were over 50 years old and suffered from osteoporosis-related fractures were selected for this research. They were divided into fracture group and refracture group. The refracture rate was followed up for 2 years, during which 11 patients developed refracture, thus were included in the refracture group. Therefore, 273 patients, 225 first-fracture cases, aged (67.7± 8.5 years, and 48 refracture cases, aged (72.7±9.5 years, were included in this study. General data including age and sex, fracture types, femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD T-scores tested by dual-energy X-rays absorptiometry (DEXA, Charlson index, time-frame between two fractures as well as mobility skill assessment were collected and analyzed by single-factor and multivariate statistical methods. Results: Females accounted for 70.2% of the fracture group and 77.1% of the refracture group. The most common refracture type was vertebral fracture for the first time and femoral neck fracture for the second time during the followup. The second fracture happened 3.7 years after the first one on average. The refracture rate was 2.12% within one year, and 4.66% within two years. Risk factors for a second fracture in osteoporotic fracture patients included age (>75 years, HR=1.23, 95%CI 1.18-1.29; >85 years, HR=1.68, 95% CI 1.60-1.76, female sex (HR=1.36, 95%CI 1.32-1.40, prior vertebral fractures (HR=1.62, 95%CI 1.01-2.07, prior hip fractures (HR=1.27, 95%CI 0.89-2.42, BMD T-score<-3.5 (HR=1.38, 95%CI 1.17-1.72 and weakened motor skills (HR=1.27, 95%CI 1.09-1.40. Conclusions: The risks of second fracture among patients with initial brittle fracture are substantial. There is adequate time between the

  18. Fragility non-hip fracture patients are at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosch, M; Druml, T; Nicholas, J A; Hoffmann-Weltin, Y; Roth, T; Zegg, M; Blauth, M; Kammerlander, C

    2015-01-01

    Fragility fractures are a growing worldwide health care problem. Hip fractures have been clearly associated with poor outcomes. Fragility fractures of other bones are common reasons for hospital admission and short-term disability, but specific long-term outcome studies of non-hip fragility fractures are rare. The aim of our trial was to evaluate the 1-year outcomes of non-hip fragility fracture patients. This study is a retrospective cohort review of 307 consecutive older inpatient non-hip fracture patients. Patient data for analysis included fracture location, comorbidity prevalence, pre-fracture functional status, osteoporosis treatments and sociodemographic characteristics. The main outcomes evaluated were 1-year mortality and post-fracture functional status. As compared to the expected mortality, the observed 1-year mortality was increased in the study group (17.6 vs. 12.2 %, P = 0.005). After logistic regression, three variables remained as independent risk factors for 1-year mortality among non-hip fracture patients: malnutrition (OR 3.3, CI 1.5-7.1), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) (OR 1.3, CI 1.1-1.5) and the Parker Mobility Score (PMS) (OR 0.85, CI 0.74-0.98). CCI and PMS were independent risk factors for a high grade of dependency after 1 year. Management of osteoporosis did not significantly improve after hospitalization due to a non-hip fragility fracture. The outcomes of older non-hip fracture patients are comparable to the poor outcomes of older hip fracture patients, and appear to be primarily related to comorbidities, pre-fracture function and nutritional status. The low rate of patients on osteoporosis medications likely reflects the insufficient recognition of the importance of osteoporosis assessment and treatment in non-hip fracture patients. Increased clinical and academic attention to non-hip fracture patients is needed.

  19. Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Astronaut Post Flight Bone Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Myers, Jerry; Licata, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Space flight potentially reduces the loading that bone can resist before fracture. This reduction in bone integrity may result from a combination of factors, the most common reported as reduction in astronaut BMD. Although evaluating the condition of bones continues to be a critical aspect of understanding space flight fracture risk, defining the loading regime, whether on earth, in microgravity, or in reduced gravity on a planetary surface, remains a significant component of estimating the fracture risks to astronauts. This presentation summarizes the concepts, development, and application of NASA's Bone Fracture Risk Module (BFxRM) to understanding pre-, post, and in mission astronaut bone fracture risk. The overview includes an assessment of contributing factors utilized in the BFxRM and illustrates how new information, such as biomechanics of space suit design or better understanding of post flight activities may influence astronaut fracture risk. Opportunities for the bone mineral research community to contribute to future model development are also discussed. Methods: To investigate the conditions in which spaceflight induced changes to bone plays a critical role in post-flight fracture probability, we implement a modified version of the NASA Bone Fracture Risk Model (BFxRM). Modifications included incorporation of variations in physiological characteristics, post-flight recovery rate, and variations in lateral fall conditions within the probabilistic simulation parameter space. The modeled fracture probability estimates for different loading scenarios at preflight and at 0 and 365 days post-flight time periods are compared. Results: For simple lateral side falls, mean post-flight fracture probability is elevated over mean preflight fracture probability due to spaceflight induced BMD loss and is not fully recovered at 365 days post-flight. In the case of more energetic falls, such as from elevated heights or with the addition of lateral movement

  20. Risk factors for hip fracture among institutionalised older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian Sheng; Sambrook, Philip N; Simpson, Judy M; Cameron, Ian D; Cumming, Robert G; Seibel, Markus J; Lord, Stephen R; March, Lyn M

    2009-07-01

    risk factors for hip fracture in community-dwelling individuals have been extensively studied, but there have been fewer studies of institutionalised older people. a total of 1,894 older people (1,433 females, 461 males; mean age 86 years, SD 7.1 years) were recruited from 52 nursing homes and 30 intermediate-care nursing care facilities in Australia during March 1999 and February 2003. We assessed clinical risk factors for hip fracture and skeletal fragility by calcaneus broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) at baseline and then followed up for fracture for 4 years. Hip fractures were validated by x-ray reports. Survival analysis with age as a time-dependent covariate was used to analyse the data. during a mean follow-up period of 2.65 years (SD 1.38), 201 hip fractures in 191 residents were recorded, giving an overall hip fracture incidence rate of 4.0% per person year (males 3.6% and females 4.1%). Residents living in intermediate-care hostels had a higher crude hip fracture rate (4.6% vs. 3.0%) than those living in high-care nursing homes. In multivariate analysis, an increased risk of hip fracture was significantly associated with older age, cognitive impairment, a history of fracture since age 50, lower body weight, longer lower leg length and poorer balance in intermediate-care hostel residents, but not with lower BUA. institutionalised older people, who are at a higher risk of hip fracture than community-dwelling individuals, have differences in some risk factors for hip fracture that should be considered in targeting intervention programs.

  1. Use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate and fracture risk

    OpenAIRE

    Meier, Christian; Brauchli, Yolanda B.; Jick, Susan S.; Kraenzlin, Marius E.; Meier, Christoph R.

    2010-01-01

    Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), which has a high rate of use among teenagers in Europe and the United States, has been associated with impaired bone mineral acquisition during adolescence and accelerated bone loss in later life. Studies on the association between DMPA use and fracture risk are limited.; We aimed at evaluating the relationship between use of hormonal contraceptives, specifically DMPA, and fracture risk.; We conducted a case-control analysis using the United Kingdom-b...

  2. Risk factors for fractures in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacqmin-Gadda, H; Fourrier, A; Commenges, D; Dartigues, J F

    1998-07-01

    We report the results of a 5-year prospective cohort study of risk factors for fractures, including drinking fluoridated water, in a cohort of 3,216 men and women aged 65 years and older. We studied risk factors for hip fracture and fractures at other locations separately. We found a higher risk of hip fractures for subjects exposed to fluorine concentrations over 0.11 mg per liter but without a dose-effect relation (odds ratio (OR) = 3.25 for a concentration of 0.11-0.25 mg per liter; OR = 2.43 for > or = 0.25 mg per liter]. For higher thresholds (0.7 and 1 mg per liter), however, the OR was less than 1. We found no association between fluorine and non-hip fractures. Non-hip fractures were associated with polymedication rather than with specific drug use, whereas fracture was associated with polymedication and use of anxiolytic and antidepressive drugs. Subjects drinking spirits every day were more likely to have hip fractures. Tobacco consumption increased the risk for non-hip fractures.

  3. Bone and fall-related fracture risks in women and men with a recent clinical fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helden, Svenhjalmar; van Geel, Antonia C M; Geusens, Piet P; Kessels, Alfons; Nieuwenhuijzen Kruseman, Arie C; Brink, Peter R G

    2008-02-01

    Worldwide fracture rates are increasing as a result of the aging population, and prevention, both primary and secondary, is an important public health goal. Therefore, we systematically analyzed risk factors in subjects with a recent clinical fracture. All men and women over fifty years of age who had been treated in the emergency department of, or hospitalized at, our institution because of a recent fracture during a one-year period were offered the opportunity to undergo an evidence-based bone and fall-related risk-factor assessment and bone densitometry. The women included in this study were also compared with a group of postmenopausal women without a fracture history who had been included in another cohort study. Of the 940 consecutive patients, 797 (85%) were eligible for this study and 568 (60%) agreed to participate. The prevalence of fall-related risk factors (75% [95% confidence interval = 71% to 78%]; n = 425) and the prevalence of bone-related risk factors (53% [95% confidence interval = 49% to 57%]; n = 299) at the time of fracture were higher than the prevalence of osteoporosis (35% [95% confidence interval = 31% to 39%]; n = 201) as defined by a dual x-ray absorptiometry T score of fall and bone-related risk factors were present irrespective of the fracture location, patient age, or gender. An overlap between bone and fall-related risk factors was found in 50% of the patients. After adjusting for age, weight, and height, we found that women with a fracture more frequently had a diagnosis of osteoporosis (odds ratio = 2.9; 95% confidence interval = 2.0 to 4.1) and had a more extensive history of falls (odds ratio = 4.0; 95% confidence interval = 2.7 to 5.9) than did the postmenopausal women without a fracture history. Men and women over fifty years of age who had recently sustained a clinical fracture had, at the time of that fracture, bone and fall-related risk factors that were greater than the risk predicted by the presence of osteoporosis. Risk

  4. Influence of fall related factors and bone strength on fracture risk in the frail elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambrook, P N; Cameron, I D; Chen, J S; Cumming, R G; Lord, S R; March, L M; Schwarz, J; Seibel, M J; Simpson, J M

    2007-05-01

    When subjects are selected on the basis of fall risk alone, therapies for osteoporosis have not been effective. In a prospective study of elderly subjects at high risk of falls, we investigated the influence of bone strength and fall risk on fracture. At baseline we assessed calcaneal bone ultrasound attenuation (BUA) as well as quantitative measures of fall risk in 2005 subjects in residential care. Incident falls and fractures were recorded (median follow-up 705 days). A total of 6646 fall events and 375 low trauma fracture events occurred. The fall rate was 214 per 100 person years and the fracture rate 12.1 per 100 person years. 82% of the fractures could be attributed to falls. Although fracture rates increased with decreasing BUA (incidence rate ratio 1.94 for lowest vs. highest BUA tertile, pfalls also affected fracture incidence. Subjects who fell frequently (>3.15 falls/per person year) were 3.35 times more likely to suffer a fracture than those who did not fall. Some fall risk factors such as balance were associated with the lowest fracture risk lowest in the worst performing group. Multivariate analysis revealed higher fall rate, history of previous fracture, lower BUA, lower body weight, cognitive impairment and better balance as significant independent risk factors for fracture. In the frail elderly, both skeletal fragility and fall risk including the frequency of exposure to falls are important determinants of fracture risk.

  5. Fracture risk associated with use of antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2018-01-01

    of fractures. The cause for this increase has to be determined but may be related to their use against infections of the bone, the increase thus rather being due to the underlying disease than the drug. Other types of antibiotics especially the fluoroquinolones were not systematically associated......BACKGROUND: Data have pointed at an impaired fracture healing with fluoroquinolones and thus potentially a decreased bone biomechanical competence. OBJECTIVES: To study fracture risk associated with antibiotics. METHODS: Case control study. There were 124,655 fracture cases and 373,962 age...... and gender matched controls. The main exposure was use of various groups of antibiotics. Confounder control was performed for social variables, contacts to hospitals and general practitioners, alcoholism and a number of other variables. RESULTS: An increased risk of any fracture (OR =1. 45, 95% CI: 1. 42 -1...

  6. Association between metabolic syndrome and bone fracture risk: A community-based study using a fracture risk assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chia-Ying; Chen, Fang-Ping; Chen, Li-Wei; Kuo, Sheng-Fong; Chien, Rong-Nan

    2017-12-01

    Osteoporosis and metabolic syndrome (MS) share similar risk factors. Previous studies of association between bone marrow density (BMD) and MS are controversial. Moreover, some studies revealed that MS is associated with BMD but not with bone fracture. In clinical practice, patients pay more attention to bone fracture risk than BMD values. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the association between MS and the 10-year bone fracture risk probability using a fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) from community-based data. From March 2014 to August 2015, 2689 participants (897 men and 1792 women) were enrolled in this study. Inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha and C-reactive protein, and adipokines were included for analysis.The mean age was 60.2 ± 10.7 years in men and 58.9 ± 9.6 years in women. The percentage of MS was 27.6% in men and 27.9% in women. Participants were divided into 2 groups, those with or without MS. Compared with women without MS, women with MS had a higher rate of fracture risk (22.8% vs 16.3%, P = .001). In contrast, men with MS had a lower rate of fracture risk then men without MS (5.6% vs 12.3%, P = .004). However, MS loss the association with a high bone fracture risk in men based on multivariate logistical regression analysis, after adjusting for confounding factor of body mass index (BMI). Conclusively, the result of regression analysis between MS and the bone fracture risk may be different in men and women, and BMI was an important confounding factor to interfere with the regression analysis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Complications of Open Tibial Fracture Management: Risk Factors and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lua, JYC; Tan, VH; Sivasubramanian, H; Kwek, EBK

    2017-01-01

    Open tibial fractures result in high rates of complications. This study aims to elucidate the risk factors causing these complications, and suggest antimicrobial regimens based on the organisms grown in post-operative infections. Over a period of five years, 173 patients had sustained open tibial fractures and undergone operative treatment at a single institution. All surgical data was gathered retrospectively through online medical records. Thirty-one patients (17.9%) had sustained post-oper...

  8. Gout and the Risk of Non-vertebral Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seoyoung C; Paik, Julie M; Liu, Jun; Curhan, Gary C; Solomon, Daniel H

    2017-02-01

    Prior studies suggest an association between osteoporosis, systemic inflammation, and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6. Conflicting findings exist on the association between hyperuricemia and osteoporosis. Furthermore, it remains unknown whether gout, a common inflammatory arthritis, affects fracture risk. Using data from a US commercial health plan (2004-2013), we evaluated the risk of non-vertebral fracture (ie, forearm, wrist, hip, and pelvis) in patients with gout versus those without. Gout patients were identified with ≥2 diagnosis codes and ≥1 dispensing for a gout-related drug. Non-gout patients, identified with ≥2 visits coded for any diagnosis and ≥1 dispensing for any prescription drugs, were free of gout diagnosis and received no gout-related drugs. Hip fracture was the secondary outcome. Fractures were identified with a combination of diagnosis and procedure codes. Cox proportional hazards models compared the risk of non-vertebral fracture in gout patients versus non-gout, adjusting for more than 40 risk factors for osteoporotic fracture. Among gout patients with baseline serum uric acid (sUA) measurements available, we assessed the risk of non-vertebral fracture associated with sUA. We identified 73,202 gout and 219,606 non-gout patients, matched on age, sex, and the date of study entry. The mean age was 60 years and 82% were men. Over the mean 2-year follow-up, the incidence rate of non-vertebral fracture per 1,000 person-years was 2.92 in gout and 2.66 in non-gout. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 0.98 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85-1.12) for non-vertebral fracture and 0.83 (95% CI 0.65-1.07) for hip fracture in gout versus non-gout. Subgroup analysis (n = 15,079) showed no association between baseline sUA and non-vertebral fracture (HR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.93-1.15), adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity score, and number of any prescription drugs. Gout was not associated with a risk of non

  9. The risk of major and any (non-hip) fragility fracture after hip fracture in the United Kingdom : 2000-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson-Smith, D; Klop, C; Elders, P J M; Welsing, P M J; van Schoor, N; Leufkens, H G M; Harvey, N C; van Staa, T P; de Vries, F

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The risk of a subsequent major or any fracture after a hip fracture and secular trends herein were examined. Within 1 year, 2.7 and 8.4% of patients sustained a major or any (non-hip) fracture, which increased to 14.7 and 32.5% after 5 years. Subsequent fracture rates increased during

  10. Self-perception of fracture risk: what can it tell us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwic, A E; Compston, J E; Wyman, A; Siris, E S; Gehlbach, S H; Adachi, J D; Chapurlat, R; Díez-Pérez, A; LaCroix, A Z; Nieves, J W; Netelenbos, J C; Pfeilschifter, J; Rossini, M; Roux, C; Saag, K G; Silverman, S; Watts, N B; Greenspan, S L; March, L; Gregson, C L; Cooper, C; Dennison, E M

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we report that self-perception of fracture risk captures some aspect of fracture risk not currently measured using conventional fracture prediction tools and is associated with improved medication uptake. It suggests that adequate appreciation of fracture risk may be beneficial and lead to greater healthcare engagement and treatment. This study aimed to assess how well self-perception of fracture risk, and fracture risk as estimated by the fracture prediction tool FRAX, related to fracture incidence and uptake and persistence of anti-osteoporosis medication among women participating in the Global Longitudinal study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW). GLOW is an international cohort study involving 723 physician practices across 10 countries in Europe, North America and Australia. Aged ≥ 55 years, 60,393 women completed baseline questionnaires detailing medical history, including co-morbidities, fractures and self-perceived fracture risk (SPR). Annual follow-up included self-reported incident fractures and anti-osteoporosis medication (AOM) use. We calculated FRAX risk without bone mineral density measurement. Of the 39,241 women with at least 1 year of follow-up data, 2132 (5.4%) sustained an incident major osteoporotic fracture over 5 years of follow-up. Within each SPR category, risk of fracture increased as the FRAX categorisation of risk increased. In GLOW, only 11% of women with a lower baseline SPR were taking AOM at baseline, compared with 46% of women with a higher SPR. AOM use tended to increase in the years after a reported fracture. However, women with a lower SPR who were fractured still reported lower AOM rates than women with or without a fracture but had a higher SPR. These results suggest that SPR captures some aspect of fracture risk not currently measured using conventional fracture prediction tools and is also associated with improved medication uptake.

  11. Multiple Sclerosis Increases Fracture Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixian Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The association between multiple sclerosis (MS and fracture risk has been reported, but results of previous studies remain controversial and ambiguous. To assess the association between MS and fracture risk, a meta-analysis was performed. Method. Based on comprehensive searches of the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science, we identified outcome data from all articles estimating the association between MS and fracture risk. The pooled risk ratios (RRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated. Results. A significant association between MS and fracture risk was found. This result remained statistically significant when the adjusted RRs were combined. Subgroup analysis stratified by the site of fracture suggested significant associations between MS and tibia fracture risk, femur fracture risk, hip fracture risk, pelvis fracture risk, vertebrae fracture risk, and humerus fracture risk. In the subgroup analysis by gender, female MS patients had increased fracture risk. When stratified by history of drug use, use of antidepressants, hypnotics/anxiolytics, anticonvulsants, and glucocorticoids increased the risk of fracture risk in MS patients. Conclusions. This meta-analysis demonstrated that MS was significantly associated with fracture risk.

  12. Residual lifetime and 10 year absolute risks of osteoporotic fractures in Chinese men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Lei; Winzenberg, Tania M; Chen, Mingsheng; Jiang, Qicheng; Palmer, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    To determine the residual lifetime and 10 year absolute risks of osteoporotic fractures in Chinese men and women. A validated state-transition microsimulation model was used. Microsimulation and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to address the uncertainties in the model. All parameters including fracture incidence rates and mortality rates were retrieved from published literature. Simulated subjects were run through the model until they died to estimate the residual lifetime fracture risks. A 10 year time horizon was used to determine the 10 year fracture risks. We estimated the risk of only the first osteoporotic fracture during the simulation time horizon. The residual lifetime and 10 year risks of having the first osteoporotic (hip, clinical vertebral or wrist) fracture for Chinese women aged 50 years were 40.9% (95% CI: 38.3-44.0%) and 8.2% (95% CI: 6.8-9.3%) respectively. For men, the residual lifetime and 10 year fracture risks were 8.7% (95% CI: 7.5-9.8%) and 1.2% (95% CI: 0.8-1.7%) respectively. The residual lifetime fracture risks declined with age, whilst the 10 year fracture risks increased with age until the short-term mortality risks outstripped the fracture risks. Residual lifetime and 10 year clinical vertebral fracture risks were higher than those of hip and wrist fractures in both sexes. More than one third of the Chinese women and approximately one tenth of the Chinese men aged 50 years are expected to sustain a major osteoporotic fracture in their remaining lifetimes. Due to increased fracture risks and a rapidly ageing population, osteoporosis will present a great challenge to the Chinese healthcare system. While national data was used wherever possible, regional Chinese hip and clinical vertebral fracture incidence rates were used, wrist fracture rates were taken from a Norwegian study and calibrated to the Chinese population. Other fracture sites like tibia, humerus, ribs and pelvis were not included in the analysis, thus these

  13. Risk Factors for Migration, Fracture, and Dislocation of Pancreatic Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Kawaguchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze the risk factors for pancreatic stent migration, dislocation, and fracture in chronic pancreatitis patients with pancreatic strictures. Materials and Methods. Endoscopic stent placements (total 386 times were performed in 99 chronic pancreatitis patients with pancreatic duct stenosis at our institution between April 2006 and June 2014. We retrospectively examined the frequency of stent migration, dislocation, and fracture and analyzed the patient factors and stent factors. We also investigated the retrieval methods for migrated and fractured stents and their success rates. Results. The frequencies of stent migration, dislocation, and fracture were 1.5% (5/396, 0.8% (3/396, and 1.2% (4/396, respectively. No significant differences in the rates of migration, dislocation, or fracture were noted on the patient factors (etiology, cases undergoing endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy, location of pancreatic duct stenosis, existence of pancreatic stone, and approach from the main or minor papilla and stent factors (duration of stent placement, numbers of stent placements, stent shape, diameter, and length. Stent retrieval was successful in all cases of migration. In cases of fractured stents, retrieval was successful in 2 of 4 cases. Conclusion. Stent migration, fracture, and dislocation are relatively rare, but possible complications. A good understanding of retrieval techniques is necessary.

  14. Modeling climate effects on hip fracture rate by the multivariate GARCH model in Montreal region, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarres, Reza; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.; Vanasse, Alain; Orzanco, Maria Gabriela; Gosselin, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Changes in extreme meteorological variables and the demographic shift towards an older population have made it important to investigate the association of climate variables and hip fracture by advanced methods in order to determine the climate variables that most affect hip fracture incidence. The nonlinear autoregressive moving average with exogenous variable-generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARMA X-GARCH) and multivariate GARCH (MGARCH) time series approaches were applied to investigate the nonlinear association between hip fracture rate in female and male patients aged 40-74 and 75+ years and climate variables in the period of 1993-2004, in Montreal, Canada. The models describe 50-56 % of daily variation in hip fracture rate and identify snow depth, air temperature, day length and air pressure as the influencing variables on the time-varying mean and variance of the hip fracture rate. The conditional covariance between climate variables and hip fracture rate is increasing exponentially, showing that the effect of climate variables on hip fracture rate is most acute when rates are high and climate conditions are at their worst. In Montreal, climate variables, particularly snow depth and air temperature, appear to be important predictors of hip fracture incidence. The association of climate variables and hip fracture does not seem to change linearly with time, but increases exponentially under harsh climate conditions. The results of this study can be used to provide an adaptive climate-related public health program and ti guide allocation of services for avoiding hip fracture risk.

  15. Risk Factors for Hip Fracture in Japanese Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yamashita

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors for hip fracture in Japanese older populations are understudied compared with Western countries arguably due to the relatively lower prevalence rates in Japan. Nationally representative data from the Nihon University Japanese Longitudinal Study of Aging were analyzed using logistic regression to examine possible risk factors of hip fractures, separately for older women (n = 2,859 and older men (n = 2,108. Results showed that older Japanese women with difficulty bending their knees (OR = 1.9, with diabetes (OR = 1.7 times, and/or with more activity of daily living limitations (OR = 1.1 had higher risks of hip fracture. Older Japanese men with difficulty bending their knees (OR = 2.6, who use more external prescription drugs (OR = 1.9, and with cancer (OR = 2.0 times had higher risks of hip fracture. Further considerations of gender- and culture-specific factors along with the identified risk factors may provide insights into future intervention programs for hip fracture in Japanese older populations.

  16. Influence of surgeon's experience and supervision on re-operation rate after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Jacobsen, Steffen; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of the performing surgeon's experience and degree of supervision on re-operation rate among patients admitted with a proximal femoral fracture (PFF). METHODS: Prospective study of 600 consecutive patients with proximal femoral fracture in our multimodal...... Society of Anaesthesiologists score, New Mobility Score, time to surgery and type of implant, surgery by unsupervised junior registrars was still a significant independent risk factor for re-operation in technically demanding proximal femoral fractures. CONCLUSION: Unsupervised junior registrars should...

  17. Risk-factors for surgical delay following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Reig, J; Salvador Marín, J; Ferrández Martínez, J; Orozco Beltrán, D; Martínez López, J F

    To identify pre-operative risk factors for surgical delay of more than 2 days after admission in patients older than 65 years with a hip fracture. A prospective observational study was conducted on 180 hip fractures in patients older than 65 years of age admitted to our hospital from January 2015 to April 2016. The data recorded included, patient demographics, day of admission, pre-fracture comorbidities, mental state, level of mobility and physical function, type of fracture, antiaggregant and anticoagulant medication, pre-operative haemoglobin value, type of treatment, and surgical delay. The mean age of the patients was 83.7 years. The mean Charlson Index was 2.8. The pre-fracture baseline co-morbidities were equal or greater than 2 in 70% of cases. Mean timing of surgery was 3.1 days. At the time of admission, 122 (67.7%) patients were fit for surgery, of which 80 (44.4%) underwent surgery within 2 days. A Charlson index greater than 2, anticoagulant therapy, and admission on Thursday to Saturday, were independently associated with a surgical delay greater than 2 days. The rate of hip fracture patients undergoing surgery within 2 days is low. Risk factors associated to surgical delay are non-modifiable. However, their knowledge should allow the development of protocols that can reduce surgical delay in this group of patients. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. The risk of fracture in incident multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bazelier, Marloes T; Bentzen, Joan; Vestergaard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at increased risk of fractures owing to osteoporosis and falling.......Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at increased risk of fractures owing to osteoporosis and falling....

  19. Low evaluation rate for osteoporosis among patients presenting with a rib fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Whang; Gong, Hyun Sik; Lee, Seung Hoo; Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Kahyun; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2017-12-01

    This study in a regional hospital setting found a low evaluation rate for osteoporosis among patients presenting with a rib fracture. Increased emphasis or education for osteoporosis evaluation may be necessary in case of rib fractures. Rib fractures from a low-energy trauma are common in the elderly, and a history of rib fracture has been reported to increase the risk for a subsequent osteoporotic fracture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how many of the patients presenting with an isolated rib fracture were being evaluated for osteoporosis and the risk for a subsequent fracture. We retrospectively reviewed all patients aged 50 years or older who were diagnosed with a rib fracture between January 2011 and April 2016 at a regional tertiary care university hospital near Seoul, South Korea. We excluded those who had been treated for osteoporosis or those with other concomitant fractures or fractures from a motor vehicle accident or cancer. We evaluated the frequency of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan examinations in these patients. There were 231 patients with isolated rib fractures (132 men and 99 women). The mean age was 65 years. Rib fractures were most commonly diagnosed at the emergency department and most of the patients were referred to the department of thoracic surgery for follow-up evaluations. Of these 231 patients, 29 (12%) had DXA examinations after the injury, and only 9 (4%) of them did so within 6 months. Physicians specializing in orthopedic surgery, family medicine, internal medicine, rehabilitation medicine, and emergency medicine were ordering the examination. This study in a regional hospital setting found a low evaluation rate for osteoporosis among patients presenting with a rib fracture. This study suggests that increased emphasis or education for osteoporosis evaluation may be necessary for physicians who are often referred to for care of rib fractures.

  20. Fusion Rates of Different Anterior Grafts in Thoracolumbar Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Maxime; Charles, Yann Philippe; Walter, Axel; Schuller, Sébastien; Steib, Jean-Paul

    2015-11-01

    Retrospective CT analysis of anterior fusion in thoracolumbar trauma. The aim of this study was to compare fusion rates of different bone grafts and to analyze risk factors for pseudarthrosis. Interbody fusion is indicated in anterior column defects. Different grafts are used: autologous iliac crest, titanium mesh cages filled with cancellous bone, and autologous ribs. It is not clear which graft offers the most reliable fusion. Radiologic data of 116 patients (71 men, 45 women) operated for type A2, A3, B, or C fractures were analyzed. The average age was 44.6 years (range, 16-75 y) and follow-up was 2.7 years (range, 1-9 y). All patients were treated by posterior instrumentation followed by an anterior graft: 53 cases with iliac crest, 43 cases with mesh cages, and 20 with rib grafts. Fusion was evaluated on CT and classified into complete fusion, partial fusion, unipolar pseudarthrosis, and bipolar pseudarthrosis. Iliac crest fused in 66%, cages in 98%, and rib grafts in 90%. The fusion rate of cages filled with bone was significantly higher as the iliac graft fusion rate (P=0.002). The same was applied to rib grafts compared with iliac crest (P=0.041). Additional bone formation around the main graft, bridging both vertebral bodies, was observed in 31 of the 53 iliac crests grafts. Pseudarthrosis occurred more often in smokers (P=0.042). A relationship between fracture or instrumentation types, sex, age, BMI, and fusion could not be determined. Tricortical iliac crest grafts showed an unexpected high pseudarthrosis rate in thoracolumbar injuries. Their cortical bone is dense and their fusion surface is small. Rib grafts led to a better fusion when used in combination with the cancellous bone from the fractured vertebral body. Titanium mesh cages filled with cancellous bone led to the highest fusion rate and built a complete bony bridge between vertebral bodies. Smoking seemed to influence fusion. Case control study, Level III.

  1. High fall incidence and fracture rate in elderly dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polinder-Bos, H A; Emmelot-Vonk, M H; Gansevoort, R T; Diepenbroek, A; Gaillard, C A J M

    2014-12-01

    Although it is recognised that the dialysis population is ageing rapidly, geriatric complications such as falls are poorly appreciated, despite the many risk factors for falls in this population. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence, complications and risk factors for falls in an elderly dialysis population. A one-year observational study of chronic dialysis patients aged ≥ 70 years. At baseline, patient characteristics were noted and during follow-up the vital parameters and laboratory values were recorded. Patients were questioned weekly about falls, fall circumstances and consequences by trained nurses. 49 patients were included with a median age of 79.3 years (70-89 years). During follow-up 40 fall accidents occurred in 27 (55%) patients. Falls resulted in fractures in 15% of cases and in hospital admissions in 15%. In haemodialysis (HD) patients, the mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) before HD was lower in fallers compared with non-fallers (130 vs. 143 mmHg). Several patients in the lower blood pressure category received antihypertensive medication. For every 5 mmHg lower SBP (before HD) the fall risk increased by 30% (hazard ratio (HR) 1.30, 95% CI 1.03-1.65, p = 0.03). Furthermore, fall risk increased by 22% for every 10 pmol/l rise of parathyroid hormone (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.06-1.39, p = 0.004). Elderly dialysis patients have a high incidence of falls accompanied by a high fracture rate. Given the high complication rate, elderly patients at risk of falling should be identified and managed. Reduction of blood pressure-lowering medication might be a treatment strategy to reduce falls.

  2. Cementless Stem for Femoral Neck Fractures in a Patient's 10th Decade of Life: High Rate of Periprosthetic Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabelitz, Method; Fritz, Yannick; Grueninger, Patrick; Meier, Christoph; Fries, Patrick; Dietrich, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Subsidence of cementless femoral stems in hemiarthroplasty (HA) and increased fracture rates are ongoing concerns of orthopedic surgeons when treating fractures in very old patients. Additionally, bone cement implantation syndrome may result in perioperative cardiac or pulmonary complications, especially in older patients, leading to morbidity and mortality. This study was performed to analyze possible subsidence and intraoperative fractures in a cohort of very old patients treated with cementless stems. We retrospectively analyzed a consecutive cohort of patients aged ≥90 years with femoral neck fractures treated by uncemented HA and an anterior minimally invasive approach. Immediate full-weight bearing was allowed postoperatively. Pelvic radiographs were examined for subsidence immediately postoperatively and 6 weeks later. We treated 109 patients (74% women; mean age, 93 years; range, 90-102 years) by HA from January 2010 to March 2016. The 30-day mortality rate was 16%, and the morbidity rate was 47%. There were 11 (12%) intraoperative fractures: 8 (Vancouver B 2 ) had to be addressed immediately during the primary operation, while 3 (1 Vancouver B 1 and 2 Vancouver A G ) were treated conservatively. One periprosthetic femoral fracture (Vancouver B 1 ) was documented during follow-up. In 17 patients, subsidence of >2.0 mm (median, 3.9 mm; range, 2.5-9.0 mm) was documented. Early subsidence was low in this very old cohort treated with an uncemented stem and not showing a periprosthetic fracture. The risk of intraoperative periprosthetic fractures was high. The use of uncemented implants in osteoporotic bone continues to be an intervention with high risk and should only be performed by experienced surgeons. Level III, Therapeutic study.

  3. Hip fractures. Epidemiology, risk factors, falls, energy absorption, hip protectors, and prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, J B

    1997-01-01

    have a high risk of hip fracture (annual rate of 5-6%), and the incidence of falls is about 1,500 falls/1,000 persons/year. Most hip fractures are a result of a direct trauma against the hip. The incidence of falls on the hip among nursing home residents is about 290 falls/1,000 persons/year and about......%, corresponding to 9 out of 247 residents saved from sustaining a hip fracture. The review points to the essentials of the development of hip fracture, which constitutes; risk of fall, type of fall, type of impact, energy absorption, and lastly bone strength, which is the ultimate and last permissive factor......The present review summarizes the pathogenic mechanisms leading to hip fracture based on epidemiological, experimental, and controlled studies. The estimated lifetime risk of hip fracture is about 14% in postmenopausal women and 6% in men. The incidence of hip fractures increases exponentially...

  4. [Hip Fracture--Epidemiology, Management and Liaison Service. Risk factor for hip fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2015-04-01

    Many risk factors have been identified for hip fracture, including female, advanced age, osteoporosis, previous fractures, low body weight or low body mass index, alcohol drinking, smoking, family history of fractures, use of glucocorticoid, factors related to falls, and bone strength. The factors related to falls are number of fall, frail, post stroke, paralysis, muscle weakness, anti-anxiety drugs, anti-depression drugs, and sedatives. Dementia and respiratory disease and others have been reported to be risk factors for secondary hip fracture.

  5. Arthritis increases the risk for fractures--results from the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicole C; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Walitt, Brian T; Eaton, Charles B; Chen, Zhao

    2011-08-01

    To examine the relationship between arthritis and fracture. Women were classified into 3 self-reported groups at baseline: no arthritis (n = 83,295), osteoarthritis (OA; n = 63,402), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 960). Incident fractures were self-reported throughout followup. Age-adjusted fracture rates by arthritis category were generated, and the Cox proportional hazards model was used to test the association between arthritis and fracture. After an average of 7.80 years, 24,137 total fractures were reported including 2559 self-reported clinical spinal fractures and 1698 adjudicated hip fractures. For each fracture type, age-adjusted fracture rates were highest in the RA group and lowest in the nonarthritic group. After adjustment for several covariates, report of arthritis was associated with increased risk for spine, hip, and any clinical fractures. Compared to the nonarthritis group, the risk of sustaining any clinical fracture in the OA group was HR 1.09 (95% CI 1.05, 1.13; p < 0.001) and HR 1.49 (95% CI 1.26, 1.75; p < 0.001) in the RA group. The risk of sustaining a hip fracture was not statistically increased in the OA group (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.98, 1.25; p = 0.122) compared to the nonarthritis group; however, the risk of hip fracture increased significantly (HR 3.03; 95% CI 2.03, 4.51; p < 0.001) in the RA group compared to the nonarthritis group. The increase in fracture risk confirms the importance of fracture prevention in patients with RA and OA.

  6. Mapping the prescriptiome to fractures in men--a national analysis of prescription history and fracture risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B; Brixen, K; Abrahamsen, B

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY: A nationwide case-control study was performed in 62,865 men aged 50+ using fracture data from the national hospital discharge register to screen all redeemed prescriptions in the past 5 years for significant mapping to fracture risk, employing measures to control for false discovery rate....... INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis in men is frequently related to alcohol abuse, hypogonadism, hypercalciuria, or the use of glucocorticoids. Very limited information is available on the impact of other medications on fracture risk in men. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide population-based case-control study...... collecting fracture data from the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register and prescriptions from the National Prescriptions Database (1995-2000). We included men aged 50+ years, with hospital-treated fractures in the year 2000 (n = 15,716), and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 47,149). RESULTS: We...

  7. Epidemiology and risk factors of humerus fractures among skiers and snowboarders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, Benjamin T; Johnson, Robert J; Shafritz, Adam B; Chase, Derek C; Ettlinger, Carl F

    2008-10-01

    The incidence of humerus fractures while participating in snowboarding and skiing is undefined. Very little is known about the risk factors associated with these fractures. Snowboarders are at increased risk for sustaining humerus fractures when compared with skiers. In addition, the types of fractures, laterality, and risk factors differ between the 2 groups. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. At a major ski area clinic, 318 humerus fractures were evaluated over 34 seasons. Radiographs were classified according to the AO and Neer systems. Patient data were analyzed and compared with that of a control population of uninjured skiers and snowboarders to determine incidence and risk factors. The incidence of humerus fractures among snowboarders (0.062 per 1000 snowboarder days) was significantly higher than that of skiers (0.041 per 1000, P Jumping was involved in 28.3% of humerus fractures among snowboarders and in 5.4% among skiers. Skiers with humerus fractures were more skilled, older, and fell less frequently than controls. Snowboarders were less skilled, younger, and fell at a similar rate compared with controls. Snowboarders are at significantly higher risk of sustaining humerus fractures than skiers. In skiers, humerus fractures show no laterality and most often involve the proximal humerus. In contrast, snowboarders more often fracture the left humerus at the diaphysis.

  8. Development of a Korean Fracture Risk Score (KFRS for Predicting Osteoporotic Fracture Risk: Analysis of Data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Young Kim

    Full Text Available Asian-specific prediction models for estimating individual risk of osteoporotic fractures are rare. We developed a Korean fracture risk prediction model using clinical risk factors and assessed validity of the final model.A total of 718,306 Korean men and women aged 50-90 years were followed for 7 years in a national system-based cohort study. In total, 50% of the subjects were assigned randomly to the development dataset and 50% were assigned to the validation dataset. Clinical risk factors for osteoporotic fracture were assessed at the biennial health check. Data on osteoporotic fractures during the follow-up period were identified by ICD-10 codes and the nationwide database of the National Health Insurance Service (NHIS.During the follow-up period, 19,840 osteoporotic fractures were reported (4,889 in men and 14,951 in women in the development dataset. The assessment tool called the Korean Fracture Risk Score (KFRS is comprised of a set of nine variables, including age, body mass index, recent fragility fracture, current smoking, high alcohol intake, lack of regular exercise, recent use of oral glucocorticoid, rheumatoid arthritis, and other causes of secondary osteoporosis. The KFRS predicted osteoporotic fractures over the 7 years. This score was validated using an independent dataset. A close relationship with overall fracture rate was observed when we compared the mean predicted scores after applying the KFRS with the observed risks after 7 years within each 10th of predicted risk.We developed a Korean specific prediction model for osteoporotic fractures. The KFRS was able to predict risk of fracture in the primary population without bone mineral density testing and is therefore suitable for use in both clinical setting and self-assessment. The website is available at http://www.nhis.or.kr.

  9. Increased fracture risk assessed by fracture risk assessment tool in Greek patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzoudis, Sotirios; Zavos, Christos; Damilakis, John; Neratzoulakis, John; Dimitriadi, Daphne Anna; Roussomoustakaki, Maria; Kouroumalis, Elias A; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization has recently developed the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) based on clinical risk factors and bone mineral density (BMD) for evaluation of the 10-year probability of a hip or a major osteoporotic fracture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the FRAX tool in Greek patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). FRAX scores were applied to 134 IBD patients [68 Crohn's disease (CD); 66 ulcerative colitis (UC)] who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans at the femoral neck and lumbar spine during the period 2007-2012. Calculation of the FRAX scores, with or without BMD, was made through a web-based probability model used to compute individual fracture probabilities according to specific clinical risk factors. The median 10-year probability of a major osteoporotic fracture for IBD patients based on clinical data was 7.1%, and including the BMD was 6.2%. A significant overestimation with the first method was found (P = 0.01). Both scores with and without BMD were significantly higher in CD patients compared with UC patients (P = 0.02 and P = 0.005, respectively). The median 10-year probability of hip fracture based on clinical data was 0.8%, and including the BMD was 0.9%. The score with use of BMD was significantly higher in CD compared with UC patients (P = 0.04). CD patients have significantly higher FRAX scores and possibly fracture risk compared with UC patients. The clinical FRAX score alone seems to overestimate the risk of osteoporotic fracture in Greek IBD patients.

  10. Perimenopausal risk of falling and incidence of distal forearm fracture.

    OpenAIRE

    Winner, S. J.; Morgan, C. A.; Evans, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    A postal survey of 2000 women and 2000 men sampled from the electoral roll in Oxford was undertaken to ascertain whether changes with age in the risk of falling might explain the stepwise increases in age specific incidence rates of distal forearm fracture which occur in women at around the age of 50. Corrected response rates were 83% for women and 72% for men. In women, but not in men, there was a rise in the risk of falling from 45 years, peaking in the 55-59 year age group, and sinking to ...

  11. Risk Factors Associated With Survival to Hospital Discharge of 54 Horses With Fractures of the Radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Suzanne; Richardson, Dean; Boston, Ray; Schaer, Thomas P

    2015-11-01

    To determine (1) survival to discharge of horses with radial fractures (excluding osteochondral fragmentation of the distal aspect of the radius and stress fractures); and (2) risk factors affecting survival to hospital discharge in conservative and surgically managed fractures. Case series. Horses (n = 54). Medical records (1990-June 2012) and radiographs of horses admitted with radial fracture were reviewed. Horses with osteochondral fragmentation of the distal aspect of the radius or stress fractures were excluded. Evaluated risk factors were age, fracture configuration, surgical repair method, surgical duration, hospitalization time, implant failure rate, and surgical site infection (SSI) rate. Of 54 horses, overall survival to discharge was 50%. Thirteen (24%) were euthanatized on admission because of (1) fracture severity; (2) presence of an open fracture; or (3) financial constraints. Fourteen (26%) horses with minimally displaced incomplete fractures were conservatively managed and 12 (86%) survived to discharge. Twenty-seven (50%) horses had surgical treatment by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) and 15 (56%) survived to hospital discharge. Open fractures were significantly more likely to develop SSI (P = .008), which also resulted in a 17-fold increase in implant failure (P horses with an open fracture did not survive to discharge. Outcome was also adversely affected by age (P 168 minutes (P fractures is good. Young horses have a good prognosis survival to discharge for ORIF, whereas ORIF in adult horses has a poor prognosis and SSI strongly correlates with catastrophic implant failure. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  12. Risk of hip fracture after osteoporosis fractures. 451 women with fracture of lumbar spine, olecranon, knee or ankle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, J B; Lund, B

    1993-01-01

    In a follow-up study during 1976-1984, the risk of a subsequent hip fracture was investigated in women aged 60-99 years, hospitalized for the following fractures: lumbar spine (n 70), olecranon (n 52), knee (n 129) and ankle (n 200). Follow-up ranged from 0 to 9 years. Observation time of the 4...... different fractures were 241, 180, 469, and 779, person-years, respectively. In women aged 60-79 years with one of the following fractures the relative risk of a subsequent hip fracture was increased by 4.8 (lumbar spine), 4.1 (olecranon), 3.5 (knee) and 1.5 (ankle). The relative risk of hip fracture showed...... a tendency to level off 3 years after the primary fracture....

  13. Fracture Risk Assessment in Chronic Kidney Disease, Prospective Testing Under Real World Environments (FRACTURE: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    West Sarah L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with an increased risk of fracture. Decreased bone mass and disruption of microarchitecture occur early in the course of CKD and worsens with the progressive decline in renal function so that at the time of initiation of dialysis at least 50% of patients have had a fracture. Despite the excess fracture risk, and the associated increases in morbidity and mortality, little is known about the factors that are associated with an increase in fracture risk. Our study aims to identify prognostic factors for bone loss and fractures in patients with stages 3 to 5 CKD. Methods This prospective study aims to enroll two hundred and sixty men and women with stages 3 to 5 CKD. Subjects will be followed for 24 months and we will examine the ability of: 1 bone mineral density by dual x-ray absorptiometry at the spine, hip, and radius; 2 volumetric bone density by high resolution peripheral quantitated computed tomography at the radius and tibia; 3 serum markers of bone turnover; 4 bone formation rate by bone biopsy; and 5 muscle strength and balance to predict spine and non-spine fractures, identified by self-report and/or vertebral morphometry. All measurements will be obtained at baseline, at 12 and at 24 months with the exception of bone biopsy, which will be measured once at 12 months. Subjects will be contacted every 4 months to determine if there have been incident fractures or falls. Discussion This study is one of the first that aims to identify risk factors for fracture in early stage CKD patients. Ultimately, by identifying risk factors for fracture and targeting treatments in this group-before the initiation of renal replacement therapy - we will reduce the burden of disease due to fractures among patients with CKD.

  14. Fracture risk and zoledronic acid therapy in men with osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonen, Steven; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Kaufman, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Fractures in men are a major health issue, and data on the antifracture efficacy of therapies for osteoporosis in men are limited. We studied the effect of zoledronic acid on fracture risk among men with osteoporosis.......Fractures in men are a major health issue, and data on the antifracture efficacy of therapies for osteoporosis in men are limited. We studied the effect of zoledronic acid on fracture risk among men with osteoporosis....

  15. Season of birth and the risk of hip fracture in danish men and women aged 65+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Heitmann, Berit L; Eiken, Pia Agnete

    2012-01-01

    calculated fracture rates and relative risks. The analysis covered 541,109 men and 691,522 women. In women, we observed a small but statistically significant difference between fracture rates by season of birth for all age intervals expect the youngest (age 65-69). A similar pattern was seen in men...... an epidemiological analysis of hip fracture rates as a function of season of birth, age, and sex. We retrieved information on all hip fractures in the 9-year period between 1997 and 2005 in all men and women aged 65-95, excluded hip fractures that occurred in current and recent prednisolone users, and subsequently......, but this was only statistically significant in the two oldest age groups (age 85-89 and 90-95). These findings suggest that vitamin D availability in the first and second trimester of intrauterine life could have a small but lasting impact on bone health and the risk of osteoporotic fractures. Further studies...

  16. Older Male Physicians Have Lower Risk of Trochanteric but Not Cervical Hip Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Nien Shen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoporosis is pathophysiologically related to trochanteric fractures, and this condition is more preventable by lifestyle modifications than cervical fractures. We investigated whether older physicians, who are health-conscious people, are at a lower risk of hip fractures because of fewer trochanteric fractures. Methods: Data regarding older (≥65 years physicians (n = 4303 and matched non-medical persons (control were retrieved from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance claims. All of the subjects were obtained from NHIRD with index dates from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2008. Cox proportional hazard and competing risk regression models were established to estimate the hazard ratio (HR of hip fracture associated with older physicians. Results: The incidence rates of trochanteric fractures were lower in older physicians than in controls (1.73 and 3.07 per 1000 person-years, respectively, whereas the rates of cervical fractures were similar between the two groups (2.45 and 2.12 per 1000 person-years, respectively. Older physicians yielded 46% lower hazard of trochanteric fractures than controls (adjusted HR 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.37–0.79; by contrast, hazards of cervical fractures were comparable between the two groups. The HRs estimated from the competing risk models remained unchanged. Conclusions: Our findings indicated that health risk awareness may pose a significant preventive effect on trochanteric hip fractures.

  17. Older Male Physicians Have Lower Risk of Trochanteric but Not Cervical Hip Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hsiu-Nien; Lin, Wei-Ting; Lu, Chin-Li; Li, Chung-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is pathophysiologically related to trochanteric fractures, and this condition is more preventable by lifestyle modifications than cervical fractures. We investigated whether older physicians, who are health-conscious people, are at a lower risk of hip fractures because of fewer trochanteric fractures. Methods: Data regarding older (≥65 years) physicians (n = 4303) and matched non-medical persons (control) were retrieved from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance claims. All of the subjects were obtained from NHIRD with index dates from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2008. Cox proportional hazard and competing risk regression models were established to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of hip fracture associated with older physicians. Results: The incidence rates of trochanteric fractures were lower in older physicians than in controls (1.73 and 3.07 per 1000 person-years, respectively), whereas the rates of cervical fractures were similar between the two groups (2.45 and 2.12 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Older physicians yielded 46% lower hazard of trochanteric fractures than controls (adjusted HR 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.37–0.79); by contrast, hazards of cervical fractures were comparable between the two groups. The HRs estimated from the competing risk models remained unchanged. Conclusions: Our findings indicated that health risk awareness may pose a significant preventive effect on trochanteric hip fractures. PMID:25689999

  18. Complications and their risk factors following hip fracture surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Keng Soon; Lingaraj, K

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To evaluate various postoperative complications and their risk factors in hip fracture patients. METHODS. 207 female and 87 male consecutive patients (mean age, 78.1 years) who underwent surgical (n=242) or conservative (n=52) treatment for closed fractures of the femoral neck (n=157) or peritrochanter (n=137) were prospectively studied. The types of complication and outcome were recorded. The comorbidity status of the patients was categorised based on the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification. Complications and their associations with various risk factors and mortality were analysed. RESULTS. For all patients, the mean length of hospitalisation was 14.6 days. For the 242 patients who underwent surgical treatment after a mean of 3.6 days, 56.8% of them had at least one complication. Acute urinary retention (39.3%) and urinary tract infection (24.0%) were most common. Patients with ASA grade III or higher had 2.3 fold higher risk of developing complications than those with lower-grade comorbidity, whereas patients with delayed operation (>48 hours after presentation) had 1.8 fold higher risk of developing complications than those without delayed operation. Four patients died in hospital: 2 from myocardial infarction and 2 from upper gastrointestinal bleeding. CONCLUSION. Complications after hip fracture surgery were common. Advanced age, high ASA status, and delay in surgery were associated with higher complication rates. Operations should be performed on medically fit patients as early as possible.

  19. Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Bone Fracture - Bone Fracture Risk Module (BFxRM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Angelo; Myers, Jerry G.; Lewandowski, Beth

    2013-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the concepts, development, and application of NASA's Bone Fracture Risk Module (BFxRM). The overview includes an assessmnet of strenghts and limitations of the BFxRM and proposes a numebr of discussion questions to the panel regarding future development avenues for this simulation system.

  20. Risk of fracture in adults on renal replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ditte; Olesen, Jonas B; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients on dialysis treatment or living with a transplanted kidney have several risk factors for bone fracture, especially disturbances in mineral metabolism and immunosuppressive therapy. We describe the incidence of fracture in this retrospective national Danish cohort study and ex....... Differences in age, gender, drug use and comorbidity only partly explain this increased risk. Further studies are warranted to explore the reason for this increased fracture risk in patients on renal replacement therapy....

  1. Association of Obesity with Forearm Fractures, Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk (FRAX® During Postmenopausal Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Mesci

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association among obesity with bone mineral density (BMD and subsequent fracture risk among postmenopausal women with a previous forearm fracture. Materials and Methods: The study enrolled obese (n=40 and normal-weight (n=40 postmenopausal women who had a previous forearm fracture. BMD measurements were obtained using a GE-LUNAR DPX dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan for all subjects. FRAX® fracture risk scores were calculated taking into account former fractures and current risk factors of the subjects. Both groups were compared with respect to their BMD values, T scores, FRAX® risk scores and frequency of previous fractures. Results: No difference was observed between groups with regard to mean age, mean age of menopause onset and mean serum calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase levels (p>0.05 for all. Statistically, obese patients showed highly significantly greater mean BMD values at lumbar spine (L1-L4 and femoral neck in comparison to subjects with normal body weight (p=0.000 for all. Obese patients had a lower 10-year probability of a major osteoporotic fracture on average as determined by FRAX® fracture risk score compared to that in normal-weight subjects (p<0.05. Also, obese group had a lower 10-year probability of a hip fracture versus normal-weight subjects (p<0.01. Both groups were found to have a similar frequency of previous fractures. Conclusion: Although obese patients in this study had greater BMD values and lower FRAX® risk scores, the probability of subsequent fractures predicted for the obese group was not lower when compared to that predicted for normal-weight group. It should be kept in mind that obesity may not necessarily be protective against fractures and treatment algorithms based solely on BMD might be inadequate to predict future fracture risk.

  2. Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hip fractures in people of all ages. In older adults, a hip fracture is most often a result of a fall from a standing height. In people with very weak bones, a hip fracture can occur simply by standing on the leg and twisting. Risk factors The rate of hip fractures increases substantially with ...

  3. Radiotherapy of pathologic fractures and skeletal lesions bearing the risk of fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieden, K.; Kober, B.; Mende, U.; Zum Winkel, K.

    1986-01-01

    Radiotherapy is of great importance in the treatment of pathologic fractures and skeletal lesions bearing the risk of fracture which are induced by malignomas, especially if these are in an advanced stage. In dependence on site and extent of skeletal destruction as well as on the general tumor dissemination, it can be distinguished between palliative radiotherapy and curative radiotherapy aiming at analgesia and remineralization. A retrospective analysis of 27 pathologic fractures and 56 skeletal lesions bearing the risk of fracture in malignoma patients showed an analgetic effect obtained by radiotherapy in 67% of pathological fractures and in 80% of skeletal lesions bearing the risk of fracture, whereas a remineralization could be demonstrated for 33% of pathological fractures and 50% of destructions bearing the risk of fracture. A stabilization of destructions progressing before therapy was found in 55% of pathological fractures and 40% of skeletal lesions bearing the risk of fracture. Thus a partial loading, supported by orthopedic prostheses, was possible for more than 50% of all patients. (orig.) [de

  4. Osteoporosis and fall risk in patients with fragility fractures

    OpenAIRE

    van Helden, SH; Nieuwenhuijzen-Kruseman, AC; Dinant, G; Pijpers, E; ten Broeke, R; Brink, PR; GEUSENS, Piet

    2005-01-01

    Low BMD and fall risk are well-documented risk factors for fractures. The prevalence of both risk factors has only scarcely been reported in the same population of patients with recent clinical fractures. Methods : 261 consecutive patients (women and men of 50 years and older) admitted to the hospital with a recent clinical fracture were included and had extensive evaluation of bone mineral density (BMD) and fall risk (135 patients with fracture of the upper limb, 94 of the lower limb, 12 of...

  5. Near Wellbore Hydraulic Fracture Propagation from Perforations in Tight Rocks: The Roles of Fracturing Fluid Viscosity and Injection Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Fallahzadeh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracture initiation and near wellbore propagation is governed by complex failure mechanisms, especially in cased perforated wellbores. Various parameters affect such mechanisms, including fracturing fluid viscosity and injection rate. In this study, three different fracturing fluids with viscosities ranging from 20 to 600 Pa.s were used to investigate the effects of varying fracturing fluid viscosities and fluid injection rates on the fracturing mechanisms. Hydraulic fracturing tests were conducted in cased perforated boreholes made in tight 150 mm synthetic cubic samples. A true tri-axial stress cell was used to simulate real far field stress conditions. In addition, dimensional analyses were performed to correspond the results of lab experiments to field-scale operations. The results indicated that by increasing the fracturing fluid viscosity and injection rate, the fracturing energy increased, and consequently, higher fracturing pressures were observed. However, when the fracturing energy was transferred to a borehole at a faster rate, the fracture initiation angle also increased. This resulted in more curved fracture planes. Accordingly, a new parameter, called fracturing power, was introduced to relate fracture geometry to fluid viscosity and injection rate. Furthermore, it was observed that the presence of casing in the wellbore impacted the stress distribution around the casing in such a way that the fracture propagation deviated from the wellbore vicinity.

  6. Hip fracture epidemiological trends, outcomes, and risk factors, 1970–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Marks

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Ray MarksCity University of New York and Columbia University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Hip fractures – which commonly lead to premature death, high rates of morbidity, or reduced life quality – have been the target of a voluminous amount of research for many years. But has the lifetime risk of incurring a hip fracture decreased sufficiently over the last decade or are high numbers of incident cases continuing to prevail, despite a large body of knowledge and a variety of contemporary preventive and refined surgical approaches? This review examines the extensive hip fracture literature published in the English language between 1980 and 2009 concerning hip fracture prevalence trends, and injury mechanisms. It also highlights the contemporary data concerning the personal and economic impact of the injury, plus potentially remediable risk factors underpinning the injury and ensuing disability. The goal was to examine if there is a continuing need to elucidate upon intervention points that might minimize the risk of incurring a hip fracture and its attendant consequences. Based on this information, it appears hip fractures remain a serious global health issue, despite some declines in the incidence rate of hip fractures among some women. Research also shows widespread regional, ethnic and diagnostic variations in hip fracture incidence trends. Key determinants of hip fractures include age, osteoporosis, and falls, but some determinants such as socioeconomic status, have not been well explored. It is concluded that while more research is needed, well-designed primary, secondary, and tertiary preventive efforts applied in both affluent as well as developing countries are desirable to reduce the present and future burden associated with hip fracture injuries. In this context, and in recognition of the considerable variation in manifestation and distribution, as well as risk factors underpinning hip fractures, well-crafted comprehensive, rather

  7. Infection Rates in Open Fractures of the Tibia: Is the 6-Hour Rule Fact or Fiction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameya S. Kamat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Emergency debridement has long been the standard of care for open fractures of the tibia as infection is an important complication. The timing of operative debridement can be debated. We review open fractures of the tibia and compare infection rates in those that were operated on within and after 6-hours. Method. 103 consecutive open fractures of the tibia were reviewed. The data was analysed retrospectively with regard to severity of fracture and incidence of infection. Infection rates over a three-month period were compared between the two groups. Results. 12 (11.6% patients developed an infection within the first 3 months of injury. 7 of which were taken to theatre within 6-hours, and 5 after 6-hours. No significant differences were found between these two groups. Conclusion. There is no significant difference in timing of surgery. Initial basic interventions may play more of a role in limiting the risk of infection.

  8. Risk of septic knee following retrograde intramedullary nailing of open and closed femur fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halvorson Jason J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One potential complication of retrograde femoral nailing in the treatment of femur fractures is the risk of septic knee. This risk theoretically increases in open fractures as a contaminated fracture site has the potential to seed the instrumentation being passed in and out of the sterile intraarticular starting point. There are few studies examining this potential complication in a relatively commonly practiced technique. Methods All patients who received a retrograde femoral nail for femur fracture between September 1996 and November 2006 at a Level 1 trauma center were retrospectively reviewed. This yielded 143 closed fractures, 38 open fractures and 4 closed fractures with an ipsilateral traumatic knee arthrotomy. Patient follow-up records were reviewed for documentation of septic knee via operative notes, wound culture or knee aspirate data, or the administration of antibiotics for suspected septic knee. Results No evidence of septic knee was found in the 185 fractures examined in the dataset. Utilizing the Wilson confidence interval, the rate of septic knee based on our population was no greater than 2%, with that of the open fracture group alone being 9%. Conclusions Based on these results and review of the literature, the risk of septic knee in retrograde femoral nailing of both open and closed femoral shaft fractures appears low but potentially not insignificant. Funding There was no outside source of funding from either industry or other organization for this study.

  9. Delivery by Cesarean Section is not Associated With Decreased at-Birth Fracture Rates in Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellur, S; Jain, M; Cuthbertson, D; Krakow, D; Shapiro, JR; Steiner, RD; Smith, PA; Bober, MB; Hart, T; Krischer, J; Mullins, M; Byers, PH; Pepin, M; Durigova, M; Glorieux, FH; Rauch, F; Sutton, VR; Lee, B; Nagamani, SC

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) predisposes to recurrent fractures. The moderate-to-severe forms of OI present with antenatal fractures and the mode of delivery that would be safest for the fetus is not known. Methods We conducted systematic analyses on the largest cohort of individuals (n=540) with OI enrolled to-date in the OI Linked Clinical Research Centers. Self-reported at-birth fracture rates were compared in individuals with OI types I, III, and IV. Multivariate analyses utilizing backward-elimination logistic regression model building were performed to assess the effect of multiple covariates including method of delivery on fracture-related outcomes. Results When accounting for other covariates, at-birth fracture rates did not differ based on whether delivery was by vaginal route or by cesarean section (CS). Increased birth weight conferred higher risk for fractures irrespective of the delivery method. In utero fracture, maternal history of OI, and breech presentation were strong predictors for choosing CS for delivery. Conclusion Our study, the largest to analyze the effect of various factors on at-birth fracture rates in OI shows that delivery by CS is not associated with decreased fracture rate. With the limitation that the fracture data were self-reported in this cohort, these results suggest that CS should be performed only for other maternal or fetal indications, but not for the sole purpose of fracture prevention in OI. PMID:26426884

  10. Fracture risk in hepatitis C virus infected persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Omland, Lars Haukali; Krarup, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The association between Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection and fracture risk is not well characterized. We compared fracture risk between HCV-seropositive (HCV-exposed) patients and the general population and between patients with cleared and chronic HCV-infection. METHODS...

  11. The impact of fragility fracture and approaches to osteoporosis risk assessment worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Elizabeth M; Moon, Rebecca J; Harvey, Nicholas C; Cooper, Cyrus

    2017-11-01

    Osteoporosis constitutes a major public health problem, through its association with age-related fractures, particularly of the hip, vertebrae, distal forearm and humerus. Substantial geographic variation has been noted in the incidence of osteoporotic fractures worldwide, with Western populations (North America, Europe and Oceania), reporting increases in hip fracture throughout the second half of the 20th century, with a stabilisation or decline in the last two decades. In developing populations however, particularly in Asia, the rates of osteoporotic fracture appears to be increasing. The massive global burden consequent to osteoporosis means that fracture risk assessment should be a high priority among health measures considered by policy makers. The WHO operational definition of osteoporosis, based on a measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), has been used globally since the mid-1990s. However, although this definition identifies those at greatest individual risk of fracture, in the population overall a greater total number of fractures occur in individuals with BMD values above the threshold for osteoporosis diagnosis. A number of web-based tools to enable the inclusion of clinical risk factors, with or without BMD, in fracture prediction algorithms have been developed to improve the identification of individuals at high fracture risk, the most commonly used globally being FRAX®. Access to DXA, osteoporosis risk assessment, case finding and treatment varies worldwide, but despite such advances studies indicate that a minority of men and women at high fracture risk receive treatment. Importantly, research is ongoing to demonstrate the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of osteoporosis case finding and risk assessment strategies worldwide. The huge burden caused by osteoporosis related fractures to individuals, healthcare systems and societies should provide a clear impetus for the progression of such

  12. Reprint of: The impact of fragility fracture and approaches to osteoporosis risk assessment worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Elizabeth M; Moon, Rebecca J; Harvey, Nicholas C; Cooper, Cyrus

    2017-08-01

    Osteoporosis constitutes a major public health problem, through its association with age-related fractures, particularly of the hip, vertebrae, distal forearm and humerus. Substantial geographic variation has been noted in the incidence of osteoporotic fractures worldwide, with Western populations (North America, Europe and Oceania), reporting increases in hip fracture throughout the second half of the 20th century, with a stabilisation or decline in the last two decades. In developing populations however, particularly in Asia, the rates of osteoporotic fracture appears to be increasing. The massive global burden consequent to osteoporosis means that fracture risk assessment should be a high priority amongst health measures considered by policy makers. The WHO operational definition of osteoporosis, based on a measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), has been used globally since the mid-1990s. However, although this definition identifies those at greatest individual risk of fracture, in the population overall a greater total number of fractures occur in individuals with BMD values above threshold for osteoporosis diagnosis. A number of web-based tools to enable the inclusion of clinical risk factors, with or without BMD, in fracture prediction algorithms have been developed to improve the identification of individuals at high fracture risk, the most commonly used globally being FRAX ® . Access to DXA, osteoporosis risk assessment, case finding and treatment varies worldwide, but despite such advances studies indicate that a minority of men and women at high fracture risk receive treatment. Importantly, research is ongoing to demonstrate the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of osteoporosis case finding and risk assessment strategies worldwide. The huge burden caused by osteoporosis related fractures to individuals, healthcare systems and societies should provide a clear impetus for the progression of such

  13. Fracture patterns and the energy release rate of phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Hong, Jiawang; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-03-14

    Phosphorene, also known as monolayer black phosphorus, has been enjoying popularity in electronic devices due to its superior electrical properties. However, it's relatively low Young's modulus, low fracture strength and susceptibility to structural failure have limited its application in mechanical devices. Therefore, in order to design more mechanically reliable devices that utilize phosphorene, it is necessary to explore the fracture patterns and energy release rate of phosphorene. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate phosphorene's fracture mechanism. The results indicate that fracture under uniaxial tension along the armchair direction is attributed to a break in the interlayer bond angles, while failure in the zigzag direction is triggered by the break in both intra-layer angles and bonds. Furthermore, we developed a modified Griffith criterion to analyze the energy release rate of phosphorene and its dependence on the strain rates and orientations of cracks. Simulation results indicate that phosphorene's energy release rate remains almost unchanged in the armchair direction while it fluctuates intensively in the zigzag direction. Additionally, the strain rate was found to play a negligible role in the energy release rate. The geometrical factor α in the Griffith's criterion is almost constant when the crack orientation is smaller than 45 degree, regardless of the crack orientation and loading direction. Overall, these findings provide helpful insights into the mechanical properties and failure behavior of phosphorene.

  14. Comparison between frailty index of deficit accumulation and fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) in prediction of risk of fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guowei; Thabane, Lehana; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Adachi, Jonathan D

    2015-08-01

    A frailty index (FI) of deficit accumulation could quantify and predict the risk of fractures based on the degree of frailty in the elderly. We aimed to compare the predictive powers between the FI and the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) in predicting risk of major osteoporotic fracture (hip, upper arm or shoulder, spine, or wrist) and hip fracture, using the data from the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW) 3-year Hamilton cohort. There were 3985 women included in the study, with the mean age of 69.4 years (standard deviation [SD] = 8.89). During the follow-up, there were 149 (3.98%) incident major osteoporotic fractures and 18 (0.48%) hip fractures reported. The FRAX and FI were significantly related to each other. Both FRAX and FI significantly predicted risk of major osteoporotic fracture, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.03 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.05) and 1.02 (95% CI: 1.01-1.04) for per-0.01 increment for the FRAX and FI respectively. The HRs were 1.37 (95% CI: 1.19-1.58) and 1.26 (95% CI: 1.12-1.42) for an increase of per-0.10 (approximately one SD) in the FRAX and FI respectively. Similar discriminative ability of the models was found: c-index = 0.62 for the FRAX and c-index = 0.61 for the FI. When cut-points were chosen to trichotomize participants into low-risk, medium-risk and high-risk groups, a significant increase in fracture risk was found in the high-risk group (HR = 2.04, 95% CI: 1.36-3.07) but not in the medium-risk group (HR = 1.23, 95% CI: 0.82-1.84) compared with the low-risk women for the FI, while for FRAX the medium-risk (HR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.09-3.68) and high-risk groups (HR = 2.61, 95% CI: 1.48-4.58) predicted risk of major osteoporotic fracture significantly only when survival time exceeded 18months (550 days). Similar findings were observed for hip fracture and in sensitivity analyses. In conclusion, the FI is comparable with FRAX in the prediction of risk of future fractures, indicating that

  15. Fracture Risk Prediction Using Phalangeal Bone Mineral Density or FRAX(®)?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Holmberg, Teresa; Rubin, Katrine Hass; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    the association between low, intermediate, and high risk by phalangeal T-score or FRAX and incident fractures, and receiver operating characteristic curves were obtained. Mean follow-up time was 4.3 yr, and a total of 395 persons (3.1%) experienced a fracture during follow-up. The highest rate of major...... variables performed overall best in the prediction of major osteoporotic fractures. In predicting hip fractures, there was a tendency of T-score performing worse than the other methods....

  16. Previous Fractures at Multiple Sites Increase the Risk for Subsequent Fractures: The Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlbach, Stephen; Saag, Kenneth G.; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Hooven, Fred H.; Flahive, Julie; Boonen, Steven; Chapurlat, Roland D.; Compston, Juliet E.; Cooper, Cyrus; Díez-Perez, Adolfo; Greenspan, Susan L.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Netelenbos, J. Coen; Pfeilschifter, Johannes; Rossini, Maurizio; Roux, Christian; Sambrook, Philip N.; Silverman, Stuart; Siris, Ethel S.; Watts, Nelson B.; Lindsay, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Previous fractures of the hip, spine, or wrist are well-recognized predictors of future fracture, but the role of other fracture sites is less clear. We sought to assess the relationship between prior fracture at 10 skeletal locations and incident fracture. The Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW) is an observational cohort study being conducted in 17 physician practices in 10 countries. Women ≥ 55 years answered questionnaires at baseline and at 1 and/or 2 years (fractures in previous year). Of 60,393 women enrolled, follow-up data were available for 51,762. Of these, 17.6%, 4.0%, and 1.6% had suffered 1, 2, or ≥3 fractures since age 45. During the first 2 years of follow-up, 3149 women suffered 3683 incident fractures. Compared with women with no prior fractures, women with 1, 2, or ≥ 3 prior fractures were 1.8-, 3.0-, and 4.8-fold more likely to have any incident fracture; those with ≥3 prior fractures were 9.1-fold more likely to sustain a new vertebral fracture. Nine of 10 prior fracture locations were associated with an incident fracture. The strongest predictors of incident spine and hip fractures were prior spine fracture (hazard ratio 7.3) and hip (hazard ratio 3.5). Prior rib fractures were associated with a 2.3-fold risk of subsequent vertebral fracture, previous upper leg fracture predicted a 2.2-fold increased risk of hip fracture; women with a history of ankle fracture were at 1.8-fold risk of future fracture of a weight-bearing bone. Our findings suggest that a broad range of prior fracture sites are associated with an increased risk of incident fractures, with important implications for clinical assessments and risk model development. PMID:22113888

  17. Perioperative risks associated with the operative treatment of clavicle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Heurle, Albert; Le, Toan; Grawe, Brian; Casstevens, E Christopher; Edgington, Jon; Archdeacon, Michael T; Wyrick, John

    2013-11-01

    Clavicle fractures are a common injury among young adults who were historically treated non-operatively with satisfactory outcomes. However, more recent studies have shown a higher nonunion rate for displaced clavicle fractures treated conservatively. The purpose of this study is to investigate the midterm complications, clinical outcomes and overall patient satisfaction after osteosynthesis of midshaft clavicular fractures. A total of 37 patients treated for a clavicle fracture from January 2007 to December 2008 with at least 12 months' follow-up were identified from a billing code search. At the latest follow-up appointment, the patients completed the Constant Shoulder, the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scale (DASH) and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey version 2.0 (SF36v2) functional outcome surveys as well as a custom questionnaire to assess hand dominance, employment status, the amount of time taken before returning to work, the presence of numbness around the incision site (a surrogate marker of a supraclavicular nerve palsy), whether the patient desired the plate removed and/or if it was worth another surgery. With regard to the functional outcome surveys, the average DASH score was 11.8 ± 16.4, the Constant score was 93.3 ± 7.2, the SF36v2 physical component summary (PCS) was 50.7 ± 10.1 and the SF36v2 mental component summary (MCS) 50.6 ± 11.2. From the custom questionnaire, 27 patients (73%) found their cosmetic appearance acceptable while the remaining 10 patients (27%) were bothered by the appearance of the plate. The average time to return to work was 82.1 ± 77.4 days. There were no infections, refractures or nonunions of the clavicle. As the relative indications for open reduction and internal fixation of clavicle fractures become more popular, such as cosmetic concerns or faster recovery, we wish to demonstrate that the procedure is not without risks, including implant discomfort requiring a subsequent

  18. Fracture risk in Danish men with prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Nielsen, Morten F; Eskildsen, Peter Claes

    2007-01-01

    To assess the risk of fracture attributable to prostate cancer, and the impact of exposure to prescribed gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonists and antiandrogens on this risk in a nationwide, population-based case-control study.......To assess the risk of fracture attributable to prostate cancer, and the impact of exposure to prescribed gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonists and antiandrogens on this risk in a nationwide, population-based case-control study....

  19. Loading rate effect on the fracture behaviour of highstrength concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Viso J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with the sensitivity of eight types of performancedesigned high-strength concrete to the loading rate. Variations in the composition of the concrete produce the desired performance, for instance having null shrinkage or being able to be pumped at elevated heights without segregation, but they also produce variations in the fracture properties that are reported in this paper. We performed tests at five loading rates spanning six orders of magnitude in the displacement rate, from 1.74 × 10-5 mm/s to 17.4 mm/s. Load-displacement curves show that their peak is higher as the displacement rate increases, whereas the corresponding displacement is almost constant. Fracture energy also increases, but only for loading rates higher than 0.01 mm/s. We use a formula based on a cohesive law with a viscous term to study the results. The correlation of the formula to the experimental results is good and it allows us to obtain the theoretical value for the fracture energy under strictly static conditions. In addition, both the fracture energy and the characteristic length of the concretes used in the study diminish as the compressive strength of their aggregates increases.

  20. Neonatal clavicle fracture in cesarean delivery: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Ah; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Ko, Sun Young; Shin, Son Moon

    2017-07-01

    Neonatal clavicle fracture in cesarean delivery is rare and has not been extensively studied. We performed a retrospective review of cesarean deliveries with neonatal clavicle fracture during a 12-year period. Maternal and neonatal factors as well as surgical factors related to cesarean delivery for the fracture were determined and compared to the control group to analyze their significance. Among a total 89 367 deliveries during the study period, 36 286 babies were born via cesarean section. Nineteen cases of clavicle fractures in cesarean section were identified (0.05% of total live births via cesarean section). In the analysis of maternal and neonatal risk factors, birthweight, birthweight ≥ 4000  g and maternal age were significantly associated with clavicle fracture in cesarean section. However, clavicle fractures were not correlated with the selected surgical factors such as indication for cesarean section, skin incision to delivery time and incision type of skin and uterus. Logistic regression analysis showed that birthweight was the major risk factor for clavicle fracture. Clavicle fractures complicated 0.05% of cesarean deliveries. The main risk factor related to a clavicle fracture in cesarean section was the birthweight of an infant. As reported in previous studies associated with vaginal delivery, clavicle fracture is considered to be an unavoidable event and may not be eliminated, even in cesarean delivery.

  1. Recognizing and reporting vertebral fractures: reducing the risk of future osteoporotic fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.; Brown, J.P.; Khan, A.

    2007-01-01

    Given the increasing evidence that vertebral fractures are underdiagnosed and not acted on, Osteoporosis Canada and the Canadian Association of Radiologists initiated a project to develop and publish a set of recommendations to promote and facilitate the diagnosis and reporting of vertebral fractures. The identification of spinal fractures is not uniform. More than 65% of vertebral fractures cause no symptoms. It is also apparent that vertebral fractures are inadequately recognized when the opportunity for diagnosis arises fortuitously. It is to patients' benefit that radiologists report vertebral fractures evident on a chest or other radiograph, no matter how incidental to the immediate clinical indication for the examination. The present recommendations can help to close the gap in care in recognizing and treating vertebral fractures, to prevent future fractures and thus reduce the burden of osteoporosis-related morbidity and mortality, as well as fracture-related costs to the health care system. Several studies indicate that a gap exists in regard to the diagnosis of vertebral fractures and the clinical response following such diagnosis. All recommendations presented here are based on consensus. These recommendations were developed by a multidisciplinary working group under the auspices of the Scientific Advisory Council of Osteoporosis Canada and the Canadian Association of Radiologists. Prevalent vertebral fractures have important clinical implications in terms of future fracture risk. Recognizing and reporting fractures incidental to radiologic examinations done for other reasons has the potential to reduce health care costs by initiating further steps in osteoporosis diagnosis and appropriate therapy. Physicians should be aware of the importance of vertebral fracture diagnosis in assessing future osteoporotic fracture risk. Vertebral fractures incidental to radiologic examinations done for other reasons should be identified and reported. Vertebral fractures

  2. Incidence Rates of and Mortality after Hip Fracture among German Nursing Home Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Jacobs

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about hip fracture rates and post-fracture mortality among nursing home residents. This retrospective cohort study examined incidence rates (IR of and mortality after hip fracture in this population focusing on sex differences. A cohort of >127,000 residents ≥65 years, newly admitted to German nursing homes between 2010 and 2014 were used to calculate age-, sex-, care-need- and time after admission-specific IR. To determine mortality, the Kaplan-Meier-method was applied. Using Cox regression, we studied mortality and estimated time-dependent hazard ratios (HRs. For this purpose, to each person with a hip fracture, one resident without a hip fracture was matched by sex, age and care-need using risk-set sampling. 75% were women (mean age: 84.0 years. During 168,588 person-years (PY, 8537 residents with at least one hip fracture were observed. The IR for women and men were 52.9 and 42.5/1000 PY. For both sexes, IR increased with rising age and decreased with increasing care-level. IR were highest in the first months after admission and subsequently declined afterwards. The impact of hip fractures on mortality was time-dependent. Mortality of residents with hip fracture was highest in the first two months after fracture compared to those without (HR: 2.82; 95% CI 2.57–3.11 and after six months, no differences were found (HR: 1.10; 95% CI 0.98–1.22 Further research should always include analyses stratified by sex, age and time period after admission.

  3. [High complication rate after surgical treatment of ankle fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørslev, Naja; Ebskov, Lars; Lind, Marianne; Mersø, Camilla

    2014-08-04

    The purpose of this study was to determine the quality and re-operation rate of the surgical treatment of ankle fractures at a large university hospital. X-rays and patient records of 137 patients surgically treated for ankle fractures were analyzed for: 1) correct classification according to Lauge-Hansen, 2) if congruity of the ankle joint was achieved, 3) selection and placement of the hardware, and 4) the surgeon's level of education. Totally 32 of 137 did not receive an optimal treatment, 11 were re-operated. There was no clear correlation between incorrect operation and the surgeon's level of education.

  4. High-Risk Stress Fractures: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnis, Kelly C; Ramey, Lindsay N

    2016-03-01

    Stress fractures are common overuse injuries in athletes. They occur during periods of increased training without adequate rest, disrupting normal bone reparative mechanisms. There are a host of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including biochemical and biomechanical, that put athletes at risk. In most stress fractures, the diagnosis is primarily clinical, with imaging indicated at times, and management focused on symptom-free relative rest with advancement of activity as tolerated. Overall, stress fractures in athletes have an excellent prognosis for return to sport, with little risk of complication. There is a subset of injuries that have a greater risk of fracture progression, delayed healing, and nonunion and are generally more challenging to treat with nonoperative care. Specific locations of high-risk stress fracture include the femoral neck (tension side), patella, anterior tibia, medial malleolus, talus, tarsal navicular, proximal fifth metatarsal, and great toe sesamoids. These sites share a characteristic region of high tensile load and low blood flow. High-risk stress fractures require a more aggressive approach to evaluation, with imaging often necessary, to confirm early and accurate diagnosis and initiate immediate treatment. Treatment consists of nonweight-bearing immobilization, often with a prolonged period away from sport, and a more methodic and careful reintroduction to athletic activity. These stress fractures may require surgical intervention. A high index of suspicion is essential to avoid delayed diagnosis and optimize outcomes in this subset of stress fractures. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of loading rate on ductile fracture toughness and fracture surface roughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osovski, S.; Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Ponson, L.

    2015-01-01

    The variation of ductile crack growth resistance and fracture surface roughness with loading rate is modeled under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions. Three-dimensional calculations are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitatin...

  6. Fracture risk in hepatitis C virus infected persons: results from the DANVIR cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Omland, Lars Haukali; Krarup, Henrik; Obel, Niels

    2014-07-01

    The association between Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection and fracture risk is not well characterized. We compared fracture risk between HCV-seropositive (HCV-exposed) patients and the general population and between patients with cleared and chronic HCV-infection. Outcome measures were time to first fracture at any site, time to first low-energy and first non-low-energy (other) fracture in 12,013 HCV-exposed patients from the DANVIR cohort compared with a general population control cohort (n=60,065) matched by sex and age. Within DANVIR, 4500 patients with chronic HCV-infection and 2656 patients with cleared HCV-infection were studied. Compared with population controls, HCV-exposed patients had increased overall risk of fracture [adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) 2.15, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 2.03-2.28], increased risk of low-energy fracture (aIRR 2.13, 95% CI: 1.93-2.35) and of other fracture (aIRR 2.18, 95% CI: 2.02-2.34). Compared with cleared HCV-infection, chronic HCV-infection was not associated with increased risk of fracture at any site (aIRR 1.08, 95% CI: 0.97-1.20), or other fracture (aIRR 1.04, 95% CI: 0.91-1.19). The aIRR for low-energy fracture was 1.20 (95% CI: 0.99-1.44). HCV-exposed patients had increased risk of all fracture types. In contrast, overall risk of fracture did not differ between patients with chronic vs. cleared HCV-infection, although chronic HCV-infection might be associated with a small excess risk of low-energy fractures. Our study suggests that fracture risk in HCV-infected patients is multi-factorial and mainly determined by lifestyle-related factors associated with HCV-exposure. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Change in fracture risk and fracture pattern after bariatric surgery: nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Catherine; Jean, Sonia; Gamache, Philippe; Lebel, Stéfane; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Biertho, Laurent; Michou, Laëtitia; Gagnon, Claudia

    2016-07-27

     To investigate whether bariatric surgery increases the risk of fracture.  Retrospective nested case-control study.  Patients who underwent bariatric surgery in the province of Quebec, Canada, between 2001 and 2014, selected using healthcare administrative databases.  12 676 patients who underwent bariatric surgery, age and sex matched with 38 028 obese and 126 760 non-obese controls.  Incidence and sites of fracture in patients who had undergone bariatric surgery compared with obese and non-obese controls. Fracture risk was also compared before and after surgery (index date) within each group and by type of surgery from 2006 to 2014. Multivariate conditional Poisson regression models were adjusted for fracture history, number of comorbidities, sociomaterial deprivation, and area of residence.  Before surgery, patients undergoing bariatric surgery (9169 (72.3%) women; mean age 42 (SD 11) years) were more likely to fracture (1326; 10.5%) than were obese (3065; 8.1%) or non-obese (8329; 6.6%) controls. A mean of 4.4 years after surgery, bariatric patients were more susceptible to fracture (514; 4.1%) than were obese (1013; 2.7%) and non-obese (3008; 2.4%) controls. Postoperative adjusted fracture risk was higher in the bariatric group than in the obese (relative risk 1.38, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.55) and non-obese (1.44, 1.29 to 1.59) groups. Before surgery, the risk of distal lower limb fracture was higher, upper limb fracture risk was lower, and risk of clinical spine, hip, femur, or pelvic fractures was similar in the bariatric and obese groups compared with the non-obese group. After surgery, risk of distal lower limb fracture decreased (relative risk 0.66, 0.56 to 0.78), whereas risk of upper limb (1.64, 1.40 to 1.93), clinical spine (1.78, 1.08 to 2.93), pelvic, hip, or femur (2.52, 1.78 to 3.59) fractures increased. The increase in risk of fracture reached significance only for biliopancreatic diversion.  Patients undergoing bariatric

  8. Hyponatremia, a risk factor for osteoporosis and fractures in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, J P; Amar, A O S; Hyldstrup, L

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia has been linked to an increased risk of osteoporosis and fractures. We found an increased hazard ratio of major osteoporotic fractures adjusted for potential confounders, including osteoporosis and medication. A reduced BMD was not sufficiently explaining the association. Our data...... indicate that hyponatremia should be considered a risk factor for osteoporosis and fractures. INTRODUCTION: Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder in clinical practice and could be a risk factor for both osteoporosis and fractures. Mild hyponatremia has traditionally been regarded as a benign...... and asymptomatic condition; however, data from large population and animal studies have led to a reappraisal of this view. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of hyponatremia with osteoporosis and major osteoporotic fractures (MOF) in women. METHODS: This is a historical cohort study...

  9. Osteoporosis and the risk of fracture | | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterised by low bone mass and a deterioration of the microarchitecture of bone tissue, leading to an increase in bone fragility and a greater risk of fracture. It is a life-threatening disease, with mortality following hip fracture exceeding mortality after myocardial infarction.1 For women, ...

  10. Diagnostic strategies in patients with high fracture risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malgo, F.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis describes the results of data collected from patients who were referred to our Fracture Liaison Service in a 2-year time period for screening for increased fracture risk, and also describes the results of our clinical studies performed using the impact microindentation technique, a new

  11. Is warfarin usage a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures? A cohort study in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genady Drozdinsky

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Several studies have examined the association between warfarin sodium use and risk of osteoporotic fractures with conflicting results. Our study addresses this question, for the first time regarding patients attending emergency department (ED. Aims The aim of this study was to retrospectively detect whether there is higher rate of usage of warfarin sodium in patients with osteoporotic fractures attending an ED. Methods This is a retrospective study from patients' computerized charts. All individuals >65 years old who had an osteoporotic fracture and attended an ED in a tertiary hospital were compared with a similar group of elderly individuals >65 years old without an osteoporotic fracture who attended the ED for a cause other than an osteoporotic fracture. Results This study included 328 patients who were evaluated in the years 2005–2016. Overall, 164 individuals with a typical osteoporotic fracture (hip -66 patients (40 per cent, spine- 92 patients (56 per cent, humerus -4 patients (2 per cent, radius -13 patients (8 per cent were identified and compared with a matched group of elderly individuals who were evaluated in the ED for other complaints. Warfarin sodium was used in 61 individuals (19 per cent in the entire cohort, 34 in the fracture group and 27 in the non-fracture group (p=0.324. Conclusion In elderly patients, attending an ED, warfarin sodium use does not seem to be a risk factor for an osteoporotic fracture

  12. Gender-specific hip fracture risk in community-dwelling and institutionalized seniors age 65 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterwald, M; Sidelnikov, E; Orav, E J; Dawson-Hughes, B; Theiler, R; Egli, A; Platz, A; Simmen, H P; Meier, C; Grob, D; Beck, S; Stähelin, H B; Bischoff-Ferrari, H A

    2014-01-01

    In this study of acute hip fracture patients, we show that hip fracture rates differ by gender between community-dwelling seniors and seniors residing in nursing homes. While women have a significantly higher rate of hip fracture among the community-dwelling seniors, men have a significantly higher rate among nursing home residents. Differences in gender-specific hip fracture risk between community-dwelling and institutionalized seniors have not been well established, and seasonality of hip fracture risk has been controversial. We analyzed detailed data from 1,084 hip fracture patients age 65 years and older admitted to one large hospital center in Zurich, Switzerland. In a sensitivity analysis, we extend to de-personalized data from 1,265 hip fracture patients from the other two large hospital centers in Zurich within the same time frame (total n = 2,349). The denominators were person-times accumulated by the Zurich population in the corresponding age/gender/type of dwelling stratum in each calendar season for the period of the study. In the primary analysis of 1,084 hip fracture patients (mean age 85.1 years; 78% women): Among community-dwelling seniors, the risk of hip fracture was twofold higher among women compared with men (RR = 2.16; 95% CI, 1.74-2.69) independent of age, season, number of comorbidities, and cognitive function; among institutionalized seniors, the risk of hip fracture was 26% lower among women compared with men (RR = 0.77; 95% CI: 0.63-0.95) adjusting for the same confounders. In the sensitivity analysis of 2,349 hip fracture patients (mean age 85.0 years, 76% women), this pattern remained largely unchanged. There is no seasonal swing in hip fracture incidence. We confirm for seniors living in the community that women have a higher risk of hip fracture than men. However, among institutionalized seniors, men are at higher risk for hip fracture.

  13. Surgical menopause and nonvertebral fracture risk among older US women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesco, Kimberly K; Marshall, Lynn M; Nelson, Heidi D; Humphrey, Linda; Rizzo, Joanne; Pedula, Kathryn L; Cauley, Jane A; Ensrud, Kristine E; Hochberg, Marc C; Antoniucci, Diana; Hillier, Teresa A

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether older postmenopausal women with a history of bilateral oophorectomy before natural menopause (surgical menopause) have a higher risk of nonvertebral postmenopausal fracture than women with natural menopause. We used 21 years of prospectively collected incident fracture data from the ongoing Study of Osteoporotic Fractures, a cohort study of community-dwelling women without previous bilateral hip fracture who were 65 years or older at enrollment, to determine the risk of hip, wrist, and any nonvertebral fracture. χ(2) and t tests were used to compare the two groups on important characteristics. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models stratified by baseline oral estrogen use status were used to estimate the risk of fracture. Baseline characteristics differed significantly among the 6,616 women within the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures who underwent either surgical (1,157) or natural (5,459) menopause, including mean age at menopause (44.3 ± 7.4 vs 48.9 ± 4.9 y, P menopause, even among women who had never used oral estrogen (hip fracture: hazard ratio [HR], 0.87; 95% CI, 0.63-1.21; wrist fracture: HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.78-1.57; any nonvertebral fracture: HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.93-1.32). These data provide some reassurance that the long-term risk of nonvertebral fracture is not substantially increased for postmenopausal women who experienced premenopausal bilateral oophorectomy, compared with postmenopausal women with intact ovaries, even in the absence of postmenopausal estrogen therapy.

  14. The fluoridation of drinking water and hip fracture hospitalization rates in two Canadian communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Almazor, M E; Flowerdew, G; Saunders, L D; Soskolne, C L; Russell, A S

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hip fracture hospitalization rates between a fluoridated and a non-fluoridated community in Alberta, Canada: Edmonton, which has had fluoridated drinking water since 1967, and Calgary, which considered fluoridation in 1991 but is currently revising this decision. Case subjects were all individuals aged 45 years or older residing in Edmonton or Calgary who were admitted to hospitals in Alberta between January 1, 1981, and December 31, 1987, and who had a discharge diagnosis of hip fracture. Edmonton rates were compared with Calgary rates, with adjustment for age and sex using the Edmonton population as a standard. The hip fracture hospitalization rate for Edmonton from 1981 through 1987 was 2.77 per 1000 person-years. The age-sex standardized rate for Calgary was 2.78 per 1000 person-years. No statistically significant difference was observed in the overall rate, and only minor differences were observed within age and sex subgroups, with the Edmonton rates being higher in males. These findings suggest that fluoridation of drinking water has no impact, neither beneficial nor deleterious, on the risk of hip fracture.

  15. Active unicameral bone cysts in the upper limb are at greater risk of fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Inn Kuang; Mahadev, Arjandas; Lim, Kevin Boon Leong; Lee, Eng Hin; Nathan, Saminathan Suresh

    2009-08-01

    To elucidate the natural history of unicameral bone cyst (UBC) and risk factors for pathological fracture. 14 males and 8 females (mean age, 9 years) diagnosed with UBC were reviewed. Cyst location, symptoms, and whether there was any fracture or surgery were recorded. Cyst parameters were measured on radiographs, and included (1) the cyst index, (2) the ratio of the widest cyst diameter to the growth plate diameter, and (3) the adjusted distance of the cyst border from the growth plate. There were 11 upper- and 11 lower-limb cysts. 13 patients had pathological fractures and 9 did not. 20 patients were treated conservatively with limb immobilisation; 2 underwent curettage and bone grafting (one resolved and one did not). Seven cysts resolved (5 had fractures and 2 did not). The risk of fracture was higher in the upper than lower limbs (100% vs 18%, pFractured cysts were larger than unfractured cysts (mean cyst index, 4.5 vs. 2.2, p=0.07). Active cysts were more likely to fracture. Conservative management had a 30% resolution rate. Surgery should be considered for large active cysts in the upper limbs in order to minimise the fracture risk.

  16. Calcium intake and risk of fracture: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolland, Mark J; Leung, William; Tai, Vicky; Bastin, Sonja; Gamble, Greg D; Grey, Andrew; Reid, Ian R

    2015-09-29

    To examine the evidence underpinning recommendations to increase calcium intake through dietary sources or calcium supplements to prevent fractures. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials and observational studies of calcium intake with fracture as an endpoint. Results from trials were pooled with random effects meta-analyses. Ovid Medline, Embase, PubMed, and references from relevant systematic reviews. Initial searches undertaken in July 2013 and updated in September 2014. Randomised controlled trials or cohort studies of dietary calcium, milk or dairy intake, or calcium supplements (with or without vitamin D) with fracture as an outcome and participants aged >50. There were only two eligible randomised controlled trials of dietary sources of calcium (n=262), but 50 reports from 44 cohort studies of relations between dietary calcium (n=37), milk (n=14), or dairy intake (n=8) and fracture outcomes. For dietary calcium, most studies reported no association between calcium intake and fracture (14/22 for total, 17/21 for hip, 7/8 for vertebral, and 5/7 for forearm fracture). For milk (25/28) and dairy intake (11/13), most studies also reported no associations. In 26 randomised controlled trials, calcium supplements reduced the risk of total fracture (20 studies, n=58,573; relative risk 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 0.96) and vertebral fracture (12 studies, n=48,967. 0.86, 0.74 to 1.00) but not hip (13 studies, n=56,648; 0.95, 0.76 to 1.18) or forearm fracture (eight studies, n=51,775; 0.96, 0.85 to 1.09). Funnel plot inspection and Egger's regression suggested bias toward calcium supplements in the published data. In randomised controlled trials at lowest risk of bias (four studies, n=44,505), there was no effect on risk of fracture at any site. Results were similar for trials of calcium monotherapy and co-administered calcium and vitamin D. Only one trial in frail elderly women in residential care with low dietary calcium intake and vitamin D

  17. Risk factors for trochanteric and femoral neck fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, A R; Navas, P Z

    The differences between the two main types of fracture of proximal end of the femur, trochanteric and cervical fractures, are still a subject of study, and could be the key to a better understanding of its pathophysiology and prevention. The aim of this study is to determine whether epidemiological differences in the distribution of risk factors associated with hip fracture exist between these two entities. A descriptive cross-sectional study of 428 patients over the age of 65 admitted for trochanteric or cervical fractures in 2015, in which gender, age, previous diagnosis, external causes associated with fracture and place of the event were recorded. There were 220 patients with a cervical fracture (51.4%) and 208 patients with a trochanteric fracture (48.6%). The average age was higher in the trochanteric fracture, observing a constant increase with age only in women with trochanteric fractures. Cervical fracture showed a significant association with cerebrovascular disease (p=0.039) and trochanteric fracture with accidental falls (p=0.047) and presence of 5-9 previous diseases (p=0.014). A regression analysis maintained this association in the case of a cerebrovascular disease (OR 2.6, 95%CI 1.1-6.4) and the presence of 5-9 diseases (OR 1.5, 95%CI 1.1-2.3). Trochanteric fractures are associated with women patients of more advanced ages, 5-9 previous diseases and accidental falls. Cerebrovascular disease shows a higher prevalence in cervical fractures. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Risk factors for falls within the first 3 months after a fracture.

    OpenAIRE

    GEUSENS, Piet; Helden, SV; Wyers, C; Dagnelie, PC; Pijpers, E; Willems, G; Brink, P; Linden, SV; Nieuwenhuijzen-Kruseman, A

    2006-01-01

    A history of fracture indicates a risk for future fractures. The absolute risk is highest in the first year after a clinical fracture. We investigated the incidence offalls and fracture and the risk factors for falls within 3 months after a fracture. We included 296 consecutive men and women aged 50 years who presented to the hospital with a clinical fracture. Risk factors for falls were assessed according to the guidelines on fall prevention in the Netherlands. Osteoporosis wa...

  19. Fracture risk by HIV infection status in perinatally HIV-exposed children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siberry, George K; Li, Hong; Jacobson, Denise

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the incidence of fractures in HIV-infected children and comparable HIV-exposed, uninfected (HEU) children in a multicenter, prospective cohort study (PACTG 219/219C) in the United States. The main outcome was first fracture during the risk period. Nine fractures occurred in 7 of 1326 HIV-infected and 2 of 649 HEU children, corresponding to incidence rates of 1.2 per 1000 person-years and 1.1 per 1000 person-years, respectively. The incidence rate ratio was 1.1 (95% CI 0.2, 5.5). There was no evidence of a substantially increased risk of fracture in HIV-infected compared to HEU children.

  20. Advances in Imaging Approaches to Fracture Risk Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhard, Mary Kate; Nyman, Jeffry S.; Does, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Fragility fractures are a growing problem worldwide, and current methods for diagnosing osteoporosis do not always identify individuals who require treatment to prevent a fracture and may misidentify those not a risk. Traditionally, fracture risk is assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, which provides measurements of areal bone mineral density (BMD) at sites prone to fracture. Recent advances in imaging show promise in adding new information that could improve the prediction of fracture risk in the clinic. As reviewed herein, advances in quantitative computed tomography (QCT) predict hip and vertebral body strength; high resolution HR-peripheral QCT (HR-pQCT) and micro-magnetic resonance imaging (μMRI) assess the micro-architecture of trabecular bone; quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measures the modulus or tissue stiffness of cortical bone; and quantitative ultra-short echo time MRI methods quantify the concentrations of bound water and pore water in cortical bone, which reflect a variety of mechanical properties of bone. Each of these technologies provides unique characteristics of bone and may improve fracture risk diagnoses and reduce prevalence of fractures by helping to guide treatment decisions. PMID:27816505

  1. Pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate detection: Probabilistic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.

    1993-01-01

    This is the second in series of three papers generated from studies on nuclear pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate detection. This paper focuses on the development of novel probabilistic models for stochastic performance evaluation of degraded nuclear piping systems. It was accomplished here in three distinct stages. First, a statistical analysis was conducted to characterize various input variables for thermo-hydraulic analysis and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, such as material properties of pipe, crack morphology variables, and location of cracks found in nuclear piping. Second, a new stochastic model was developed to evaluate performance of degraded piping systems. It is based on accurate deterministic models for thermo-hydraulic and fracture mechanics analyses described in the first paper, statistical characterization of various input variables, and state-of-the-art methods of modem structural reliability theory. From this model. the conditional probability of failure as a function of leak-rate detection capability of the piping systems can be predicted. Third, a numerical example was presented to illustrate the proposed model for piping reliability analyses. Results clearly showed that the model provides satisfactory estimates of conditional failure probability with much less computational effort when compared with those obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. The probabilistic model developed in this paper will be applied to various piping in boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor plants for leak-rate detection applications

  2. Rib fracture as a predictor of future fractures in young and older postmenopausal women: National Osteoporosis Risk Assessment (NORA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjan, S. G.; Barrett-Connor, E.; McHorney, C. A.; Miller, P. D.; Sen, S. S.; Siris, E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A rib fracture history after age 45 was associated with a 5.4-fold increase in new rib fracture risk and a 2.4-fold increase in risk of any new clinical fracture in 155,031 postmenopausal women. A rib fracture history suggests osteoporosis and should be considered when evaluating patients for interventions to prevent fractures. Introduction Until recently, little attention was paid to rib fracture as an osteoporosis marker. Emerging evidence suggests rib fracture may be an osteoporotic fracture in men and women. We report the 5-year independent association between baseline rib fracture histories and self-reported future fractures by age (decade) in the NORA cohort (155,031 postmenopausal women, 50–99 years). Methods Participants reported fracture history and responded to follow-up surveys at years 1, 3, or 6. Women with a baseline rib fracture history without other fractures were compared with women with no fracture. Results At baseline, 4,758 (3.07%) women reported a rib fracture history without other fractures; 6,300 women reported 6,830 new clinical fractures, including wrist (2,271), rib (1,891), spine (1,136), hip (941), and forearm (591). Adjusted relative risk (ARR) values (95% confidence interval [CI]) for future fractures in women with rib fracture history versus women with no fracture history were 5.4 (4.8–6.1) at the rib, 2.1 (1.7–2.6) at the spine, and 1.4 (1.1–1.7) at the wrist, and not significant for forearm or hip fractures. Future fracture risk was at least doubled in women with a rib fracture history in all ages: ARR (95% CI) 3.4 (2.8–4.0) for ages 50–59, 2.5 (2.1–3.0) for ages 60–69, 2.0 (1.7–2.3) for ages 70–79, and 2.0 (1.6–2.6) for ages >80. Conclusions Rib fracture, the second most common clinical fracture in women (after wrist fracture), predicted future fractures of the rib, wrist, and spine at all ages. Women presenting with rib fractures should be evaluated for appropriate management to prevent future

  3. Vitamin D Insufficiency Among Professional Basketball Players: A Relationship to Fracture Risk and Athletic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshober, Jason A; Mehran, Nima; Photopolous, Christos; Fishman, Matthew; Lombardo, Stephen J; Kharrazi, F Daniel

    2018-05-01

    Vitamin D is believed to play a role in influencing fracture risk and athletic performance. Insufficiency of vitamin D affects an estimated three-quarters of the United States population. Hypovitaminosis D has also been demonstrated to be quite common among professional basketball players in the National Basketball Association (NBA). To determine whether a relationship exists between vitamin D levels and fracture risk and athletic performance (as measured by NBA draft status) among elite basketball players. Descriptive epidemiology study. Data were obtained from the NBA regarding combine participants from 2009 through 2013. This information included vitamin D level, demographic information, fracture history, and NBA draft status. The data were analyzed to determine associations between vitamin D level and fracture risk and NBA draft status. Vitamin D levels were measured for 279 players at the NBA Combine from 2009 through 2013. Vitamin D deficiency (30 ng/mL) were present in only 26.5%. A total of 118 players had a history of at least 1 fracture. Vitamin D level was not predictive of fracture risk. Contrary to our hypothesis, players with a history of stress fracture had a significantly greater mean vitamin D level than those without such history (30.7 vs 25.1 ng/mL; P = .04). A majority (79.6%) of participants were selected in the NBA draft. Players with deficient vitamin D levels had a significantly lower rate of being drafted into the NBA ( P = .027). The NBA draft rate was found to increase with increasing levels of vitamin D ( P = .007). Hypovitaminosis D is quite common among NBA Combine participants, affecting 73.5%. While no significant relationship was found between vitamin D level and fracture history, patients with a history of stress fracture had significantly greater mean vitamin D levels. Additionally, participants with greater vitamin D levels were more likely to be drafted into the NBA. This information supports the potential role of vitamin D in

  4. Management of interest rate risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šabović Šerif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest rate risk is one of the biggest and most dangerous risks that a bank is exposed to. When a change of interest rates occurs, the incomes of a bank based on credits and securities endure significant changes. Banks resources also endure some changes. The change of interest rates changes the value of the assets and liabilities of the bank and it's net and investment worth . The change of interest rates also affects bank's balance sheet, income sheet statement and bank's share capital.

  5. Risk Assessment of Bone Fracture During Space Exploration Missions to the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Griffin, Devon

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of a traumatic bone fracture in space is a concern due to the observed decrease in astronaut bone mineral density (BMD) during spaceflight and because of the physical demands of the mission. The Bone Fracture Risk Module (BFxRM) was developed to quantify the probability of fracture at the femoral neck and lumbar spine during space exploration missions. The BFxRM is scenario-based, providing predictions for specific activities or events during a particular space mission. The key elements of the BFxRM are the mission parameters, the biomechanical loading models, the bone loss and fracture models and the incidence rate of the activity or event. Uncertainties in the model parameters arise due to variations within the population and unknowns associated with the effects of the space environment. Consequently, parameter distributions were used in Monte Carlo simulations to obtain an estimate of fracture probability under real mission scenarios. The model predicts an increase in the probability of fracture as the mission length increases and fracture is more likely in the higher gravitational field of Mars than on the moon. The resulting probability predictions and sensitivity analyses of the BFxRM can be used as an engineering tool for mission operation and resource planning in order to mitigate the risk of bone fracture in space.

  6. Schizophrenia, antipsychotics and risk of hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Jensen, Signe O W; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2013-01-01

    In a nationwide study using linkage of Danish hospital registers we examined predictors of hip fracture (ICD-10: S72) in 15,431 patients with schizophrenia (ICD-10: F20 or ICD-8: 295) and 3,807,597 population controls. Shorter education, disability pension, lifetime alcohol abuse, somatic co......-morbidity, antipsychotics (IRR=1.19; 95% CI 1.15-1.24), antidepressant (IRR=1.18; 95% CI 1.16-1.20), anticholinergics (IRR=1.29; 95% CI 1.22-1.36), benzodiazepines (IRR=1.06; 95% CI 1.04-1.08) and corticosteroids (IRR=1.44; 95% CI 1.36-1.53) were significant predictors. In 556 persons with schizophrenia and hip fracture...... (matched to 1:3 to schizophrenia controls without hip fracture), antipsychotic polypharmacy predicted hip fracture. Analyses among antipsychotic monotherapy patients showed no differential effect of individual antipsychotics. A dose-response relationship of hip fracture and lifetime antipsychotics...

  7. Identification of risk factors for neurological deficits in patients with pelvic fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Hauschild, Oliver; Culemann, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    This multicenter register study was performed to define injury and fracture constellations that are at risk to develop pelvic associated neural lesions. Data of 3607 patients treated from 2004 to 2009 for pelvic fractures were evaluated for neurological deficits depending on Tile classification......, pelvic injury configuration, and treatment.In 223 patients (6.5%), neurological lesions were diagnosed on the day of discharge from the hospital. The degree of instability of the pelvic fracture correlated with occurrence of nerve lesions. Rate of neurological dysfunction increased from 1.5% in type...... A fractures to 14.4% in type C fractures (PPatients sustaining complex pelvic trauma (7.85%) suffered from significantly more neurological...

  8. Fragility fracture risk and skeletal muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-López, F R; Ara, I

    2016-01-01

    Low-intensity fractures are closely related with age-related musculoskeletal disorders, including osteoporosis, muscle dysfunction and sarcopenia, age-related chronic diseases, and pharmacological treatments. During the last years, a huge amount of information and recommendations has been released in relation to bone metabolism and mineral content. Muscle dysfunction and sarcopenia are highly prevalent during the second half of life, especially in older subjects. The development of sarcopenia may be slowed through healthy lifestyle changes, which include adequate dietary protein, vitamin D and mineral intakes, and regular physical activity. Prevention of falls should be integral, including correction in major involved factors in order to reduce fragility fracture, improve quality of life and appropriately focus clinical and economic resources. Therefore, to obtain better results a global approach is needed to prevent age-related fractures in frail patients that is not only centered on bone metabolism and antiresorptive drugs.

  9. Patients with eating disorders. A high-risk group for fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Peter; Emborg, C.; Stoving, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze fracture risk and bone mineral density in patients with eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders). DESIGN: Clinical overview. FINDINGS: Bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased in patients with anorexia nervosa....... In patients with bulimia nervosa, bone mineral is only marginally decreased and fracture risk marginally increased. In patients with other eating disorders (eating disorders not otherwise specified), bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased. CONCLUSIONS: Fracture risk is increased...

  10. Intermittent Nitrate Use and Risk of Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Devyani; Peloquin, Christine; Kiel, Douglas P.; Neogi, Tuhina; Lu, Na; Zhang, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Nitrates, commonly used anti-anginal medications, also have beneficial effect on bone remodeling and bone density, particularly with intermittent use. However, their effect on fracture risk is not clear. We examined the relation of short-acting nitrate use (proxy for intermittent use) to the risk of hip fracture in a large cohort of older adults with ischemic heart disease. Materials and Methods Participants ≥ 60 years old with ischemic heart disease and without history of hip fracture from The Health Improvement Network (THIN), an electronic medical records database in the UK, were included. The association of incident (new) use of short-acting nitrate formulations (nitroglycerin sublingual/spray/ointment or ISDN injection/sprays) with incident (new-onset) hip fracture risk was examined by plotting Kaplan-Maier curves and calculating Hazard ratios (HR) using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Competing risk by death was analyzed in separate analyses. Results Among 14, 451 pairs of matched nitrate users and non-users (mean age 72±7.6, 41% women for each cohort), 573 fractures occurred during follow up (257 nitrate users; 316 non-users). Hip fracture risk was 33% lower among short-acting nitrate users compared with non-users (HR=0.67, 95% CI 0.53–0.85, p=0.0008). Competing risk analysis by death did not change effect estimates. Conclusion In this large population-based cohort of older adults with ischemic heart disease, we found significant reduction in hip fracture risk with use of short-acting nitrates (intermittent use). Future studies are warranted given the potential for nitrates to be potent, inexpensive and readily available anti-osteoporotic agents. PMID:27720852

  11. Epidemiology and risk factors of lower limb fractures (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Grygorieva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents current data about the risk factors of main lower limb fractures (LLFs of different localization (femur, tibia and foot. It has been shown that the most studies examine epidemiology and risk factors for hip fractures, but information about the risk factors for other LLFs is insufficient and controversial. It has been demonstrated that in addition to factors of age and sex, the road traffic accidents, sports, inadequate physical activity, injuries, falls and previous fractures play the important role in the development of LLFs. Also some diseases (systemic osteoporosis, large joints osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, dementia, epilepsy, alcoholism, parkinsonism, cancer, obesity and cataract can influence the LLFs risk. Administration of some drugs, in particular, hypnotic and sedative, as well as antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs and glucocorticoids, is the additional risk factor for LLFs. Almost all types of fractures in women are associated with low bone mineral density, which is more defined at femoral neck than at spine or peripheral skeleton, but part of fractures associated with osteoporosis is small and ranges from 10 to 44 %. The assessment of risk factors should necessarily be carried out in routine clinical practice in patients with LLFs, since it affects not only their incidence, but also the prognosis of treatment of these patients.

  12. Cementless Stem for Femoral Neck Fractures in a Patient’s 10th Decade of Life: High Rate of Periprosthetic Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabelitz, Method; Fritz, Yannick; Grueninger, Patrick; Meier, Christoph; Fries, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Background: Subsidence of cementless femoral stems in hemiarthroplasty (HA) and increased fracture rates are ongoing concerns of orthopedic surgeons when treating fractures in very old patients. Additionally, bone cement implantation syndrome may result in perioperative cardiac or pulmonary complications, especially in older patients, leading to morbidity and mortality. This study was performed to analyze possible subsidence and intraoperative fractures in a cohort of very old patients treated with cementless stems. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed a consecutive cohort of patients aged ≥90 years with femoral neck fractures treated by uncemented HA and an anterior minimally invasive approach. Immediate full-weight bearing was allowed postoperatively. Pelvic radiographs were examined for subsidence immediately postoperatively and 6 weeks later. Results: We treated 109 patients (74% women; mean age, 93 years; range, 90-102 years) by HA from January 2010 to March 2016. The 30-day mortality rate was 16%, and the morbidity rate was 47%. There were 11 (12%) intraoperative fractures: 8 (Vancouver B2) had to be addressed immediately during the primary operation, while 3 (1 Vancouver B1 and 2 Vancouver AG) were treated conservatively. One periprosthetic femoral fracture (Vancouver B1) was documented during follow-up. In 17 patients, subsidence of >2.0 mm (median, 3.9 mm; range, 2.5-9.0 mm) was documented. Conclusion: Early subsidence was low in this very old cohort treated with an uncemented stem and not showing a periprosthetic fracture. The risk of intraoperative periprosthetic fractures was high. The use of uncemented implants in osteoporotic bone continues to be an intervention with high risk and should only be performed by experienced surgeons. Level of Evidence: Level III, Therapeutic study. PMID:29623237

  13. Retrospective population cohort study on hip fracture risk associated with zolpidem medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fang-Yu; Chen, Pei-Chun; Liao, Chun Hui; Hsieh, Yow-Wen; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2014-04-01

    Few studies have evaluated the hip fracture risk for zolpidem users. We assessed the risk for subjects taking zolpidem. Population-based retrospective cohort study using claims data of a universal insurance system. We identified 6,978 patients newly prescribed for zolpidem in 2000-2001 age 18 y and older, and 27,848 nonusers frequency matched with sex, age, and date visiting a clinic. Both cohorts were followed up to the end of 2008 to measure the hip fracture incidence and risk, which considered factors such as sex, age, occupation, days of drug use, and osteoporosis status. The zolpidem users had a 2.23-fold higher hip fracture incidence than nonusers (3.10 versus 1.39 per 1,000 person-y). The risk increased with age for both cohorts. The elderly users had a 21-fold higher incidence than the younger users, or twofold higher than the elderly nonusers. Among 33 patients (20.4%) with hip fracture occurring during presumed medication days, which was accountable for an incidence of 1,083.0 per 1,000 person-y. Those taking the medicine for 8 days or longer had a moderately higher fracture rate than those taking it for less days (6.02 versus 4.48 per 100 person-times) with a ratio of 1.34 (95% confidence interval 0.42-4.56). Subjects with blue collar occupations were at a higher fracture risk. The hip fracture risk of zolpidem users is higher than that of nonusers. Fracture prevention awareness should be disseminated to the users.

  14. The Impact of Disease and Drugs on Hip Fracture Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Leavy, Breiffni; Michaëlsson, Karl; Åberg, Anna Cristina; Melhus, Håkan; Byberg, Liisa

    2017-01-01

    We report the risks of a comprehensive range of disease and drug categories on hip fracture occurrence using a strict population-based cohort design. Participants included the source population of a Swedish county, aged ?50?years (n?=?117,494) including all incident hip fractures during 1?year (n?=?477). The outcome was hospitalization for hip fracture (ICD-10 codes S72.0?S72.2) during 1?year (2009?2010). Exposures included: prevalence of (1) inpatient diseases [International Classification o...

  15. An Improved Rate-Transient Analysis Model of Multi-Fractured Horizontal Wells with Non-Uniform Hydraulic Fracture Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youwei He

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Although technical advances in hydraulically fracturing and drilling enable commercial production from tight reservoirs, oil/gas recovery remains at a low level. Due to the technical and economic limitations of well-testing operations in tight reservoirs, rate-transient analysis (RTA has become a more attractive option. However, current RTA models hardly consider the effect of the non-uniform production on rate decline behaviors. In fact, PLT results demonstrate that production profile is non-uniform. To fill this gap, this paper presents an improved RTA model of multi-fractured horizontal wells (MFHWs to investigate the effects of non-uniform properties of hydraulic fractures (production of fractures, fracture half-length, number of fractures, fracture conductivity, and vertical permeability on rate transient behaviors through the diagnostic type curves. Results indicate obvious differences on the rate decline curves among the type curves of uniform properties of fractures (UPF and non-uniform properties of fractures (NPF. The use of dimensionless production integral derivative curve magnifies the differences so that we can diagnose the phenomenon of non-uniform production. Therefore, it’s significant to incorporate the effects of NPF into the RDA models of MFHWs, and the model proposed in this paper enables us to better evaluate well performance based on long-term production data.

  16. Cardiovascular Risk Factor Analysis in Patients with a Recent Clinical Fracture at the Fracture Liaison Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline E. Wyers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with a low bone mineral density have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD and venous thromboembolic events (VTE. The aim of our retrospective chart review was to investigate the prevalence of CVD, VTE, hypertension (HT, and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2 in patients with a recent clinical fracture visiting the Fracture Liaison Service (FLS. Out of 3057 patients aged 50–90 years, 1359 consecutive patients, who agreed and were able to visit the FLS for fracture risk evaluation, were included (71.7% women; mean age 65.2 yrs. Based on medical history, 29.9% had a history of CVD (13.7%, VTE (1.7%, HT (14.9%, and DM2 (7.1% or a combination. Their prevalence increased with age (21% in patients aged 50–59 years to 48% in patients aged >80 years and was higher in men than in women (36% versus 27%, but independent of bone mineral density and fracture type. Careful evaluation of medical history with respect to these risk factors should be performed in patients with a recent clinical fracture before starting treatment with medications that increase the risk of VTE or cardiovascular events, such as raloxifene, strontium ranelate, or NSAIDs.

  17. Nutritional risk assessment for Hip fracture, A Case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Torbergsen, Anne Cathrine

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted at Oslo University Hospital, Norway. Patients were included from September 2009 until April 2011. In total 116 patients and 73 healthy non-fractured controls participated. The study has 3 parts. In the first part, we studied micronutrients and the risk of hip fracture in a case control study. In the second part, we conducted a randomized controlled nutrition intervention trial and finally, in the third part, we studied if micronutrients were associated with delirium in...

  18. Risk of vertebral compression fractures in multiple myeloma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Anitha, D.; Thomas, Baum; Jan, Kirschke S.; Subburaj, Karupppasamy

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a finite element (FE) model to predict vertebral bone strength in vitro using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) images in multiple myeloma (MM) patients, to serve as a complementing tool to assess fracture risk. In addition, it also aims to differentiate MM patients with and without vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) by performing FE analysis on vertebra segments (T1?L5) obtained from in vivo routine MDCT imaging scans....

  19. Forefoot Adduction Is a Risk Factor for Jones Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Adam E; Stack, Rebecca; Klein, Erin E; Baker, Jeffrey R; Weil, Lowell; Weil, Lowell Scott

    Jones fractures are among the most common fractures of the foot; however, much remains unknown about their etiology. The purpose of the present study was to further examine the risk factors of forefoot and hindfoot alignment on Jones fractures using an epidemiologic study design. We used a retrospective, matched, case-control study design. Cases consisted of patients with acute, isolated Jones fractures confirmed on plain film radiographs seen at our institute from January 2009 to December 2013. Patients presenting with pain unrelated to metatarsal fractures served as controls. Controls were matched to cases by age (±2 years), gender, and year of presentation. Weightbearing foot radiographs were assessed for 13 angular relationships by a single rater. Conditional multivariable logistic regression was used to identify important risk factors. Fifty patients with acute Jones fractures and 200 controls were included. The only significant variables in the final multivariable model were the metatarsus adductus angle (odds ratio [OR] 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08 to 1.25) and fourth/fifth intermetatarsal angle (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.83)-both measures of static forefoot adduction. The presence of metatarsus adductus (defined as >15°) on foot radiographs was associated with a 2.4 times greater risk of a Jones fracture (adjusted OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.8). We have concluded that the risk of Jones fracture increases with an adducted forefoot posture. In our population, which consisted primarily of patients presenting after a fall (10 of 50; 20%) or misstep/inversion injury (19 of 50; 38%), the hindfoot alignment appeared to be a less important factor. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fracture risk associated with use of antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Peter; Rejnmark, Lars; Mosekilde, Leif

    2004-11-01

    To assess fracture risk associated with different antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). An increased fracture risk has been reported in patients with epilepsy. Classical AEDs have been associated with decreased bone mineral density. The effects of newer AEDs are unknown. We undertook a population-based pharmacoepidemiologic case-control study with any fracture as outcome and use of AEDs as exposure variables (124,655 fracture cases and 373,962 controls). All AEDs were associated with an increased fracture risk in an unadjusted analysis. After adjustment for prior fracture, use (ever) of corticosteroids, comorbidity, social variables, and diagnosis of epilepsy, carbamazepine [CBZ; odds ratio (OR), 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-1.26], [and oxcarbazepine (OXC; 1.14, 1.03-1.26)], clonazepam (CZP; 1.27, 1.15-1.41), phenobarbital (PB; 1.79, 1.64-1.95), and valproate (VPA; 1.15, 1.05-1.26) were statistically significantly associated with risk of any fracture. Ethosuximide (0.75, 0.37-1.52), lamotrigine (1.04, 0.91-1.19), phenytoin (1.20, 1.00-1.43), primidone (1.18, 0.95-1.48), tiagabine (0.75, 0.40-1.41), topiramate (1.39, 0.99-1.96), and vigabatrin (0.93, 0.70-1.22) were not statistically significantly associated with fracture risk after adjustment for confounders. The relative increase was modest and in the same range for the significant and nonsignificant results. CBZ, PB, OXC, and VPA displayed a dose-response relation. Fracture risk was more increased by liver-inducing AEDs (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.31-1.45) than by noninducing AEDs (1.19; 95% CI, 1.11-1.27). A very limited increased fracture risk is present in users of CBZ, CZP, OXC, PB, and VPA. A limited significant increase cannot be excluded for the other AEDs because of the statistical power.

  1. Androgen deprivation therapy and fracture risk in Chinese patients with prostate carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ho Lee

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT increases fracture risk in men with carcinoma of the prostate, but little is known about the fracture risk for different types of ADT. We studied the fracture risk amongst Chinese patients with carcinoma of the prostate prescribed different ADT regimens.This was a single-centered observational study that involved 741 patients with carcinoma of the prostate from January 2001 to December 2011.After a median follow-up of 5 years, 71.7% of the study cohort received ADT and the incidence rate of fracture was 8.1%. Multivariable Cox regression analysis revealed that use of ADT was significantly associated with risk of incident fracture (Hazard Ratio [HR] 3.60; 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] 1.41-9.23; p = 0.008, together with aged >75 years and type 2 diabetes. Compared with no ADT, all three types of ADT were independently associated with the risk of incident fracture: anti-androgen monotherapy (HR 4.47; 95% CI 1.47-13.7; p = 0.009, bilateral orchiectomy ± anti-androgens (HR 4.01; 95% CI 1.46-11.1; p = 0.007 and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists ± anti-androgens (HR 3.16; 95% CI 1.18-8.43; p = 0.022. However, there was no significant difference in the relative risks among the three types of ADT.Fracture risk increases among all types of ADT. Clinicians should take into account the risk-benefit ratio when prescribing ADT, especially in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes.

  2. High revision rate but good healing capacity of atypical femoral fractures. A comparison with common shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilcher, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Healing of complete, atypical femoral fractures is thought to be impaired, but the evidence is weak and appears to be based on the delayed healing observed in patients with incomplete atypical fractures. Time until fracture healing is difficult to assess, therefore we compared the reoperation rates between women with complete atypical femoral fractures and common femoral shaft fractures. We searched the orthopaedic surgical registry in Östergötland County for patients with subtrochanteric and femoral shaft fractures (ICD-10 diagnosis codes S72.2, S72.3 and M84.3F) between January 1st 2007 and December 31st 2013. Out of 895 patients with surgically treated femoral shaft fractures, 511 were women 50 years of age or older. Among these we identified 24 women with atypical femoral shaft fractures, and 71 with common shaft fractures. Reoperations were performed in 6 and 5 patients, respectively, odds ratio 4.4 (95% CI 1.2 to 16.1). However, 5 reoperations in the atypical fracture group could not be ascribed to poor healing. In 3 patients the reoperation was due to a new fracture proximal to a standard intramedullary nail. In 2 patients the distal locking screws were removed due to callus formation that was deemed incomplete 5 months post-operatively. The one patient with poor healing showed faint callus formation at 5 months when the fracture was dynamised and callus remained sparse at 11 months. Among patients with common shaft fractures, 2 reoperations were performed to remove loose screws, 2 because of peri-implant fractures and 1 reoperation due to infection. Reoperation rates in patients with complete atypical femoral fractures are higher than in patients with common shaft fractures. The main reason for failure was peri-implant fragility fractures which might be prevented with the use of cephalomedullary nails at the index surgery. Fracture healing however, seems generally good. A watchful waiting approach is advocated in patients with fractures that appear to

  3. Risk of fracture and pneumonia from acid suppressive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Chun-Sick; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2011-09-26

    A recently published systematic review and meta-analysis, incorporating all relevant studies on the association of acid suppressive medications and pneumonia identified up to August 2009, revealed that for every 200 patients, treated with acid suppressive medication, one will develop pneumonia. They showed the overall risk of pneumonia was higher among people using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.11-1.46, I(2) = 90.5%] and Histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) (adjusted OR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.09-1.36, I(2) = 0.0%). In the randomized controlled trials, use of H2RAs was associated with an elevated risk of hospital-acquired pneumonia (relative risk 1.22, 95% CI: 1.01-1.48, I(2) = 30.6%). Another meta-analysis of 11 studies published between 1997 and 2011 found that PPIs, which reduce stomach acid production, were associated with increased risk of fracture. The pooled OR for fracture was 1.29 (95% CI: 1.18-1.41) with use of PPIs and 1.10 (95% CI: 0.99-1.23) with use of H2RAs, when compared with non-use of the respective medications. Long-term use of PPIs increased the risk of any fracture (adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.15-1.48) and of hip fracture risk (adjusted OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.09-1.66), whereas long-term H2RA use was not significantly associated with fracture risk. Clinicians should carefully consider when deciding to prescribe acid-suppressive drugs, especially for patients who are already at risk for pneumonia and fracture. Since it is unnecessary to achieve an achlorhydric state in order to resolve symptoms, we recommend using the only minimum effective dose of drug required to achieve the desired therapeutic goals.

  4. Subclinical Thyroid Dysfunction and the Risk for Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Christina D.; Blum, Manuel R.; da Costa, Bruno R.; Baumgartner, Christine; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Medici, Marco; Peeters, Robin P.; Aujesky, Drahomir; Bauer, Douglas C.; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background Data on the association between subclinical thyroid dysfunction and fractures conflict. Purpose To assess the risk for hip and nonspine fractures associated with subclinical thyroid dysfunction among prospective cohorts. Data Sources Search of MEDLINE and EMBASE (1946 to 16 March 2014) and reference lists of retrieved articles without language restriction. Study Selection Two physicians screened and identified prospective cohorts that measured thyroid function and followed participants to assess fracture outcomes. Data Extraction One reviewer extracted data using a standardized protocol, and another verified data. Both reviewers independently assessed methodological quality of the studies. Data Synthesis The 7 population-based cohorts of heterogeneous quality included 50 245 participants with 1966 hip and 3281 nonspine fractures. In random-effects models that included the 5 higher-quality studies, the pooled adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of participants with subclinical hyperthyroidism versus euthyrodism were 1.38 (95% CI, 0.92 to 2.07) for hip fractures and 1.20 (CI, 0.83 to 1.72) for nonspine fractures without statistical heterogeneity (P = 0.82 and 0.52, respectively; I2 = 0%). Pooled estimates for the 7 cohorts were 1.26 (CI, 0.96 to 1.65) for hip fractures and 1.16 (CI, 0.95 to 1.42) for nonspine fractures. When thyroxine recipients were excluded, the HRs for participants with subclinical hyperthyroidism were 2.16 (CI, 0.87 to 5.37) for hip fractures and 1.43 (CI, 0.73 to 2.78) for nonspine fractures. For participants with subclinical hypothyroidism, HRs from higher-quality studies were 1.12 (CI, 0.83 to 1.51) for hip fractures and 1.04 (CI, 0.76 to 1.42) for nonspine fractures (P for heterogeneity = 0.69 and 0.88, respectively; I2 = 0%). Limitations Selective reporting cannot be excluded. Adjustment for potential common confounders varied and was not adequately done across all studies. Conclusion Subclinical hyperthyroidism might be associated with

  5. Risk Factors for Hip Fracture in Older Home Care Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poss, Jeff; Cook, Richard J.; Byrne, Kerry; Hirdes, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Little information is available on hip fracture risks among community-dwelling persons receiving home care. Our aim was to identify risk factors for hip fracture from health information routinely collected for older home care clients. Methods This was a cohort study involving secondary analysis of data on 40,279 long-stay (>60 days) home care clients aged 65 and older in Ontario, Canada; occurrence of hip fracture as well as potential risk factor information were measured using the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI)/Minimum Data Set–Home Care assessment instrument. Results In all, 1,003 clients (2.5%) had hip fracture on follow-up assessment. Older (85+ vs 65–74, relative risk [95% confidence interval]: 0.52 [0.43–0.64]) clients are at increased risk; males are at reduced risk [0.60 (0.51–0.70)]. Other risk factors include osteoporosis (1.19 [1.03–1.36]), falls (1.31 [1.15–1.49]), unsteady gait (1.18 [1.03–1.36]), use of ambulation aide (1.39 [1.21–1.59]), tobacco use (1.42, [1.13–1.80]), severe malnutrition (2.61 [1.67–4.08]), and cognitive impairment (1.30 [1.12–1.51]). Arthritis (0.86 [0.76–0.98]) and morbid obesity (0.34 [0.16–0.72]) were associated with reduced risk. Males and females demonstrated different risk profiles. Conclusions Important risk factors for hip fracture can be identified from routinely collected data; these could be used to identify at-risk clients for further investigation and prevention strategies [22]. PMID:19196903

  6. Risk Factors and Clinical Evaluation of Superficial Femoral Artery Stent Fracture: Prote'ge'GPS Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Da Un; Kim, Jae Kyu; Jung, Hye Doo; Huh, Tae Wook; Yim, Nam Yeol; Oh, Hyun jun; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Chang, Nam Kyu

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of superficial femoral artery stent fractures, the risk factors of stent fracture, and the relationship between fractures and clinical findings. Of the 38 patients who underwent treatment with Prote'ge'GPS stenting due to arterial occlusions on the superficial femoral artery, 17 also underwent a clinical analysis. Forty-three stents were inserted in the 17 superficial femoral arteries, ranging between 15 and 50 cm in length, with a mean treated length of 26.4 cm (15-50 cm). A fracture was evaluated by taking a PA and lateral simple radiography, as well as a follow-up evaluation accompanied with a CT angiography, DSA, and a color Doppler sonography. The examination involved the assessment of the difference between bone fractures due to length, placement, and frequency. Fractures occurred in 13 of 43 stents (30.2%). A total of 10 (71.4%) occurred in the upper third, compared to 4 (28.6%) in the lower third of the superficial femoral artery. In addition, 10 stents (71.4%) had a single strut fracture, whereas 4 (28.6%) had multiple strut fractures. A stent fracture occurred more frequently when the stents and lesions were longer (p=0.021, 0.012) and the stents were inserted near the joint. However, there was no significant relationship between stent numbers and the fractures (p=0.126). When the stents were inserted along the popliteal artery, a stent fracture occurred more frequently in the lower third of the artery. The stent fractures did not significantly influence the patency rate of the stented artery (p=0.44) Prote'ge'GPS stents in the superficial femoral artery revealed a considerable number of fractures and the fracture frequency showed a significant relationship with the length of stents and lesions. The closer stent insertion was to the joints, the more frequently fractures occurred. There were no evident significant relationships between the presence of stent fractures and the patency of the stented arteries

  7. The Impact of Disease and Drugs on Hip Fracture Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavy, Breiffni; Michaëlsson, Karl; Åberg, Anna Cristina; Melhus, Håkan; Byberg, Liisa

    2017-01-01

    We report the risks of a comprehensive range of disease and drug categories on hip fracture occurrence using a strict population-based cohort design. Participants included the source population of a Swedish county, aged ≥50 years (n = 117,494) including all incident hip fractures during 1 year (n = 477). The outcome was hospitalization for hip fracture (ICD-10 codes S72.0-S72.2) during 1 year (2009-2010). Exposures included: prevalence of (1) inpatient diseases [International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes A00-T98 in the National Patient Register 1987-2010] and (2) prescribed drugs dispensed in 2010 or the year prior to fracture. We present age- and sex-standardized risk ratios (RRs), risk differences (RDs) and population attributable risks (PARs) of disease and drug categories in relation to hip fracture risk. All disease categories were associated with increased risk of hip fracture. Largest risk ratios and differences were for mental and behavioral disorders, diseases of the blood and previous fracture (RRs between 2.44 and 3.00; RDs (per 1000 person-years) between 5.0 and 6.9). For specific drugs, strongest associations were seen for antiparkinson (RR 2.32 [95 % CI 1.48-1.65]; RD 5.2 [1.1-9.4]) and antidepressive drugs (RR 1.90 [1.55-2.32]; RD 3.1 [2.0-4.3]). Being prescribed ≥10 drugs during 1 year incurred an increased risk of hip fracture, whereas prescription of cardiovascular drugs or ≤5 drugs did not appear to increase risk. Diseases inferring the greatest PARs included: cardiovascular diseases PAR 22 % (95 % CI 14-29) and previous injuries (PAR 21 % [95 % CI 16-25]; for specific drugs, antidepressants posed the greatest risk (PAR 16 % [95 % CI 12.0-19.3]).

  8. Risk, ambiguity and sovereign rating

    OpenAIRE

    Di Caro, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Decisions of investing in sovereign assets involve both risk and ambiguity. Ambiguity arises from unknown elements characterizing the value of a generic sovereign. In presence of ambiguity, ambiguity-averse investors are prone to pay for obtaining summary information such as ratings which reduces ambiguity. Ambiguity-neutral and ambiguity-averse investors, then, make decisions on the basis of different informative sources. By presenting a simple model of sovereign rating under ambiguity, thre...

  9. Fracture risk is decreased in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, Katrine Hass; Glintborg, Dorte; Nybo, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Hyperandrogenism, obesity, and hyperinsulinemia may protect against osteoporosis, whereas amenorrhea, increased cortisol, and low growth hormone may be associated with higher fracture risk in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). OBJECTIVE: To investigate fracture risk in PCOS. MATERIAL/METHODS: PCOS...... be greater in women who have not yet reached peak bone mass. Reduced participation in sports activities was probably not the reason for the reduced risk of fractures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....... Denmark: Women with PCOS and/or hirsutism were identified in the Danish National Patient Register (1995-2012). Each patient was assigned three age-matched controls on the index date of PCOS diagnosis. Individuals with a previous endocrine diagnosis were excluded. Within PCOS Denmark, we embedded a well......-characterized subcohort of patients, PCOS OUH, diagnosed with PCOS at Odense University Hospital (n = 1,217). We identified incident fractures by ICD-10 codes and used conditional Cox regression analysis to compare fracture risk. RESULTS: PCOS Denmark: 19,199 women with PCOS and 57,483 controls were included, mean age 30...

  10. Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate-detection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.; Wilkowski, G.

    1995-04-01

    Regulatory Guide 1.45, open-quotes Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary Leakage Detection Systems,close quotes was published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1973, and provides guidance on leak detection methods and system requirements for Light Water Reactors. Additionally, leak detection limits are specified in plant Technical Specifications and are different for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). These leak detection limits are also used in leak-before-break evaluations performed in accordance with Draft Standard Review Plan, Section 3.6.3, open-quotes Leak Before Break Evaluation Proceduresclose quotes where a margin of 10 on the leak detection limit is used in determining the crack size considered in subsequent fracture analyses. This study was requested by the NRC to: (1) evaluate the conditional failure probability for BWR and PWR piping for pipes that were leaking at the allowable leak detection limit, and (2) evaluate the margin of 10 to determine if it was unnecessarily large. A probabilistic approach was undertaken to conduct fracture evaluations of circumferentially cracked pipes for leak-rate-detection applications. Sixteen nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants were analyzed to evaluate conditional failure probability and effects of crack-morphology variability on the current margins used in leak rate detection for leak-before-break

  11. Risk Factors of the Hip Fractures in Elderly Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Nik-Tab'e

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The hip fractures are the most frequent cause of traumatic death after the age of 75 years, occurring more frequently in women that will make a negative impact of the patient's life style. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the risk factors of the hip fractures in elderly hospitalized in centers of education and treatment of Kerman and Rafsanjan cities in 1998-2000. Methods and Materials & Methods: This study was a descriptive method of sampling during 27 months (from 19 April 1998 to 21 July 2000 in hospitalized patients of orthopedic wards of Ali ebne Abitaleb hospital of Rafsanjan and Shahid bahonar hospital of Kerman. 257 patients who were afflicted with hip fracture were evaluated by a questionnaire with 20 statements (risk factors of hip fractures that was used to recorded information about this study: This risk factors were including age, sex, type of fracture, osteoporosis, milk consumption, muscle atrophy, environmental hazards, body mass index diseases, diabetes, previous fracture, smoking, antidepressant and anti convulsion drugs, heart disease, low mobility and activity perception disorders, age of menopause, impaired visual and nonuse external hip protector (padding. Results: The results of this study showed that many of above risk factors were effective (>50% than others. These factors were including environmental hazards (81.7%, muscle atrophy (72.8%, previous fractures (52.1%, low mobility and activity (70.8%, low milk consumption (100%, low BMI (79.8%, osteoporosis (52.1% and nonuse external hip protector (100%. Conclusion: The results of this study recommend that environmental hazards of elderly should be modified (e.g. well lighted, stair case with secure hand rail to prevent from falling Exercise and faradic current prevent muscle atrophy and improve physical fitness, muscle strength, balance and coordination. Treatment of impaired visual is important because risk of falling is decreased. Regular load

  12. Risk of falling in patients with a recent fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willems Gittie

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with a history of a fracture have an increased risk for future fractures, even in short term. The aim of this study was to assess the number of patients with falls and to identify fall risk factors that predict the risk of falling in the first three months after a clinical fracture. Methods Prospective observational study with 3 months of follow-up in a large European academic and regional hospital. In 277 consenting women and men aged ≥ 50 years and with no dementia and not receiving treatment for osteoporosis who presented to hospital with a clinical fracture, fall risk factors were assessed according to the guidelines on fall prevention in the Netherlands. Follow-up information on falls and fractures was collected by monthly telephone interview. Incidence of falls and odds ratio's (OR, with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results 512 consecutive patients with a fracture were regarded for analysis, 87 were not eligible for inclusion and 137 patients were excluded. No follow-up data were available for 11 patients. Therefore full analysis was possible in 277 patients. A new fall incident was reported by 42 patients (15%, of whom five had a fracture. Of the 42 fallers, 32 had one new fall and 10 had two or more. Multivariate analysis in the total group with sex, age, ADL difficulties, urine incontinence and polypharmacy showed that sex and ADL were significant fall risk factors. Women had an OR of 3.02 (95% CI 1.13–8.06 and patients with ADL-difficulties had an OR of 2.50 (95% CI 1.27–4.93. Multivariate analysis in the female group with age, ADL difficulties, polypharmacy and presence of orthostatic hypotension indicated that polypharmacy was the predominant risk factor (OR 2.51; 95% CI: 1.19 – 5.28. The incidence of falls was 35% in women with low ADL score and polypharmacy compared to 15% in women without these risk factors (OR 3.56: CI 1.47 – 8.67. Conclusion 15% of patients reported a new fall

  13. Risk factors for stress fracture among young female cross-country runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Jennifer L; Bachrach, Laura K; Procter-Gray, Elizabeth; Nieves, Jeri; Greendale, Gail A; Sowers, Maryfran; Brown, Byron W; Matheson, Kim A; Crawford, Sybil L; Cobb, Kristin L

    2007-09-01

    To identify risk factors for stress fracture among young female distance runners. Participants were 127 competitive female distance runners, aged 18-26, who provided at least some follow-up data in a randomized trial among 150 runners of the effects of oral contraceptives on bone health. After completing a baseline questionnaire and undergoing bone densitometry, they were followed an average of 1.85 yr. Eighteen participants had at least one stress fracture during follow-up. Baseline characteristics associated (Pstress fracture occurrence were one or more previous stress fractures (rate ratio [RR] [95% confidence interval]=6.42 (1.80-22.87), lower whole-body bone mineral content (RR=2.70 [1.26-5.88] per 1-SD [293.2 g] decrease), younger chronologic age (RR=1.42 [1.05-1.92] per 1-yr decrease), lower dietary calcium intake (RR=1.11 [0.98-1.25] per 100-mg decrease), and younger age at menarche (RR=1.92 [1.15-3.23] per 1-yr decrease). Although not statistically significant, a history of irregular menstrual periods was also associated with increased risk (RR=3.41 [0.69-16.91]). Training-related factors did not affect risk. The results of this and other studies indicate that risk factors for stress fracture among young female runners include previous stress fractures, lower bone mass, and, although not statistically significant in this study, menstrual irregularity. More study is needed of the associations between stress fracture and age, calcium intake, and age at menarche. Given the importance of stress fractures to runners, identifying preventive measures is of high priority.

  14. Strain rate effects on fracture behavior of Austempered Ductile Irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Andrew; Bonora, Nicola; Gentile, Domenico; Iannitti, Gianluca; Testa, Gabriel; Hörnqvist Colliander, Magnus; Masaggia, Stefano; Vettore, Federico

    2017-06-01

    Austempered Ductile Irons (ADIs), combining high strength, good ductility and low density, are candidates to be a suitable alternative to high-strength steels. Nevertheless, the concern about a low ductility under dynamic loads often leads designers to exclude cast irons for structural applications. However, results from dynamic tensile tests contradict this perception showing larger failure strain with respect to quasistatic data. The fracture behaviour of ADIs depends on damage mechanisms occurring in the spheroids of graphite, in the matrix and at their interface, with the matrix (ausferrite) consisting of acicular ferrite in carbon-enriched austenite. Here, a detailed microstructural analysis was performed on the ADI 1050-6 deformed under different conditions of strain rates, temperatures, and states of stress. Beside the smooth specimens used for uniaxial tensile tests, round notched bars to evaluate the ductility reduction with increasing stress triaxiality and tophat geometries to evaluate the propensity to shear localization and the associated microstructural alterations were tested. The aim of the work is to link the mechanical and fracture behavior of ADIs to the load condition through the microstructural modifications that occur for the corresponding deformation path.

  15. Fracture risk in perimenopausal women treated with beta-blockers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars; Vestergaard, Peter; Kassem, M.

    2004-01-01

    beta2-Adrenergic receptors have been identified on human osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells, raising the question of a sympathetic regulation of bone metabolism. We investigated effects of treatment with beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists (beta-blockers) on bone turnover, bone mineral density...... (BMD), and fracture risk. Within the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study (DOPS) a population based, comprehensive cohort study of 2016 perimenopausal women, associations between treatment with beta-blockers and bone turnover and BMD were assessed in a cross-sectional design at the start of study....... Moreover, in a nested case-control design, fracture risk during the subsequent 5 years was assessed in relation to treatment with beta-blockers at baseline. Multiple regression- and logistic regression-analyses were performed. Treatment with beta-blockers was associated with a threefold increased fracture...

  16. Integrating a gender dimension into osteoporosis and fracture risk research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geusens, Piet; Dinant, Geertjan

    2007-01-01

    Sex (referring to the strict biological sense) and gender (referring to the sociocultural dimension) are major determinants of health and disease. This review examines similarities and differences between the sexes in the prevalence of osteoporosis and fractures, bone- and fall-related risk factors for incident fractures, and the possibilities of fracture prevention, as well as gender differences in the perception of osteoporosis. We reviewed recent English-language publications on sex and gender differences in the context of osteoporosis and fracture risk. We refer to several reviews that provide extensive reference lists on the topics discussed. The incidence of fractures is higher in boys than in girls. The burden of fractures in adults increases with age, and it starts earlier and is higher in adult women than in adult men. With life expectancy increasing, the annual number of fractures is likely to increase substantially. Fractures in adults contribute to increased mortality (more in men than in women), increased morbidity (equal in men and women), and high costs (greater for women than for men). Adult men experience fewer fractures than women do. Men build larger bones with better microarchitecture while they are growing and thereafter have less increase in bone remodeling. Furthermore, they develop bone loss at a later age. Compared with their female counterparts, fewer older men are hypogonadic, and life expectancy is shorter for men than for women. There are multiple reasons for the differences in the incidences of fractures between men and women, related to the many factors associated with both bone and falls that influence fracture risk from the molecular and cellular level to the organ level. Sex hormones play a central and essential role in the physiology of bone by direct and indirect mechanisms (eg, by interfering with the growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 axis). Case-finding strategies to identify patients at highest risk for fractures

  17. Sensitivity Analysis of the Bone Fracture Risk Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Myers, Jerry; Sibonga, Jean Diane

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The probability of bone fracture during and after spaceflight is quantified to aid in mission planning, to determine required astronaut fitness standards and training requirements and to inform countermeasure research and design. Probability is quantified with a probabilistic modeling approach where distributions of model parameter values, instead of single deterministic values, capture the parameter variability within the astronaut population and fracture predictions are probability distributions with a mean value and an associated uncertainty. Because of this uncertainty, the model in its current state cannot discern an effect of countermeasures on fracture probability, for example between use and non-use of bisphosphonates or between spaceflight exercise performed with the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) or on devices prior to installation of ARED on the International Space Station. This is thought to be due to the inability to measure key contributors to bone strength, for example, geometry and volumetric distributions of bone mass, with areal bone mineral density (BMD) measurement techniques. To further the applicability of model, we performed a parameter sensitivity study aimed at identifying those parameter uncertainties that most effect the model forecasts in order to determine what areas of the model needed enhancements for reducing uncertainty. Methods: The bone fracture risk model (BFxRM), originally published in (Nelson et al) is a probabilistic model that can assess the risk of astronaut bone fracture. This is accomplished by utilizing biomechanical models to assess the applied loads; utilizing models of spaceflight BMD loss in at-risk skeletal locations; quantifying bone strength through a relationship between areal BMD and bone failure load; and relating fracture risk index (FRI), the ratio of applied load to bone strength, to fracture probability. There are many factors associated with these calculations including

  18. Multi-hazard risk assessment applied to hydraulic fracturing operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Aristizabal, Alexander; Gasparini, Paolo; Russo, Raffaella; Capuano, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Without exception, the exploitation of any energy resource produces impacts and intrinsically bears risks. Therefore, to make sound decisions about future energy resource exploitation, it is important to clearly understand the potential environmental impacts in the full life-cycle of an energy development project, distinguishing between the specific impacts intrinsically related to exploiting a given energy resource and those shared with the exploitation of other energy resources. Technological advances as directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing have led to a rapid expansion of unconventional resources (UR) exploration and exploitation; as a consequence, both public health and environmental concerns have risen. The main objective of a multi-hazard risk assessment applied to the development of UR is to assess the rate (or the likelihood) of occurrence of incidents and the relative potential impacts on surrounding environment, considering different hazards and their interactions. Such analyses have to be performed considering the different stages of development of a project; however, the discussion in this paper is mainly focused on the analysis applied to the hydraulic fracturing stage of a UR development project. The multi-hazard risk assessment applied to the development of UR poses a number of challenges, making of this one a particularly complex problem. First, a number of external hazards might be considered as potential triggering mechanisms. Such hazards can be either of natural origin or anthropogenic events caused by the same industrial activities. Second, failures might propagate through the industrial elements, leading to complex scenarios according to the layout of the industrial site. Third, there is a number of potential risk receptors, ranging from environmental elements (as the air, soil, surface water, or groundwater) to local communities and ecosystems. The multi-hazard risk approach for this problem is set by considering multiple hazards

  19. Osteoporosis in clinical practice – bone densitometry and fracture risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osteoporosis is a condition of decreased bone mass and bone density associated with an increase in fracture risk. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and femur can be reliably measured by double-beam X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), which provides a measure of bone strength. Reduction in BMD is a ...

  20. Association Between Dabigatran vs Warfarin and Risk of Osteoporotic Fractures Among Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wallis C Y; Chan, Esther W; Cheung, Ching-Lung; Sing, Chor Wing; Man, Kenneth K C; Lip, Gregory Y H; Siu, Chung-Wah; Lam, Joanne K Y; Lee, Alan C H; Wong, Ian C K

    2017-03-21

    The risk of osteoporotic fracture with dabigatran use in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is unknown. To investigate the risk of osteoporotic fracture with dabigatran vs warfarin in patients with NVAF. Retrospective cohort study using a population-wide database managed by the Hong Kong Hospital Authority. Patients newly diagnosed with NVAF from 2010 through 2014 and prescribed dabigatran or warfarin were matched by propensity score at a 1:2 ratio with follow-up until July 31, 2016. Dabigatran or warfarin use during the study period. Risk of osteoporotic hip fracture and vertebral fracture was compared between dabigatran and warfarin users using Poisson regression. The corresponding incidence rate ratio (IRR) and absolute risk difference (ARD) with 95% CIs were calculated. Among 51 496 patients newly diagnosed with NVAF, 8152 new users of dabigatran (n = 3268) and warfarin (n = 4884) were matched by propensity score (50% women; mean [SD] age, 74 [11] years). Osteoporotic fracture developed in 104 (1.3%) patients during follow-up (32 dabigatran users [1.0%]; 72 warfarin users [1.5%]). Results of Poisson regression analysis showed that dabigatran use was associated with a significantly lower risk of osteoporotic fracture compared with warfarin (0.7 vs 1.1 per 100 person-years; ARD per 100 person-years, -0.68 [95% CI, -0.38 to -0.86]; IRR, 0.38 [95% CI, 0.22 to 0.66]). The association with lower risk was statistically significant in patients with a history of falls, fractures, or both (dabigatran vs warfarin, 1.6 vs 3.6 per 100 person-years; ARD per 100 person-years, -3.15 [95% CI, -2.40 to -3.45]; IRR, 0.12 [95% CI, 0.04 to 0.33]), but not in those without a history (0.6 vs 0.7 per 100 person-years; ARD per 100 person-years, -0.04 [95% CI, 0.67 to -0.39]; IRR, 0.95 [95% CI, 0.45 to 1.96]) (P value for interaction, <.001). Among adults with NVAF receiving anticoagulation, the use of dabigatran compared with warfarin was associated with a

  1. The fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX® score in subclinical hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polovina Snežana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX® score is the 10-year estimated risk calculation tool for bone fracture that includes clinical data and hip bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to elucidate the ability of the FRAX® score in discriminating between bone fracture positive and negative pre- and post-menopausal women with subclinical hyperthyroidism. Methods. The bone mineral density (by DXA, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH level, free thyroxine (fT4 level, thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb titre, osteocalcin and beta-cross-laps were measured in 27 pre- and post-menopausal women with newly discovered subclinical hyperthyroidism [age 58.85 ± 7.83 years, body mass index (BMI 27.89 ± 3.46 kg/m2, menopause onset in 46.88 ± 10.21 years] and 51 matched euthyroid controls (age 59.69 ± 5.72 years, BMI 27.68 ± 4.66 kg/m2, menopause onset in 48.53 ± 4.58 years. The etiology of subclinical hyperthyroisims was autoimmune thyroid disease or toxic goiter. FRAX® score calculation was performed in both groups. Results. In the group with subclinical hyperthyroidism the main FRAX® score was significantly higher than in the controls (6.50 ± 1.58 vs 4.35 ± 1.56 respectively; p = 0.015. The FRAX® score for hip was also higher in the evaluated group than in the controls (1.33 ± 3.92 vs 0.50 ± 0.46 respectively; p = 0.022. There was no correlations between low TSH and fracture risk (p > 0.05. The ability of the FRAX® score in discriminating between bone fracture positive and negative pre- and postmenopausal female subjects (p < 0.001 is presented by the area under the curve (AUC plotted via ROC analysis. The determined FRAX score cut-off value by this analysis was 6%, with estimated sensitivity and specificity of 95% and 75.9%, respectively. Conclusion. Pre- and postmenopausal women with subclinical hyperthyroidism have higher FRAX® scores and thus

  2. Risk factors for hip fracture in elderly persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Olivi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this observational study, promoted by the Health Authorities of the Regione Veneto (Italy, is to assess the prevalence of the most relevant environmental and individual risk factors in subjects with a recent hip fracture. Methods: Patients aged more than 60 years of both genders with a recent hip fracture not associated with malignancies, were administered questionnaires on dietary habits, sun exposure, and disability score. A complete family, pharmacological and pathology history was collected together with information on previous falls, details of the fracture index, and anthropometric data. In all subjects, blood was taken for the measurement of serum 25 hydroxy-vitamin D (25OHD. Results: The study included 704 patients (573 women and 131 men. Mean age was 81±8 years (range 60-102. Severe pre-fracture disability was a common feature (58% associated with multiple co-morbidities (84%, more frequently cardio- vascular and neurological diseases, and specific medications. In a large proportion (86% of the patients, environmental or individual risk factors for falling were found. Vitamin D insufficiency (serum 25OHD levels <75 nmol/l was quite common (70%, particularly in the regional Health Districts were strategies for preventing vitamin D deficiency were not implemented (91%. Only a small proportion (17% of the study population had been evaluated and treated for osteoporosis. Conclusions: In senile patients with a recent hip fracture, pre-existing disability, multiple co-morbidities, high risk of falling and inadequate intake of calcium and vitamin D is relatively common. Community and case-finding interventions aimed at selecting subjects at high risk of osteoporosis, preventing vitamin D and dietary calcium deficiency, and increasing awareness on the environmental risks of falling are highly warranted.

  3. The risk of second hip fracture is decreased with compliant and persistent use of bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise; Vestergaard, Peter; Petersen, Karin Dam

    experience a 19% increased mortality within the first year following hip fractures. Furthermore, studies have shown that within 10 years after first hip fracture 40% will experience another hip fracture. The risk for second hip fracture is markedly increased, initiating at a relative risk of 11.8 within...... the first month after fracture and does not normalise until 15 years later. Fracture prevention programs have focused on identifying patients at risk of secondary low energy trauma fractures. The secondary prevention programs for fractures begin immediately after the first fracture, through identification...... of risk factors and initiate pharmaceutical treatment. The aim of this study was to estimate the potential benefits from alendronate treatment for secondary low energy trauma fracture patients in Denmark, compared to no pharmaceutical treatment for this group of patients. METHODS: A Markov model...

  4. Malnutrition and chronic inflammation as risk factors for sarcopenia in elderly patients with hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jun-Il; Ha, Yong-Chan; Choi, Hana; Kim, Kyu-Hwang; Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi; Park, Ki-Soo

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate malnutrition and chronic inflammation as risk factors for sarcopenia in elderly patients with hip fractures, as defined by the criteria of the Asian Working Group on Sarcopenia (AWGS). A total of 327 elderly patients with hip fractures were enrolled in this retrospective observational study. The main outcome measure was the nutritional status and nutritional risk factors for sarcopenia in elderly patients. Diagnosis of sarcopenia was made according to the guidelines of the AWGS. Whole body densitometry analysis was used to measure skeletal muscle mass, and muscle strength was evaluated by handgrip testing. Multivariable regression analysis was utilized to analyze the nutritional risk factors for sarcopenia in patients with hip fractures. Of 327 patients with hip fractures (78 men and 249 women), the prevalence of sarcopenia was 60.3% and 30.1% in men and women, respectively. The rates of three indicators of malnutrition in men and women (low BMI, hypoalbuminemia, and hypoproteinemia) in sarcopenia patients with hip fractures were 23.4%, 31.9%, and 53.2% and 21.3%, 21.3%, and 37.3%, respectively. The prevalence of markers of chronic inflammation (increased CRP and ESR) in men and women with sarcopenia and hip fractures were 74.9% and 52.2%, and 49.3% and 85.1%, respectively. After adjusting for covariates, low BMI and hypoproteinemia in women were associated with a 2.9- and 2.1-fold greater risk of sarcopenia than non-sarcopenia, respectively. The present study revealed a strong relationship between sarcopenia and malnutrition and chronic inflammatory factors in elderly patients with hip fractures.

  5. Risk factors for surgical site infection following operative ankle fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, E G; Cashman, J P; Groarke, P J; Morris, S F

    2013-09-01

    Ankle fracture is a common injury and there is an increasingly greater emphasis on operative fixation. The purpose of the study was to determine the complication rate in this cohort of patients and, in doing so, determine risk factors which predispose to surgical site infection. A prospective cohort study was performed at a tertiary referral trauma center examining risk factors for surgical site infection in operatively treated ankle fractures. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed. Female gender and advancing age were determined to be the risk factors in univariate analysis. Drain usage and peri-operative pyrexia were found to be significant for infection in multivariate analysis. This study allows surgeons to identify those at increased risk of infection and counsel them appropriately. It also allows for a high level of vigilance with regard to soft tissue handling intra-operatively in this higher risk group.

  6. Exercise Frequency and Fracture Risk in Older Adults-How Often Is Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; von Stengel, Simon; Kohl, Matthias

    2017-12-01

    Due to older people's low sports participation rates, exercise frequency may be the most critical component for designing exercise protocols that address fracture risk. The aims of the present article were to review and summarize the independent effect of exercise frequency (ExFreq) on the main determinants of fracture prevention, i.e., bone strength, fall frequency, and fall impact in older adults. Evidence collected last year suggests that there is a critical dose of ExFreq that just affects bone (i.e., BMD). Corresponding data for fall-related fracture risk are still sparse and inconsistent, however. The minimum effective dose (MED) of ExFreq that just favorably affects BMD at the lumbar spine and femoral neck has been found to vary between 2.1 and 2.5 sessions/week. Although this MED cannot necessarily be generalized to other cohorts, we speculate that this "critical exercise frequency" might not significantly vary among adult cohorts.

  7. Poverty is a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, M C; Sosa, M; Saavedra, P; Lainez, P; Marrero, M; Torres, M; Medina, C D

    2009-03-01

    the lumbar spine, and a higher prevalence of densitometric osteoporosis, and a higher prevalence of total and vertebral fractures. Because of this, apart from the well known risk factors for osteoporosis, poverty should be taken into account as a possible risk factor for both osteoporosis and fragility fractures, in order to establish sanitary strategies to protect unfavoured postmenopausal women.

  8. Proximal Femoral Geometry and the Risk of Fractures: Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Grygorieva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the literature review of the impact of the upper third of the femur geometry (hip axis length, femoral neck angle, inter-trochanteric length, horizontal offset, thickness of the cortical bone, etc. on the risk of fractures. The article demonstrates the capabilities of techniques for measurement of hip geometry, namely conventional X-ray of pelvic bones, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, computed tomography. Possible correlation is shown between some genetic markers and features of the geometry of the upper third of the femur. Also, there are presented the results of own researches of age and sex characteristics of proximal hip geometry parameters in patients without fractures, as well as in patients of older age groups with internal and extraarticular femoral fractures.

  9. Overweight/obesity and underweight are both risk factors for osteoporotic fractures at different sites in Japanese postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, S; Kuroda, T; Saito, M; Shiraki, M

    2013-01-01

    This cohort study of 1,614 postmenopausal Japanese women followed for 6.7 years showed that overweight/obesity and underweight are both risk factors for fractures at different sites. Fracture risk assessment may be improved if fracture sites are taken into account and BMI is categorized. The effect of body mass index (BMI) on fracture at a given level of bone mineral density (BMD) is controversial, since varying associations between BMI and fracture sites have been reported. A total of 1,614 postmenopausal Japanese women were followed for 6.7 years in a hospital-based cohort study. Endpoints included incident vertebral, femoral neck, and long-bone fractures. Rate ratios were estimated by Poisson regression models adjusted for age, diabetes mellitus, BMD, prior fracture, back pain, and treatment by estrogen. Over a mean follow-up period of 6.7 years, a total of 254 clinical and 335 morphometric vertebral fractures, 48 femoral neck fractures, and 159 long-bone fractures were observed. Incidence rates of vertebral fracture in underweight and normal weight women were significantly lower than overweight or obese women by 0.45 (95 % confidence interval: 0.32 to 0.63) and 0.61 (0.50 to 0.74), respectively, if BMD and other risk factors were adjusted, and by 0.66 (0.48 to 0.90) and 0.70 (0.58 to 0.84) if only BMD was not adjusted. Incidence rates of femoral neck and long-bone fractures in the underweight group were higher than the overweight/obese group by 2.15 (0.73 to 6.34) and 1.51 (0.82 to 2.77) and were similar between normal weight and overweight/obesity. Overweight/obesity and underweight are both risk factors for fractures at different sites. Fracture risk assessment may be improved if fracture sites are taken into account and BMI is categorized.

  10. Changing incidence and residual lifetime risk of common osteoporosis-related fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, J B; Schwarz, Peter; Lund, B

    1993-01-01

    1735 fractures of the distal radius, 747 fractures of the proximal humerus, 878 cervical and 635 trochanteric hip fractures were included. In men 273 cervical and 232 trochanteric hip fractures were included. The fractures were registered during the period 1976 to 1984 and changes in age.......05) during the observation period, while no significant decrease was found in the incidence of trochanteric fractures. No significant changes in incidence were observed in women with radial or humeral fractures, or in men with hip fractures. A women 60 years old with a life expectancy of 81 years had......Changes in incidence and lifetime risk of fractures are of major importance in the epidemiology of osteoporosis. We focused on hip fractures in women and men and on radial and humeral fractures in women. The study subjects comprised 4500 women and men 20 years old or more with fractures. In women...

  11. The utility of absolute risk prediction using FRAX® and Garvan Fracture Risk Calculator in daily practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geel, Tineke A C M; Eisman, John A; Geusens, Piet P; van den Bergh, Joop P W; Center, Jacqueline R; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2014-02-01

    There are two commonly used fracture risk prediction tools FRAX(®) and Garvan Fracture Risk Calculator (GARVAN-FRC). The objective of this study was to investigate the utility of these tools in daily practice. A prospective population-based 5-year follow-up study was conducted in ten general practice centres in the Netherlands. For the analyses, the FRAX(®) and GARVAN-FRC 10-year absolute risks (FRAX(®) does not have 5-year risk prediction) for all fractures were used. Among 506 postmenopausal women aged ≥60 years (mean age: 67.8±5.8 years), 48 (9.5%) sustained a fracture during follow-up. Both tools, using BMD values, distinguish between women who did and did not fracture (10.2% vs. 6.8%, respectively for FRAX(®) and 32.4% vs. 39.1%, respectively for GARVAN-FRC, pbetter for women who sustained a fracture (higher sensitivity) and FRAX(®) for women who did not sustain a fracture (higher specificity). Similar results were obtained using age related cut off points. The discriminant value of both models is at least as good as models used in other medical conditions; hence they can be used to communicate the fracture risk to patients. However, given differences in the estimated risks between FRAX(®) and GARVAN-FRC, the significance of the absolute risk must be related to country-specific recommended intervention thresholds to inform the patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nontraumatic fracture risk with diabetes mellitus and impaired fasting glucose in older white and black adults: the health, aging, and body composition study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Cauley, Jane A; Schwartz, Ann V; Nevitt, Michael C; Resnick, Helaine E; Bauer, Douglas C; Tylavsky, Frances A; de Rekeneire, Nathalie; Harris, Tamara B; Newman, Anne B

    2005-07-25

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and related complications may increase clinical fracture risk in older adults. Our objectives were to determine if type 2 diabetes mellitus or impaired fasting glucose was associated with higher fracture rates in older adults and to evaluate how diabetic individuals with fractures differed from those without fractures. The Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study participants were well-functioning, community-dwelling men and women aged 70 to 79 years (N = 2979; 42% black), of whom 19% had DM and 6% had impaired fasting glucose at baseline. Incident nontraumatic clinical fractures were verified by radiology reports for a mean +/- SD of 4.5 +/- 1.1 years. Cox proportional hazards regression models determined how DM and impaired fasting glucose affected subsequent risk of fracture. Diabetes mellitus was associated with elevated fracture risk (relative risk, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-2.51) after adjustment for a hip bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk factors. Impaired fasting glucose was not significantly associated with fractures (relative risk, 1.34; 95% confidence interval, 0.67-2.67). Diabetic participants with fractures had lower hip BMD (0.818 g/cm(2) vs 0.967 g/cm(2); Pbattery score (5.0 vs 7.0), and falls (37% vs 21%) compared with diabetic participants without fractures (P<.05). These results indicate that older white and black adults with DM are at higher fracture risk compared with nondiabetic adults with a similar BMD since a higher risk of nontraumatic fractures was found after adjustment for hip BMD. Fracture prevention needs to target specific risk factors found in older adults with DM.

  13. Potential Explanatory Factors for Higher Incident Hip Fracture Risk in Older Diabetic Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa S. Strotmeyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is associated with higher fracture risk. Diabetes-related conditions may account for this risk. Cardiovascular Health Study participants (N=5641; 42.0% men; 15.5% black; 72.8±5.6 years were followed 10.9 ± 4.6 years. Diabetes was defined as hypoglycemic medication use or fasting glucose (FG ≥126 mg/dL. Peripheral artery disease (PAD was defined as ankle-arm index <0.9. Incident hip fractures were from medical records. Crude hip fracture rates (/1000 person-years were higher for diabetic vs. non-diabetic participants with BMI <25 (13.6, 95% CI: 8.9–20.2 versus 11.4, 95% CI: 10.1–12.9 and BMI ≥25 to <30 (8.3, 95% CI: 5.7–11.9 versus 6.6, 95% CI: 5.6–7.7, but similar for BMI ≥30. Adjusting for BMI, sex, race, and age, diabetes was related to fractures (HR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.01–1.78. PAD (HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 0.92–1.57 and longer walk time (HR = 1.07 (95% CI: 1.04–1.10 modified the fracture risk in diabetes (HR = 1.17 (95% CI: 0.87–1.57. Diabetes was associated with higher hip fracture risk after adjusting for BMI though this association was modified by diabetes-related conditions.

  14. Low bone mineral density and risk of incident fracture in HIV-infected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battalora, Linda; Buchacz, Kate; Armon, Carl; Overton, Edgar T; Hammer, John; Patel, Pragna; Chmiel, Joan S; Wood, Kathy; Bush, Timothy J; Spear, John R; Brooks, John T; Young, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Prevalence rates of low bone mineral density (BMD) and bone fractures are higher among HIV-infected adults compared with the general United States (US) population, but the relationship between BMD and incident fractures in HIV-infected persons has not been well described. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) results of the femoral neck of the hip and clinical data were obtained prospectively during 2004-2012 from participants in two HIV cohort studies. Low BMD was defined by a T-score in the interval >-2.5 to fractures, adjusted for sociodemographics, other risk factors and covariables, using multivariable proportional hazards regression. Among 1,006 participants analysed (median age 43 years [IQR 36-49], 83% male, 67% non-Hispanic white, median CD4(+) T-cell count 461 cells/mm(3) [IQR 311-658]), 36% (n=358) had osteopenia and 4% (n=37) osteoporosis; 67 had a prior fracture documented. During 4,068 person-years of observation after DXA scanning, 85 incident fractures occurred, predominantly rib/sternum (n=18), hand (n=14), foot (n=13) and wrist (n=11). In multivariable analyses, osteoporosis (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 4.02, 95% CI 2.02, 8.01) and current/prior tobacco use (aHR 1.59, 95% CI 1.02, 2.50) were associated with incident fracture. In this large sample of HIV-infected adults in the US, low baseline BMD was significantly associated with elevated risk of incident fracture. There is potential value of DXA screening in this population.

  15. Bone Parameters and Risk of Hip and Femur Fractures in Patients on Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzan, Azzour D.; Jhaveri, Kenar D.; Ma, Lin; Lacson, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Patients on hemodialysis have a high rate of hip fractures. In this study, we performed a contemporary analysis of mineral and bone parameters and their relationship to hip and femur fracture risk. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Patients on hemodialysis treated between 2000 and 2013 in Fresenius Medical Care North America facilities were included. Predictors were on the basis of data as of December 31 of each baseline year and time-averaged values of selected laboratory parameters and medication doses throughout the year. Four period cohorts were constructed from baseline years: 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009. Follow-up for each cohort was ≤3 years. Results The incidence of hip and femur fractures remained generally unchanged (P=0.40), except among patients who were white and >65 years of age, in whom the rate decreased significantly over the 14-year period (P<0.01). Results from combined multivariable models indicated that the lowest quartiles of time–averaged intact parathyroid hormone were independently associated with higher hip fracture risk (intact parathyroid hormone =181–272 pg/ml: hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.03 to 1.41 and intact parathyroid hormone <181 pg/ml: hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.44; referent third quartile, 273 to <433 pg/ml). The lowest quartile of time–averaged serum calcium was also associated with higher risk (calcium <8.7 mg/dl; hazard ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.37) compared with the referent third quartile of 9.1 to <9.5 mg/dl. Conclusions We found an association between lower levels of intact parathyroid hormone and serum calcium and greater risk for hip and femur fractures among patients on hemodialysis. These findings support additional research toward elucidating long-term safety of treatment approaches for hyperparathyroidism in patients with ESRD. PMID:27026521

  16. Increase in Fracture Risk Following Unintentional Weight Loss in Postmenopausal Women: The Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compston, Juliet E.; Wyman, A; FitzGerald, Gordon; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Chapurlat, Roland D.; Cooper, Cyrus; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Gehlbach, Stephen H; Greenspan, Susan L.; Hooven, Frederick H.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; March, Lyn; Coen Netelenbos, J.; Nieves, Jeri W.; Pfeilschifter, Johannes; Rossini, Maurizio; Roux, Christian; Saag, Kenneth G.; Siris, Ethel S.; Silverman, Stuart; Watts, Nelson B.; Anderson, Frederick A.

    2016-01-01

    Increased fracture risk has been associated with weight loss in postmenopausal women but the time course over which this occurs has not been established. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of unintentional weight loss of ≥10 lb (4.5 kg) in postmenopausal women on fracture risk at multiple sites up to 5 years following weight loss. Using data from the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW) we analyzed the relationships between self-reported unintentional weight loss of ≥10 lb at baseline, year 2, or year 3 and incident clinical fracture in the years following weight loss. Complete data were available in 40,179 women (mean age ± SD 68 ± 8.3 years). Five-year cumulative fracture rate was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and adjusted hazard ratios for weight loss as a time-varying covariate were calculated from Cox multiple regression models. Unintentional weight loss at baseline was associated with a significantly increased risk of fracture of the clavicle, wrist, spine, rib, hip, and pelvis for up to 5 years following weight loss. Adjusted hazard ratios showed a significant association between unintentional weight loss and fracture of the hip, spine, and clavicle within 1 year of weight loss, and these associations were still present at 5 years. These findings demonstrate increased fracture risk at several sites after unintentional weight loss in postmenopausal women. This increase is seen as early as 1 year following weight loss, emphasizing the need for prompt fracture risk assessment and appropriate management to reduce fracture risk in this population. PMID:26861139

  17. Relationship between subjective fall risk assessment and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimada Hiroyuki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Objective measurements can be used to identify people with risks of falls, but many frail elderly adults cannot complete physical performance tests. The study examined the relationship between a subjective risk rating of specific tasks (SRRST to screen for fall risks and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people. Methods The SRRST was investigated in 5,062 individuals aged 65 years or older who were utilized day-care services. The SRRST comprised 7 dichotomous questions to screen for fall risks during movements and behaviours such as walking, transferring, and wandering. The history of falls and fall-related fractures during the previous year was reported by participants or determined from an interview with the participant's family and care staff. Results All SRRST items showed significant differences between the participants with and without falls and fall-related fractures. In multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, diseases, and behavioural variables, the SRRST score was independently associated with history of falls and fractures. Odds ratios for those in the high-risk SRRST group (≥ 5 points compared with the no risk SRRST group (0 point were 6.15 (p Conclusion These results suggest that subjective ratings by care staff can be utilized to determine the risks of falls and fall-related fractures in the frail elderly, however, these preliminary results require confirmation in further prospective research.

  18. Shape-based assessment of vertebral fracture risk in postmenopausal women using discriminative shape alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crimi, Alessandro; Loog, Marco; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2012-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Risk assessment of future osteoporotic vertebral fractures is currently based mainly on risk factors, such as bone mineral density, age, prior fragility fractures, and smoking. It can be argued that an osteoporotic vertebral fracture is not exclusively an abrupt event...... independently performed manual annotations of the vertebrae, and fracture prediction using shape features extracted from the baseline annotations was performed. This was implemented using posterior probabilities from a standard linear classifier. RESULTS: The classifier tested on the study population quantified...

  19. 76 FR 16570 - Interest Rate Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION 12 CFR Part 741 RIN 3133-AD66 Interest Rate Risk AGENCY... regulations to require Federally insured credit unions to have a written policy addressing interest rate risk... Risk Management for Credit Unions with Large Positions in Fixed Rate Mortgages; 06-CU-16 Inter-Agency...

  20. Study of Hip Fracture Risk using Tree Structured Survival Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Y

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In dieser Studie wird das Hüftfraktur-Risiko bei postmenopausalen Frauen untersucht, indem die Frauen in verschiedene Subgruppen hinsichtlich dieses Risikos klassifiziert werden. Frauen in einer gemeinsamen Subgruppe haben ein ähnliches Risiko, hingegen in verschiedenen Subgruppen ein unterschiedliches Hüftfraktur-Risiko. Die Subgruppen wurden mittels der Tree Structured Survival Analysis (TSSA aus den Daten von 7.665 Frauen der SOF (Study of Osteoporosis Fracture ermittelt. Bei allen Studienteilnehmerinnen wurde die Knochenmineraldichte (BMD von Unterarm, Oberschenkelhals, Hüfte und Wirbelsäule gemessen. Die Zeit von der BMD-Messung bis zur Hüftfraktur wurde als Endpunkt notiert. Eine Stichprobe von 75% der Teilnehmerinnen wurde verwendet, um die prognostischen Subgruppen zu bilden (Trainings-Datensatz, während die anderen 25% als Bestätigung der Ergebnisse diente (Validierungs-Datensatz. Aufgrund des Trainings-Datensatzes konnten mittels TSSA 4 Subgruppen identifiziert werden, deren Hüftfraktur-Risiko bei einem Follow-up von im Mittel 6,5 Jahren bei 19%, 9%, 4% und 1% lag. Die Einteilung in die Subgruppen erfolgte aufgrund der Bewertung der BMD des Ward'schen Dreiecks sowie des Oberschenkelhalses und nach dem Alter. Diese Ergebnisse konnten mittels des Validierungs-Datensatzes reproduziert werden, was die Sinnhaftigkeit der Klassifizierungregeln in einem klinischen Setting bestätigte. Mittels TSSA war eine sinnvolle, aussagekräftige und reproduzierbare Identifikation von prognostischen Subgruppen, die auf dem Alter und den BMD-Werten beruhen, möglich. In this paper we studied the risk of hip fracture for post-menopausal women by classifying women into different subgroups based on their risk of hip fracture. The subgroups were generated such that all the women in a particular subgroup had relatively similar risk while women belonging to two different subgroups had rather different risks of hip fracture. We used the Tree Structured

  1. Individualized fracture risk assessment: State-of-the-art and room for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan V. Nguyen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fragility fracture is a serious clinical event, because it is associated with increased risk of mortality and reduced quality of life. The risk of fracture is determined by multiple risk factors, and their effects may be interactional. Over the past 10 years, a number of predictive models (e.g., FRAX, Garvan Fracture Risk Calculator, and Qfracture have been developed for individualized assessment of fracture risk. These models use different risk profiles to estimate the probability of fracture over 5- and 10-year period. The ability of these models to discriminate between those individuals who will and will not have a fracture (i.e., area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] is generally acceptable-to-good (AUC, 0.6 to 0.8, and is highly variable between populations. The calibration of existing models is poor, particularly in Asian populations. There is a strong need for the development and validation of new prediction models based on Asian data for Asian populations. We propose approaches to improve the accuracy of existing predictive models by incorporating new markers such as genetic factors, bone turnover markers, trabecular bone score, and time-variant factors. New and more refined models for individualized fracture risk assessment will help identify those most likely to sustain a fracture, those most likely to benefit from treatment, and encouraging them to modify their risk profile to decrease risk. Keywords: Osteoporosis, Fracture, Fracture risk assessment, Genetic profiling, FRAX, Garvan

  2. Updated fracture incidence rates for the US version of FRAX (registered trademark)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of results produced by the US version of FRAX (trademarked) indicates that this tool overestimates the likelihood of major osteoporotic fracture. In an attempt to correct this, we updated underlying baseline fracture rates for the model. We used US hospital discharge data from 2006 to ca...

  3. Risk of Fractures and Falls during and after 5-α Reductase Inhibitor Use: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David; Garmo, Hans; Stattin, Pär; Michaëlsson, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms are common among older men and 5-α reductase inhibitors (5-ARI) are a group of drugs recommended in treating these symptoms. The effect on prostate volume is mediated by a reduction in dihydrotestosterone; however, this reduction is counterbalanced by a 25% rise in serum testosterone levels. Therefore, 5-ARI use might have systemic effects and differentially affect bone mineral density, muscular mass and strength, as well as falls, all of which are major determinants of fractures in older men. We conducted a nationwide cohort study of all Swedish men who used 5-ARI by comparing their risk of hip fracture, any type of fracture and of falls with matched control men randomly selected from the population and unexposed to 5-ARI. During 1 417 673 person-years of follow-up, 10 418 men had a hip fracture, 19 570 any type of fracture and 46 755 a fall requiring hospital care. Compared with unexposed men, current users of 5-ARI had an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 0.96 (95% CI 0.91-1.02) for hip fracture, an HR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.90-0.98) for all fracture and an HR of 0.99 (95% CI 0.96-1.02) for falls. Former users had an increased risk of hip fractures (HR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.19). 5-ARI is safe from a bone health perspective with an unaltered risk of fractures and falls during periods of use. After discontinuation of 5-ARI, there is a modest increase in the rate of fractures and falls.

  4. Risk of Fractures and Falls during and after 5-α Reductase Inhibitor Use: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Robinson

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract symptoms are common among older men and 5-α reductase inhibitors (5-ARI are a group of drugs recommended in treating these symptoms. The effect on prostate volume is mediated by a reduction in dihydrotestosterone; however, this reduction is counterbalanced by a 25% rise in serum testosterone levels. Therefore, 5-ARI use might have systemic effects and differentially affect bone mineral density, muscular mass and strength, as well as falls, all of which are major determinants of fractures in older men.We conducted a nationwide cohort study of all Swedish men who used 5-ARI by comparing their risk of hip fracture, any type of fracture and of falls with matched control men randomly selected from the population and unexposed to 5-ARI.During 1 417 673 person-years of follow-up, 10 418 men had a hip fracture, 19 570 any type of fracture and 46 755 a fall requiring hospital care. Compared with unexposed men, current users of 5-ARI had an adjusted hazard ratio (HR of 0.96 (95% CI 0.91-1.02 for hip fracture, an HR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.90-0.98 for all fracture and an HR of 0.99 (95% CI 0.96-1.02 for falls. Former users had an increased risk of hip fractures (HR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.19.5-ARI is safe from a bone health perspective with an unaltered risk of fractures and falls during periods of use. After discontinuation of 5-ARI, there is a modest increase in the rate of fractures and falls.

  5. A comprehensive hip fracture program reduces complication rates and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Moltke, Finn Borgbjerg; Schousboe, B.

    2008-01-01

    community dwellers before the fracture and 159 (29.7%) were admitted from nursing homes. INTERVENTION: The fast-track treatment and care program included a switch from systemic opiates to a local femoral nerve catheter block; an earlier assessment by the anesthesiologist; and more-systematic approach...

  6. The Effect of Loading Rate on Hydraulic Fracturing in Synthetic Granite - a Discrete Element Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomac, I.; Gutierrez, M.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracture initiation and propagation from a borehole in hard synthetic rock is modeled using the two dimensional Discrete Element Method (DEM). DEM uses previously established procedure for modeling the strength and deformation parameters of quasi-brittle rocks with the Bonded Particle Model (Itasca, 2004). A series of simulations of laboratory tests on granite in DEM serve as a reference for synthetic rock behavior. Fracturing is enabled by breaking parallel bonds between DEM particles as a result of the local stress state. Subsequent bond breakage induces fracture propagation during a time-stepping procedure. Hydraulic fracturing occurs when pressurized fluid induces hoop stresses around the wellbore which cause rock fracturing and serves for geo-reservoir permeability enhancement in oil, gas and geothermal industries. In DEM, a network of fluid pipes and reservoirs is used for mathematical calculation of fluid flow through narrow channels between DEM particles, where the hydro-mechanical coupling is fully enabled. The fluid flow calculation is superimposed with DEM stress-strain calculation at each time step. As a result, the fluid pressures during borehole pressurization in hydraulic fracturing, as well as, during the fracture propagation from the borehole, can be simulated. The objective of this study is to investigate numerically a hypothesis that fluid pressurization rate, or the fluid flow rate, influences upon character, shape and velocity of fracture propagation in rock. The second objective is to better understand and define constraints which are important for successful fracture propagation in quasi-brittle rock from the perspective of flow rate, fluid density, viscosity and compressibility relative to the rock physical properties. Results from this study indicate that not only too high fluid flow rates cause fracture arrest and multiple fracture branching from the borehole, but also that the relative compressibility of fracturing fluid and

  7. Loading rate and test temperature effects on fracture of in situ niobium silicide-niobium composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigney, J.D.; Lewandowski, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Arc cast, extruded, and heat-treated in situ composites of niobium silicide (Nb 5 Si 3 ) intermetallic with niobium phases (primary--Nb p and secondary--Nb s ) exhibited high fracture resistance in comparison to monolithic Nb 5 Si 3 . In toughness tests conducted at 298 K and slow applied loading rates, the fracture process proceeded by the microcracking of the Nb 5 Si 3 and plastic deformation of the Nb p and Nb s phases, producing resistance-curve behavior and toughnesses of 28 MPa√m with damage zone lengths less than 500 microm. The effects of changes in the Nb p yield strength and fracture behavior on the measured toughnesses were investigated by varying the loading rates during fracture tests at both 77 and 298 K. Quantitative fractography was utilized to completely characterize each fracture surface created at 298 K in order to determine the type of fracture mode (i.e., dimpled, cleavage) exhibited by the Nb p . Specimens tested at either higher loading rates or lower test temperatures consistently exhibited a greater amount of cleavage fracture in the Nb p , while the Nb s always remained ductile. However, the fracture toughness values determined from experiments spanning six orders of magnitude in loading rate at 298 and 77 K exhibited little variation, even under conditions when the majority of Nb p phases failed by cleavage at 77 K. The changes in fracture mode with increasing loading rate and/or decreasing test temperature and their effects on fracture toughness are rationalized by comparison to existing theoretical models

  8. Risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative treatment of ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaska, Mikko T; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Madanat, Rami; Huotari, Kaisa; Vahlberg, Tero; Hirvensalo, Eero; Lindahl, Jan

    2013-02-20

    Surgical site infection is one of the most common complications following ankle fracture surgery. These infections are associated with substantial morbidity and lead to increased resource utilization. Identification of risk factors is crucial for developing strategies to prevent these complications. We performed an age and sex-matched case-control study to identify patient and surgery-related risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative ankle fracture treatment. We identified 1923 ankle fracture operations performed in 1915 patients from 2006 through 2009. A total of 131 patients with deep infection were identified and compared with an equal number of uninfected control patients. Risk factors for infection were determined with use of conditional logistic regression analysis. The incidence of deep infection was 6.8%. Univariate analysis showed diabetes (odds ratio [OR] = 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0, 4.9), alcohol abuse (OR = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.6, 9.4), fracture-dislocation (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2, 3.5), and soft-tissue injury (a Tscherne grade of ≥1) (OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.3, 5.3) to be significant patient-related risk factors for infection. Surgery-related risk factors were suboptimal timing of prophylactic antibiotics (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0, 3.4), difficulties encountered during surgery, (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.1, 4.0), wound complications (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.6, 14.0), and fracture malreduction (OR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.3, 9.2). Independent risk factors for infection identified by multivariable analyses were tobacco use (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.6, 8.5) and a duration of surgery of more than ninety minutes (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.1, 5.7). Cast application in the operating room was independently associated with a decreased infection rate (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2, 0.8). We identified several modifiable risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative treatment of ankle fractures.

  9. Risk factors for fracture in elderly men: a population-based prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Frost; Abrahamsen, Bo; Masud, T

    2012-01-01

    .30-3.09) and pulmonary illness (1.90; 1.03-3.53) were associated with increased risk of osteoporotic fractures in adjusted models. CONCLUSION: These results underline the importance of assessment of dizziness, falls and those with a family history of hip fracture. Frequent urination and erectile dysfunction were......Risk factors for fractures were assessed in a random sample of 4,696 elderly men followed for 5.4 years. Results highlighted the importance of assessment of falls and dizziness as well as novel risk factors including frequent urination and erectile dysfunction. INTRODUCTION: Knowledge about risk...... in the forearm). Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to evaluate risk factors for any and osteoporotic fractures. The following variables were found to be associated with increased risk of any fracture in adjusted models family history of a hip fracture (HR; 95%CI: 1.56; 1.05-2.33), falls (2...

  10. Subsequent fracture rates in a nationwide population-based cohort study with a 10-year perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Petersen, K D; Eriksen, S A

    2014-01-01

    with an index fracture (ICD-10 codes: S22.x, S32.x, S42.x, S52.x, S62.x, S72.x, S82.x, S92.x, T02.x, T08.x, T10.x and T12.x) between January 1st, 2001 and December 31st, 2001 and if older than 50 years at time of fracture. The patients were investigated for future subsequent fractures from January 1st, 2002......Summary: Fractures after the age of 50 are frequently observed in Denmark, and many of these may be osteoporotic. This study examined the incidence of all and subsequent fractures in a 10-year period from 2001 to 2011. The incidence of subsequent fractures was high, especially following hip...... fracture. Introduction: The purpose of this study is to examine patterns of subsequent fractures and mortality rates over a 10-year period in patients already suffering from fracture. Methods: The study was designed as a nationwide, registerbased follow-up study. Patients were included if diagnosed...

  11. False negative rate of syndesmotic injury in pronation-external rotation stage IV ankle fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Soon Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate false negative rate in the diagnosis of diastasis on initial static anteroposterior radiograph and reliability of intraoperative external rotational stress test for detection of concealed disruption of syndesmosis in pronation external rotation (PER stage IV (Lauge-Hansen ankle fractures. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 34 PER stage IV ankle fractures between September 2001 and September 2008. Twenty (59% patients show syndesmotic injury on initial anteroposterior radiographs. We performed an intraoperative external rotation stress test in other 14 patients with suspicious PER stage IV ankle fractures, which showed no defined syndesmotic injury on anteroposterior radiographs inspite of a medial malleolar fracture, an oblique fibular fracture above the syndesmosis and fracture of the posterior tubercle of the tibia. Results: All 14 fractures showed different degrees of tibiofibular clear space (TFCS and tibiofibular overlapping (TFO on the external rotation stress test radiograph compared to the initial plain anteroposterior radiograph. It is important to understand the fracture pattern characterstic of PER stage IV ankle fractures even though it appears normal on anteroposterior radiographs, it is to be confirmed for the concealed syndesmotic injury through a routine intraoperative external rotational stress radiograph.

  12. Influence of surgeon's experience and supervision on re-operation rate after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Jacobsen, Steffen; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    rehabilitation programme, between 2002 and 2004. Re-operation rate was assessed 6 months postoperatively. Surgeons were grouped as unsupervised junior registrars versus experienced surgeons operating or supervising. Fractures were stratified as technically undemanding or demanding. RESULTS: Unsupervised junior......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of the performing surgeon's experience and degree of supervision on re-operation rate among patients admitted with a proximal femoral fracture (PFF). METHODS: Prospective study of 600 consecutive patients with proximal femoral fracture in our multimodal...... registrars operated on 23% (137/600) of all and 15% (56/365) of technically demanding proximal femoral fractures. The latter had a higher re-operation rate within 6 months, compared with the rate when more experienced surgeons were present. In logistic regression analysis combining age, gender, American...

  13. Population-based studies on risk of fracture in patients with neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients with neurological disorders may be at an increased risk of fracture via multiple causal pathways, including increases in the risk of falls, changes in bone mineral density and quality of bone microarchitecture. Risk of fracture may be increased by the disease itself, by

  14. Diabetes mellitus and bone health: epidemiology, etiology and implications for fracture risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrábano, Rodrigo J; Linares, Maria I

    2018-01-01

    Skeletal fractures can result when there are co-morbid conditions that negatively impact bone strength. Fractures represent an important source of morbidity and mortality, especially in older populations. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that has reached worldwide epidemic proportions and is increasingly being recognized as a risk factor for fracture. Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes have different effects on bone mineral density but share common pathways, which lead to bone fragility. In this review, we discuss the available data on diabetes and fractures, bone density and the clinical implications for fracture risk stratification in current practice.

  15. Evaluation of hip fracture risk in relation to fall direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankaku, Manabu; Kanzaki, Hideto; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Nakamura, Takashi

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate hip fracture risk in relation to fall direction, and to elucidate factors that influence the impact force in falls on the hip. Eight healthy volunteers performed deliberate falls in three directions (lateral, posterolateral and posterior) on a force platform covered by a mattress of 13 cm thickness. Fall descent motions and impact postures were examined by a three-dimensional analyzer. The maximum ground force reaction, velocity of the greater trochanter at impact, and activity of quadriceps and gluteus medius were measured. In all trials of lateral and posterolateral falls, but not of posterior falls, the subjects hit their greater trochanter directly on the mattress. The impact forces were between 2,000 N and 4,000 N. Posterolateral falls showed significantly higher velocity at impact than did posterior falls. The height and the lower limb length exhibited positive correlations with the impact force in all directions of fall. In the lateral fall, there was a positive correlation between the activity of quadriceps and the impact force. In view of the impact point, force, and velocity, the posterolateral fall seemed to carry the highest risk of hip fracture.

  16. Survival Rates from Fracture of Endodontically Treated Premolars Restored with Full-coverage Crowns or Direct Resin Composite Restorations: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksaphar, Warattama; Banomyong, Danuchit; Jirathanyanatt, Titalee; Ngoenwiwatkul, Yaowaluk

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the survival rates against fracture of premolar endodontically treated teeth (ETT) restored with resin composite or crowns and to identify risk factors associated with the fracture. Data from dental records and radiographs of premolar ETT with postendodontic restorations (ie, resin composite or crowns) were collected between 2012 and 2016 and selected following selected inclusion and exclusion criteria. Tooth location, type of restoration, number of proximal contacts, and amount of tooth surface loss were recorded. The incidence and restorability of postendodontic fractures were identified. Survival rates against fracture of the 2 restoration types were calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Any potential factors associated with fractures were identified using Cox proportional hazards models. The survival rate against fracture of ETT restored with crowns (95.1%) was higher than resin composite (77.0%). ETT restored with resin composite with 1 or 2 tooth surface losses and 2 proximal contacts had a high survival rate of 88.5% that was not significantly different from ETT with crowns. A higher incidence of restorability after fracture was observed in teeth restored with resin composite than crowns. The type of restoration and number of proximal contacts were identified as potential risk factors associated with fracture incidence. The survival rate against fracture of ETT restored with crowns was higher than resin composite. However, ETT with 1 or 2 tooth surface losses and 2 proximal contacts and restored with resin composite showed a high survival rate that was comparable with ETT restored with crowns. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship between subjective fall risk assessment and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Suzukawa, Megumi; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Kumiko; Kim, Hunkyung; Suzuki, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Objective measurements can be used to identify people with risks of falls, but many frail elderly adults cannot complete physical performance tests. The study examined the relationship between a subjective risk rating of specific tasks (SRRST) to screen for fall risks and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people. Methods The SRRST was investigated in 5,062 individuals aged 65 years or older who were utilized day-care services. The SRRST comprised 7 dichotom...

  18. Fracture risk in women with type II diabetes. Results from a historical cohort with fracture follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jakob Præst; Jensen, Thomas; Hyldstrup, Lars

    2018-01-01

    . Prevalent fractures (43.7 vs. 33.2%, p = 0.0010) and prevalent MOF (26.2 vs. 20.5% p = 0.038) were more common among patients with type II diabetes. The unadjusted incident fracture risk was increased with a higher relative risk of 42%. An elevated MOF hazard ratio was present (HR = 1.726, p = 0.......0006). Adjustment for prevalent osteoporosis and other possible confounders did not change this finding (HR = 1.558, p = 0.0207). CONCLUSIONS: An association between type II diabetes and an increased risk of MOF primarily driven by an increased hip fracture risk was documented. This finding was independent......PURPOSE: To examine the independent association between type II diabetes and fracture risk in a population of predominantly postmenopausal women referred to a specialist clinic for osteoporosis evaluation. METHODS: Type II diabetes associated fracture risk were evaluated among to 229 patients...

  19. Intralesional Injection of Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum May Increase the Risk of Late-Onset Penile Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilan, Jonathan A; Wallen, Jared J; Baumgarten, Adam S; Morgan, Kevin N; Parker, Justin L; Carrion, Rafael E

    2018-04-01

    The use of intralesional injection of collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) has become a valid treatment option in the management of Peyronie's disease (PD). Multiple studies have shown the drug's safety and efficacy. However, sparse literature exists on the utility of the injection protocol's 14-day "observation period," in which patients are instructed to abstain from all sexual activity. To summarize the contemporary literature and report on our series of patients treated with CCH in an effort to explore the effectiveness of the postinjection observation period. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical course of men treated with at least one CCH injection at our institution from April 2014 through February 2017. The main outcome measure for our cohort was complication rate (hematoma, fracture). Secondary outcomes included progression to corrective surgery. Of the 102 patients treated, 5 (4.9%) developed a corporal fracture. Four of these occurred outside the 14-day observation period. One fracture was managed conservatively and the rest underwent surgical exploration and repair. Twelve penile hematomas were reported; one of these patients was surgically explored because of suspicious magnetic resonance imaging findings. Seven patients (6.9%) progressed to corrective surgery. Penile hematoma and corporal fracture are serious complications that must be discussed with patients before initiation of intralesional CCH treatment. Little evidence exists to direct physicians on the proper management of post-CCH penile fractures; many caregivers and patients elect to treat these injuries conservatively and avoid surgical exploration. Further studies are warranted to generate discussion and reassessment regarding the safety and effectiveness of this 14-day observation period. Beilan JA, Wallen JJ, Baumgarten AS, Morgan KN, Parker JL, Carrion RE. Intralesional Injection of Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum May Increase the Risk of Late-Onset Penile Fracture. Sex

  20. Midshaft clavicle fractures with associated ipsilateral acromioclavicular joint dislocations: Incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottomeyer, Christina; Taylor, Benjamin C; Isaacson, Mark; Martinez, Lara; Ebaugh, Pierce; French, Bruce G

    2017-02-01

    Simultaneous ipsilateral clavicle and acromioclavicular (AC) joint injury have been infrequently reported in the literature at this time. The purpose of this study was to assess incidence as well as assess risk factors for this dual injury pattern. We performed a retrospective review of a prospectively collected database (Level III evidence), evaluating 383 adult patients without previous shoulder girdle injury or trauma with a minimum 1-year follow-up who sustained a displaced diaphyseal clavicle fracture. All patients in the study underwent either nonoperative management or surgical reduction and stabilization of a diaphyseal clavicle fracture with a plate and screw construct. Study subjects were followed with serial radiographs. Clavicle and shoulder radiographs, as well as chest radiographs and contralateral films in questionable cases, were used to assess for acromioclavicular joint injury in both operative and nonoperative groups. Additional data was collected on concurrent injuries, patient demographics, fracture characteristics, fixation techniques, surgical/post-operative data, and operative or nonoperative treatment. We found that 13/183 (7.1%) of patients undergoing fixation of a diaphyseal clavicle fracture had an ipsilateral AC joint injury, while 13/200 (6.5%) of patients undergoing conservative management had an ipsilateral AC joint injury. Critical analysis of the data revealed that presence of ipsilateral scapular body fractures, and a likely incidental association with superior plating fixation, were associated with an increased rate of this injury pattern. Ipsilateral clavicle fracture and AC joint injury is much more common than traditionally believed, with an incidence of 6.8% overall. It is unknown how the presence of an associated AC injury influences outcome, as AC injury was not universally symptomatic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The risks of hydraulic fracturing and the responsibilities of engineers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kirkman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available One third of U.S. natural gas is extracted by injecting fluid at high pressure into shale formations, a process associated with a number of possible hazards and risks that have become the subject of intense public controversy. We develop a three-part schema to make sense of risks of hydraulic fracturing and the responsibilities of engineers: the lab, the field, and the forum. In the lab, researchers seek to answer basic questions about, for example, the behavior of shale under particular conditions; there uncertainty seems to arise at every turn. In the field, engineers and others work to implement technological processes, such as hydraulic fracturing and the subsequent extraction of oil and gas; hazards may arise as natural and social systems respond in sometimes surprising ways. In the forum, the public and their representatives deliberate about risk and acceptable risk, questions that are framed in ethical as well as technical terms. The difficulty of characterizing – and in living up to – the responsibilities of engineers lie in part in the apparent distance between the lab and the forum. We examine in turn uncertainties in the lab, hazards in the field, and deliberation in the forum, leading to the conclusion that scientists and engineers can and should help to inform public deliberation but that their research cannot, on its own, resolve all controversies. Scientists and engineers who seek to inform deliberation should be mindful of the scope and limits of their authority, clear and modest in communicating research findings to the public, and careful to avoid even apparent conflicts of interest wherever possible. We close by drawing from the lab-field-forum schema to suggest a direction for pedagogical innovations aimed at the formation of responsible engineers in the context of college-level degree programs.

  2. Prenatal exposure to vitamin D from fortified margarine and risk of fractures in late childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Händel, Mina Nicole; Frederiksen, Peder; Osmond, Clive

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal low vitamin D may have consequences for bone health. By means of a nationwide mandatory vitamin D fortification programme, we examined the risk of fractures among 10–18-year-old children from proximate birth cohorts born around the date of the termination of the programme. For all subjects...... in fracture rates across birth cohorts was analysed by fitting an age-cohort model to the data. We addressed the potential modification of the effect of vitamin D availability by season of birth. The risk of fractures was increased among both girls and boys who were born before the vitamin D fortification...... terminated in 1985 (rate ratio (RR) exposed v. non-exposed girls: 1·15 (95 % CI 1·11, 1·20); RR exposed v. non-exposed boys: 1·11 (95 % CI 1·07, 1·14). However, these associations no longer persisted after including the period effects. There was no interaction between season of birth and vitamin D...

  3. Initiation of anti-osteoporotic therapy in patients with recent fractures: a nationwide analysis of prescription rates and persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roerholt, C; Eiken, P; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2009-01-01

    initiation within 1 year was highest after spine fracture: 39.6% of women began therapy in 2004 compared with 19.5% in 1997. In men, 16.5% began therapy in 2004 vs. 8.0% in 1997. Following hip fracture, 9.2% of women and 4.1% of men began therapy in 2004 vs. 3.4% and 0.7% in 1997, respectively. Median...... or weekly alendronate obtaining treatment durations equalling those of the licensing trials. INTRODUCTION: Reducing the societal fracture burden remains challenging due to failure to treat fragility fractures and non-compliance with treatment. METHODS: We used national registers to identify patients born...... persistence (years) was 2.8 for daily alendronate, 3.8 for weekly alendronate, 2.5 for etidronate and 4.7 for raloxifene. The risk of discontinuing or changing therapy increased with age. CONCLUSIONS: Prescription rates for anti-osteoporotic medication are very low, especially in hip fracture and in men...

  4. Risk Prediction of New Adjacent Vertebral Fractures After PVP for Patients with Vertebral Compression Fractures: Development of a Prediction Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Bin-Yan; He, Shi-Cheng; Zhu, Hai-Dong; Wu, Chun-Gen; Fang, Wen; Chen, Li; Guo, Jin-He; Deng, Gang; Zhu, Guang-Yu; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2017-01-01

    PurposeWe aim to determine the predictors of new adjacent vertebral fractures (AVCFs) after percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) in patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs) and to construct a risk prediction score to estimate a 2-year new AVCF risk-by-risk factor condition.Materials and MethodsPatients with OVCFs who underwent their first PVP between December 2006 and December 2013 at Hospital A (training cohort) and Hospital B (validation cohort) were included in this study. In training cohort, we assessed the independent risk predictors and developed the probability of new adjacent OVCFs (PNAV) score system using the Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. The accuracy of this system was then validated in both training and validation cohorts by concordance (c) statistic.Results421 patients (training cohort: n = 256; validation cohort: n = 165) were included in this study. In training cohort, new AVCFs after the first PVP treatment occurred in 33 (12.9%) patients. The independent risk factors were intradiscal cement leakage and preexisting old vertebral compression fracture(s). The estimated 2-year absolute risk of new AVCFs ranged from less than 4% in patients with neither independent risk factors to more than 45% in individuals with both factors.ConclusionsThe PNAV score is an objective and easy approach to predict the risk of new AVCFs.

  5. Risk Prediction of New Adjacent Vertebral Fractures After PVP for Patients with Vertebral Compression Fractures: Development of a Prediction Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Bin-Yan; He, Shi-Cheng; Zhu, Hai-Dong [Southeast University, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Zhongda Hospital (China); Wu, Chun-Gen [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (China); Fang, Wen; Chen, Li; Guo, Jin-He; Deng, Gang; Zhu, Guang-Yu; Teng, Gao-Jun, E-mail: gjteng@vip.sina.com [Southeast University, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Zhongda Hospital (China)

    2017-02-15

    PurposeWe aim to determine the predictors of new adjacent vertebral fractures (AVCFs) after percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) in patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs) and to construct a risk prediction score to estimate a 2-year new AVCF risk-by-risk factor condition.Materials and MethodsPatients with OVCFs who underwent their first PVP between December 2006 and December 2013 at Hospital A (training cohort) and Hospital B (validation cohort) were included in this study. In training cohort, we assessed the independent risk predictors and developed the probability of new adjacent OVCFs (PNAV) score system using the Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. The accuracy of this system was then validated in both training and validation cohorts by concordance (c) statistic.Results421 patients (training cohort: n = 256; validation cohort: n = 165) were included in this study. In training cohort, new AVCFs after the first PVP treatment occurred in 33 (12.9%) patients. The independent risk factors were intradiscal cement leakage and preexisting old vertebral compression fracture(s). The estimated 2-year absolute risk of new AVCFs ranged from less than 4% in patients with neither independent risk factors to more than 45% in individuals with both factors.ConclusionsThe PNAV score is an objective and easy approach to predict the risk of new AVCFs.

  6. Relationship between subjective fall risk assessment and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Suzukawa, Megumi; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Kumiko; Kim, Hunkyung; Suzuki, Takao

    2011-08-12

    Objective measurements can be used to identify people with risks of falls, but many frail elderly adults cannot complete physical performance tests. The study examined the relationship between a subjective risk rating of specific tasks (SRRST) to screen for fall risks and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people. The SRRST was investigated in 5,062 individuals aged 65 years or older who were utilized day-care services. The SRRST comprised 7 dichotomous questions to screen for fall risks during movements and behaviours such as walking, transferring, and wandering. The history of falls and fall-related fractures during the previous year was reported by participants or determined from an interview with the participant's family and care staff. All SRRST items showed significant differences between the participants with and without falls and fall-related fractures. In multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, diseases, and behavioural variables, the SRRST score was independently associated with history of falls and fractures. Odds ratios for those in the high-risk SRRST group (≥ 5 points) compared with the no risk SRRST group (0 point) were 6.15 (p fall, 15.04 (p falls, and 5.05 (p fall-related fractures. The results remained essentially unchanged in subgroup analysis accounting for locomotion status. These results suggest that subjective ratings by care staff can be utilized to determine the risks of falls and fall-related fractures in the frail elderly, however, these preliminary results require confirmation in further prospective research.

  7. Risks to Water Resources from Shale Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Warner, Nathaniel; Darrah, Thomas H.; Kondash, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    The rise of shale gas development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has expanded oil and gas exploration in the USA. The rapid rate of shale gas exploration has triggered an intense public debate regarding the potential environmental and human health effects. A review of the updated literature has identified four potential risks for impacts on water resources: (1) stray gas contamination of shallow aquifers near shale gas sites; (2) contamination of surface water and shallow groundwater from spills, leaks, and disposal of inadequately treated wastewater or hydraulic fracturing fluids; (3) accumulation of toxic and radioactive residues in soil or stream sediments near disposal or spill sites; and (4) over-extraction of water resources for drilling and hydraulic fracturing that could induce water shortages and conflicts with other water users, particularly in water-scarce areas. As part of a long-term research on the potential water contamination associated with shale gas development, new geochemical and isotopic techniques have been developed for delineating the origin of gases and contaminants in water resource. In particular, multiple geochemical and isotopic (carbon isotopes in hydrocarbons, noble gas, strontium, boron, radium isotopes) tracers have been utilized to distinguish between naturally occurring dissolved gas and salts in water and contamination directly induced from shale gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing operations.

  8. Treatment thresholds for osteoporosis and reimbursability criteria: perspectives associated with fracture risk-assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Silvano; Bertoldo, Francesco; Gatti, Davide; Minisola, Giovanni; Rossini, Maurizio; Sinigaglia, Luigi; Varenna, Massimo

    2013-09-01

    The definition of osteoporosis was based for several years on bone mineral density values, which were used by most guidelines for defining treatment thresholds. The availability of tools for the estimation of fracture risk, such as FRAX™ or its adapted Italian version, DeFRA, is providing a way to grade osteoporosis severity. By applying these new tools, the criteria identified in Italy for treatment reimbursability (e.g., "Nota 79") are confirmed as extremely conservative. The new fracture risk-assessment tools provide continuous risk values that can be used by health authorities (or "payers") for identifying treatment thresholds. FRAX estimates the risk for "major osteoporotic fractures," which are not counted in registered fracture trials. Here, we elaborate an algorithm to convert vertebral and nonvertebral fractures to the "major fractures" of FRAX, and this allows a cost-effectiveness assessment for each drug.

  9. Complex association between body weight and fracture risk in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpalaris, V; Anagnostis, P; Goulis, D G; Iakovou, I

    2015-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a common disease, characterized by low bone mass with micro-architectural disruption and skeletal fragility, resulting in an increased risk of fracture. A substantial number of studies has examined the possible relationship between body weight, bone mineral density and fracture risk in post-menopausal women, with the majority of them concluding that low body weight correlates with increased risk of fracture, especially hip fracture. Controversies about the potential protective effect of obesity on osteoporosis and consequent fracture risk still exist. Several recent studies question the concept that obesity exerts a protective effect against fractures, suggesting that it stands as a risk factor for fractures at specific skeletal sites, such as upper arm. The association between body weight and fracture risk is complex, differs across skeletal sites and body mass index, and is modified by the interaction between body weight and bone mineral density. Some potential explanations that link obesity with increased fracture risk may be the pattern of falls and impaired mobility in obese individuals, comorbidities, such as asthma, diabetes and early menopause, as well as, increased parathyroid hormone and reduced 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations. © 2015 World Obesity.

  10. [Effects of long-term fluoride in drinking water on risks of hip fracture of the elderly: an ecologic study based on database of hospitalization episodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Young; Hwang, Seung Sik; Kim, Jai Yong; Cho, Soo Hun

    2008-05-01

    Fluoridation of drinking water is known to decrease dental caries, particularly in children. However, the effects of fluoridated water on bone over several decades are still in controversy. To assess the risk of hip fracture related to water fluoridation, we evaluated the hip fracture-related hospitalizations of the elderly between a fluoridated city and non-fluoridated cities in Korea. Cheongju as a fluoridated area and Chungju, Chuncheon, Suwon, Wonju as non-fluoridated areas were chosen for the study. We established a database of hip fracture hospitalization episode based on the claims data submitted to the Health Insurance Review Agency from January 1995 to December 2002. The hip fracture hospitalization episodes that satisfied the conditions were those that occurred in patients over 65 years old, the injuries had a hip fracture code (ICD-9 820, ICD-10 S72) and the patients were hospitalized for at least 7days. A total of 80,558 cases of hip fracture hospitalization episodes were analyzed. The admission rates for hip fracture increased with the age of the men and women in both a fluoridated city and the non-fluoridated cities (phip fracture increased significantly both for men and women as their age increased. However, any difference in the hip fracture admission rates was not consistently observed between the fluoridated city and the nonfluoridated cities. We cannot conclude that fluoridation of drinking water increases the risk of hip fracture in the elderly.

  11. A Biomechanical Approach to Assessing Hip Fracture Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellman, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Bone loss in microgravity is well documented, but it is difficult to quantify how declines in bone mineral density (BMD) contribute to an astronaut's overall risk of fracture upon return. This study uses a biomechanical approach to assessing hip fracture risk, or Factor of Risk (Phi), which is defined as the ratio of applied load to bone strength. All long-duration NASA astronauts from Expeditions 1-18 were included in this study (n=25), while crewmembers who flew twice (n=2) were treated as separate subjects. Bone strength was estimated based on an empirical relationship between areal BMD at the hip, as measured by DXA, and failure load, as determined by mechanical testing of cadaver femora. Fall load during a sideways fall was calculated from a previously developed biomechanical model, which takes into account body weight, height, gender, and soft tissue thickness overlying the lateral aspect of the hip that serves to attenuate the impact force. While no statistical analyses have been performed yet, preliminary results show that males in this population have a higher FOR than females, with a post- flight Phi of 0.87 and 0.36, respectively. FOR increases 5.1% from preflight to postflight, while only one subject crossed the fracture "threshold" of Phi = 1, for a total of 2 subjects with a postflight Phi > 1. These results suggest that men may be at greater risk for hip fracture due largely in part to their relatively thin soft tissue padding as compared to women, since soft tissue thickness has the highest correlation (R(exp 2)= .53) with FOR of all subject-specific parameters. Future work will investigate changes in FOR during recovery to see if baseline risk levels are restored upon return to 1-g activity. While dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the most commonly used clinical measure of bone health, it fails to provide compartment-specific information that is useful in assessing changes to bone quality as a result of microgravity exposure. Peripheral

  12. The Risk of Fractures Among Patients With Cirrhosis or Chronic Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich Christian; Benfield, Thomas; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Cirrhosis and chronic pancreatitis (CP) are accompanied by inflammation and malnutrition. Both conditions can have negative effects on bone metabolism and promote fractures. We evaluated the risk of fractures among patients with CP or cirrhosis and determined the effect of fat...... individuals younger than 50 years old. Alcohol as an etiology was associated with an increased risk of fracture compared with patients with nonalcoholic cirrhosis (HR, 2.4 vs 1.5; P

  13. Risk factors of neurological lesions in low cervical spine fractures and dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COELHO DANILO GONÇALVES

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighty-nine patients with lower cervical spine fractures or dislocations were evaluated for risk factors of neurological lesion. The age, sex, level and pattern of fracture and sagittal diameter of the spinal canal were analysed. There were no significant differences on the age, gender, level and Torg's ratio between intact patients and those with nerve root injury, incomplete or complete spinal cord injuries. Bilateral facet dislocations and burst fractures are a significant risk factor of spinal cord injury.

  14. A service development study of the assessment and management of fracture risk in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shribman, Samuel; Torsney, Kelli M; Noyce, Alastair J; Giovannoni, Gavin; Fearnley, Julian; Dobson, Ruth

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with an increased risk of fragility fracture. FRAX and Qfracture are risk calculators that estimate the 10-year risk of hip and major fractures and guide definitive investigation for osteoporosis using dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) imaging. It is unclear which PD patients should be considered for fracture risk assessment and whether FRAX or Qfracture should be used. Seventy-seven patients with PD were recruited in the movement disorders clinic. Data were collected on PD-related characteristics and fracture risk scores were calculated. Patients with previous osteoporotic fractures had a higher incidence of falls (p = 0.0026) and use of bilateral walking aids (p = 0.0187) in addition to longer disease duration (p = 0.0037). Selecting patients with falls in combination with either disease duration >5 years, bilateral walking aids, or previous osteoporotic fracture distinguished patients with and without previous osteoporotic fracture with specificity 67.7 % (95 % CI 55.0-78.8) and sensitivity 100.0 % (95 % CI 73.5-100.0). Qfracture calculated significantly higher fracture risk scores than FRAX for hip (p < 0.0001) and major (p = 0.0008) fracture in PD patients. Receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated that FRAX outperformed Qfracture with an area under the curve of 0.84 (95 % CI 0.70-0.97, p = 0.0004) for FRAX and 0.68 (95 % CI 52-86, p = 0.0476) for Qfracture major fracture risk calculators. We suggest that falls in combination with either a disease duration longer than 5 years or bilateral walking aids or previous osteoporotic fracture should be used as red flags in PD patients to prompt clinicians to perform a FRAX fracture risk assessment in the neurology clinic.

  15. Fracture toughness evaluation of small notched specimen in consideration of notch effect and loading rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Baik Woo; Kwon, Dong Il; Jang, Jae Il

    2000-01-01

    Notch effect and loading rate dependency on fracture toughness were considered when evaluating fracture toughness of small notched specimens using the instrumented impact test. Notch effect was analyzed into stress redistribution effect and stress relaxation with a viewpoint of stress triaxiality. Stress redistribution effect was corrected by introducing effective crack length, which was the sum of actual crack length and plastic zone size. Stress relaxation effect was also corrected using elastic stress concentration factor, which would decrease if plastic deformation occurred. As a result, corrected fracture toughness of the notched specimen was very consistent with the reference fracture toughness obtained using precracked specimen. In addition, limiting notch root radius, below which fracture toughness was independent of notch radius, was observed and discussed. Loading rate dependency on fracture toughness, which was obtained from the static three point bending test and the instrumented impact test, was also discussed with stress field in plastic zone ahead of a notch and fracture based on stress control mechanism. (author)

  16. [Is Mapuche ethnicity a risk factor for hip fracture in aged?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapunar, Jorge; Bravo, Paulina; Schneider, Hermann; Jiménez, Marcela

    2003-10-01

    Ethnic factors are involved in the risk for osteoporosis and hip fracture. To assess the effect of Mapuche ethnicity on the risk of hip fracture. A case control study. Cases were subjects over 55 years of age admitted, during one year, for hip fracture not associated to major trauma or tumors. Controls were randomly chosen from other hospital services and paired for age with cases. The magnitude of the association between ethnicity and hip fracture was expressed as odds ratio in a logistic regression model. In the study period, 156 cases with hip fracture were admitted. The proportion of subjects with Mapuche origin was significantly lower among cases than controls (11.8 and 26.5% respectively, p Mapuche ethnicity was associated with hip fracture with an odds radio of 0.14 (p = 0.03, 95% CI 0.03-0.8). In this sample, Mapuche ethnicity is a protective factor for hip fracture.

  17. Effects of medication reviews performed by a physician on treatment with fracture-preventing and fall-risk-increasing drugs in older adults with hip fracture-a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Christina; Wallerstedt, Susanna M

    2013-09-01

    To investigate whether medication reviews increase treatment with fracture-preventing drugs and decrease treatment with fall-risk-increasing drugs. Randomized controlled trial (1:1). Departments of orthopedics, geriatrics, and medicine at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. One hundred ninety-nine consecutive individuals with hip fracture aged 65 and older. Medication reviews, based on assessments of risks of falls and fractures, regarding fracture-preventing and fall-risk-increasing drugs, performed by a physician, conveyed orally and in written form to hospital physicians during the hospital stay, and to general practitioners after discharge. Primary outcomes were changes in treatment with fracture-preventing and fall-risk-increasing drugs 12 months after discharge. Secondary outcomes were falls, fractures, deaths, and physicians' attitudes toward the intervention. At admission, 26% of intervention and 29% of control participants were taking fracture-preventing drugs, and 12% and 11%, respectively, were taking bone-active drugs, predominantly bisphosphonates. After 12 months, 77% of intervention and 58% of control participants were taking fracture-preventing drugs (P = .01), and 29% and 15%, respectively, were taking bone-active drugs (P = .04). Mean number of fall-risk-increasing drugs per participants was 3.1 (intervention) and 3.1 (control) at admission and 2.9 (intervention) and 3.1 (control) at 12 months (P = .62). No significant differences in hard endpoints were found. The responding physicians (n = 65) appreciated the intervention; on a scale from 1 (very bad) to 6 (very good), the median rating was 5 (interquartile range (IQR) 4-6) for the oral part and 5 (IQR 4-5.5) for the text part. Medication reviews performed and conveyed by a physician increased treatment with fracture-preventing drugs but did not significantly decrease treatment with fall-risk-increasing drugs in older adults with hip fracture. Prescribing physicians appreciated

  18. Symptoms of anxiety or depression and risk of fracture in older people: the Hertfordshire Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Catharine R; Dennison, Elaine M; Edwards, Mark; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Cooper, Cyrus

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prospective association between symptoms of anxiety and depression and risk of fracture in older people. Results showed that men, but not women, with probable anxiety at baseline had an increased risk of fracture. The use of psychotropic drugs has been linked with an increased risk of fracture in older people, but there are indications that the conditions for which these drugs were prescribed may themselves influence fracture risk. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between symptoms of anxiety and depression and risk of fracture in older people. The study design is a prospective cohort study. One thousand eighty-seven men and 1,050 women aged 59-73 years completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data on incident fracture during an average follow-up period of 5.6 years were collected through interview and a postal questionnaire. Compared to men with no or few symptoms of anxiety (score ≤7 on the HADS anxiety subscale), men with probable anxiety (score ≥11) had an increased risk of fracture: After adjustment for age and potential confounding factors, the odds ratio (OR) (95 % confidence interval) was 4.03 (1.55, 10.5). There were no associations between levels of anxiety and fracture risk in women. Few men or women had probable depression at baseline (score ≥11 on the HADS depression subscale). Amongst men with possible depression (score 8-10), there was an increased risk of fracture that was of borderline significance: multivariate-adjusted OR 3.57 (0.99, 12.9). There was no association between possible depression and fracture risk in women. High levels of anxiety in older men may increase their risk of fracture. Future research needs to replicate this finding in other populations and investigate the underlying mechanisms.

  19. Reasons for the low flowback rates of fracturing fluids in marine shale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Lu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, marine shale cores taken from Zhaotong, Changning and Weiyuan Blocks in South China were used as samples to investigate the interaction between fracturing fluids and shale and the retention mechanisms. Firstly, adsorption, swelling, dissolution pore, dissolution fluid mineralization degree and ionic composition were experimentally studied to reveal the occurrence of water in shale and the reason for a high mineralization degree. Then, the mechanisms of water retention and mineralization degree increase were simulated and calculated. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis shows that there are a large number of micro fractures originated from clay minerals in the shale. Mineral dissolution rates of shale immersed in ultrasonic is around 0.5–0.7%. The ionic composition is in accordance with that of formation water. The clay minerals in core samples are mainly composed of chlorites and illites with a small amount of illites/smectites, but no montmorillonites (SS, and its content is between 18% and 20%. It is verified by XRD and infrared spectroscopy that the fracturing fluid doesn't flow into the space between clay mineral layers, so it can't lead to shale swelling. Thus, the retention of fracturing fluids is mainly caused by the adsorption at the surface of the newly fractured micro fractures in shale in a mode of successive permeation, and its adsorptive saturation rates is proportional to the pore diameters. It is concluded that the step-by-step extraction of fracturing fluids to shale and the repulsion of nano-cracks to ion are the main reasons for the abrupt increase of mineralization degree in the late stage of flowing back. In addition, the liquid carrying effect of methane during the formation of a gas reservoir is also a possible reason. Based on the experimental and field data, fracturing fluid flowback rates and gas production rates of 9 wells were analyzed. It is indicated that the same block follows an overall

  20. Are certain fractures at increased risk for compartment syndrome after civilian ballistic injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskey, Thomas; Hardcastle, John; O'Toole, Robert V

    2011-11-01

    Compartment syndrome after ballistic fracture is uncommon but potentially devastating. Few data are available to help guide clinicians regarding risk factors for developing compartment syndrome after ballistic fractures. Our primary hypothesis was that ballistic fractures of certain bones would be at higher risk for development of compartment syndrome. A retrospective review at a Level I trauma center from 2001 through 2007 yielded 650 patients with 938 fractures resulting from gunshots. We reviewed all operative notes, clinic notes, discharge summaries, and data from our prospective trauma database. Cases in which the attending orthopedic surgeon diagnosed compartment syndrome and performed fasciotomy were considered cases with compartment syndrome. We excluded all prophylactic fasciotomies. Univariate analyses were conducted to identify risk factors associated with development of compartment syndrome. Twenty-six (2.8%) of the 938 fractures were associated with compartment syndrome. Only fibular (11.6%) and tibial (11.4%) fractures had incidence significantly higher than baseline for all ballistic fractures (p Ballistic fractures of the fibula and tibia are at increased risk for development of compartment syndrome over other ballistic fractures. We recommend increased vigilance when treating these injuries, particularly if the fracture is in the proximal aspect of the bone or is associated with vascular injury.

  1. Do cadmium, lead, and aluminum in drinking water increase the risk of hip fractures? A NOREPOS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Cecilie; Søgaard, Anne Johanne; Tell, Grethe S; Flaten, Trond Peder; Hongve, Dag; Omsland, Tone Kristin; Holvik, Kristin; Meyer, Haakon E; Aamodt, Geir

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate relations between cadmium, lead, and aluminum in municipality drinking water and the incidence of hip fractures in the Norwegian population. A trace metals survey in 566 waterworks was linked geographically to hip fractures from hospitals throughout the country (1994-2000). In all those supplied from these waterworks, 5,438 men and 13,629 women aged 50-85 years suffered a hip fracture. Poisson regression models were fitted, adjusting for age, region of residence, urbanization, and type of water source as well as other possibly bone-related water quality factors. Effect modification by background variables and interactions between water quality factors were examined (correcting for false discovery rate). Men exposed to a relatively high concentration of cadmium (IRR = 1.10; 95 % CI 1.01, 1.20) had an increased risk of fracture. The association between relatively high lead and hip fracture risk was significant in the oldest age group (66-85 years) for both men (IRR = 1.11; 95 % CI 1.02, 1.21) and women (IRR = 1.10; 95 % CI 1.04, 1.16). Effect modification by degree of urbanization on hip fracture risk in men was also found for all three metals: cadmium, lead, and aluminum. In summary, a relatively high concentration of cadmium, lead, and aluminum measured in drinking water increased the risk of hip fractures, but the associations depended on gender, age, and urbanization degree. This study could help in elucidating the complex effects on bone health by risk factors found in the environment.

  2. Incidence rates and trends of hip/femur fractures in five European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Requena, G; Abbing-Karahagopian, V; Huerta, C

    2014-01-01

    Hip fractures represent a major public health challenge worldwide. Multinational studies using a common methodology are scarce. We aimed to estimate the incidence rates (IRs) and trends of hip/femur fractures over the period 2003-2009 in five European countries. The study was performed using seven......, P European countries. With the exception of Denmark, no decreasing trend was observed over the study period....

  3. Risk factors for fractures in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (preliminary results of the multicenter program «Osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis: Diagnosis, risk factors, fractures, treatment»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Mikhailovna Podvorotova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, bone fractures occur 1.5-2 times more frequently than in the population. They often lead to reduced quality of life, to disability and death in the patients. It should be noted that risk factors (RFs for fractures have not been studied on a sufficient sample in Russia; there are no recommendations on the prevention of fractures in this category of patients. Objective: to compare groups of RA patients with and without a history of fractures to further identify possible RFs for fractures. Subjects and methods. The trial included 254 patients aged 18 to 85 years, diagnosed with RA, from the database of the multicenter program «Osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis: Diagnosis, risk factors, fractures, treatment», who had been followed up in 2010 to 2011. The patients were divided into two groups: 1 101 (39.8% patients with a history of low-trauma fractures and 2 153 (60.2% patients without a history of fractures. In Group 1, the patients were older than in Group 2 (mean age 59.8 and 56.1 years, respectively. Menopause was recorded in 88.1 and 77.8% of cases, respectively. The groups differed in the duration of RA an average of 15.5 and 11.5 years, respectively Results. The fractures in the history were associated with the use of glucocorticoids (GC, their higher cumulative dose and use duration. In Group 1 patients, the bone mineral density (BMD was lower in all study skeleton portions and more frequently corresponded to osteoporosis. RA complications, such as amyloidosis and osteonecrosis, were more common in the patients with a history of fractures. Conclusion. In RA patients, the most likely RFs of fractures are age, the long-term intake of large-dose GC, low BMD, the severe course of RA, and the presence of its complications.

  4. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part II. Fatigue crack growth rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, B., E-mail: margolinbz@yandex.ru; Minkin, A.; Smirnov, V.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Potapova, V.

    2016-11-15

    The experimental data on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) have been obtained for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various radiation swelling. The performed study of the fracture mechanisms for cracked specimens under cyclic loading has explained why radiation swelling affects weakly FCGR unlike its effect on fracture toughness. Mechanical modeling of fatigue crack growth has been carried out and the dependencies for prediction of FCGR in irradiated austenitic steel with and with no swelling are proposed and verified with the obtained experimental results. As input data for these dependencies, FCGR for unirradiated steel and the tensile mechanical properties for unirradiated and irradiated steels are used.

  5. The Determinants of Country Risk Ratings

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Claude Cosset; Jean Roy

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to replicate Euromoney's and Institutional Investor's country risk ratings on the basis of economic and political variables. The evidence reveals that country risk ratings respond to some of the variables suggested by the theory. In particular, both the level of per capita income and propensity to invest affect positively the rating of a country. In addition, high-ranking countries are less indebted than low-ranking countries. It also appears that the ability of t...

  6. High fall incidence and fracture rate in elderly dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polinder-Bos, H. A.; Emmelot-Vonk, M. H.; Gansevoort, R. T.; Diepenbroek, A.; Gaillard, C. A. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although it is recognised that the dialysis population is ageing rapidly, geriatric complications such as falls are poorly appreciated, despite the many risk factors for falls in this population. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence, complications and risk factors

  7. Fracture rates of IPS Empress all-ceramic crowns--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Siegward D; Rousson, Valentin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical fracture rate of crowns fabricated with the pressable, leucite-reinforced ceramic IPS Empress, and relate the results to the type of tooth restored. The database SCOPUS was searched for clinical studies involving full-coverage crowns made of IPS Empress. To assess the fracture rate of the crowns in relation to the type of restored tooth and study, Poisson regression analysis was used. Seven clinical studies were identified involving 1,487 adhesively luted crowns (mean observation time: 4.5+/-1.7 years) and 81 crowns cemented with zinc-phosphate cement (mean observation time: 1.6+/-0.8 years). Fifty-seven of the adhesively luted crowns fractured (3.8%). The majority of fractures (62%) occurred between the third and sixth year after placement. There was no significant influence regarding the test center on fracture rate, but the restored tooth type played a significant role. The hazard rate (per year) for crowns was estimated to be 5 in every 1,000 crowns for incisors, 7 in every 1,000 crowns for premolars, 12 in every 1,000 crowns for canines, and 16 in every 1,000 crowns for molars. One molar crown in the zinc-phosphate group fractured after 1.2 years. Adhesively luted IPS Empress crowns showed a low fracture rate for incisors and premolars and a somewhat higher rate for molars and canines. The sample size of the conventionally luted crowns was too small and the observation period too short to draw meaningful conclusions.

  8. Stress fracture risk factors in female football players and their clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Stuart J; Creaby, Mark W; Bryant, Adam L; Crossley, Kay M

    2007-08-01

    A stress fracture represents the inability of the skeleton to withstand repetitive bouts of mechanical loading, which results in structural fatigue, and resultant signs and symptoms of localised pain and tenderness. Reports of stress fractures in female football players are not prevalent; however, they are probably under-reported and their importance lies in the morbidity that they cause in terms of time lost from participation. By considering risk factors for stress fractures in female football players it may be possible to reduce the impact of these troublesome injuries. Risk factors for stress fractures in female football players include intrinsic risk factors such as gender, endocrine, nutritional, physical fitness and neuromusculoskeletal factors, as well as extrinsic risk factors such as training programme, equipment and environmental factors. This paper discusses these risk factors and their implications in terms of developing prevention and management strategies for stress fractures in female football players.

  9. Fracture risk assessment in postmenopausal women with diabetes: comparison between DeFRA and FRAX tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorsi, Gloria; Messina, Carmelo; Cervellati, Carlo; Maietti, Elisa; Medini, Matilde; Rossini, Maurizio; Massari, Leo; Greco, Pantaleo

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the performance of Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) with that of Derived FRAX (DeFRA) in estimating fracture risk in a cohort of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) postmenopausal women. One hundred nineteen T2DM postmenopausal women and 118 consecutive healthy postmenopausal women were enrolled. Fracture risk was assessed with FRAX (adjusted or non- for trabecular bone score, TBS) and DeFRA. Bone mineral density (BMD) and TBS were evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The outcome was the presence of vertebral/non-vertebral fragility fractures (FFs). T2DM women showed higher spinal BMD T-score (p < .05), but lower TBS (p < .05), than controls. Diabetic patients had higher prevalence of FFs compared to controls (p < .05), but no significant difference were found in the scores of any of the predictor tools. Differently, in the T2DM group, the scores of DeFRA, FRAX and adjusted-FRAX were significantly (p < .01 for all) higher in fractured compared with non-fractured women. DeFRA showed the best discriminative power among all fracture risk predictor tools (area under curves: DeFra: 0.89; adjusted FRAX: 0.80; non-adjusted FRAX: 0.73). In summary, all fracture risk assessment tools appeared to be effective in predicting bone fractures in T2DM postmenopausal women, with DeFRA showing a slightly better diagnostic accuracy.

  10. The risk of fractures among patients with cirrhosis or chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Ulrich Christian; Benfield, Thomas; Bendtsen, Flemming; Hyldstrup, Lars; Beck Jensen, Jens-Erik

    2014-02-01

    Cirrhosis and chronic pancreatitis (CP) are accompanied by inflammation and malnutrition. Both conditions can have negative effects on bone metabolism and promote fractures. We evaluated the risk of fractures among patients with CP or cirrhosis and determined the effect of fat malabsorption on fracture risk among patients with CP. We performed a retrospective cohort study using the Danish National Patient Register to identify patients diagnosed with CP or cirrhosis. We analyzed data collected from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2010, on 20,769 patients (35.5% women with cirrhosis and 11,972 patients (33.5% women) with CP. Each patient was compared with 10 age- and sex-matched controls. We also assessed the risk of fractures among patients with CP who received pancreatic enzyme substitution (PES) for fat malabsorption. During the study period, bone fractures occurred in 3954 patients with cirrhosis and 2594 patients with CP. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for any fracture was 2.4 in patients with cirrhosis (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-2.5) and 1.7 in patients with CP (95% CI, 1.6-1.8). The relative risk of low-trauma fractures was highest among individuals younger than 50 years old. Alcohol as an etiology was associated with an increased risk of fracture compared with patients with nonalcoholic cirrhosis (HR, 2.4 vs 1.5; P risk of fractures than other CP patients (HR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.7-0.9). However, increasing the duration of treatment with PES was associated with an increased risk of fracture. Patients, especially younger patients, with cirrhosis or CP have an increased risk of fractures of all types. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bipolar disorder and the risk of fracture: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jian-An; Cheng, Bi-Hua; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lu, Mong-Liang; Hsu, Chung-Yao; Lee, Yena; McIntyre, Roger S; Chin Lin, Tzu; Chin-Hung Chen, Vincent

    2017-08-15

    The co-primary aims are: 1) to compare the risk of fracture between adults with bipolar disorder and those without bipolar disorder; and 2) to assess whether lithium, anticonvulsants and antipsychotics reduce risk of fracture among individuals with bipolar disorder. The analysis herein is a population-based retrospective cohort study, utilizing the National Health Insurance (NHI) medical claims data collected between 1997 and 2013 in Taiwan. We identified 3705 cases with incident diagnoses of bipolar disorder during study period and 37,050 matched controls without bipolar diagnoses. Incident diagnosis of fracture was operationalized as any bone fracture after the diagnosis of bipolar disorder or after the matched index date for controls. Bipolar patients had significantly higher risk of facture when compared to matched controls (17.6% versus 11.7%, respectively pbipolar disorder and a prior history of psychiatric hospitalization were had higher risk for bone fracture than those without prior history of psychiatric hospitalization when compared to match controls. Higher cumulative dose of antipsychotics or mood stabilizers did not increase the risk of fracture. The diagnoses of bipolar disorder were not confirmed with structured clinical interview. Drug adherence, exact exposure dosage, smoking, lifestyle, nutrition and exercise habits were unable to be assessed in our dataset. Bipolar disorder is associated with increased risk of fracture, and higher cumulative dose of mood stabilizers and antipsychotics did not further increase the risk of fracture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. New method of analyzing well tests in fractured wells using sandface pressure and rate data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, M.; Almehaideb, R.; Abou-Kassem, J. [U.A.E. University, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    1998-05-01

    Analysis of variable flow rate tests has been of special interest recently because in many cases it is impractical to keep a flow rate constant long enough to perform a drawdown test. Further, in many other drawdown and buildup tests, the early data were influenced by wellbore storage effects, and the duration of these effects could be quite long for low-permeability reservoirs. This paper presents a mathematical model which describes drawdown and buildup tests in hydraulically fractured wells. This new method uses a specialized plot approach to analyze the linear flow data and combines it with the superposition of constant-rate solution method for the analysis of psuedoradial flow data. It does not require prior knowledge of the fracture type (uniform-flux or infinite-conductivity); in fact it predicts the fracture type. This method is useful for the analysis of simultaneously measured downhole pressure and sandface rate data. 12 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Risk Factors for Pelvic Insufficiency Fractures in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Following Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Røhl, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    and underwent external beam radiation therapy with 45 Gy in 25 fractions (node-negative patients) or 50 Gy in 25 fractions with a simultaneous integrated boost of 60 Gy in 30 fractions (node-positive patients). Pulsed dose rate magnetic resonance imaging guided adaptive brachytherapy was given in addition......PURPOSE: To investigate the incidence of and risk factors for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF) after definitive chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). METHODS AND MATERIALS: We analyzed 101 patients with LACC treated from 2008-2014. Patients received weekly cisplatin...

  14. Value of routine blood tests for prediction of mortality risk in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosfeldt, Mathias; Pedersen, Ole Birger Vesterager; Riis, Troels

    2012-01-01

    There is a 5- to 8-fold increased risk of mortality during the first 3 months after a hip fracture. Several risk factors are known. We studied the predictive value (for mortality) of routine blood tests taken on admission.......There is a 5- to 8-fold increased risk of mortality during the first 3 months after a hip fracture. Several risk factors are known. We studied the predictive value (for mortality) of routine blood tests taken on admission....

  15. Risk of vertebral fracture after menopause: detection of high risk subjects by dual photon absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutris, G.; Talbot, J.N.; Kiffel, T.; Paus, L.; Milhaud, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dual photon absorptiometry of bone is used to detect in an exposed population those subjects who are high risk of fracture and also to follow up the evolution of these patients. 37 women who have suffered fractures have been compared to 41 women without fractures of similar age distribution. A highly significant correlation between body height and Bone Mineral Content (BMC) of the lumbar spine is found in the control group thus allowing the calculation of the expected BMC value for each patient. A crushing index is defined as the ratio of the observed BMC value to the expected one. Using this index, instead of the two more usual modes of BMC expression, leads to an improvement of the predictive estimation of fracture risk. The predictive value of such indices should still be improved. With this aim, further determinations of indices are desirable. The following requirements should be borne in mind: the physical data should be easily obtainable e.g. body height and weight and the meaning of the index based on these easily verifiable factors they should be easily understood [fr

  16. Fracture risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and possible risk factors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moayeri A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ardeshir Moayeri,1 Mahmoud Mohamadpour,2 Seyedeh Fatemeh Mousavi,3 Ehsan Shirzadpour,2 Safoura Mohamadpour,3 Mansour Amraei4 1Department of Anatomy, 2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, 3Department of Epidemiology, Prevention of Psychosocial Injuries Research Center, 4Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran Aim: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM have an increased risk of bone fractures. A variable increase in fracture risk has been reported depending on skeletal site, diabetes duration, study design, insulin use, and so on. The present meta-analysis aimed to investigate the association between T2DM with fracture risk and possible risk factors.Methods: Different databases including PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information, and Scopus were searched up to May 2016. All epidemiologic studies on the association between T2DM and fracture risk were included. The relevant data obtained from these papers were analyzed by a random effects model and publication bias was assessed by funnel plot. All analyses were done by R software (version 3.2.1 and STATA (version 11.1.Results: Thirty eligible studies were selected for the meta-analysis. We found a statistically significant positive association between T2DM and hip, vertebral, or foot fractures and no association between T2DM and wrist, proximal humerus, or ankle fractures. Overall, T2DM was associated with an increased risk of any fracture (summary relative risk =1.05, 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.06 and increased with age, duration of diabetes, and insulin therapy.Conclusion: Our findings strongly support an association between T2DM and increased risk of overall fracture. These findings emphasize the need for fracture prevention strategies in patients with diabetes. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, fractures, bone, osteoporosis, risk factors, meta-analysis

  17. Nutritional factors that influence change in bone density and stress fracture risk among young female cross-country runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Jeri W; Melsop, Kathryn; Curtis, Meredith; Kelsey, Jennifer L; Bachrach, Laura K; Greendale, Gail; Sowers, Mary Fran; Sainani, Kristin L

    2010-08-01

    To identify nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns associated with stress fracture risk and changes in bone density among young female distance runners. Two-year, prospective cohort study. Observational data were collected in the course of a multicenter randomized trial of the effect of oral contraceptives on bone health. One hundred and twenty-five female competitive distance runners ages 18-26 years. Dietary variables were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Bone mineral density and content (BMD/BMC) of the spine, hip, and total body were measured annually by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Stress fractures were recorded on monthly calendars, and had to be confirmed by radiograph, bone scan, or magnetic resonance imaging. Seventeen participants had at least one stress fracture during follow-up. Higher intakes of calcium, skim milk, and dairy products were associated with lower rates of stress fracture. Each additional cup of skim milk consumed per day was associated with a 62% reduction in stress fracture incidence (P stress fracture rate. Potassium intake was also associated with greater gains in hip and whole-body BMD. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Areal and volumetric Bone Mineral Density and risk of multiple types of fracture in older men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalhoub, Didier; Orwoll, Eric S.; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Boudreau, Robert; Greenspan, Susan; Newman, Anne B.; Zmuda, Joseph; Bauer, Douglas; Cummings, Steven; Cauley, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies have examined the association between low bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk in older men, none have simultaneously studied the relationship between multiple BMD sites and risk of different types of fractures. Using data from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men study, we evaluated the association between areal BMD (aBMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and volumetric BMD (vBMD) by quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measurements, and different types of fractures during an average of 9.7 years of follow up. Men answered questionnaires about fractures every 4 months (>97% completions). Fractures were confirmed by centralized review of radiographic reports; pathological fractures were excluded. Risk of fractures was assessed at the hip, spine, wrist, shoulder, rib/chest/sternum, ankle/foot/toe, arm, hand/finger, leg, pelvis/coccyx, skull/face and any non-spine fracture. Age and race adjusted Cox proportional-hazards modeling was used to assess the risk of fracture in 3301 older men with both aBMD (at the femoral neck (FN) and lumbar spine) and vBMD (at the trabecular spine and FN, and cortical FN) measurements, with hazard ratios (HRs) expressed per standard deviation (SD) decrease. Lower FN and spine aBMD were associated with an increased risk of fracture at the hip, spine, wrist, shoulder, rib/chest/sternum, arm, and any non-spine fracture (statistically significant HRs per SD decrease ranged from 1.24 - 3.57). Lower trabecular spine and FN vBMD were associated with increased risk of most fractures with statistically significant HRs ranging between 1.27 and 3.69. There was a statistically significant association between FN cortical vBMD and fracture risk at the hip (HR=1.55) and spine sites (HR=1.26), but no association at other fracture sites. In summary, both lower aBMD and vBMD were associated with increased fracture risk. The stronger associations observed for trabecular vBMD than cortical vBMD may reflect the greater

  19. Fracture Energy of Plain Concrete Beams at Different Rates of Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, J. P.; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard; Madsen, S. H.

    . The beams are tested in a closed loop servo controlled materials testing system. The experimental results for these preliminary tests show that the bending tensile strength is increasing with the displacement rate and that the fracture energy is constant at lower displacement rates and then increasing...

  20. Risk of vertebral insufficiency fractures in relation to compressive strength predicted by quantitative computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggemann, M.; Hilweg, D.; Seidel, S.; Horst, M.; Brinckmann, P.

    1991-01-01

    Vertebral insufficiency fractures may result from excessive loading of normal and routine loading of osteoporotic spines. Fractures occur when the mechanical load exceeds the vertebral compressive strength, i.e., the maximum load a vertebra can tolerate. Vertebral compressive strength is determined by trabecular bone density and the size of end-plate area. Both parameters can be measured non-invasively by quanti-tative computed tomography (QCT). In 75 patients compressive strength (i.e., trabecular bone density and endplate area) of the vertebra L3 was determined using QCT. In addition, conventional radiographs of the spines were analysed for the prevalence of insufficiency fractures in each case. By relating fracture prevalence to strength, 3 fracture risk groups were found: a high-risk group with strength values of L3 5 kN and a fracture risk near 0 percent. Biomechanical measurements and model calculations indicate that spinal loads of 3 to 4 kN at L3/4 will be common in everyday activities. These data and the results described above suggest that spines with strength values of L3<3 kN are at an extremely high risk of insufficiency fractures in daily life. Advantages of fracture risk assessment by strength determination over risk estimation based on clinically used trabecular bone density measurements are discussed. (author). 18 refs.; 4 figs

  1. Differential impact of some risk factors on trochanteric and cervical hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Sari; Gurevich, Alexander; Sagiv, Shaul; Guller, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the potential distinct risk factors associated with trochanteric and cervical hip fractures. Elderly patients aged 65 years and older (n = 1161) were admitted to the orthopedic department with hip fractures during the years 2006-2011. Demographic and clinical data, as well as routine blood tests, were retrieved from the patient electronic medical records. Approximately 58% of patients had trochanteric fractures and 42% had cervical fractures. Women were more likely to have trochanteric fractures than men (P = 0.002). Female sex, frailty, falls, diabetes and subnormal calcium, as well as subnormal hemoglobin levels, were significant risk factors for trochanteric fractures (OR 1.39, P = 0.0202, OR 1.36, P = 0.0166, OR 1.49, P = 0.0015, OR 1.33, P = 0.0343, OR 0.68, P = 0.0054, OR 0.70, P = 0.0036, respectively). Patients with Parkinson's disease were at a lower risk for trochanteric fractures (OR 0.6, P = 0.007). As there are some differences between risk factors for trochanteric and cervical hip fractures, there is a need for further studies in order to understand the etiology of fractures and to be able to carry out effective preventive efforts. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. A review of lifestyle, smoking and other modifiable risk factors for osteoporotic fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Brask-Lindemann, Dorthe; Rubin, Katrine Hass

    2014-01-01

    Although many strong risk factors for osteoporosis-such as family history, fracture history and age-are not modifiable, a number of important risk factors are potential targets for intervention. Thus, simple, non-pharmacological intervention in patients at increased risk of osteoporotic fractures...... could include reduction of excessive alcohol intake, smoking cessation, adequate nutrition, patient education, daily physical activity and a careful review of medications that could increase the risk of falls and fractures. There remains, however, an unmet need for high-quality intervention studies...

  3. Temporal trends in obesity, osteoporosis treatment, bone mineral density, and fracture rates: a population-based historical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, William D; Lix, Lisa M; Yogendran, Marina S; Morin, Suzanne N; Metge, Colleen J; Majumdar, Sumit R

    2014-04-01

    Diverging international trends in fracture rates have been observed, with most reports showing that fracture rates have stabilized or decreased in North American and many European populations. We studied two complementary population-based historical cohorts from the Province of Manitoba, Canada (1996-2006) to determine whether declining osteoporotic fracture rates in Canada are attributable to trends in obesity, osteoporosis treatment, or bone mineral density (BMD). The Population Fracture Registry included women aged 50 years and older with major osteoporotic fractures, and was used to assess impact of changes in osteoporosis treatment. The BMD Registry included all women aged 50 years and older undergoing BMD tests, and was used to assess impact of changes in obesity and BMD. Model-based estimates of temporal changes in fracture rates (Fracture Registry) were calculated. Temporal changes in obesity and BMD and their association with fracture rates (BMD Registry) were estimated. In the Fracture Registry (n=27,341), fracture rates declined 1.6% per year (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3% to 2.0%). Although osteoporosis treatment increased from 5.6% to 17.4%, the decline in fractures was independent of osteoporosis treatment. In the BMD Registry (n=36,587), obesity increased from 12.7% to 27.4%. Femoral neck BMD increased 0.52% per year and lumbar spine BMD increased 0.32% per year after covariate adjustment (pobesity or osteoporosis treatment. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  4. Dual mobility cup reduces dislocation rate after arthroplasty for femoral neck fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertsson Otto

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip dislocation after arthroplasty for femoral neck fractures remains a serious complication. The aim of our study was to investigate the dislocation rate in acute femoral neck fracture patients operated with a posterior approach with cemented conventional or dual articulation acetabular components. Methods We compared the dislocation rate in 56 consecutive patients operated with conventional (single mobility cemented acetabular components to that in 42 consecutive patients operated with dual articulation acetabular components. All the patients were operated via posterior approach and were followed up to one year postoperatively. Results There were 8 dislocations in the 56 patients having conventional components as compared to no dislocations in those 42 having dual articulation components (p = 0.01. The groups were similar with respect to age and gender distribution. Conclusions We conclude that the use of a cemented dual articulation acetabular component significantly reduces the dislocation rates in femoral neck fracture patients operated via posterior approach.

  5. Differences in Site-Specific Fracture Risk Among Older Women with Discordant Results for Osteoporosis at Hip and Spine: the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Howard A.; Harrison, Stephanie L.; Taylor, Brent C.; Cummings, Steven R.; Schousboe, John T.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Stone, Katie L.; Ensrud, Kristine E.

    2009-01-01

    To examine the fracture pattern in older women whose bone mineral density (BMD) T-score criteria for osteoporosis at hip and spine disagree, hip and spine BMD were measured in Study of Osteoporotic Fractures participants using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Hip osteoporosis was defined as T-score ≤-2.5 at femoral neck or total hip, and spine osteoporosis as T-score ≤-2.5 at lumbar spine. Incident clinical fractures were self-reported and centrally adjudicated. Incident radiographic spine fractures were defined morphometrically. Compared to women with osteoporosis at neither hip nor spine, those osteoporotic only at hip had a 3.0-fold age and weight-adjusted increased risk for hip fracture (95%CI 2.4-3.6), and smaller increases in risk of nonhip nonspine (HR=1.6), clinical spine (OR=2.2), and radiographic spine fractures (OR=1.5). Women osteoporotic only at spine had a 2.8-fold increased odds of radiographic spine fracture (95%CI 2.1-3.8), and smaller increases in risk of clinical spine (OR=1.4), nonhip nonspine (HR=1.6), and hip fractures (HR=1.2). Discordant BMD results predict different fracture patterns. DXA fracture risk estimation in these patients should be site-specific. Women osteoporotic only at spine would not have been identified from hip BMD measurement alone, and may have a sufficiently high fracture risk to warrant preventive treatment. PMID:18296090

  6. Intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for nonunion after nonoperative treatment of midshaft clavicle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Xiao, J; Ji, F; Xie, Y; Hao, Y

    2015-04-01

    The optimal treatment of midshaft clavicle fractures remains controversial. Nonunion is usually considered to be an uncommon complication following a nonoperatively treated clavicle fracture. Not every midshaft clavicular fractures shares the same risk of developing nonunion after nonoperative treatment. The present study was performed to identify the intrinsic and extrinsic independent factors that are independently predictive of nonunion in patients with midshaft clavicular fractures after nonoperative treatment. We performed a retrospective study of a series of 804 patients (391 men and 413 women with a median age of 51.3 years) with a radiographically confirmed midshaft clavicle fracture, which was treated nonoperatively. There were 96 patients who underwent nonunion. Putative intrinsic (patient-related) and extrinsic (injured-related) risk factors associated with nonunion were determined with the use of bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses. By bivariate analysis, the risk of nonunion was significantly increased by several intrinsic risk factors including age, sex, and smoking and extrinsic risk factors including displacement of the fracture and the presence of comminution (P<0.05 for all). On multivariate analysis, smoking (OR=4.16, 95% CI: 1.01-14.16), fracture displacement (OR=7.81, 95% CI: 2.27-25.38) and comminution of fracture (OR=3.86, 95% CI: 1.16-13.46) were identified as independent predictive factors. The risk factors for nonunion after nonoperative treatment of midshaft clavicle fractures are multifactorial. Smoking, fracture displacement and comminution of fracture are independent predictors for an individual likelihood of nonunion. Further studies are still required to evaluate these factors in the future. Level III, case-control study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Tourette syndrome increases risk of bone fractures: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Ming-Yu; Wei, I-Hua; Lin, Che-Chen; Huang, Chih-Chia

    2017-05-01

    This study assesses the risk of fractures among children with Tourette syndrome (TS), and identifies the effects of comorbidities and antipsychotics. We randomly sampled the claims data of 1 million enrollees in the National Health Insurance program of Taiwan, and identified 1258 children with TS diagnosed between 2000 and 2010. Additionally, 12,580 children without TS who were frequency matched for sex, age, residential area, parental occupation, and index year were identified for comparison. The children's cases were followed until December 31, 2010, or censored to ascertain incident fractures cases and associations with comorbidities of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and treatments with antipsychotics, antidepressants, or clonidine. The TS cohort had a 1.27-fold higher incidence of fractures than did the comparison cohort (190.37 vs. 149.94 per 10,000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.28 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.55] based on multivariable Cox regression analysis. This increased risk of fractures was apparent for fractures of the skull, neck, and spine. Comorbid ADHD and OCD did not result in an additional risk of fractures. The children without both ADHD and OCD were also at a higher risk of fractures, indicating that TS alone increases the risk of fractures. The children taking antipsychotics had a reduced risk of fractures, and the adjusted HR decreased to 1.17 (95% CI 0.90-1.52). Children with TS have an increased risk of fractures. ADHD and OCD do not increase the risk further.

  8. Expedited CT-Based Methods for Evaluating Fracture Severity to Assess Risk of Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis After Articular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Donald D; Kilburg, Anthony T; Thomas, Thaddeus P; Marsh, J Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) is common after intra-articular fractures of the tibial plafond. An objective CT-based measure of fracture severity was previously found to reliably predict whether PTOA developed following surgical treatment of such fractures. However, the extended time required obtaining the fracture energy metric and its reliance upon an intact contralateral limb CT limited its clinical applicability. The objective of this study was to establish an expedited fracture severity metric that provided comparable PTOA predictive ability without the prior limitations. An expedited fracture severity metric was computed from the CT scans of 30 tibial plafond fractures using textural analysis to quantify disorder in CT images. The expedited method utilized an intact surrogate model to enable severity assessment without requiring a contralateral limb CT. Agreement between the expedited fracture severity metric and the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) radiographic OA score at two-year follow-up was assessed using concordance. The ability of the metric to differentiate between patients that did or did not develop PTOA was assessed using the Wilcoxon Ranked Sum test. The expedited severity metric agreed well (75.2% concordance) with the KL scores. The initial fracture severity of cases that developed PTOA differed significantly (p = 0.004) from those that did not. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the expedited severity metric could accurately predict PTOA outcome in 80% of the cases. The time required to obtain the expedited severity metric averaged 14.9 minutes/ case, and the metric was obtained without using an intact contralateral CT. The expedited CT-based methods for fracture severity assessment present a solution to issues limiting the utility of prior methods. In a relatively short amount of time, the expedited methodology provided a severity score capable of predicting PTOA risk, without needing to have the intact contralateral limb

  9. The gender- and age-specific 10-year and lifetime absolute fracture risk in Tromso, Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Luai A.; Schirmer, Henrik; Bjornerem, Ashild; Emaus, Nina; Jorgensen, Lone; Stormer, Jan; Joakimsen, Ragnar M.

    2009-01-01

    Aim of this study is to estimate the gender- and age-specific 10-year and lifetime absolute risks of non-vertebral and osteoporotic (included hip, distal forearm and proximal humerus) fractures in a large cohort of men and women. This is a population-based 10 years follow-up study of 26,891 subjects aged 25 years and older in Tromso, Norway. All non-vertebral fractures were registered from 1995 throughout 2004 by computerized search in radiographic archives. Absolute risks were estimated by life-table method taking into account the competing risk of death. The absolute fracture risk at each year of age was estimated for the next 10 years (10-year risk) or up to the age of 90 years (lifetime risk). The estimated 10-year absolute risk of all non-vertebral fracture was higher in men than women before but not after the age of 45 years. The 10-year absolute risk for non-vertebral and osteoporotic fractures was over 10%, respectively, in men over 65 and 70 years and in women over 45 and 50 years of age. The 10-year absolute risks of hip fractures at the age of 65 and 80 years were 4.2 and 18.6% in men, and 9.0 and 24.0% in women, respectively. The risk estimates for distal forearm and proximal humerus fractures were under 5% in men and 13% in women. The estimated lifetime risks for all fracture locations were higher in women than men at all ages. At the age of 50 years, the risks were 38.1 and 24.8% in men and 67.4 and 55.0% in women for all non-vertebral and osteoporotic fractures, respectively. The estimated gender- and age-specific 10-year and lifetime absolute fracture risk were higher in Tromso than in other populations. The high lifetime fracture risk reflects the increased burden of fractures in this cohort

  10. Determination of dynamic fracture initiation toughness of elastic-plastic materials at intermediate strain rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Saez, J.; Luna de, S.; Rubio, L.; Perez-Castellanos, J. L.; Navarro, C.

    2001-01-01

    An earlier paper dealt with the experimental techniques used to determine the dynamic fracture properties of linear elastic materials. Here we describe those most commonly used as elastoplastic materials, limiting the study to the initiation fracture toughness at the intermediate strain rate (of around 10''2 s''-1). In this case the inertial forces are negligible and it is possible to apply the static solutions. With this stipulation, the analysis can be based on the methods of testing in static conditions. The dynamic case differs basically, from the static one, in the influence of the strain rate on the properties of the material. (Author) 57 refs

  11. Increased rate of osteoporosis, low lean mass, and fragility fractures in COPD patients: association with disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graumam, R Q; Pinheiro, M M; Nery, L E; Castro, C H M

    2018-03-21

    A very high rate of osteoporosis, fractures, and low lean mass was observed in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Disease severity was associated with bone and muscle adverse outcomes, while age ≥ 63.5 years old, low lean mass, higher iPTH, and a T-score below - 2.5 were all associated with higher risk of fracture. Osteoporosis is frequently neglected in patients with COPD. We aimed at evaluating the rate of osteoporosis, fractures, and low lean mass in patients with COPD. Ninety-nine patients with COPD (53 women, 64.5 ± 9.6 years old, and 46 men, 65.9 ± 8.0 years old) underwent bone densitometry (DXA) with body composition analyses. Healthy individuals (N = 57) not exposed to tobacco matched by sex, age, and body mass index (BMI) were used as controls. Spirometry, routine laboratory workout, and conventional thoracolumbar radiography surveying for vertebral deformities were performed in all patients. Osteoporosis was found in 40.4% of the COPD patients against only 13.0% of the healthy controls (p = 0.001). Vertebral fractures were seen in 24.4% of the men and 22.0% of the women with COPD. Disease severity (GOLD 3 and 4) was significantly associated with higher risk of vitamin D deficiency (p = 0.032), lower BMD (both men and women at all sites), higher frequency of osteoporosis (in women at all sites), lower skeletal mass index, and higher rate of low lean mass (in both men and women) than healthy controls and COPD patients with milder disease (GOLD 1 and 2). Age was a main predictor of vertebral fractures (OR = 1.164 (1.078-9.297); p lean mass were associated with FEV 1% lean mass, high iPTH, and low bone mass were all significantly associated with fractures in COPD patients.

  12. Rate of displacement for Jakob Type 1 lateral condyle fractures treated with a cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zale, C; Winthrop, Z A; Hennrikus, W

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to report the rate of displacement of Jakob Type 1 lateral condyle fractures that were initially treated in a cast. We performed a retrospective review of all patients that were treated for a non-displaced (Jakob Type 1 displaced and were converted to a closed pinning treatment plan with a conversion rate of 8.5%. There was a mean of 13.2 days (4 to 21) between treatment by initial casting and closed pinning. This study demonstrates an 8.5% displacement and conversion rate from cast treatment to closed pinning for initially non-displaced Jakob Type 1 lateral condyle fractures of the humerus. The internal oblique radiograph is most accurate to determine displacement. We recommend obtaining an internal oblique view at initial evaluation and at follow-up in the cast for lateral condyle fractures. To minimize movement at the fracture site, we recommend treating Jakob Type 1 lateral condyle fractures with a long arm cast with the elbow at 90° and the forearm in the supine position with a sling-loop design. IV - retrospective therapeutic study.

  13. A genome-wide association study demonstrates significant genetic variation for fracture risk in Thoroughbred racehorses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Thoroughbred racehorses are subject to non-traumatic distal limb bone fractures that occur during racing and exercise. Susceptibility to fracture may be due to underlying disturbances in bone metabolism which have a genetic cause. Fracture risk has been shown to be heritable in several species but this study is the first genetic analysis of fracture risk in the horse. Results Fracture cases (n = 269) were horses that sustained catastrophic distal limb fractures while racing on UK racecourses, necessitating euthanasia. Control horses (n = 253) were over 4 years of age, were racing during the same time period as the cases, and had no history of fracture at the time the study was carried out. The horses sampled were bred for both flat and National Hunt (NH) jump racing. 43,417 SNPs were employed to perform a genome-wide association analysis and to estimate the proportion of genetic variance attributable to the SNPs on each chromosome using restricted maximum likelihood (REML). Significant genetic variation associated with fracture risk was found on chromosomes 9, 18, 22 and 31. Three SNPs on chromosome 18 (62.05 Mb – 62.15 Mb) and one SNP on chromosome 1 (14.17 Mb) reached genome-wide significance (p fracture than cases, p = 1 × 10-4), while a second haplotype increases fracture risk (cases at 3.39 times higher risk of fracture than controls, p = 0.042). Conclusions Fracture risk in the Thoroughbred horse is a complex condition with an underlying genetic basis. Multiple genomic regions contribute to susceptibility to fracture risk. This suggests there is the potential to develop SNP-based estimators for genetic risk of fracture in the Thoroughbred racehorse, using methods pioneered in livestock genetics such as genomic selection. This information would be useful to racehorse breeders and owners, enabling them to reduce the risk of injury in their horses. PMID:24559379

  14. Effect of Control Mode and Test Rate on the Measured Fracture Toughness of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Bronson D.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of control mode and test rate on the measured fracture toughness of ceramics were evaluated by using chevron-notched flexure specimens in accordance with ASTM C1421. The use of stroke control gave consistent results with about 2% (statistically insignificant) variation in measured fracture toughness for a very wide range of rates (0.005 to 0.5 mm/min). Use of strain or crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) control gave approx. 5% (statistically significant) variation over a very wide range of rates (1 to 80 µm/m/s), with the measurements being a function of rate. However, the rate effect was eliminated by use of dry nitrogen, implying a stress corrosion effect rather than a stability effect. With the use of a nitrogen environment during strain controlled tests, fracture toughness values were within about 1% over a wide range of rates (1 to 80 micons/m/s). CMOD or strain control did allow stable crack extension well past maximum force, and thus is preferred for energy calculations. The effort is being used to confirm recommendations in ASTM Test Method C1421 on fracture toughness measurement.

  15. Carotenoids and risk of fracture: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiuhong; Song, Chunli; Song, Xiaochao; Zhang, Xi; Li, Xinli

    2017-01-10

    To quantify the association between dietary and circulating carotenoids and fracture risk, a meta-analysis was conducted by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE databases for eligible articles published before May 2016. Five prospective and 2 case-control studies with 140,265 participants and 4,324 cases were identified in our meta-analysis. Among which 5 studies assessed the association between dietary carotenoids levels and hip fracture risk, 2 studies focused on the association between circulating carotenoids levels and any fracture risk. A random-effects model was employed to summarize the risk estimations and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Hip fracture risk among participants with high dietary total carotenoids intake was 28% lower than that in participants with low dietary total carotenoids (OR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.51, 1.01). A similar risk of hip fracture was found for β-carotene based on 5 studies, the summarized OR for high vs. low dietary β-carotene was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.54, 0.95). However, a significant between-study heterogeneity was found (total carotene: I2 = 59.4%, P = 0.06; β-carotene: I2 = 74.4%, P = 0.04). Other individual carotenoids did not show significant associations with hip fracture risk. Circulating carotene levels had no significant association with any fracture risk, the pooled OR (95% CI) was 0.83 (0.59, 1.17). Based on the evidence from observational studies, our meta-analysis supported the hypothesis that higher dietary total carotenoids or β-carotene intake might be potentially associated with a low risk of hip fracture, however, future well-designed prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trials are warranted to specify the associations between carotenoids and fracture.

  16. A risk assessment tool for contaminated sites in low-permeability fractured media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Binning, Philip John; Jørgensen, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    A risk assessment tool for contaminated sites in low-permeability fractured media is developed, based on simple transient and steady-state analytical solutions. The discrete fracture (DF) tool, which explicitly accounts for the transport along fractures, covers different source geometries...... and history (including secondary sources) and can be applied to a wide range of compounds. The tool successfully simulates published data from short duration column and field experiments. The use for risk assessment is illustrated by three typical risk assessment case studies, involving pesticides...

  17. Rate of avascular necrosis and time to surgery in proximal humerus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, L A; Furey, A

    2016-12-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the humeral head is a devastating complication of proximal humeral fracture (PHF) that often results in long-term morbidity for the patient. Rates of AVN depend on the number of fracture fragments and are highly variable. The literature suggests that timely stable and anatomic reduction may decrease the rate at which AVN develops after PHF. To our knowledge, there is no literature published investigating a temporal relationship between the timing of PHF fixation and rates of AVN. Operative records of one orthopedic trauma surgeon were used to identify patients that underwent open reduction internal fixation for PHF at our institution between 2007 and 2012. Radiographs at presentation were reviewed and used to classify the fractures into two, three or four parts. Date and time of the initial radiograph were recorded as were the date and time of available intra-operative fluoroscopic images. The time from presentation radiograph to operative fixation was calculated (hours). Available follow-up plain films were then reviewed and evaluated for the presence or absence of humeral head AVN. Time to surgery (less than or greater than 72 h) and patient age did not correlate with development of AVN after PHF (p > 0.26). Notably, the number of fracture fragments did influence the rate of AVN identified in patients with PHF (p = 0.002). Early operative intervention does not appear to decrease the rate of development of avascular necrosis after PHF.

  18. Could whole body vibration exercises influence the risk factors for fractures in women with osteoporosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloá Moreira-Marconi

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Although the paucity of research regarding direct effects of WBV in decreasing fractures, WBV could be a feasible and effective way to modify well-recognized risk factors for falls and fractures, improvements in some aspects of neuromuscular function and balance. More studies have to be performed establish protocols with well controlled parameters.

  19. Education, marital status, and risk of hip fractures in older men and women: the CHANCES project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetou, V; Orfanos, P; Feskanich, D; Michaëlsson, K; Pettersson-Kymmer, U; Ahmed, L A; Peasey, A; Wolk, A; Brenner, H; Bobak, M; Wilsgaard, T; Schöttker, B; Saum, K-U; Bellavia, A; Grodstein, F; Klinaki, E; Valanou, E; Papatesta, E-M; Boffetta, P; Trichopoulou, A

    2015-06-01

    The role of socioeconomic status in hip fracture incidence is unclear. In a diverse population of elderly, higher education was found to be associated with lower, whereas living alone, compared to being married/cohabiting, with higher hip fracture risk. Educational level and marital status may contribute to hip fracture risk. The evidence on the association between socioeconomic status and hip fracture incidence is limited and inconsistent. We investigated the potential association of education and marital status with hip fracture incidence in older individuals from Europe and USA. A total of 155,940 participants (79 % women) aged 60 years and older from seven cohorts were followed up accumulating 6456 incident hip fractures. Information on education and marital status was harmonized across cohorts. Hip fractures were ascertained through telephone interviews/questionnaires or through record linkage with registries. Associations were assessed through Cox proportional hazard regression adjusting for several factors. Summary estimates were derived using random effects models. Individuals with higher education, compared to those with low education, had lower hip fracture risk [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.84, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.72-0.95]. Respective HRs were 0.97 (95 % CI 0.82-1.13) for men and 0.75 (95 % CI 0.65-0.85) for women. Overall, individuals living alone, especially those aged 60-69 years, compared to those being married/cohabiting, tended to have a higher hip fracture risk (HR = 1.12, 95 % CI 1.02-1.22). There was no suggestion for heterogeneity across cohorts (P heterogeneity > 0.05). The combined data from >150,000 individuals 60 years and older suggest that higher education may contribute to lower hip fracture risk. Furthermore, this risk may be higher among individuals living alone, especially among the age group 60-69 years, when compared to those being married/cohabiting.

  20. Risk Factors for First Fractures Among Males With Duchenne or Becker Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Katherine A; Cunniff, Christopher; Apkon, Susan D; Mathews, Katherine; Lu, Zhenqiang; Holtzer, Caleb; Pandya, Shree; Ciafaloni, Emma; Miller, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    Fractures are a significant concern for individuals with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy with 21% to 44% of males experiencing a fracture. Factors that increase or decrease the risk for fracture have been suggested in past research, although statistical risk has not been determined. In this retrospective cohort study, we used the Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking and Research Network cohort, a large, population-based sample to identify risk factors associated with first fractures in patients with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy. Our study cohort included males with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy born between 1982 and 2006 who resided in Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa, and Western New York, retrospectively identified and followed through 2010. We utilized a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model to determine hazard ratios for relevant factors associated with first fracture risk including race/ethnicity, surveillance site, ambulation status, calcium/vitamin D use and duration, bisphosphonate use and duration, and corticosteroid use and duration. Of 747 cases, 249 had at least 1 fracture (33.3%). Full-time wheelchair use increased the risk of first fracture by 75% for every 3 months of use (hazard ratio=1.75, 95% confidence interval, 1.14, 2.68), but corticosteroid use, bisphosphonate use, and calcium/vitamin D use did not significantly affect risk in the final adjusted model. In this cohort, first fractures were common and full-time wheelchair use, but not corticosteroid use, was identified as a risk factor. The impact of prevention measures should be more thoroughly assessed. Fractures are a significant concern for individuals with dystrophinopathies, but the contribution of various risk factors has not been consistently demonstrated.

  1. Milk consumption during teenage years and risk of hip fractures in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feskanich, Diane; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A; Frazier, A Lindsay; Willett, Walter C

    2014-01-01

    Milk consumption during adolescence is recommended to promote peak bone mass and thereby reduce fracture risk in later life. However, its role in hip fracture prevention is not established and high consumption may adversely influence risk by increasing height. To determine whether milk consumption during teenage years influences risk of hip fracture in older adults and to investigate the role of attained height in this association. Prospective cohort study over 22 years of follow-up in more than 96,000 white postmenopausal women from the Nurses' Health Study and men aged 50 years and older from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study in the United States. Frequency of consumption of milk and other foods during ages 13 to 18 years and attained height were reported at baseline. Current diet, weight, smoking, physical activity, medication use, and other risk factors for hip fractures were reported on biennial questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate relative risks (RRs) of first incidence of hip fracture from low-trauma events per glass (8 fl oz or 240 mL) of milk consumed per day during teenage years. During follow-up, 1226 hip fractures were identified in women and 490 in men. After controlling for known risk factors and current milk consumption, each additional glass of milk per day during teenage years was associated with a significant 9% higher risk of hip fracture in men (RR = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17). The association was attenuated when height was added to the model (RR = 1.06; 95% CI, 0.98-1.14). Teenage milk consumption was not associated with hip fractures in women (RR = 1.00 per glass per day; 95% CI, 0.95-1.05). Greater milk consumption during teenage years was not associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in older adults. The positive association observed in men was partially mediated through attained height.

  2. Assessment of fracture risk in a cohort of Egyptian female Systemic Lupus erythematosus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman A. Hafez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the work: To assess the fracture risk in a cohort of Egyptian systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE females in correlation to some disease variables. Patients and methods: Seventy female SLE patients ≥40 years old were enrolled with detailed history taking, assessment of disease activity and damage index. Measurement of Serum calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase, bone mineral density (BMD by dual emission X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA at lumbar spine (LS and femoral neck (FN, serum osteocalcin level and World Health Organization (WHO fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX®. Results: 20% of the patients had LS osteoporosis, 35.7% LS osteopenia, 8.6% FN osteoporosis, and 42.9% FN osteopenia. Ten-year risk of major and hip fractures was high in SLE patients evidenced by FRAX-Major ≥20% in 10% of patients, and FRAX-Hip ≥3% in 27.1% of patients. Serum osteocalcin level was significantly decreased in SLE patients with lower BMD than those with normal BMD, and significantly decreased in patients with osteoporosis than those with osteopenia. A significant negative correlation was found between osteocalcin level and age of patients, disease duration, disease activity and damage index scores, current intravenous pulse and cumulative steroids, immunosuppressants, anticoagulants, but there was a positive correlation with antimalarials and calcium supplements. Conclusion: Ten-year risk of major and hip fractures was high in SLE patients. Increasing age, disease duration, high anti-DNA titres, higher disease activity and damage index were associated with a higher fracture risk. FRAX predicted fractures among SLE patients with normal and low bone mass not just those with frank osteoporosis. Physicians should be alerted to the higher risk of future fractures in SLE patients for periodic monitoring. Keywords: Systemic lupus erythematosus, Bone mineral density, Osteoporosis, Fracture risk, Fracture risk assessment tool

  3. Exposure to antiepileptic drugs and the risk of hip fracture: a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsiropoulos, Ioannis; Andersen, Morten; Nymark, Tine

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) increases the risk of hip fracture. METHODS: We performed a case-control study using data from the Funen County (population 2004: 475,000) hip fracture register. Cases (n = 7,557) were all patients admitted to county hospitals...... with a hip fracture during the period 1996-2004. Controls (n = 27,575) were frequency matched by age and gender. Information on use of AEDs, other drugs, and hospital contacts was available from local registers. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for hip fracture were estimated...

  4. Evaluation of easily measured risk factors in the prediction of osteoporotic fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Jacques P

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fracture represents the single most important clinical event in patients with osteoporosis, yet remains under-predicted. As few premonitory symptoms for fracture exist, it is of critical importance that physicians effectively and efficiently identify individuals at increased fracture risk. Methods Of 3426 postmenopausal women in CANDOO, 40, 158, 99, and 64 women developed a new hip, vertebral, wrist or rib fracture, respectively. Seven easily measured risk factors predictive of fracture in research trials were examined in clinical practice including: age (, 65–69, 70–74, 75–79, 80+ years, rising from a chair with arms (yes, no, weight (≥ 57kg, maternal history of hip facture (yes, no, prior fracture after age 50 (yes, no, hip T-score (>-1, -1 to >-2.5, ≤-2.5, and current smoking status (yes, no. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results The inability to rise from a chair without the use of arms (3.58; 95% CI: 1.17, 10.93 was the most significant risk factor for new hip fracture. Notable risk factors for predicting new vertebral fractures were: low body weight (1.57; 95% CI: 1.04, 2.37, current smoking (1.95; 95% CI: 1.20, 3.18 and age between 75–79 years (1.96; 95% CI: 1.10, 3.51. New wrist fractures were significantly identified by low body weight (1.71, 95% CI: 1.01, 2.90 and prior fracture after 50 years (1.96; 95% CI: 1.19, 3.22. Predictors of new rib fractures include a maternal history of a hip facture (2.89; 95% CI: 1.04, 8.08 and a prior fracture after 50 years (2.16; 95% CI: 1.20, 3.87. Conclusion This study has shown that there exists a variety of predictors of future fracture, besides BMD, that can be easily assessed by a physician. The significance of each variable depends on the site of incident fracture. Of greatest interest is that an inability to rise from a chair is perhaps the most readily identifiable significant risk factor for hip fracture and can be easily incorporated

  5. Currency Risk Management under Floating Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicu Duret

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As for the research into this subject, we find, therefore, that one of the most important indicators that quantify the international competitiveness is the exchange rate, together with other fundamental macroeconomic variables such as the size of the potential GDP, the equilibrium real exchange rate, gives a certain insight into the functioning of the fundamental macroeconomic mechanisms and their regulation. Commercial and financial operations imply relationships between partners from different currency countries or areas that involve conversion operations, of replacement of a currency to another. Exchange rate fluctuations of one currency create currency risk, to the extent that it is used to carry out international transactions. These operations are subjected to currency risk as exchange rates change frequently from one period to another and, on the other hand, speculations in the forex market influence the exchange rate by the interventions of those who perform them.

  6. Dual-stiffness flooring: can it reduce fracture rates associated with falls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoefel, Frank; Patrick, Louise; Taylor, Jodie; Goubran, Rafik

    2013-04-01

    Falls cause significant morbidity and mortality in long term care facilities. Dual-stiffness flooring (DSF) has previously shown promise in reducing such morbidity in experimental models. This study set out to measure the impact of SmartCell flooring on falls-related morbidity in a nursing home. All falls occurring at an Arizona nursing home between July 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, were reviewed for age, sex, diagnosis of osteoporosis, number of medications, history of previous falls, type of flooring (normal vs DSF), time of day, type of injury, and resulting actions. Fall-related outcomes were compared across room types using chi-square and logistic regression methods. Eighty-two falls on the DSF were compared with 85 falls on the regular floor. There was a tendency for residents falling on DSF to have less bruising and abrasions, while having more redness and cuts. There were 2 fractures on regular flooring (2.4% fracture rate) and none on the DSF flooring (0% fracture rate). The fracture rate of 2.4% of falls on the regular floor is consistent with previous reports in the literature, whereas a 0% rate found on the DSF floor is a clinically significant improvement. This suggests that DSF may be a practical approach for institutions and consumers to reduce fall-related injuries. A larger scale controlled study to confirm these encouraging preliminary findings is warranted. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Subtrochanteric Femur Fractures in an Irish Trauma Centre over 9 years: How the Impact of Hospital Coding on Diagnosis of Subtrochanteric Femur Fractures Leads to Inaccurate Occurrence Rates

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coveney, EI

    2018-06-01

    Our aim was to assess the occurrence rates of subtrochanteric femur fractures in an orthopaedic tertiary referral centre and to assess the correlation of patient’s actual diagnosis with national hospital inpatient enquiry data.

  8. Risks of subsequent contralateral fractures of the trochanteric region in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogliacomi, Francesco; Pellegrini, Andrea; Tacci, Fabrizio; Pedrini, Martina Francesca; Costantino, Cosimo; Pedrazzini, Alessio; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe; Lauretani, Fulvio; Vaienti, Enrico; Ceccarelli, Francesco

    2017-01-16

    Fractures in elderly are always a dramatic event and the healing is often not complete. In a context of bone fragility, repeated fractures are a growing problem in the industrialized world, in which the mean age of population is increasing. The aim of this study was to identify those general factors which may increase the risk of subsequent trochanteric fractures after an initial lesion. Three-hundred and thirty-one patients who underwent intramedullary fixation for trochanteric fractures between January 2012 and December 2013 were studied. Forty subjects yet alive (group 1), affected by a subsequent contralateral hip fracture, were compared with 202 patients (group 2) affected by isolated trochanteric fracture. Days of hospitalization before surgery, hospitalization, period of rehabilitation, type of discharge and comorbidities, that are reported in literature as possible risk factors for hip refracture, were analyzed. In addition, all patients were interviewed in order to assess if a therapy for osteoporosis was prescribed after the initial fracture and how their gait had been modified by fractures. Days of hospitalization before surgery, hospitalization, period of rehabilitation and type of discharge were not predictive factors for subsequent fractures, as well as diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cardiac diseases. The presence of neurologic and respiratory diseases were associated to a higher risk of refractures, as well as the absence of specific medical treatment for osteoporosis. Neurologic and respiratory comorbidities and the absence of osteoporosis medical treatment are the variables associated to a higher risk of contralateral fractures. Physicians can do more in terms of prevention and strategies must consider these risk factors.

  9. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and risk of fractures in French older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feart, C; Lorrain, S; Ginder Coupez, V; Samieri, C; Letenneur, L; Paineau, D; Barberger-Gateau, P

    2013-12-01

    Prevention of fractures is a considerable public health challenge. In a population-based cohort of French elderly people, a diet closer to a Mediterranean type had a borderline significant deleterious effect on the risk of fractures, in part linked to a low consumption of dairy products and a high consumption of fruits. Higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) is linked to a lower risk of several chronic diseases, but its association with the risk of fractures is unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between MeDi adherence and the risk of fractures in older persons. The sample consisted of 1,482 individuals aged 67 years or older, from Bordeaux, France, included in the Three-City Study in 2001-2002. Occurrences of hip, vertebral and wrist fractures were self-reported every 2 years over 8 years, and 155 incident fractures were recorded. Adherence to the MeDi was evaluated at baseline by a MeDi score, on a 10-point scale based on a food frequency questionnaire and a 24-h recall. Multivariate Cox regression tests were performed to estimate the risk of fractures according to MeDi adherence. Higher MeDi adherence was associated with a non-significant increased risk of fractures at any site (hazard ratio [HR] per 1-point increase of MeDi score = 1.10, P = 0.08) in fully adjusted model. Among MeDi components, higher fruits consumption (>2 servings/day) was significantly associated with an increased risk of hip fractures (HR = 1.95, P = 0.04), while low intake of dairy products was associated with a doubled risk of wrist fractures (HR = 2.03, P = 0.007). An inverse U-shaped association between alcohol intake and risk of total fracture was observed (HR high vs. moderate = 0.61, P for trend = 0.03). Greater MeDi adherence was not associated with a decreased risk of fractures in French older persons. The widely recognized beneficial effects of the MeDi do not seem to apply to bone health in these people.

  10. Bisphosphonate Drug Holiday and Fracture Risk: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Annette L; Adams, John L; Raebel, Marsha A; Tang, Beth T; Kuntz, Jennifer L; Vijayadeva, Vinutha; McGlynn, Elizabeth A; Gozansky, Wendolyn S

    2018-03-12

    Holidays from bisphosphonates (BPs) may help to prevent rare adverse events like atypical femoral fractures, but may be appropriate only if risk of osteoporosis-related fractures does not increase. Our objective was to compare the incidence of osteoporosis-related fractures among women who had a bisphosphonate (BP) holiday to those who continued use BPs. This retrospective cohort study, conducted within 4 Kaiser Permanente integrated health system regions, included 39,502 women aged ≥45 years with ≥3 years exposure to BP. Participants with a BP holiday (≥12 months with no use) were compared to persistent (use with ≥50% adherence) and non-persistent (use with holiday (n = 11,497), non-persistent user (n = 10,882), and persistent user groups (n = 17,123) were observed for 156,657 person-years. A total of 5,199 osteoporosis-related fractures (including 1,515 hip fractures and 2,147 vertebral fractures) were observed. Compared to the persistent use group, there was a slight difference in overall osteoporosis-related fracture risk (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.84-0.99)and no difference in hip fracture risk (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.83-1.10) for the BP holiday group. A slight reduction in risk of vertebral fracture was observed (HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.74-0.95). Compared to the non-persistent user group, the BP holiday group was at decreased risk for osteoporosis-related fractures (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.65-0.79), vertebral fractures (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.59-0.78), and hip fractures (HR 0.59; 95% CI 0.50-0.70). Women who undertake a BP holiday from BP of ≥12 months duration for any reason after ≥3 years of BP use do not appear to be at greater risk of osteoporosis-related fragility fracture, hip, or vertebral fractures compared to ongoing BP users. In our cohort, BP holiday remains a viable strategy for balancing the benefits and potential harms associated with long-term BP use. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright

  11. Remarks on Interest Rate Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena-Violeta DRAGOI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bank interest and interest rate risk management is a contemporary subject and for socio-economic environment of Romania cause serious consequences in the level of economic development. The purpose of this research is to highlight the main indicator that measures the total cost of a loan, namely the annual percentage rate (APR, because if we refer to an interest rate lower, at first glance that loan seems more advantageous, but at a closer look, taking into account the commissions charged by the bank, we see that the loan is more expensive compared to another, whose interest rate is higher.

  12. High risk of early periprosthetic fractures after primary hip arthroplasty in elderly patients using a cemented, tapered, polished stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodén, Cyrus; Mukka, Sebastian; Muren, Olle; Eisler, Thomas; Boden, Henrik; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Postoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture (PPF) after hip arthroplasty is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. We assessed the incidence and characteristics of periprosthetic fractures in a consecutive cohort of elderly patients treated with a cemented, collarless, polished and tapered femoral stem (CPT). Patients and methods In this single-center prospective cohort study, we included 1,403 hips in 1,357 patients (mean age 82 (range 52–102) years, 72% women) with primary osteoarthritis (OA) or a femoral neck fracture (FNF) as indication for surgery (367 hips and 1,036 hips, respectively). 64% of patients were ASA class 3 or 4. Hip-related complications and need for repeat surgery were assessed at a mean follow-up time of 4 (1–7) years. A Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate risk factors associated with PPF. Results 47 hips (3.3%) sustained a periprosthetic fracture at median 7 (2–79) months postoperatively; 41 were comminute Vancouver B2 or complex C-type fractures. The fracture rate was 3.8% for FNF patients and 2.2% for OA patients (hazard ratio (HR) = 4; 95% CI: 1.3–12). Patients > 80 years of age also had a higher risk of fracture (HR = 2; 95% CI: 1.1–4.5). Interpretation We found a high incidence of early PPF associated with the CPT stem in this old and frail patient group. A possible explanation may be that the polished tapered stem acts as a wedge, splitting the femur after a direct hip contusion. Our results should be confirmed in larger, registry-based studies, but we advise caution when using this stem for this particular patient group. PMID:25280133

  13. Prediction on fracture risk of femur with Osteogenesis Imperfecta using finite element models: Preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanna, S. B. C.; Basaruddin, K. S.; Mat Som, M. H.; Mohamad Hashim, M. S.; Daud, R.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Sulaiman, A. R.

    2017-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disease which affecting the bone geometry. In a severe case, this disease can cause death to patients. The main issue of this disease is the prediction on bone fracture by the orthopaedic surgeons. The resistance of the bone to withstand the force before the bones fracture often become the main concern. Therefore, the objective of the present preliminary study was to investigate the fracture risk associated with OI bone, particularly in femur, when subjected to the self-weight. Finite element (FEA) was employed to reconstruct the OI bone model and analyse the mechanical stress response of femur before it fractures. Ten deformed models with different severity of OI bones were developed and the force that represents patient self-weight was applied to the reconstructed models in static analysis. Stress and fracture risk were observed and analysed throughout the simulation. None of the deformed model were observed experienced fracture. The fracture risk increased with increased severity of the deformed bone. The results showed that all deformed femur models were able to bear the force without experienced fracture when subjected to only the self-weight.

  14. Persistent hyperparathyroidism is a major risk factor for fractures in the five years after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, P; Caillard, S; Javier, R M; Braun, L; Heibel, F; Borni-Duval, C; Muller, C; Olagne, J; Moulin, B

    2013-10-01

    The risk of fractures after kidney transplantation is high. Hyperparathyroidism frequently persists after successful kidney transplantation and contributes to bone loss, but its impact on fracture has not been demonstrated. This longitudinal study was designed to evaluate hyperparathyroidism and its associations with mineral disorders and fractures in the 5 posttransplant years. We retrospectively analyzed 143 consecutive patients who underwent kidney transplantation between August 2004 and April 2006. The biochemical parameters were determined at transplantation and at 3, 12 and 60 months posttransplantation, and fractures were recorded. The median intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) level was 334 ng/L (interquartile 151-642) at the time of transplantation and 123 ng/L (interquartile 75-224) at 3 months. Thirty fractures occurred in 22 patients. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis for PTH at 3 months (area under the ROC curve = 0.711, p = 0.002) showed that a good threshold for predicting fractures was 130 ng/L (sensitivity = 81%, specificity = 57%). In a multivariable analysis, independent risk factors for fracture were PTH >130 ng/L at 3 months (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 7.5, 95% CI 2.18-25.50), and pretransplant osteopenia (AHR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.07-7.26). In summary, this study demonstrates for the first time that persistent hyperparathyroidism is an independent risk factor for fractures after kidney transplantation. © Copyright 2013 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  15. The risk of fracture in patients with multiple sclerosis: The UK general practice research database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bazelier, Marloes T; van Staa, Tjeerd; Uitdehaag, Bernard Mj

    2011-01-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at an increased risk of fracture owing to a greater risk of falling and decreased bone mineral density when compared with the general population. This study was designed to estimate the relative and absolute risk of fracture in patients with MS. We...... were used to derive adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for fracture associated with MS. Time-dependent adjustments were made for age, comorbidity, and drug use. Absolute 5- and 10-year risks of fracture were estimated for MS patients as a function of age. Compared with controls, MS patients had an almost...... threefold increased risk of hip fracture [HR = 2.79,95% confidence interval (CI) 1.83-4.26] and a risk of osteoporotic fracture that was increased 1.4-fold (HR = 1.35,95% CI 1.13-1.62). Risk was greater in patients who had been prescribed oral/intravenous glucocorticoids (GCs; HR = 1.85, 95% CI 1...

  16. Risks of all-cause and site-specific fractures among hospitalized patients with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Liang, Fu-Wen; Li, Chung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high prevalence of osteoporosis. The clinical sequel of osteoporosis is fracture. Patients with COPD who experience a fracture also have increased morbidity and mortality. Currently, the types of all-cause and site-specific fracture among patients with COPD are unknown. Thus, we elucidated the all-cause and site-specific fractures among patients with COPD. A retrospective, population-based, cohort study was conducted utilizing the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database. Patients with COPD were defined as those who were hospitalized with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code of 490 to 492 or 496 between 2001 and 2011. The index date was set as the date of discharge. The study patients were followed from the index date to the date when they sought care for any type of fracture, date of death, date of health insurance policy termination, or the last day of 2013. The types of fracture analyzed in this study included vertebral, rib, humeral, radial and ulnar/wrist, pelvic, femoral, and tibial and fibular fractures. The cohort consisted of 11,312 patients with COPD. Among these patients, 1944 experienced fractures. The most common site-specific fractures were vertebral, femoral, rib, and forearm fractures (radius, ulna, and wrist) at 32.4%, 31%, 12%, and 11.8%, respectively. The adjusted hazard ratios of fracture were 1.71 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.56–1.87] for female patient with COPD and 1.50 (95% CI = 1.39–1.52) for patients with osteoporosis after covariate adjustment. Vertebral and hip fractures are common among patients with COPD, especially among males with COPD. Many comorbidities contribute to the high risk of fracture among patients with COPD. PMID:27749576

  17. Identification and management of patients at increased risk of osteoporotic fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanis, J A; Cooper, C; Rizzoli, R

    2017-01-01

    where the risk of a subsequent fracture following a first fracture is high. Consequently, there is a significant treatment gap between those who would benefit from treatment and those who receive it, which urgently needs to be addressed so that the burden of disease can be reduced. Conclusions......Summary: Osteoporosis represents a significant and increasing healthcare burden in Europe, but most patients at increased risk of fracture do not receive medication, resulting in a large treatment gap. Identification of patients who are at particularly high risk will help clinicians target...... appropriate treatment more precisely and cost-effectively, and should be the focus of future research. Introduction: The purpose of the study was to review data on the identification and treatment of patients with osteoporosis at increased risk of fracture. Methods: A working group convened by the European...

  18. Titanium and steel fracture fixation plates with different surface topographies: Influence on infection rate in a rabbit fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsemakers, W J; Schmid, Tanja; Zeiter, Stephan; Ernst, Manuela; Keller, Iris; Cosmelli, Nicolo; Arens, Daniel; Moriarty, T Fintan; Richards, R Geoff

    2016-03-01

    Implant-related infection is a challenging complication in musculoskeletal trauma surgery. In the present study, we examined the role of implant material and surface topography as influencing factors on the development of infection in an experimental model of plating osteosynthesis in the rabbit. The implants included in this experimental study were composed of: standard Electropolished Stainless Steel (EPSS), standard titanium (Ti-S), roughened stainless steel (RSS) and surface polished titanium (Ti-P). Construct stability and load-to-failure of Ti-P implants was compared to that of Ti-S implants in a rabbit cadaveric model. In an in vivo study, a rabbit humeral fracture model was used. Each rabbit received one of three Staphylococcus aureus inocula, aimed at determining the infection rate at a low, medium and high dose of bacteria. Outcome measures were quantification of bacteria on the implant and in the surrounding tissues, and determination of the infectious dose 50 (ID50). No significant differences were observed between Ti-S and Ti-P regarding stiffness or failure load in the cadaver study. Of the 72 rabbits eventually included in the in vivo study, 50 developed an infection. The ID50 was found to be: EPSS 3.89×10(3) colony forming units (CFU); RSS 8.23×10(3) CFU; Ti-S 5.66×10(3) CFU; Ti-P 3.41×10(3) CFU. Significantly lower bacterial counts were found on the Ti-S implants samples compared with RSS implants (ptitanium and steel implants with conventional or modified topographies. Ti-P implants, which have previously been shown in preclinical studies to reduce complications associated with tissue adherence, do not affect infection rate in this preclinical fracture model. Therefore, Ti-P implants are not expected to affect the infection rate, or influence implant stability in the clinical situation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The excess risk of major osteoporotic fractures in hypothyroidism is driven by cumulative hyperthyroid as opposed to hypothyroid time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Laulund, Anne Sofie

    2015-01-01

    was not associated with an increased risk of hip fracture (HR 0.90; 95% CI, 0.80 to 1.02) or major osteoporotic fractures (HR 0.97; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.05), nor was subsequent thyroxine prescription predictive of increased risk of fractures. The number of subsequent 6-month periods with low TSH-suggesting excessive...

  20. Increased risk for complications following removal of hardware in patients with liver disease, pilon or pelvic fractures: A regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bryan D; Steinert, Justin N; Stelzer, John W; Yoon, Richard S; Langford, Joshua R; Koval, Kenneth J

    2017-12-01

    Indications for removing orthopedic hardware on an elective basis varies widely. Although viewed as a relatively benign procedure, there is a lack of data regarding overall complication rates after fracture fixation. The purpose of this study is to determine the overall short-term complication rate for elective removal of orthopedic hardware after fracture fixation and to identify associated risk factors. Adult patients indicated for elective hardware removal after fracture fixation between July 2012 and July 2016 were screened for inclusion. Inclusion criteria included patients with hardware related pain and/or impaired cosmesis with complete medical and radiographic records and at least 3-month follow-up. Exclusion criteria were those patients indicated for hardware removal for a diagnosis of malunion, non-union, and/or infection. Data collected included patient age, gender, anatomic location of hardware removed, body mass index, ASA score, and comorbidities. Overall complications, as well as complications requiring revision surgery were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 20.0, and included univariate and multivariate regression analysis. 391 patients (418 procedures) were included for analysis. Overall complication rates were 8.4%, with a 3.6% revision surgery rate. Univariate regression analysis revealed that patients who had liver disease were at significant risk for complication (p=0.001) and revision surgery (p=0.036). Multivariate regression analysis showed that: 1) patients who had liver disease were at significant risk of overall complication (p=0.001) and revision surgery (p=0.039); 2) Removal of hardware following fixation for a pilon had significantly increased risk for complication (p=0.012), but not revision surgery (p=0.43); and 3) Removal of hardware for pelvic fixation had a significantly increased risk for revision surgery (p=0.017). Removal of hardware following fracture fixation is not a risk-free procedure. Patients with

  1. Endogenous hormones, muscle strength, and risk of fall-related fractures in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipilä, Sarianna; Heikkinen, Eino; Cheng, Sulin; Suominen, Harri; Saari, Päivi; Kovanen, Vuokko; Alén, Markku; Rantanen, Taina

    2006-01-01

    Among older people, fracture-causing fall often leads to health deterioration. The role of endogenous hormone status and muscle strength on fall-related fracture risk is unclear. This study investigates if, after adjustment for bone density, endogenous hormones and muscle strength would predict fall-related limb fracture incidence in older community-dwelling women followed-up over 10 years. As a part of a prospective population-based study, 187 75-year-old women were investigated. Serum estradiol, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentrations were analyzed, and isometric muscle strength and bone mineral density were assessed. Fall-related limb fractures were gathered from patient records. Serum estradiol concentration was a significant predictor of fall-related limb fractures. Women with serum estradiol concentrations less than 0.022 nmol/L had a 3-fold risk (relative risk 3.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-7.36), and women with estradiol concentrations between 0.022 and 0.066 nmol/L doubled the risk (relative risk 2.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.97-5.19) of fall-related limb fracture compared to the women with estradiol concentrations ()above 0.066 nmol/L. Adjustment for muscle strength and bone mineral density did not materially change the risk estimates. High muscle strength was associated with a low incidence of fall-related limb fractures. This study showed that in 75-year-old women higher serum estradiol concentration and greater muscle strength were independently associated with a low incidence of fall-related limb fractures even after adjustment for bone density. Our results suggest that hormonal status and muscle strength have their own separate mechanisms protecting from fall-related fractures. This finding is of importance in developing preventive strategies, but calls for further study.

  2. Dairy product consumption and risk of hip fracture: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Shanshan; Hu, Jingmin; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Yunguo; Yu, Miaohui; Ma, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Background Dairy product consumption may affect the risk of hip fracture, but previous studies have reported inconsistent findings. The primary aim of our meta-analysis was to examine and quantify the potential association of dairy product consumption with risk of hip fracture. Methods We searched the databases of PubMed and EMBASE for relevant articles from their inception through April 17, 2017. The final analysis included 10 cohort studies and 8 case-control studies. Random-effects models ...

  3. Use of anti-depressants and the risk of fracture of the hip or femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brand, M W M; Pouwels, S; Samson, M M; van Staa, T P; Thio, B; Cooper, C; Leufkens, H G M; Egberts, A C G; Verhaar, H J J; de Vries, F

    2009-10-01

    Anti-depressants are used largely, but have serious side effects. We show that both selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic anti-depressants (TCAs) increase the risk of hip/femur fracture and that this risk is time related and depends on the degree of serotonin transporter inhibition. This should be considered when prescribing anti-depressants to patients. Anti-depressants are known to have serious side effects. We examined the association between the use of anti-depressants and the risk of hip/femur fractures with a special focus on the relation with the degree of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter (5-HTT) inhibition and the duration of use. A case-control study was conducted within the Dutch PHARMO-RLS database. Cases (n = 6,763) were adult patients with a first hip/femur fracture during the study period. For each case, four controls (n = 26341) were matched by age, gender and geographic region. The risk of hip/femur fracture increased with current use of SSRIs (adjusted odds ratio (OR(adj)) 2.35 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.94-2.84]) and TCAs (ORadj 1.76 [95% CI 1.45-2.15]). The risk of hip/femur fracture declined rapidly after discontinuation of use. The risk of hip/femur fracture increased as the degree of 5-HTT inhibition of all anti-depressants increased from OR(adj) 1.64 [95% CI 1.14-2.35] for drugs with low 5-HTT inhibition to OR(adj) 2.31 [95% CI 1.94-2.76] for those with high 5-HTT inhibiting properties. Current use of both SSRIs and TCAs increase hip/femur fracture risk. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanistic pathways and the relation with the underlying pathophysiology. Until then, the elevated fracture risk should be considered when prescribing anti-depressants.

  4. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and risk of fractures in French older persons.

    OpenAIRE

    Feart , Catherine; Lorrain , Simon; Ginder Coupez , Vanessa; Samieri , Cécilia; Letenneur , Luc; Paineau , Damien; Barberger-Gateau , Pascale

    2013-01-01

    International audience; UNLABELLED: Prevention of fractures is a considerable public health challenge. In a population-based cohort of French elderly people, a diet closer to a Mediterranean type had a borderline significant deleterious effect on the risk of fractures, in part linked to a low consumption of dairy products and a high consumption of fruits. INTRODUCTION: Higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) is linked to a lower risk of several chronic diseases, but its association ...

  5. High-Strain Rate Failure Modeling Incorporating Shear Banding and Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-22

    High Strain Rate Failure Modeling Incorporating Shear Banding and Fracture The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT 6. AUTHORS...Report as of 05-Dec-2017 Agreement Number: W911NF-13-1-0238 Organization: Columbia University Title: High Strain Rate Failure Modeling Incorporating

  6. Calcium intake and risk of fracture: systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Bolland, Mark J; Leung, William; Tai, Vicky; Bastin, Sonja; Gamble, Greg D; Grey, Andrew; Reid, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the evidence underpinning recommendations to increase calcium intake through dietary sources or calcium supplements to prevent fractures. Design Systematic review of randomised controlled trials and observational studies of calcium intake with fracture as an endpoint. Results from trials were pooled with random effects meta-analyses. Data sources Ovid Medline, Embase, PubMed, and references from relevant systematic reviews. Initial searches undertaken in July 2013 and upd...

  7. Risk of fracture with thiazolidinediones: an individual patient data meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marloes T Bazelier

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs has been associated with increased fracture risks. Our aim was to estimate the risk of fracture with TZDs in three different healthcare registries, using exactly the same study design, and to perform an individual patient data meta-analysis of these three studies. Methods: Population-based cohort studies were performed utilizing the British General Practice Research Database (GPRD, the Dutch PHARMO Record Linkage System, and the Danish National Health Registers. In all three databases, the exposed cohort consisted of all patients (aged 18+ with at least one prescription of antidiabetic (AD medication. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs of fracture. The total period of follow-up for each patient was divided into periods of current exposure and past exposure, with patients moving between current and past use.Results: In all three registries, the risk of fracture was increased for women who were exposed to TZDs: HR 1.48 [1.37-1.60] in GPRD, HR 1.35 [1.15-1.58] in PHARMO and HR 1.22 [1.03-1.44] in Denmark. Combining the data in an individual patient data meta-analysis resulted, for women, in a 1.4-fold increased risk of any fracture for current TZD users versus other AD drug users (adj. HR 1.44 [1.35-1.53]. For men, there was no increased fracture risk (adj. HR 1.05 [0.96-1.14]. Risks were increased for fractures of the radius/ulna, humerus, tibia/fibula, ankle and foot, but not for hip/femur or vertebral fractures. Current TZD users with more than 25 TZD presciptions ever before had a 1.6-fold increased risk of fracture compared with other AD drug users (HR 1.59 [1.46-1.74].Conclusion: In this study, we consistently found a 1.2- to 1.5-fold increased risk of fractures for women using TZDs, but not for men, across three different healthcare registries. TZD users had an increased risk for fractures of the extremities, and risks further increased for prolonged users

  8. Celiac Disease Does Not Influence Fracture Risk in Young Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Norelle R; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Mollazadegan, Kaziwe; Michaëlsson, Karl; Green, Peter HR; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the risk of any fractures in patients with both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CD) vs patients with T1D only. Study design We performed a population-based cohort study. We defined T1D as individuals aged ≤30 years who had a diagnosis of diabetes recorded in the Swedish National Patient Register between 1964–2009. Individuals with CD were identified through biopsy report data between 1969–2008 from any of Sweden’s 28 pathology departments. Some 958 individuals had both T1D and CD and were matched for sex, age and calendar period with 4,598 reference individuals with T1D only. We then used a stratified Cox regression analysis, where CD was modeled as a time-dependent covariate, to estimate the risk of any fractures and osteoporotic fractures (hip, distal forearm, thoracic and lumbar spine, and proximal humerus) in patients with both T1D and CD compared with that in patients with T1D only. Results During follow-up, 12 patients with T1D and CD had a fracture (1 osteoporotic fracture). CD did not influence the risk of any fracture (adjusted Hazard Ratio=0.77; 95%CI=0.42–1.41) or osteoporotic fractures (adjusted Hazard Ratio=0.46; 95%CI=0.06–3.51) in patients with T1D. Stratification for time since CD diagnosis did not affect risk estimates. Conclusion Having a diagnosis of CD does not seem to influence fracture risk in young patients with T1D. Follow-up in this study was, however, too short to ascertain osteoporotic fractures which traditionally occur in old age. PMID:26589343

  9. Physical activity in middle-aged women and hip fracture risk: the UFO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, U; Nordström, P; Nilsson, J; Bucht, G; Björnstig, U; Hallmans, G; Svensson, O; Pettersson, U

    2011-02-01

    In a population-based case-control study, we demonstrate that middle-aged women who were active with walking or in different physical spare time activities were at lower risk of later sustaining a hip fracture compared to more sedentary women. In middle-aged women participating in the Umeå Fracture and Osteoporosis (UFO) study, we investigated whether physical activity is associated with a subsequent decreased risk of sustaining a hip fracture. The UFO study is a nested case-control study investigating associations between bone markers, lifestyle, and osteoporotic fractures. We identified 81 female hip fracture cases that had reported lifestyle data before they sustained their fracture. Each case was compared with two female controls who were identified from the same cohort and matched for age and week of reporting data, yielding a total cohort of 237 subjects. Mean age at baseline was 57.2 ± 5.0 years, and mean age at fracture was 65.4 ± 6.4 years. Conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustments for height, weight, smoking, and menopausal status showed that subjects who were regularly active with walking or had a moderate or high frequency of physical spare time activities (i.e. berry/mushroom picking and snow shovelling) were at reduced risk of sustaining a hip fracture (OR 0.14; 95% CI; 0.05-0.53 for walking and OR 0.19; 95% CI; 0.08-0.46, OR 0.17, 95% CI; 0.05-0.64 for moderate and high frequency of spare time activities, respectively) compared to more sedentary women. An active lifestyle in middle age seems to reduce the risk of future hip fracture. Possible mechanisms may include improved muscle strength, coordination, and balance resulting in a decreased risk of falling and perhaps also direct skeletal benefits.

  10. Psychotropic drugs and the risk of fractures in old age: a prospective population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurminen, Janne; Puustinen, Juha; Piirtola, Maarit; Vahlberg, Tero; Kivelä, Sirkka-Liisa

    2010-07-06

    There is evidence that the use of any psychotropic and the concomitant use of two or more benzodiazepines are related to an increased risk of fractures in old age. However, also controversial results exist. The aim was to describe associations between the use of a psychotropic drug, or the concomitant use of two or more of these drugs and the risk of fractures in a population aged 65 years or over. This study was a part of a prospective longitudinal population-based study carried out in the municipality of Lieto, South-Western Finland. The objective was to describe gender-specific associations between the use of one psychotropic drug [benzodiazepine (BZD), antipsychotic (AP) or antidepressant (AD)] or the concomitant use of two or more psychotropic drugs and the risk of fractures in a population 65 years or over. Subjects were participants in the first wave of the Lieto study in 1990-1991, and they were followed up until the end of 1996. Information about fractures confirmed with radiology reports in 1,177 subjects (482 men and 695 women) during the follow-up was collected from medical records. Two follow-up periods (three and six years) were used, and previously found risk factors of fractures were adjusted as confounding factors separately for men and women. The Poisson regression model was used in the analyses. The concomitant use of two or more BZDs and the concomitant use of two or more APs were related to an increased risk of fractures during both follow-up periods after adjusting for confounding factors in men. No similar associations were found in women. The concomitant use of several BZDs and that of several APs are associated with an increase in the risk of fractures in older men. Our findings show only risk relations. We cannot draw the conclusion that these drug combinations are causes of fractures.

  11. Tobacco smoking and risk of hip fracture in men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høidrup, S; Prescott, E; Sørensen, T I

    2000-01-01

    population studies conducted in Copenhagen with detailed information on smoking habit. A total of 13,393 women and 17,379 men, initially examined between 1964 and 1992, were followed until 1997 for first admission due to hip fracture. The relative risks (RR) of hip fracture associated with smoking were......BACKGROUND: Previous findings suggest that tobacco smoking increases the risk of hip fracture in women. A similar adverse effect of smoking is suspected to be present in men, but bone mineral density studies have raised the concern that men may be more sensitive to the deleterious effect of smoking...... on bone than women. In this study we prospectively determined the influence of current, previous, and cumulative smoking history on risk of hip fracture in men and women and addressed the issue of possible gender difference in the susceptibility to tobacco smoking. METHODS: Pooled data from three...

  12. Osteoporosis among Fallers without Concomitant Fracture Identified in an Emergency Department: Frequencies and Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Hesse, Ulrik; Houe, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    aged 50-80 years sustaining a low-energy fall without fracture were identified from an ED (n = 199). Patients answered a questionnaire on risk factors and underwent osteodensitometry. Data was compared to a group of patients routinely referred to osteodensitometry from general practice (n = 201......). Results. Among the 199 included fallers, 41 (21%) had osteoporosis. Among these, 35 (85%) reported either previous fracture or reduced body height (>3¿cm). These two risk factors were more frequent among fallers with osteoporosis compared to fallers with normal bone mineral density or osteopenia (previous...... if the patient has a prior fracture or declined body height. Since fallers generally have higher fracture risk, the ED might serve as an additional entrance to osteodensitometry compared to referral from primary care....

  13. On the spillover of exchange rate risk into default risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božović Miloš

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the exchange-rate risk, banks in emerging markets are typically denominating their loans in foreign currencies. However, in the event of a substantial depreciation of the local currency, the payment ability of a foreign-currency borrower may be reduced significantly, exposing the lender to additional default risk. This paper analyses how the exchange-rate risk of foreign currency loans spills over into default risk. We show that in an economy where foreign currency loans are a dominant source of financing economic activity, depreciation of the local currency establishes a negative feedback mechanism that leads to higher default probabilities, reduced credit supply, and reduced growth. This finding has some important implications that may be of special interest for regulators and market participants in emerging economies.

  14. Hip fracture risk and different gene polymorphisms in the turkish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan Dinçel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to discuss the risk assessments for both patients with hip fractures due to fall-related, low energy traumas and non-fractured control patients by examining bone mineral density and genetic data, two features associated with femoral strength and hip fracture risk. METHODS: Twenty-one osteoporotic patients with proximal femur fractures and non-fractured, osteoporotic, age- and gender-matched controls were included in the study. Bone mineral density measurements were performed with a Lunar DXA. The COL1A1, ESR, VDR, IL-6, and OPG genes were amplified, and labeling of specific gene sequences was performed in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction using the osteo/check PCR kit from the whole blood of all subjects. RESULTS: The bone mineral density (trochanteric and total bone mineral density values of the fracture group was significantly decreased relative to the control group. We were not able to conduct statistical tests for the polymorphisms of the COL1A1, ESR, and VDR genes because our results were expressed in terms of frequency. Although they were not significant, we did examine differences in the IL-6 and OPG genes polymorphisms between the two groups. We concluded that increasing the number of cases will allow us to evaluate racial differences in femoral hip fracture risk by genotypes.

  15. Vitamin D and Fracture Risk in Early Childhood: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Laura N.; Heong, Sze Wing; Chen, Yang; Thorpe, Kevin E.; Adeli, Khosrow; Howard, Andrew; Sochett, Etienne; Birken, Catherine S.; Parkin, Patricia C.; Maguire, Jonathon L.; Abdullah, Kawsari; Anderson, Laura N.; Birken, Catherine S.; Borkhoff, Cornelia M.; Carsley, Sarah; Chen, Yang; Katz-Lavigne, Mikael; Kavikondala, Kanthi; Kowal, Christine; Maguire, Jonathon L.; Mason, Dalah; Omand, Jessica; Parkin, Patricia C.; Persaud, Navindra; van den Heuvel, Meta; Baker, Jillian; Barozzino, Tony; Bonifacio, Joey; Campbell, Douglas; Cheema, Sohail; Chisamore, Brian; Danayan, Karoon; Das, Paul; Derocher, Mary Beth; Do, Anh; Dorey, Michael; Freeman, Sloane; Fung, Keewai; Guiang, Charlie; Handford, Curtis; Hatch, Hailey; Jacobson, Sheila; Kiran, Tara; Knowles, Holly; Kwok, Bruce; Lakhoo, Sheila; Lam-Antoniades, Margarita; Lau, Eddy; Leung, Fok-Han; Loo, Jennifer; Mahmoud, Sarah; Moodie, Rosemary; Morinis, Julia; Naymark, Sharon; Neelands, Patricia; Owen, James; Peer, Michael; Perlmutar, Marty; Persaud, Navindra; Pinto, Andrew; Porepa, Michelle; Ramji, Nasreen; Ramji, Noor; Rosenthal, Alana; Saunderson, Janet; Saxena, Rahul; Sgro, Michael; Shepherd, Susan; Smiltnieks, Barbara; Taylor, Carolyn; Weisdors, Thea; Wijayasinghe, Sheila; Wong, Peter; Ying, Ethel; Young, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of vitamin D intake and serum levels with fracture risk in children under 6 years of age. A case-control study was conducted in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Cases were recruited from the fracture clinic at the Hospital for Sick Children, and matched controls were obtained from the TARGet Kids! primary-care research network. Controls were matched to cases on age, sex, height, and season. Fracture risk was estimated from conditional logistic regression, with adjustment for skin type, fracture history, waist circumference, outdoor free play, neighborhood income, soda consumption, and child's birth weight. A total of 206 cases were recruited during May 2009–April 2013 and matched to 343 controls. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration (per 10-nmol/L increment: adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88, 1.03) and intake of cow's milk (2 cups/day vs. 2 cups/day: aOR = 1.39 (95% CI: 0.85, 2.23)) were not significantly associated with reduced odds of fracture. A statistically significant association was observed between child use of vitamin D supplements and decreased odds of fracture (yes vs. no: aOR = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.25, 0.69). Vitamin D supplementation, but not serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level or milk intake, was associated with reduced fracture risk among these healthy young children. PMID:28459987

  16. Pilot case-control investigation of risk factors for hip fractures in the urban Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhotra Nidhi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the reported high prevalence of osteoporosis in India, there have been no previous studies examining the risk factors for hip fracture in the Indian population. Methods We carried out a case control investigation comprising 100 case subjects (57 women and 43 men admitted with a first hip fracture into one of three hospitals across New Delhi. The 100 controls were age and sex matched subjects who were either healthy visitors not related to the case patients or hospital staff. Information from all subjects was obtained through a questionnaire based interview. Results There was a significant increase in the number of cases of hip fracture with increasing age. There were significantly more women (57% than men (43%. Univariate analysis identified protective effects for increased activity, exercise, calcium and vitamin supplements, almonds, fish, paneer (cottage cheese, curd (plain yogurt, and milk. However, tea and other caffeinated beverages were significant risk factors. In women, hormone/estrogen therapy appeared to have a marginal protective effect. For all cases, decreased agility, visual impairment, long term medications, chronic illnesses increased the risk of hip fracture. The multivariate analysis confirmed a protective effect of increased activity and also showed a decrease in hip fracture risk with increasing body mass index (odds ratio (OR 0.024, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.006-0.10 & OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68-0.97 respectively. Individuals who take calcium supplements have a decreased risk of hip fracture (OR 0.076; CI 0.017-0.340, as do individuals who eat fish (OR 0.094; CI 0.020-0.431, and those who eat paneer (OR 0.152; 0.031-0.741. Tea drinkers have a higher risk of hip fracture (OR 22.8; 95% CI 3.73-139.43. Difficulty in getting up from a chair also appears to be an important risk factor for hip fractures (OR 14.53; 95% CI 3.86-54.23. Conclusions In the urban Indian population, dietary calcium, vitamin D

  17. Prevalence of and risk factors for osteoporosis and fracture among a male HIV-infected population in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Charlotte-Eve S; Shaw, Simon G; Fisher, Martin J; Walker-Bone, Karen; Gilleece, Yvonne C

    2014-02-01

    Rates of osteoporosis and fracture may be increased in HIV but there are few UK data. Our aim was to examine the prevalence of and risk factors for osteoporosis and fractures among a homogeneous cohort of well-characterized HIV-infected men. In total, 168 men were recruited, median age 45 years, 37 combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) naïve, 46 with exposed longer term (median >10 years). All participants provided information on bone health and underwent DEXA scanning. Osteopenia was found in 58% of subjects and osteoporosis in 12%; 14% reported fractures since HIV diagnosis. Number of fractures since HIV diagnosis was significantly increased among those with osteoporosis (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.2-10.4, p = 0.018). Duration of infection greater than 13 years was significantly associated with osteoporosis. Duration of cART was associated in univariate but not multivariate analyses. Strategies to prevent osteoporosis and fractures in HIV will require attention to viral and lifestyle factors and not just cART.

  18. Risk Factors for Pelvic Insufficiency Fractures in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Following Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramlov, Anne, E-mail: anraml@rm.dk [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Pedersen, Erik Morre; Røhl, Lisbeth [Department of Radiotherapy, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Worm, Esben [Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Fokdal, Lars; Lindegaard, Jacob Chr. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Tanderup, Kari [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of and risk factors for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF) after definitive chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 101 patients with LACC treated from 2008-2014. Patients received weekly cisplatin and underwent external beam radiation therapy with 45 Gy in 25 fractions (node-negative patients) or 50 Gy in 25 fractions with a simultaneous integrated boost of 60 Gy in 30 fractions (node-positive patients). Pulsed dose rate magnetic resonance imaging guided adaptive brachytherapy was given in addition. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging was performed routinely at 3 and 12 months after the end of treatment or based on clinical indication. PIF was defined as a fracture line with or without sclerotic changes in the pelvic bones. D{sub 50%} and V{sub 55Gy} were calculated for the os sacrum and jointly for the os ileum and pubis. Patient- and treatment-related factors including dose were analyzed for correlation with PIF. Results: The median follow-up period was 25 months. The median age was 50 years. In 20 patients (20%), a median of 2 PIFs (range, 1-3 PIFs) were diagnosed; half were asymptomatic. The majority of the fractures were located in the sacrum (77%). Age was a significant risk factor (P<.001), and the incidence of PIF was 4% and 37% in patients aged ≤50 years and patients aged >50 years, respectively. Sacrum D{sub 50%} was a significant risk factor in patients aged >50 years (P=.04), whereas V{sub 55Gy} of the sacrum and V{sub 55Gy} of the pelvic bones were insignificant (P=.33 and P=.18, respectively). A dose-effect curve for sacrum D{sub 50%} in patients aged >50 years showed that reduction of sacrum D{sub 50%} from 40 Gy{sub EQD2} to 35 Gy{sub EQD2} reduces PIF risk from 45% to 22%. Conclusions: PIF is common after treatment of LACC and is mainly seen in patients aged >50 years. Our data indicate that PIFs are not related to lymph node

  19. Extra virgin olive oil consumption reduces the risk of osteoporotic fractures in the PREDIMED trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gavilán, J F; Bulló, M; Canudas, S; Martínez-González, M A; Estruch, R; Giardina, S; Fitó, M; Corella, D; Ros, E; Salas-Salvadó, J

    2018-02-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic fractures is lower in countries in the Mediterranean basin. Virgin olive oil, a key component of the Mediterranean Diet (MDiet), with recognised beneficial effects on metabolism and cardiovascular health, may decrease the risk of osteoporotic fractures. The aim to this study was to explore the effect of chronic consumption of total olive oil and its varieties on the risk of osteoporosis-related fractures in a middle-aged and elderly Mediterranean population. We included all participants (n = 870) recruited in the Reus (Spain) centre of the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) trial. Individuals, aged 55-80 years at high cardiovascular risk, were randomized to a MedDiet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, a MedDiet supplemented with nuts, or a low-fat diet. The present analysis was an observational cohort study nested in the trial. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary habits and olive oil consumption. Information on total osteoporotic fractures was obtained from a systematic review of medical records. The association between yearly repeated measurements of olive oil consumption and fracture risk was assessed by multivariate Cox proportional hazards. We documented 114 incident cases of osteoporosis-related fractures during a median follow-up of 8.9 years. Treatment allocation had no effect on fracture risk. Participants in the highest tertile of extra-virgin olive oil consumption had a 51% lower risk of fractures (HR:0.49; 95% CI:0.29-0.81. P for trend = 0.004) compared to those in the lowest tertile after adjusting for potential confounders. Total and common olive oil consumption was not associated with fracture risk. Higher consumption of extra-virgin olive oil is associated with a lower risk of osteoporosis-related fractures in middle-aged and elderly Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and

  20. Risk assessment tools to identify women with increased risk of osteoporotic fracture. Complexity or simplicity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, Katrine Hass; Friis-Holmberg, Teresa; Hermann, Anne Pernille

    2013-01-01

    A huge number of risk assessment tools have been developed. Far from all have been validated in external studies, more of them have absence of methodological and transparent evidence and few are integrated in national guidelines. Therefore, we performed a systematic review to provide an overview...... of existing valid and reliable risk assessment tools for prediction of osteoporotic fractures. Additionally, we aimed to determine if the performance each tool was sufficient for practical use and lastly to examine whether the complexity of the tools influenced their discriminative power. We searched Pub......Med, Embase and Cochrane databases for papers and evaluated these with respect to methodological quality using the QUADAS checklist. A total of 48 tools were identified, 20 had been externally validated, however only 6 tools had been tested more than once in a population-based setting with acceptable...

  1. Intertrochanteric fractures in elderly high risk patients treated with Ender nails and compression screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangadharan Sidhartha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ender and Simon Weidner popularized the concept of closed condylocephlic nailing for intertrochanteric fractures in 1970. The clinical experience of authors revealed that Ender nailing alone cannot provide secure fixation in elderly patients with osteoporosis. Hence we conducted a study to evaluate the efficacy of a combined fixation procedure using Ender nails and a cannulated compression screw for intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: 76 patients with intertrochanteric fractures were treated using intramedullary Ender nails and cannulated compression screw from January 2004 to December 2007. The mean age of the patients was 80 years (range 70-105 years.Using the Evan′s system of classification 49 were stable and 27 unstable fractures. Inclusion criteria was high risk elderly patients (age > 70 years with intertrochanteric fracture. The exclusion criteria included patients with pressure sores over the trochanteric region. Many patients had pre-existing co-morbidities like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, COPD, ischemic heart disease, CVA and coronary artery bypass surgery. The two Ender nails of 4.5mm each were passed across the fracture site into the proximal neck. This was reinforced with a 6.5 mm cannulated compression screw passed from the sub trochanteric region, across the fracture into the head. Results: The mean follow-up was 14 months (range 9-19 months Average time to fracture union was 10 weeks (range 6-16 weeks. The mean knee ROM was 130o (± 5o. There was no case of nail penetration into hip joint. In five cases with advanced osteoporosis there was minimal migration of Ender nails distally. Conclusions: The Ender nailing combined with compression screw fixation in cases of intertrochanteric fractures in high risk elderly patients could achieve reliable fracture stability with minimal complications.

  2. Can paramedics use FRAX (the WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) to help GPs improve future fracture risk in patients who fall? Protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Shane; Bradley, Rachel; Simmonds, Bethany; Salisbury, Chris; Benger, Jonathan; Marques, Elsa; Greenwood, Rosemary; Shepstone, Lee; Robinson, Maria; Appleby-Fleming, John; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2014-09-03

    Currently identification, and therefore, management of patients at risk of osteoporotic fracture in the UK is suboptimal. As the majority of patients who fracture have fallen, it follows that people who fall can usefully be targeted in any programme that aims to reduce osteoporotic fracture. Targeting vulnerable patients who are likely to benefit from intervention may help shift the management of fracture prevention into primary care, away from emergency departments. Paramedics who attend to patients who have fallen may be well placed to assess future fracture risk, using the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) and communicate that information directly to general practitioners (GPs). This feasibility study takes the form of a pragmatic, randomised controlled trial aimed at exploring and refining issues of study design, recruitment, retention, sample size and acceptability preceding a large-scale study with fracture as the end point. Patients (aged >50) who fall, call an ambulance, are attended by a study paramedic and give verbal consent will be asked FRAX and fall questions. Patients who subsequently formally consent to participation will be randomised to control (usual care) or intervention groups. Intervention will constitute transmission of calculated future fracture risk to the patients' GP with suitable, evidence-based recommendations for investigation or treatment. 3 months after the index fall, data (proportion of patients in each group undergoing investigation or starting new treatment, quality of life and health economic) will be collected and analysed using descriptive statistics. A nested qualitative study will explore issues of acceptability and study design with patients, paramedics and GPs. This protocol was approved by NRES Committee South Central Oxford C in October 2012. Research Ethics Committee ref.12/SC/0604. The study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and local public events. A publication

  3. Inhibitors of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and risk of fracture among older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K A; Andrade, S E; Boles, M; Buist, D S; Chase, G A; Donahue, J G; Goodman, M J; Gurwitz, J H; LaCroix, A Z; Platt, R

    2000-06-24

    Inhibitors of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (statins) increase new bone formation in rodents and in human cells in vitro. Statin use is associated with increased bone mineral density of the femoral neck. We undertook a population-based case-control study at six health-maintenance organisations in the USA to investigate further the relation between statin use and fracture risk among older women. We investigated women aged 60 years or older. Exposure, outcome, and confounder information was obtained from automated claims and pharmacy data from October, 1994, to September, 1997. Cases had an incident diagnosis of non-pathological fracture of the hip, humerus, distal tibia, wrist, or vertebrae between October, 1996, and September, 1997. Controls had no fracture during this period. We excluded women with records of dispensing of drugs to treat osteoporosis. There were 928 cases and 2747 controls. Compared with women who had no record of statin dispensing during the previous 2 years, women with 13 or more statin dispensings during this period had a decreased risk of non-pathological fracture (odds ratio 0.48 [95% CI 0.27-0.83]) after adjustment for age, number of hospital admissions during the previous year, chronic disease score, and use of non-statin lipid-lowering drugs. No association was found between fracture risk and fewer than 13 dispensings of statins or between fracture risk and use of non-statin lipid-lowering drugs. Statins seem to be protective against non-pathological fracture among older women. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that statins increase bone mineral density in human beings and thereby decrease the risk of osteoporotic fractures.

  4. Improvement in spine bone density and reduction in risk of vertebral fractures during treatment with antiresorptive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Steven R; Karpf, David B; Harris, Fran; Genant, Harry K; Ensrud, Kristine; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Black, Dennis M

    2002-03-01

    To estimate how much the improvement in bone mass accounts for the reduction in risk of vertebral fracture that has been observed in randomized trials of antiresorptive treatments for osteoporosis. After a systematic search, we conducted a meta-analysis of 12 trials to describe the relation between improvement in spine bone mineral density and reduction in risk of vertebral fracture in postmenopausal women. We also used logistic models to estimate the proportion of the reduction in risk of vertebral fracture observed with alendronate in the Fracture Intervention Trial that was due to improvement in bone mineral density. Across the 12 trials, a 1% improvement in spine bone mineral density was associated with a 0.03 decrease (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.02 to 0.05) in the relative risk (RR) of vertebral fracture. The reductions in risk were greater than predicted from improvement in bone mineral density; for example, the model estimated that treatments predicted to reduce fracture risk by 20% (RR = 0.80), based on improvement in bone mineral density, actually reduce the risk of fracture by about 45% (RR = 0.55). In the Fracture Intervention Trial, improvement in spine bone mineral density explained 16% (95% CI: 11% to 27%) of the reduction in the risk of vertebral fracture with alendronate. Improvement in spine bone mineral density during treatment with antiresorptive drugs accounts for a predictable but small part of the observed reduction in the risk of vertebral fracture.

  5. Fracture History in Osteoporosis: Risk Factors and its Effect on Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Kuru

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fractures are one of the main outcomes in osteoporosis and have an important effect on the general health status. Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of major fracture history on quality of life. We also investigated the important risk factors and their effect on bone mineral density and fracture history. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: We recruited 105 patients who were admitted to an osteoporosis outpatient clinic. Medical history, family history, calcium intake, physical activity level and biochemical tests were evaluated. Lumbar spine and femur neck bone mineral density were measured. The Qualeffo- 41 questionnaire was also used for evaluating quality of life. Results: The average age of the 105 patients included in the study was 56.04±13.73 and 89% of them were post-menopausal women. The average body mass index was 26.84±5.99, which means that the women were overweight. Also, 48.5% of the patients were diagnosed with osteoporosis and 51.5% of them were diagnosed as low bone density. A total of 34 patients had a fracture history with minor trauma and some of the patients had more than one fracture (12 ankle and foot, 10 forearm, 9 vertebral, 4 hand, 3 hip, 2 rib, 1 tibial. When the patients with and without fracture history were compared, the mean Qualeffo-41 score in patients with fracture was 43.85±2.57 and in the non-fracture group was 36.27±2.01. Conclusion: Forearm, ankle and foot fractures can be commonly seen in osteoporosis patients with fracture history. We suggest that it is important to recognise osteoporosis prior to first fracture and disease-specific quality of life assessment should be done.

  6. Fracture history in osteoporosis: risk factors and its effect on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, Pınar; Akyüz, Gülseren; Cerşit, Hülya Peynirci; Çelenlioğlu, Alp Eren; Cumhur, Ahmet; Biricik, Şefikcan; Kozan, Seda; Gökşen, Aylin; Özdemir, Mikail; Lüleci, Emel

    2014-12-01

    Fractures are one of the main outcomes in osteoporosis and have an important effect on the general health status. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of major fracture history on quality of life. We also investigated the important risk factors and their effect on bone mineral density and fracture history. Cross-sectional study. We recruited 105 patients who were admitted to an osteoporosis outpatient clinic. Medical history, family history, calcium intake, physical activity level and biochemical tests were evaluated. Lumbar spine and femur neck bone mineral density were measured. The Qualeffo-41 questionnaire was also used for evaluating quality of life. The average age of the 105 patients included in the study was 56.04±13.73 and 89% of them were post-menopausal women. The average body mass index was 26.84±5.99, which means that the women were overweight. Also, 48.5% of the patients were diagnosed with osteoporosis and 51.5% of them were diagnosed as low bone density. A total of 34 patients had a fracture history with minor trauma and some of the patients had more than one fracture (12 ankle and foot, 10 forearm, 9 vertebral, 4 hand, 3 hip, 2 rib, 1 tibial). When the patients with and without fracture history were compared, the mean Qualeffo-41 score in patients with fracture was 43.85±2.57 and in the non-fracture group was 36.27±2.01. Forearm, ankle and foot fractures can be commonly seen in osteoporosis patients with fracture history. We suggest that it is important to recognise osteoporosis prior to first fracture and disease-specific quality of life assessment should be done.

  7. 13 CFR 120.1015 - Risk Rating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Risk Rating System. 120.1015 Section 120.1015 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1015 Risk Rating System. (a) Risk Rating. SBA may assign a Risk Rating...

  8. Risk factors for equine fractures in Thoroughbred flat racing in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Stamatis Panagiotis; Parkin, Tim D H

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify risk factors associated with equine fractures in flat horse racing of Thoroughbreds in North America. Equine fractures were defined as any fracture sustained by a horse during a race. This was a cohort study that made use of all starts from the racecourses reporting injuries. The analysis was based on 2,201,152 racing starts that represent 91% of all official racing starts in the USA and Canada from 1st January 2009-31st December 2014. Approximately 3,990,000 workout starts made by the 171,523 Thoroughbreds that raced during that period were also included in the analysis. During this period the incidence of equine fractures was 2 per 1000 starts. The final multivariable logistic regression models identified risk factors significantly associated (pfracture. For example, horses were found to have a 32% higher chance of sustaining a fracture when racing on a dirt surface compared to a synthetic surface; a 35% higher chance if they had sustained a previous injury during racing and a 47% higher chance was also found for stallions compared to mares and geldings. Furthermore, logistic regression models based on data available only from the period 2009-2013 were used to predict the probability of a Thoroughbred sustaining a fracture for 2014. The 5% of starts that had the highest score in our predictive models for 2014 were found to have 2.4 times (95% CI: 1.9-2.9) higher fracture prevalence than the mean fracture prevalence of 2014. The results of this study can be used to identify horses at higher risk on entering a race and could help inform the design and implementation of preventive measures aimed at minimising the number of Thoroughbreds sustaining fractures during racing in North America. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Calcaneal Fractures in Non-Racing Dogs and Cats: Complications, Outcome, and Associated Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Karen L; Adams, Robert J; Woods, Samantha; Bruce, Mieghan

    2017-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of complications and describe the outcome associated with calcaneal fractures in non-racing dogs and in cats. Retrospective multicenter clinical cohort study. Medical records of client-owned dogs and cats (2004-2013). Medical records were searched and 50 animals with calcaneal fractures were included for analysis. Complications were recorded and an outcome score applied to each fracture. Associations between putative risk factors and both major complications, and final outcome scores were explored. Complications occurred in 27/50 fractures (61%) including 23 major and 4 minor complications. At final follow-up, 4 animals (10%) were sound, 27 (64%) had either intermittent or consistent mild weight-bearing lameness, 7 (17%) had moderate weight-bearing lameness, and 1 (2%) had severe weight-bearing lameness. Fractures managed using plates and screws had a lower risk of complications than fractures managed using pin and tension band wire, lag or positional screws or a combination of these techniques (Relative risk 0.16, 95% CI 0.02-1.02, P=.052). Non-sighthounds had reduced odds of a poorer outcome score than sighthounds (Odds ratio 0.11, 95% CI 0.02-0.50, P=.005) and fractures with major complications had 13 times the odds of a poorer outcome score (Odds ratio 13.4, 95% CI 3.6-59.5, Pdogs and in cats, and a poorer outcome score was more likely in animals with complications. A more guarded prognosis should be given to owners of non-racing dogs or cats with calcaneal fractures than previously applied to racing Greyhounds with calcaneal fractures. © 2016 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  10. Study of the effect of moisture content and bending rate on the fracture toughness of rocks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavro, Leona; Souček, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2013), s. 247-253 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : fracture toughness * bending rate * tensile strength Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.667, year: 2013 http://www.irsm.cas.cz/materialy/acta_content/2013_02/acta_170_14_Vavro_Soucek_247-253.pdf

  11. VaR: Exchange Rate Risk and Jump Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen-Ying Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating the Poisson jumps and exchange rate risk, this paper provides an analytical VaR to manage market risk of international portfolios over the subprime mortgage crisis. There are some properties in the model. First, different from past studies in portfolios valued only in one currency, this model considers portfolios not only with jumps but also with exchange rate risk, that is vital for investors in highly integrated global financial markets. Second, in general, the analytical VaR solution is more accurate than historical simulations in terms of backtesting and Christoffersen's independence test (1998 for small portfolios and large portfolios. In other words, the proposed model is reliable not only for a portfolio on specific stocks but also for a large portfolio. Third, the model can be regarded as the extension of that of Kupiec (1999 and Chen and Liao (2009.

  12. Comparison of orally administered bisphosphonate drugs in reducing the risk of hip fracture in older adults: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadarette, Suzanne M; Lévesque, Linda; Mamdani, Muhammad; Perreault, Sylvie; Juurlink, David N; Paterson, J Michael; Carney, Greg; Gunraj, Nadia; Hawker, Gillian A; Tadrous, Mina; Wong, Lindsay; Dormuth, Colin R

    2013-09-01

    Orally administered bisphosphonate drugs (i.e., alendronate, etidronate, risedronate) can reduce the risk of vertebral fracture. However, only alendronate and risedronate have proven efficacy in reducing the risk of hip fracture. We sought to examine the comparative effectiveness of orally administered bisphosphonate drugs in reducing hip fractures among older adults. We identified new users of orally administered bisphosphonate drugs in British Columbia and Ontario between 2001 and 2008. We used province- and sex-specific propensity score-matching strategies to maximize comparability between exposure groups. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compare time-to-hip fracture within 1 year of treatment between exposures by sex in each province. Our secondary analyses considered hip fracture rates within 2 and 3 years' follow-up. We used alendronate as the reference for all comparisons and pooled provincial estimates using random effects variance-weighted meta-analysis. We identified 321 755 patients who were eligible for inclusion in the study. We found little difference in fracture rates between men (pooled hazard ratio [HR] 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74-1.14) or women (pooled HR 1.15, 95% CI 0.73-1.56) taking risedronate and those taking alendronate. We similarly identified little difference in fracture rates between women taking etidronate and those taking alendronate (pooled HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.82-1.18). However, we identified lower rates of hip fracture among men taking etidronate relative to alendronate (pooled HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.60-0.94). Results extended to 2 and 3 years' follow-up were similar. However, with 3 years' follow-up, rates of hip fracture were lower among women in British Columbia who had taken alendronate. We identified little overall difference between alendronate and risedronate in reducing the risk of hip fracture in men or women. Our finding that etidronate is associated with lower fracture risk among men is likely due to

  13. Depression and risk of fracture and bone loss: an updated meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q; Liu, B; Tonmoy, S

    2018-03-12

    This meta-analysis pooled results from 23 qualifying individual cohort studies and found that depression was significantly associated with an increased risk of fractures and bone loss. The association between depression and risk of fracture remains controversial. We conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis to examine the effect of depression on the risk of osteoporotic fractures and bone loss. We searched databases and reviewed citations in relevant articles for eligible cohort studies. Two investigators independently conducted study selection, appraisal, and data abstraction through the use of a standardized protocol. Random effect models were used for meta-analysis. Cochrane Q and I 2 statistics were used to assess heterogeneity. Funnel plots and rank correlation tests were used to evaluate publication bias. Twenty-three studies were included for meta-analysis. In studies that reported hazard ratio (HR) as the outcome (nine studies [n = 309,862]), depression was associated with 26% increase in fracture risk (HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.10-1.43, p meta-analysis having modified inclusion criteria and in different subgroup analyses as well. Significant heterogeneity was observed in the meta-analysis; however, no significant publication bias was detected. Depression is associated with a significant increased risk in fracture and bone loss. Effective prevention may decrease such risk.

  14. Fracture Risk in Type 2 Diabetes: Current Perspectives and Gender Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina T. Russo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is associated with an increased risk of osteoporotic fractures, resulting in disabilities and increased mortality. The pathophysiological mechanisms linking diabetes to osteoporosis have not been fully explained, but alterations in bone structure and quality are well described in diabetic subjects, likely due to a combination of different factors. Insulin deficiency and dysfunction, obesity and hyperinsulinemia, altered level of oestrogen, leptin, and adiponectin as well as diabetes-related complications, especially peripheral neuropathy, orthostatic hypotension, or reduced vision due to retinopathy may all be associated with an impairment in bone metabolism and with the increased risk of fractures. Finally, medications commonly used in the treatment of T2DM may have an impact on bone metabolism and on fracture risk, particularly in postmenopausal women. When considering the impact of hypoglycaemic drugs on bone, it is important to balance their potential direct effects on bone quality with the risk of falling-related fractures due to the associated hypoglycaemic risk. In this review, experimental and clinical evidence connecting bone metabolism and fracture risk to T2DM is discussed, with particular emphasis on hypoglycaemic treatments and gender-specific implications.

  15. Dietary Patterns and Fractures Risk in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Colica

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available PurposeAlthough the role of dietary factors in the prevention of bone loss and fractures has been investigated in many studies, few studies have examined the association between dietary patterns and total body bone density. Our aim was to determine the relations between dietary patterns and whole-body bone mineral density (WB-BMD and the association between dietary patterns, fractures, and multiple fractures in the elderly.MethodsThis cross-sectional study included 177 individuals aged ≥65 years. A dual X-ray absorptiometry scan was performed to measure BMD. Dietary patterns were ascertained by a combination of dietary intake assessment and principal components analysis.ResultsOnly three dietary patterns correlated with whole-body bone density. The multivariate-adjusted mean bone density across tertiles of these dietary patterns showed that the highest tertile of both the patterns 1 and 2 had a significantly higher bone density than the lowest tertile (pattern 1: 1.021 ± 0.01 and 1.070 ± 0.01 g/cm2 for T1 and T3, respectively; p = 0.043; pattern 2: 1.023 ± 0.01, and 1.081 ± 0.01 g/cm2 for T1 and T3, respectively; p = 0.003. We also find significant gender difference in these results. The highest adherence to the dietary pattern 5 was associated with decreased odds of having fractures (OR = 0.20, p = 0.009, and adherence to the pattern 1 was negatively associated with multiple fractures.ConclusionA high adherence to the dietary pattern 1 (high intake of grains, fish and olive oil was associated with a high BMD and a low number of fractures. The highest adherence to the dietary pattern 5 (legumes and wine was associated with decreased odds of having fractures. Our finding would suggest a potential bone-preserving properties of specific dietary patterns in the elderly.

  16. High risk for revision after shoulder arthroplasty for failed osteosynthesis of proximal humeral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Marc Randall; Rasmussen, Jeppe Vejlgaard; Elmengaard, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Background and purpose - It is unclear whether previous osteosynthesis is a risk factor for inferior outcome following shoulder arthroplasty for a proximal humeral fracture. We used data from the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry (DSR) to examine this question. Patients and methods - All 285...... patients treated with a shoulder arthroplasty after failed osteosynthesis of a proximal humeral fracture reported to DSR from 2006 to 2013 were included. Each case was matched with 2 controls (570) treated with a primary shoulder arthroplasty for an acute proximal humeral fracture. Patient reported outcome...... for a shoulder arthroplasty after failed osteosynthesis was 2 with a primary arthroplasty for fracture as reference. In a separate analysis of patients treated by locking plate the mean WOOS was 46 (24), with a relative risk of revision at 1.5 with a primary arthroplasty as reference. Interpretation - Compared...

  17. Dairy product consumption and risk of hip fracture: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Shanshan; Hu, Jingmin; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Yunguo; Yu, Miaohui; Ma, Jie

    2018-01-22

    Dairy product consumption may affect the risk of hip fracture, but previous studies have reported inconsistent findings. The primary aim of our meta-analysis was to examine and quantify the potential association of dairy product consumption with risk of hip fracture. We searched the databases of PubMed and EMBASE for relevant articles from their inception through April 17, 2017. The final analysis included 10 cohort studies and 8 case-control studies. Random-effects models were used to estimate the pooled risk. Subgroup and dose-response analyses were conducted to explore the relationships between the consumption of milk and the risk of hip fracture. After pooling the data from the included studies, the summary relative risk (RR) for hip fracture for highest versus lowest consumption were 0.91 (95% CI: 0.74-1.12), 0.75 (95% CI: 0.66-0.86), 0.68 (95% CI: 0.61-0. 77), 1.02 (95% CI: 0.93-1.12) for milk, yogurt, cheese, and total dairy products in cohort studies, respectively. Higher milk consumption [Odds ratio (OR), 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55-0. 91] was associated with lower risk of hip fracture for highest versus lowest consumption in case-control studies. After quantifying the specific dose of milk, the summary RR/OR for an increased milk consumption of 200 g/day was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.94-1.07), and 0.89 (95%CI: 0.64-1.24) with significant heterogeneity for cohort and case-control studies, respectively; There was a nonlinear association between milk consumption and hip fracture risk in cohort, and case-control studies. Our findings indicate that consumption of yogurt and cheese was associated with lower risk of hip fracture in cohort studies. However, the consumption of total dairy products and cream was not significantly associated with the risk of hip fracture. There was insufficient evidence to deduce the association between milk consumption and risk of hip fracture. A lower threshold of 200 g/day milk intake may have beneficial effects, whereas the effects of a higher

  18. Risk factors for equine fractures in Thoroughbred flat racing in North America

    OpenAIRE

    Georgopoulos, Stamatis Panagiotis; Parkin, Tim D.H.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify risk factors associated with equine fractures in flat horse racing of Thoroughbreds in North America. Equine fractures were defined as any fracture sustained by a horse during a race. This was a cohort study that made use of all starts from the racecourses reporting injuries. The analysis was based on 2,201,152 racing starts that represent 91% of all official racing starts in the USA and Canada from 1 st January 2009–31 st December 2014. Approximately 3,99...

  19. Risk factors for fragility fracture in Seremban district, Malaysia: a comparison of patients with fragility fracture in the orthopedic ward versus those in the outpatient department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keng Yin Loh; King Hock Shong; Soo Nie Lan; Lo, Wan-Yi; Shu Yuen Woon

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a silent disease and becomes clinically significant in the presence of fragility fracture. Identifying risk factors that are associated with osteoporosis in the community is important in reducing the incidence of fragility fracture. The aim of this study is to identify risk factors associated with fragility fracture in the Seremban District of Malaysia. This is a population comparison study between orthopedic ward patients and outpatients attending a community health clinic for 6 months. Epidemiological data and the possible risk factors for osteoporosis were collected by direct interview. This study demonstrates that advancing age, low body weight, smoking, lack of regular exercise, low consumption of calcium containing foods, and using bone depleting drugs (steroids, thyroid hormone, and frusemides) are major risk factors for fragility fracture. Most of these risk factors are modifiable through effective lifestyle intervention.

  20. Fluoride in drinking water and risk of hip fracture in the UK: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, S; Cooper, C; Kellingray, S; Russell, G; Hughes, H; Coggon, D

    2000-01-22

    Although the benefits of water fluoridation for dental health are widely accepted, concerns remain about possible adverse effects, particularly effects on bone. Several investigators have suggested increased rates of hip fracture in places with high concentrations of fluoride in drinking water, but this finding has not been consistent, possibly because of unrecognised confounding effects. We did a case-control study of men and women aged 50 years and older from the English county of Cleveland, and compared patients with hip fracture with community controls. Current addresses were ascertained for all participants; for those who agreed to an interview and who passed a mental test, more detailed information was obtained about lifetime residential history and exposure to other known and suspected risk factors for hip fracture. Exposures to fluoride in water were estimated from the residential histories and from information provided by water suppliers. Analysis was by logistic regression. 914 cases and 1196 controls were identified, of whom 514 and 527, respectively, were interviewed. Among those interviewed, hip fracture was strongly associated with low body-mass index (p for trend water ranged from 0.15 to 1.79 ppm. Current residence in Hartlepool was a good indicator for high lifetime exposure to fluoride. After adjustment for potential confounders, the odds ratio associated with an average lifetime exposure to fluoride > or =0.9 ppm was 1.0 [95% CI 0.7-1.5]. There is a low risk of hip fracture for people ingesting fluoride in drinking water at concentrations of about 1 ppm. This low risk should not be a reason for withholding fluoridation of water supplies.

  1. Milk and other dairy foods and risk of hip fracture in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feskanich, D; Meyer, H E; Fung, T T; Bischoff-Ferrari, H A; Willett, W C

    2018-02-01

    The role of dairy foods for hip fracture prevention remains controversial. In this study, among US men and women, a glass of milk per day was associated with an 8% lower risk of hip fracture. This contrasts with a reported increased risk with higher milk intake in Swedish women. The purpose of this study was to examine whether higher milk and dairy food consumption are associated with risk of hip fracture in older adults following a report of an increased risk for milk in Swedish women. In two US cohorts, 80,600 postmenopausal women and 43,306 men over 50 years of age were followed for up to 32 years. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the relative risks (RR) of hip fracture per daily serving of milk (240 mL) and other dairy foods that were assessed every 4 years, controlling for other dietary intakes, BMI, height, smoking, activity, medications, and disease diagnoses. Two thousand one hundred thirty-eight incident hip fractures were identified in women and 694 in men. Each serving of milk per day was associated with a significant 8% lower risk of hip fracture in men and women combined (RR = 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.87 to 0.97). A suggestive inverse association was found for cheese in women only (RR = 0.91, CI 0.81 to 1.02). Yogurt consumption was low and not associated with risk. Total dairy food intake, of which milk contributed about half, was associated with a significant 6% lower risk of hip fracture per daily serving in men and women (RR = 0.94, CI 0.90 to 0.98). Calcium, vitamin D, and protein from non-dairy sources did not modify the association between milk and hip fracture, nor was it explained by contributions of these nutrients from milk. In this group of older US adults, higher milk consumption was associated with a lower risk of hip fracture.

  2. Hot Tensile and Fracture Behavior of 35CrMo Steel at Elevated Temperature and Strain Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengbing Xiao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the tensile deformation and fracture behavior of 35CrMo steel during hot processing, uniaxial tensile tests at elevated temperatures and strain rates were performed. Effects of deformation condition on the flow behavior, strain rate sensitivity, microstructure transformation, and fracture characteristic were characterized and discussed. The results indicated that the flow stress was sensitive to the deformation condition, and fracture occurs immediately after the peak stress level is reached, especially when the temperature is low or the strain rate is high. The strain rate sensitivity increases with the deformation temperature, which indicates that formability could improve at high temperatures. Photographs showing both the fracture surfaces and the matrix near the fracture section indicated the ductile nature of the material. However, the fracture mechanisms varied according to the deformation condition, which influences the dynamic recrystallization (DRX condition, and the DRX was accompanied by the formation of voids. For samples deformed at high temperatures or low strain rates, coalescence of numerous voids formed in the recrystallized grains is responsible for fracture, while at high strain rates or low temperatures, the grains rupture mainly by splitting because of cracks formed around the inclusions.

  3. Risk factors for decreased range of motion and poor outcomes in open periarticular elbow fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Jonathan F; Wilson, Kevin W; Tintle, Scott M; Heckert, Reed; Gordon, Wade T; D'Alleyrand, Jean-Claude G; Potter, Benjamin K

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors present at the time of injury that predict poor functional outcomes and heterotopic ossification (HO) in open periarticular elbow fractures. We performed a retrospective review of 136 combat-related open elbow fractures from 2003 to 2010. Patient demographics, injury characteristics, treatment variables, and complications were recorded. Functional outcomes were analyzed to determine range of motion (ROM) and Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS). Secondary outcome measures included the development of HO, return to duty, and revision operation. At a median 2.7 years from injury the median MEPS was 67.8 (range 30-100) with an average ulnohumeral arc motion of 89°. Bipolar fractures, with periarticular fractures on both sides of the elbow and at least one side containing intra-articular extension, were independently associated with decreased ulnohumeral motion (p=0.02) and decreased MEPS (pROM included more severe osseous comminution (p=0.001), and increased time to definitive fixation (p=0.03) and HO (p=0.02). More severe soft tissue injury (Gustilo and Anderson fracture type, p=0.02), peripheral nerve injury (p=0.04), and HO (p=0.03) were independently associated with decreased MEPS. HO developed in 65% (89/136) of extremities and was associated with more severe Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) fracture type (p=0.01) and escalating Gustilo and Anderson fracture classification (p=0.049). In the largest series of open elbow fractures, we identified risk factors that portend a poor clinical outcome and decreased ROM. Bipolar elbow fractures, which have not previously been associated with worse results, are particularly prone to decreased ROM and worse outcomes. Prognostic level IV. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Intake of Milk or Fermented Milk Combined With Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Relation to Hip Fracture Rates: A Cohort Study of Swedish Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaëlsson, Karl; Wolk, Alicja; Lemming, Eva Warensjö; Melhus, Håkan; Byberg, Liisa

    2018-03-01

    Milk products may differ in pro-oxidant properties and their effects on fracture risk could potentially be modified by the intake of foods with antioxidant activity. In the population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort study, we aimed to determine how milk and fermented milk combined with fruit and vegetable consumption are associated with hip fracture. Women born in 1914-1948 (n = 61,240) answered food frequency and lifestyle questionnaires in 1987-1990 and 38,071 women contributed with updated information in 1997. During a mean follow-up of 22 years, 5827 women had a hip fracture (ascertained via official register data). Compared with a low intake of milk (yogurt or soured milk) yielded a different pattern with lowest rates of hip fracture in high consumers: HR, 0.81 (95% CI, 0.68 to 0.97) for ≥2 servings/day of fermented milk and ≥5 servings/day of fruits and vegetables compared with low consumption of both fruit and vegetables and fermented milk. We conclude that the amount and type of dairy products as well as fruit and vegetable intake are differentially associated with hip fracture rates in women. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  5. Influence of bone mineral density measurement on fracture risk assessment tool® scores in postmenopausal Indian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daswani, Bhavna; Desai, Meena; Mitra, Sumegha; Gavali, Shubhangi; Patil, Anushree; Kukreja, Subhash; Khatkhatay, M Ikram

    2016-03-01

    Fracture risk assessment tool® calculations can be performed with or without addition of bone mineral density; however, the impact of this addition on fracture risk assessment tool® scores has not been studied in Indian women. Given the limited availability and high cost of bone mineral density testing in India, it is important to know the influence of bone mineral density on fracture risk assessment tool® scores in Indian women. Therefore, our aim was to assess the contribution of bone mineral density in fracture risk assessment tool® outcome in Indian women. Apparently healthy postmenopausal Indian women (n = 506), aged 40-72 years, without clinical risk factors for bone disease, were retrospectively selected, and their fracture risk assessment tool® scores calculated with and without bone mineral density were compared. Based on WHO criteria, 30% women were osteoporotic, 42.9% were osteopenic and 27.1% had normal bone mineral density. Fracture risk assessment tool® scores for risk of both major osteoporotic fracture and hip fracture significantly increased on including bone mineral density (P women eligible without bone mineral density was 0 and with bone mineral density was 1, P > 0.05, whereas, for hip fracture risk number of women eligible without bone mineral density was 2 and with bone mineral density was 17, P Indian women. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Costs and Risk Factors for Hospital Readmission After Periprosthetic Knee Fractures in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Russell A; Schairer, William W; Jevsevar, David S

    2018-02-01

    Periprosthetic fractures (PPFX) around total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are devastating complications with significant morbidity. With growing healthcare costs, hospital readmissions have become a marker for quality healthcare delivery. However, little is known about the risk factors or costs associated with readmission after treatment of PPFX. We sought to identify the patient demographics, prevalence of treatment types (open reduction internal fixation [ORIF] vs revision TKA), 30 and 90-day readmission rates, costs of initial treatment and readmission, and risk factors for readmission. We used the 2013 Nationwide Readmissions Database to select patients who underwent TKA, revision TKA, and treatment of PPFX with either ORIF or revision TKA. The 90-day readmission rate was determined through a survival analysis, and risk factors were identified using a cox proportional hazards model that adjusted for patient and hospital characteristics. We identified 1526 patients with PPFX treated with ORIF and 1458 treated with revision TKA. Ninety-day readmissions were 20.5% and 21.8%, respectively. Patients with ORIF were more often female and had multiple medical comorbidities. Patient factors associated with readmission included advanced age, male gender, comorbidities, discharge to a skilled nursing facility or home with health aide, and Medicare or Medicaid insurance. Treatment at a teaching hospital was the only hospital-associated risk factor identified. ORIF cost USD 25,539 and revision THA cost USD 37,680, with associated readmissions costing 15,269 and 16,806, respectively. PPFX results in greater costs compared to primary and revision TKA. This study highlights risk factors for readmission after PPFX treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for applications to leak-rate detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, S; Wilkowski, G; Ghadiali, N [Battelle Columbus Labs., OH (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Stochastic pipe fracture evaluations are conducted for applications to leak-rate detection. A state-of-the-art review was first conducted to evaluate the adequacy of current deterministic models for thermo-hydraulic and elastic-plastic fracture analyses. Then a new probabilistic model was developed with the above deterministic models for structural reliability analysis of cracked piping systems and statistical characterization of crack morphology parameters, material properties of pipe, and crack location. The proposed models are then applied for computing conditional probability of failure for various nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants. The PRAISE code was not used, and the probabilistic model is based on modern methods of stochastic mechanics, computationally far superior to Monte Carlo and Stratified Sampling methods used in PRAISE. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for applications to leak-rate detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.

    1992-01-01

    Stochastic pipe fracture evaluations are conducted for applications to leak-rate detection. A state-of-the-art review was first conducted to evaluate the adequacy of current deterministic models for thermo-hydraulic and elastic-plastic fracture analyses. Then a new probabilistic model was developed with the above deterministic models for structural reliability analysis of cracked piping systems and statistical characterization of crack morphology parameters, material properties of pipe, and crack location. The proposed models are then applied for computing conditional probability of failure for various nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants. The PRAISE code was not used, and the probabilistic model is based on modern methods of stochastic mechanics, computationally far superior to Monte Carlo and Stratified Sampling methods used in PRAISE. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  9. Does formal education and training of staff reduce the operation rate for fractures of the distal radius?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kyle; Murphy, Lynn; Gallagher, Brendan; Eames, Niall

    2013-12-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are one of the most common extremity fractures, and operation rates are increasing. Staff within our unit felt that formal teaching, particularly of new medical staff, with regards to fracture reduction and appropriate cast application could result in a reduction in operation rates. Retrospective data was extracted from FORD (Fracture Outcome and Research Database), including: number of fractures, number of fractures undergoing ORIF, fracture configuration, patient demographics, and mechanism of injury. All patients undergoing ORIF had their radiographs assessed by two separate reviewers. Information regarding adequate fracture reduction, adequate cast application (using Gap Index), and appropriate plaster cast moulding was recorded. Formal teaching was then given to the next group of medical staff rotating through the unit, and the same data was collected prospectively for that six-month period. Exclusion criteria included bilateral injuries, and polytrauma patients. A total of 1623 distal radial fractures were treated in our unit over the 12-month period, with 71 undergoing ORIF in the first 6 months and 39 in the second 6 months, this was statistically significant (p = 0.0009). Our study found that formal teaching and education significantly reduced the operation rate for distal radial fractures. This effect was most significant for extra-articular, dorsally angulated fractures of the distal radius. Our study proves that just 1 h of basic training at the beginning of an attachment can have significant benefits to both the unit and, more importantly, the patients. Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk of Fractures in Youths with Celiac Disease-A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canova, Cristina; Pitter, Gisella; Zanier, Loris; Simonato, Lorenzo; Michaelsson, Karl; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2018-04-19

    To assess the risk of any fracture requiring hospital care in a cohort of individuals with celiac disease diagnosed in childhood/adolescence compared with reference individuals matched by age and sex. Our study cohort consisted of 213 635 people born and residing in Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region, Italy, in 1989-2011. We selected, through pathology reports, hospital discharge records, or co-payment exemptions, 1233 individuals with celiac disease (aged 0-17 years at diagnosis) and compared them with 6167 reference individuals matched by sex and year of birth. Fractures were identified through hospital discharge records. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for any fracture after celiac disease diagnosis (or index date for reference individuals) with Cox regression and ORs for any fracture before celiac disease diagnosis with conditional logistic regression. During the follow-up period (maximum 23 years), 22 individuals with celiac disease (9394 person-years) and 128 reference individuals (47 308 person-years) experienced a fracture, giving an overall HR of 0.87 (95% CI 0.55-1.37). The risk was not modified by sex, age at diagnosis, or calendar period of diagnosis. We obtained similar HRs when excluding fractures occurring after the age of 18 years and adjusting for maternal education or vitamin D supplementation. The odds of previous fracture also did not differ between subjects with celiac disease and reference individuals (22 and 96 cases, respectively: OR 1.15; 95% CI 0.72-1.84). We did not find any evidence of an increased risk of fractures during childhood and youth among patients with celiac disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzar, B.; Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 10 4 to 4 × 10 4  s −1 . The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading

  12. Does Alendronate reduce the risk of fracture in men? A meta-analysis incorporating prior knowledge of anti-fracture efficacy in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaioannou Alexandra

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alendronate has been found to reduce the risk of fractures in postmenopausal women as demonstrated in multiple randomized controlled trials enrolling thousands of women. Yet there is a paucity of such randomized controlled trials in osteoporotic men. Our objective was to systematically review the anti-fracture efficacy of alendronate in men with low bone mass or with a history of prevalent fracture(s and incorporate prior knowledge of alendronate efficacy in women in the analysis. Methods We examined randomized controlled trials in men comparing the anti-fracture efficacy of alendronate to placebo or calcium or vitamin D, or any combination of these. Studies of men with secondary causes of osteoporosis other than hypogonadism were excluded. We searched the following electronic databases (without language restrictions for potentially relevant citations: Medline, Medline in Process (1966-May 24/2004, and Embase (1996–2004. We also contacted the manufacturer of the drug in search of other relevant trials. Two reviewers independently identified two trials (including 375 men, which met all inclusion criteria. Data were abstracted by one reviewer and checked by another. Results of the male trials were pooled using Bayesian random effects models, incorporating prior information of anti-fracture efficacy from meta-analyses of women. Results The odds ratios of incident fractures in men (with 95% credibility intervals with alendronate (10 mg daily were: vertebral fractures, 0.44 (0.23, 0.83 and non-vertebral fractures, 0.60 (0.29, 1.44. Conclusion In conclusion, alendronate decreases the risk of vertebral fractures in men at risk. There is currently insufficient evidence of a statistically significant reduction of non-vertebral fractures, but the paucity of trials in men limit the statistical power to detect such an effect.

  13. A systematic review of undisplaced femoral neck fracture treatments for patients over 65 years of age, with a focus on union rates and avascular necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dan-Feng; Bi, Fang-Gang; Ma, Chi-Yuan; Wen, Zheng-Fa; Cai, Xun-Zi

    2017-02-10

    It remains unclear whether conservative treatment should be used to treat the common undisplaced femoral neck fractures that develop in the elderly. Herein, we systematically review the rates of union and avascular necrosis after conservative and surgical treatment of undisplaced femoral neck fractures. We searched the EMBASE, PubMed, OVID, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Scopus databases for randomized controlled trials or observational studies that assessed the outcomes of conservative or surgical treatments of undisplaced femoral neck fractures. No language or publication year limitation was imposed. Statistical analyses were performed with the aid of the chi-squared test. We evaluated the quality of each publication and the risk of bias. Twenty-nine studies involving 5071 patients were ultimately included; 1120 patients were treated conservatively and 3951 surgically. The union rates were 68.8% (642/933) and 92.6% (635/686) in the former and latter groups, respectively (p avascular necrosis rate in the conservatively treated group was 10.3% (39/380), while it was 7.7% (159/2074) in the surgically treated group (p = 0.09). Surgery to treat undisplaced femoral neck fractures was associated with a higher union rate and a tendency toward less avascular necrosis than conservative treatment.

  14. Fracture risk in unicameral bone cyst. Is magnetic resonance imaging a better predictor than plain radiography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pireau, Nathalie; De Gheldere, Antoine; Mainard-Simard, Laurence; Lascombes, Pierre; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2011-04-01

    The classical indication for treating a simple bone cyst is usually the risk of fracture, which can be predicted based on three parameters: the bone cyst index, the bone cyst diameter, and the minimal cortical thickness. A retrospective review was carried out based on imaging of 35 simple bone cysts (30 humeral and 5 femoral). The three parameters were measured on standard radiographs, and on T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. The measurements were performed by two independent reviewers, and twice by the same reviewer. Kappa values and binary logistic regression were used to assess the ability of the parameters to predict the fracture risk. Inter- and intra-observer agreement was measured. T1-weighted MRI was found to have the best inter- and intraobserver repeatability. The bone cyst index was found to be the best predictor for the risk of fracture.

  15. Discrete Fracture Network Models for Risk Assessment of Carbon Sequestration in Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Pashin; Guohai Jin; Chunmiao Zheng; Song Chen; Marcella McIntyre

    2008-07-01

    A software package called DFNModeler has been developed to assess the potential risks associated with carbon sequestration in coal. Natural fractures provide the principal conduits for fluid flow in coal-bearing strata, and these fractures present the most tangible risks for the leakage of injected carbon dioxide. The objectives of this study were to develop discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling tools for risk assessment and to use these tools to assess risks in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama, where coal-bearing strata have high potential for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. DFNModeler provides a user-friendly interface for the construction, visualization, and analysis of DFN models. DFNModeler employs an OpenGL graphics engine that enables real-time manipulation of DFN models. Analytical capabilities in DFNModeler include display of structural and hydrologic parameters, compartmentalization analysis, and fluid pathways analysis. DFN models can be exported to third-party software packages for flow modeling. DFN models were constructed to simulate fracturing in coal-bearing strata of the upper Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior Basin. Outcrops and wireline cores were used to characterize fracture systems, which include joint systems, cleat systems, and fault-related shear fractures. DFN models were constructed to simulate jointing, cleating, faulting, and hydraulic fracturing. Analysis of DFN models indicates that strata-bound jointing compartmentalizes the Pottsville hydrologic system and helps protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. Analysis of fault zones, however, suggests that faulting can facilitate cross-formational flow. For this reason, faults should be avoided when siting injection wells. DFN-based flow models constructed in TOUGH2 indicate that fracture aperture and connectivity are critical variables affecting the leakage of injected CO{sub 2} from coal. Highly transmissive joints

  16. Strain rate effects on the mechanical properties and fracture mode of skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Michael; Tovar, Nick; Yoo, Daniel [Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry (United States); Sobieraj, Micheal [Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital for Joint Diseases (United States); Gupta, Nikhil [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, NYU-Poly (United States); Branski, Ryan C. [Dept of Otolaryngology, New York University School of Medicine (United States); Coelho, Paulo G., E-mail: pc92@nyu.edu [Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to characterize the mechanical response of beagle sartorius muscle fibers under strain rates that increase logarithmically (0.1 mm/min, 1 mm/min and 10 mm/min), and provide an analysis of the fracture patterns of these tissues via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Muscle tissue from dogs' sartorius was excised and test specimens were sectioned with a lancet into sections with nominal length, width, and thickness of 7, 2.5 and 0.6 mm, respectively. Trimming of the tissue was done so that the loading would be parallel to the direction of the muscle fiber. Samples were immediately tested following excision and failures were observed under the SEM. No statistically significant difference was observed in strength between the 0.1 mm/min (2.560 ± 0.37 MPa) and the 1 mm/min (2.702 ± 0.55 MPa) groups. However, the 10 mm/min group (1.545 ± 0.50 MPa) had a statistically significant lower strength than both the 1 mm/min group and the 0.1 mm/min group with p < 0.01 in both cases. At the 0.1 mm/min rate the primary fracture mechanism was that of a shear mode failure of the endomysium with a significant relative motion between fibers. At 1 mm/min this continues to be the predominant failure mode. At the 10 mm/min strain rate there is a significant change in the fracture pattern relative to other strain rates, where little to no evidence of endomysial shear failure nor of significant motion between fibers was detected.

  17. Impact of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder therapy on fracture risk in children treated in German pediatric practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, L; Kostev, K

    2017-04-01

    Two thousand eight hundred ninety-four children and adolescents treated by 243 pediatricians were analyzed. Patients receiving attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications were at a lower risk of fractures than patients without ADHD medications. The strongest impact was in the age group of 6-9 years. Finally, there was a significant association between therapy duration and fracture risk. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of ADHD therapy on fracture risk in children treated by German pediatricians. Children and adolescents initially diagnosed with ADHD and fractures between 2010 and 2015 were identified by 243 pediatricians. In this nested case-control study, each ADHD case with a fracture was matched (1:1) to an ADHD control without a fracture for age, gender, index year, and physician. In total, 2894 individuals were available for analysis. The main outcome of the study was the risk of fracture as a function of ADHD therapy. Multivariate logistic regression models were created to determine the effect of ADHD therapy on the risk of fracture in the entire population and in three age-specific subgroups. Patients receiving ADHD medications were at a lower risk of fracture than patients without ADHD medications (OR = 0.61). The impact of ADHD therapy on the risk of fracture was stronger in the age group of 6-9 years (OR = 0.41) than in the age groups of 10-13 years (OR = 0.68) and 14-17 years (OR = 0.74). Finally, a significant correlation was found between therapy duration and fracture risk (OR = 0.71 per month). ADHD therapy was associated with a decrease in the risk of fracture in children and adolescents treated by German pediatricians.

  18. Is use of fall risk-increasing drugs in an elderly population associated with an increased risk of hip fracture, after adjustment for multimorbidity level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorell, Kristine; Ranstad, Karin; Midlöv, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Risk factors for hip fracture are well studied because of the negative impact on patients and the community, with mortality in the first year being almost 30% in the elderly. Age, gender and fall risk-increasing drugs, identified by the National Board of Health and Welfare in Sweden......, are well known risk factors for hip fracture, but how multimorbidity level affects the risk of hip fracture during use of fall risk-increasing drugs is to our knowledge not as well studied. This study explored the relationship between use of fall risk-increasing drugs in combination with multimorbidity...... level and risk of hip fracture in an elderly population. METHODS: Data were from Östergötland County, Sweden, and comprised the total population in the county aged 75 years and older during 2006. The odds ratio (OR) for hip fracture during use of fall risk-increasing drugs was calculated by multivariate...

  19. Slow strain rate corrosion and fracture characteristics of X-52 and X-70 pipeline steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, A.; Albiter, A.; Salazar, M.; Perez, R.

    2005-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a NACE solution saturated with H 2 S, of the X-52 and X-70 steels was studied using slow strain rate tests (SSRT) and electrochemical evaluations. SCC tests were performed in samples which include the longitudinal weld bead of the pipeline steels and were carried out in the NACE solution at both room temperature and 50 deg. C. After failure, the fracture surfaces were observed in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the chemical analysis were obtained using X-rays energy dispersive (EDXs) techniques. The specimens tested in air, exhibited a ductile type of failure, and whereas, those tested in the corrosive solution showed a brittle fracture. Specimens tested in the NACE solution saturated with H 2 S presented high susceptibility to SCC. Corrosion was found to be an important factor in the initiation of some cracks. In addition, the effect of the temperature on the corrosion attack was explored. The susceptibility to SCC was manifested as a decrease in the mechanical properties. Potentiodynamic polarization curves and hydrogen permeation measurements were made. The diffusion of atomic hydrogen was related to this fracture forms. The hydrogen permeation flux increased with the increasing of temperature

  20. Estimated drinking water fluoride exposure and risk of hip fracture: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näsman, P; Ekstrand, J; Granath, F; Ekbom, A; Fored, C M

    2013-11-01

    The cariostatic benefit from water fluoridation is indisputable, but the knowledge of possible adverse effects on bone and fracture risk due to fluoride exposure is ambiguous. The association between long-term (chronic) drinking water fluoride exposure and hip fracture (ICD-7-9: '820' and ICD-10: 'S72.0-S72.2') was assessed in Sweden using nationwide registers. All individuals born in Sweden between January 1, 1900 and December 31, 1919, alive and living in their municipality of birth at the time of start of follow-up, were eligible for this study. Information on the study population (n = 473,277) was linked among the Swedish National In-Patient Register (IPR), the Swedish Cause of Death Register, and the Register of Population and Population Changes. Estimated individual drinking water fluoride exposure was stratified into 4 categories: very low, hip fracture. The risk estimates did not change in analyses restricted to only low-trauma osteoporotic hip fractures. Chronic fluoride exposure from drinking water does not seem to have any important effects on the risk of hip fracture, in the investigated exposure range.

  1. Vitamin D and Fracture Risk in Early Childhood: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Laura N; Heong, Sze Wing; Chen, Yang; Thorpe, Kevin E; Adeli, Khosrow; Howard, Andrew; Sochett, Etienne; Birken, Catherine S; Parkin, Patricia C; Maguire, Jonathon L

    2017-06-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of vitamin D intake and serum levels with fracture risk in children under 6 years of age. A case-control study was conducted in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Cases were recruited from the fracture clinic at the Hospital for Sick Children, and matched controls were obtained from the TARGet Kids! primary-care research network. Controls were matched to cases on age, sex, height, and season. Fracture risk was estimated from conditional logistic regression, with adjustment for skin type, fracture history, waist circumference, outdoor free play, neighborhood income, soda consumption, and child's birth weight. A total of 206 cases were recruited during May 2009-April 2013 and matched to 343 controls. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration (per 10-nmol/L increment: adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88, 1.03) and intake of cow's milk (2 cups/day vs. 2 cups/day: aOR = 1.39 (95% CI: 0.85, 2.23)) were not significantly associated with reduced odds of fracture. A statistically significant association was observed between child use of vitamin D supplements and decreased odds of fracture (yes vs. no: aOR = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.25, 0.69). Vitamin D supplementation, but not serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level or milk intake, was associated with reduced fracture risk among these healthy young children. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Nutrient patterns and risk of fracture in older subjects: results from the Three-City Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samieri, C; Ginder Coupez, V; Lorrain, S; Letenneur, L; Allès, B; Féart, C; Paineau, D; Barberger-Gateau, P

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the association between nutrient patterns and risk of fractures in 1,482 older subjects. Patterns associated with higher intakes of Ca, P, vitamin B12, proteins and unsaturated fats, and moderate alcohol intake, provided by diets rich in dairies and charcuteries, were related to a lower risk of wrist and hip fractures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patterns of nutrient intake and the risk of fractures in older subjects. Among 1,482 participants from the Bordeaux sample of the Three-City (3C) Study who completed a 24-h dietary recall and a food frequency questionnaire, we examined the association between patterns of nutrient intake derived from principal component analysis and 8-year incidence of self-reported fractures of the hip, the wrist, and the vertebrae. A "nutrient-dense" pattern rich in Ca and P, iron, vitamins B including B12, vitamins C and E, alcohol, proteins, and unsaturated fats, and characterized by a higher consumption of fruits and vegetables, meats and fish, cheese and milk, charcuteries, cereals, rice, pasta, and potatoes, was associated with a 19% (95% CI 2-34%, P=0.03) lower risk of wrist fractures. The same pattern was associated with a 14% (95% CI 2-25%) lower risk of fractures at any site. A "south-western French" pattern rich in Ca, P, vitamins D and B12, retinol, alcohol, proteins, and fats-including unsaturated fats; poor in vitamins C, E, and K, carotenes, folates, and fibers; and related to a higher consumption of cheese, milk, and charcuterie and a lower consumption of fruits and vegetables was related to a 33% lower risk of hip fractures (95% CI 3-39%, P=0.03). Higher intakes of Ca, P, vitamin B12, proteins, and unsaturated fats and moderate alcohol, provided by dietary patterns rich in cheese, milk, and charcuteries, were related to a lower risk of wrist and hip fractures in our cohort.

  3. Nutrient and food intakes in early life and risk of childhood fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Händel, Mina N; Heitmann, Berit L; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The identification of detrimental dietary patterns early in life may contribute to reducing the high incidence of fracture among healthy children. However, information based on a systematic review of the effect of various dietary foods and nutrients on fracture risk is lacking......, Web of Science, and Scopus databases and by hand searching references by first author based on predefined inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis was carried out for case-control studies that examined differences in mean calcium intake in the case compared with the control group. Random-effects analysis...... of a systematic review of studies that were judged to be of high or medium quality, there is an indication that some nutritional factors seem to be associated with an increased fracture risk among children. The results may be inflated by selection bias, bias in diet reporting, or residual confounding. More high...

  4. Measurement of Bone: Diagnosis of SCI-Induced Osteoporosis and Fracture Risk Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, Karen L; Morse, Leslie R

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with a rapid loss of bone mass, resulting in severe osteoporosis and a 5- to 23-fold increase in fracture risk. Despite the seriousness of fractures in SCI, there are multiple barriers to osteoporosis diagnosis and wide variations in treatment practices for SCI-induced osteoporosis. We review the biological and structural changes that are known to occur in bone after SCI in the context of promoting future research to prevent or reduce risk of fracture in this population. We also review the most commonly used methods for assessing bone after SCI and discuss the strengths, limitations, and clinical applications of each method. Although dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry assessments of bone mineral density may be used clinically to detect changes in bone after SCI, 3-dimensional methods such as quantitative CT analysis are recommended for research applications and are explained in detail.

  5. Is allopurinol use associated with an excess risk of osteoporotic fracture?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dennison, Elaine M; Rubin, Katrine Hass; Schwarz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Using a Danish Register cohort of 86,039 adult new allopurinol users and propensity score matched controls, we found that gout requiring allopurinol prescription was associated with an increased fracture risk. PURPOSE: Gout, an acute inflammatory arthritis, is common and associated...... (new allopurinol users) and 86,039 age, sex and propensity score matched controls (not exposed to allopurinol or with a gout diagnosis), with no diagnosis of malignancy in the year prior. RESULTS: We found a modest adjusted effect of allopurinol prescription on major osteoporotic fractures (hazard...... gout diagnosis had been confirmed by at least one hospital contact. Prespecified subanalyses by filled dose of allopurinol (mg/day in first year of prescription) showed increased hip and major fracture risk in women in the highest allopurinol dose grouping only, while a less strong dose effect...

  6. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambu, Atsushi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Tominaga, Licht; Kuriyama, Kengo; Araya, Masayuki; Saito, Ryoh; Maehata, Yoshiyasu; Komiyama, Takafumi; Marino, Kan; Koshiishi, Tsuyota; Sawada, Eiichi; Araki, Tsutomu

    2013-02-07

    As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1-10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients.

  7. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambu, Atsushi; Marino, Kan; Koshiishi, Tsuyota; Sawada, Eiichi; Araki, Tsutomu; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Tominaga, Licht; Kuriyama, Kengo; Araya, Masayuki; Saito, Ryoh; Maehata, Yoshiyasu; Komiyama, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1–10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients

  8. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nambu Atsushi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Methods Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT. The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1–10 Gy. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Results Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41, and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Conclusions Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients.

  9. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Methods Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1–10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Results Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Conclusions Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients. PMID:23391264

  10. High-rate deformation and fracture of steel 09G2S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandin, Vl. Vas.; Balandin, Vl. Vl.; Bragov, A. M.; Igumnov, L. A.; Konstantinov, A. Yu.; Lomunov, A. K.

    2014-11-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of steel 09G2S deformation and fracture laws in a wide range of strain rates and temperature variations are given. The dynamic deformation curves and the ultimate characteristics of plasticity in high-rate strain were determined by the Kolsky method in compression, extension, and shear tests. The elastoplastic properties and spall strength were studied by using the gaseous gun of calibre 57 mm and the interferometer VISAR according to the plane-wave experiment technique. The data obtained by the Kolsky method were used to determine the parameters of the Johnson-Cook model which, in the framework of the theory of flow, describes how the yield surface radius depends on the strain, strain rate, and temperature.

  11. [Fracture Type and Injury-to-Surgery Interval as Risk Factors for Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head after Internal Fixation of Intracapsular Femoral Neck Fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelka, O; Skála-Rosenbaum, J; Bartoška, R; Waldauf, P; Krbec, M; Džupa, V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the occurrence of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head following the osteosynthesis of intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck in relation to the time interval between injury and surgery and the type of fracture. The data of patients with intracapsular fractures of the femoral neck surgically treated in the period from 2001 to 2011 were reviewed. Of 1555 patients treated for this fracture, 125 (7%) underwent osteosynthesis. The evaluated group included 115 patients who came for examination at one-year follow-up. There were 59 (52%) women and 56 (48%) men. Dynamic hip screw (DHS) osteosynthesis with an anti-rotation screw was performed in 103 patients and lag-screw osteosynthesis involving three parallel cannulated cancellous screws was employed in 12 patients. The patients were allocated to groups according to the injury-to-surgery interval and to sub-groups on the basis of the Garden classification of femoral fracture stage. In the group of 58 patients treated within 6 h of injury, AVN developed in 10 (17%). When the type of fracture was considered, 4% of the non-displaced fractures and 30% of the displaced fractures developed AVN. The patients with Garden stage I and II (non-displaced) fractures treated within 6 h of injury had a significantly lower risk of AVN development than those with Garden stage III or IV (displaced) fractures. The group treated between 6 and 24 post-injury hours comprised 21 patients, of whom four (19%) had AVN. In non-displaced and displaced fracture sub-groups, 25% of the patients in the former and 16% in the latter had AVN. The stage of displacement had no effect on AVN development. The two groups together (patients treated by 24 h) had a significantly lower AVN incidence than the patients treated after 24 h (p = 0.0025). In this group of 36 patients, 16 had AVN (44%) and the fracture stage made no significant difference (p = 0.6985; nondisplacement sub-group, 41%; displacement sub

  12. Predictors of Fracture Risk and Bone Mineral Density in Men with Prostate Cancer on Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Neubecker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Decrease of bone mineral density (BMD and fracture risk is increased in men with prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. We looked at possible predictors of decreased BMD and increased fracture risk in men with prostate cancer; most of whom were on ADT. In a retrospective study, we analyzed serum, BMD, and clinical risk factors used in the Fracture Risk Assessment (FRAX tool and others in 78 men with prostate cancer with reported height loss. The subjects were divided in two groups: 22 men with and 56 without vertebral fractures. 17 of the 22 men with vertebral fractures on spine X-rays did not know they had a vertebral fracture. Of those 17 men, 9 had not previously qualified for treatment based on preradiograph FRAX score calculated with BMD, and 6 based on FRAX calculated without BMD. Performing spine films increased the predictive ability of FRAX for vertebral fracture. Vertebral fracture was better predicted by FRAX for other osteoporotic fractures than FRAX for hip fractures. The inclusion of BMD in FRAX calculations did not affect the predictive ability of FRAX. The PSA level showed a positive correlation with lumbar spine BMD and accounted for about 9% of spine BMD.

  13. HIV infection and its association with an excess risk of clinical fractures : a nationwide case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Güerri-Fernández, Robert; De Vries, Frank; Lalmohamed, Arief; Bazelier, Marloes; Starup-Linde, Jakob; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Cooper, Cyrus; Vestergaard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Different studies have reported an association between HIV infection, antiretroviral therapies, and impaired bone metabolism, but data on their impact on fracture risk are scarce. We studied the association between a clinical diagnosis of HIV infection and fracture risk. METHODS: We

  14. HIV infection and its association with an excess risk of clinical fractures: A nationwide case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Güerri-Fernández, Robert; De Vries, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/303546670; Lalmohamed, Arief|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357580680; Bazelier, Marloes|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341589802; Starup-Linde, Jakob; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Cooper, Cyrus; Vestergaard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Different studies have reported an association between HIV infection, antiretroviral therapies, and impaired bone metabolism, but data on their impact on fracture risk are scarce. We studied the association between a clinical diagnosis of HIV infection and fracture risk. METHODS: We

  15. Factors associated with an increased risk of vertebral fracture in monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piot, J M; Royer, M; Schmidt-Tanguy, A; Hoppé, E; Gardembas, M; Bourrée, T; Hunault, M; François, S; Boyer, F; Ifrah, N; Renier, G; Chevailler, A; Audran, M; Chappard, D; Libouban, H; Mabilleau, G; Legrand, E; Bouvard, B

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS) have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of fractures. This study describes prospectively the bone status of MGUS patients and determines the factors associated with vertebral fracture. We included prospectively 201 patients with MGUS, incidentally discovered, and with no known history of osteoporosis: mean age 66.6±12.5 years, 48.3% women, 51.7% immunoglobulin G (IgG), 33.3% IgM and 10.4% IgA. Light chain was kappa in 64.2% patients. All patients had spinal radiographs and bone mineral density measurement in addition to gammopathy assessment. At least one prevalent non-traumatic vertebral fracture was discovered in 18.4% patients and equally distributed between men and women. Fractured patients were older, had a lower bone density and had also more frequently a lambda light chain isotype. Compared with patients with κ light chain, the odds ratio of being fractured for patients with λ light chain was 4.32 (95% confidence interval 1.80–11.16; P=0.002). These results suggest a high prevalence of non-traumatic vertebral fractures in MGUS associated with lambda light chain isotype and not only explained by low bone density

  16. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is associated with fracture risk in diabetes patients - a nested case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starup-Linde, Jakob; Gregersen, Søren; Vestergaard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    available for an analysis of patient characteristics, co-morbidities, biochemical parameters and drug usage. Results: Patient age at the time of diabetes diagnosis, a diagnosis of previous fracture, an alcohol related diagnosis, total cholesterol level, and the usage of antidepressants, antiepileptics...... and insulin all increased the odds of fracture. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) levels decreased the odds of fracture, where the level of 3.04-5.96 mmol/l was optimal with regard to fracture risk. Conclusion: LDL may add to the understanding of fractures in diabetes patients and it may be added...

  17. A rating for the risk; Ein Rating fuers Risiko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faltermeier, Daniel [Meteocontrol GmbH, Augsburg (Germany). Technische Due Diligence PV

    2013-07-01

    The assessment of the quality and risks of the photovoltaics project plays an important role in the investment decision. Especially for very large projects, an extensive risk assessment of yield losses and technical tests are increasingly demanded by independent experts. A new method enables the evaluation of solar energy systems.

  18. Risk factor analysis for predicting vertebral body re-collapse after posterior instrumented fusion in thoracolumbar burst fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hae-Dong; Bang, Chungwon; Lee, Jae Chul; Soh, Jae-Wan; Choi, Sung-Woo; Cho, Hyeung-Kyu; Shin, Byung-Joon

    2018-02-01

    than 20% at any follow-up time compared with immediate postoperative body height loss; we assigned the remaining patients to the well-maintained group. The chi-square test and t test of SPSS were used for comparison of differences between two groups and multiple logistic regression analysis for risk factor evaluation. Through the decision tree analysis of statistical package R, a decision-making model was composed, and a cutoff value of revealed risk factors and re-collapse rate of each subgroup were identified. The present study wassupported by the University College of Medicine Research Fund (university to which authors belong). There was no external funding source for this study. The authors have no conflict of interest to declare. Re-collapse occurred in 31 of 208 patients (14.9%). In this group, age, the proportion of male gender, preoperative height loss, and preoperative wedge angle were significantly greater than the well-maintained group. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified two independent risk factors: age (adjusted odds ratio 1.084, p=.002) and body height loss (adjusted odds ratio 1.065, p=.003). According to the decision-making tree, age (>43 years) was the most discriminating variable, andpreoperative body height loss (>54%) was the second. In this model, the re-collapse rate was zero in ages less than 43 years, and among those remaining, nearly 80% patients with greater than 54% of body height loss belonged to the re-collapse group. The independent predictors of re-collapse after posterior instrumented fusion for T-L burst fracture were the age at operation (>43 years old) and preoperative body height loss (>54%). Careful assessment using our decision-making model could help to predict re-collapse and prevent unnecessary additional spinal surgery for anterior column support, especially in young patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rib stress fractures among rowers: definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, risk factors and effectiveness of injury prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Lisa K; Hume, Patria A; Nolte, Volker

    2011-11-01

    Rib stress fractures (RSFs) can have serious effects on rowing training and performance and accordingly represent an important topic for sports medicine practitioners. Therefore, the aim of this review is to outline the definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors, injury management and injury prevention strategies for RSF in rowers. To this end, nine relevant books, 140 journal articles, the proceedings of five conferences and two unpublished presentations were reviewed after searches of electronic databases using the keywords 'rowing', 'rib', 'stress fracture', 'injury', 'mechanics' and 'kinetics'. The review showed that RSF is an incomplete fracture occurring from an imbalance between the rate of bone resorption and the rate of bone formation. RSF occurs in 8.1-16.4% of elite rowers, 2% of university rowers and 1% of junior elite rowers. Approximately 86% of rowing RSF cases with known locations occur in ribs four to eight, mostly along the anterolateral/lateral rib cage. Elite rowers are more likely to experience RSF than nonelite rowers. Injury occurrence is equal among sweep rowers and scullers, but the regional location of the injury differs. The mechanism of injury is multifactorial with numerous intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors contributing. Posterior-directed resultant forces arising from the forward directed force vector through the arms to the oar handle in combination with the force vector induced by the scapula retractors during mid-drive, or repetitive stress from the external obliques and rectus abdominis in the 'finish' position, may be responsible for RSF. Joint hypomobility, vertebral malalignment or low bone mineral density may be associated with RSF. Case studies have shown increased risk associated with amenorrhoea, low bone density or poor technique, in combination with increases in training volume. Training volume alone may have less effect on injury than other factors. Large differences in seat and handle

  20. Assessment of fracture risk: value of random population-based samples--the Geelong Osteoporosis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, M J; Pasco, J A; Seeman, E; Nicholson, G C; Sanders, K M; Kotowicz, M A

    2001-01-01

    Fracture risk is determined by bone mineral density (BMD). The T-score, a measure of fracture risk, is the position of an individual's BMD in relation to a reference range. The aim of this study was to determine the magnitude of change in the T-score when different sampling techniques were used to produce the reference range. Reference ranges were derived from three samples, drawn from the same region: (1) an age-stratified population-based random sample, (2) unselected volunteers, and (3) a selected healthy subset of the population-based sample with no diseases or drugs known to affect bone. T-scores were calculated using the three reference ranges for a cohort of women who had sustained a fracture and as a group had a low mean BMD (ages 35-72 yr; n = 484). For most comparisons, the T-scores for the fracture cohort were more negative using the population reference range. The difference in T-scores reached 1.0 SD. The proportion of the fracture cohort classified as having osteoporosis at the spine was 26, 14, and 23% when the population, volunteer, and healthy reference ranges were applied, respectively. The use of inappropriate reference ranges results in substantial changes to T-scores and may lead to inappropriate management.

  1. Innovative probabilistic risk assessment applications: barrier impairments and fracture toughness. Panel Discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterman, Michael; Root, Steven; Li, F.; Modarres, Mohammad; Reinhart, F. Mark; Bradley, Biff; Calhoun, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: New probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) applications promise to improve the overall safety and efficiency of nuclear plant operations. This discussion will explore the use of PRA in evaluating barrier integrity with respect to the consequences of natural phenomena such as tornadoes, floods, and harsh environments. Additionally, the session will explore proposals to improve fracture toughness techniques using PRA. (authors)

  2. Gender-specific associations between physical functioning, bone quality and fracture risk in older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furrer, R.; van Schoor, N.M.; de Haan, A.; Lips, P.; de Jongh, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate which parameters of physical functioning are associated with bone quality and fracture risk and whether gender-specific differences exist within these associations. We studied 1,486 participants of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam. As measures of

  3. Increased risk of intraoperative and early postoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture with uncemented stems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Martin; Jørgensen, Christoffer C.; Solgaard, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose - The use of uncemented fixation in total hip arthroplasty (THA) is increasing. Registry studies have indicated an increased risk of revision of uncemented implants due to early periprosthetic femoral fracture. In this paper, we describe the incidence and predisposing facto...

  4. Prenatal exposure to vitamin D from fortified margarine and risk of fractures in late childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Händel, Mina Nicole; Frederiksen, Peder; Osmond, Clive

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal low vitamin D may have consequences for bone health. By means of a nationwide mandatory vitamin D fortification programme, we examined the risk of fractures among 10-18-year-old children from proximate birth cohorts born around the date of the termination of the programme. For all subjec...

  5. Rib stress fractures among rowers: a systematic review on return to sports, risk factors and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ailly, Philip N; Sluiter, Judith K; Kuijer, Paul P

    2016-06-01

    Rib stress fractures (RSFs) are injuries frequently sustained by elite rowers with an injury rate of 8-16% over the course of a rowing career, resulting in negative effects on training and performance. For clinical management, the aim of this review was to describe time to return to sports, summarize potentially preventive measures and appraise the evidence on risk factors. A search strategy was performed in PubMed, SportDiscus, Web of Science and Embase till June 1st 2015. All studies were graded on their quality. The search resulted in 124 studies, of which 17 were included: Ten reported on return to sports, 17 reported on risk factors and nine on preventive measures. For return to sports, nine studies mentioned a loss of training of 4-6 weeks. The shortest period was one week and the longest 16 weeks. For risk factors, insufficient or conflicting evidence was found for changes in the training program, incorrect rowing technique, female gender, low bone mineral density, inadequate equipment, and training type. For prevention, gradual changes in the training program, alertness on the part of coaches and clinicians, and supplementation of diet and hormones are suggested as effective measures. However, no effect studies have been found. The main outcome of this review on RSFs is that little evidence is available on return to sports, risk factors and preventive measures. Coaches and clinicians should carefully guide and assist rowers suffering from RSFs in off training and in the subsequent training period to regain their pre-injury level.

  6. Risk estimates for hip fracture from clinical and densitometric variables and impact of database selection in Lebanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badra, Mohammad; Mehio-Sibai, Abla; Zeki Al-Hazzouri, Adina; Abou Naja, Hala; Baliki, Ghassan; Salamoun, Mariana; Afeiche, Nadim; Baddoura, Omar; Bulos, Suhayl; Haidar, Rachid; Lakkis, Suhayl; Musharrafieh, Ramzi; Nsouli, Afif; Taha, Assaad; Tayim, Ahmad; El-Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada

    2009-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture incidence vary greatly worldwide. The data, if any, on clinical and densitometric characteristics of patients with hip fractures from the Middle East are scarce. The objective of the study was to define risk estimates from clinical and densitometric variables and the impact of database selection on such estimates. Clinical and densitometric information were obtained in 60 hip fracture patients and 90 controls. Hip fracture subjects were 74 yr (9.4) old, were significantly taller, lighter, and more likely to be taking anxiolytics and sleeping pills than controls. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) database selection resulted in a higher sensitivity and almost equal specificity in identifying patients with a hip fracture compared with the Lebanese database. The odds ratio (OR) and its confidence interval (CI) for hip fracture per standard deviation (SD) decrease in total hip BMD was 2.1 (1.45-3.05) with the NHANES database, and 2.11 (1.36-2.37) when adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI). Risk estimates were higher in male compared with female subjects. In Lebanese subjects, BMD- and BMI-derived hip fracture risk estimates are comparable to western standards. The study validates the universal use of the NHANES database, and the applicability of BMD- and BMI-derived risk fracture estimates in the World Health Organization (WHO) global fracture risk model, to the Lebanese.

  7. Active commuting reduces the risk of wrist fractures in middle-aged women-the UFO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, U; Nordström, P; Nilsson, J; Hallmans, G; Svensson, O; Bergström, U; Pettersson-Kymmer, U

    2013-02-01

    Middle-aged women with active commuting had significantly lower risk for wrist fracture than women commuting by car/bus. Our purpose was to investigate whether a physically active lifestyle in middle-aged women was associated with a reduced risk of later sustaining a low-trauma wrist fracture. The Umeå Fracture and Osteoporosis (UFO) study is a population-based nested case-control study investigating associations between lifestyle and fragility fractures. From a cohort of ~35,000 subjects, we identified 376 female wrist fracture cases who had reported data regarding their commuting habits, occupational, and leisure physical activity, before they sustained their fracture. Each fracture case was compared with at least one control drawn from the same cohort and matched for age and week of reporting data, yielding a total of 778 subjects. Mean age at baseline was 54.3 ± 5.8 years, and mean age at fracture was 60.3 ± 5.8 years. Conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustments for height, body mass index, smoking, and menopausal status showed that subjects with active commuting (especially walking) were at significantly lower risk of sustaining a wrist fracture (OR 0.48; 95 % CI 0.27-0.88) compared with those who commuted by car or bus. Leisure time activities such as dancing and snow shoveling were also associated with a lower fracture risk, whereas occupational activity, training, and leisure walking or cycling were unrelated to fracture risk. This study suggests that active commuting is associated with a lower wrist fracture risk, in middle-aged women.

  8. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Zuogui; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Zhang Boping

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  9. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Songjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China); Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Zuogui [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Akiyama, Eiji [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: AKIYAMA.Eiji@nims.go.jp; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Boping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  10. Bisphosphonate drug holidays in postmenopausal osteoporosis: effect on clinical fracture risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot, M A; Taisne, N; Legroux, I; Cortet, B; Paccou, J

    2017-12-01

    A cohort of 183 postmenopausal women, who had either discontinued or continued bisphosphonates (BPs) after first-line therapy, was used to investigate the relationships between "drug holiday" and clinical fracture. The risk of new clinical fractures was found to be 40% higher in women who had taken a BP "drug holiday." BPs are the most widely used treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis. The optimal treatment duration, however, remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture risk in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis after discontinuing BP treatment (BP "drug holiday"). A retrospective analysis was performed at Lille University Hospital (LUH) on postmenopausal women with osteoporosis who had taken a "drug holiday" or continued treatment after first-line BP therapy (3 to 5 years). The occurrence of new clinical fractures during follow-up was also explored. Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate the relationships between BP "drug holiday" and the occurrence of clinical fractures, while controlling for confounding factors. Survival without new clinical fractures was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. One hundred eighty-three women (mean age: 61.8 years; SD: 8.7) who had previously undergone BP treatment for 3 to 5 years were enrolled in our study. The patients had received alendronate (n = 81), risedronate (n = 73), zoledronic acid (n = 20), and ibandronate (n = 9). In 166 patients ("drug holiday" group: n = 31; continuous-treatment group: n = 135), follow-up ranged from 6 to 36 months (mean duration: 31.8 months; SD: 8.2). The incidences of new clinical fractures during follow-up were 16.1% (5/31) and 11.9% (16/135). After full adjustment, the hazard ratio of new clinical fractures among "drug holiday" patients was 1.40 (95% CI: 1.12-1.60; p = 0.0095). After first-line BP therapy in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, the risk of new clinical fractures was 40% higher in

  11. Fracture Rates and Fracture Sites in Patients With Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A Nationwide Register-Based Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkestad, Lars; Hald, Jannie Dahl; Ersbøll, Annette Kjaer

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary, clinically heterogeneous, connective tissue disorder. The population prevalence of OI in Denmark is 10.6 in 100,000. A hallmark of the disease is frequent fractures that are often precipitated by minimal trauma. The aim of the current study...

  12. Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Risk for Fracture at Specific Sites: Data Mining of the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwei; Li, Mei; Cao, Yuying; Han, Zhengqi; Wang, Xueju; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Liu, Hongfang; Amin, Shreyasee

    2017-07-17

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely used to treat gastric acid-related disorders. Concerns have been raised about potential fracture risk, especially at the hip, spine and wrist. However, fracture risk at other bone sites has not been as well studied. We investigated the association between PPIs and specific fracture sites using an aggregated knowledge-enhanced database, the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System Data Mining Set (AERS-DM). Proportional reporting ratio (PRR) was used to detect statistically significant associations (signals) between PPIs and fractures. We analyzed both high level terms (HLT) and preferred terms (PT) for fracture sites, defined by MedDRA (Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities). Of PPI users reporting fractures, the mean age was 65.3 years and the female to male ratio was 3.4:1. Results revealed signals at multiple HLT and PT fracture sites, consistent for both sexes. These included fracture sites with predominant trabecular bone, not previously reported as being associated with PPIs, such as 'rib fractures', where signals were detected for overall PPIs as well as for each of 5 generic ingredients (insufficient data for dexlansoprazole). Based on data mining from AERS-DM, PPI use appears to be associated with an increased risk for fractures at multiple sites.

  13. Use of anti-depressants and the risk of fracture of the hip or femur

    OpenAIRE

    van den Brand, M. W. M.; Samson, M. M.; Pouwels, S.; van Staa, T. P.; Thio, B.; Cooper, C.; Leufkens, H. G. M.; Egberts, A. C. G.; Verhaar, H. J. J.; de Vries, F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Anti-depressants are used largely, but have serious side effects. We show that both selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic anti-depressants (TCAs) increase the risk of hip/femur fracture and that this risk is time related and depends on the degree of serotonin transporter inhibition. This should be considered when prescribing anti-depressants to patients. Introduction Anti-depressants are known to have serious side effects. We examined the association between t...

  14. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Aerospace Engineering (India); Raha, S. [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Computational and Data Sciences (India); Mahapatra, D. Roy, E-mail: droymahapatra@aero.iisc.ernet.in [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Aerospace Engineering (India)

    2017-02-15

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  15. Elimination of the risk of brittle fracture in thick welded pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leymonie, C.; Genevray, R.

    1975-01-01

    The builder of welded pressure vessels faces the risk of brittle fracture throughout fabrication. He is forced to observe many precautions, in selecting the following: materials possessing good impact strength in the service conditions of the vessels; filler materials preventing transverse cracking of the welds: welding parameters preventing cold cracking. Fracture mechanics establish the relationships between material characteristics and critical defect size for a given set of service conditions. These principles must be expanded to increase the safety of thick pressure vessels. However, in order to derive maximum benefit, a major effort must be applied to increasing the effectiveness of nondestructive testing [fr

  16. Use of organic nitrates and the risk of hip fracture: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, Sander; Lalmohamed, Arief; van Staa, Tjeerd; Cooper, Cyrus; Souverein, Patrick; Leufkens, Hubertus G; Rejnmark, Lars; de Boer, Anthonius; Vestergaard, Peter; de Vries, Frank

    2010-04-01

    Use of organic nitrates has been associated with increased bone mineral density. Moreover, a large Danish case-control study reported a decreased fracture risk. However, the association with duration of nitrate use, dose frequency, and impact of discontinuation has not been extensively studied. Our objective was to evaluate the association between organic nitrates and hip fracture risk. A case-control study was conducted using the Dutch PHARMO Record Linkage System (1991-2002, n = 6,763 hip fracture cases and 26,341 controls). Cases had their first admission for hip fracture, whereas controls had not sustained any fracture after enrollment. Current users of organic nitrates were patients who had received a prescription within 90 d before the index date. The analyses were adjusted for disease and drug history. Current use of nitrates was not associated with a decreased risk of hip fracture [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.83-1.04]. Those who used as-needed medication only had a lower risk of hip fracture (adjusted OR = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.63-1.08) compared with users of maintenance medication only (adjusted OR = 1.17; 95% CI = 0.97-1.40). No association was found between duration of nitrate use and fracture risk. Our overall analyses showed that risk of a hip fracture was significantly lower among users of as-needed organic nitrates, when compared with users of maintenance medication. Our analyses of hip fracture risks with duration of use did not further support a beneficial effect of organic nitrates on hip fracture, although residual confounding may have masked beneficial effects.

  17. Hedging endowment assurance products under interest rate and mortality risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, A.; Mahayni, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes how model misspecification associated with both interest rate and mortality risk influences hedging decisions of insurance companies. For this purpose, diverse risk management strategies which are riskminimizing when model risk is ignored come into consideration. The

  18. The population attributable risk of nutrition and lifestyle on hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pripp, Are Hugo; Dahl, Ola E

    2015-01-01

    Norway is among the countries with the highest incidence of hip fractures, and how to reduce this incidence is a major public health concern. The population attributable risk (PAR), which measures the portion of hip fracture incidences in the population that can be attributed to an exposure if there is a causal relationship, was assessed for the exposure to excessive alcohol consumption, being underweight, low calcium from dairy products, low physical activity and current tobacco smoking. The risk ratio (RR) of the exposures summarized from systematic reviews and meta-analyses, as well as their prevalence from national statistics or Norwegian population-based studies, were used to estimate PARs. Low physical activity and current tobacco smoking had the highest RR for hip fractures, with 1.65 (95% CI 1.50-1.81) and 1.52 (95% CI 1.41-1.63). Low physical activity had the highest prevalence in the population (27.4%) and the highest PAR (0.151), followed by tobacco smoking (PAR = 0.081) and excessive alcohol consumption (PAR = 0.01). By comparison, being underweight and low calcium from dairy products had negligible PAR estimates. From a public health perspective, increased daily physical activity is the most promising intervention to reduce the incidence of hip fractures. Reduced smoking and alcohol consumption are of relevance, but other health risks related to these exposures are of greater public health concern. Low body weight and nutritional calcium from dairy products seem to be of less importance.

  19. Challenges of Estimating Fracture Risk with DXA: Changing Concepts About Bone Strength and Bone Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Angelo A

    2015-07-01

    Bone loss due to weightlessness is a significant concern for astronauts' mission safety and health upon return to Earth. This problem is monitored with bone densitometry (DXA), the clinical tool used to assess skeletal strength. DXA has served clinicians well in assessing fracture risk and has been particularly useful in diagnosing osteoporosis in the elderly postmenopausal population for which it was originally developed. Over the past 1-2 decades, however, paradoxical and contradictory findings have emerged when this technology was widely employed in caring for diverse populations unlike those for which it was developed. Although DXA was originally considered the surrogate marker for bone strength, it is now considered one part of a constellation of factors-described collectively as bone quality-that makes bone strong and resists fracturing, independent of bone density. These characteristics are beyond the capability of routine DXA to identify, and as a result, DXA can be a poor prognosticator of bone health in many clinical scenarios. New clinical tools are emerging to make measurement of bone strength more accurate. This article reviews the historical timeline of bone density measurement (dual X-ray absorptiometry), expands upon the clinical observations that modified the relationship of DXA and bone strength, discusses some of the new clinical tools to predict fracture risk, and highlights the challenges DXA poses in the assessment of fracture risk in astronauts.

  20. Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures in women and men: cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaëlsson, Karl; Wolk, Alicja; Langenskiöld, Sophie; Basu, Samar; Warensjö Lemming, Eva; Melhus, Håkan; Byberg, Liisa

    2014-10-28

    To examine whether high milk consumption is associated with mortality and fractures in women and men. Cohort studies. Three counties in central Sweden. Two large Swedish cohorts, one with 61,433 women (39-74 years at baseline 1987-90) and one with 45,339 men (45-79 years at baseline 1997), were administered food frequency questionnaires. The women responded to a second food frequency questionnaire in 1997. Multivariable survival models were applied to determine the association between milk consumption and time to mortality or fracture. During a mean follow-up of 20.1 years, 15,541 women died and 17,252 had a fracture, of whom 4259 had a hip fracture. In the male cohort with a mean follow-up of 11.2 years, 10,112 men died and 5066 had a fracture, with 1166 hip fracture cases. In women the adjusted mortality hazard ratio for three or more glasses of milk a day compared with less than one glass a day was 1.93 (95% confidence interval 1.80 to 2.06). For every glass of milk, the adjusted hazard ratio of all cause mortality was 1.15 (1.13 to 1.17) in women and 1.03 (1.01 to 1.04) in men. For every glass of milk in women no reduction was observed in fracture risk with higher milk consumption for any fracture (1.02, 1.00 to 1.04) or for hip fracture (1.09, 1.05 to 1.13). The corresponding adjusted hazard ratios in men were 1.01 (0.99 to 1.03) and 1.03 (0.99 to 1.07). In subsamples of two additional cohorts, one in males and one in females, a positive association was seen between milk intake and both urine 8-iso-PGF2α (a biomarker of oxidative stress) and serum interleukin 6 (a main inflammatory biomarker). High milk intake was associated with higher mortality in one cohort of women and in another cohort of men, and with higher fracture incidence in women. Given the observational study designs with the inherent possibility of residual confounding and reverse causation phenomena, a cautious interpretation of the results is recommended. © Michaëlsson et al 2014.

  1. 12 CFR 615.5135 - Management of interest rate risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Management of interest rate risk. 615.5135... of interest rate risk. The board of directors of each Farm Credit Bank, bank for cooperatives, and agricultural credit bank shall develop and implement an interest rate risk management program as set forth in...

  2. A Review of the Effect of Anticonvulsant Medications on Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard H.; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen

    2011-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis and seizure disorders are common diagnoses in older adults and often occur concomitantly. Objective The goal of this review was to discuss the current hypothesis for the pathogenesis of anticonvulsant-induced bone density loss and the evidence regarding the risk for osteoporosis and fractures in older individuals. Methods A review of the literature was performed, searching in MEDLINE and CINAHL for articles published between 1990 and October 2009 with the following search terms: anticonvulsant OR antiepileptic; AND osteoporosis OR bone density OR fracture OR absorptiometry, photon. Studies within the pediatric population, cross-sectional studies, and studies whose results were published in a language other than English were excluded. Results A search of the published literature yielded >300 results, of which 24 met the inclusion and exclusion criteria and were included in this review. Hepatic enzyme induction by certain anticonvulsant medications appears to contribute to increased metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D to inactive metabolites, which results in metabolic bone disease. There is increasing evidence that anticonvulsant use is associated with a higher risk of osteoporosis and clinical fractures, especially among older agents such as phenobarbital, carbamazepine, phenytoin, and valproate. Several observational studies suggest a class effect among anticonvulsant agents, associated with clinically significant reductions in bone mineral density and fracture risk. The use of anticonvulsant medications increases the odds of fracture by 1.2 to 2.4 times. However, only 2 large-scale observational studies have specifically examined the risk among those aged >65 years. This review also identified a randomized controlled trial whose results suggest that supplementation with high-dose vitamin D may be associated with increased bone mineral density in patients taking anticonvulsant medications. However, no randomized controlled trials

  3. Infirmity and injury complexity are risk factors for surgical-site infection after operative fracture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoura, Abdo; Guitton, Thierry G; Smith, R Malcolm; Vrahas, Mark S; Zurakowski, David; Ring, David

    2011-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgical-site infections prolong hospital stays, double rehospitalization rates, and increase healthcare costs. Additionally, patients with orthopaedic surgical-site infections (SSI) have substantially greater physical limitations and reductions in their health-related quality of life. However, the risk factors for SSI after operative fracture care are unclear. We determined the incidence and quantified modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors for SSIs in patients with orthopaedic trauma undergoing surgery. We retrospectively indentified, from our prospective trauma database and billing records, 1611 patients who underwent 1783 trauma-related procedures between 2006 and 2008. Medical records were reviewed and demographics, surgery-specific data, and whether the patients had an SSI were recorded. We determined which if any variables predicted SSI. Six factors independently predicted SSI: (1) the use of a drain, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-3.8); (2) number of operations OR 3.4, 95% CI (2.0-6.0); (3) diabetes, OR 2.1, 95% CI (1.2-3.8); (4) congestive heart failure (CHF), OR 2.8, 95% CI (1.3-6.5); (5) site of injury tibial shaft/plateau, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-4.2); and (6) site of injury, elbow, OR 2.2, 95% CI (1.1-4.7). The risk factors for SSIs after skeletal trauma are most strongly determined by nonmodifiable factors: patient infirmity (diabetes and heart failure) and injury complexity (site of injury, number of operations, use of a drain). Level II, prognostic study. See the Guideline for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  4. Rib stress fractures among rowers: a systematic review on return to sports, risk factors and prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Ailly, Philip N.; Sluiter, Judith K.; Kuijer, Paul P.

    2016-01-01

    Rib stress fractures (RSFs) are injuries frequently sustained by elite rowers with an injury rate of 8-16% over the course of a rowing career, resulting in negative effects on training and performance. For clinical management, the aim of this review was to describe time to return to sports,

  5. [Association between hip fractures and risk factors for osteoporosis. Multivariate analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoni, Ana; Morosano, Mario; Tomat, María Florencia; Pezzotto, Stella M; Sánchez, Ariel

    2007-01-01

    In this observational, case-control study, 376 inpatients were evaluated in order to determine the association of risk factors (RF) and hip fracture; 151 patients had osteoporotic hip fracture (cases); the remaining were controls. Data were obtained from medical charts, and through a standardized questionnaire about RF. Mean age of the sample (+/- SD) was 80.6 +/- 8.1 years, without statistically significant difference between cases and controls; the female:male ratio was 3:1 in both groups. Fractured women were older than men (82.5 +/- 8.1 vs. 79.7 +/- 7.2 years, respectively; p household duties was a RF (p = 0.007), which was absent in males. In multivariate analysis, the following RF were significantly more frequent: Cognitive impairment (p = 0.001), and previous falls (p < 0.0001); whereas the following protective factors were significantly different from controls: Calcium intake during youth (p < 0.0001), current calcium intake (p < 0.0001), and mechanical aid for walking (p < 0.0001). Evaluation of RF and protective factors may contribute to diminish the probability of hip fracture, through a modification of personal habits, and measures to prevent falls among elderly adults. Present information can help to develop local and national population-based strategies to diminish the burden of hip fractures for the health system.

  6. Subchondral cysts of the atlantoaxial joint: a risk factor for odontoid fractures in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Terrill P; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Barlow, Brian; Harris, Mitchel B

    2009-10-01

    Scholars have postulated that cervical degeneration can predispose the upper cervical spine to injury after minor trauma. Subchondral cysts have previously been recognized as potentiators of fracture in the hip and knee but no cases of cervical degenerative cysts contributing to fracture have been reported. This report documents a case series in which patients sustained significant injury to the upper cervical spine in the setting of subchondral cervical cysts. Case series/academic level I trauma center. Between 2004 and 2008, six patients (ages 73-91 years) with cervical pathology were admitted to the trauma service at our Level I trauma center. The most common mechanism of injury was a low velocity fall, which occurred in 5 out of 6 patients. All patients suffered an odontoid fracture. In all cases, there was radiographic evidence of cyst formation, and computed tomographic imaging demonstrated fracture communication with the subchondral cyst. Of the six cases, four were treated definitively with immobilization in a cervical orthosis and two required surgery. One patient was treated with an occipital-cervical fusion, whereas the other underwent Brooks wiring. All patients ultimately went on to heal their fractures. Degenerative changes in the cervical spine have previously been recognized to potentiate injury. This report raises the question of whether degenerative processes at the C1-C2 articulation predispose elderly patients to injury at this level. The presence of cystic degeneration at the atlantoaxial joint should be recognized as a potential risk factor for cervical injury after relatively minor trauma.

  7. Impact of Maternal Diet on Offspring Bone Fracture Risk During Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sesilje Elise Bondo

    , including maternal diet and vitamin D status. However, few studies have investigated whether these factors during pregnancy impact offspring bone health in short as well as in the long term. The overall objective of this thesis was to investigate epidemiologically whether maternal vitamin D status...... and dietary patterns in two prospective pregnancy cohorts, were associated with offspring risk of bone fractures in childhood. Overall, our studies provided limited support to the hypothesis that fetal bone health is programmed by the maternal vitamin D status and overall diet during pregnancy. However......, there were some indications of an increased risk for fractures when the mother consumed a Western diet and had high consumption of artificially sweetened soft drinks. Further, our results indicated that mid-pregnancy use of dietary supplements with high doses of vitamin D increased the risk for offspring...

  8. Risk factors for proximal sesamoid bone fractures associated with exercise history and horseshoe characteristics in Thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthenill, Lucy A; Stover, Susan M; Gardner, Ian A; Hill, Ashley E

    2007-07-01

    To assess individual and combined associations of high-speed exercise and horseshoe characteristics with risk of forelimb proximal sesamoid bone fractures and proximal sesamoid bone midbody fractures in Thoroughbred racehorses. 269 deceased Thoroughbred racehorses. A case-control study design was used to compare 121 horses with a fracture of at least 1 of 4 forelimb proximal sesamoid bones (75 horses had a midbody fracture) and 148 horses without a forelimb proximal sesamoid bone fracture. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate potential risk factors for association with proximal sesamoid bone fracture. Compared with horses that died without proximal sesamoid bone fractures, horses that died with proximal sesamoid bone fractures were more likely to be sexually intact males, spend more time in active trainingand racing, complete more events, train and race longer since their last layup, have higher exercise intensities during the 12 months prior to death, and have greater cumulative distances for their career. Horses with proximal sesamoid bone midbody fractures were more likely to be sexually intact males, train and race longer since their last layup, and have higher exercise intensities during the 12 months prior to death. Limitingexercise intensity and the continuous time spent in activity duringa horse's career may decrease the frequency of forelimb proximal sesamoid bone fractures in Thoroughbred horses.

  9. Dental trauma. Combination injuries 1. The risk of pulp necrosis in permanent teeth with concussion injuries and concomitant crown fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Hermann, Nuno Vibe; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    included 469 permanent incisors with concussion from 358 patients (226 male, 132 female). Among these, 292 had a concomitant crown fracture (70 with and 222 without pulp exposure). All teeth were examined and treated according to standardized protocol. Statistical analysis:  The risk of PN was analyzed...... by the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression. Risk factors included in the analysis: gender, age, stage of root development, type of crown fracture, and response to electric pulp test (EPT) at the initial examination. The level of significance was set at 5%. Results:  The risk of PN was low in teeth......The reported risk of pulp necrosis (PN) is low in teeth with concussion injuries. A concomitant crown fracture may affect the risk of PN. Aim:  To analyze the influence of a crown fracture (with and without pulp exposure) on the risk of PN in teeth with concussion injury. Material:  The study...

  10. Self-perceived facture risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothmann, M J; Ammentorp, J; Bech, M

    2015-01-01

    , and self-rated heath) and self-perceived fracture risk. Although women recognized the importance of some fracture risk factors, a number of significant risk factors appeared to be less well known. INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study is to investigate women's self-perceived fracture risk and potential...... factors associated with this and to compare self-perceived risk with absolute fracture risk estimated by FRAX® in women aged 65-80 years. METHODS: Data from 20,905 questionnaires from the ROSE study were analyzed. The questionnaire included 25 items on osteoporosis, risk factors for fractures, and self...... their fracture risk significantly higher than their peers. No correlation between self-perceived risk and absolute risk was found. The ordered logistic regression model showed a significant association between high self-perceived fracture risk and previous fragility fracture, parental hip fracture, falls, self...

  11. Evaluation of varying ductile fracture criteria for 42CrMo steel by compressions at different temperatures and strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Luo, Gui-chang; Mao, An; Liang, Jian-ting; Wu, Dong-sen

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an innovative approach involving hot compression tests, numerical simulations, and mathematic computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions, which has not been expounded by Cockcroft and Latham. The results show that the maximum damage value appears in the region of upsetting drum, while the minimal value appears in the middle region. Furthermore, DFC of 42CrMo steel at temperature range of 1123~1348 K and strain rate of 0.01~10 s(-1) are not constant but change in a range of 0.160~0.226; thus, they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC) and characterized by a function of temperature and strain rate. In bulk forming operations, VDFC help technicians to choose suitable process parameters and avoid the occurrence of fracture.

  12. Evaluation of Varying Ductile Fracture Criteria for 42CrMo Steel by Compressions at Different Temperatures and Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-zheng Quan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an innovative approach involving hot compression tests, numerical simulations, and mathematic computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions, which has not been expounded by Cockcroft and Latham. The results show that the maximum damage value appears in the region of upsetting drum, while the minimal value appears in the middle region. Furthermore, DFC of 42CrMo steel at temperature range of 1123~1348 K and strain rate of 0.01~10 s-1 are not constant but change in a range of 0.160~0.226; thus, they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC and characterized by a function of temperature and strain rate. In bulk forming operations, VDFC help technicians to choose suitable process parameters and avoid the occurrence of fracture.

  13. DUAL-ENERGY X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY AND CALCULATED FRAX RISK SCORES MAY UNDERESTIMATE OSTEOPOROTIC FRACTURE RISK IN VITAMIN D-DEFICIENT VETERANS WITH HIV INFECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Kelly I; Rubinsztain, Leon; Payan, John; Rentsch, Chris; Rimland, David; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the utility of the World Health Organization (WHO) Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) in assessing fracture risk in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and vitamin D deficiency. This was a retrospective study of HIV-infected patients with co-existing vitamin D deficiency at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), and the 10-year fracture risk was calculated by the WHO FRAX algorithm. Two independent radiologists reviewed lateral chest radiographs for the presence of subclinical vertebral fractures. We identified 232 patients with HIV and vitamin D deficiency. Overall, 15.5% of patients met diagnostic criteria for osteoporosis on DEXA, and 58% had low BMD (T-score between -1 and -2.5). The median risk of any major osteoporotic and hip fracture by FRAX score was 1.45 and 0.10%, respectively. Subclinical vertebral fractures were detected in 46.6% of patients. Compared to those without fractures, those with fractures had similar prevalence of osteoporosis (15.3% versus 15.7%; P>.999), low BMD (53.2% versus 59.3%; P = .419), and similar FRAX hip scores (0.10% versus 0.10%; P = .412). While the FRAX major score was lower in the nonfracture group versus fracture group (1.30% versus 1.60%; P = .025), this was not clinically significant. We found a high prevalence of subclinical vertebral fractures among vitamin D-deficient HIV patients; however, DEXA and FRAX failed to predict those with fractures. Our results suggest that traditional screening tools for fragility fractures may not be applicable to this high-risk patient population.

  14. Crohn's disease and risk of fracture: does thyroid disease play a role?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nakechand Pooran; Pankaj Singh; Simmy Bank

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role of thyroid disease as a risk for fractures in Crohn's patients.METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1998 to 2000. The study group consisted of 210 patients with Crohn's disease. A group of 206 patients without inflammatory bowel disease served as controls. Primary outcome was thyroid disorder. Secondary outcomes included use of steroids, immunosuppressive medications, surgery and incidence of fracture.RESULTS: The prevalence of hyperthyroidism was similar in both groups. However, the prevalence of hypothyroidism was lower in Crohn's patients (3.8 % vs 8.2 %, P=0.05).Within the Crohn's group, the use of immunosuppressive agents (0 % vs11 %), steroid usage (12.5 % vs37 %), small bowel surgery (12.5 % vs 28 %) and large bowel surgery (12.5 % vs27 %) were lower in the hypothyroid subset as compared to the euthyroid subset. Seven (3.4 %) Crohn'spatients suffered fracture, all of whom were euthyroid.CONCLUSION: Thyroid disorder was not found to be associated with Crohn's disease and was not found to increase the risk for fractures. Therefore, screening for thyroid disease is not a necessary component in the management of Crohn's disease.

  15. Are Elite Female Soccer Athletes at Risk for Disordered Eating Attitudes, Menstrual Dysfunction, and Stress Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Heidi; Hunt, Devyani; McKeon, Kathryn; Simpson, Scott; Meyer, E Blair; Yemm, Ted; Brophy, Robert

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of stress fractures, menstrual dysfunction and disordered eating attitudes in elite female soccer athletes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Female soccer athletes were recruited from a national level youth soccer club, an NCAA Division I university team, and a women's professional team. Two hundred twenty female soccer athletes with a mean age of 16.4 ± 4 years and BMI of 20.8 ± 2 kg/m(2) completed the study, representing all athletes from the included teams. One-time surveys completed by the athletes. Height and weight were recorded, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated for each athlete. Athletes reported age of menarche, history of missing 3 or more menses within a 12-month period and stress fracture. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was used to assess the athlete's body perception and attitudes toward eating. Of the 220 soccer athletes, 3 athletes (1.6%) had a low BMI for their age, and 19 (8.6%) reported stress fractures of the lower extremity. Among athletes who had reached menarche, the average onset was 13 + 1 year; menstrual dysfunction were present in 21 (19.3%). On the EAT-26, 1 player scored in the high risk range (>20) and 17 (7.7%) scored in the intermediate risk range (10-19) for eating disorders. Athletes with an EAT-26 score ≥ 10 points had a significantly higher prevalence of menstrual dysfunction in the past year compared to athletes with an EAT-26 score of less than 10 (P = .02). Elite female soccer athletes are susceptible to stress fractures and menstrual dysfunction and have delayed onset of menarche despite normal BMI and appropriate body perception and attitudes towards eating. Further studies are needed to better understand stress fracture risk in female soccer athletes and in other team sports to determine how these findings relate to long-term bone health in this population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Exchange rate policy under sovereign default risk

    OpenAIRE

    Schabert, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    We examine monetary policy options for a small open economy where sovereign default might occur due to intertemporal insolvency. Under interest rate policy and floating exchange rates the equilibrium is indetermined. Under a fixed exchange rate the equilibrium is uniquely determined and independent of sovereign default.

  17. Different aspects of visual impairment as risk factors for falls and fractures in older men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Michiel R; Pluijm, Saskia M F; Lips, Paul; Moll, Annette C; Völker-Dieben, Hennie J; Deeg, Dorly J H; van Rens, Ger H M B

    UNLABELLED: Visual impairment has been implicated as a risk factor for falling and fractures, but results of previous studies have been inconsistent. The relationship between several aspects of vision and falling/fractures were examined in a prospective cohort study in 1,509 older men and women. The

  18. Low serum magnesium levels are associated with increased risk of fractures: a long-term prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunutsor, Setor Kwadzo; Whitehouse, Michael Richard; Blom, Ashley William; Laukkanen, Jari Antero

    2017-07-01

    Magnesium, which is an essential trace element that plays a key role in several cellular processes, is a major component of bone; however, its relationship with risk of major bone fractures is uncertain. We aimed to investigate the association of baseline serum magnesium concentrations with risk of incident fractures. We analyzed data on 2245 men aged 42-61 years in the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease prospective cohort study, with the assessment of serum magnesium measurements and dietary intakes made at baseline. Hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals (CI)] for incident total (femoral, humeral, and forearm) and femoral fractures were assessed. During a median follow-up of 25.6 years, 123 total fractures were recorded. Serum magnesium was non-linearly associated with risk of total fractures. In age-adjusted Cox regression analysis, the hazard ratio (HR) (95% CIs) for total fractures in a comparison of the bottom quartile versus top quartile of magnesium concentrations was 2.10 (1.30-3.41), which persisted on adjustment for several established risk factors 1.99 (1.23-3.24). The association remained consistent on further adjustment for renal function, socioeconomic status, total energy intake, and several trace elements 1.80 (1.10-2.94). The corresponding adjusted HRs for femoral fractures were 2.56 (1.38-4.76), 2.43 (1.30-4.53) and 2.13 (1.13-3.99) respectively. There was no evidence of an association of dietary magnesium intake with risk of any fractures. In middle-aged Caucasian men, low serum magnesium is strongly and independently associated with an increased risk of fractures. Further research is needed to assess the potential relevance of serum magnesium in the prevention of fractures.

  19. Fall Risk Assessment Predicts Fall-Related Injury, Hip Fracture, and Head Injury in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Martin; Eriksson, Joel; Larsson, Berit; Odén, Anders; Johansson, Helena; Lorentzon, Mattias

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the role of a fall risk assessment, using the Downton Fall Risk Index (DFRI), in predicting fall-related injury, fall-related head injury and hip fracture, and death, in a large cohort of older women and men residing in Sweden. Cross sectional observational study. Sweden. Older adults (mean age 82.4 ± 7.8) who had a fall risk assessment using the DFRI at baseline (N = 128,596). Information on all fall-related injuries, all fall-related head injuries and hip fractures, and all-cause mortality was collected from the Swedish Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. The predictive role of DFRI was calculated using Poisson regression models with age, sex, height, weight, and comorbidities as covariates, taking time to outcome or end of study into account. During a median follow-up of 253 days (interquartile range 90-402 days) (>80,000 patient-years), 15,299 participants had a fall-related injury, 2,864 a head injury, and 2,557 a hip fracture, and 23,307 died. High fall risk (DFRI ≥3) independently predicted fall-related injury (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.39-1.49), hip fracture (HR = 1.51, 95% CI =1.38-1.66), head injury (HR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.03-1.22), and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.35-1.43). DFRI more strongly predicted head injury (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.21-1.36 vs HR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.04-1.11) and hip fracture (HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.30-1.53 vs HR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.05-1.11) in 70-year old men than in 90-year old women (P Fall risk assessment using DFRI independently predicts fall-related injury, fall-related head injury and hip fracture, and all-cause mortality in older men and women, indicating its clinical usefulness to identify individuals who would benefit from interventions. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Identifying cost-effective treatment with raloxifene in postmenopausal women using risk algorithms for fractures and invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivergård, M; Ström, O; Borgström, F; Burge, R T; Tosteson, A N A; Kanis, J

    2010-11-01

    The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) recommends considering treatment in women with a 20% or higher 10-year probability of a major fracture. However, raloxifene reduces both the risk of vertebral fractures and invasive breast cancer so that raloxifene treatment may be clinically appropriate and cost-effective in women who do not meet a 20% threshold risk. The aim of this study was to identify cost-effective scenarios of raloxifene treatment compared to no treatment in younger postmenopausal women at increased risk of invasive breast cancer and fracture risks below 20%. A micro-simulation model populated with data specific to American Caucasian women was used to quantify the costs and benefits of 5-year raloxifene treatment. The population evaluated was selected based on 10-year major fracture probability as estimated with FRAX® being below 20% and 5-year invasive breast cancer risk as estimated with the Gail risk model ranging from 1% to 5%. The cost per QALY gained ranged from US $22,000 in women age 55 with 5% invasive breast cancer risk and 15-19.9% fracture probability, to $110,000 in women age 55 with 1% invasive breast cancer risk and 5-9.9% fracture probability. Raloxifene was progressively cost-effective with increasing fracture risk and invasive breast cancer risk for a given age cohort. At lower fracture risk in combination with lower invasive breast cancer risk or when no preventive raloxifene effect on invasive breast cancer was assumed, the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene worsened markedly and was not cost-effective given a willingness-to-pay of US $50,000. At fracture risk of 15-19.9% raloxifene was cost-effective also in women at lower invasive breast cancer risk. Raloxifene is potentially cost-effective in cohorts of young postmenopausal women, who do not meet the suggested NOF 10-year fracture risk threshold. The cost-effectiveness is contingent on their 5-year invasive breast cancer risk. The result highlights the importance of considering

  1. Use of vacuum-assisted closure in pediatric open fractures with a focus on the rate of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorson, Jason; Jinnah, Riyaz; Kulp, Brenda; Frino, John

    2011-07-07

    The use of the vacuum-assisted closure device (VAC; KCI, San Antonio, Texas) has given the orthopedist a new tool for the successful management of severe traumatic wounds and open fractures. While the VAC's role in the adult population is proving itself as an improved therapy compared to "traditional wound care," it's role within pediatric orthopedics remains less well defined. Questions remain whether VAC therapy provides benefit regarding decreased infection rates as well as decreased need for extensive soft tissue coverage procedures. A review was therefore performed of a pediatric level I trauma center's experience using the VAC therapy for pediatric open fractures with a focus on the rate of superficial, deep, and chronic infection. A retrospective chart review spanning 4.5 years of all pediatric patients younger than 18 years with an open fracture initially treated with VAC therapy was conducted at a level I pediatric trauma center. This yielded 28 patients with 37 open fractures aged 2 to 17 years who were initially treated with wound VAC therapy. Subsequent chart review of these patients was performed examining in-hospital records, operative notes, and clinical follow-up visits for documented cases of superficial, deep, or chronic infection. Of 37 open pediatric fractures treated with a wound VAC, there were no cases of superficial infection and 2 cases of deep infection for an overall infection rate of 5%. Both infections resolved with surgical intervention and antibiotics without chronic infection development. When compared with historical controls, the use of VAC therapy for pediatric open fractures appears to be an equally safe and effective modality to help reduce infection in pediatric open fractures and should be considered a valuable tool in treating these injuries. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Estrogen receptor alpha polymorphism and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Alisa D; Ellervik, Christina; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Background- We hypothesized that the estrogen receptor (ESR1) IVS1-397T/C polymorphism affects high-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to hormone replacement therapy and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer of reproductive organs, and hip fracture. Methods and Results- We studied...... thromboembolism, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism), cancer of reproductive organs (breasts, ovaries, uterus, and prostate), and hip fracture. We also studied patients with ischemic heart disease (n=2495), ischemic cerebrovascular disease (n=856), and breast cancer (n=1256) versus general population...... controls. The CC, CT, and TT genotypes had general population frequencies of 21%, 50%, and 29%, respectively. Cross-sectionally, genotype did not influence high-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to hormone replacement therapy. In the cohort study, there were no differences in risks of CVD, cancer...

  3. Tissue-Level Mechanical Properties of Bone Contributing to Fracture Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Granke, Mathilde; Singleton, Robert C; Pharr, George M

    2016-08-01

    Tissue-level mechanical properties characterize mechanical behavior independently of microscopic porosity. Specifically, quasi-static nanoindentation provides measurements of modulus (stiffness) and hardness (resistance to yielding) of tissue at the length scale of the lamella, while dynamic nanoindentation assesses time-dependent behavior in the form of storage modulus (stiffness), loss modulus (dampening), and loss factor (ratio of the two). While these properties are useful in establishing how a gene, signaling pathway, or disease of interest affects bone tissue, they generally do not vary with aging after skeletal maturation or with osteoporosis. Heterogeneity in tissue-level mechanical properties or in compositional properties may contribute to fracture risk, but a consensus on whether the contribution is negative or positive has not emerged. In vivo indentation of bone tissue is now possible, and the mechanical resistance to microindentation has the potential for improving fracture risk assessment, though determinants are currently unknown.

  4. The Verbal Rating Scale Is Reliable for Assessment of Postoperative Pain in Hip Fracture Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, R. D.; Lauritsen, J.; Ovesen, O.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hip fracture patients represent a challenge to pain rating due to the high prevalence of cognitive impairment. Methods. Patients prospectively rated pain on the VRS. Furthermore, patients described the changes in pain after raising their leg, with one of five descriptors. Agreement...... between paired measures on the VRS at rest and by passive straight leg raise with a one-minute interval between ratings at rest and three-minute interval for straight leg raise was expressed by kappa coefficients. Reliability of this assessment of pain using the VRS was compared to the validity...... weighted kappa coefficients ranged from 0.68 (95% CI = 0.59-0.77) at leg raise to 0.75 (95% CI = 0.65-0.85) at rest. Unweighted kappa coefficients of agreement in recalled pain compared to agreement of paired VRS scores ranged from 0.57 (95% CI = 0.49-0.65) to 0.36 (95% CI = 0.31-0.41). Interpretation...

  5. Exchange rate risks and their impact upon the energy market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abed Al-Zabidi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of international business in Slovakia brought not only the opening of markets and expansion of enterprise possibilities but also an increase in the competition and new risks. One of such risks is also the exchange rate risk. The business that realizes a financial transaction exceeding borders of the state or derives his buying or selling prices in Slovak crowns from the foreign currency, is subjected to the exchange rate risks. The exchange rate risks are caused by volatility of exchange courses of Slovak crowns related to foreign currencies. The progress of exchange rates can considerably influence a real result of a transaction negatively; therefore it is important for enterprises to identify possible risks resulting from changes in exchange rates, so they could react accordingly.The proposed article is aimed at the explanation of basic techniques of minimizing exchange rate risks with the use of financial tools available on the financial market.

  6. Evolution of the fracture process zone in high-strength concrete under different loading rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cámara M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available For cementitious materials, the inelastic zone around a crack tip is termed as fracture process zone (FPZ and dominated by complicated mechanism, such as microcracking, crack deflection, bridging, crack face friction, crack tip blunting by voids, crack branching, and so on. Due to the length of the FPZ is related with the characteristic length of the cementitious materials, the size, extent and location of the FPZ has been the object of countless research efforts for several decades. For instance, Cedolin et al. [1] have used an optical method based on the moiré interferometry to determine FPZ in concrete. Castro-Montero et al. [2] have applied the method of holographic interferometry to mortar to study the extension of the FPZ. The advantage of the interferometry method is that the complete FPZ can be directly observed on the surface of the sample. Swartz et al. [3] has adopted the dye penetration technique to illustrate the changing patterns observed as the crack progress from the tensile side to the compression side of the beam. Moreover, acoustic emission (AE is also an experimental technique well suited for monitoring fracture process. Haidar et al. [4] and Maji et al. [5] have studied the relation between acoustic emission characteristics and the properties of the FPZ. Compared with the extensive research on properties of the FPZ under quasi-static loading conditions, much less information is available on its dynamic characterization, especially for high-strength concrete (HSC. This paper presents the very recent results of an experimental program aimed at disclosing the loading rate effect on the size and velocity of the (FPZ in HSC. Eighteen three-point bending specimens were conducted under a wide range of loading rates from from 10-4 mm/s to 103 mm/s using either a servo-hydraulic machine or a self-designed drop-weight impact device. The beam dimensions were 100 mm 100 mm in cross section, and 420 mm in length. The initial notch

  7. The Juvenile Addiction Risk Rating: Development and Initial Psychometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Michael; Newgent, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the development and psychometrics of the Juvenile Addiction Risk Rating. The Juvenile Addiction Risk Rating is a brief screening of addiction potential based on 10 risk factors predictive of youth alcohol and drug-related problems that assists examiners in more accurate treatment planning when self-report information is…

  8. Usefulness of the Trabecular Bone Score for assessing the risk of osteoporotic fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, L; Puigoriol, E; Rodríguez, J R; Peris, P; Kanterewicz, E

    2018-04-01

    The trabecular bone score (TBS) is an imaging technique that assesses the condition of the trabecular microarchitecture. Preliminary results suggest that TBS, along with the bone mineral density assessment, could improve the calculation of the osteoporotic fracture risk. The aim of this study was to analyse TBS values and their relationship with the clinical characteristics, bone mineral density and history of fractures of a cohort of posmenopausal women. We analysed 2,257 posmenopausal women from the FRODOS cohort, which was created to determine the risk factors for osteoporotic fracture through a clinical survey and bone densitometry with vertebral morphometry. TBS was applied to the densitometry images. TBS values ≤1230 were considered indicative of degraded microarchitecture. We performed a simple and multiple linear regression to determine the factors associated with this index. The mean TBS value in L1-L4 was 1.203±0.121. Some 55.3% of the women showed values indicating degraded microarchitecture. In the multiple linear regression analysis, the factors associated with low TBS values were age, weight, height, spinal T-score, glucocorticoid treatment, presence of type 2 diabetes and a history of fractures due to frailty. TBS showed microarchitecture degradation values in the participants of the FRODOS cohort and was associated with anthropometric factors, low bone mineral density values, the presence of fractures, a history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and the use of glucocorticoids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  9. Sideways fall-induced impact force and its effect on hip fracture risk: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri Sarvi, M; Luo, Y

    2017-10-01

    Osteoporotic hip fracture, mostly induced in falls among the elderly, is a major health burden over the world. The impact force applied to the hip is an important factor in determining the risk of hip fracture. However, biomechanical researches have yielded conflicting conclusions about whether the fall-induced impact force can be accurately predicted by the available models. It also has been debated whether or not the effect of impact force has been considered appropriately in hip fracture risk assessment tools. This study aimed to provide a state-of-the-art review of the available methods for predicting the impact force, investigate their strengths/limitations, and suggest further improvements in modeling of human body falling. We divided the effective parameters on impact force to two categories: (1) the parameters that can be determined subject-specifically and (2) the parameters that may significantly vary from fall to fall for an individual and cannot be considered subject-specifically. The parameters in the first category can be investigated in human body fall experiments. Video capture of real-life falls was reported as a valuable method to investigate the parameters in the second category that significantly affect the impact force and cannot be determined in human body fall experiments. The analysis of the gathered data revealed that there is a need to develop modified biomechanical models for more accurate prediction of the impact force and appropriately adopt them in hip fracture risk assessment tools in order to achieve a better precision in identifying high-risk patients. Graphical abstract Impact force to the hip induced in sideways falls is affected by many parameters and may remarkably vary from subject to subject.

  10. Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation and risk of fractures: an updated meta-analysis from the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, C M; Alexander, D D; Boushey, C J; Dawson-Hughes, B; Lappe, J M; LeBoff, M S; Liu, S; Looker, A C; Wallace, T C; Wang, D D

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to meta-analyze randomized controlled trials of calcium plus vitamin D supplementation and fracture prevention. Meta-analysis showed a significant 15 % reduced risk of total fractures (summary relative risk estimate [SRRE], 0.85; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 0.73-0.98) and a 30 % reduced risk of hip fractures (SRRE, 0.70; 95 % CI, 0.56-0.87). Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation has been widely recommended to prevent osteoporosis and subsequent fractures; however, considerable controversy exists regarding the association of such supplementation and fracture risk. The aim was to conduct a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials [RCTs] of calcium plus vitamin D supplementation and fracture prevention in adults. A PubMed literature search was conducted for the period from July 1, 2011 through July 31, 2015. RCTs reporting the effect of calcium plus vitamin D supplementation on fracture incidence were selected from English-language studies. Qualitative and quantitative information was extracted; random-effects meta-analyses were conducted to generate summary relative risk estimates (SRREs) for total and hip fractures. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran's Q test and the I (2) statistic, and potential for publication bias was assessed. Of the citations retrieved, eight studies including 30,970 participants met criteria for inclusion in the primary analysis, reporting 195 hip fractures and 2231 total fractures. Meta-analysis of all studies showed that calcium plus vitamin D supplementation produced a statistically significant 15 % reduced risk of total fractures (SRRE, 0.85; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 0.73-0.98) and a 30 % reduced risk of hip fractures (SRRE, 0.70; 95 % CI, 0.56-0.87). Numerous sensitivity and subgroup analyses produced similar summary associations. A limitation is that this study utilized data from subgroup analysis of the Women's Health Initiative. This meta-analysis of RCTs supports the use of calcium plus

  11. Bone mineral density at diagnosis determines fracture rate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the DCOG-ALL9 protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Winkel, Mariel L.; Pieters, Rob; Hop, Wim C. J.; Roos, Jan C.; Bokkerink, Jos P. M.; Leeuw, Jan A.; Bruin, Marrie C. A.; Kollen, Wouter J. W.; Veerman, Anjo J. P.; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A.; van der Sluis, Inge M.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    Purpose: To elucidate incidence and risk factors of bone mineral density and fracture risk in children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). Methods: Prospectively, cumulative fracture incidence, calculated from diagnosis until one year after cessation of treatment, was assessed in 672 patients.

  12. The impact of thyroid diseases on bone metabolism and fracture risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, M; Giorgadze, E; Tsagareli, M; Nozadze, N; Jeiranashvili, N

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, leading to enhanced bone fragility and a consequent increase in fracture risk. One of the leading causes of secondary osteoporosis are thyroid diseases; this fact carries special importance for Georgia because of thyroid disease prevalence in Georgian population. In the present article we discuss the mechanisms, by which thyroid hormones and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) act on bone. We also present the data of meta-analysis of large studies, which demonstrate the complex relationship between the thyroid diseases and bone mineral density as well as the fracture risk; namely by overt and subclinical thyrotoxicosis, hypothyroidism and the treatment with the suppressive doses of levothyroxine. Beside that, we review the related data and the possible reasons, why different treatment regimens of Grave's disease: conservative, operative and radioiodine are related to different fracture risks. Finally, we discuss briefly the practical aspects of the treatment of secondary osteoporosis, related with thyroid diseases.

  13. Interest rate risk of life insurers: Evidence from accounting data

    OpenAIRE

    Möhlmann, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Life insurers are exposed to interest rate risk, and their liability side is typically more sensitive to interest rate changes than their asset side. This paper develops an accounting-based measure of interest rate sensitivity. My approach uses the coexistence of historical cost and market value accounting, which permits the observation of valuations for different discount rates. Using microdata, I show that German life insurers have a significant exposure to interest rate risk. However, ther...

  14. Simplifying cardiovascular risk estimation using resting heart rate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2010-09-01

    Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is a known, independent cardiovascular (CV) risk factor, but is not included in risk estimation systems, including Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). We aimed to derive risk estimation systems including RHR as an extra variable and assess the value of this addition.

  15. Growth and Age-Related Abnormalities in Cortical Structure and Fracture Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ego Seeman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral fractures and trabecular bone loss have dominated thinking and research into the pathogenesis and the structural basis of bone fragility during the last 70 years. However, 80% of all fractures are non-vertebral and occur at regions assembled using large amounts of cortical bone; only 20% of fractures are vertebral. Moreover, ~80% of the skeleton is cortical and ~70% of all bone loss is cortical even though trabecular bone is lost more rapidly than cortical bone. Bone is lost because remodelling becomes unbalanced after midlife. Most cortical bone loss occurs by intracortical, not endocortical remodelling. Each remodelling event removes more bone than deposited enlarging existing canals which eventually coalesce eroding and thinning the cortex from 'within.' Thus, there is a need to study the decay of cortical as well as trabecular bone, and to develop drugs that restore the strength of both types of bone. It is now possible to accurately quantify cortical porosity and trabecular decay in vivo. The challenges still to be met are to determine whether measurement of porosity identifies persons at risk for fracture, whether this approach is compliments information obtained using bone densitometry, and whether changes in cortical porosity and other microstructural traits have the sensitivity to serve as surrogates of treatment success or failure.

  16. Risk Factors for Pneumonia in Ventilated Trauma Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Oh Park

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is a common disease that may contribute to morbidity and mortality among trauma patients in the intensive care unit (ICU. This study evaluated the associations between trauma factors and the development of VAP in ventilated patients with multiple rib fractures. Methods: We retrospectively and consecutively evaluated 101 patients with multiple rib fractures who were ventilated and managed at our hospital between January 2010 and December 2015, analyzing the associations between VAP and trauma factors in these patients. Trauma factors included sternal fracture, flail chest, diaphragm injury, traumatic aortic dissection, combined cardiac injury, pulmonary contusion, pneumothorax, hemothorax, hemopneumothorax, abbreviated injury scale score, thoracic trauma severity score, and injury severity score. Results: Forty-six patients (45.5% had at least 1 episode of VAP, 10 (21.7% of whom died in the ICU. Of the 55 (54.5% patients who did not have pneumonia, 9 (16.4% died in the ICU. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that VAP was associated with severe lung contusion (odds ratio, 3.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 8.39; p=0.029. Conclusion: Severe pulmonary contusion (pulmonary lung contusion score 6–12 is an independent risk factor for VAP in ventilated trauma patients with multiple rib fractures.

  17. Risk factors associated with outcomes of hip fracture surgery in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Hoon; Lee, Sangseok; Yoo, Byunghoon; Lee, Woo Yong; Lim, Yunhee; Kim, Mun-Cheol; Yon, Jun Heum; Kim, Kye-Min

    2015-12-01

    Hip fracture surgery on elderly patients is associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to identify the risk factors related to the postoperative mortality and complications following hip fracture surgery on elderly patients. In this retrospective study, the medical records of elderly patients (aged 65 years or older) who underwent hip fracture surgery from January 2011 to June 2014 were reviewed. A total of 464 patients were involved. Demographic data of the patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, preoperative comorbidities, type and duration of anesthesia and type of surgery were collected. Factors related to postoperative mortality and complications; as well as to intensive care unit admission were analyzed using logistic regression. The incidence of postoperative mortality, cardiovascular complications, respiratory complications and intensive care unit (ICU) admission were 1.7, 4.7, 19.6 and 7.1%, respectively. Postoperative mortality was associated with preoperative respiratory comorbidities, postoperative cardiovascular complications (P bedridden state (P elderly patients undergoing hip fracture surgery.

  18. Expected lifetime numbers, risks, and burden of osteoporotic fractures for 50-year old Chinese women: a discrete event simulation incorporating FRAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yawen; Ni, Weiyi

    2016-11-01

    This work was undertaken to provide an estimation of expected lifetime numbers, risks, and burden of fractures for 50-year-old Chinese women. A discrete event simulation model was developed to simulate the lifetime fractures of 50-year-old Chinese women at average risk of osteoporotic fracture. Main events in the model included hip fracture, clinical vertebral fracture, wrist fracture, humerus fracture, and other fracture. Fracture risks were calculated using the FRAX ® tool. Simulations of 50-year-old Chinese women without fracture risks were also carried out as a comparison to determine the burden of fractures. A 50-year-old Chinese woman at average risk of fracture is expected to experience 0.135 (95 % CI: 0.134-0.137) hip fractures, 0.120 (95 % CI: 0.119-0.122) clinical vertebral fractures, 0.095 (95 % CI: 0.094-0.096) wrist fractures, 0.079 (95 % CI: 0.078-0.080) humerus fractures, and 0.407 (95 % CI: 0.404-0.410) other fractures over the remainder of her life. The residual lifetime risk of any fracture, hip fracture, clinical vertebral fracture, wrist fracture, humerus fracture, and other fracture for a 50-year-old Chinese woman is 37.36, 11.77, 10.47, 8.61, 7.30, and 27.80 %, respectively. The fracture-attributable excess quality-adjusted life year (QALY) loss and lifetime costs are estimated at 0.11 QALYs (95 % CI: 0.00-0.22 QALYs) and US $714.61 (95 % CI: US $709.20-720.02), totaling a net monetary benefit loss of US $1,104.43 (95 % CI: US $904.09-1,304.78). Chinese women 50 years of age are at high risk of osteoporotic fracture, and the expected economic and quality-of-life burden attributable to osteoporotic fractures among Chinese women is substantial.

  19. Exchange rate risk in Central European countries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kočenda, Evžen; Poghosyan, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2010), s. 22-39 ISSN 0015-1920 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA402/08/1376; GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM0021620846 Keywords : foreign exchange risk * time-varying risk premium * stochastic discount factor Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.278, year: 2010 http://journal.fsv.cuni.cz/storage/1178_str_22_39_-_ko%C4%8Denda.pdf

  20. Individualized Fracture Risk Feedback and Long-term Benefits After 10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feitong; Wills, Karen; Laslett, Laura L; Riley, Malcolm D; Oldenburg, Brian; Jones, Graeme; Winzenberg, Tania

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to determine if beneficial effects of individualized feedback of fracture risk on osteoporosis preventive behaviors and bone mineral density observed in a 2-year trial were sustained long-term. This was a 10-year follow-up of a 2-year RCT in 470 premenopausal women aged 25-44 years, who were randomized to one of two educational interventions (the Osteoporosis Prevention and Self-Management Course [OPSMC] or an osteoporosis information leaflet) and received tailored feedback of their relative risk of fracture in later life (high versus normal risk groups). Bone mineral density of lumbar spine and femoral neck were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Physical activity, dietary calcium intake, calcium and vitamin D supplements, and smoking status were measured by questionnaires. From 2 to 12 years, the high-risk group had a smaller decrease in femoral neck bone mineral density (β=0.023, 95% CI=0.005, 0.041 g/cm 2 ) but similar lumbar spine bone mineral density change as the normal-risk group. They were more likely to use calcium (relative risk=1.66, 95% CI=1.22, 2.24) and vitamin D supplements (1.99, 95% CI=1.27, 3.11). The OPSMC had no effects on bone mineral density change. Both high-risk (versus normal-risk) and the OPSMC groups (versus leaflet) had a more favorable pattern of smoking behavior change (relative risk=1.85, 95% CI=0.70, 4.89 and relative risk=2.27, 95% CI=0.86, 6.01 for smoking cessation; relative risk=0.33, 95% CI=0.13, 0.80 and relative risk=0.28, 95% CI=0.10, 0.79 for commenced or persistent smoking). Feedback of high fracture risk to younger women was associated with long-term improvements in osteoporosis preventive behaviors and attenuated femoral neck bone mineral density loss. Therefore, this could be considered as a strategy to prevent osteoporosis. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) NCT00273260. Copyright © 2018 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. 'Balancing risk' after fall-induced hip fracture: the older person's need for information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Laura; Booth, Joanne; Currie, Kay; Howe, Tracey

    2014-12-01

    Hip fracture is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in older people. Healthcare professionals have a role to identify and respond to challenges and concerns that older people face as they strive to manage risk of future falls and rebuild confidence and independence after discharge. This study aimed to explore the postdischarge concerns of older people after fall-induced hip fracture. Glaser's approach to the grounded theory method guided qualitative interviews conducted with 19 older people in their own homes up to 3 months post discharge, in two health authority areas. A theory of 'taking control' was generated. 'Balancing risk' emerged as a key strategy that older people employed to help them to take control after discharge home. Older people attempted to control or 'balance' their risk of future falls and dependence by implementing two further strategies: 'protective guarding' and 'following orders'. The instinctive strategy of protective guarding and the learned strategy of following orders were implemented simultaneously and were characterised by older people aiming to pace their progress and balance risk safely and appropriately. To apply these strategies, older people required information from healthcare professionals. In circumstances where older people did not receive or did not understand the information provided, they were left 'grasping to understand' and were more likely to miscalculate risk. This leads to damaged confidence and in some cases further falls. The concept of balancing risk aims to help healthcare professionals understand the older person's perspective of hip fracture and to recognise the efforts that people make to guard against further injury and dependence in the early postdischarge period. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Alveolar process fractures in the permanent dentition. Part 2. The risk of healing complications in teeth involved in an alveolar process fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas; Andreasen, Jens Ove

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the risk of pulp canal obliteration (PCO), pulp necrosis (PN), repair-related resorption (RRR), infection-related resorption (IRR), ankylosis-related resorption (ARR), marginal bone loss (MBL), and tooth loss (TL) for teeth involved in an alveolar process fracture and to identify ...

  3. Risk of Fracture in Women with Sarcopenia, Low Bone Mass, or Both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rebekah; Chang, Yuefang; Beavers, Kristen; Laddu-Patel, Deepika; Bea, Jennifer; Johnson, Karen; LeBoff, Meryl; Womack, Catherine; Wallace, Robert; Li, Wenjun; Crandall, Carolyn; Cauley, Jane

    2017-12-01

    To determine whether women with sarcopenia and low bone mineral density (BMD) are at greater risk of clinical fractures than those with sarcopenia or low BMD alone. Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Observational and Clinical trials. Three U.S. clinical centers (Pittsburgh, PA; Birmingham, AL; Phoenix/Tucson, AZ). Women (mean age 63.3 ± 0.07) with BMD measurements (N = 10,937). Sarcopenia was defined as appendicular lean mass values corrected for height and fat mass. Low BMD was defined as a femoral neck T-score less than -1.0 based on the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey reference database for white women. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We followed women for incident fractures over a median of 15.9 years. Participants were classified into mutually exclusive groups based on BMD and sarcopenia status: normal BMD and no sarcopenia (n = 3,857, 35%), sarcopenia alone (n = 774, 7%), low BMD alone (n = 4,907, 45%), and low BMD and sarcopenia (n = 1,399, 13%). Women with low BMD, with (HR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.44-2.06) or without sarcopenia (HR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.37-1.83), had greater risk of fracture than women with normal BMD; the difference remained statistically significant after adjustment for important covariates. Women with low BMD, with (HR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.78-4.30 and without (HR = 2.42, 95% CI = 1.63-3.59) sarcopenia had higher risk of hip fractures. Women with sarcopenia alone had similar HRs to women with normal BMD. Compared to women with normal BMD. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  4. Cement Leakage in Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation for Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures: Analysis of Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weixing; Jin, Daxiang; Ma, Hui; Ding, Jinyong; Xu, Jixi; Zhang, Shuncong; Liang, De

    2016-05-01

    The risk factors for cement leakage were retrospectively reviewed in 192 patients who underwent percutaneous vertebral augmentation (PVA). To discuss the factors related to the cement leakage in PVA procedure for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. PVA is widely applied for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Cement leakage is a major complication of this procedure. The risk factors for cement leakage were controversial. A retrospective review of 192 patients who underwent PVA was conducted. The following data were recorded: age, sex, bone density, number of fractured vertebrae before surgery, number of treated vertebrae, severity of the treated vertebrae, operative approach, volume of injected bone cement, preoperative vertebral compression ratio, preoperative local kyphosis angle, intraosseous clefts, preoperative vertebral cortical bone defect, and ratio and type of cement leakage. To study the correlation between each factor and cement leakage ratio, bivariate regression analysis was employed to perform univariate analysis, whereas multivariate linear regression analysis was employed to perform multivariate analysis. The study included 192 patients (282 treated vertebrae), and cement leakage occurred in 100 vertebrae (35.46%). The vertebrae with preoperative cortical bone defects generally exhibited higher cement leakage ratio, and the leakage is typically type C. Vertebrae with intact cortical bones before the procedure tend to experience type S leakage. Univariate analysis showed that patient age, bone density, number of fractured vertebrae before surgery, and vertebral cortical bone were associated with cement leakage ratio (Pcement leakage are bone density and vertebral cortical bone defect, with standardized partial regression coefficients of -0.085 and 0.144, respectively. High bone density and vertebral cortical bone defect are independent risk factors associated with bone cement leakage.

  5. Exposure to Fluoride in Drinking Water and Hip Fracture Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Xin-Hai; Huang, Guang-Lei; Lin, Du-Ren; Wan, Cheng-Cheng; Wang, Ya-Dong; Song, Ju-Kun; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Many observational studies have shown that exposure to fluoride in drinking water is associated with hip fracture risk. However, the findings are varied or even contradictory. In this work, we performed a meta-analysis to assess the relationship between fluoride exposure and hip fracture risk. Methods PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched to identify relevant observational studies from the time of inception until March 2014 without restrictions. Data from the included studies w...

  6. Application of probabilistic fracture mechanics to estimate the risk of rupture of PWR steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitner, P.; Riffard, T.; Granger, B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the COMPROMIS code developed by Electricite de France (EDF) to optimize the tube bundle maintenance of steam generators. The model, based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, makes it possible to quantify the influence of in-service inspections and maintenance work on the risk of an SG tube rupture, taking all significant parameters into account as random variables (initial defect size distribution, reliability of non-destructive detection and sizing, crack initiation and propagation, critical sizes, leak before risk of break, etc.). (authors). 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Do pathological fractures influence survival and local recurrence rate in bony sarcomas?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramer, J. A. M.; Abudu, A. A.; Grimer, R. J.; Carter, S. R.; Tillman, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of pathological fracture on surgical management, local recurrence and survival was established in patients with high grade, localised, extremity osteosarcoma (n=484), chondrosarcoma (n=130) and Ewing's sarcoma (n=156). Limb salvage was possible in 79% of patients with a fracture

  8. Risk of hip fractures associated with benzodiazepines: Applying common protocol to a multi-database nested case-control study. The protect project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Requena, Gema; Logie, John; González-González, Rocío; Gardarsdottir, Helga|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/321858131; Afonso, Ana; Souverein, Patrick C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/243074948; Merino, Elisa Martin; Boudiaf, Nada; Huerta, Consuelo; Bate, Andrew; Alvarez, Yolanda; García-Rodríguez, Luis A.; Reynolds, Robert; Schlienger, Raymond G.; De Groot, Mark C.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313936455; Klungel, Olaf H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/181447649; De Abajo, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between benzodiazepines (BZD) and hip fractures has been estimated in several observational studies although diverse methodologies and definitions have hampered comparability. Objectives: To evaluate the discrepancies in the risk estimates of hip/femur fractures

  9. Comparative trends in incident fracture rates for all long-term care and community-dwelling seniors in Ontario, Canada, 2002-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, A; Kennedy, C C; Ioannidis, G; Cameron, C; Croxford, R; Adachi, J D; Mursleen, S; Jaglal, S

    2016-03-01

    In this population-based study, we compared incident fracture rates in long-term care (LTC) versus community seniors between 2002 and 2012. Hip fracture rates declined more rapidly in LTC than in the community. An excess burden of fractures occurred in LTC for hip, pelvis, and humerus fractures in men and hip fractures only in women. This study compares trends in incident fracture rates between long-term care (LTC) and community-dwelling seniors ≥65 years, 2002-2012. This is a population-based cohort study using administrative data. Measurements were age/sex-adjusted incident fracture rates and rate ratios (RR) and annual percent change (APC). Over 11 years, hip fracture rates had a marked decline occurring more rapidly in LTC (APC, -3.49 (95% confidence interval (CI), -3.97, -3.01)) compared with the community (APC, -2.93 (95% CI, -3.28, -2.57); p community (RRs: women, 1.55 (95% CI, 1.45, 1.67); men, 2.18 (95% CI, 1.93, 2.47)). Higher rates of pelvis (RR, 1.48 (95% CI, 1.22, 1.80)) and humerus (RR, 1.40 (95% CI, 1.07, 1.84)) fractures were observed in LTC men, not women. In women, wrist (RR, 0.76 (95% CI, 0.71, 0.81)) and spine (RR, 0.52 (95% CI, 0.45, 0.61)) fracture rates were lower in LTC than the community; in men, spine (RR, 0.75 (95% CI, 0.57, 0.98) but not wrist fracture (RR, 0.91 (95% CI, 0.67, 1.23)) rates were significantly lower in LTC than the community. Previous studies in the community have shown declining hip fracture rates over time, also demonstrated in our study but at a more rapid rate in LTC. Rates of humerus and wrist fractures also declined. An excess burden of fractures in LTC occurred for hip fractures in women and for hip, pelvis, and humerus fractures in men.

  10. Health related quality of life, reoperation rate and function in patients with diabetes mellitus and hip fracture--a 2 year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, W; Al-Ani, A N; Sääf, M; Cederholm, T; Ponzer, S; Hedström, M

    2013-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus confers an increased risk of hip fractures. There is a limited knowledge of how the outcome after a hip fracture in patients with diabetes affect Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate HRQoL. Secondary aims were reoperation rate, complications and functions in patients with diabetes followed for 2 years after a hip fracture. Out of 2133 patients diabetes was present in 234 patients (11%). Main outcome measurements were HRQoL evaluated with EuroQoL 5-Dindex score, reoperation rate, surgical and medical complications, function as walking ability, daily activities, living condition and pain. Preoperatively, patients with diabetes mellitus had more pain (p=0.044), co-morbidities, reduced health status (p=0.001) and more often used a walking frame (p=0.014) than patients without diabetes, whereas Katz ADL index, cognition and body mass index did not differ. There was no difference in fracture type, surgical method or reoperation between the two groups or between patients with insulin treated or oral treated diabetes. The EQ-5Dindex score decreased from 0.64 at admission to 0.45 at 4 months, 0.49 at 12 months and 0.51 at 24 months with similar results for patients with and without diabetes. During the first postoperative year there was not more medical complications among patients with diabetes, however cardiac (p=0.023) and renal failure (p=0.032) were more frequent in patients with diabetes at 24 months. Patients with diabetes more often had severe hip pain at 4 months (p=0.031). At 12 months more diabetic patients were living independently (p=0.034). There was no difference in walking ability, ADL and living condition between the groups at 24 months. The findings of this study indicate that patients with diabetes mellitus had more pain, co-morbidities, reduced health status preoperatively than patients without diabetes. Hip fracture patients with diabetes mellitus have more hip pain at 4 months. Cardiac

  11. Identifying the Risk of Swallowing-Related Pulmonary Complications in Older Patients With Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meals, Clifton; Roy, Siddharth; Medvedev, Gleb; Wallace, Matthew; Neviaser, Robert J; O'Brien, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    To identify and potentially modify the risk of pulmonary complications in a group of older patients with hip fracture, the authors obtained speech and language pathology consultations for these patients. Then they performed a retrospective chart review of all patients 65 years and older who were admitted to their institution between June 2011 and July 2013 with acute hip fracture, were treated surgically, and had a speech and language pathology evaluation in the immediate perioperative period. The authors identified 52 patients who met the study criteria. According to the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification system, at the time of surgery, 1 patient (2%) was classified as ASA I, 12 patients (23%) were ASA II, 26 (50%) were ASA III, and 12 (23%) were ASA IV. Based on a speech and language pathology evaluation, 22 patients (42%) were diagnosed with dysphagia. Statistical analysis showed that ASA III status and ASA IV status were meaningful predictors of dysphagia and that dysphagia itself was a strong risk factor for pulmonary aspiration, pneumonia, and aspiration pneumonitis. Evaluation by a speech and language pathologist, particularly of patients classified as ASA III or ASA IV, may be an efficient means of averting pulmonary morbidity that is common in older patients with hip fracture. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Characterizing trabecular bone structure for assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Tsai, Halley; Wang, Xixi; Hobbs, Susan K.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    While the proximal femur is preferred for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) in fracture risk estimation, the introduction of volumetric quantitative computed tomography has revealed stronger associations between BMD and spinal fracture status. In this study, we propose to capture properties of trabecular bone structure in spinal vertebrae with advanced second-order statistical features for purposes of fracture risk assessment. For this purpose, axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) images were acquired from 28 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. A semi-automated method was used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the central vertebral slice with a circular region of interest (ROI) to exclude cortical bone; pixels within were converted to values indicative of BMD. Six second-order statistical features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) and the mean BMD within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a generalized radial basis functions (GRBF) neural network to predict the failure load of the specimens; true failure load was measured through biomechanical testing. Prediction performance was evaluated with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric. The best prediction performance was observed with GLCM feature `correlation' (RMSE = 1.02 ± 0.18), which significantly outperformed all other GLCM features (p biomechanical strength prediction in spinal vertebrae can be significantly improved through characterization of trabecular bone structure with GLCM-derived texture features.

  13. The risk of hydraulic fracturing on public health in the UK and the UK's fracking legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reap, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing to extract natural gas from shale rock is a new, rapidly expanding industry in the United States (US). However, there is concern that these operations could be having large negative impacts such as groundwater contamination, increased air pollution and seismic events. The United Kingdom (UK) is looking at the potential for emulating the success of 'shale gas' in the US. Differences in population density and geological conditions mean that the public health impacts recorded in the US cannot be directly extrapolated to the UK. There is limited academic literature available but findings suggest that the UK government is not fully recognising the inherent risks of hydraulic fracturing exposed by this literature. Government reports suggest a reliance on engineering solutions and better practice to overcome problems found in the US when evidence suggests that there are inherent risks and impacts that cannot be eliminated. This study applies US results to approximate the impact of one exposure pathway, inhalation of hydrocarbons by the public from operational air emissions over the 30 year lifetime of a well and finds that 7.2 extra cancer cases from exposure to air contamination would be expected in the UK if all test sites, approved test sites and test sites awaiting approval as of January 2015 went on to extract gas. In conclusion, limited assessment of the public health implications of hydraulic fracturing operations is available but the UK government appears to not be applying the precautionary principle to potentially significant legislation.

  14. A simple score for estimating the long-term risk of fracture in patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bazelier, M. T.; van Staa, T. P.; Uitdehaag, B. M. J.

    2012-01-01

    was converted into integer risk scores. Results: In comparison with the FRAX calculator, our risk score contains several new risk factors that have been linked with fracture, which include MS, use of antidepressants, use of anticonvulsants, history of falling, and history of fatigue. We estimated the 5- and 10......Objective: To derive a simple score for estimating the long-term risk of osteoporotic and hip fracture in individual patients with MS. Methods: Using the UK General Practice Research Database linked to the National Hospital Registry (1997-2008), we identified patients with incident MS (n = 5......,494). They were matched 1:6 by year of birth, sex, and practice with patients without MS (control subjects). Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the long-term risk of osteoporotic and hip fracture. We fitted the regression model with general and specific risk factors, and the final Cox model...

  15. Strut fracture of Björk-Shiley convexo-concave valve in Japan--risk of small valve size--.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watarida, S; Shiraishi, S; Nishi, T; Imura, M; Yamamoto, Y; Hirokawa, R; Fujita, M

    2001-08-01

    The Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (BSCC) prosthetic valve was introduced in 1979. Between 1979 and 1986, approximately 86,000 BSCC valves were implanted. By December 31, 1994, 564 complete strut fractures had been reported to the manufacture. We experienced a case of an outlet strut fracture and investigated the risk of BSCC prosthetic valve fractures in Japan. To investigate the risk factor of a strut fracture in Japan, we investigated published cases of strut fractures. Between 1979 and 1986, 2021 BSCC valves were implanted in Japan. By January 31, 2000, 11 complete strut fractures of 60-degree BSCC valves including our case had occurred. The patients were eight males and three females. The average age at valve replacement was 42.4+/-8.1 years, and nine of eleven (81.8%) were patients valve fractured was 47.7+/-6.4 years, and eight of eleven (72.7%) were patients valve were 27 mm (n=5) (45.5%), 29 mm (n=3) (27.2%), and 31 mm (n=3) (27.2%). Four patients died and seven patients survived. Although only 11 BSCC valve struts fractured and statistical analysis could not be performed, our findings suggest that the high risk group for a strut fracture in Japan is young male patients with a mitral valve, >= 27 mm in size with BSCC models manufactured before March 1982. When following-up patients with BSCC models manufactured before March 1982, the possibility of a strut fracture in all BSCC valve sizes should be kept in mind.

  16. Interest Rate Risk Management using Duration Gap Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Armeanu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The world for financial institutions has changed during the last 20 years, and become riskier and more competitive-driven. After the deregulation of the financial market, banks had to take on extensive risk in order to earn sufficient returns. Interest rate volatility has increased dramatically over the past twenty-five years and for that an efficient management of this interest rate risk is strong required. In the last years banks developed a variety of methods for measuring and managing interest rate risk. From these the most frequently used in real banking life and recommended by Basel Committee are based on: Reprising Model or Funding Gap Model, Maturity Gap Model, Duration Gap Model, Static and Dynamic Simulation. The purpose of this article is to give a good understanding of duration gap model used for managing interest rate risk. The article starts with a overview of interest rate risk and explain how this type of risk should be measured and managed within an asset-liability management. Then the articles takes a short look at methods for measuring interest rate risk and after that explains and demonstrates how can be used Duration Gap Model for managing interest rate risk in banks.The world for financial institutions has changed during the last 20 years, and become riskier and more competitive-driven. After the deregulation of the financial market, banks had to take on extensive risk in order to earn sufficient returns. Interest rate volatility has increased dramatically over the past twenty-five years and for that an efficient management of this interest rate risk is strong required. In the last years banks developed a variety of methods for measuring and managing interest rate risk. From these the most frequently used in real banking life and recommended by Basel Committee are based on: Reprising Model or Funding Gap Model, Maturity Gap Model, Duration Gap Model, Static and Dynamic Simulation. The purpose of this article is to give a

  17. Non-sedentary Lifestyle Can Reduce Hip Fracture Risk among Older Caucasians Adults: The Adventist Health Study-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousuebsakul-Matthews, Vichuda; Thorpe, Donna; Knutsen, Raymond; Beeson, W Larry; Fraser, Gary E; Knutsen, Synnove F

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial effect of physical activity on reducing hip fracture risk has been supported in many previous studies. The present cohort study explores the relationship between total daily physical activity expressed as MET-hour/day and hip fracture risk among men over 50 years of age and postmenopausal women (n=22,836). Associations between self-reported hip fracture incidence and total daily physical activity and selected lifestyle factors were assessed using Cox proportional hazard regression. In gender-specific multivariable models, total activity above average (≥ 51 MET-hours per day for men, ≥ 48 MET-hours per day for women) compared to those with sedentary lifestyle (sedentary lifestyle can reduce the risk of hip fracture among the elderly.

  18. Falling Down on the Job: Evaluation and Treatment of Fall Risk Among Older Adults With Upper Extremity Fragility Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Christine M; Colla, Carrie H; Carmichael, Donald; Tosteson, Anna N A; Tosteson, Tor D; Bell, John-Erik; Cantu, Robert V; Lurie, Jonathan D; Bynum, Julie P W

    2017-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend fall risk assessment and intervention for older adults who sustain a fall-related injury to prevent future injury and mobility decline. The aim of this study was to describe how often Medicare beneficiaries with upper extremity fracture receive evaluation and treatment for fall risk. Observational cohort. Participants were fee-for-service beneficiaries age 66 to 99 treated as outpatients for proximal humerus or distal radius/ulna ("wrist") fragility fractures. -Participants were studied using Carrier and Outpatient Hospital files. The proportion of patients evaluated or treated for fall risk up to 6 months after proximal humerus or wrist fracture from 2007-2009 was examined based on evaluation, treatment, and diagnosis codes. Time to evaluation and number of treatment sessions were calculated. Logistic regression was used to analyze patient characteristics that predicted receiving evaluation or treatment. Narrow (gait training) and broad (gait training or therapeutic exercise) definitions of service were used. There were 309,947 beneficiaries who sustained proximal humerus (32%) or wrist fracture (68%); 10.7% received evaluation or treatment for fall risk or gait issues (humerus: 14.2%; wrist: 9.0%). Using the broader definition, the percentage increased to 18.5% (humerus: 23.4%; wrist: 16.3%). Factors associated with higher likelihood of services after fracture were: evaluation or treatment for falls or gait prior to fracture, more comorbidities, prior nursing home stay, older age, humerus fracture (vs wrist), female sex, and white race. Claims analysis may underestimate physician and physical therapist fall assessments, but it is not likely to qualitatively change the results. A small proportion of older adults with upper extremity fracture received fall risk assessment and treatment. Providers and health systems must advance efforts to provide timely evidence-based management of fall risk in this population. © 2017

  19. Effect of a multifactorial fall-and-fracture risk assessment and management program on gait and balance performances and disability in hospitalized older adults: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetti, A; Hars, M; Herrmann, F; Rizzoli, R; Ferrari, S

    2013-03-01

    This controlled intervention study in hospitalized oldest old adults showed that a multifactorial fall-and-fracture risk assessment and management program, applied in a dedicated geriatric hospital unit, was effective in improving fall-related physical and functional performances and the level of independence in activities of daily living in high-risk patients. Hospitalization affords a major opportunity for interdisciplinary cooperation to manage fall-and-fracture risk factors in older adults. This study aimed at assessing the effects on physical performances and the level of independence in activities of daily living (ADL) of a multifactorial fall-and-fracture risk assessment and management program applied in a geriatric hospital setting. A controlled intervention study was conducted among 122 geriatric inpatients (mean ± SD age, 84 ± 7 years) admitted with a fall-related diagnosis. Among them, 92 were admitted to a dedicated unit and enrolled into a multifactorial intervention program, including intensive targeted exercise. Thirty patients who received standard usual care in a general geriatric unit formed the control group. Primary outcomes included gait and balance performances and the level of independence in ADL measured 12 ± 6 days apart. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, incidence of in-hospital falls, hospital readmission, and mortality rates. Compared to the usual care group, the intervention group had significant improvements in Timed Up and Go (adjusted mean difference [AMD] = -3.7s; 95 % CI = -6.8 to -0.7; P = 0.017), Tinetti (AMD = -1.4; 95 % CI = -2.1 to -0.8; P fall-and-fracture risk-based intervention program, applied in a dedicated geriatric hospital unit, was effective and more beneficial than usual care in improving physical parameters related to the risk of fall and disability among high-risk oldest old patients.

  20. Implementation of a fall screening program in a high risk of fracture population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchey, Katherine; Olney, Amanda; Shofer, Jane; Phelan, Elizabeth A; Matsumoto, Alvin M

    2017-10-31

    Fall prevention is an important way to prevent fractures in person with osteoporosis. We developed and implemented a fall screening program in the context of routine osteoporosis care. This program was found to be feasible and showed that a significant proportion of persons with osteoporosis are at risk of falling. Falls are the most common cause of fracture in persons with osteoporosis. However, osteoporosis care rarely includes assessment and prevention of falling. We thus sought to assess the feasibility of a fall screening and management program integrated into routine osteoporosis care. The program was developed and offered to patients with osteoporosis or osteopenia seen at an outpatient clinic between May 2015 and May 2016. Feasibility was measured by physical therapist time required to conduct screening and ease of integrating the screening program into the usual clinic workflow. Self-report responses and mobility testing were conducted to describe the fall and fracture risk profile of osteoporosis patients screened. Effects on fall-related care processes were assessed via chart abstraction of patient participation in fall prevention exercise. Of the 154 clinic patients who presented for a clinic visit, 68% met screening criteria and completed in two thirds of persons. Screening was completed in a third of the time typically allotted for traditional PT evaluations and did not interfere with clinic workflow. Forty percent of those screened reported falling in the last year, and over half had two or more falls in the past year. Over half reported a balance or lower extremity impairment, and over 40% were below norms on one or more performance tests. Most patients who selected a group exercise fall prevention program completed all sessions while only a quarter completed either supervised or independent home-based programs. Implementation of a fall risk screening program in an outpatient osteoporosis clinic appears feasible. A substantial proportion of people

  1. Physical therapy approaches to reduce fall and fracture risk among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karinkanta, Saija; Piirtola, Maarit; Sievänen, Harri; Uusi-Rasi, Kirsti; Kannus, Pekka

    2010-07-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries, such as fractures, are a growing problem among older adults, often causing longstanding pain, functional impairments, reduced quality of life and excess health-care costs and mortality. These problems have led to a variety of single component or multicomponent intervention strategies to prevent falls and subsequent injuries. The most effective physical therapy approach for the prevention of falls and fractures in community-dwelling older adults is regular multicomponent exercise; a combination of balance and strength training has shown the most success. Home-hazard assessment and modification, as well as assistive devices, such as canes and walkers, might be useful for older people at a high risk of falls. Hip protectors are effective in nursing home residents and potentially among other high-risk individuals. In addition, use of anti-slip shoe devices in icy conditions seems beneficial for older people walking outdoors. To be effective, multifactorial preventive programs should include an exercise component accompanied by individually tailored measures focused on high-risk populations. In this Review, we focus on evidence-based physical therapy approaches, including exercise, vibration training and improvements of safety at home and during periods of mobility. Additionally, the benefits of multifaceted interventions, which include risk factor assessment, dietary supplements, elements of physical therapy and exercise, are addressed.

  2. Loading rate effects on strength and fracture toughness of pipe steels used in Task 1 of the IPIRG program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschall, C.W.; Landow, M.P.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1993-10-01

    Material characterization tests were conducted on laboratory specimens machined from pipes to determine the effect of dynamic loading (i.e., rates comparable to those for high amplitude seismic events) on tensile properties and fracture resistance at 288 C (550 F). Specimens were fabricated from seven different pipes, including carbon steels and stainless steels (both base metal and weld metal), which were to be subjected to full-scale pipe tests in IPIRG Task 1.0. For the stainless steels tested at 288 C (550 F), tensile strength was unchanged, while yield strength and fracture resistance were increased. The increase in fracture resistance was modest for the wrought base metals and substantial for the weld metal and the cast base metal. The carbon steels tested were sensitive to dynamic strain aging, and hence the strength and toughness was affected by both temperature and strain rate effects. The carbon steel base metal and welds exhibited ultimate tensile strength values at 288 C (550 F) that were greater than at room temperature. Furthermore, the ultimate tensile strength at 288 C (550 F) was lowered significantly by increased strain rate and, in the carbon steel base metals, increased strain rate also lowered the fracture resistance, substantially in the base metal of one pipe. In comparing these results to the IPIRG pipe test results to date, it was found that the trends of these tests agree well with the Subtask 1.2 quasi-static and dynamic pipe fracture experiments. Loads measured in the Subtask 1.1 pipe experiments were, however, somewhat higher than would have been expected by the trends observed in the laboratory tests

  3. Self-rated health and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roelsgaard, Ida Kristiane; Olesen, Anne Marie; Simonsen, Mette Kildevæld

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self-rated health (SRH) has been shown to be a strong predictor of mortality from a number of major chronic diseases, however, the association with cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible association between change in SRH and cancer incidence...... proportional hazards model with adjustment for age, smoking, alcohol, marital status, physical activity, body mass index and estrogen replacement therapy. RESULTS: No significant association was found between SRH and overall cancer incidence in the age-adjusted Cox proportional hazards model (1.04; 95% CI 0...

  4. Real interest rates, leverage, and bank risk-taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dell’Ariccia, G.; Laeven, L.; Marquez, R.

    2014-01-01

    Do low interest rate environments lead to greater bank risk-taking? We show that, when banks can adjust their capital structures, reductions in real interest rates lead to greater leverage and higher risk for any downward sloping loan demand function. However, if the capital structure is fixed, the

  5. Interest Rate Risk Management using Duration Gap Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Armeanu

    2008-01-01

    should be measured and managed within an asset-liability management. Then the articles takes a short look at methods for measuring interest rate risk and after that explains and demonstrates how can be used Duration Gap Model for managing interest rate risk in banks.

  6. [FRAX® thresholds to identify people with high or low risk of osteoporotic fracture in Spanish female population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azagra, Rafael; Roca, Genís; Martín-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Casado, Enrique; Encabo, Gloria; Zwart, Marta; Aguyé, Amada; Díez-Pérez, Adolf

    2015-01-06

    To detect FRAX(®) threshold levels that identify groups of the population that are at high/low risk of osteoporotic fracture in the Spanish female population using a cost-effective assessment. This is a cohort study. Eight hundred and sixteen women 40-90 years old selected from the FRIDEX cohort with densitometry and risk factors for fracture at baseline who received no treatment for osteoporosis during the 10 year follow-up period and were stratified into 3 groups/levels of fracture risk (low20%) according to the real fracture incidence. The thresholds of FRAX(®) baseline for major osteoporotic fracture were: low riskX-ray absorptiometry (DXA-scan) for FRAX(®)≥ 5 (Intermediate and high risk) to reclassify by FRAX(®) with DXA-scan at high/low risk. These thresholds select 17.5% of women for DXA-scan and 10% for treatment. With these thresholds of FRAX(®), compared with the strategy of opportunistic case finding isolated risk factors, would improve the predictive parameters and reduce 82.5% the DXA-scan, 35.4% osteoporosis prescriptions and 28.7% cost to detect the same number of women who suffer fractures. The use of FRAX ® thresholds identified as high/low risk of osteoporotic fracture in this calibration (FRIDEX model) improve predictive parameters in Spanish women and in a more cost-effective than the traditional model based on the T-score ≤ -2.5 of DXA scan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. The effects of the Korean reference value on the prevalence of osteoporosis and the prediction of fracture risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungwha; Choi, Moon-Gi; Yu, Jaemyung; Ryu, Ohk-Hyun; Yoo, Hyung Joon; Ihm, Sung-Hee; Kim, Doo-Man; Hong, Eun-Gyung; Park, Kyutae; Choi, Myungjin; Choi, Hyunhee

    2015-03-27

    Since the reference value is the core factor of the T-score calculation, it has a significant impact on the prevalence of osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of using the Korean reference value on the prevalence of osteoporosis and on the prediction of fracture risk. We used femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2008-2011. The Korean reference was identified by the mean and standard deviation of men and women aged 20-29 years. We compared the prevalence and the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX™) probability obtained from the Korean reference and the NHANES III reference. In men, the prevalence of osteoporosis increased when using the Korean men's reference, and the difference increased up to 9% for those in their 80s. In women, the prevalence increased when using the NHANES III reference, and the difference increased up to 17% for those in their 80s. The reference value also affected the fracture risk probability, and the difference from changing the reference value increased in women and in subjects with more clinical fracture risk factors. In major osteoporotic fractures, the difference of the risk probability was up to 6% in women aged 70-79 years with two clinical risk factors. For femoral neck fractures, the difference was up to 7% in women aged 50-59 years with two clinical risk factors. We confirmed that the reference value had significant effects on the prevalence of osteoporosis and on the fracture risk probability. The KNHANES 2008-2011 BMD data reflected the characteristics of the Korean BMD status well with regard to data size and study design; therefore, these data can be used as reference values.

  8. Credit ratings and CEO risk-taking incentives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuang, Y.; Qin, B.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the sophistication of rating agencies in incorporating managerial risk-taking incentives into their credit risk evaluation. We measure risk-taking incentives using two proxies: the sensitivity of managerial wealth to stock return volatility (vega) and the sensitivity of

  9. Common and rare variants in the exons and regulatory regions of osteoporosis-related genes improve osteoporotic fracture risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Kang, Moo Il; Ahn, Seong Hee; Lim, Kyeong-Hye; Lee, Gun Eui; Shin, Eun-Soon; Lee, Jong-Eun; Kim, Beom-Jun; Cho, Eun-Hee; Kim, Sang-Wook; Kim, Tae-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Lee, Won Chul; Kim, Ghi Su; Koh, Jung-Min; Kim, Shin-Yoon

    2014-11-01

    Osteoporotic fracture risk is highly heritable, but genome-wide association studies have explained only a small proportion of the heritability to date. Genetic data may improve prediction of fracture risk in osteopenic subjects and assist early intervention and management. To detect common and rare variants in coding and regulatory regions related to osteoporosis-related traits, and to investigate whether genetic profiling improves the prediction of fracture risk. This cross-sectional study was conducted in three clinical units in Korea. Postmenopausal women with extreme phenotypes (n = 982) were used for the discovery set, and 3895 participants were used for the replication set. We performed targeted resequencing of 198 genes. Genetic risk scores from common variants (GRS-C) and from common and rare variants (GRS-T) were calculated. Nineteen common variants in 17 genes (of the discovered 34 functional variants in 26 genes) and 31 rare variants in five genes (of the discovered 87 functional variants in 15 genes) were associated with one or more osteoporosis-related traits. Accuracy of fracture risk classification was improved in the osteopenic patients by adding GRS-C to fracture risk assessment models (6.8%; P risk in an osteopenic individual.

  10. Prevalence of risk factors for fractures and use of DXA scanning in Danish women. A regional population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, K H; Abrahamsen, B; Hermann, A P

    2011-01-01

    .5% of those with more than 40 km to the nearest scanner had a history of DXA. Logistic regression analysis showed that distance, fracture risk, oral glucocorticoids, low-energy fracture, conditions associated with secondary osteoporosis, low BMI, history of falls, age 65–79 years, spouse status, and income......To determine the relationship between risk factors and use of DXA scans. Our study showed a relatively high use of DXA in low-risk women and the relatively low coverage in women with multiple risk factors. Moreover, distance to DXA clinics, age, and socio-economic factors are associated...... with the use of DXA. Introduction To determine the relationship between risk factors for fracture and use of DXA scans in Danish women in relation to distance to DXA clinics and socio-economic factors. Methods From the Danish National Civil Register we randomly selected 5,000 women aged 40–90 years living...

  11. Dental trauma. Combination injuries 2. The risk of pulp necrosis in permanent teeth with subluxation injuries and concomitant crown fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Hermann, Nuno Vibe; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    on the risk of PN in permanent teeth with subluxation injury. Material and Methods:  The study included 404 permanent incisors with subluxation injury from 289 patients (188 male, 101 female). Of these teeth, 137 had also suffered a concomitant crown fracture. All the teeth were examined and treated according...... to a standardized protocol. Statistical Analysis:  The risk of PN was analysed separately for teeth with immature and mature root development by the Kaplan–Meier method, the log-rank test and Cox regression analysis. The level of significance was set at 5%. Risk factors included in the analysis were gender, patient......The reported risk of pulp necrosis (PN) is generally low in teeth with subluxation injuries. A concomitant crown fracture may increase the risk of PN in such teeth. Aim:  To analyse the influence of a concomitant trauma-related infraction, enamel-, enamel–dentin- or enamel–dentin–pulp fracture...

  12. Interest Rate Risk Management and the Use of Derivative Securities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana-Diana PĂUN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to demonstrate the utility of derivative financial instruments for the management of interest rate risk that is faced by banks and financial institutions, and to provide an efficient flow of monitoring and control thereof. Banking institutions can now use a combination of balance sheet and off balance sheet measures, i.e. gap method, of interest rate risk management, in order to control exposure of short-term rates and derivatives to control the residual interest rate exposures. The result of the study shows that banks can achieve better diversification and risk management using derivatives.

  13. The insufficiencies of risk analysis of impending pathological fractures in patients with femoral metastases: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Benca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Pathologic fractures in patients with bone metastases are a common problem in clinical orthopaedic routine. On one hand recognition of metastatic lesions, which are at a high risk of fracture, is essential for timely prophylactic fixation, while on the other hand patients with a low risk of pathologic fractures should be spared from overtreatment.The purpose of this review is to identify all methods for fracture risk evaluation in patients with femoral metastases in the literature and to evaluate their predictive values in clinical applications. Methods: A MEDLINE database literature research was conducted in order to identify clinical scoring systems, conclusions from prospective and retrospective radiologic and/or clinical studies, as well as data from biomechanical experiments, numerical computational methods, and computer simulations. Results: The search identified 441 articles of which 18 articles met the inclusion criteria; 4 more articles were identified from citations of the primarily found studies. In principle there are two distinct methodologies, namely fracture risk prediction factors based on clinical and radiological data such as the most deployed the Mirels' score and fracture risk prediction based on engineering methods. Fracture risk prediction using Mirels' score, based on pure clinical data, shows a negative predictive value between 86 and 100%, but moderate to poor results in predicting non-impending fractures with a positive predictive value between 23 and 70%. Engineering methods provide a high accuracy (correlation coefficient between ex vivo and results from numerical calculations: 0.68 < r2 < 0.96 in biomechanical lab experiments, but have not been applied to clinical routine yet. Conclusion: This review clearly points out a lack of adequate clinical methods for fracture risk prediction in patients with femoral metastases. Today's golden standard, the Mirels' score leads to an overtreatment. Whereas

  14. TECHNICAL RISK RATING OF DOE ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS - 9153

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cercy, M.; Fayfich, Ronald; Schneider, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. The scope of work is diverse, with projects ranging from single acquisitions to collections of projects and operations that span several decades and costs from hundreds of millions to billions US$. The need to be able to manage and understand the technical risks from the project to senior management level has been recognized as an enabler to successfully completing the mission. In 2008, DOE-EM developed the Technical Risk Rating as a new method to assist in managing technical risk based on specific criteria. The Technical Risk Rating, and the criteria used to determine the rating, provides a mechanism to foster open, meaningful communication between the Federal Project Directors and DOE-EM management concerning project technical risks. Four indicators (technical maturity, risk urgency, handling difficulty and resolution path) are used to focus attention on the issues and key aspects related to the risks. Pressing risk issues are brought to the forefront, keeping DOE-EM management informed and engaged such that they fully understand risk impact. Use of the Technical Risk Rating and criteria during reviews provides the Federal Project Directors the opportunity to openly discuss the most significant risks and assists in the management of technical risks across the portfolio of DOE-EM projects. Technical Risk Ratings can be applied to all projects in government and private industry. This paper will present the methodology and criteria for Technical Risk Ratings, and provide specific examples from DOE-EM projects

  15. Hip fracture risk and cadmium in erythrocytes: a nested case-control study with prospectively collected samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommar, Johan Nilsson; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Lundh, Thomas; Svensson, Olle; Hallmans, Göran; Bergdahl, Ingvar A

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have investigated the relation between bone mass density and cadmium exposure, but only few studies have been performed on fractures and biomarkers of cadmium. This study analyzed the association between hip fracture risk and cadmium in erythrocytes (Ery-Cd). Prospective samples from the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study's biobank were used for 109 individuals who later in life had sustained a low-trauma hip fracture, matched with two controls of the same age and gender. The mean concentration of Ery-Cd (±SD) in case samples was 1.3 ± 1.4 versus 0.9 ± 1.0 μg/L in controls. The odds ratio (OR) was 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-2.42] for suffering a hip fracture for each microgram per liter increase in Ery-Cd. However, when taking smoking into consideration (never, former, or current), neither Ery-Cd nor smoking showed a statistically significant increase in fracture risk. Using multiple conditional logistic regression with BMI, height, and smoking, the estimated OR for a 1-μg/L increase in Ery-Cd was 1.52 (95% CI 0.77-2.97). Subgroup analysis showed an increased fracture risk among women (OR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.18-3.20, for a 1 μg/L increase), which also remained in the multiple analysis (OR = 3.33, 95% CI 1.29-8.56). This study shows that fracture risk is associated with Ery-Cd. It is, however, not possible to draw firm conclusions on whether cadmium is the causal factor or whether other smoking-related factors cause this association. Subgroup analysis shows that cadmium is a risk factor for hip fracture among women.

  16. Recurrent Hip Fracture Prevention With Osteoporosis Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahla

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:Osteoporosis is a major public health threat,and hip fracture is a serious consequence of osteoporosis.Apatient with an osteoporosis-related hip fracture has an increased risk for a second hip fracture.The effect of osteoporosis management on the risk of recurrent hip fracture was evaluated in this study.Methods:58 hip fracture patients older than 50yr and BMD < 2.5 were discharged from hospital with Ca-Vitamin D- Alendronate prescriptions, and followed up for 4 years to determine the rate of recurrent hip fractures. Rate of second hip fractures was compared with 58 hip fractures in the control group (without osteoporosis treatment which were also followed for 4 years. Results:72% of patients continued treatment for 2 years. There were no second hip fractures in the critical first 12 months in the treated group.Overall second hip fractures in osteoporosis treated and control groups were 3.4% and 8.6%(p<0.03, respectively.Conclusion:Management of hip fractures in the elderly should include bone mineral density determination and osteoporosis treatment to prevent further fractures.

  17. Pathologic C-spine fracture with low risk mechanism and normal physical exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Andrew; McGreevy, Jolion; Linden, Judith

    2017-09-01

    Cervical spinal fracture is a rare, but potentially disabling complication of trauma to the neck. Clinicians often rely on clinical decision rules and guidelines to decide whether or not imaging is necessary when a patient presents with neck pain. Validated clinical guidelines include the Canadian C-Spine Rule and the Nexus criteria. Studies suggest that the risks of a pathologic fracture from a simple rear end collision are negligible. We present a case of an individual who presented to an emergency department (ED) after a low speed motor vehicle collision complaining of lateral neck pain and had multiple subsequent visits for the same complaint with negative exam findings. Ultimately, he was found to have a severely pathologic cervical spine fracture with notable cord compression. Our objective is to discuss the necessity to incorporate clinical decision rules with physician gestalt and the need to take into account co-morbidities of a patient presenting after a minor MVC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Considerations of the manner of accounting for fast fracture risk in the design of PWR vessel