WorldWideScience

Sample records for fractional scaling analysis

  1. Fractional parentage analysis and a scale-free reproductive network of brown trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyano, Hitoshi; Serbezov, Dimitar; Kishino, Hirohisa; Schweder, Tore

    2013-11-07

    In this study, we developed a method of fractional parentage analysis using microsatellite markers. We propose a method for calculating parentage probability, which considers missing data and genotyping errors due to null alleles and other causes, by regarding observed alleles as realizations of random variables which take values in the set of alleles at the locus and developing a method for simultaneously estimating the true and null allele frequencies of all alleles at each locus. We then applied our proposed method to a large sample collected from a wild population of brown trout (Salmo trutta). On analyzing the data using our method, we found that the reproductive success of brown trout obeyed a power law, indicating that when the parent-offspring relationship is regarded as a link, the reproductive system of brown trout is a scale-free network. Characteristics of the reproductive network of brown trout include individuals with large bodies as hubs in the network and different power exponents of degree distributions between males and females. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multi codes and multi-scale analysis for void fraction prediction in hot channel for VVER-1000/V392

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang Minh Giang; Hoang Tan Hung; Nguyen Huu Tiep

    2015-01-01

    Recently, an approach of multi codes and multi-scale analysis is widely applied to study core thermal hydraulic behavior such as void fraction prediction. Better results are achieved by using multi codes or coupling codes such as PARCS and RELAP5. The advantage of multi-scale analysis is zooming of the interested part in the simulated domain for detail investigation. Therefore, in this study, the multi codes between MCNP5, RELAP5, CTF and also the multi-scale analysis based RELAP5 and CTF are applied to investigate void fraction in hot channel of VVER-1000/V392 reactor. Since VVER-1000/V392 reactor is a typical advanced reactor that can be considered as the base to develop later VVER-1200 reactor, then understanding core behavior in transient conditions is necessary in order to investigate VVER technology. It is shown that the item of near wall boiling, Γ w in RELAP5 proposed by Lahey mechanistic method may not give enough accuracy of void fraction prediction as smaller scale code as CTF. (author)

  3. Development of a test facility for analyzing transients in supercritical water-cooled reactors by fractional scaling analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto, Thiago D., E-mail: thiagodbtr@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN—RJ), Rua Hélio de Almeida, 75 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro Caixa-Postal: 68550, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Mário A. B. da, E-mail: mabs500@gmail.com [Departamento de Energia Nuclear (CTG/UFPE), Av. Professor Luiz Freire, 1000, Recife 50740-540, PE (Brazil); Lapa, Celso M.F., E-mail: lapa@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN—RJ), Rua Hélio de Almeida, 75 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro Caixa-Postal: 68550, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    The feasibility of performing experiments using water under supercritical conditions is limited by technical and financial difficulties. These difficulties can be overcome by using model fluids that are characterized by feasible supercritical conditions, that is, lower critical pressure and critical temperature. Experimental investigations are normally used to determine the conditions under which model fluids reliably represent supercritical fluids under steady-state conditions. A fluid-to-fluid scaling approach has been proposed to determine the model fluids that represent supercritical fluids in a transient state. Recently, a similar technique known as fractional scaling analysis was developed to establish the conditions under which experiments can be performed using models that represent transients in prototypes. This paper presents a fractional scaling analysis application to determine parameters for a test facility in which transient conditions in supercritical water-cooled reactors are simulated by using carbon dioxide as a model fluid, whose critical point conditions are more feasible than those of water. Similarity is obtained between water (prototype) and carbon dioxide (model) by depressurization in a simple vessel. The main parameters required for the construction of a future test facility are obtained using the proposed method.

  4. Development of a test facility for analyzing transients in supercritical water-cooled reactors by fractional scaling analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberto, Thiago D.; Silva, Mário A. B. da; Lapa, Celso M.F.

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of performing experiments using water under supercritical conditions is limited by technical and financial difficulties. These difficulties can be overcome by using model fluids that are characterized by feasible supercritical conditions, that is, lower critical pressure and critical temperature. Experimental investigations are normally used to determine the conditions under which model fluids reliably represent supercritical fluids under steady-state conditions. A fluid-to-fluid scaling approach has been proposed to determine the model fluids that represent supercritical fluids in a transient state. Recently, a similar technique known as fractional scaling analysis was developed to establish the conditions under which experiments can be performed using models that represent transients in prototypes. This paper presents a fractional scaling analysis application to determine parameters for a test facility in which transient conditions in supercritical water-cooled reactors are simulated by using carbon dioxide as a model fluid, whose critical point conditions are more feasible than those of water. Similarity is obtained between water (prototype) and carbon dioxide (model) by depressurization in a simple vessel. The main parameters required for the construction of a future test facility are obtained using the proposed method.

  5. Fractional dynamic calculus and fractional dynamic equations on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, Svetlin G

    2018-01-01

    Pedagogically organized, this monograph introduces fractional calculus and fractional dynamic equations on time scales in relation to mathematical physics applications and problems. Beginning with the definitions of forward and backward jump operators, the book builds from Stefan Hilger’s basic theories on time scales and examines recent developments within the field of fractional calculus and fractional equations. Useful tools are provided for solving differential and integral equations as well as various problems involving special functions of mathematical physics and their extensions and generalizations in one and more variables. Much discussion is devoted to Riemann-Liouville fractional dynamic equations and Caputo fractional dynamic equations.  Intended for use in the field and designed for students without an extensive mathematical background, this book is suitable for graduate courses and researchers looking for an introduction to fractional dynamic calculus and equations on time scales. .

  6. On the Scaled Fractional Fourier Transformation Operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong-Yi, Fan; Li-Yun, Hu

    2008-01-01

    Based on our previous study [Chin. Phys. Lett. 24 (2007) 2238] in which the Fresnel operator corresponding to classical Fresnel transform was introduced, we derive the fractional Fourier transformation operator, and the optical operator method is then enriched

  7. Fractional Nottale's Scale Relativity and emergence of complexified gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Nabulsi, Ahmad Rami

    2009-01-01

    Fractional calculus of variations has recently gained significance in studying weak dissipative and nonconservative dynamical systems ranging from classical mechanics to quantum field theories. In this paper, fractional Nottale's Scale Relativity (NSR) for an arbitrary fractal dimension is introduced within the framework of fractional action-like variational approach recently introduced by the author. The formalism is based on fractional differential operators that generalize the differential operators of conventional NSR but that reduces to the standard formalism in the integer limit. Our main aim is to build the fractional setting for the NSR dynamical equations. Many interesting consequences arise, in particular the emergence of complexified gravity and complex time.

  8. Scale-invariant solutions to partial differential equations of fractional order with a moving boundary condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xicheng; Xu Mingyu; Wang Shaowei

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give similarity solutions of partial differential equations of fractional order with a moving boundary condition. The solutions are given in terms of a generalized Wright function. The time-fractional Caputo derivative and two types of space-fractional derivatives are considered. The scale-invariant variable and the form of the solution of the moving boundary are obtained by the Lie group analysis. A comparison between the solutions corresponding to two types of fractional derivative is also given

  9. Definition of parameters for a test section for the analysis of natural convection and coolant loss in the AP1000 nuclear reactor by similarity laws and fractional scaling analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadiz, Luis Felipe S.; Bezerra, Mario Augusto [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Lima, Fernando Roberto A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PB), Recife, PB (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The present work develops and analyzes the main parameters of a test section for natural convection in case of a failure of the pumping system as much as the loss of coolant in refrigeration accidents. For this realization, a combination of laws of basic similarity and an innovative scale methodology, known as Fractional Scaling Analysis (FSA), was developed. The depressurizing is analyzed when a rupture occurs in one of the primary system piping of the AP1000 nuclear reactor. This reactor is developed by Westinghouse Electric Co., which is a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) with an electric power equal to 1000MW. Such a reactor is provided with a passive safety system that promotes considerable improvements in the safety, reliability, protection and reduction of costs of a nuclear power plant. The FSA is based on two concepts: fractional scale and hierarchy. It is used to provide experimental data that generate quantitative evaluation criteria as well as operational parameters in thermal and hydraulic processes of nuclear power plants. The results were analyzed with the use of computational codes. (author)

  10. Analytical Solutions for Multi-Time Scale Fractional Stochastic Differential Equations Driven by Fractional Brownian Motion and Their Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Li Ding; Juan J. Nieto

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate analytical solutions of multi-time scale fractional stochastic differential equations driven by fractional Brownian motions. We firstly decompose homogeneous multi-time scale fractional stochastic differential equations driven by fractional Brownian motions into independent differential subequations, and give their analytical solutions. Then, we use the variation of constant parameters to obtain the solutions of nonhomogeneous multi-time scale fractional stochast...

  11. Scale dependency of fractional flow dimension in a fractured formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-C. Chang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The flow dimensions of fractured media were usually predefined before the determination of the hydraulic parameters from the analysis of field data in the past. However, it would be improper to make assumption about the flow geometry of fractured media before site characterization because the hydraulic structures and flow paths are complex in the fractured media. An appropriate way to investigate the hydrodynamic behavior of a fracture system is to determine the flow dimension and aquifer parameters simultaneously. The objective of this study is to analyze a set of field data obtained from four observation wells during an 11-day hydraulic test at Chingshui geothermal field (CGF in Taiwan in determining the hydrogeologic properties of the fractured formation. Based on the generalized radial flow (GRF model and the optimization scheme, simulated annealing, an approach is therefore developed for the data analyses. The GRF model allows the flow dimension to be integer or fractional. We found that the fractional flow dimension of CGF increases near linearly with the distance between the pumping well and observation well, i.e. the flow dimension of CGF exhibits scale-dependent phenomenon. This study provides insights into interpretation of fracture flow at CGF and gives a reference for characterizing the hydrogeologic properties of fractured media.

  12. The fractional scaling methodology (FSM) Part 1. methodology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak Zuber; Ivan Catton; Upendra S Rohatgi; Wolfgang Wulff

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: a quantitative methodology is developed, based on the concepts of hierarchy and synthesis, to integrate and organize information and data. The methodology uses scaling to synthesize experimental data and analytical results, and to provide quantitative criteria for evaluating the effects of various design and operating parameters that influence processes in a complex system such as a nuclear power plant or a related test facility. Synthesis and scaling are performed on three hierarchical levels: the process, component and system levels. Scaling on the process level determines the effect of a selected process on a particular state variable during a selected scenario. At the component level this scaling determines the effects various processes have on a state variable, and it ranks the processes according to their importance by the magnitude of the fractional change they cause on that state variable. At the system level the scaling determines the governing processes and corresponding components, ranking these in the order of importance according to their effect on the fractional change of system-wide state variables. The scaling methodology reveals on all levels the fractional change of state variables and is called therefore the Fractional Scaling Methodology (FSM). FSM synthesizes process parameters and assigns to each thermohydraulic process a dimensionless effect metric Ω = ωt, that is the product of the specific rate of fractional change ω and the characteristic time t. The rate of fractional change ω is the ratio of process transport rate over content of a preserved quantity in a component. The effect metric Ω quantifies the contribution of the process to the fractional change of a state variable in a given component. Ordering of a component effect metrics provides the hierarchy of processes in a component, then in all components and the system. FSM separates quantitatively dominant from minor processes and components and

  13. The Use of Fractionation Scales for Communication Audits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, George A.; And Others

    A study investigated a new method of measuring organizational communication other than the audit methods currently in use. The method, which employs fractionation procedures, was used with workers from five different business groups within a large multinational corporation. The results showed that: (1) workers could use the scales reliably, (2)…

  14. Modeling of isotope fractionation at the catchment scale: How promising is compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) as a tool for analyzing diffuse pollution by agrochemicals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, S. R.; van Meerveld, H. J.; Waterloo, M. J.; Broers, H. P.; van Breukelen, B. M.

    2012-04-01

    Concentration measurements are indispensable for the assessment of subsurface and surface water pollution by agrochemicals such as pesticides. However, monitoring data is often ambiguous and easily misinterpreted as a decrease in concentration could be caused by transformation, dilution or changes in the application of the pesticide. In this context, compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) has recently emerged as a complementary monitoring technique. It is based on the measurement of the isotopic composition (e.g. δ13C and δ2H) of the contaminant. Since transformation processes are likely accompanied by isotope fractionation, thus a change in this composition, CSIA offers the opportunity to gain additional knowledge about transport and degradation processes as well as to track pollutants back to their sources. Isotopic techniques have not yet been applied in a comprehensive way in the analysis of catchment-wide organic pollution. We therefore incorporated fractionation processes associated with the fate of pesticides into the numerical flow and solute transport model HydroGeoSphere in order to assess the feasibility of CSIA within the context of catchment monitoring. The model was set up for a hypothetical hillslope transect which drains into a river. Reactive solute transport was driven by two pesticides applications within one year and actual data for rainfall and potential evapotranspiration from a meteorological station in the Netherlands. Degradation of the pesticide was assumed to take place at a higher rate under the prevailing oxic conditions in the topsoil than in deeper, anoxic subsurface layers. In terms of CSIA, these two degradation pathways were associated with different strengths of isotope fractionation for both hydrogen and carbon atoms. By simulating changes in δ13C and δ2H, the share of the oxic and the anoxic reaction on the overall degradation could be assessed. Model results suggest that CSIA is suitable for assessing degradation of

  15. Analysis of low-temperature tar fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikkawa, S; Yamada, F

    1952-01-01

    A preliminary comparative study was made on the applicability of the methods commonly used for the type analysis of petroleum products to the low-temperature tar fractions. The usability of chromatography was also studied.

  16. Analytical Solutions for Multi-Time Scale Fractional Stochastic Differential Equations Driven by Fractional Brownian Motion and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Ding

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate analytical solutions of multi-time scale fractional stochastic differential equations driven by fractional Brownian motions. We firstly decompose homogeneous multi-time scale fractional stochastic differential equations driven by fractional Brownian motions into independent differential subequations, and give their analytical solutions. Then, we use the variation of constant parameters to obtain the solutions of nonhomogeneous multi-time scale fractional stochastic differential equations driven by fractional Brownian motions. Finally, we give three examples to demonstrate the applicability of our obtained results.

  17. Gram-scale fractionation of nanodiamonds by density gradient ultracentrifugation

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Size is a defining characteristic of nanoparticles; it influences their optical and electronic properties as well as their interactions with molecules and macromolecules. Producing nanoparticles with narrow size distributions remains one of the main challenges to their utilization. At this time, the number of practical approaches to optimize the size distribution of nanoparticles in many interesting materials systems, including diamond nanocrystals, remains limited. Diamond nanocrystals synthesized by detonation protocols-so-called detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs)-are promising systems for drug delivery, photonics, and composites. DNDs are composed of primary particles with diameters mainly <10 nm and their aggregates (ca. 10-500 nm). Here, we introduce a large-scale approach to rate-zonal density gradient ultracentrifugation to obtain monodispersed fractions of nanoparticles in high yields. We use this method to fractionate a highly concentrated and stable aqueous solution of DNDs and to investigate the size distribution of various fractions by dynamic light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. This fractionation method enabled us to separate gram-scale amounts of DNDs into several size ranges within a relatively short period of time. In addition, the high product yields obtained for each fraction allowed us to apply the fractionation method iteratively to a particular size range of particles and to collect various fractions of highly monodispersed primary particles. Our method paves the way for in-depth studies of the physical and optical properties, growth, and aggregation mechanism of DNDs. Applications requiring DNDs with specific particle or aggregate sizes are now within reach. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. Fractional Sobolev’s Spaces on Time Scales via Conformable Fractional Calculus and Their Application to a Fractional Differential Equation on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanning Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using conformable fractional calculus on time scales, we first introduce fractional Sobolev spaces on time scales, characterize them, and define weak conformable fractional derivatives. Second, we prove the equivalence of some norms in the introduced spaces and derive their completeness, reflexivity, uniform convexity, and compactness of some imbeddings, which can be regarded as a novelty item. Then, as an application, we present a recent approach via variational methods and critical point theory to obtain the existence of solutions for a p-Laplacian conformable fractional differential equation boundary value problem on time scale T:  Tα(Tαup-2Tα(u(t=∇F(σ(t,u(σ(t, Δ-a.e.  t∈a,bTκ2, u(a-u(b=0, Tα(u(a-Tα(u(b=0, where Tα(u(t denotes the conformable fractional derivative of u of order α at t, σ is the forward jump operator, a,b∈T,  01, and F:[0,T]T×RN→R. By establishing a proper variational setting, we obtain three existence results. Finally, we present two examples to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the existence results.

  19. Fractional scaling of quantum walks on percolation lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendon, Viv; Knott, Paul; Leung, Godfrey; Bailey, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Quantum walks can be used to model processes such as transport in spin chains and bio-molecules. The enhanced spreading and mixing properties of quantum walks compared with their classical counterparts have been well-studied on regular structures and also shown to be sensitive to defects and imperfections. Using numerical simulation, we study the spreading properties of quantum walks on percolation lattices for both bond and site percolation. The randomly missing edges or sites provide a controlled amount of disorder in the regular Cartesian lattice. In one dimension (the line) we introduce a simple model of quantum tunneling to allow the walk to proceed past the missing edges or sites. This allows the quantum walk to spread faster than a classical random walk for short times, but at longer times the disorder localises the quantum walk. In two dimensions, we observe fractional scaling of the spreading with the number of steps of the walk. For percolation above the 85% level, we obtain faster spreading than classical random walks on the full lattice.

  20. Fractional Hamiltonian analysis of higher order derivatives systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baleanu, Dumitru; Muslih, Sami I.; Tas, Kenan

    2006-01-01

    The fractional Hamiltonian analysis of 1+1 dimensional field theory is investigated and the fractional Ostrogradski's formulation is obtained. The fractional path integral of both simple harmonic oscillator with an acceleration-squares part and a damped oscillator are analyzed. The classical results are obtained when fractional derivatives are replaced with the integer order derivatives

  1. Analysis of Equivalent Circuits for Cells: A Fractional Calculus Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernal-Alvarado J.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Fractional order systems are considered by many mathematicians the systems of the XXI century. The reason is that nature has proved to be best described in terms of systems composed of fractional order derivatives. This emerging area of research is slowly gaining more strength in engineering, biochemistry, medicine, biophysics, among others. This paper presents an analysis in the frequency domain equivalent of cellular systems described by equations of integer and fractional order; it also carries out an analysis in time domain in order to display the memory capacity of fractional systems. It presents the fractional differential equations equivalent models and simulations comparing integer and fractional order.

  2. H2@Scale Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark

    2017-07-12

    'H2@Scale' is a concept based on the opportunity for hydrogen to act as an intermediate between energy sources and uses. Hydrogen has the potential to be used like the primary intermediate in use today, electricity, because it too is fungible. This presentation summarizes the H2@Scale analysis efforts performed during the first third of 2017. Results of technical potential uses and supply options are summarized and show that the technical potential demand for hydrogen is 60 million metric tons per year and that the U.S. has sufficient domestic resources to meet that demand. A high level infrastructure analysis is also presented that shows an 85% increase in energy on the grid if all hydrogen is produced from grid electricity. However, a preliminary spatial assessment shows that supply is sufficient in most counties across the U.S. The presentation also shows plans for analysis of the economic potential for the H2@Scale concept. Those plans involve developing supply and demand curves for potential hydrogen generation options and as compared to other options for use of that hydrogen.

  3. New Approach for the Analysis of Damped Vibrations of Fractional Oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy A. Rossikhin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behavior of linear and nonlinear mechanical oscillators with constitutive equations involving fractional derivatives defined as a fractional power of the operator of conventional time-derivative is considered. Such a definition of the fractional derivative enables one to analyse approximately vibratory regimes of the oscillator without considering the drift of its position of equilibrium. The assumption of small fractional derivative terms allows one to use the method of multiple time scales whereby a comparative analysis of the solutions obtained for different orders of low-level fractional derivatives and nonlinear elastic terms is possible to be carried out. The interrelationship of the fractional parameter (order of the fractional operator and nonlinearity manifests itself in full measure when orders of the small fractional derivative term and of the cubic nonlinearity entering in the oscillator's constitutive equation coincide.

  4. Stability Analysis of Fractional-Order Nonlinear Systems with Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stability analysis of fractional-order nonlinear systems with delay is studied. We propose the definition of Mittag-Leffler stability of time-delay system and introduce the fractional Lyapunov direct method by using properties of Mittag-Leffler function and Laplace transform. Then some new sufficient conditions ensuring asymptotical stability of fractional-order nonlinear system with delay are proposed firstly. And the application of Riemann-Liouville fractional-order systems is extended by the fractional comparison principle and the Caputo fractional-order systems. Numerical simulations of an example demonstrate the universality and the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Fractional-Order Nonlinear Systems Modeling, Analysis and Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Petráš, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    "Fractional-Order Nonlinear Systems: Modeling, Analysis and Simulation" presents a study of fractional-order chaotic systems accompanied by Matlab programs for simulating their state space trajectories, which are shown in the illustrations in the book. Description of the chaotic systems is clearly presented and their analysis and numerical solution are done in an easy-to-follow manner. Simulink models for the selected fractional-order systems are also presented. The readers will understand the fundamentals of the fractional calculus, how real dynamical systems can be described using fractional derivatives and fractional differential equations, how such equations can be solved, and how to simulate and explore chaotic systems of fractional order. The book addresses to mathematicians, physicists, engineers, and other scientists interested in chaos phenomena or in fractional-order systems. It can be used in courses on dynamical systems, control theory, and applied mathematics at graduate or postgraduate level. ...

  6. Analysis of Nonlinear Fractional Nabla Difference Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagan Mohan Jonnalagadda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we establish sufficient conditions on global existence and uniqueness of solutions of nonlinear fractional nabla difference systems and investigate the dependence of solutions on initial conditions and parameters.

  7. Fractional Nottale's Scale Relativity and emergence of complexified gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EL-Nabulsi, Ahmad Rami [Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, Cheju National University, Ara-dong 1, Jeju 690-756 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: nabulsiahmadrami@yahoo.fr

    2009-12-15

    Fractional calculus of variations has recently gained significance in studying weak dissipative and nonconservative dynamical systems ranging from classical mechanics to quantum field theories. In this paper, fractional Nottale's Scale Relativity (NSR) for an arbitrary fractal dimension is introduced within the framework of fractional action-like variational approach recently introduced by the author. The formalism is based on fractional differential operators that generalize the differential operators of conventional NSR but that reduces to the standard formalism in the integer limit. Our main aim is to build the fractional setting for the NSR dynamical equations. Many interesting consequences arise, in particular the emergence of complexified gravity and complex time.

  8. Scale-free animal movement patterns: Levy walks outperform fractional Brownian motions and fractional Levy motions in random search scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, A M

    2009-01-01

    The movement patterns of a diverse range of animals have scale-free characteristics. These characteristics provide necessary but not sufficient conditions for the presence of movement patterns that can be approximated by Levy walks. Nevertheless, it has been widely assumed that the occurrence of scale-free animal movements can indeed be attributed to the presence of Levy walks. This is, in part, because it is known that the super-diffusive properties of Levy walks can be advantageous in random search scenarios when searchers have little or no prior knowledge of target locations. However, fractional Brownian motions (fBms) and fractional Levy motions (fLms) are both scale-free and super-diffusive, and so it is possible that these motions rather than Levy walks underlie some or all occurrences of scale-free animal movement patterns. Here this possibility is examined in numerical simulations through a determination of the searching efficiencies of fBm and fLm searches. It is shown that these searches are less efficient than Levy walk searches. This finding does not rule out the possibility that some animals with scale-free movement patterns are executing fBm and fLm searches, but it does make Levy walk searches the more likely possibility.

  9. Fractionation of milk proteins on pilot scale with particular focus on β-casein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thienel, Katharina J.F.; Holder, Aline; Schubert, Thomas; Boom, Remko M.; Hinrichs, Jörg; Atamer, Zeynep

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to increase the yield and purity of casein fractions at pilot scale and determine the main process parameters influencing the isolation of β-casein, such as cold extraction time, separation speed. The fractions were obtained from micellar casein by means of selective

  10. A time-frequency analysis of wave packet fractional revivals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Suranjana; Banerji, J

    2007-01-01

    We show that the time-frequency analysis of the autocorrelation function is, in many ways, a more appropriate tool to resolve fractional revivals of a wave packet than the usual time-domain analysis. This advantage is crucial in reconstructing the initial state of the wave packet when its coherent structure is short-lived and decays before it is fully revived. Our calculations are based on the model example of fractional revivals in a Rydberg wave packet of circular states. We end by providing an analytical investigation which fully agrees with our numerical observations on the utility of time-frequency analysis in the study of wave packet fractional revivals

  11. Scaling characteristics of one-dimensional fractional diffusion processes in the presence of power-law distributed random noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhadhaghighi, Mohsen Ghasemi

    2017-08-01

    Here, we present results of numerical simulations and the scaling characteristics of one-dimensional random fluctuations with heavy-tailed probability distribution functions. Assuming that the distribution function of the random fluctuations obeys Lévy statistics with a power-law scaling exponent, we investigate the fractional diffusion equation in the presence of μ-stable Lévy noise. We study the scaling properties of the global width and two-point correlation functions and then compare the analytical and numerical results for the growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α. We also investigate the fractional Fokker-Planck equation for heavy-tailed random fluctuations. We show that the fractional diffusion processes in the presence of μ-stable Lévy noise display special scaling properties in the probability distribution function (PDF). Finally, we numerically study the scaling properties of the heavy-tailed random fluctuations by using the diffusion entropy analysis. This method is based on the evaluation of the Shannon entropy of the PDF generated by the random fluctuations, rather than on the measurement of the global width of the process. We apply the diffusion entropy analysis to extract the growth exponent β and to confirm the validity of our numerical analysis.

  12. Scaling characteristics of one-dimensional fractional diffusion processes in the presence of power-law distributed random noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhadhaghighi, Mohsen Ghasemi

    2017-08-01

    Here, we present results of numerical simulations and the scaling characteristics of one-dimensional random fluctuations with heavy-tailed probability distribution functions. Assuming that the distribution function of the random fluctuations obeys Lévy statistics with a power-law scaling exponent, we investigate the fractional diffusion equation in the presence of μ -stable Lévy noise. We study the scaling properties of the global width and two-point correlation functions and then compare the analytical and numerical results for the growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α . We also investigate the fractional Fokker-Planck equation for heavy-tailed random fluctuations. We show that the fractional diffusion processes in the presence of μ -stable Lévy noise display special scaling properties in the probability distribution function (PDF). Finally, we numerically study the scaling properties of the heavy-tailed random fluctuations by using the diffusion entropy analysis. This method is based on the evaluation of the Shannon entropy of the PDF generated by the random fluctuations, rather than on the measurement of the global width of the process. We apply the diffusion entropy analysis to extract the growth exponent β and to confirm the validity of our numerical analysis.

  13. Laplace-Laplace analysis of the fractional Poisson process

    OpenAIRE

    Gorenflo, Rudolf; Mainardi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We generate the fractional Poisson process by subordinating the standard Poisson process to the inverse stable subordinator. Our analysis is based on application of the Laplace transform with respect to both arguments of the evolving probability densities.

  14. Robust scaling laws for energy confinement time, including radiated fraction, in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Peluso, E.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, the limitations of scalings in power-law form that are obtained from traditional log regression have become increasingly evident in many fields of research. Given the wide gap in operational space between present-day and next-generation devices, robustness of the obtained models in guaranteeing reasonable extrapolability is a major issue. In this paper, a new technique, called symbolic regression, is reviewed, refined, and applied to the ITPA database for extracting scaling laws of the energy-confinement time at different radiated fraction levels. The main advantage of this new methodology is its ability to determine the most appropriate mathematical form of the scaling laws to model the available databases without the restriction of their having to be power laws. In a completely new development, this technique is combined with the concept of geodesic distance on Gaussian manifolds so as to take into account the error bars in the measurements and provide more reliable models. Robust scaling laws, including radiated fractions as regressor, have been found; they are not in power-law form, and are significantly better than the traditional scalings. These scaling laws, including radiated fractions, extrapolate quite differently to ITER, and therefore they require serious consideration. On the other hand, given the limitations of the existing databases, dedicated experimental investigations will have to be carried out to fully understand the impact of radiated fractions on the confinement in metallic machines and in the next generation of devices.

  15. Neutron activation analysis of monomineral fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drykhin, V.I.; Belen'kij, B.V.; Voinkov, D.M.; Il'yasova, K.I.; Lejpinskaya, D.I.; Nedostyp, T.V.

    1977-01-01

    The results are described of the development of an instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) of monomineral sulfides (pyrites, pyrrhotites, chalcopyrites and others), quartzites and other minerals, the technique being intended for geochemical investigations. For a multi-element INAA of monomineral sulfides, the optimum irradiation time in a flux of 10 12 to 1.3x10 13 n/cm 2 (neutron field of a nuclear reactor) is 20 to 40 hours, thus ensuring a reliable determination of a great number of elements not lower than 10 -4 %. The time of the induced activity for determining indium in sulfides is 0.5 to 3 min. The actual sensitivity of the method is 10 -4 %. A sensitivity with respect to gold of 0.01 g/t was attained in monominerals after an irradiation of up to 5 min

  16. Dimensional analysis, scaling and fractals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timm, L.C.; Reichardt, K.; Oliveira Santos Bacchi, O.

    2004-01-01

    Dimensional analysis refers to the study of the dimensions that characterize physical entities, like mass, force and energy. Classical mechanics is based on three fundamental entities, with dimensions MLT, the mass M, the length L and the time T. The combination of these entities gives rise to derived entities, like volume, speed and force, of dimensions L 3 , LT -1 , MLT -2 , respectively. In other areas of physics, four other fundamental entities are defined, among them the temperature θ and the electrical current I. The parameters that characterize physical phenomena are related among themselves by laws, in general of quantitative nature, in which they appear as measures of the considered physical entities. The measure of an entity is the result of its comparison with another one, of the same type, called unit. Maps are also drawn in scale, for example, in a scale of 1:10,000, 1 cm 2 of paper can represent 10,000 m 2 in the field. Entities that differ in scale cannot be compared in a simple way. Fractal geometry, in contrast to the Euclidean geometry, admits fractional dimensions. The term fractal is defined in Mandelbrot (1982) as coming from the Latin fractus, derived from frangere which signifies to break, to form irregular fragments. The term fractal is opposite to the term algebra (from the Arabic: jabara) which means to join, to put together the parts. For Mandelbrot, fractals are non topologic objects, that is, objects which have as their dimension a real, non integer number, which exceeds the topologic dimension. For the topologic objects, or Euclidean forms, the dimension is an integer (0 for the point, 1 for a line, 2 for a surface, and 3 for a volume). The fractal dimension of Mandelbrot is a measure of the degree of irregularity of the object under consideration. It is related to the speed by which the estimate of the measure of an object increases as the measurement scale decreases. An object normally taken as uni-dimensional, like a piece of a

  17. Determination of fractional flow reserve (FFR) based on scaling laws: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Jerry T; Molloi, Sabee

    2008-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) provides an objective physiological evaluation of stenosis severity. A technique that can measure FFR using only angiographic images would be a valuable tool in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. To perform this, the diseased blood flow can be measured with a first pass distribution analysis and the theoretical normal blood flow can be estimated from the total coronary arterial volume based on scaling laws. A computer simulation of the coronary arterial network was used to gain a better understanding of how hemodynamic conditions and coronary artery disease can affect blood flow, arterial volume and FFR estimation. Changes in coronary arterial flow and volume due to coronary stenosis, aortic pressure and venous pressure were examined to evaluate the potential use of flow and volume for FFR determination. This study showed that FFR can be estimated using arterial volume and a scaling coefficient corrected for aortic pressure. However, variations in venous pressure were found to introduce some error in FFR estimation. A relative form of FFR was introduced and was found to cancel out the influence of pressure on coronary flow, arterial volume and FFR estimation. The use of coronary flow and arterial volume for FFR determination appears promising

  18. Spiritual Competency Scale: Further Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Stephanie F.; Robertson, Linda A.; Gill, Carman S.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a follow-up analysis of the Spiritual Competency Scale, which initially validated ASERVIC's (Association for Spiritual, Ethical and Religious Values in Counseling) spiritual competencies. The study examined whether the factor structure of the Spiritual Competency Scale would be supported by participants (i.e., ASERVIC…

  19. Decimal Fraction Arithmetic: Logical Error Analysis and Its Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standiford, Sally N.; And Others

    This report illustrates procedures of item construction for addition and subtraction examples involving decimal fractions. Using a procedural network of skills required to solve such examples, an item characteristic matrix of skills analysis was developed to describe the characteristics of the content domain by projected student difficulties. Then…

  20. Analysis of fractionation in corn-to-ethanol plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Camille

    As the dry grind ethanol industry has grown, the research and technology surrounding ethanol production and co-product value has increased. Including use of back-end oil extraction and front-end fractionation. Front-end fractionation is pre-fermentation separation of the corn kernel into 3 fractions: endosperm, bran, and germ. The endosperm fraction enters the existing ethanol plant, and a high protein DDGS product remains after fermentation. High value oil is extracted out of the germ fraction. This leaves corn germ meal and bran as co-products from the other two streams. These 3 co-products have a very different composition than traditional corn DDGS. Installing this technology allows ethanol plants to increase profitability by tapping into more diverse markets, and ultimately could allow for an increase in profitability. An ethanol plant model was developed to evaluate both back-end oil extraction and front-end fractionation technology and predict the change in co-products based on technology installed. The model runs in Microsoft Excel and requires inputs of whole corn composition (proximate analysis), amino acid content, and weight to predict the co-product quantity and quality. User inputs include saccharification and fermentation efficiencies, plant capacity, and plant process specifications including front-end fractionation and backend oil extraction, if applicable. This model provides plants a way to assess and monitor variability in co-product composition due to the variation in whole corn composition. Additionally the co-products predicted in this model are entered into the US Pork Center of Excellence, National Swine Nutrition Guide feed formulation software. This allows the plant user and animal nutritionists to evaluate the value of new co-products in existing animal diets.

  1. Scaling laws for fractional Brownian motion with power-law clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Malley, Daniel; Cushman, John H; Johnson, Graham

    2011-01-01

    We study the mean first passage time (MFPT) for fractional Brownian motion (fBm) in a finite interval with absorbing boundaries at each end. Analytical arguments are used to suggest a simple scaling law for the MFPT and numerical experiments are performed to verify its accuracy. The same approach is used to derive a scaling law for fBm with a power-law clock (fBm-plc). The MFPT scaling laws are employed to develop scaling laws for the finite-size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE) of fBm and fBm-plc. We apply these results to diffusion of a large polymer in a region with absorbing boundaries. (letter)

  2. Modeling and analysis of fractional order DC-DC converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Ahmed G; Emira, Ahmed A; AbdelAty, Amr M; Azar, Ahmad Taher

    2017-07-11

    Due to the non-idealities of commercial inductors, the demand for a better model that accurately describe their dynamic response is elevated. So, the fractional order models of Buck, Boost and Buck-Boost DC-DC converters are presented in this paper. The detailed analysis is made for the two most common modes of converter operation: Continuous Conduction Mode (CCM) and Discontinuous Conduction Mode (DCM). Closed form time domain expressions are derived for inductor currents, voltage gain, average current, conduction time and power efficiency where the effect of the fractional order inductor is found to be strongly present. For example, the peak inductor current at steady state increases with decreasing the inductor order. Advanced Design Systems (ADS) circuit simulations are used to verify the derived formulas, where the fractional order inductor is simulated using Valsa Constant Phase Element (CPE) approximation and Generalized Impedance Converter (GIC). Different simulation results are introduced with good matching to the theoretical formulas for the three DC-DC converter topologies under different fractional orders. A comprehensive comparison with the recently published literature is presented to show the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Method for fractional solid-waste sampling and chemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Christian; Rodushkin, I.; Spliid, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    four subsampling methods and five digestion methods, paying attention to the heterogeneity and the material characteristics of the waste fractions, it was possible to determine 61 substances with low detection limits, reasonable variance, and high accuracy. For most of the substances of environmental...... of variance (20-85% of the overall variation). Only by increasing the sample size significantly can this variance be reduced. The accuracy and short-term reproducibility of the chemical characterization were good, as determined by the analysis of several relevant certified reference materials. Typically, six...... to eight different certified reference materials representing a range of concentrations levels and matrix characteristics were included. Based on the documentation provided, the methods introduced were considered satisfactory for characterization of the chemical composition of waste-material fractions...

  4. Aspect Ratio Scaling of Ideal No-wall Stability Limits in High Bootstrap Fraction Tokamak Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, J.E.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Gates, D.A.; Kaye, S.M.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Maingi, R.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stutman, D.

    2003-01-01

    Recent experiments in the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] have achieved normalized beta values twice the conventional tokamak limit at low internal inductance and with significant bootstrap current. These experimental results have motivated a computational re-examination of the plasma aspect ratio dependence of ideal no-wall magnetohydrodynamic stability limits. These calculations find that the profile-optimized no-wall stability limit in high bootstrap fraction regimes is well described by a nearly aspect ratio invariant normalized beta parameter utilizing the total magnetic field energy density inside the plasma. However, the scaling of normalized beta with internal inductance is found to be strongly aspect ratio dependent at sufficiently low aspect ratio. These calculations and detailed stability analyses of experimental equilibria indicate that the nonrotating plasma no-wall stability limit has been exceeded by as much as 30% in NSTX in a high bootstrap fraction regime

  5. Error analysis of pupils in calculating with fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Uranič, Petra

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I examine the correlation between the frequency of errors that seventh grade pupils make in their calculations with fractions and their level of understanding of fractions. Fractions are a relevant and demanding theme in the mathematics curriculum. Although we use fractions on a daily basis, pupils find learning fractions to be very difficult. They generally do not struggle with the concept of fractions itself, but they frequently have problems with mathematical operations ...

  6. Different techniques of multispectral data analysis for vegetation fraction retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancheva, Rumiana; Georgiev, Georgi

    2012-07-01

    Vegetation monitoring is one of the most important applications of remote sensing technologies. In respect to farmlands, the assessment of crop condition constitutes the basis of growth, development, and yield processes monitoring. Plant condition is defined by a set of biometric variables, such as density, height, biomass amount, leaf area index, and etc. The canopy cover fraction is closely related to these variables, and is state-indicative of the growth process. At the same time it is a defining factor of the soil-vegetation system spectral signatures. That is why spectral mixtures decomposition is a primary objective in remotely sensed data processing and interpretation, specifically in agricultural applications. The actual usefulness of the applied methods depends on their prediction reliability. The goal of this paper is to present and compare different techniques for quantitative endmember extraction from soil-crop patterns reflectance. These techniques include: linear spectral unmixing, two-dimensional spectra analysis, spectral ratio analysis (vegetation indices), spectral derivative analysis (red edge position), colorimetric analysis (tristimulus values sum, chromaticity coordinates and dominant wavelength). The objective is to reveal their potential, accuracy and robustness for plant fraction estimation from multispectral data. Regression relationships have been established between crop canopy cover and various spectral estimators.

  7. Validation and scale dependencies of the triangle method for the evaporative fraction estimation over heterogeneous areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Tomás, Alberto; Nieto, Héctor; Guzinski, Radoslaw

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing has proved to be a consistent tool for monitoring water fluxes at regional scales. The triangle method, in particular, estimates the evaporative fraction (EF), defined as the ratio of latent heat flux (LE) to available energy, based on the relationship between satellite observations...... of land surface temperature and a vegetation index. Among other methodologies, this approach has been commonly used as an approximation to estimate LE, mainly over large semi-arid areas with uniform landscape features. In this study, an interpretation of the triangular space has been applied over...

  8. Micro-scale novel stable isotope fractionation during weathering disclosed by femtosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuessler, J. A.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2012-12-01

    The stable isotope fractionation of metals and metalloids during chemical weathering and alteration of rocks at low temperature is a topic receiving increasing scientific attention. For these systems, weathering of primary minerals leads to selective partitioning of isotopes between the secondary minerals formed from them, and the dissolved phase of soil or river water. While the isotopic signatures of these processes have been mapped-out at the catchment or the soil scale, the actual isotopic fractionation is occurring at the mineral scale. To identify the processes underlying such micro-scale fractionation, the development of micro-analytical tools allows to investigate mechanisms of isotope fractionation in-situ, in combination with textural information of weathering reactions. We have developed a second-generation UV femtosecond (fs) laser system at GFZ Potsdam. The advantage of UV-fs laser ablation is the reduction of laser-induced isotopic and elemental fractionation by avoiding 'thermal effects' during ablation, such that accurate isotope ratios can be measured by standard-sample-standard bracketing using laser ablation multicollector ICP-MS; where the matrix of the bracketing standard does not need to match that of the sample [1]. Our system consists of the latest generation femtosecond solid-state laser (Newport Spectra Physics Solstice), producing an ultra short pulse width of about 100 femtoseconds at a wavelength of 196 nm. The system is combined with a custom-build computer-controlled sample stage and allows fully automated isotope analyses through synchronised operation of the laser with the Neptune MC-ICP-MS. To assess precision and accuracy of our laser ablation method, we analysed various geological reference materials. We obtained δ30Si values of -0.31 ± 0.23 (2SD, n = 13) for basalt glass BHVO-2G, and -1.25 ± 0.21 (2SD, n = 27) for pure Si IRMM17 when bracketed against NBS-28 quartz. δ56Fe and δ26Mg values obtained from non-matrix matched

  9. Fractional statistics and quantum scaling properties of the integrable Penson-Kolb-Hubbard chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitoriano, Carlindo; Coutinho-Filho, M. D.

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the ground-state and low-temperature properties of the integrable version of the Penson-Kolb-Hubbard chain. The model obeys fractional statistical properties, which give rise to fractional elementary excitations and manifest differently in the four regions of the phase diagram U/t versus n , where U is the Coulomb coupling, t is the correlated hopping amplitude, and n is the particle density. In fact, we can find local pair formation, fractionalization of the average occupation number per orbital k , or U - and n -dependent average electric charge per orbital k . We also study the scaling behavior near the U -driven quantum phase transitions and characterize their universality classes. Finally, it is shown that in the regime of parameters where local pair formation is energetically more favorable, the ground state exhibits power-law superconductivity; we also stress that above half filling the pair-hopping term stabilizes local Cooper pairs in the repulsive- U regime for U

  10. Pilot-scale resin adsorption as a means to recover and fractionate apple polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Dietmar R; Carle, Reinhold; Stanley, Roger A; Saleh, Zaid S

    2010-06-09

    The purification and fractionation of phenolic compounds from crude plant extracts using a food-grade acrylic adsorbent were studied at pilot-plant scale. A diluted apple juice concentrate served as a model phenolic solution for column adsorption and desorption trials. Phenolic concentrations were evaluated photometrically using the Folin-Ciocalteu assay and by HPLC-DAD. Recovery rates were significantly affected by increasing phenolic concentrations of the feed solutions applied to the column. In contrast, the flow rate during column loading hardly influenced adsorption efficiency, whereas the temperature and pH value were shown to be crucial parameters determining both total phenolic recovery rates and the adsorption behavior of individual polyphenols. As expected, the eluent composition had the greatest impact on the desorption characteristics of both total and individual phenolic compounds. HPLC analyses revealed significantly different elution profiles of individual polyphenols depending on lipophilicity. This technique allows fractionation of crude plant phenolic extracts, thus providing the opportunity to design the functional properties of the resulting phenolic fractions selectively, and the present study delivers valuable information with regard to the adjustment of individual process parameters.

  11. Stability analysis of distributed order fractional chen system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminikhah, H; Refahi Sheikhani, A; Rezazadeh, H

    2013-01-01

    We first investigate sufficient and necessary conditions of stability of nonlinear distributed order fractional system and then we generalize the integer-order Chen system into the distributed order fractional domain. Based on the asymptotic stability theory of nonlinear distributed order fractional systems, the stability of distributed order fractional Chen system is discussed. In addition, we have found that chaos exists in the double fractional order Chen system. Numerical solutions are used to verify the analytical results.

  12. Stability Analysis of Distributed Order Fractional Chen System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminikhah, H.; Refahi Sheikhani, A.; Rezazadeh, H.

    2013-01-01

    We first investigate sufficient and necessary conditions of stability of nonlinear distributed order fractional system and then we generalize the integer-order Chen system into the distributed order fractional domain. Based on the asymptotic stability theory of nonlinear distributed order fractional systems, the stability of distributed order fractional Chen system is discussed. In addition, we have found that chaos exists in the double fractional order Chen system. Numerical solutions are used to verify the analytical results. PMID:24489508

  13. Scaling relations between trabecular bone volume fraction and microstructure at different skeletal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räth, Christoph; Baum, Thomas; Monetti, Roberto; Sidorenko, Irina; Wolf, Petra; Eckstein, Felix; Matsuura, Maiko; Lochmüller, Eva-Maria; Zysset, Philippe K; Rummeny, Ernst J; Link, Thomas M; Bauer, Jan S

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the scaling relations between trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and parameters of the trabecular microstructure at different skeletal sites. Cylindrical bone samples with a diameter of 8mm were harvested from different skeletal sites of 154 human donors in vitro: 87 from the distal radius, 59/69 from the thoracic/lumbar spine, 51 from the femoral neck, and 83 from the greater trochanter. μCT images were obtained with an isotropic spatial resolution of 26μm. BV/TV and trabecular microstructure parameters (TbN, TbTh, TbSp, scaling indices ( and σ of α and αz), and Minkowski Functionals (Surface, Curvature, Euler)) were computed for each sample. The regression coefficient β was determined for each skeletal site as the slope of a linear fit in the double-logarithmic representations of the correlations of BV/TV versus the respective microstructure parameter. Statistically significant correlation coefficients ranging from r=0.36 to r=0.97 were observed for BV/TV versus microstructure parameters, except for Curvature and Euler. The regression coefficients β were 0.19 to 0.23 (TbN), 0.21 to 0.30 (TbTh), -0.28 to -0.24 (TbSp), 0.58 to 0.71 (Surface) and 0.12 to 0.16 (), 0.07 to 0.11 (), -0.44 to -0.30 (σ(α)), and -0.39 to -0.14 (σ(αz)) at the different skeletal sites. The 95% confidence intervals of β overlapped for almost all microstructure parameters at the different skeletal sites. The scaling relations were independent of vertebral fracture status and similar for subjects aged 60-69, 70-79, and >79years. In conclusion, the bone volume fraction-microstructure scaling relations showed a rather universal character. © 2013.

  14. Numerical analysis for the fractional diffusion and fractional Buckmaster equation by the two-step Laplace Adam-Bashforth method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sonal

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to use the alternative numerical scheme given by Gnitchogna and Atangana for solving partial differential equations with integer and non-integer differential operators. We applied this method to fractional diffusion model and fractional Buckmaster models with non-local fading memory. The method yields a powerful numerical algorithm for fractional order derivative to implement. Also we present in detail the stability analysis of the numerical method for solving the diffusion equation. This proof shows that this method is very stable and also converges very quickly to exact solution and finally some numerical simulation is presented.

  15. Analysis of Drude model using fractional derivatives without singular kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez Leonardo Martínez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We report study exploring the fractional Drude model in the time domain, using fractional derivatives without singular kernels, Caputo-Fabrizio (CF, and fractional derivatives with a stretched Mittag-Leffler function. It is shown that the velocity and current density of electrons moving through a metal depend on both the time and the fractional order 0 < γ ≤ 1. Due to non-singular fractional kernels, it is possible to consider complete memory effects in the model, which appear neither in the ordinary model, nor in the fractional Drude model with Caputo fractional derivative. A comparison is also made between these two representations of the fractional derivatives, resulting a considered difference when γ < 0.8.

  16. Stability analysis of a class of fractional delay differential equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we analyse stability of nonlinear fractional order delay differential equa- tions of the form Dα y(t) = af (y(t − τ )) − by(t), where Dα is a Caputo fractional derivative of order 0 < α ≤ 1. We describe stability regions using critical curves. To explain the proposed theory, we discuss fractional order logistic ...

  17. Stability analysis of a class of fractional delay differential equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we analyse stability of nonlinear fractional order delay differential equations of the form D y ( t ) = a f ( y ( t − ) ) − by ( t ) , where D is a Caputo fractional derivative of order 0 < ≤ 1. We describe stability regions using critical curves. To explain the proposed theory, we discuss fractional order logistic ...

  18. Dynamic stability and bifurcation analysis in fractional thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béda, Péter B.

    2018-02-01

    In mechanics, viscoelasticity was the first field of applications in studying geomaterials. Further possibilities arise in spatial non-locality. Non-local materials were already studied in the 1960s by several authors as a part of continuum mechanics and are still in focus of interest because of the rising importance of materials with internal micro- and nano-structure. When material instability gained more interest, non-local behavior appeared in a different aspect. The problem was concerned to numerical analysis, because then instability zones exhibited singular properties for local constitutive equations. In dynamic stability analysis, mathematical aspects of non-locality were studied by using the theory of dynamic systems. There the basic set of equations describing the behavior of continua was transformed to an abstract dynamic system consisting of differential operators acting on the perturbation field variables. Such functions should satisfy homogeneous boundary conditions and act as indicators of stability of a selected state of the body under consideration. Dynamic systems approach results in conditions for cases, when the differential operators have critical eigenvalues of zero real parts (dynamic stability or instability conditions). When the critical eigenvalues have non-trivial eigenspace, the way of loss of stability is classified as a typical (or generic) bifurcation. Our experiences show that material non-locality and the generic nature of bifurcation at instability are connected, and the basic functions of the non-trivial eigenspace can be used to determine internal length quantities of non-local mechanics. Fractional calculus is already successfully used in thermo-elasticity. In the paper, non-locality is introduced via fractional strain into the constitutive relations of various conventional types. Then, by defining dynamic systems, stability and bifurcation are studied for states of thermo-mechanical solids. Stability conditions and genericity

  19. Design aspects of gamma densitometers for void fraction measurements in small scale two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, A.M.C.; Banerjee, S.

    1981-01-01

    Design procedure for a single-beam gamma densitometer operated in the count mode is described. The design is simple, compact and is particularly suited for small scale two-phase flow experiments with thin-metal walled or non-metallic test sections. The choice of gamma sources, scintillators and signal processing systems is discussed. The procedure has been applied by the authors in the design of densitometers for two transient experiments: refilling and rewetting experiments and flow boiling experiments. Good average void measurements were obtained for relatively fast transients. It has also been shown that some useful flow parameters other than void fractions can be obtained if two or more densitometers are used, eg, the average rewetting and entrained liquid velocities in the refilling and rewetting experiments, and the average void velocity in the flow boiling experiments. (orig.)

  20. Fractionation and analysis of allergenicity of allergens from Prosopis juliflora pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, I S

    1989-01-01

    Prosopis juliflora pollen allergen extract was prepared, and its crude allergen extract was fractionated by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. Six different fractions were obtained which was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Protein and carbohydrate content of each fraction were estimated. Fraction E (MW 20,000) showed a 25% carbohydrate concentration. The amino acid analysis indicated that this fraction was rich in glutamic acid and alanine. Antigenicity or allergenicity of fractionated allergens were checked by gel diffusion test, rocket immunoelectrophoresis, skin prick test, and radioallergosorbent test. All these test indicate that fraction E consisted mainly of allergenic molecules (MW 20,000) of P. juliflora pollen.

  1. Developing a Scale to Measure Content Knowledge and Pedagogy Content Knowledge of In-Service Elementary Teachers on Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Farhad; Rafiepour, Abolfazl

    2018-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to develop a scale for measuring content knowledge (CK) and pedagogy content knowledge (PCK) of in-service elementary teachers on mathematical fractions. Another aim of this study was to consider whether CK and PCK are separate from each other, or are in a single body. Therefore, a scale containing 22 items about…

  2. Fractional Brownian motion run with a multi-scaling clock mimics diffusion of spherical colloids in microstructural fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Moongyu; Cushman, John Howard; O'Malley, Dan

    2014-09-30

    The collective molecular reorientations within a nematic liquid crystal fluid bathing a spherical colloid cause the colloid to diffuse anomalously on a short time scale (i.e., as a non-Brownian particle). The deformations and fluctuations of long-range orientational order in the liquid crystal profoundly influence the transient diffusive regimes. Here we show that an anisotropic fractional Brownian process run with a nonlinear multiscaling clock effectively mimics this collective and transient phenomenon. This novel process has memory, Gaussian increments, and a multiscale mean square displacement that can be chosen independently from the fractal dimension of a particle trajectory. The process is capable of modeling multiscale sub-, super-, or classical diffusion. The finite-size Lyapunov exponents for this multiscaling process are defined for future analysis of related mixing processes.

  3. Chaotic convective behavior and stability analysis of a fractional viscoelastic fluids model in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    N'Doye, Ibrahima; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2015-01-01

    , and show the existence of chaos. The behavior and stability analysis of the integer-order and the fractional commensurate and non-commensurate orders of a fractional viscoelastic fluids system, which exhibits chaos, are presented as well.

  4. Numerical Analysis of Fractional Order Epidemic Model of Childhood Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal Haq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractional order Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR epidemic model of childhood disease is considered. Laplace–Adomian Decomposition Method is used to compute an approximate solution of the system of nonlinear fractional differential equations. We obtain the solutions of fractional differential equations in the form of infinite series. The series solution of the proposed model converges rapidly to its exact value. The obtained results are compared with the classical case.

  5. Analysis of a time fractional wave-like equation with the homotopy analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hang; Cang Jie

    2008-01-01

    The time fractional wave-like differential equation with a variable coefficient is studied analytically. By using a simple transformation, the governing equation is reduced to two fractional ordinary differential equations. Then the homotopy analysis method is employed to derive the solutions of these equations. The accurate series solutions are obtained. Especially, when h f =h g =-1, these solutions are exactly the same as those results given by the Adomian decomposition method. The present work shows the validity and great potential of the homotopy analysis method for solving nonlinear fractional differential equations. The basic idea described in this Letter is expected to be further employed to solve other similar nonlinear problems in fractional calculus

  6. Mapping canopy gap fraction and leaf area index at continent-scale from satellite lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, C.; Hopkinson, C.; Held, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Information on canopy cover is essential for understanding spatial and temporal variability in vegetation biomass, local meteorological processes and hydrological transfers within vegetated environments. Gap fraction (GF), an index of canopy cover, is often derived over large areas (100's km2) via airborne laser scanning (ALS), estimates of which are reasonably well understood. However, obtaining country-wide estimates is challenging due to the lack of spatially distributed point cloud data. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) removes spatial limitations, however, its large footprint nature and continuous waveform data measurements make derivations of GF challenging. ALS data from 3 Australian sites are used as a basis to scale-up GF estimates to GLAS footprint data by the use of a physically-based Weibull function. Spaceborne estimates of GF are employed in conjunction with supplementary predictor variables in the predictive Random Forest algorithm to yield country-wide estimates at a 250 m spatial resolution; country-wide estimates are accompanied with uncertainties at the pixel level. Preliminary estimates of effective Leaf Area Index (eLAI) are also presented by converting GF via the Beer-Lambert law, where an extinction coefficient of 0.5 is employed; deemed acceptable at such spatial scales. The need for such wide-scale quantification of GF and eLAI are key in the assessment and modification of current forest management strategies across Australia. Such work also assists Australia's Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN), a key asset to policy makers with regards to the management of the national ecosystem, in fulfilling their government issued mandates.

  7. Functional analysis of mildly refined fractions from yellow pea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrom, P.J.M.; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Dry fractionation offers an attractive route to sustainably produce protein-enriched plant-based ingredients. For example, fine milling of peas followed by air classification separates starch granules from the protein matrix. Unlike conventional wet isolates, dry-enriched pea fractions consist of a

  8. A Quantitative Analysis of Children's Splitting Operations and Fraction Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Anderson; Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

    2009-01-01

    Teaching experiments with pairs of children have generated several hypotheses about students' construction of fractions. For example, Steffe (2004) hypothesized that robust conceptions of improper fractions depends on the development of a splitting operation. Results from teaching experiments that rely on scheme theory and Steffe's hierarchy of…

  9. Analysis of Caputo Impulsive Fractional Order Differential Equations with Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshman Mahto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We use Sadovskii's fixed point method to investigate the existence and uniqueness of solutions of Caputo impulsive fractional differential equations of order with one example of impulsive logistic model and few other examples as well. We also discuss Caputo impulsive fractional differential equations with finite delay. The results proven are new and compliment the existing one.

  10. Application of a decanter centrifuge for casein fractionation on pilot scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, Thomas; Meric, Asutay; Boom, Remko; Hinrichs, Jörg; Atamer, Zeynep

    2018-01-01

    Individual casein fractions are of growing interest because of their multifunctional applications. The fractions of caseins (αS-, β- & κ-) possess a wide range of bio- and techno-functional properties. Although various isolation and purification methods to obtain casein fractions

  11. HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-16

    The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

  12. Dynamics analysis of fractional order Yu-Wang system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalekar, Sachin

    2013-10-01

    Fractional order version of a dynamical system introduced by Yu and Wang (Engineering, Technology & Applied Science Research, 2, (2012) 209-215) is discussed in this article. The basic dynamical properties of the system are studied. Minimum effective dimension 0.942329 for the existence of chaos in the proposed system is obtained using the analytical result. For chaos detection, we have calculated maximum Lyapunov exponents for various values of fractional order. Feedback control method is then used to control chaos in the system. Further, the system is synchronized with itself and with fractional order financial system using active control technique. Modified Adams-Bashforth-Moulton algorithm is used for numerical simulations.

  13. Fractional-topological-charge-induced vortex birth and splitting of light fields on the submicron scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yiqi; Lu, Qinghong; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Wuhong; Chen, Lixiang

    2017-02-01

    The study of vortex dynamics is of fundamental importance in understanding the structured light's propagation behavior in the realm of singular optics. Here, combining with the large-angle holographic lithography in photoresist, a simple experiment to trace and visualize the vortex birth and splitting of light fields induced by various fractional topological charges is reported. For a topological charge M =1.76 , the recorded microstructures reveal that although it finally leads to the formation of a pair of fork gratings, these two vortices evolve asynchronously. More interestingly, it is observed on the submicron scale that high-order topological charges M =3.48 and 3.52, respectively, give rise to three and four characteristic forks embedded in the samples with one-wavelength resolution of about 450 nm. Numerical simulations based on orbital angular momentum eigenmode decomposition support well the experimental observations. Our method could be applied effectively to study other structured matter waves, such as the electron and neutron beams.

  14. Aggregation of evaporative fraction by remote sensing from micro to macro scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaanssen, W.G.M.; Pelgrum, H.; Wal, van der T.; Roebeling, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The evaporative fraction of the surface energy balance has been favoured as a tool to describe the energy partitioning during daytime. It is shown that the evaporative fraction behaves temporally stable under heterogeneous terrain conditions in the Echival Field Experiment in

  15. Source Code Analysis Laboratory (SCALe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    products (including services) and processes. The agency has also published ISO / IEC 17025 :2005 General Requirements for the Competence of Testing...SCALe undertakes. Testing and calibration laboratories that comply with ISO / IEC 17025 also operate in accordance with ISO 9001. • NIST National...assessed by the accreditation body against all of the requirements of ISO / IEC 17025 : 2005 General requirements for the competence of testing and

  16. Chaotic convective behavior and stability analysis of a fractional viscoelastic fluids model in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    N'Doye, Ibrahima

    2015-05-25

    In this paper, a dynamical fractional viscoelastic fluids convection model in porous media is proposed and its chaotic behavior is studied. A preformed equilibrium points analysis indicates the conditions where chaotic dynamics can be observed, and show the existence of chaos. The behavior and stability analysis of the integer-order and the fractional commensurate and non-commensurate orders of a fractional viscoelastic fluids system, which exhibits chaos, are presented as well.

  17. Analysis of Student Errors on Division of Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maelasari, E.; Jupri, A.

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to describe the type of student errors that typically occurs at the completion of the division arithmetic operations on fractions, and to describe the causes of students’ mistakes. This research used a descriptive qualitative method, and involved 22 fifth grade students at one particular elementary school in Kuningan, Indonesia. The results of this study showed that students’ error answers caused by students changing their way of thinking to solve multiplication and division operations on the same procedures, the changing of mix fractions to common fraction have made students confused, and students are careless in doing calculation. From student written work, in solving the fraction problems, we found that there is influence between the uses of learning methods and student response, and some of student responses beyond researchers’ prediction. We conclude that the teaching method is not only the important thing that must be prepared, but the teacher should also prepare about predictions of students’ answers to the problems that will be given in the learning process. This could be a reflection for teachers to be better and to achieve the expected learning goals.

  18. Assessing SOC labile fractions through respiration test, density-size fractionation and thermal analysis - A comparison of methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Cécillon, Lauric; Chenu, Claire; Baudin, François; Nicolas, Manuel; Savignac, Florence; Barré, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is the biggest terrestrial carbon reservoir, storing 3 to 4 times more carbon than the atmosphere. However, despite its major importance for climate regulation SOM dynamics remains insufficiently understood. For instance, there is still no widely accepted method to assess SOM lability. Soil respiration tests and particulate organic matter (POM) obtained by different fractionation schemes have been used for decades and are now considered as classical estimates of very labile and labile soil organic carbon (SOC), respectively. But the pertinence of these methods to characterize SOM turnover can be questioned. Moreover, they are very time-consuming and their reproducibility might be an issue. Alternate ways of determining the labile SOC component are thus well-needed. Thermal analyses have been used to characterize SOM among which Rock-Eval 6 (RE6) analysis of soil has shown promising results in the determination of SOM biogeochemical stability (Gregorich et al., 2015; Barré et al., 2016). Using a large set of samples of French forest soils representing contrasted pedoclimatic conditions, including deep samples (up to 1 m depth), we compared different techniques used for SOM lability assessment. We explored whether results from soil respiration test (10-week laboratory incubations), SOM size-density fractionation and RE6 thermal analysis were comparable and how they were correlated. A set of 222 (respiration test and RE6), 103 (SOM fractionation and RE6) and 93 (respiration test, SOM fractionation and RE6) forest soils samples were respectively analyzed and compared. The comparison of the three methods (n = 93) using a principal component analysis separated samples from the surface (0-10 cm) and deep (40-80 cm) layers, highlighting a clear effect of depth on the short-term persistence of SOC. A correlation analysis demonstrated that, for these samples, the two classical methods of labile SOC determination (respiration and SOM fractionation

  19. Effect of dairy wastewater on changes in COD fractions in technical-scale SBR type reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk-Sokołowska, Joanna; Rodziewicz, Joanna; Mielcarek, Artur

    2017-04-01

    The annual global production of milk is approximately 630,000 million litres and the volume of generated dairy wastewater accounts for 3.2 m 3 ·m -3 product. Dairy wastewater is characterized by a high load of chemical oxygen demand (COD). In many wastewater plants dairy wastewater and municipal wastewater are co-treated. The effect of dairy wastewater contribution on COD fraction changes in municipal sewage which has been treated with a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) in three wastewater treatment plants in north-east Poland is presented. In these plants the real contribution of dairy wastewater was 10, 13 and 17%. In raw wastewater, S S fraction (readily biodegradable dissolved organic matter) was dominant and ranged from 38.3 to 62.6%. In the effluent, S S fraction was not noted, which is indicative of consumption by microorganisms. The presence of dairy wastewater in municipal sewage does not cause changes in the content of the X I fraction (insoluble fractions of non-biodegradable organic matter). SBR effluents were dominated by non-biodegradable dissolved organic matter S I , which from 57.7 to 61.7%. In raw wastewater S I ranged from 1.0 to 4.6%. X s fraction (slowly biodegradable non-soluble organic matter) in raw wastewater ranged from 24.6 to 45.5% while in treated wastewater it ranged from 28.6 to 30.8%. In the control object (fourth wastewater plant) which does not process dairy wastewater, the S S , S I , X s and X I fraction in inflow was 28.7, 2.4, 51.7 and 17.2% respectively. In the effluent the S S , S I , X s and X I fraction was below 0.1, 33.6, 50.0 and 16.4% respectively.

  20. Analytical scale purification of zirconia colloidal suspension using field programmed sedimentation field flow fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van-Quynh, Alexandra; Blanchart, Philippe; Battu, Serge; Clédat, Dominique; Cardot, Philippe

    2006-03-03

    Sedimentation field flow fractionation was used to obtain purified fractions from a polydispersed zirconia colloidal suspension in the potential purpose of optical material hybrid coating. The zirconia particle size ranged from 50/70 nm to 1000 nm. It exhibited a log-Gaussian particle size distribution (in mass or volume) and a 115% polydispersity index (P.I.). Time dependent eluted fractions of the original zirconia colloidal suspension were collected. The particle size distribution of each fraction was determined with scanning electron microscopy and Coulter sub-micron particle sizer (CSPS). These orthogonal techniques generated similar data. From fraction average elution times and granulometry measurements, it was shown that zirconia colloids are eluted according to the Brownian elution mode. The four collected fractions have a Gaussian like distribution and respective average size and polydispersity index of 153 nm (P.I. = 34.7%); 188 nm (P.I. = 27.9%); 228 nm (P.I. = 22.6%), and 276 nm (P.I. = 22.3%). These data demonstrate the strong size selectivity of SdFFF operated with programmed field of exponential profile for sorting particles in the sub-micron range. Using this technique, the analytical production of zirconia of given average size and reduced polydispersity is possible.

  1. Biogeochemial modeling of biodegradation and stable isotope fractionation of DCE in a small-scale wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Zaldívar, Pablo; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Maier, Uli; Centler, Florian; Thullner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, the use of (constructed) wetlands has gained significant attention for the in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated with (chlorinated) organic hydrocarbons. Although many sophisticated experimental methods exist for the assessment of contaminant removal in such wetlands the understanding how changes in wetland hydrochemistry affect the removal processes is still limited. This knowledge gap might be reduced by the use of biogeochemical reactive transport models. This study presents the reactive transport simulation of a small-scale constructed wetland treated with groundwater containing cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE). Simulated processes consider different cDCE biodegradation pathways and the associated carbon isotope fractionation, a set of further (bio)geochemical processes as well as the activity of the plant roots. Spatio-temporal hydrochemical and isotope data from a long-term constructed wetland experiment [1] are used to constrain the model. Simulation results for the initial oxic phase of the wetland experiment indicate carbon isotope enrichment factors typical for cometabolic DCE oxidation, which suggests that aerobic treatment of cDCE is not an optimal remediation strategy. For the later anoxic phase of the experiment model derived enrichment factors indicate reductive dechlorination pathways. This degradation is promoted at all wetland depths by a sufficient availability of electron donor and carbon sources from root exudates, which makes the anoxic treatment of groundwater in such wetlands an effective remediation strategy. In combination with the previous experimental data results from this study suggest that constructed wetlands are viable remediation means for the treatment of cDCE contaminated groundwater. Reactive transport models can improve the understanding of the factors controlling chlorinated ethenes removal, and the used model approach would also allow for an optimization of the wetland operation needed for a complete

  2. PHIBSS: Unified Scaling Relations of Gas Depletion Time and Molecular Gas Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconi, L. J.; Genzel, R.; Saintonge, A.; Combes, F.; García-Burillo, S.; Neri, R.; Bolatto, A.; Contini, T.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Lilly, S.; Lutz, D.; Wuyts, S.; Accurso, G.; Boissier, J.; Boone, F.; Bouché, N.; Bournaud, F.; Burkert, A.; Carollo, M.; Cooper, M.; Cox, P.; Feruglio, C.; Freundlich, J.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Juneau, S.; Lippa, M.; Naab, T.; Renzini, A.; Salome, P.; Sternberg, A.; Tadaki, K.; Übler, H.; Walter, F.; Weiner, B.; Weiss, A.

    2018-02-01

    This paper provides an update of our previous scaling relations between galaxy-integrated molecular gas masses, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs), in the framework of the star formation main sequence (MS), with the main goal of testing for possible systematic effects. For this purpose our new study combines three independent methods of determining molecular gas masses from CO line fluxes, far-infrared dust spectral energy distributions, and ∼1 mm dust photometry, in a large sample of 1444 star-forming galaxies between z = 0 and 4. The sample covers the stellar mass range log(M */M ⊙) = 9.0–11.8, and SFRs relative to that on the MS, δMS = SFR/SFR(MS), from 10‑1.3 to 102.2. Our most important finding is that all data sets, despite the different techniques and analysis methods used, follow the same scaling trends, once method-to-method zero-point offsets are minimized and uncertainties are properly taken into account. The molecular gas depletion time t depl, defined as the ratio of molecular gas mass to SFR, scales as (1 + z)‑0.6 × (δMS)‑0.44 and is only weakly dependent on stellar mass. The ratio of molecular to stellar mass μ gas depends on (1+z{)}2.5× {(δ {MS})}0.52× {({M}* )}-0.36, which tracks the evolution of the specific SFR. The redshift dependence of μ gas requires a curvature term, as may the mass dependences of t depl and μ gas. We find no or only weak correlations of t depl and μ gas with optical size R or surface density once one removes the above scalings, but we caution that optical sizes may not be appropriate for the high gas and dust columns at high z. Based on observations of an IRAM Legacy Program carried out with the NOEMA, operated by the Institute for Radio Astronomy in the Millimetre Range (IRAM), which is funded by a partnership of INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  3. Stochastic fractional differential equations: Modeling, method and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedjeu, Jean-C.; Ladde, Gangaram S.

    2012-01-01

    By introducing a concept of dynamic process operating under multi-time scales in sciences and engineering, a mathematical model described by a system of multi-time scale stochastic differential equations is formulated. The classical Picard–Lindelöf successive approximations scheme is applied to the model validation problem, namely, existence and uniqueness of solution process. Naturally, this leads to the problem of finding closed form solutions of both linear and nonlinear multi-time scale stochastic differential equations of Itô–Doob type. Finally, to illustrate the scope of ideas and presented results, multi-time scale stochastic models for ecological and epidemiological processes in population dynamic are outlined.

  4. Analysis of football player's motion in view of fractional calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couceiro, Micael S.; Clemente, Filipe M.; Martins, Fernando M. L.

    2013-06-01

    Accurately retrieving the position of football players over time may lay the foundations for a whole series of possible new performance metrics for coaches and assistants. Despite the recent developments of automatic tracking systems, the misclassification problem ( i.e., misleading a given player by another) still exists and requires human operators as final evaluators. This paper proposes an adaptive fractional calculus (FC) approach to improve the accuracy of tracking methods by estimating the position of players based on their trajectory so far. One half-time of an official football match was used to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed approach under different sampling periods of 250, 500 and 1000 ms. Moreover, the performance of the FC approach was compared with position-based and velocity-based methods. The experimental evaluation shows that the FC method presents a high classification accuracy for small sampling periods. Such results suggest that fractional dynamics may fit the trajectory of football players, thus being useful to increase the autonomy of tracking systems.

  5. Scaling analysis of meteorite shower mass distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Lene; Meibom, A.; Bohr, Jakob

    1998-01-01

    Meteorite showers are the remains of extraterrestrial objects which are captivated by the gravitational field of the Earth. We have analyzed the mass distribution of fragments from 16 meteorite showers for scaling. The distributions exhibit distinct scaling behavior over several orders of magnetude......; the observed scaling exponents vary from shower to shower. Half of the analyzed showers show a single scaling region while the orther half show multiple scaling regimes. Such an analysis can provide knowledge about the fragmentation process and about the original meteoroid. We also suggest to compare...... the observed scaling exponents to exponents observed in laboratory experiments and discuss the possibility that one can derive insight into the original shapes of the meteoroids....

  6. Ultrasonically enhanced fractionation of milk fat in a litre-scale prototype vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Thomas; Johansson, Linda; Mawson, Raymond; McArthur, Sally L; Manasseh, Richard; Juliano, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasonic fractionation of milk fat in whole milk to fractions with distinct particle size distributions was demonstrated using a stage-based ultrasound-enhanced gravity separation protocol. Firstly, a single stage ultrasound gravity separation was characterised after various sonication durations (5-20 min) with a mass balance, where defined volume partitions were removed across the height of the separation vessel to determine the fat content and size distribution of fat droplets. Subsequent trials using ultrasound-enhanced gravity separation were carried out in three consecutive stages. Each stage consisted of 5 min sonication, with single and dual transducer configurations at 1 MHz and 2 MHz, followed by aliquot collection for particle size characterisation of the formed layers located at the bottom and top of the vessel. After each sonication stage, gentle removal of the separated fat layer located at the top was performed. Results indicated that ultrasound promoted the formation of a gradient of vertically increasing fat concentration and particle size across the height of the separation vessel, which became more pronounced with extended sonication time. Ultrasound-enhanced fractionation provided fat enriched fractions located at the top of the vessel of up to 13 ± 1% (w/v) with larger globules present in the particle size distributions. In contrast, semi-skim milk fractions located at the bottom of the vessel as low as 1.2 ± 0.01% (w/v) could be produced, containing proportionally smaller sized fat globules. Particle size differentiation was enhanced at higher ultrasound energy input (up to 347 W/L). In particular, dual transducer after three-stage operation at maximum energy input provided highest mean particle size differentiation with up to 0.9 μm reduction in the semi-skim fractions. Higher frequency ultrasound at 2 MHz was more effective in manipulating smaller sized fat globules retained in the later stages of skimming than 1 MHz. While 2 MHz

  7. Dynamic analysis of a new chaotic system with fractional order and its generalized projective synchronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Yu-Jun; Wang Xing-Yuan; Nian Fu-Zhong; Wang Ming-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Based on the stability theory of the fractional order system, the dynamic behaviours of a new fractional order system are investigated theoretically. The lowest order we found to have chaos in the new three-dimensional system is 2.46, and the period routes to chaos in the new fractional order system are also found. The effectiveness of our analysis results is further verified by numerical simulations and positive largest Lyapunov exponent. Furthermore, a nonlinear feedback controller is designed to achieve the generalized projective synchronization of the fractional order chaotic system, and its validity is proved by Laplace transformation theory. (general)

  8. An experimental and theoretical analysis of void fraction dynamics in a boiling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romberg, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental and theoretical investigation of the void fraction dynamics at the exit of a test boiling channel which is operated near the 'instability threshold power' (the power level at which coolant flow instabilities occur). Dynamic measurements of the perturbations in channel inlet flow-rate, power input and exit void fraction are analysed using multivariate spectral analysis. The resulting experimental cross-spectral density functions between flow-rate/exit void fraction and power input/exit void fraction agree favourably with those calculated by a linearised hydrodynamic model in the frequency domain. (Author)

  9. Design and analysis of fractional order seismic transducer for displacement and acceleration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraian, Parthasarathi; Gandhi, Uma; Mangalanathan, Umapathy

    2018-04-01

    Seismic transducers are widely used for measurement of displacement, velocity, and acceleration. This paper presents the design of seismic transducer in the fractional domain for the measurement of displacement and acceleration. The fractional order transfer function for seismic displacement and acceleration transducer are derived using Grünwald-Letnikov derivative. Frequency response analysis of fractional order seismic displacement transducer (FOSDT) and fractional order seismic acceleration transducer (FOSAT) are carried out for different damping ratio with the different fractional order, and the maximum dynamic measurement range is identified. The results demonstrate that fractional order seismic transducer has increased dynamic measurement range and less phase distortion as compared to the conventional seismic transducer even with a lower damping ratio. Time response of FOSDT and FOSAT are derived analytically in terms of Mittag-Leffler function, the effect of fractional behavior in the time domain is evaluated from the impulse and step response. The fractional order system is found to have significantly reduced overshoot as compared to the conventional transducer. The fractional order seismic transducer design proposed in this paper is illustrated with a design example for FOSDT and FOSAT. Finally, an electrical equivalent of FOSDT and FOSAT is considered, and its frequency response is found to be in close agreement with the proposed fractional order seismic transducer.

  10. Generalized modeling of the fractional-order memcapacitor and its character analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhang; Si, Gangquan; Diao, Lijie; Jia, Lixin; Zhang, Yanbin

    2018-06-01

    Memcapacitor is a new type of memory device generalized from the memristor. This paper proposes a generalized fractional-order memcapacitor model by introducing the fractional calculus into the model. The generalized formulas are studied and the two fractional-order parameter α, β are introduced where α mostly affects the fractional calculus value of charge q within the generalized Ohm's law and β generalizes the state equation which simulates the physical mechanism of a memcapacitor into the fractional sense. This model will be reduced to the conventional memcapacitor as α = 1 , β = 0 and to the conventional memristor as α = 0 , β = 1 . Then the numerical analysis of the fractional-order memcapacitor is studied. And the characteristics and output behaviors of the fractional-order memcapacitor applied with sinusoidal charge are derived. The analysis results have shown that there are four basic v - q and v - i curve patterns when the fractional order α, β respectively equal to 0 or 1, moreover all v - q and v - i curves of the other fractional-order models are transition curves between the four basic patterns.

  11. A fractionally cointegrated VAR analysis of price discovery in commodity futures markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolatabadi, Sepideh; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard; Xu, Ke

    straightforward examination of the adjustment coefficients. In our empirical analysis we use the data from Figuerola-Ferretti and Gonzalo (2010), who conduct a similar analysis using the usual (non-fractional) CVAR model. Our first finding is that, for all markets except copper, the fractional integration......In this paper we apply the recently developed fractionally cointegrated vector autoregressive (FCVAR) model to analyze price discovery in the spot and futures markets for five non-ferrous metals (aluminium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc). The FCVAR model allows for long memory (fractional...... to the results from the non-fractional model, we find slightly more evidence of price discovery in the spot market. Specifically, using standard likelihood ratio tests, we do not reject the hypothesis that price discovery takes place exclusively in the spot (futures) market for copper, lead, and zinc (aluminium...

  12. Large-scale isolation and fractionation of organs of Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweidler, A; Cohen, L H

    1971-10-01

    Methods for the mass isolation of diverse organs from small animals are described. They involve novel devices: a mechanical dissecting system, a centrifugal agitator for the separation of fibrillar from globular particles, and a settling chamber for the fractionation at unit gravity of particles with sedimentation velocities above the useful range for centrifugation. The application of these methods to the isolation of polytene and nonpolytene nuclei from Drosophila melanogaster larvae is described.

  13. H2@Scale Resource and Market Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark

    2017-05-04

    The 'H2@Scale' concept is based on the potential for wide-scale utilization of hydrogen as an energy intermediate where the hydrogen is produced from low cost energy resources and it is used in both the transportation and industrial sectors. H2@Scale has the potential to address grid resiliency, energy security, and cross-sectoral emissions reductions. This presentation summarizes the status of an ongoing analysis effort to quantify the benefits of H2@Scale. It includes initial results regarding market potential, resource potential, and impacts of when electrolytic hydrogen is produced with renewable electricity to meet the potential market demands. It also proposes additional analysis efforts to better quantify each of the factors.

  14. LBA-ECO CD-34 Landsat Fractional Land Cover Analysis, Manaus, Brazil: 2004-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides the results of fractional land cover analysis for nonphotosynthetic vegetation (NPV) from two Landsat images of Manaus, Brazil, for October...

  15. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DESPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu**, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; **IIT Research Institute, Chicago, IL; *S...

  16. Taxonomical analysis of the suspended bacterial fraction in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-30

    Nov 30, 2011 ... hundred individuals representative of the rumen bacterial community. A preliminary analysis ... sterile plastic syringes from eviscerated animals. The fluid was .... engaged in the active degradation of the substrate to which as a ...

  17. Corroded scale analysis from water distribution pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaković-Ognjanović Vladana N.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this study was the steel pipes that are part of Belgrade's drinking water supply network. In order to investigate the mutual effects of corrosion and water quality, the corrosion scales on the pipes were analyzed. The idea was to improve control of corrosion processes and prevent impact of corrosion on water quality degradation. The instrumental methods for corrosion scales characterization used were: scanning electron microscopy (SEM, for the investigation of corrosion scales of the analyzed samples surfaces, X-ray diffraction (XRD, for the analysis of the presence of solid forms inside scales, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, for the microstructural analysis of the corroded scales, and BET adsorption isotherm for the surface area determination. Depending on the composition of water next to the pipe surface, corrosion of iron results in the formation of different compounds and solid phases. The composition and structure of the iron scales in the drinking water distribution pipes depends on the type of the metal and the composition of the aqueous phase. Their formation is probably governed by several factors that include water quality parameters such as pH, alkalinity, buffer intensity, natural organic matter (NOM concentration, and dissolved oxygen (DO concentration. Factors such as water flow patterns, seasonal fluctuations in temperature, and microbiological activity as well as water treatment practices such as application of corrosion inhibitors can also influence corrosion scale formation and growth. Therefore, the corrosion scales found in iron and steel pipes are expected to have unique features for each site. Compounds that are found in iron corrosion scales often include goethite, lepidocrocite, magnetite, hematite, ferrous oxide, siderite, ferrous hydroxide, ferric hydroxide, ferrihydrite, calcium carbonate and green rusts. Iron scales have characteristic features that include: corroded floor, porous core that contains

  18. Large-Scale Analysis of Art Proportions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    While literature often tries to impute mathematical constants into art, this large-scale study (11 databases of paintings and photos, around 200.000 items) shows a different truth. The analysis, consisting of the width/height proportions, shows a value of rarely if ever one (square) and with majo......While literature often tries to impute mathematical constants into art, this large-scale study (11 databases of paintings and photos, around 200.000 items) shows a different truth. The analysis, consisting of the width/height proportions, shows a value of rarely if ever one (square...

  19. Emissions from small-scale energy production using co-combustion of biofuel and the dry fraction of household waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Björn; Burvall, Jan; Nilsson, Calle; Marklund, Stellan

    2005-01-01

    In sparsely populated rural areas, recycling of household waste might not always be the most environmentally advantageous solution due to the total amount of transport involved. In this study, an alternative approach to recycling has been tested using efficient small-scale biofuel boilers for co-combustion of biofuel and high-energy waste. The dry combustible fraction of source-sorted household waste was mixed with the energy crop reed canary-grass (Phalaris Arundinacea L.), and combusted in both a 5-kW pilot scale reactor and a biofuel boiler with 140-180 kW output capacity, in the form of pellets and briquettes, respectively. The chlorine content of the waste fraction was 0.2%, most of which originated from plastics. The HCl emissions exceeded levels stipulated in new EU-directives, but levels of equal magnitude were also generated from combustion of the pure biofuel. Addition of waste to the biofuel did not give any apparent increase in emissions of organic compounds. Dioxin levels were close to stipulated limits. With further refinement of combustion equipment, small-scale co-combustion systems have the potential to comply with emission regulations.

  20. Emissions from small-scale energy production using co-combustion of biofuel and the dry fraction of household waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedman, Bjoern; Burvall, Jan; Nilsson, Calle; Marklund, Stellan

    2005-01-01

    In sparsely populated rural areas, recycling of household waste might not always be the most environmentally advantageous solution due to the total amount of transport involved. In this study, an alternative approach to recycling has been tested using efficient small-scale biofuel boilers for co-combustion of biofuel and high-energy waste. The dry combustible fraction of source-sorted household waste was mixed with the energy crop reed canary-grass (Phalaris Arundinacea L.), and combusted in both a 5-kW pilot scale reactor and a biofuel boiler with 140-180 kW output capacity, in the form of pellets and briquettes, respectively. The chlorine content of the waste fraction was 0.2%, most of which originated from plastics. The HCl emissions exceeded levels stipulated in new EU-directives, but levels of equal magnitude were also generated from combustion of the pure biofuel. Addition of waste to the biofuel did not give any apparent increase in emissions of organic compounds. Dioxin levels were close to stipulated limits. With further refinement of combustion equipment, small-scale co-combustion systems have the potential to comply with emission regulations

  1. EFFECTS OF OXYGEN AND AIR MIXING ON VOID FRACTIONS IN A LARGE SCALE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leishear, R; Hector Guerrero, H; Michael Restivo, M

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen and air mixing with spargers was performed in a 30 foot tall by 30 inch diameter column, to investigate mass transfer as air sparged up through the column and removed saturated oxygen from solution. The mixing techniques required to support this research are the focus of this paper. The fluids tested included water, water with an antifoam agent (AFA), and a high, solids content, Bingham plastic, nuclear waste simulant with AFA, referred to as AZ01 simulant, which is non-radioactive. Mixing of fluids in the column was performed using a recirculation system and an air sparger. The re-circulation system consisted of the column, a re-circulating pump, and associated piping. The air sparger was fabricated from a two inch diameter pipe concentrically installed in the column and open near the bottom of the column. The column contents were slowly re-circulated while fluids were mixed with the air sparger. Samples were rheologically tested to ensure effective mixing, as required. Once the fluids were adequately mixed, oxygen was homogeneously added through the re-circulation loop using a sintered metal oxygen sparger followed by a static mixer. Then the air sparger was re-actuated to remove oxygen from solution as air bubbled up through solution. To monitor mixing effectiveness several variables were monitored, which included flow rates, oxygen concentration, differential pressures along the column height, fluid levels, and void fractions, which are defined as the percent of dissolved gas divided by the total volume of gas and liquid. Research showed that mixing was uniform for water and water with AFA, but mixing for the AZ101 fluid was far more complex. Although mixing of AZ101 was uniform throughout most of the column, gas entrapment and settling of solids significantly affected test results. The detailed test results presented here provide some insight into the complexities of mixing and void fractions for different fluids and how the mixing process itself

  2. EFFECTS OF OXYGEN AND AIR MIXING ON VOID FRACTIONS IN A LARGE SCALE SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R; Hector Guerrero, H; Michael Restivo, M

    2008-09-11

    Oxygen and air mixing with spargers was performed in a 30 foot tall by 30 inch diameter column, to investigate mass transfer as air sparged up through the column and removed saturated oxygen from solution. The mixing techniques required to support this research are the focus of this paper. The fluids tested included water, water with an antifoam agent (AFA), and a high, solids content, Bingham plastic, nuclear waste simulant with AFA, referred to as AZ01 simulant, which is non-radioactive. Mixing of fluids in the column was performed using a recirculation system and an air sparger. The re-circulation system consisted of the column, a re-circulating pump, and associated piping. The air sparger was fabricated from a two inch diameter pipe concentrically installed in the column and open near the bottom of the column. The column contents were slowly re-circulated while fluids were mixed with the air sparger. Samples were rheologically tested to ensure effective mixing, as required. Once the fluids were adequately mixed, oxygen was homogeneously added through the re-circulation loop using a sintered metal oxygen sparger followed by a static mixer. Then the air sparger was re-actuated to remove oxygen from solution as air bubbled up through solution. To monitor mixing effectiveness several variables were monitored, which included flow rates, oxygen concentration, differential pressures along the column height, fluid levels, and void fractions, which are defined as the percent of dissolved gas divided by the total volume of gas and liquid. Research showed that mixing was uniform for water and water with AFA, but mixing for the AZ101 fluid was far more complex. Although mixing of AZ101 was uniform throughout most of the column, gas entrapment and settling of solids significantly affected test results. The detailed test results presented here provide some insight into the complexities of mixing and void fractions for different fluids and how the mixing process itself

  3. Fractional Order Differentiation by Integration and Error Analysis in Noisy Environment

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dayan

    2015-03-31

    The integer order differentiation by integration method based on the Jacobi orthogonal polynomials for noisy signals was originally introduced by Mboup, Join and Fliess. We propose to extend this method from the integer order to the fractional order to estimate the fractional order derivatives of noisy signals. Firstly, two fractional order differentiators are deduced from the Jacobi orthogonal polynomial filter, using the Riemann-Liouville and the Caputo fractional order derivative definitions respectively. Exact and simple formulae for these differentiators are given by integral expressions. Hence, they can be used for both continuous-time and discrete-time models in on-line or off-line applications. Secondly, some error bounds are provided for the corresponding estimation errors. These bounds allow to study the design parameters\\' influence. The noise error contribution due to a large class of stochastic processes is studied in discrete case. The latter shows that the differentiator based on the Caputo fractional order derivative can cope with a class of noises, whose mean value and variance functions are polynomial time-varying. Thanks to the design parameters analysis, the proposed fractional order differentiators are significantly improved by admitting a time-delay. Thirdly, in order to reduce the calculation time for on-line applications, a recursive algorithm is proposed. Finally, the proposed differentiator based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional order derivative is used to estimate the state of a fractional order system and numerical simulations illustrate the accuracy and the robustness with respect to corrupting noises.

  4. Sensitivity analysis for large-scale problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Whitworth, Sandra L.

    1987-01-01

    The development of efficient techniques for calculating sensitivity derivatives is studied. The objective is to present a computational procedure for calculating sensitivity derivatives as part of performing structural reanalysis for large-scale problems. The scope is limited to framed type structures. Both linear static analysis and free-vibration eigenvalue problems are considered.

  5. An Instructional Module on Mokken Scale Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Stefanie A.

    2017-01-01

    Mokken scale analysis (MSA) is a probabilistic-nonparametric approach to item response theory (IRT) that can be used to evaluate fundamental measurement properties with less strict assumptions than parametric IRT models. This instructional module provides an introduction to MSA as a probabilistic-nonparametric framework in which to explore…

  6. Fractional calculus ties the microscopic and macroscopic scales of complex network dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, B J; Turalska, M; Grigolini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    A two-state, master equation-based decision-making model has been shown to generate phase transitions, to be topologically complex, and to manifest temporal complexity through an inverse power-law probability distribution function in the switching times between the two critical states of consensus. These properties are entailed by the fundamental assumption that the network elements in the decision-making model imperfectly imitate one another. The process of subordination establishes that a single network element can be described by a fractional master equation whose analytic solution yields the observed inverse power-law probability distribution obtained by numerical integration of the two-state master equation to a high degree of accuracy. (paper)

  7. Lie symmetry analysis and conservation laws for the time fractional fourth-order evolution equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study Lie symmetry analysis and conservation laws for the time fractional nonlinear fourth-order evolution equation. Using the method of Lie point symmetry, we provide the associated vector fields, and derive the similarity reductions of the equation, respectively. The method can be applied wisely and efficiently to get the reduced fractional ordinary differential equations based on the similarity reductions. Finally, by using the nonlinear self-adjointness method and Riemann-Liouville time-fractional derivative operator as well as Euler-Lagrange operator, the conservation laws of the equation are obtained.

  8. A fractionally cointegrated VAR analysis of economic voting and political support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Maggie E. C.; Ørregård Nielsen, Morten; Popiel, Michael Ksawery

    We use a fractionally cointegrated vector autoregressive model to examine the relationship between Canadian political support and macroeconomic conditions. This model is well suited for the analysis because it allows multiple fractional time series and admits simple asymptotic inference for the m......We use a fractionally cointegrated vector autoregressive model to examine the relationship between Canadian political support and macroeconomic conditions. This model is well suited for the analysis because it allows multiple fractional time series and admits simple asymptotic inference...... for the model parameters and tests of the hypotheses of interest. In the long-run equilibrium, we find that support for the Progressive Conservative Party was higher during periods of high interest rates and low unemployment, while support for the Liberal Party was higher during periods of low interest rates...

  9. H2@Scale Resource and Market Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark

    2017-07-12

    This presentation overviews progress to date on the H2@Scale resource and market analysis work. The work finds, for example, that hydrogen demand of 60 MMT/yr is possible when transportation and industry are considered; resources are available to meet that demand; using renewable resources would reduce emissions and fossil use by over 15%; further impacts are possible when considering synergistic benefits; additional analysis is underway to improve understanding of potential markets and synergistic impacts; and further analysis will be necessary to estimate impacts due to spatial characteristics, feedback effects in the economy, and inertia characteristics.

  10. Voxel-based analysis of fractional anisotropy in post-stroke apathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-ran Yang

    Full Text Available To explore the structural basis of post-stroke apathy by using voxel-based analysis (VBA of fractional anisotropy (FA maps.We enrolled 54 consecutive patients with ischemic stroke during convalescence, and divided them into apathy (n = 31 and non-apathy (n = 23 groups. We obtained magnetic resonance images of their brains, including T1, T2 and DTI sequences. Age, sex, education level, Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD scores, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores, and infarct locations for the two groups were compared. Finally, to investigate the structural basis of post-stroke apathy, VBA of FA maps was performed in which we included the variables that a univariate analysis determined had P-values less than 0.20 as covariates.HAMD (P = 0.01 and MMSE (P<0.01 scores differed significantly between the apathy and non-apathy groups. After controlling for age, education level, HAMD scores, and MMSE scores, significant FA reduction was detected in four clusters with peak voxels at the genu of the corpus callosum (X = -16, Y = 30, Z = 8, left anterior corona radiata (-22, 30, 10, splenium of the corpus callosum (-24, -56, 18, and right inferior frontal gyrus white matter (52, 24, 18, after family-wise error correction for multiple comparisons.Post-stroke apathy is related to depression and cognitive decline. Damage to the genu of the corpus callosum, left anterior corona radiata, splenium of the corpus callosum, and white matter in the right inferior frontal gyrus may lead to apathy after ischemic stroke.

  11. A procedure for partitioning bulk sediments into distinct grain-size fractions for geochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbanti, A.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1993-01-01

    A method to separate sediments into discrete size fractions for geochemical analysis has been tested. The procedures were chosen to minimize the destruction or formation of aggregates and involved gentle sieving and settling of wet samples. Freeze-drying and sonication pretreatments, known to influence aggregates, were used for comparison. Freeze-drying was found to increase the silt/clay ratio by an average of 180 percent compared to analysis of a wet sample that had been wet sieved only. Sonication of a wet sample decreased the silt/clay ratio by 51 percent. The concentrations of metals and organic carbon in the separated fractions changed depending on the pretreatment procedures in a manner consistent with the hypothesis that aggregates consist of fine-grained organic- and metal-rich particles. The coarse silt fraction of a freeze-dried sample contained 20–44 percent higher concentrations of Zn, Cu, and organic carbon than the coarse silt fraction of the wet sample. Sonication resulted in concentrations of these analytes that were 18–33 percent lower in the coarse silt fraction than found in the wet sample. Sonication increased the concentration of lead in the clay fraction by an average of 40 percent compared to an unsonicated sample. Understanding the magnitude of change caused by different analysis protocols is an aid in designing future studies that seek to interpret the spatial distribution of contaminated sediments and their transport mechanisms.

  12. Exergy analysis of a distillation tower for crude oil fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivero, R.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the application of the exergy method to a crude oil atmospheric distillation tower is presented. The fundamentals and procedures are presented as well as the main parameters used to describe the thermodynamic performance of the system, such as Exergy Losses, Effectiveness and Improvement Potential. A parametric analysis of the influence on the effectiveness of the tower is then performed as a function of the number of trays, the amount of stripping steam, the use of reboilers and the operation pressure. The results obtained are discussed. As expected, the effectiveness of the tower increases with the overall number of trays in the tower and in the stripping columns for a constant operation pressure and a constant amount of stripping steam but there is a limit at which the pressure drop across the trays and the stripping steam requirements make the effectiveness decrease. The use of reboilers in the stripping columns adjacent to the main tower allows an increase in the effectiveness basically due to a greater heat integration. Finally, the increase in the operation pressure of the tower produces an increase of the effectiveness but also an increase in the stripping steam requirements

  13. COD fractions of leachate from aerobic and anaerobic pilot scale landfill reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilgili, M. Sinan; Demir, Ahmet; Akkaya, Ebru; Ozkaya, Bestamin

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important problems with designing and maintaining a landfill is managing leachate that generated when water passes through the waste. In this study, leachate samples taken from aerobic and anaerobic landfill reactors operated with and without leachate recirculation are investigated in terms of biodegradable and non-biodegradable fractions of COD. The operation time is 600 days for anaerobic reactors and 250 days for aerobic reactors. Results of this study show that while the values of soluble inert COD to total COD in the leachate of aerobic landfill with leachate recirculation and aerobic dry reactors are determined around 40%, this rate was found around 30% in the leachate of anaerobic landfill with leachate recirculation and traditional landfill reactors. The reason for this difference is that the aerobic reactors generated much more microbial products. Because of this condition, it can be concluded that total inert COD/total COD ratios of the aerobic reactors were 60%, whereas those of anaerobic reactors were 50%. This study is important for modeling, design, and operation of landfill leachate treatment systems and determination of discharge limits

  14. Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanakya, H.N.; Sharma, Isha; Ramachandra, T.V.

    2009-01-01

    The fermentation characteristics of six specific types of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns of a vegetable (cabbage), fruits (banana and citrus peels), fresh leaf litter of bamboo and teak leaves, and paper (newsprint) waste streams as feedstocks were studied. Individual OFMSW components were placed into nylon mesh bags and subjected to various fermentation periods (solids retention time, SRT) within the inlet of a functioning plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals, and their composition was analyzed to monitor decomposition rates and changes in chemical composition. Components like cabbage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor (PFBR) as well as under a biological methane potential (BMP) assay, while other OFMSW components (leaf litter from bamboo and teak leaves and newsprint) fermented slowly with poor process stability and moderate biodegradation. For fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), a rapid and efficient removal of pectins is the main cause of rapid disintegration of these feedstocks, which left behind very little compost forming residues (2-5%). Teak and bamboo leaves and newsprint decomposed only to 25-50% in 30 d. These results confirm the potential for volatile fatty acids accumulation in a PFBR's inlet and suggest a modification of the inlet zone or operation of a PFBR with the above feedstocks

  15. Fractional-Order Discrete-Time Laguerre Filters: A New Tool for Modeling and Stability Analysis of Fractional-Order LTI SISO Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Stanisławski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new results on modeling and analysis of dynamics of fractional-order discrete-time linear time-invariant single-input single-output (LTI SISO systems by means of new, two-layer, “fractional-order discrete-time Laguerre filters.” It is interesting that the fractionality of the filters at the upper system dynamics layer is directly projected from the lower Laguerre-based approximation layer for the Grünwald-Letnikov difference. A new stability criterion for discrete-time fractional-order Laguerre-based LTI SISO systems is introduced and supplemented with a stability preservation analysis. Both the stability criterion and the stability preservation analysis bring up rather surprising results, which is illustrated with simulation examples.

  16. High frequency magnetic field technique: mathematical modelling and development of a full scale water fraction meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimpan, Emil

    2004-09-15

    water fraction. The model intended to employ existent formulas of the medium parameters worked out by Maxwell, Bruggeman and Ramu and Rao. However, to calculate the loss due to the induced eddy currents within the medium in the particular case of the oil continuous phase, other mathematical models expressing (equivalent) medium conductivity and permittivity were required and developed in this work. Although the resonance frequency of the coil was decreasing with increasing medium conductivity, this variation was not as significant as the variation of the coil impedance. This raised the question as to whether coils having the same self-resonance frequency in different media could be constructed. This was worth investigating because it could simplify the mathematical modelling. This was indeed the case and coils featuring approximately the same resonance frequency in different media were made. Concluding, the measuring device based on the HFMFT, which was constructed, investigated and described in this work can be developed into a practical instrument for monitoring the water fraction in multiphase flows. The overall measurement accuracy when using this technique would depend on the analytical models expressing the medium parameters and circumscribing the HFMFT itself. When the mathematical modelling of the HFMFT was finalised, it was understood that many other applications of the technique were also possible. Some of these applications, which might be of interest such as a conductivity meter and a three-component ratio meter, are briefly discussed.

  17. Analysis of hard coal quality for narrow size fraction under 20 mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedoba, Tomasz; Pięta, Paulina

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an analysis of hard coal quality diversion in narrow size fraction by using taxonomic methods. Raw material samples were collected in selected mines of Upper Silesian Industrial Region and they were classified according to the Polish classification as types 31, 34.2 and 35. Then, each size fraction was characterized in terms of the following properties: density, ash content, calorific content, volatile content, total sulfur content and analytical moisture. As a result of the analysis it can be stated that the best quality in the entire range of the tested size fractions was the 34.2 coking coal type. At the same time, in terms of price parameters, high quality of raw material characterised the following size fractions: 0-6.3 mm of 31 energetic coal type and 0-3.15 mm of 35 coking coal type. The methods of grouping (Ward's method) and agglomeration (k-means method) have shown that the size fraction below 10 mm was characterized by higher quality in all the analyzed hard coal types. However, the selected taxonomic methods do not make it possible to identify individual size fraction or hard coal types based on chosen parameters.

  18. Applications of Convex Analysis to Multidimensional Scaling

    OpenAIRE

    Jan de Leeuw

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the convergence of an algorithm for metric and nonmetric multidimensional scaling that is very similar to the C-matrix algorithm of Guttman. The paper improves some earlier results in two respects. In the first place the analysis is extended to cover general Minkovski metrics, in the second place a more elementary proof of convergence based on results of Robert is presented.

  19. Free Flow Zonal Electrophoresis for Fractionation of Plant Membrane Compartments Prior to Proteomic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, Bronwyn J

    2018-01-01

    Free flow zonal electrophoresis (FFZE) is a versatile, reproducible, and potentially high-throughput technique for the separation of plant organelles and membranes by differences in membrane surface charge. It offers considerable benefits over traditional fractionation techniques, such as density gradient centrifugation and two-phase partitioning, as it is relatively fast, sample recovery is high, and the method provides unparalleled sample purity. It has been used to successfully purify chloroplasts and mitochondria from plants but also, to obtain highly pure fractions of plasma membrane, tonoplast, ER, Golgi, and thylakoid membranes. Application of the technique can significantly improve protein coverage in large-scale proteomics studies by decreasing sample complexity. Here, we describe the method for the fractionation of plant cellular membranes from leaves by FFZE.

  20. Approximate analytical solution of diffusion equation with fractional time derivative using optimal homotopy analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Das

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, optimal homotopy-analysis method is used to obtain approximate analytic solution of the time-fractional diffusion equation with a given initial condition. The fractional derivatives are considered in the Caputo sense. Unlike usual Homotopy analysis method, this method contains at the most three convergence control parameters which describe the faster convergence of the solution. Effects of parameters on the convergence of the approximate series solution by minimizing the averaged residual error with the proper choices of parameters are calculated numerically and presented through graphs and tables for different particular cases.

  1. Elemental analysis of various biomass solid fractions in biorefineries by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Duy Michael; Sorensen, Hanne R.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2017-01-01

    , poplar) followed by enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. For all the different biomasses, the biorefinery process concentrated silicon, aluminium, and calcium in the solid fraction, while potassium and magnesium were solubilised in the process and removed from the solid fraction. Sodium concentrations....... Based on ultimate elemental analysis of all biomasses, the formula for biomass was C6H8.4O3.5, which was used for all types of samples (raw biomass, pretreated biomass, and lignin residue) and can be used in future XRF analysis of samples of similar process and biomass feedstock as those used...

  2. Determination of bone mineral volume fraction using impedance analysis and Bruggeman model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciuchi, Ioana Veronica; Olariu, Cristina Stefania, E-mail: oocristina@yahoo.com; Mitoseriu, Liliana, E-mail: lmtsr@uaic.ro

    2013-11-20

    Highlights: • Mineral volume fraction of a bone sample was determined. • Dielectric properties for bone sample and for the collagen type I were determined by impedance spectroscopy. • Bruggeman effective medium approximation was applied in order to evaluate mineral volume fraction of the sample. • The computed values were compared with ones derived from a histogram test performed on SEM micrographs. -- Abstract: Measurements by impedance spectroscopy and Bruggeman effective medium approximation model were employed in order to determine the mineral volume fraction of dry bone. This approach assumes that two or more phases are present into the composite: the matrix (environment) and the other ones are inclusion phases. A fragment of femur diaphysis dense bone from a young pig was investigated in its dehydrated state. Measuring the dielectric properties of bone and its main components (hydroxyapatite and collagen) and using the Bruggeman approach, the mineral volume filling factor was determined. The computed volume fraction of the mineral volume fraction was confirmed by a histogram test analysis based on the SEM microstructures. In spite of its simplicity, the method provides a good approximation for the bone mineral volume fraction. The method which uses impedance spectroscopy and EMA modeling can be further developed by considering the conductive components of the bone tissue as a non-invasive in situ impedance technique for bone composition evaluation and monitoring.

  3. Determination of bone mineral volume fraction using impedance analysis and Bruggeman model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciuchi, Ioana Veronica; Olariu, Cristina Stefania; Mitoseriu, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Mineral volume fraction of a bone sample was determined. • Dielectric properties for bone sample and for the collagen type I were determined by impedance spectroscopy. • Bruggeman effective medium approximation was applied in order to evaluate mineral volume fraction of the sample. • The computed values were compared with ones derived from a histogram test performed on SEM micrographs. -- Abstract: Measurements by impedance spectroscopy and Bruggeman effective medium approximation model were employed in order to determine the mineral volume fraction of dry bone. This approach assumes that two or more phases are present into the composite: the matrix (environment) and the other ones are inclusion phases. A fragment of femur diaphysis dense bone from a young pig was investigated in its dehydrated state. Measuring the dielectric properties of bone and its main components (hydroxyapatite and collagen) and using the Bruggeman approach, the mineral volume filling factor was determined. The computed volume fraction of the mineral volume fraction was confirmed by a histogram test analysis based on the SEM microstructures. In spite of its simplicity, the method provides a good approximation for the bone mineral volume fraction. The method which uses impedance spectroscopy and EMA modeling can be further developed by considering the conductive components of the bone tissue as a non-invasive in situ impedance technique for bone composition evaluation and monitoring

  4. Carlson iterating rational approximation and performance analysis of fractional operator with arbitrary order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Qiu-Yan; Yuan Xiao; Yu Bo

    2017-01-01

    The performance analysis of the generalized Carlson iterating process, which can realize the rational approximation of fractional operator with arbitrary order, is presented in this paper. The reasons why the generalized Carlson iterating function possesses more excellent properties such as self-similarity and exponential symmetry are also explained. K-index, P-index, O-index, and complexity index are introduced to contribute to performance analysis. Considering nine different operational orders and choosing an appropriate rational initial impedance for a certain operational order, these rational approximation impedance functions calculated by the iterating function meet computational rationality, positive reality, and operational validity. Then they are capable of having the operational performance of fractional operators and being physical realization. The approximation performance of the impedance function to the ideal fractional operator and the circuit network complexity are also exhibited. (paper)

  5. Analysis of polymeric phenolics in red wines using different techniques combined with gel permeation chromatography fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalupe, Zenaida; Soldevilla, Alberto; Sáenz-Navajas, María-Pilar; Ayestarán, Belén

    2006-04-21

    A multiple-step analytical method was developed to improve the analysis of polymeric phenolics in red wines. With a common initial step based on the fractionation of wine phenolics by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), different analytical techniques were used: high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD), HPLC-mass spectrometry (MS), capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and spectrophotometry. This method proved to be valid for analyzing different families of phenolic compounds, such as monomeric phenolics and their derivatives, polymeric pigments and proanthocyanidins. The analytical characteristics of fractionation by GPC were studied and the method was fully validated, yielding satisfactory statistical results. GPC fractionation substantially improved the analysis of polymeric pigments by CZE, in terms of response, repeatability and reproducibility. It also represented an improvement in the traditional vanillin assay used for proanthocyanidin (PA) quantification. Astringent proanthocyanidins were also analyzed using a simple combined method that allowed these compounds, for which only general indexes were available, to be quantified.

  6. Lie symmetry analysis, exact solutions and conservation laws for the time fractional Caudrey-Dodd-Gibbon-Sawada-Kotera equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleanu, Dumitru; Inc, Mustafa; Yusuf, Abdullahi; Aliyu, Aliyu Isa

    2018-06-01

    In this work, we investigate the Lie symmetry analysis, exact solutions and conservation laws (Cls) to the time fractional Caudrey-Dodd-Gibbon-Sawada-Kotera (CDGDK) equation with Riemann-Liouville (RL) derivative. The time fractional CDGDK is reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) of fractional order. New exact traveling wave solutions for the time fractional CDGDK are obtained by fractional sub-equation method. In the reduced equation, the derivative is in Erdelyi-Kober (EK) sense. Ibragimov's nonlocal conservation method is applied to construct Cls for time fractional CDGDK.

  7. Snow fraction products evaluation with Landsat-8/OLI data and its spatial scale effects over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L.

    2016-12-01

    Snow cover is one of important elements in the water supply of large populations, especially in those downstream from mountainous watershed. The cryosphere process in the Tibetan Plateau is paid much attention due to rapid change of snow amount and cover extent. Snow mapping from MODIS has been increased attention in the study of climate change and hydrology. But the lack of intensive validation of different snow mapping methods especially at Tibetan Plateau hinders its application. In this work, we examined three MODIS snow products, including standard MODIS fractional snow product (MOD10A1) (Kaufman et al., 2002; Salomonson & Appel, 2004, 2006), two other fractional snow product, MODSCAG (Painter et al., 2009) and MOD_MESMA (Shi, 2012). Both these two methods are based on spectral mixture analysis. The difference between MODISCAG and MOD_MESMA was the endmember selection. For MODSCAG product, snow spectral endmembers of varying grain size was obtained both from a radiative transfer model and spectra of vegetation, rock and soil collected in the field and laboratory. MOD_MESMA was obtained from automated endmember extraction method using linear spectral mixture analysis. Its endmembers are selected in each image to enhance the computational efficiency of MESMA (Multiple Endmember Spectral Analysis). Landsat-8 Operatinal Land Imager (OLI) data from 2013-2015 was used to evaluate the performance of these three snow fraction products in Tibetan Plateau. The effect of land cover types including forest, grass and bare soil was analyzed to evaluate three products. In addition, the effects of relatively flat surface in internal plateau and high mountain areas of Himalaya were also evaluated on the impact of these snow fraction products. From our comparison, MODSCAG and MOD10A1 overestimated snow cover, while MOD_MESMA underestimated snow cover. And RMSE of MOD_MESMA at each land cover type including forest, grass and mountain area decreased with the spatial resolution

  8. Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 1, Analysis of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This handbook contains (1) a systematic compilation of airborne release and respirable fraction experimental data for nonreactor nuclear facilities, (2) assessments of the data, and (3) values derived from assessing the data that may be used in safety analyses when the data are applicable. To assist in consistent and effective use of this information, the handbook provides: identification of a consequence determination methodology in which the information can be used; discussion of the applicability of the information and its general technical limits; identification of specific accident phenomena of interest for which the information is applicable; and examples of use of the consequence determination methodology and airborne release and respirable fraction information

  9. Rapid estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction in acute myocardial infarction by echocardiographic wall motion analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, J; Rokkedal Nielsen, J; Launbjerg, J

    1992-01-01

    Echocardiographic estimates of left ventricular ejection fraction (ECHO-LVEF) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were obtained by a new approach, using visual analysis of left ventricular wall motion in a nine-segment model. The method was validated in 41 patients using radionuclide...

  10. Analysis of magnetic nanoparticles using quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpino, Francesca; Moore, Lee R.; Zborowski, Maciej; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Williams, P. Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The new technique of quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation is described. It is a separation and characterization technique for particulate magnetic materials. Components of a sample are eluted from the separation channel at times dependent on the strength of their interaction with the magnetic field. A quadrupole electromagnet allows a programmed reduction of field strength during analysis of polydisperse samples

  11. Global ejection fraction and phase analysis assessed by radionuclide angiography during exercise and after isoproterenol infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Righetti, A.; Ratib, O.; Merier, G.; Widmann, T.; Donath, A.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography obtained during and following Isoproterenol infusion is a new approach for detecting latent myocardial ischemia. It is very sensitive and could be considered as an alternative to conventional exercice radionuclide angiography. The data presented show that phase analysis assessment of regional systolic wall motion is a better indicator than global ejection fraction for quantifying left ventricular dysfunction

  12. Concentration of 17 Elements in Subcellular Fractions of Beef Heart Tissue Determined by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, P O

    1964-12-15

    Subcellular fractions of beef heart tissue are investigated, by means of neutron activation analysis, with respect to their concentration of 17 different elements. A recently developed ion-exchange technique combined with gamma spectrometry is used. The homogeneity of the subcellular fractions is examined electron microscopically. The following elements are determined: As, Ba, Br, Cas Co, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, La, Mo, P, Rb, Se, Sm, W and Zn. The determination of Ag, Au, Cd, Ce, Cr, Sb and Sc is omitted, in view of contamination. Reproducible and characteristic patterns of distribution are obtained for all elements studied.

  13. Concentration of 17 Elements in Subcellular Fractions of Beef Heart Tissue Determined by Neutron Activation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wester, P.O.

    1964-12-01

    Subcellular fractions of beef heart tissue are investigated, by means of neutron activation analysis, with respect to their concentration of 17 different elements. A recently developed ion-exchange technique combined with gamma spectrometry is used. The homogeneity of the subcellular fractions is examined electron microscopically. The following elements are determined: As, Ba, Br, Cas Co, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, La, Mo, P, Rb, Se, Sm, W and Zn. The determination of Ag, Au, Cd, Ce, Cr, Sb and Sc is omitted, in view of contamination. Reproducible and characteristic patterns of distribution are obtained for all elements studied

  14. Fast Virtual Fractional Flow Reserve Based Upon Steady-State Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Morris, PhD

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractional flow reserve (FFR-guided percutaneous intervention is superior to standard assessment but remains underused. The authors have developed a novel “pseudotransient” analysis protocol for computing virtual fractional flow reserve (vFFR based upon angiographic images and steady-state computational fluid dynamics. This protocol generates vFFR results in 189 s (cf >24 h for transient analysis using a desktop PC, with <1% error relative to that of full-transient computational fluid dynamics analysis. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that physiological lesion significance was influenced less by coronary or lesion anatomy (33% and more by microvascular physiology (59%. If coronary microvascular resistance can be estimated, vFFR can be accurately computed in less time than it takes to make invasive measurements.

  15. X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis of kaolins particle size fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia dos Santos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Kaolins are common geological materials and have high concentrations of kaolinite as well as the clay fraction of tropical and subtropical soils of Brazil. The characterization of kaolin is a proxy of assessing the contribution of kaolinite to important soil chemical and mineralogical attributes. This study evaluated four kaolins (commercial kaolin A (CCA, commercial kaolin B (CCB, pink sandy kaolin A (CRA and green sandy kaolin A (CVA in the original form and after particle size separation into: sand (200-53 mm, coarse silt (53-20 m, fine silt (20-2 m, large clay (2-1m, medium clay (1-0.5 m and fine clay (<0.5m fractions. The minerals were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD and evaluated for crystallinity (kaolinite and halloysite through indexes Hughes and Brown, Amigó, Bramão and the dehydroxylation temperature. The physical fractionation was efficient to concentrate minerals in specific size fractions which were not identified in the original material. In CCA kaolin was concentrated one mineral which remains unidentified in fine fractions, in kaolin CRA, zircon was concentrated in the coarse silt and different silicates in the fine fractions, in kaolin CCB were concentrated kaolinite and a silicate in the medium and coarse clay fractions. The estimate by X-ray diffraction overestimated the amount of kaolinite and halloysite underestimated when compared to quantification by thermal gravimetric analysis The crystallinity index exhibit different behaviors depending on the mineralogy of each material, thus the correlation between the crystallinity of kaolinite and / or halloysite and other variables, may be compromised, especially in materials with distinct geological origins.

  16. Large Scale EOF Analysis of Climate Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhat, M.; Gittens, A.; Kashinath, K.; Cavanaugh, N. R.; Mahoney, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present a distributed approach towards extracting EOFs from 3D climate data. We implement the method in Apache Spark, and process multi-TB sized datasets on O(1000-10,000) cores. We apply this method to latitude-weighted ocean temperature data from CSFR, a 2.2 terabyte-sized data set comprising ocean and subsurface reanalysis measurements collected at 41 levels in the ocean, at 6 hour intervals over 31 years. We extract the first 100 EOFs of this full data set and compare to the EOFs computed simply on the surface temperature field. Our analyses provide evidence of Kelvin and Rossy waves and components of large-scale modes of oscillation including the ENSO and PDO that are not visible in the usual SST EOFs. Further, they provide information on the the most influential parts of the ocean, such as the thermocline, that exist below the surface. Work is ongoing to understand the factors determining the depth-varying spatial patterns observed in the EOFs. We will experiment with weighting schemes to appropriately account for the differing depths of the observations. We also plan to apply the same distributed approach to analysis of analysis of 3D atmospheric climatic data sets, including multiple variables. Because the atmosphere changes on a quicker time-scale than the ocean, we expect that the results will demonstrate an even greater advantage to computing 3D EOFs in lieu of 2D EOFs.

  17. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Reilly's Role Overload Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, Palaniappan; Chakrabarty, Subhra; Taylor, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    In 1982, Reilly developed a 13-item scale to measure role overload. This scale has been widely used, but most studies did not assess the unidimensionality of the scale. Given the significance of unidimensionality in scale development, the current study reports a confirmatory factor analysis of the 13-item scale in two samples. Based on the…

  18. HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT-FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HERTING DL

    2008-01-01

    The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated

  19. Micron scale spectroscopic analysis of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, David; Finlayson, Trevor; Prawer, Steven

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this proposal is the establishment of a facility which will enable complete micron scale spectroscopic analysis of any sample which can be imaged in the optical microscope. Current applications include studies of carbon fibres, diamond thin films, ceramics (zirconia and high T c superconductors), semiconductors, wood pulp, wool fibres, mineral inclusions, proteins, plant cells, polymers, fluoride glasses, and optical fibres. The range of interests crosses traditional discipline boundaries and augurs well for a truly interdisciplinary collaboration. Developments in instrumentation such as confocal imaging are planned to achieve sub-micron resolution, and advances in computer software and hardware will enable the aforementioned spectroscopies to be used to map molecular and crystalline phases on the surfaces of materials. Coupled with existing compositional microprobes (e.g. the proton microprobe) the possibilities for the development of new, powerful, hybrid imaging technologies appear to be excellent

  20. Analysis using large-scale ringing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baillie, S. R.

    2004-06-01

    ]; Peach et al., 1998; DeSante et al., 2001 are generally co–ordinated by ringing centres such as those that make up the membership of EURING. In some countries volunteer census work (often called Breeding Bird Surveys is undertaken by the same organizations while in others different bodies may co–ordinate this aspect of the work. This session was concerned with the analysis of such extensive data sets and the approaches that are being developed to address the key theoretical and applied issues outlined above. The papers reflect the development of more spatially explicit approaches to analyses of data gathered at large spatial scales. They show that while the statistical tools that have been developed in recent years can be used to derive useful biological conclusions from such data, there is additional need for further developments. Future work should also consider how to best implement such analytical developments within future study designs. In his plenary paper Andy Royle (Royle, 2004 addresses this theme directly by describing a general framework for modelling spatially replicated abundance data. The approach is based on the idea that a set of spatially referenced local populations constitutes a metapopulation, within which local abundance is determined as a random process. This provides an elegant and general approach in which the metapopulation model as described above is combined with a data–generating model specific to the type of data being analysed to define a simple hierarchical model that can be analysed using conventional methods. It should be noted, however, that further software development will be needed if the approach is to be made readily available to biologists. The approach is well suited to dealing with sparse data and avoids the need for data aggregation prior to analysis. Spatial synchrony has received most attention in studies of species whose populations show cyclic fluctuations, particularly certain game birds and small mammals. However

  1. Several problems of cumulative effective mass fraction in anti-seismic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Sheng Feng; Li Hailong; Wen Jing; Luan Lin

    2005-01-01

    Cumulative Effective Mass Fraction (CEMF) is one of important items which sign the accuracy in antiseismic analysis. Based on the primary theories of CEMF, the paper show the influence of CEMF on the accuracy in antiseismic analysis. Moreover, some advices and ways are given to solve common problems in antiseismic analysis, such as how to increase CEMF, how to avoid the mass's loss because of the torsional frequency's being close to the frequency corresponding to the peak of seismic response spectrum, how to avoid the mass's loss because of the constraints, and so on. (authors)

  2. Structural analysis of gluten-free doughs by fractional rheological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orczykowska, Magdalena; Dziubiński, Marek; Owczarz, Piotr

    2015-02-01

    This study examines the effects of various components of tested gluten-free doughs, such as corn starch, amaranth flour, pea protein isolate, and cellulose in the form of plantain fibers on rheological properties of such doughs. The rheological properties of gluten-free doughs were assessed by using the rheological fractional standard linear solid model (FSLSM). Parameter analysis of the Maxwell-Wiechert fractional derivative rheological model allows to state that gluten-free doughs present a typical behavior of viscoelastic quasi-solid bodies. We obtained the contribution dependence of each component used in preparations of gluten-free doughs (either hard-gel or soft-gel structure). The complicate analysis of the mechanical structure of gluten-free dough was done by applying the FSLSM to explain quite precisely the effects of individual ingredients of the dough on its rheological properties.

  3. Multi-element analysis, bioavailability and fractionation of herbal tea products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymczycha-Madeja, Anna; Welna, Maja; Zyrnicki, Wieslaw

    2013-01-01

    Herbal teas (Mentha piperitae foliumand mixture Marticaria chamomilla flos with Lavandula officinalis flos) were compared considering the total contents of micro (Al, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Ti, V) and macro (C, H, N, S, Ca, Mg, P) elements, bioavailability and fractionation. Different methods (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and CHNS elemental analysis) were applied. The microwave-assisted digestion procedure was found to be more effective than the hot-plate heating for the wet acid digestion of tea. The application of the modified BCR (Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure exhibited differences in the concentrations of metal bound to reducible and oxidizable fractions. The accuracy of method was verified by analysis of certified reference material INCT-TL -1 Tea Leaves. The daily intake of all elements from the analyzed herbal tea infusion did not exceed the maximum permissible levels and does not constitute health risk. (author)

  4. Multi-element analysis, bioavailability and fractionation of herbal tea products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymczycha-Madeja, Anna; Welna, Maja; Zyrnicki, Wieslaw, E-mail: anna.szymczycha@pwr.wroc.pl [Wroclaw University of Technology, Chemistry Department, Analytical Chemistry Division, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2013-05-15

    Herbal teas (Mentha piperitae foliumand mixture Marticaria chamomilla flos with Lavandula officinalis flos) were compared considering the total contents of micro (Al, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Ti, V) and macro (C, H, N, S, Ca, Mg, P) elements, bioavailability and fractionation. Different methods (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and CHNS elemental analysis) were applied. The microwave-assisted digestion procedure was found to be more effective than the hot-plate heating for the wet acid digestion of tea. The application of the modified BCR (Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure exhibited differences in the concentrations of metal bound to reducible and oxidizable fractions. The accuracy of method was verified by analysis of certified reference material INCT-TL{sup -1} Tea Leaves. The daily intake of all elements from the analyzed herbal tea infusion did not exceed the maximum permissible levels and does not constitute health risk. (author)

  5. In-depth analysis of low abundant proteins in bovine colostrum using different fractionation techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Asger; Bendixen, Emøke; Ingvartsen, Klaus Lønne

    2012-01-01

    Bovine colostrum is well known for its large content of bioactive components and its importance for neonatal survival. Unfortunately, the colostrum proteome is complicated by a wide dynamic range, because of a few dominating proteins that hamper sensitivity and proteome coverage achieved on low...... abundant proteins. Moreover, the composition of colostrum is complex and the proteins are located within different physical fractions that make up the colostrum. To gain a more exhaustive picture of the bovine colostrum proteome and gather information on protein location, we performed an extensive pre......-analysis fractionation of colostrum prior to 2D-LC-MS/MS analysis. Physical and chemical properties of the proteins and colostrum were used alone or in combination for the separation of proteins. ELISA was used to quantify and verify the presence of proteins in colostrum. In total, 403 proteins were identified...

  6. Punica granatum peel extracts: HPLC fractionation and LC MS analysis to quest compounds having activity against multidrug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ilyas; Rahman, Hazir; Abd El-Salam, Nasser M; Tawab, Abdul; Hussain, Anwar; Khan, Taj Ali; Khan, Usman Ali; Qasim, Muhammad; Adnan, Muhammad; Azizullah, Azizullah; Murad, Waheed; Jalal, Abdullah; Muhammad, Noor; Ullah, Riaz

    2017-05-03

    Medicinal plants are rich source of traditional herbal medicine around the globe. Most of the plant's therapeutic properties are due to the presence of secondary bioactive compounds. The present study analyzed the High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) fractions of Puncia granatum (peel) extracts (aqueous, chloroform, ethanol and hexane) against multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus). All the fractions having antibacterial activity was processed for bioactive compounds identification using LC MS/MS analysis. Among total HPLC fractions (n = 30), 4 HPLC fractions of P. granatum (peel) showed potential activity against MDR pathogens. Fraction 1 (F1) and fraction 4 (F4) collected from aqueous extract showed maximum activity against P. aeruginosa. Fraction 2 (F2) of hexane showed antibacterial activity against three pathogens, while ethanol F4 exhibited antibacterial activity against A. baumannii. The active fractions were processed for LC MS/MS analysis to identify bioactive compounds. Valoneic acid dilactone (aqueous F1 and F4), Hexoside (ethanol F4) and Coumaric acid (hexane F2) were identified as bioactive compounds in HPLC fractions. Puncia granatum peel extracts HPLC fractions exhibited potential inhibitory activity against MDR bacterial human pathogens. Several bioactive compounds were identified from the HPLC fractions. Further characterization of these compounds may be helpful to conclude it as therapeutic lead molecules against MDR pathogens.

  7. Mokken scale analysis : Between the Guttman scale and parametric item response theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schuur, Wijbrandt H.

    2003-01-01

    This article introduces a model of ordinal unidimensional measurement known as Mokken scale analysis. Mokken scaling is based on principles of Item Response Theory (IRT) that originated in the Guttman scale. I compare the Mokken model with both Classical Test Theory (reliability or factor analysis)

  8. Chromium Fractions Changes Compared With Total-Cr As Determined by Neutron Activation Analysis Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Sabour, M.F.; Abdou, F.M.; Elwan, I.M.; Al-Salama, Y.J.

    2003-01-01

    Fifteen soil samples were chosen from different locations (five different locations at north greater Cairo, Egypt to represent different soils (alluvial and sandy) as well as different source of contaminated wastewater (sewage and industrial effluent). Using sequential extraction technique (extracting the soil with different solutions, which is designed to separate metal fractions), Cr was separated into six operationally defined fractions water soluble, exchangeable, carbonate bound, Fe-Mn oxides bound, organic bound and residual fractions. Result of soil total-Cr indicated the serious accumulation of Cr in soils subjected to prolonged irrigation with contaminated wastewater. As it could seen, total-Cr in the tested contaminated soils exceeds the permissible levels (75-100)ppm Cr by several order of magnitude particularly at the surface and subsurface layers. The highest accumulation of total Cr down to depth 60 cm was observed in case of soil E. Data showed that values of total Cr determined by NAA method were always higher than the relevant values determined either by AAS or those calculated after the sequential extraction method. T-test analysis showed the significant difference between NAA and either AAS or sequential extraction methods. Although T-test analysis showed that were significant differences between total content in soils as determined by destructive (AAS or SUM) and non-destructive (NAA) analytical techniques however, strong liner relation between NAA and other tested methods was obtained. Chromium distribution between different extractants shows that the greatest amounts are found in the residual and Occluded in Fe and Mn-Oxides fractions followed by carbonate or organic fractions. In most cases the proportion of all tested Cr-forms has increased in contaminated soil layers with higher enrichment in organically bound Cr, occluded in Fe and Mn oxides, carbonate exchangeable and soluble fractions. Results indicate that soil properties have a

  9. The measurement of the chemically mobile fraction of lead in soil using isotopic dilution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhoff, J.; Brand, J.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1992-12-01

    The chemically available fraction of lead in eight soils measured by isotopic dilution analysis using 212 Pb ranged from 7 to 16% of the total content of lead in soil. The soluble fractions achieved values up to 63% of the total content in 1 M NH 4 NO 3 , 1 M MgCl 2 and 0.05 M DTPA solutions. Increasing the contact time between water and soil, the water-soil ratio from 1:1 to 5:1 and increasing the temperature of the soil-water suspension raised the chemically available fraction in soil. Comparing various soil parameters and the mobile fraction of lead, only pH shows a significant correlation. The amphoteric character of lead causes a minimum of mobility about pH 6; pH-values below are responsible for the higher mobility of lead as Pb 2+ , at pH-values above 6 soluble hydroxy and humic acid complexes are formed. (orig.) [de

  10. Additivity versus repair inhibition in fractionated treatments combining drugs and X rays: a theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begg, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    Drugs which inhibit the repair of radiation damage could potentially be useful for enhancing the effects of radiotherapy. In pre-clinical combined modality studies, however, it is often difficult to state with certainty whether or not a drug has inhibited radiation damage repair. This paper shows that several commonly used parameters for assessing repair can give the wrong answer regarding the presence of drug-induced repair inhibition. These parameters are; the difference in radiation dose between 1 and n fractions to give the same effect, the fractional recovered dose per fraction interval, FR, and the related parameter FREC. A further parameter used for treatment comparisons is the enhancement ratio for the drug (D.E.R.; ratio of radiation doses, with and without drug, to cause a given effect). An increasing D.E.R. with increasing number of radiation fractions has been taken as an indication that the drug inhibited repair. The present report demonstrates that this, too, can be misleading. From an analysis based on a linear-quadratic survival curve for X rays, it is suggested that deriving and comparing alpha/beta ratios (ratio of the linea to quadratic coefficients) gives the best indication of drug-induced changes in survival curve shape which may reflect underlying changes in repair capacity

  11. A new approach to the compartmental analysis in pharmacokinetics: fractional time evolution of diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Jovan K; Atanacković, Milica T; Pilipović, Ana S; Rapaić, Milan R; Pilipović, Stevan; Atanacković, Teodor M

    2010-04-01

    This study presents a new two compartmental model and its application to the evaluation of diclofenac pharmacokinetics in a small number of healthy adults, during a bioequivalence trial. In the model the integer order derivatives are replaced by derivatives of real order often called fractional order derivatives. Physically that means that a history (memory) of a biological process, realized as a transfer from one compartment to another one with the mass balance conservation, is taken into account. This kind of investigations in pharmacokinetics is founded by Dokoumetzidis and Macheras through the one compartmental models while our contribution is the analysis of multi-dimensional compartmental models with the applications of the two compartmental model in evaluation of diclofenac pharmacokinetics. Two experiments were preformed with 12 healthy volunteers with two slow release 100 mg diclofenac tablet formulations. The agreement of the values predicted by the proposed model with the values obtained through experiments is shown to be good. Thus, pharmacokinetics of slow release diclofenac can be described well by a specific two compartmental model with fractional derivatives of the same order. Parameters in the model are determined by the least-squares method and the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) numerical procedure is used. The results show that the fractional order two compartmental model for diclofenac is superior in comparison to the classical two compartmental model. Actually this is true in general case since the classical one is a special case of the fractional one.

  12. Scaling analysis in bepu licensing of LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' auria, Francesco; Lanfredini, Marco; Muellner, Nikolaus [University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    'Scaling' plays an important role for safety analyses in the licensing of water cooled nuclear power reactors. Accident analyses, a sub set of safety analyses, is mostly based on nuclear reactor system thermal hydraulics, and therefore based on an adequate experimental data base, and in recent licensing applications, on best estimate computer code calculations. In the field of nuclear reactor technology, only a small set of the needed experiments can be executed at a nuclear power plant; the major part of experiments, either because of economics or because of safety concerns, has to be executed at reduced scale facilities. How to address the scaling issue has been the subject of numerous investigations in the past few decades (a lot of work has been performed in the 80thies and 90thies of the last century), and is still the focus of many scientific studies. The present paper proposes a 'roadmap' to scaling. Key elements are the 'scaling-pyramid', related 'scaling bridges' and a logical path across scaling achievements (which constitute the 'scaling puzzle'). The objective is addressing the scaling issue when demonstrating the applicability of the system codes, the 'key-to-scaling', in the licensing process of a nuclear power plant. The proposed 'road map to scaling' aims at solving the 'scaling puzzle', by introducing a unified approach to the problem.

  13. Scaling analysis in bepu licensing of LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'auria, Francesco; Lanfredini, Marco; Muellner, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    'Scaling' plays an important role for safety analyses in the licensing of water cooled nuclear power reactors. Accident analyses, a sub set of safety analyses, is mostly based on nuclear reactor system thermal hydraulics, and therefore based on an adequate experimental data base, and in recent licensing applications, on best estimate computer code calculations. In the field of nuclear reactor technology, only a small set of the needed experiments can be executed at a nuclear power plant; the major part of experiments, either because of economics or because of safety concerns, has to be executed at reduced scale facilities. How to address the scaling issue has been the subject of numerous investigations in the past few decades (a lot of work has been performed in the 80thies and 90thies of the last century), and is still the focus of many scientific studies. The present paper proposes a 'roadmap' to scaling. Key elements are the 'scaling-pyramid', related 'scaling bridges' and a logical path across scaling achievements (which constitute the 'scaling puzzle'). The objective is addressing the scaling issue when demonstrating the applicability of the system codes, the 'key-to-scaling', in the licensing process of a nuclear power plant. The proposed 'road map to scaling' aims at solving the 'scaling puzzle', by introducing a unified approach to the problem.

  14. Analysis of TPH and Aliphatic and Aromatic Hydrocarbons Fractions in Environmental Interest Matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pindado, O.; Perez, R. M.; Garcia, S.

    2014-01-01

    Analytical methods to analyze TPH and several aliphatic and aromatic fractions present in soil and groundwater samples contaminated by hydrocarbons are showed. As a part of BIOXISOIL project, analyzing these parameters is fundamental and indispensable to know the initial contamination level, design an adequate method to decontaminate it and eventually assess decontamination accomplished. Analysis of both matrices involve different extraction stages such as microwave radiation, clean up steps based on solid phase extraction and finally a chromatograph analysis with flame ion detector. Analytical procedures have showed satisfactory analytical quality parameters and have been validated against several certified reference materials. (Author)

  15. Characterization of polypropylene–polyethylene blends by temperature rising elution and crystallization analysis fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hierro, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of single-site catalysts in the polyolefins industry opens new routes to design resins with improved performance through multicatalyst-multireactor processes. Physical combination of various polyolefin types in a secondary extrusion process is also a common practice to achieve new products with improved properties. The new resins have complex structures, especially in terms of composition distribution, and their characterization is not always an easy task. Techniques like temperature rising elution fractionation (TREF) or crystallization analysis fractionation (CRYSTAF) are currently used to characterize the composition distribution of these resins. It has been shown that certain combinations of polyolefins may result in equivocal results if only TREF or CRYSTAF is used separately for their characterization. PMID:20730530

  16. Collection of size fractionated particulate matter sample for neutron activation analysis in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otoshi, Tsunehiko; Nakamatsu, Hiroaki; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2004-01-01

    According to the decision of the 2001 Workshop on Utilization of Research Reactor (Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Section), size fractionated particulate matter collection for NAA was started from 2002 at two sites in Japan. The two monitoring sites, ''Tokyo'' and ''Sakata'', were classified into ''urban'' and ''rural''. In each site, two size fractions, namely PM 2-10 '' and PM 2 '' particles (aerodynamic particle size between 2 to 10 micrometer and less than 2 micrometer, respectively) were collected every month on polycarbonate membrane filters. Average concentrations of PM 10 (sum of PM 2-10 and PM 2 samples) during the common sampling period of August to November 2002 in each site were 0.031mg/m 3 in Tokyo, and 0.022mg/m 3 in Sakata. (author)

  17. Proteomic analysis of albumin and globulin fractions of pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuba, Jerzy; Szerszunowicz, Iwona; Nałęcz, Dorota; Dziuba, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis is emerging as a highly useful tool in food research, including studies of food allergies. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis involving isoelectric focusing and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is the most effective method of separating hundreds or even thousands of proteins. In this study, albumin and globulin tractions of pea seeds cv. Ramrod were subjected to proteomic analysis. Selected potentially alergenic proteins were identified based on their molecular weights and isoelectric points. Pea seeds (Pisum sativum L.) cv. Ramrod harvested over a period of two years (Plant Breeding Station in Piaski-Szelejewo) were used in the experiment. The isolated albumins, globulins and legumin and vicilin fractions of globulins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteomic images were analysed in the ImageMaster 2D Platinum program with the use of algorithms from the Melanie application. The relative content, isoelectric points and molecular weights were computed for all identified proteins. Electrophoregrams were analysed by matching spot positions from three independent replications. The proteomes of albumins, globulins and legumin and vicilin fractions of globulins produced up to several hundred spots (proteins). Spots most characteristic of a given fraction were identified by computer analysis and spot matching. The albumin proteome accumulated spots of relatively high intensity over a broad range of pi values of ~4.2-8.1 in 3 molecular weight (MW) ranges: I - high molecular-weight albumins with MW of ~50-110 kDa, II - average molecular-weight albumins with MW of ~20-35 kDa, and III - low molecular-weight albumins with MW of ~13-17 kDa. 2D gel electrophoregrams revealed the presence of 81 characteristic spots, including 24 characteristic of legumin and 14 - of vicilin. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis proved to be a useful tool for identifying pea proteins. Patterns of spots with similar isoelectric

  18. Lab-scale pyrolysis of the Automotive Shredder Residue light fraction and characterization of tar and solid products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzano, Manuela; Collina, Elena; Piccinelli, Elsa; Lasagni, Marina

    2017-06-01

    The general aim of this study is the recovery of Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR). The ASR light fraction, or car fluff, that was collected at an Italian shredding plant was pyrolysed at various temperatures (500-800°C) in a lab-scale reactor. The condensable gases (tar) and solid residue yields increased with decreasing temperature, and these products were characterized to suggest a potential use to reclaim them. The higher heating value (HHV) of tar was 34-37MJ/kg, which is comparable with those of fossil fuels. Furthermore, the ash content was low (0.06-4.98%). Thus, tar can be used as an alternative fuel. With this prospect, the concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in tar were determined. The toxicity of tar changes with temperature (1-5ng I-TEQ/g), and the PCDFs significantly contribute to tar toxicity, which was 75-100% with a maximum of 99.6% at 700°C. Regarding the characterization of the solid residue, the low HHV (2.4-3.3MJ/kg) does not make it suitable for energy recovery. Regarding material recovery, we considered its use as a filler in construction materials or a secondary source for metals. It shows a high metal concentration (280,000-395,000mg/kg), which is similar at different pyrolysis temperatures. At 500°C, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were not detected in the solid residue, whereas the maximum total PAH concentration (19.41ng/g, 700°C) was lower than that in fly ash from MSWI. In conclusion, 500°C is a suitable pyrolysis temperature to obtain valuable tar and solid residue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Financial analysis of technology acquisition using fractionated lasers as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutkowitz, Eric; Carniol, Paul J; Carniol, Alan R

    2010-08-01

    Ablative fractional lasers are among the most advanced and costly devices on the market. Yet, there is a dearth of published literature on the cost and potential return on investment (ROI) of such devices. The objective of this study was to provide a methodological framework for physicians to evaluate ROI. To facilitate this analysis, we conducted a case study on the potential ROI of eight ablative fractional lasers. In the base case analysis, a 5-year lease and a 3-year lease were assumed as the purchase option with a $0 down payment and 3-month payment deferral. In addition to lease payments, service contracts, labor cost, and disposables were included in the total cost estimate. Revenue was estimated as price per procedure multiplied by total number of procedures in a year. Sensitivity analyses were performed to account for variability in model assumptions. Based on the assumptions of the model, all lasers had higher ROI under the 5-year lease agreement compared with that for the 3-year lease agreement. When comparing results between lasers, those with lower operating and purchase cost delivered a higher ROI. Sensitivity analysis indicates the model is most sensitive to purchase method. If physicians opt to purchase the device rather than lease, they can significantly enhance ROI. ROI analysis is an important tool for physicians who are considering making an expensive device acquisition. However, physicians should not rely solely on ROI and must also consider the clinical benefits of a laser. (c) Thieme Medical Publishers.

  20. Effects of intra-fraction motion on IMRT dose delivery: statistical analysis and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortfeld, Thomas; Jokivarsi, Kimmo; Goitein, Michael; Kung, Jong; Jiang, Steve B.

    2002-01-01

    There has been some concern that organ motion, especially intra-fraction organ motion due to breathing, can negate the potential merit of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). We wanted to find out whether this concern is justified. Specifically, we wanted to investigate whether IMRT delivery techniques with moving parts, e.g., with a multileaf collimator (MLC), are particularly sensitive to organ motion due to the interplay between organ motion and leaf motion. We also wanted to know if, and by how much, fractionation of the treatment can reduce the effects. We performed a statistical analysis and calculated the expected dose values and dose variances for volume elements of organs that move during the delivery of the IMRT. We looked at the overall influence of organ motion during the course of a fractionated treatment. A linear-quadratic model was used to consider fractionation effects. Furthermore, we developed software to simulate motion effects for IMRT delivery with an MLC, with compensators, and with a scanning beam. For the simulation we assumed a sinusoidal motion in an isocentric plane. We found that the expected dose value is independent of the treatment technique. It is just a weighted average over the path of motion of the dose distribution without motion. If the treatment is delivered in several fractions, the distribution of the dose around the expected value is close to a Gaussian. For a typical treatment with 30 fractions, the standard deviation is generally within 1% of the expected value for MLC delivery if one assumes a typical motion amplitude of 5 mm (1 cm peak to peak). The standard deviation is generally even smaller for the compensator but bigger for scanning beam delivery. For the latter it can be reduced through multiple deliveries ('paintings') of the same field. In conclusion, the main effect of organ motion in IMRT is an averaging of the dose distribution without motion over the path of the motion. This is the same as for treatments

  1. Elemental analysis of human serum and serum protein fractions by thermal neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woittiez, J.R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Some applications of thermal neutron activation for the determination of elemental contents in human serum and human serum protein fractions are presented. Firstly total serum is dealt with, secondly serum protein fractions obtained by gel filtration are described. A brief review on the role of (trace) elements in human health and disease and a compilation of literature data for elemental contents in human serum, as obtained by neutron activation techniques, are given. The most important sources of statistical and systematic errors are evaluated. Results for the contents of sodium, potassium, magnesium, bromine, iron, copper, zinc, selenium, rubidium, cesium and antimony in serum are given, with emphasis on control of accuracy and precision. The possible relation between selenium in blood and cancer occurrence in humans is discussed. The results of elemental analyses from cancer patients and from a patient receiving a cytostatic treatment are presented. A survey of literature results for the determination of protein-bound elemental contents in serum is presented. Subsequently, results from a study on the behaviour of elements during gel filtration are discussed. Gel-element and protein-element interactions are studied. Finally the protein-bound occurrence of trace elements in human serum is determined by gel filtration and neutron activation analysis. Results for both desalting and fractionation are given, for the elements bromine, copper, manganese, vanadium, selenium, zinc, rubidium, iron and iodine. (Auth.)

  2. Fractional order analysis of Sephadex gel structures: NMR measurements reflecting anomalous diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Richard L.; Akpa, Belinda S.; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-12-01

    We report the appearance of anomalous water diffusion in hydrophilic Sephadex gels observed using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR diffusion data was collected using a Varian 14.1 Tesla imaging system with a home-built RF saddle coil. A fractional order analysis of the data was used to characterize heterogeneity in the gels for the dynamics of water diffusion in this restricted environment. Several recent studies of anomalous diffusion have used the stretched exponential function to model the decay of the NMR signal, i.e., exp[-( bD) α], where D is the apparent diffusion constant, b is determined the experimental conditions (gradient pulse separation, durations and strength), and α is a measure of structural complexity. In this work, we consider a different case where the spatial Laplacian in the Bloch-Torrey equation is generalized to a fractional order model of diffusivity via a complexity parameter, β, a space constant, μ, and a diffusion coefficient, D. This treatment reverts to the classical result for the integer order case. The fractional order decay model was fit to the diffusion-weighted signal attenuation for a range of b-values (0 < b < 4000 s mm -2). Throughout this range of b values, the parameters β, μ and D, were found to correlate with the porosity and tortuosity of the gel structure.

  3. Trimodal Mixed Mode Chromatography That Enables Efficient Offline Two-Dimensional Peptide Fractionation for Proteome Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peng; Petzoldt, Svenja; Wilhelm, Mathias; Zolg, Daniel Paul; Zheng, Runsheng; Sun, Xuefei; Liu, Xiaodong; Schneider, Günter; Huhmer, Andreas; Kuster, Bernhard

    2017-09-05

    Offline two-dimensional chromatography is a common means to achieve deep proteome coverage. To reduce sample complexity and dynamic range and to utilize mass spectrometer (MS) time efficiently, high chromatographic resolution of and good orthogonality between the two dimensions are needed. Ion exchange and high pH reversed phase chromatography are often used for this purpose. However, the former requires desalting to be MS-compatible, and the latter requires fraction pooling to create orthogonality. Here, we report an alternative first-dimension separation technique using a commercial trimodal phase incorporating polar embedded reversed phase, weak anion exchange, and strong cation exchange material. The column is capable of retaining polar and nonpolar peptides alike without noticeable breakthrough. It allows separating ordinary and TMT-labeled peptides under mild acidic conditions using an acetonitrile gradient. The direct MS compatibility of solvents and good orthogonality to online coupled C18 columns enable a straightforward workflow without fraction pooling and desalting while showing comparable performance to the other techniques. The method scales from low to high microgram sample quantity and is amenable to full automation. To demonstrate practical utility, we analyzed the proteomes of 10 human pancreatic cancer cell lines to a depth of >8,700 quantified proteins.

  4. Chiral Analysis of Pesticides and Drugs of Environmental Concern: Biodegradation and Enantiomeric Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra S. Maia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The importance of stereochemistry for medicinal chemistry and pharmacology is well recognized and the dissimilar behavior of enantiomers is fully documented. Regarding the environment, the significance is equivalent since enantiomers of chiral organic pollutants can also differ in biodegradation processes and fate, as well as in ecotoxicity. This review comprises designed biodegradation studies of several chiral drugs and pesticides followed by enantioselective analytical methodologies to accurately measure the enantiomeric fraction (EF. The enantioselective monitoring of microcosms and laboratory-scale experiments with different environmental matrices is herein reported. Thus, this review focuses on the importance of evaluating the EF variation during biodegradation studies of chiral pharmaceuticals, drugs of abuse, and agrochemicals and has implications for the understanding of the environmental fate of chiral pollutants.

  5. FEM Analysis of Brushless DC Servomotor with Fractional Number of Slots per Pole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BALUTA, G.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The authors present in this paper the analysis with Finite Element Method (FEM of the magnetic circuit for a Brushless DC servomotor with fractional number of slots/pole (9 slots and 10 poles. For this purpose, FEMM 4.2 software package was used for the analysis. To obtain the waveforms of Back-ElectroMotive Forces (BEMFs, electromagnetic and cogging torque for servomotor a program in LUA scripting language (integrated into interactive shell of FEMM4.2 has been created. A comparation with a structure with integer number of slots/pole (18 slots and 6 poles was also realized. The analysis results prove that the structure chosen is an optimal solution: sinusoidal waveforms of BEMFs, improved electromagnetic torque and reduced cogging torque. Therefore, the operating characteristics of the servomotor with 9/10 slots/poles manufactured by Sistem Euroteh Company and included in an integrated electrical drives system are presented in this paper.

  6. Production of nitrate-rich compost from the solid fraction of dairy manure by a lab-scale composting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhao-Yong; Zhang, Jing; Zhong, Xiao-Zhong; Tan, Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we developed an efficient composting process for the solid fraction of dairy manure (SFDM) using lab-scale systems. We first evaluated the factors affecting the SFDM composting process using different thermophilic phase durations (TPD, 6 or 3days) and aeration rates (AR, 0.4 or 0.2 lmin(-1)kg(-1)-total solid (TS)). Results indicated that a similar volatile total solid (VTS) degradation efficiency (approximately 60%) was achieved with a TPD of 6 or 3days and an AR of 0.4 l min(-1) kg(-1)-TS (hereafter called higher AR), and a TPD of 3days resulted in less N loss caused by ammonia stripping. N loss was least when AR was decreased to 0.2 l min(-1) kg(-1)-TS (hereafter called lower AR) during the SFDM composting process. However, moisture content (MC) in the composting pile increased at the lower AR because of water production by VTS degradation and less water volatilization. Reduced oxygen availability caused by excess water led to lower VTS degradation efficiency and inhibition of nitrification. Adding sawdust to adjust the C/N ratio and decrease the MC improved nitrification during the composing processes; however, the addition of increasing amounts of sawdust decreased NO3(-) concentration in matured compost. When an improved composting reactor with a condensate removal and collection system was used for the SFDM composting process, the MC of the composting pile was significantly reduced, and nitrification was detected 10-14days earlier. This was attributed to the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Highly matured compost could be generated within 40-50days. The VTS degradation efficiency reached 62.0% and the final N content, NO3(-) concentration, and germination index (GI) at the end of the composting process were 3.3%, 15.5×10(3)mg kg(-1)-TS, and 112.1%, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of scaled-factorial-moment data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibert, D.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the two standard constructions used in the search for intermittency, the exclusive and inclusive scaled factorial moments. We propose the use of a new scaled factorial moment that reduces to the exclusive moment in the appropriate limit and is free of undesirable multiplicity correlations that are contained in the inclusive moment. We show that there are some similarities among most of the models that have been proposed to explain factorial-moment data, and that these similarities can be used to increase the efficiency of testing these models. We begin by calculating factorial moments from a simple independent-cluster model that assumes only approximate boost invariance of the cluster rapidity distribution and an approximate relation among the moments of the cluster multiplicity distribution. We find two scaling laws that are essentially model independent. The first scaling law relates the moments to each other with a simple formula, indicating that the different factorial moments are not independent. The second scaling law relates samples with different rapidity densities. We find evidence for much larger clusters in heavy-ion data than in light-ion data, indicating possible spatial intermittency in the heavy-ion events

  8. Quantitative grain-scale ferroic domain volume fractions and domain switching strains from three-dimensional X-ray diffraction data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Majkut, Marta; Caosyd, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extension of the three-dimensional X-ray diffraction technique to allow the extraction of domain volume fractions in polycrystalline ferroic materials is presented. This method gives access to quantitative domain volume fractions of hundreds of independent embedded grains within...... are applied to tetragonal coarse-grained Ba0.88Ca0.12Zr0.06Ti0.94O3 and rhombohedral fine-grained (0.82)Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3–(0.18)Bi0.5K0.5TiO3 electroceramic materials. The fitted volume fraction information is used to calculate grain-scale non-180° ferroelectric domain switching strains. The absolute errors...

  9. SCALING ANALYSIS OF REPOSITORY HEAT LOAD FOR REDUCED DIMENSIONALITY MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MICHAEL T. ITAMUA AND CLIFFORD K. HO

    1998-01-01

    The thermal energy released from the waste packages emplaced in the potential Yucca Mountain repository is expected to result in changes in the repository temperature, relative humidity, air mass fraction, gas flow rates, and other parameters that are important input into the models used to calculate the performance of the engineered system components. In particular, the waste package degradation models require input from thermal-hydrologic models that have higher resolution than those currently used to simulate the T/H responses at the mountain-scale. Therefore, a combination of mountain- and drift-scale T/H models is being used to generate the drift thermal-hydrologic environment

  10. Economic Analysis of Small Scale Fish Pond Production in Oguta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    What are the costs and returns of small-scale fishpond enterprises? What problems hinder the development of small-scale fishpond production? Data were collected with the aid of structured questionnaires and interviews. Descriptive statistics, gross margin and likert scale were employed in data analysis. Gross margin ...

  11. Enhanced sensitivity of DNA- and rRNA-based stable isotope probing by fractionation and quantitative analysis of isopycnic centrifugation gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueders, Tillmann; Manefield, Mike; Friedrich, Michael W

    2004-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids allows the detection and identification of active members of natural microbial populations that are involved in the assimilation of an isotopically labelled compound into nucleic acids. SIP is based on the separation of isotopically labelled DNA or rRNA by isopycnic density gradient centrifugation. We have developed a highly sensitive protocol for the detection of 'light' and 'heavy' nucleic acids in fractions of centrifugation gradients. It involves the fluorometric quantification of total DNA or rRNA, and the quantification of either 16S rRNA genes or 16S rRNA in gradient fractions by real-time PCR with domain-specific primers. Using this approach, we found that fully 13C-labelled DNA or rRNA of Methylobacterium extorquens was quantitatively resolved from unlabelled DNA or rRNA of Methanosarcina barkeri by cesium chloride or cesium trifluoroacetate density gradient centrifugation respectively. However, a constant low background of unspecific nucleic acids was detected in all DNA or rRNA gradient fractions, which is important for the interpretation of environmental SIP results. Consequently, quantitative analysis of gradient fractions provides a higher precision and finer resolution for retrieval of isotopically enriched nucleic acids than possible using ethidium bromide or gradient fractionation combined with fingerprinting analyses. This is a prerequisite for the fine-scale tracing of microbial populations metabolizing 13C-labelled compounds in natural ecosystems.

  12. Sample preparation and fractionation for proteome analysis and cancer biomarker discovery by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Farid E

    2009-03-01

    Sample preparation and fractionation technologies are one of the most crucial processes in proteomic analysis and biomarker discovery in solubilized samples. Chromatographic or electrophoretic proteomic technologies are also available for separation of cellular protein components. There are, however, considerable limitations in currently available proteomic technologies as none of them allows for the analysis of the entire proteome in a simple step because of the large number of peptides, and because of the wide concentration dynamic range of the proteome in clinical blood samples. The results of any undertaken experiment depend on the condition of the starting material. Therefore, proper experimental design and pertinent sample preparation is essential to obtain meaningful results, particularly in comparative clinical proteomics in which one is looking for minor differences between experimental (diseased) and control (nondiseased) samples. This review discusses problems associated with general and specialized strategies of sample preparation and fractionation, dealing with samples that are solution or suspension, in a frozen tissue state, or formalin-preserved tissue archival samples, and illustrates how sample processing might influence detection with mass spectrometric techniques. Strategies that dramatically improve the potential for cancer biomarker discovery in minimally invasive, blood-collected human samples are also presented.

  13. Numerical Analysis of an H1-Galerkin Mixed Finite Element Method for Time Fractional Telegraph Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfeng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss and analyze an H1-Galerkin mixed finite element (H1-GMFE method to look for the numerical solution of time fractional telegraph equation. We introduce an auxiliary variable to reduce the original equation into lower-order coupled equations and then formulate an H1-GMFE scheme with two important variables. We discretize the Caputo time fractional derivatives using the finite difference methods and approximate the spatial direction by applying the H1-GMFE method. Based on the discussion on the theoretical error analysis in L2-norm for the scalar unknown and its gradient in one dimensional case, we obtain the optimal order of convergence in space-time direction. Further, we also derive the optimal error results for the scalar unknown in H1-norm. Moreover, we derive and analyze the stability of H1-GMFE scheme and give the results of a priori error estimates in two- or three-dimensional cases. In order to verify our theoretical analysis, we give some results of numerical calculation by using the Matlab procedure.

  14. Scaling and long-range dependence in option pricing V: Multiscaling hedging and implied volatility smiles under the fractional Black-Scholes model with transaction costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Tian

    2011-05-01

    This paper deals with the problem of discrete time option pricing using the fractional Black-Scholes model with transaction costs. Through the ‘anchoring and adjustment’ argument in a discrete time setting, a European call option pricing formula is obtained. The minimal price of an option under transaction costs is obtained. In addition, the relation between scaling and implied volatility smiles is discussed.

  15. Mathematical basis for the measurement of absolute and fractional cardiac output with diffusible tracers by compartmental analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charkes, N.D.

    1984-01-01

    Using compartmental analysis methods, a mathematical basis is given for the measurement of absolute and fractional cardiac output with diffusible tracers. Cardiac output is shown to be the product of the blood volume and the sum of the rate constants of tracer egress from blood, modified by a factor reflecting transcapillary diffusibility, the transfer fraction. The return of tracer to the blood and distant (intracellular) events are shown to play no role in the solution. Fractional cardiac output is the ratio of the rate constant of tracer egress from blood to an organ, divided by the sum of the egress constants from blood. Predominantly extracellular ions such as sodium or bromide are best suited for this technique, although theoretically any diffusible tracer whose compartmental model can be solved may be used. It is shown that fractional cardiac output is independent of the transfer fraction, and therefore can be measured accurately by tracers which are not freely diffusible

  16. Response analysis of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongge; Xu, Wei; Yang, Guidong; Jia, Wantao

    2016-08-01

    The Poisson white noise, as a typical non-Gaussian excitation, has attracted much attention recently. However, little work was referred to the study of stochastic systems with fractional derivative under Poisson white noise excitation. This paper investigates the stationary response of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise. The equivalent stochastic system of the original stochastic system is obtained. Then, approximate stationary solutions are obtained with the help of the perturbation method. Finally, two typical examples are discussed in detail to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The analysis also shows that the fractional order and the fractional coefficient significantly affect the responses of the stochastic systems with fractional derivative.

  17. Response analysis of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yongge; Xu, Wei; Yang, Guidong; Jia, Wantao

    2016-01-01

    The Poisson white noise, as a typical non-Gaussian excitation, has attracted much attention recently. However, little work was referred to the study of stochastic systems with fractional derivative under Poisson white noise excitation. This paper investigates the stationary response of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise. The equivalent stochastic system of the original stochastic system is obtained. Then, approximate stationary solutions are obtained with the help of the perturbation method. Finally, two typical examples are discussed in detail to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The analysis also shows that the fractional order and the fractional coefficient significantly affect the responses of the stochastic systems with fractional derivative.

  18. Lie symmetry analysis, conservation laws and exact solutions of the seventh-order time fractional Sawada–Kotera–Ito equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrullah Yaşar

    Full Text Available In this paper Lie symmetry analysis of the seventh-order time fractional Sawada–Kotera–Ito (FSKI equation with Riemann–Liouville derivative is performed. Using the Lie point symmetries of FSKI equation, it is shown that it can be transformed into a nonlinear ordinary differential equation of fractional order with a new dependent variable. In the reduced equation the derivative is in Erdelyi–Kober sense. Furthermore, adapting the Ibragimov’s nonlocal conservation method to time fractional partial differential equations, we obtain conservation laws of the underlying equation. In addition, we construct some exact travelling wave solutions for the FSKI equation using the sub-equation method. Keywords: Fractional Sawada–Kotera–Ito equation, Lie symmetry, Riemann–Liouville fractional derivative, Conservation laws, Exact solutions

  19. Response analysis of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yongge; Xu, Wei, E-mail: weixu@nwpu.edu.cn; Yang, Guidong; Jia, Wantao [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2016-08-15

    The Poisson white noise, as a typical non-Gaussian excitation, has attracted much attention recently. However, little work was referred to the study of stochastic systems with fractional derivative under Poisson white noise excitation. This paper investigates the stationary response of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise. The equivalent stochastic system of the original stochastic system is obtained. Then, approximate stationary solutions are obtained with the help of the perturbation method. Finally, two typical examples are discussed in detail to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The analysis also shows that the fractional order and the fractional coefficient significantly affect the responses of the stochastic systems with fractional derivative.

  20. Reassessing the integration of European electricity markets: A fractional cointegration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, Lilian M. de; Houllier, Melanie A.

    2016-01-01

    This study extends existing literature on the assessment of electricity market integration in Europe, by developing and testing hypotheses on the convergence of electricity wholesale prices, and adopting a time-varying fractional cointegration analysis. In addition, the potential impacts of some special events that may affect system capacity (new interconnection, market coupling, increase in share of intermittent generation) on spot and forward markets are considered and evaluated. Daily spot prices from February 2000 to March 2013 of nine European electricity spot markets (APX-UK, APX-NL, Belpex, EPEX-FR, EPEX-DE, IPEX, Nordpool, Omel and OTE) and month-ahead prices in four markets (French, British, German and Dutch) from November 2007 to December 2012 are investigated. Results show that unit root tests, which are generally used in the literature to test market integration, are inadequate for assessing electricity spot market convergence, because spot prices are found to be fractionally integrated and mean-reverting time series. Furthermore, spot price behaviour and their association with different markets change over time, reflecting changes in the EU electrical system. One-month-ahead prices, by contrast, were found to have become more resilient to shocks and to follow more stable trends. - Highlights: • We examine electricity market convergence in the EU. • Common price dynamics are affected by changes in interconnection and capacity. • Forward markets have increased in resilience. • Germany's nuclear plant closures had an adverse effect on most European electricity markets.

  1. Modeling and Analysis of a Fractional-Order Generalized Memristor-Based Chaotic System and Circuit Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ningning; Xu, Cheng; Wu, Chaojun; Jia, Rong; Liu, Chongxin

    2017-12-01

    Memristor is a nonlinear “missing circuit element”, that can easily achieve chaotic oscillation. Memristor-based chaotic systems have received more and more attention. Research shows that fractional-order systems are more close to real systems. As an important parameter, the order can increase the flexibility and degree of freedom of the system. In this paper, a fractional-order generalized memristor, which consists of a diode bridge and a parallel circuit with an equivalent unit circuit and a linear resistance, is proposed. Frequency and electrical characteristics of the fractional-order memristor are analyzed. A chain structure circuit is used to implement the fractional-order unit circuit. Then replacing the conventional Chua’s diode by the fractional-order generalized memristor, a fractional-order memristor-based chaotic circuit is proposed. A large amount of research work has been done to investigate the influence of the order on the dynamical behaviors of the fractional-order memristor-based chaotic circuit. Varying with the order, the system enters the chaotic state from the periodic state through the Hopf bifurcation and period-doubling bifurcation. The chaotic state of the system has two types of attractors: single-scroll and double-scroll attractor. The stability theory of fractional-order systems is used to determine the minimum order occurring Hopf bifurcation. And the influence of the initial value on the system is analyzed. Circuit simulations are designed to verify the results of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation.

  2. Top-down and bottom-up lipidomic analysis of rabbit lipoproteins under different metabolic conditions using flow field-flow fractionation, nanoflow liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Ju Yong; Chung, Bong Chul; Seo, Hong Seog; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-07-31

    This study demonstrated the performances of top-down and bottom-up approaches in lipidomic analysis of lipoproteins from rabbits raised under different metabolic conditions: healthy controls, carrageenan-induced inflammation, dehydration, high cholesterol (HC) diet, and highest cholesterol diet with inflammation (HCI). In the bottom-up approach, the high density lipoproteins (HDL) and the low density lipoproteins (LDL) were size-sorted and collected on a semi-preparative scale using a multiplexed hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation (MxHF5), followed by nanoflow liquid chromatography-ESI-MS/MS (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis of the lipids extracted from each lipoprotein fraction. In the top-down method, size-fractionated lipoproteins were directly infused to MS for quantitative analysis of targeted lipids using chip-type asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (cAF4-ESI-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The comprehensive bottom-up analysis yielded 122 and 104 lipids from HDL and LDL, respectively. Rabbits within the HC and HCI groups had lipid patterns that contrasted most substantially from those of controls, suggesting that HC diet significantly alters the lipid composition of lipoproteins. Among the identified lipids, 20 lipid species that exhibited large differences (>10-fold) were selected as targets for the top-down quantitative analysis in order to compare the results with those from the bottom-up method. Statistical comparison of the results from the two methods revealed that the results were not significantly different for most of the selected species, except for those species with only small differences in concentration between groups. The current study demonstrated that top-down lipid analysis using cAF4-ESI-MS/MS is a powerful high-speed analytical platform for targeted lipidomic analysis that does not require the extraction of lipids from blood samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  3. Application of the Lie Symmetry Analysis for second-order fractional differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Ilie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining analytical or numerical solution of fractional differential equations is one of the troublesome and challenging issue among mathematicians and engineers, specifically in recent years. The purpose of this paper Lie Symmetry method is developed to solve second-order fractional differential equations, based on conformable fractional derivative. Some numerical examples are presented to illustrate the proposed approach.

  4. Lie symmetry analysis and soliton solutions of time-fractional K(m, n ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-12-03

    Dec 3, 2016 ... Abstract. In this note, method of Lie symmetries is applied to investigate symmetry properties of time- fractional K (m, n) equation with the Riemann–Liouville derivatives. Reduction of time-fractional K (m, n) equation is done by virtue of the Erdélyi–Kober fractional derivative which depends on a parameter α.

  5. Computational methods for criticality safety analysis within the scale system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.V.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.; Bucholz, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The criticality safety analysis capabilities within the SCALE system are centered around the Monte Carlo codes KENO IV and KENO V.a, which are both included in SCALE as functional modules. The XSDRNPM-S module is also an important tool within SCALE for obtaining multiplication factors for one-dimensional system models. This paper reviews the features and modeling capabilities of these codes along with their implementation within the Criticality Safety Analysis Sequences (CSAS) of SCALE. The CSAS modules provide automated cross-section processing and user-friendly input that allow criticality safety analyses to be done in an efficient and accurate manner. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Tracking transformation processes of organic micropollutants in aquatic environments using multi-element isotope fractionation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, Thomas B.; Bolotin, Jakov; Skarpeli-Liati, Marita; Wijker, Reto; Kurt, Zohre; Nishino, Shirley F.; Spain, Jim C.

    2011-01-01

    The quantitative description of enzymatic or abiotic transformations of man-made organic micropollutants in rivers, lakes, and groundwaters is one of the major challenges associated with the risk assessment of water resource contamination. Compound-specific isotope analysis enables one to identify (bio)degradation pathways based on changes in the contaminants' stable isotope ratios even if multiple reactive and non-reactive processes cause concentrations to decrease. Here, we investigated how the magnitude and variability of isotope fractionation in some priority pollutants is determined by the kinetics and mechanisms of important enzymatic and abiotic redox reactions. For nitroaromatic compounds and substituted anilines, we illustrate that competing transformation pathways can be assessed via trends of N and C isotope signatures.

  7. Differential branching fraction and angular analysis of the decay $B_s^0 \\to \\phi \\mu^+\\mu^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Holtrop, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-07-11

    The determination of the differential branching fraction and the first angular analysis of the decay $B_s^0\\to\\phi\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ are presented using data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $1.0\\,{\\rm fb}^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\,{\\rm TeV}$. The differential branching fraction is determined in bins of $q^{2}$, the invariant dimuon mass squared. Integration over the full $q^{2}$ range yields a total branching fraction of ${\\cal B}(B_s^0\\to\\phi\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}) = (7.07\\,^{+0.64}_{-0.59}\\pm 0.17 \\pm 0.71)\\times 10^{-7}$, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic, and the third originates from the branching fraction of the normalisation channel. An angular analysis is performed to determine the angular observables $F_{\\rm L}$, $S_3$, $A_6$, and $A_9$. The observables are consistent with Standard Model expectations.

  8. Fundulus heteroclitus gonadotropins.5: Small scale chromatographic fractionation of pituitary extracts into components with different steroidogenic activities using homologous bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrino Teresa R

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fractionation and characterization of gonadotropins (GtH from Fundulus heteroclitus pituitary extracts were carried out using a biocompatible liquid chromatographic procedure (Pharmacia FPLC system. Chromatographic fractions were monitored for gonadotropic activities (induction of oocyte maturation and steroid production using homologous follicle bioassays in vitro. Size-exclusion chromatography eluted gonadotropic activity in one major protein peak (Mr ~ 30,000. Anion-exchange and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography (HIC yielded two distinct peaks of 17beta-estradiol (E2- and 17alpha-hydroxy,20beta-dihydroprogesterone (DHP-promoting activity with associated oocyte maturation. Two-dimensional chromatography (chromatofocusing followed by HIC resolved pituitary extracts into two active fractions; both induced E2 synthesis, but one was relatively poor in eliciting DHP and testosterone production. Thus, using homologous bioassays, at least two quantitatively different gonadotropic (steroidogenic activities: an E2-promoting gonadotropin (GtH I-like and a DHP-promoting gonadotropin (GtH II-like, which has a lower isoelectric point but greater hydrophobicity than the former, can be distinguished from F. heteroclitus pituitaries by a variety of chromatographic procedures. This study complements previous biochemical and molecular data in F. heteroclitus and substantiates the duality of GtH function in a multiple-spawning teleost.

  9. Multivariate Analysis of Industrial Scale Fermentation Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mears, Lisa; Nørregård, Rasmus; Stocks, Stuart M.

    2015-01-01

    Multivariate analysis allows process understanding to be gained from the vast and complex datasets recorded from fermentation processes, however the application of such techniques to this field can be limited by the data pre-processing requirements and data handling. In this work many iterations...

  10. Application of Tempered-Stable Time Fractional-Derivative Model to Upscale Subdiffusion for Pollutant Transport in Field-Scale Discrete Fracture Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingqing Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractional calculus provides efficient physical models to quantify non-Fickian dynamics broadly observed within the Earth system. The potential advantages of using fractional partial differential equations (fPDEs for real-world problems are often limited by the current lack of understanding of how earth system properties influence observed non-Fickian dynamics. This study explores non-Fickian dynamics for pollutant transport in field-scale discrete fracture networks (DFNs, by investigating how fracture and rock matrix properties influence the leading and tailing edges of pollutant breakthrough curves (BTCs. Fractured reservoirs exhibit erratic internal structures and multi-scale heterogeneity, resulting in complex non-Fickian dynamics. A Monte Carlo approach is used to simulate pollutant transport through DFNs with a systematic variation of system properties, and the resultant non-Fickian transport is upscaled using a tempered-stable fractional in time advection–dispersion equation. Numerical results serve as a basis for determining both qualitative and quantitative relationships between BTC characteristics and model parameters, in addition to the impacts of fracture density, orientation, and rock matrix permeability on non-Fickian dynamics. The observed impacts of medium heterogeneity on tracer transport at late times tend to enhance the applicability of fPDEs that may be parameterized using measurable fracture–matrix characteristics.

  11. Spectral analysis and multigrid preconditioners for two-dimensional space-fractional diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaderi, Hamid; Dehghan, Mehdi; Donatelli, Marco; Mazza, Mariarosa

    2017-12-01

    Fractional diffusion equations (FDEs) are a mathematical tool used for describing some special diffusion phenomena arising in many different applications like porous media and computational finance. In this paper, we focus on a two-dimensional space-FDE problem discretized by means of a second order finite difference scheme obtained as combination of the Crank-Nicolson scheme and the so-called weighted and shifted Grünwald formula. By fully exploiting the Toeplitz-like structure of the resulting linear system, we provide a detailed spectral analysis of the coefficient matrix at each time step, both in the case of constant and variable diffusion coefficients. Such a spectral analysis has a very crucial role, since it can be used for designing fast and robust iterative solvers. In particular, we employ the obtained spectral information to define a Galerkin multigrid method based on the classical linear interpolation as grid transfer operator and damped-Jacobi as smoother, and to prove the linear convergence rate of the corresponding two-grid method. The theoretical analysis suggests that the proposed grid transfer operator is strong enough for working also with the V-cycle method and the geometric multigrid. On this basis, we introduce two computationally favourable variants of the proposed multigrid method and we use them as preconditioners for Krylov methods. Several numerical results confirm that the resulting preconditioning strategies still keep a linear convergence rate.

  12. Qualitative Resting Coronary Pressure Wave Form Analysis to Predict Fractional Flow Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Mitsuaki; Maehara, Akiko; Johnson, Nils P; Fearon, William F; De Bruyne, Bernard; Oldroyd, Keith G; Pijls, Nico H J; Jenkins, Paul; Ali, Ziad A; Mintz, Gary S; Stone, Gregg W; Jeremias, Allen

    2018-03-27

    To evaluate the predictability of resting distal coronary pressure wave forms for fractional flow reserve (FFR). Resting coronary wave forms were qualitatively evaluated for the presence of (i) dicrotic notch; (ii) diastolic dipping; and (iii) ventricularization. In a development cohort (n=88) a scoring system was developed that was then applied to a validation cohort (n=428) using a multivariable linear regression model to predict FFR and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) to predict FFR ≤0.8. In the development cohort, all 3 qualitative parameters were independent predictors of FFR. However, in a multivariable linear regression model in the validation cohort, qualitative wave form analysis did not further improve the ability of resting distal coronary to aortic pressure ratio (Pd/Pa) (p=0.80) or instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) (p=0.26) to predict FFR. Using ROC, the area under the curve of resting Pd/Pa (0.86 versus 0.86, P=0.08) and iFR (0.86 versus 0.86, P=0.26) did not improve by adding qualitative analysis. Qualitative coronary wave form analysis showed moderate classification agreement in predicting FFR but did not add substantially to the resting pressure gradients Pd/Pa and iFR; however, when discrepancies between quantitative and qualitative analyses are observed, artifact or pressure drift should be considered.

  13. Histogram analysis of noise performance on fractional anisotropy brain MR image with different diffusion gradient numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yong Min; Kim, Yong Sun; Kang, Duk Sik; Lee, Young Joo; Sohn, Chul Ho; Woo, Seung Koo; Suh, Kyung Jin

    2005-01-01

    We wished to analyze, qualitatively and quantitatively, the noise performance of fractional anisotropy brain images along with the different diffusion gradient numbers by using the histogram method. Diffusion tensor images were acquired using a 3.0 T MR scanner from ten normal volunteers who had no neurological symptoms. The single-shot spin-echo EPI with a Stejskal-Tanner type diffusion gradient scheme was employed for the diffusion tensor measurement. With a b-valuee of 1000 s/mm 2 , the diffusion tensor images were obtained for 6, 11, 23, 35 and 47 diffusion gradient directions. FA images were generated for each DTI scheme. The histograms were then obtained at selected ROIs for the anatomical structures on the FA image. At the same ROI location, the mean FA value and the standard deviation of the mean FA value were calculated. The quality of the FA image was improved as the number of diffusion gradient directions increased by showing better contrast between the WM and GM. The histogram showed that the variance of FA values was reduced as the number of diffusion gradient directions increased. This histogram analysis was in good agreement with the result obtained using quantitative analysis. The image quality of the FA map was significantly improved as the number of diffusion gradient directions increased. The histogram analysis well demonstrated that the improvement in the FA images resulted from the reduction in the variance of the FA values included in the ROI

  14. Fatigue Analysis of Large-scale Wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yongli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper does research on top flange fatigue damage of large-scale wind turbine generator. It establishes finite element model of top flange connection system with finite element analysis software MSC. Marc/Mentat, analyzes its fatigue strain, implements load simulation of flange fatigue working condition with Bladed software, acquires flange fatigue load spectrum with rain-flow counting method, finally, it realizes fatigue analysis of top flange with fatigue analysis software MSC. Fatigue and Palmgren-Miner linear cumulative damage theory. The analysis result indicates that its result provides new thinking for flange fatigue analysis of large-scale wind turbine generator, and possesses some practical engineering value.

  15. Accelerated fractionation in cancers of the esophagus: a multivariate analysis on 102 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girinsky, T.; Marsiglia, H.; Auperin, A.

    1995-01-01

    for T1, T2, T3 are 67%, 43%, and 25% respectively. Late toxicity included esophageal stricture and pulmonary fibrosis in 8% and 9% of the patients respectively. Multivariate analysis found that stage, the Karnofsky index, chemotherapy, and overall treatment time were independent prognostic factors for the cause specific survival. Conclusions: Accelerated fractionation for cancer of the esophagus seems to be useful in small tumors. Chemotherapy was found to be beneficial to patients when cause specific survival was the end point. Overall radiation treatment time was also an independent prognostic factor for the same end point

  16. Accelerated fractionation in cancers of the esophagus: a multivariate analysis on 102 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girinsky, T; Marsiglia, H; Auperin, A

    1995-07-01

    for T1, T2, T3 are 67%, 43%, and 25% respectively. Late toxicity included esophageal stricture and pulmonary fibrosis in 8% and 9% of the patients respectively. Multivariate analysis found that stage, the Karnofsky index, chemotherapy, and overall treatment time were independent prognostic factors for the cause specific survival. Conclusions: Accelerated fractionation for cancer of the esophagus seems to be useful in small tumors. Chemotherapy was found to be beneficial to patients when cause specific survival was the end point. Overall radiation treatment time was also an independent prognostic factor for the same end point.

  17. SGS Analysis of the Evolution Equations of the Mixture Fraction and the Progress Variable Variances in the Presence of Spray Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Meftah

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, direct numerical simulation databases have been generated to analyze the impact of the propagation of a spray flame on several subgrid scales (SGS models dedicated to the closure of the transport equations of the subgrid fluctuations of the mixture fraction Z and the progress variable c. Computations have been carried out starting from a previous inert database [22] where a cold flame has been ignited in the center of the mixture when the droplet segregation and evaporation rate were at their highest levels. First, a RANS analysis has shown a brutal increase of the mixture fraction fluctuations due to the fuel consumption by the flame. Indeed, local vapour mass fraction reaches then a minimum value, far from the saturation level. It leads to a strong increase of the evaporation rate, which is also accompanied by a diminution of the oxidiser level. In a second part of this paper, a detailed evaluation of the subgrid models allowing to close the variance and the dissipation rates of the mixture fraction and the progress variable has been carried out. Models that have been selected for their efficiency in inert flows have shown a very good behaviour in the framework of reactive flows.

  18. BASIC program to compute uranium density and void volume fraction in laboratory-scale uranium silicide aluminum dispersion plate-type fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugajin, Mitsuhiro

    1991-05-01

    BASIC program simple and easy to operate has been developed to compute uranium density and void volume fraction for laboratory-scale uranium silicide aluminum dispersion plate-type fuel, so called miniplate. An example of the result of calculation is given in order to demonstrate how the calculated void fraction correlates with the microstructural distribution of the void in a miniplate prepared in our laboratory. The program is also able to constitute data base on important parameters for miniplates from experimentally-determined values of density, weight of each constituent and dimensions of miniplates. Utility programs pertinent to the development of the BASIC program are also given which run in the popular MS-DOS environment. All the source lists are attached and brief description for each program is made. (author)

  19. Large scale analysis of signal reachability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Andrei; Gabr, Haitham; Dobra, Alin; Kahveci, Tamer

    2014-06-15

    Major disorders, such as leukemia, have been shown to alter the transcription of genes. Understanding how gene regulation is affected by such aberrations is of utmost importance. One promising strategy toward this objective is to compute whether signals can reach to the transcription factors through the transcription regulatory network (TRN). Due to the uncertainty of the regulatory interactions, this is a #P-complete problem and thus solving it for very large TRNs remains to be a challenge. We develop a novel and scalable method to compute the probability that a signal originating at any given set of source genes can arrive at any given set of target genes (i.e., transcription factors) when the topology of the underlying signaling network is uncertain. Our method tackles this problem for large networks while providing a provably accurate result. Our method follows a divide-and-conquer strategy. We break down the given network into a sequence of non-overlapping subnetworks such that reachability can be computed autonomously and sequentially on each subnetwork. We represent each interaction using a small polynomial. The product of these polynomials express different scenarios when a signal can or cannot reach to target genes from the source genes. We introduce polynomial collapsing operators for each subnetwork. These operators reduce the size of the resulting polynomial and thus the computational complexity dramatically. We show that our method scales to entire human regulatory networks in only seconds, while the existing methods fail beyond a few tens of genes and interactions. We demonstrate that our method can successfully characterize key reachability characteristics of the entire transcriptions regulatory networks of patients affected by eight different subtypes of leukemia, as well as those from healthy control samples. All the datasets and code used in this article are available at bioinformatics.cise.ufl.edu/PReach/scalable.htm. © The Author 2014

  20. Analytical Analysis on Nonlinear Parametric Vibration of an Axially Moving String with Fractional Viscoelastic Damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear parametric vibration of an axially moving string made by rubber-like materials is studied in the paper. The fractional viscoelastic model is used to describe the damping of the string. Then, a new nonlinear fractional mathematical model governing transverse motion of the string is derived based on Newton’s second law, the Euler beam theory, and the Lagrangian strain. Taking into consideration the fractional calculus law of Riemann-Liouville form, the principal parametric resonance is analytically investigated via applying the direct multiscale method. Numerical results are presented to show the influences of the fractional order, the stiffness constant, the viscosity coefficient, and the axial-speed fluctuation amplitude on steady-state responses. It is noticeable that the amplitudes and existing intervals of steady-state responses predicted by Kirchhoff’s fractional material model are much larger than those predicted by Mote’s fractional material model.

  1. Bifurcation analysis of a noisy vibro-impact oscillator with two kinds of fractional derivative elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, YongGe; Xu, Wei; Yang, Guidong

    2018-04-01

    To the best of authors' knowledge, little work was referred to the study of a noisy vibro-impact oscillator with a fractional derivative. Stochastic bifurcations of a vibro-impact oscillator with two kinds of fractional derivative elements driven by Gaussian white noise excitation are explored in this paper. We can obtain the analytical approximate solutions with the help of non-smooth transformation and stochastic averaging method. The numerical results from Monte Carlo simulation of the original system are regarded as the benchmark to verify the accuracy of the developed method. The results demonstrate that the proposed method has a satisfactory level of accuracy. We also discuss the stochastic bifurcation phenomena induced by the fractional coefficients and fractional derivative orders. The important and interesting result we can conclude in this paper is that the effect of the first fractional derivative order on the system is totally contrary to that of the second fractional derivative order.

  2. Scaling analysis for the OSU AP600 test facility (APEX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, J.N.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the authors summarize the key aspects of a state-of-the-art scaling analysis (Reyes et al. (1995)) performed to establish the facility design and test conditions for the advanced plant experiment (APEX) at Oregon State University (OSU). This scaling analysis represents the first, and most comprehensive, application of the hierarchical two-tiered scaling (H2TS) methodology (Zuber (1991)) in the design of an integral system test facility. The APEX test facility, designed and constructed on the basis of this scaling analysis, is the most accurate geometric representation of a Westinghouse AP600 nuclear steam supply system. The OSU APEX test facility has served to develop an essential component of the integral system database used to assess the AP600 thermal hydraulic safety analysis computer codes. (orig.)

  3. Dynamical property analysis of fractionally damped van der pol oscillator and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qiuhui; Zhang, Chunrui

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the fractionally damped van der pol equation was studied. Firstly, the fractionally damped van der pol equation was transformed into a set of integer order equations. Then the Lyapunov exponents diagram was given. Secondly, it was transformed into a set of fractional integral equations and solved by a predictor-corrector method. The time domain diagrams and phase trajectory were used to describe the dynamic behavior. Finally, the fractionally damped van der pol equation was used to detect a weak signal.

  4. Consensus Analysis of Fractional-Order Multiagent Systems with Double-Integrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunde Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In nature, many phenomena can be explained by coordinated behavior of agents with fractional-order dynamics. In this paper, the consensus problem of fractional-order multiagent systems with double-integrator is studied, where the fractional-order satisfies 0<α<2. Based on the fractional-order stability theory, Mittag-Leffler function, and Laplace transform, a necessary and sufficient condition is obtained under the assumption that the directed graph for the communication network contains a directed spanning tree. Finally, an example with simulation is presented to illustrate the theoretical results.

  5. Percolation through voids around overlapping spheres: A dynamically based finite-size scaling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priour, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    The percolation threshold for flow or conduction through voids surrounding randomly placed spheres is calculated. With large-scale Monte Carlo simulations, we give a rigorous continuum treatment to the geometry of the impenetrable spheres and the spaces between them. To properly exploit finite-size scaling, we examine multiple systems of differing sizes, with suitable averaging over disorder, and extrapolate to the thermodynamic limit. An order parameter based on the statistical sampling of stochastically driven dynamical excursions and amenable to finite-size scaling analysis is defined, calculated for various system sizes, and used to determine the critical volume fraction ϕc=0.0317±0.0004 and the correlation length exponent ν =0.92±0.05.

  6. Deterministic analysis of mid scale outdoor fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidmar, P.; Petelin, S.

    2003-01-01

    The idea behind the article is how to define fire behaviour. The work is based on an analytical study of fire origin, its development and spread. Mathematical fire model called FDS (Fire Dynamic Simulator) is used in the presented work. A CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamic) model using LES (Large Eddie Simulation) is used to calculate fire development and spread of combustion products in the environment. The fire source is located in the vicinity of the hazardous plant, power, chemical etc. The article presents the brief background of the FDS computer program and the initial and boundary conditions used in the mathematical model. Results discuss output data and check the validity of results. The work also presents some corrections of the physical model used, which influence the quality of results. The obtained results were discussed and compared with the Fire Safety Analysis report included in the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of Krsko nuclear power plant. (author)

  7. A high throughput mass spectrometry screening analysis based on two-dimensional carbon microfiber fractionation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Biao; Zou, Yilin; Xie, Xuan; Zhao, Jinhua; Piao, Xiangfan; Piao, Jingyi; Yao, Zhongping; Quinto, Maurizio; Wang, Gang; Li, Donghao

    2017-06-09

    A novel high-throughput, solvent saving and versatile integrated two-dimensional microscale carbon fiber/active carbon fiber system (2DμCFs) that allows a simply and rapid separation of compounds in low-polar, medium-polar and high-polar fractions, has been coupled with ambient ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF-MS and ESI-QqQ-MS) for screening and quantitative analyses of real samples. 2DμCFs led to a substantial interference reduction and minimization of ionization suppression effects, thus increasing the sensitivity and the screening capabilities of the subsequent MS analysis. The method has been applied to the analysis of Schisandra Chinensis extracts, obtaining with a single injection a simultaneous determination of 33 compounds presenting different polarities, such as organic acids, lignans, and flavonoids in less than 7min, at low pressures and using small solvent amounts. The method was also validated using 10 model compounds, giving limit of detections (LODs) ranging from 0.3 to 30ngmL -1 , satisfactory recoveries (from 75.8 to 93.2%) and reproducibilities (relative standard deviations, RSDs, from 1.40 to 8.06%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Individual white matter fractional anisotropy analysis on patients with MRI negative partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duning, Thomas; Kellinghaus, Christoph; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Schiffbauer, Hagen; Keller, Simon; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Knecht, Stefan; Deppe, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Conventional structural MRI fails to identify a cerebral lesion in 25% of patients with cryptogenic partial epilepsy (CPE). Diffusion tensor imaging is an MRI technique sensitive to microstructural abnormalities of cerebral white matter (WM) by quantification of fractional anisotropy (FA). The objectives of the present study were to identify focal FA abnormalities in patients with CPE who were deemed MRI negative during routine presurgical evaluation. Diffusion tensor imaging at 3 T was performed in 12 patients with CPE and normal conventional MRI and in 67 age matched healthy volunteers. WM integrity was compared between groups on the basis of automated voxel-wise statistics of FA maps using an analysis of covariance. Volumetric measurements from high resolution T1-weighted images were also performed. Significant FA reductions in WM regions encompassing diffuse areas of the brain were observed when all patients as a group were compared with controls. On an individual basis, voxel based analyses revealed widespread symmetrical FA reduction in CPE patients. Furthermore, asymmetrical temporal lobe FA reduction was consistently ipsilateral to the electroclinical focus. No significant correlations were found between FA alterations and clinical data. There were no differences in brain volumes of CPE patients compared with controls. Despite normal conventional MRI, WM integrity abnormalities in CPE patients extend far beyond the epileptogenic zone. Given that unilateral temporal lobe FA abnormalities were consistently observed ipsilateral to the seizure focus, analysis of temporal FA may provide an informative in vivo investigation into the localisation of the epileptogenic zone in MRI negative patients.

  9. Slow Learner Errors Analysis in Solving Fractions Problems in Inclusive Junior High School Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitasari, N.; Lukito, A.; Ekawati, R.

    2018-01-01

    A slow learner whose IQ is between 71 and 89 will have difficulties in solving mathematics problems that often lead to errors. The errors could be analyzed to where the errors may occur and its type. This research is qualitative descriptive which aims to describe the locations, types, and causes of slow learner errors in the inclusive junior high school class in solving the fraction problem. The subject of this research is one slow learner of seventh-grade student which was selected through direct observation by the researcher and through discussion with mathematics teacher and special tutor which handles the slow learner students. Data collection methods used in this study are written tasks and semistructured interviews. The collected data was analyzed by Newman’s Error Analysis (NEA). Results show that there are four locations of errors, namely comprehension, transformation, process skills, and encoding errors. There are four types of errors, such as concept, principle, algorithm, and counting errors. The results of this error analysis will help teachers to identify the causes of the errors made by the slow learner.

  10. PLS models for determination of SARA analysis of Colombian vacuum residues and molecular distillation fractions using MIR-ATR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Orrego-Ruiz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, prediction models of Saturates, Aromatics, Resins and Asphaltenes fractions (SARA from thirty-seven vacuum residues of representative Colombian crudes and eighteen fractions of molecular distillation process were obtained. Mid-Infrared (MIR Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR spectroscopy in combination with partial least squares (PLS regression analysis was used to estimate accurately SARA analysis in these kind of samples. Calibration coefficients of prediction models were for saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes fractions, 0.99, 0.96, 0.97 and 0.99, respectively. This methodology permits to control the molecular distillation process since small differences in chemical composition can be detected. Total time elapsed to give the SARA analysis per sample is 10 minutes.

  11. Fracionamento a seco da gordura de frango em escala piloto Dry fractionation of chicken fat in pilot scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chih Chiu

    2007-09-01

    .5% of the weight of the slaughtered chicken. The objectives of this study were to fractionate the abdominal chicken fat and to evaluate its fractions regarding the physical and chemical properties. Chicken fat was processed by dry fractionation to obtain a solid fraction at ambient temperature. Crystallization and separation were performed using industrial-type procedures. Softening point, consistency, solid fat content, fatty acid and triglyceride compositions, iodine and saponification values, and the thermal behavior of the samples were evaluated. Results showed that chicken fat had 68.7% of unsaturated fatty acids. Among these, monounsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic acid, are considered desirable in regard to decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The higher softening point of the stearin was due the greatest levels of saturated fatty acids (mainly palmitic and stearic acids. Chicken fat and olein at 10 ºC were plastic and spreadable. The high olein yield suggests that this fraction can be used as frying oil and in the synthesis of structured lipids. The stearin can be applied as component in the fat manufacturing, in puff-pastry margarines and also in cake and icing shortening.

  12. The Measurand Framework: Scaling Exploratory Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D.; MacLean, L. S.; Kappler, K. N.; Bleier, T.

    2017-12-01

    Since 2005 QuakeFinder (QF) has acquired a unique dataset with outstanding spatial and temporal sampling of earth's time varying magnetic field along several active fault systems. This QF network consists of 124 stations in California and 45 stations along fault zones in Greece, Taiwan, Peru, Chile and Indonesia. Each station is equipped with three feedback induction magnetometers, two ion sensors, a 4 Hz geophone, a temperature sensor, and a humidity sensor. Data are continuously recorded at 50 Hz with GPS timing and transmitted daily to the QF data center in California for analysis. QF is attempting to detect and characterize anomalous EM activity occurring ahead of earthquakes. In order to analyze this sizable dataset, QF has developed an analytical framework to support processing the time series input data and hypothesis testing to evaluate the statistical significance of potential precursory signals. The framework was developed with a need to support legacy, in-house processing but with an eye towards big-data processing with Apache Spark and other modern big data technologies. In this presentation, we describe our framework, which supports rapid experimentation and iteration of candidate signal processing techniques via modular data transformation stages, tracking of provenance, and automatic re-computation of downstream data when upstream data is updated. Furthermore, we discuss how the processing modules can be ported to big data platforms like Apache Spark and demonstrate a migration path from local, in-house processing to cloud-friendly processing.

  13. Global scaling analysis for the pebble bed advanced high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blandford, E.D.; Peterson, P.F.

    2009-01-01

    Scaled Integral Effects Test (IET) facilities play a critical role in the design certification process of innovative reactor designs. Best-estimate system analysis codes, which minimize deliberate conservatism, require confirmatory data during the validation process to ensure an acceptable level of accuracy as defined by the regulator. The modular Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR), with a nominal power output of 900 MWth, is the most recent UC Berkeley design for a liquid fluoride salt cooled, solid fuel reactor. The PB-AHTR takes advantage of technologies developed for gas-cooled high temperature thermal and fast reactors, sodium fast reactors, and molten salt reactors. In this paper, non-dimensional scaling groups and similarity criteria are presented at the global system level for a loss of forced circulation transient, where single-phase natural circulation is the primary mechanism for decay heat removal following a primary pump trip. Due to very large margin to fuel damage temperatures, the peak metal temperature of primary-loop components was identified as the key safety parameter of interest. Fractional Scaling Analysis (FSA) methods were used to quantify the intensity of each transfer process during the transient and subsequently rank them by their relative importance while identifying key sources of distortion between the prototype and model. The results show that the development of a scaling hierarchy at the global system level informs the bottom-up scaling analysis. (author)

  14. Single-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy: a dose-response analysis of arteriovenous malformation obliteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touboul, Emmanuel; Al Halabi, Assem; Buffat, Laurent; Merienne, Louis; Huart, Judith; Schlienger, Michel; Lefkopoulos, Dimitrios; Mammar, Hamid; Missir, Odile; Meder, Jean-Francois; Laurent, Alex; Housset, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiotherapy delivered in a high-dose single fraction is an effective technique to obliterate intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVM). To attempt to analyze the relationships between dose, volume, and obliteration rates, we studied a group of patients treated using single-isocenter treatment plans. Methods and Materials: From May 1986 to December 1989, 100 consecutive patients with angiographically proven AVM had stereotactic radiotherapy delivered as a high-dose single fraction using a single-isocenter technique. Distribution according to Spetzler-Martin grade was as follows: 79 grade 1-3, three grade 4, 0 grade 5, and 18 grade 6. The target volume was spheroid in 74 cases, ellipsoid in 11, and large and irregular in 15. The targeted volume of the nidus was estimated using two-dimensional stereotactic angiographic data and, calculated as an ovoid-shaped lesion, was 1900 ± 230 mm 3 (median 968 mm 3 ; range 62-11, 250 mm 3 ). The mean minimum target dose (D min ) was 19 ± 0.6 Gy (median 20 Gy; range: 3-31.5). The mean volume within the isodose which corresponded to the minimum target dose was 2500 ± 300 mm 3 (median 1200 mm 3 ; range 75-14 900 mm 3 ). The mean maximum dose (D max ) was 34.5 ± 0.5 Gy (median 35 Gy; range 15-45). The mean angiographic follow-up was 42 ± 2.3 months (median 37.5; range 7-117). Results: The absolute obliteration rate was 51%. The 5-year actuarial obliteration rate was 62.5 ± 7%. After univariate analysis, AVM obliteration was influenced by previous surgery (p = 0.0007), D min by steps of 5 Gy (p = 0.005), targeted volume of the nidus (≤968 mm 3 vs. >968 mm 3 ; p = 0.015), and grade according to Spetzler-Martin (grade 1-3 vs. grade 4-6; p = 0.011). After multivariate analysis, the independent factors influencing AVM obliteration were the D min [relative risk (RR) 1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-2.5; p min but does not seem to be influenced by D max and the targeted volume of the nidus

  15. 'Fractional recovery' analysis of a presynaptic synaptotagmin 1-anchored endocytic protein complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Khanna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The integral synaptic vesicle protein and putative calcium sensor, synaptotagmin 1 (STG, has also been implicated in synaptic vesicle (SV recovery. However, proteins with which STG interacts during SV endocytosis remain poorly understood. We have isolated an STG-associated endocytic complex (SAE from presynaptic nerve terminals and have used a novel fractional recovery (FR assay based on electrostatic dissociation to identify SAE components and map the complex structure. The location of SAE in the presynaptic terminal was determined by high-resolution quantitative immunocytochemistry at the chick ciliary ganglion giant calyx-type synapse. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: The first step in FR analysis was to immunoprecipitate (IP the complex with an antibody against one protein component (the IP-protein. The immobilized complex was then exposed to a high salt (1150 mM stress-test that caused shedding of co-immunoprecipitated proteins (co-IP-proteins. A Fractional Recovery ratio (FR: recovery after high salt/recovery with control salt as assayed by Western blot was calculated for each co-IP-protein. These FR values reflect complex structure since an easily dissociated protein, with a low FR value, cannot be intermediary between the IP-protein and a salt-resistant protein. The structure of the complex was mapped and a blueprint generated with a pair of FR analyses generated using two different IP-proteins. The blueprint of SAE contains an AP180/X/STG/stonin 2/intersectin/epsin core (X is unknown and epsin is hypothesized, and an AP2 adaptor, H-/L-clathrin coat and dynamin scission protein perimeter. Quantitative immunocytochemistry (ICA/ICQ method at an isolated calyx-type presynaptic terminal indicates that this complex is associated with STG at the presynaptic transmitter release face but not with STG on intracellular synaptic vesicles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We hypothesize that the SAE serves as a recognition site and also as a

  16. Analysis, pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification of different fractions of Scots pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Forestry residues consisting of softwood are a major lignocellulosic resource for production of liquid biofuels. Scots pine, a commercially important forest tree, was fractionated into seven fractions of chips: juvenile heartwood, mature heartwood, juvenile sapwood, mature sapwood, bark, top parts, and knotwood. The different fractions were characterized analytically with regard to chemical composition and susceptibility to dilute-acid pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. Results All fractions were characterized by a high glucan content (38-43%) and a high content of other carbohydrates (11-14% mannan, 2-4% galactan) that generate easily convertible hexose sugars, and by a low content of inorganic material (0.2-0.9% ash). The lignin content was relatively uniform (27-32%) and the syringyl-guaiacyl ratio of the different fractions were within the range 0.021-0.025. The knotwood had a high content of extractives (9%) compared to the other fractions. The effects of pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification were relatively similar, but without pretreatment the bark fraction was considerably more susceptible to enzymatic saccharification. Conclusions Since sawn timber is a main product from softwood species such as Scots pine, it is an important issue whether different parts of the tree are equally suitable for bioconversion processes. The investigation shows that bioconversion of Scots pine is facilitated by that most of the different fractions exhibit relatively similar properties with regard to chemical composition and susceptibility to techniques used for bioconversion of woody biomass. PMID:24641769

  17. Effects of beta-blockers on heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effects of beta-blockers on the prognosis of the heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF remain controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the impact of beta-blockers on mortality and hospitalization in the patients with HFpEF. METHODS: A search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library databases from 2005 to June 2013 was conducted. Clinical studies reporting outcomes of mortality and/or hospitalization for patients with HFpEF (EF ≥ 40%, being assigned to beta-blockers treatment and non-beta-blockers control group were included. RESULTS: A total of 12 clinical studies (2 randomized controlled trials and 10 observational studies involving 21,206 HFpEF patients were included for this meta-analysis. The pooled analysis demonstrated that beta-blocker exposure was associated with a 9% reduction in relative risk for all-cause mortality in patients with HFpEF (95% CI: 0.87 - 0.95; P < 0.001. Whereas, the all-cause hospitalization, HF hospitalization and composite outcomes (mortality and hospitalization were not affected by this treatment (P=0.26, P=0.97, and P=0.88 respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The beta-blockers treatment for the patients with HFpEF was associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality, but not with a lower risk of hospitalization. These finding were mainly obtained from observational studies, and further investigations are needed to make an assertion.

  18. Module-scale analysis of pressure retarded osmosis: performance limitations and implications for full-scale operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Anthony P; Lin, Shihong; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-10-21

    We investigate the performance of pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) at the module scale, accounting for the detrimental effects of reverse salt flux, internal concentration polarization, and external concentration polarization. Our analysis offers insights on optimization of three critical operation and design parameters--applied hydraulic pressure, initial feed flow rate fraction, and membrane area--to maximize the specific energy and power density extractable in the system. For co- and counter-current flow modules, we determine that appropriate selection of the membrane area is critical to obtain a high specific energy. Furthermore, we find that the optimal operating conditions in a realistic module can be reasonably approximated using established optima for an ideal system (i.e., an applied hydraulic pressure equal to approximately half the osmotic pressure difference and an initial feed flow rate fraction that provides equal amounts of feed and draw solutions). For a system in counter-current operation with a river water (0.015 M NaCl) and seawater (0.6 M NaCl) solution pairing, the maximum specific energy obtainable using performance properties of commercially available membranes was determined to be 0.147 kWh per m(3) of total mixed solution, which is 57% of the Gibbs free energy of mixing. Operating to obtain a high specific energy, however, results in very low power densities (less than 2 W/m(2)), indicating that the trade-off between power density and specific energy is an inherent challenge to full-scale PRO systems. Finally, we quantify additional losses and energetic costs in the PRO system, which further reduce the net specific energy and indicate serious challenges in extracting net energy in PRO with river water and seawater solution pairings.

  19. Chemical Composition of the Graphitic Black Carbon Fraction in Riverine and Marine Sediments at Submicron Scales using Carbon X-ray Spectromicroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberstroh, P.; Brandes, J.; Gelinas, Y.; Dickens, A.; Wirick, S.; Cody, G.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of the graphitic black carbon (GBC) fraction of marine organic matter was explored in several marine and freshwater sedimentary environments along the west coast of North America and the Pacific Ocean. Analysis by carbon x-ray absorption near edge structure (C-XANES) spectroscopy and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) show the GBC-fraction of Stillaguamish River surface sediments to be dominated by more highly-ordered and impure forms of graphite, together forming about 80% of the GBC, with a smaller percent of an aliphatic carbon component. Eel River Margin surface sediments had very little highly-ordered graphite, and were instead dominated by amorphous carbon and to a lesser extent, impure graphite. However, the GBC of surface sediments from the Washington State Slope and the Mexico Margin were composed almost solely of amorphous carbon. Pre-anthropogenic, highly-oxidized deep-sea sediments from the open Equatorial Pacific Ocean contained over half their GBC in different forms of graphite as well as highly-aliphatic carbon, low aromatic/highly-acidic aliphatic carbon, low aromatic/highly aliphatic carbon, and amorphous forms of carbon. Our results clearly show the impact of graphite and amorphous C phases in the BC fraction in modern riverine sediments and nearby marine shelf deposits. The pre-anthropogenic Equatorial Pacific GBC fraction is remarkable in the existence of highly-ordered graphite

  20. Heat transfer analysis in a second grade fluid over and oscillating vertical plate using fractional Caputo-Fabrizio derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Nehad Ali; Khan, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a Caputo-Fabrizio fractional derivatives approach to the thermal analysis of a second grade fluid over an infinite oscillating vertical flat plate. Together with an oscillating boundary motion, the heat transfer is caused by the buoyancy force induced by temperature differences between the plate and the fluid. Closed form solutions of the fluid velocity and temperature are obtained by means of the Laplace transform. The solutions of ordinary second grade and Newtonian fluids corresponding to time derivatives of integer and fractional orders are obtained as particular cases of the present solutions. Numerical computations and graphical illustrations are used in order to study the effects of the Caputo-Fabrizio time-fractional parameter α, the material parameter α 2 , and the Prandtl and Grashof numbers on the velocity field. A comparison for time derivative of integer order versus fractional order is shown graphically for both Newtonian and second grade fluids. It is found that fractional fluids (second grade and Newtonian) have highest velocities. This shows that the fractional parameter enhances the fluid flow. (orig.)

  1. Multi-scale Analysis of High Resolution Topography: Feature Extraction and Identification of Landscape Characteristic Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, P.; Sangireddy, H.; Stark, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of digital terrain data, detailed information on terrain characteristics and on scale and location of geomorphic features is available over extended areas. Our ability to observe landscapes and quantify topographic patterns has greatly improved, including the estimation of fluxes of mass and energy across landscapes. Challenges still remain in the analysis of high resolution topography data; the presence of features such as roads, for example, challenges classic methods for feature extraction and large data volumes require computationally efficient extraction and analysis methods. Moreover, opportunities exist to define new robust metrics of landscape characterization for landscape comparison and model validation. In this presentation we cover recent research in multi-scale and objective analysis of high resolution topography data. We show how the analysis of the probability density function of topographic attributes such as slope, curvature, and topographic index contains useful information for feature localization and extraction. The analysis of how the distributions change across scales, quantified by the behavior of modal values and interquartile range, allows the identification of landscape characteristic scales, such as terrain roughness. The methods are introduced on synthetic signals in one and two dimensions and then applied to a variety of landscapes of different characteristics. Validation of the methods includes the analysis of modeled landscapes where the noise distribution is known and features of interest easily measured.

  2. The diagnostic performance of CT-derived fractional flow reserve for evaluation of myocardial ischaemia confirmed by invasive fractional flow reserve: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Tang, X; Peng, L; Luo, Y; Dong, R; Liu, J

    2015-05-01

    To review the literature on the diagnostic accuracy of CT-derived fractional flow reserve (FFRCT) for the evaluation of myocardial ischaemia in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease, with invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) as the reference standard. A PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane cross-search was performed. The pooled diagnostic accuracy of FFRCT, with FFR as the reference standard, was primarily analysed, and then compared with that of CT angiography (CTA). The thresholds to diagnose ischaemia were FFR ≤0.80 or CTA ≥50% stenosis. Data extraction, synthesis, and statistical analysis were performed by standard meta-analysis methods. Three multicentre studies (NXT Trial, DISCOVER-FLOW study and DeFACTO study) were included, examining 609 patients and 1050 vessels. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), positive likelihood ratio (LR+), negative likelihood ratio (LR-), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) for FFRCT were 89% (85-93%), 71% (65-75%), 70% (65-75%), 90% (85-93%), 3.31 (1.79-6.14), 0.16 (0.11-0.23), and 21.21 (9.15-49.15) at the patient-level, and 83% (78-63%), 78% (75-81%), 61% (56-65%), 92% (89-90%), 4.02 (1.84-8.80), 0.22 (0.13-0.35), and 19.15 (5.73-63.93) at the vessel-level. At per-patient analysis, FFRCT has similar sensitivity but improved specificity, PPV, NPV, LR+, LR-, and DOR versus those of CTA. At per-vessel analysis, FFRCT had a slightly lower sensitivity, similar NPV, but improved specificity, PPV, LR+, LR-, and DOR compared with those of CTA. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curves for FFRCT was 0.8909 at patient-level and 0.8865 at vessel-level, versus 0.7402 for CTA at patient-level. FFRCT, which was associated with improved diagnostic accuracy versus CTA, is a viable alternative to FFR for detecting coronary ischaemic lesions. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The diagnostic performance of CT-derived fractional flow reserve for evaluation of myocardial ischaemia confirmed by invasive fractional flow reserve: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.; Tang, X.; Peng, L.; Luo, Y.; Dong, R.; Liu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To review the literature on the diagnostic accuracy of CT-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR CT ) for the evaluation of myocardial ischaemia in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease, with invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) as the reference standard. Materials and methods: A PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane cross-search was performed. The pooled diagnostic accuracy of FFR CT , with FFR as the reference standard, was primarily analysed, and then compared with that of CT angiography (CTA). The thresholds to diagnose ischaemia were FFR ≤0.80 or CTA ≥50% stenosis. Data extraction, synthesis, and statistical analysis were performed by standard meta-analysis methods. Results: Three multicentre studies (NXT Trial, DISCOVER-FLOW study and DeFACTO study) were included, examining 609 patients and 1050 vessels. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), positive likelihood ratio (LR+), negative likelihood ratio (LR−), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) for FFR CT were 89% (85–93%), 71% (65–75%), 70% (65–75%), 90% (85–93%), 3.31 (1.79–6.14), 0.16 (0.11–0.23), and 21.21 (9.15–49.15) at the patient-level, and 83% (78–63%), 78% (75–81%), 61% (56–65%), 92% (89–90%), 4.02 (1.84–8.80), 0.22 (0.13–0.35), and 19.15 (5.73–63.93) at the vessel-level. At per-patient analysis, FFR CT has similar sensitivity but improved specificity, PPV, NPV, LR+, LR−, and DOR versus those of CTA. At per-vessel analysis, FFR CT had a slightly lower sensitivity, similar NPV, but improved specificity, PPV, LR+, LR−, and DOR compared with those of CTA. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curves for FFR CT was 0.8909 at patient-level and 0.8865 at vessel-level, versus 0.7402 for CTA at patient-level. Conclusions: FFR CT , which was associated with improved diagnostic accuracy versus CTA, is a viable alternative to FFR for detecting coronary ischaemic lesions

  4. Crystallization analysis fractionation of poly(ethylene-co-styrene) produced by metallocene catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad

    2013-06-06

    Ethylene homo polymer and ethylene-styrene copolymers were synthesized using Cp2ZrCl2 (1)/methyl aluminoxane (MAO) and rac-silylene-bis (indenyl) zirconium dichloride (2)/MAO catalyst systems by varying styrene concentration and reaction conditions. Crystallization analysis fractionation (CRYSTAF), DSC, FTIR and 1H NMR spectroscopy were used for characterizing the synthesized polymers. Interestingly, styrene was able to increase the activity of 1/MAO and 2/MAO catalyst systems at low concentrations, but at higher concentrations the activity decreases. The 1/MAO system at low and high pressure was unable to incorporate styrene, and the final product was pure polyethylene. On the other hand, with 2/MAO polymerization of ethylene and styrene yielded copolymer containing both styrene and ethylene. Results obtained from CRYSTAF and DSC reveal that on using 1/MAO system at high pressure, the resulting polymer in the presence of styrene has similar crystallinity as the polymer produced without styrene. Using both 1/MAO at low pressure and 2/MAO leads to decrease in crystallinity with increase in styrene concentration, even though the former does not incorporate styrene. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  5. Thermodynamic evaluation of a kerosene pre- Fraction unit using energy and exergy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Ghasemi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work applies the method of energy and exergy analysis over first step of linear alkyl benzene (LAB production namely kerosene pre fraction plant, to determine unit energy and exergy performance and loss, besides of opportunities for improvement based on operational data. For this purpose macroscopic energy and exergy balance was developed over main equipment including electro pumps, heat exchangers, air coolers, and distillation columns. The results shows that total energy performance of plant is 92.62% by 19.76 MW energy lost, while from exergy perspective, unit performance is 78.08% by 17.92 MW exergy lost. Maximum local exergy lost occurs in the feed pre heater exchanger by 27% performance which is designed to recover energy from top product of second column, furthermore results shows that upgrading low quality energy in air coolers based on heat pump concept would protect energy and exergy emission to the environment and reduce 40% of total lost energy and 16% of total lost exergy in plant.

  6. Multivariate data analysis for finding the relevant fatty acids contributing to the melting fractions of cream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buldo, Patrizia; Larsen, Mette Krogh; Wiking, Lars

    2013-01-01

    :0 and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) in milk fat, whereas it decreased the amount of stearic acid (C18:0) and C18:1 trans fatty acid. Average data on the melting behaviour of cream separated the farms into two groups where the main differences in feeding were the amounts of maize silage and rapeseed cake used. CONCLUSION......BACKGROUND: The melting behaviour and fatty acid composition of cream from a total of 33 cows from four farms were analysed. Multivariate data analysis was used to identify the fatty acids that contributed most to the melting points and to differentiate between creams from different practical...... feeding regimes. RESULTS: It was demonstrated that the melting point of the medium melting fraction of milk fat was positively correlated with palmitic acid (C16:0), whereas it was negatively correlated with oleic acid (C18:1 cis9), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA cis9 trans11), vaccenic acid (C18:1 trans11...

  7. Automatic identification of mobile and rigid substructures in molecular dynamics simulations and fractional structural fluctuation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Martínez

    Full Text Available The analysis of structural mobility in molecular dynamics plays a key role in data interpretation, particularly in the simulation of biomolecules. The most common mobility measures computed from simulations are the Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD and Root Mean Square Fluctuations (RMSF of the structures. These are computed after the alignment of atomic coordinates in each trajectory step to a reference structure. This rigid-body alignment is not robust, in the sense that if a small portion of the structure is highly mobile, the RMSD and RMSF increase for all atoms, resulting possibly in poor quantification of the structural fluctuations and, often, to overlooking important fluctuations associated to biological function. The motivation of this work is to provide a robust measure of structural mobility that is practical, and easy to interpret. We propose a Low-Order-Value-Optimization (LOVO strategy for the robust alignment of the least mobile substructures in a simulation. These substructures are automatically identified by the method. The algorithm consists of the iterative superposition of the fraction of structure displaying the smallest displacements. Therefore, the least mobile substructures are identified, providing a clearer picture of the overall structural fluctuations. Examples are given to illustrate the interpretative advantages of this strategy. The software for performing the alignments was named MDLovoFit and it is available as free-software at: http://leandro.iqm.unicamp.br/mdlovofit.

  8. Preliminary phytochemical and elemental analysis of aqueous and fractionated pod extracts of Acacia nilotica (Thorn mimosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Shaibu Auwal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acacia nilotica (Thorn mimosa is used locally for various medicinal purposes by traditionalists and herbalists in northeastern Nigeria. Plants products have been used since ancient times in the management of various conditions. The bark of A. nilotica has been reported to be used traditionally to manage diabetes, dysentery, leprosy, ulcers, cancers, tumor of the eye, ear and testicles, induration of liver and spleen and also in treatment of various condylomas. The objective of this study is to determine the phytochemical and elemental constituents of the extracts of A. nilotica pods. Flame emission and atomic absorption spectrometry were also used to determine the presence or absence of micro- and macro-elements in the extracts. Phytochemical analysis of the aqueous, ethyl acetate and N-butanol fractionated portions of the pod extracts of A. nilotica revealed the presence of tannins, saponins, flavonoids, carbohydrate, whereas carbohydrates and tannins were the only constituent in the residue portion. Anthraquinones, alkaloids, terpene and steroids were not present in the extracts. The elemental screening revealed the presence of iron, potassium, manganese, zinc, calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, sodium, cadmium and copper. Lead, arsenic and molybdenum were not detected in the pod.

  9. Analysis of 'wet-landscape' surface water fractions using medaka embryo-toxicity bioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, L. E.; McConkey, B. J.; Vanden Heuvel, M. R. (Waterloo, Univ., Dept, of Biology, Waterloo, ON (Canada)); MacKinnon, M. D. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)) Munkittricx, K. (Environment Canada, Burlington, ON (Canada))

    1998-01-01

    The self-sustaining biological potential of Syncrude's 'wetland-scape' waste disposal method was evaluated by testing water extracts from experimental pits of different ages and fine tailings/natural water compositions. This waste disposal method involves capping fine tailings with a layer of surface water. Preliminary estimates suggests a higher incidence of mortality and deformity in Japanese Medaka embryos incubated in pit waters containing elevated concentrations of naphthenates. Another study on adult perch stocked in the demonstration pit indicated the presence of PAHs in the fish bile at biologically relevant concentrations. This study was designed to determine the causative agents of the fish embryo toxicity and the level of concentrations at which chronic effects occur. The water extracts were fractionated into acid (containing naphthenates) and base-neutral (containing PAHs) components and tested using the Japanese Medaka bioassay. Endpoints measured were the presence of deformity, hatch success, swim-bladder inflation, length at hatch and time to mortality. HPLC analysis showed that PAHs were present at concentrations in the part/billion and the parts/million range. This is being taken as an indication that PAHs are not directly responsible for the observed toxicity to the embryos.

  10. Elemental analysis of size-fractionated particulate matter sampled in Goeteborg, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Annemarie [Department of Chemistry, Atmospheric Science, Goeteborg University, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)], E-mail: wagnera@chalmers.se; Boman, Johan [Department of Chemistry, Atmospheric Science, Goeteborg University, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Gatari, Michael J. [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 30197-00100, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2008-12-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate the mass distribution of trace elements in aerosol samples collected in the urban area of Goeteborg, Sweden, with special focus on the impact of different air masses and anthropogenic activities. Three measurement campaigns were conducted during December 2006 and January 2007. A PIXE cascade impactor was used to collect particulate matter in 9 size fractions ranging from 16 to 0.06 {mu}m aerodynamic diameter. Polished quartz carriers were chosen as collection substrates for the subsequent direct analysis by TXRF. To investigate the sources of the analyzed air masses, backward trajectories were calculated. Our results showed that diurnal sampling was sufficient to investigate the mass distribution for Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Sr and Zn, whereas a 5-day sampling period resulted in additional information on mass distribution for Cr and S. Unimodal mass distributions were found in the study area for the elements Ca, Cl, Fe and Zn, whereas the distributions for Br, Cu, Cr, K, Ni and S were bimodal, indicating high temperature processes as source of the submicron particle components. The measurement period including the New Year firework activities showed both an extensive increase in concentrations as well as a shift to the submicron range for K and Sr, elements that are typically found in fireworks. Further research is required to validate the quantification of trace elements directly collected on sample carriers.

  11. Elemental analysis of size-fractionated particulate matter sampled in Goeteborg, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Annemarie; Boman, Johan; Gatari, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the mass distribution of trace elements in aerosol samples collected in the urban area of Goeteborg, Sweden, with special focus on the impact of different air masses and anthropogenic activities. Three measurement campaigns were conducted during December 2006 and January 2007. A PIXE cascade impactor was used to collect particulate matter in 9 size fractions ranging from 16 to 0.06 μm aerodynamic diameter. Polished quartz carriers were chosen as collection substrates for the subsequent direct analysis by TXRF. To investigate the sources of the analyzed air masses, backward trajectories were calculated. Our results showed that diurnal sampling was sufficient to investigate the mass distribution for Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Sr and Zn, whereas a 5-day sampling period resulted in additional information on mass distribution for Cr and S. Unimodal mass distributions were found in the study area for the elements Ca, Cl, Fe and Zn, whereas the distributions for Br, Cu, Cr, K, Ni and S were bimodal, indicating high temperature processes as source of the submicron particle components. The measurement period including the New Year firework activities showed both an extensive increase in concentrations as well as a shift to the submicron range for K and Sr, elements that are typically found in fireworks. Further research is required to validate the quantification of trace elements directly collected on sample carriers

  12. SPECT myocardial perfusion versus fractional flow reserve for evaluation of functional ischemia: A meta analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Tao; Yang, Lin-feng; Zhai, Ji-liang; Li, Jiang; Wang, Qi-meng; Zhang, Rui-jie; Wang, Sen; Peng, Zhao-hui; Li, Min; Sun, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present meta-analysis illustrates the accuracy of myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) to diagnose functional stenotic coronary artery disease (CAD) with fractional flow reserve (FFR) as standard reference. Methods: All investigators screened and selected studies that compared MPS with FFR in symptomatic patients with suspected CAD. Patients and study characteristics were independently extracted by two investigators; differences were resolved by consensus. Results: 13 articles, including 1,017 patients, 699 vessels were included in the study. No significant publication bias was detected (P = 0.65). At the patient level, the summary sensitivity and specificity were 77% (95% confidence interval [CI], 70–83%) and 77% (95%CI, 67–84%) for MPS. Vessel-level pooled sensitivity was 66% (95%CI, 57–74%) and specificity was 81% (95%CI, 70–89%). The overall diagnostic performance of MPS was moderate. [The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic (sROC) curve was 0.83]. No study influenced the pooled results larger than 0.03. Conclusions: The accuracy between FFR and MPS SPECT was moderate

  13. SPECT myocardial perfusion versus fractional flow reserve for evaluation of functional ischemia: A meta analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Tao; Yang, Lin-feng [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, No, 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province, China. 250031 (China); Zhai, Ji-liang [Department of Medical Imaging, The Branch of TaiAn Central Hospital, Middle of Changcheng Road, Shandong Province, China. 271000 (China); Li, Jiang [Department of Medical Imaging, Affiliated Hospital of Taishan Medical University, No, 706, Taishan Road, Shandong Province, China. 271000 (China); Wang, Qi-meng [Department of Medical Imaging, Taishan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No, 216, Yingxuan Street, Shandong Province, China. 271000. (China); Zhang, Rui-jie; Wang, Sen; Peng, Zhao-hui [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, No, 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province, China. 250031 (China); Li, Min, E-mail: liminyingxiang@163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, No, 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province, China. 250031 (China); Sun, Gang, E-mail: cjr.sungang@vip.163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, No, 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province, China. 250031 (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The present meta-analysis illustrates the accuracy of myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) to diagnose functional stenotic coronary artery disease (CAD) with fractional flow reserve (FFR) as standard reference. Methods: All investigators screened and selected studies that compared MPS with FFR in symptomatic patients with suspected CAD. Patients and study characteristics were independently extracted by two investigators; differences were resolved by consensus. Results: 13 articles, including 1,017 patients, 699 vessels were included in the study. No significant publication bias was detected (P = 0.65). At the patient level, the summary sensitivity and specificity were 77% (95% confidence interval [CI], 70–83%) and 77% (95%CI, 67–84%) for MPS. Vessel-level pooled sensitivity was 66% (95%CI, 57–74%) and specificity was 81% (95%CI, 70–89%). The overall diagnostic performance of MPS was moderate. [The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic (sROC) curve was 0.83]. No study influenced the pooled results larger than 0.03. Conclusions: The accuracy between FFR and MPS SPECT was moderate.

  14. Lie symmetry analysis, explicit solutions and conservation laws for the space-time fractional nonlinear evolution equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inc, Mustafa; Yusuf, Abdullahi; Aliyu, Aliyu Isa; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2018-04-01

    This paper studies the symmetry analysis, explicit solutions, convergence analysis, and conservation laws (Cls) for two different space-time fractional nonlinear evolution equations with Riemann-Liouville (RL) derivative. The governing equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) of fractional order using their Lie point symmetries. In the reduced equations, the derivative is in Erdelyi-Kober (EK) sense, power series technique is applied to derive an explicit solutions for the reduced fractional ODEs. The convergence of the obtained power series solutions is also presented. Moreover, the new conservation theorem and the generalization of the Noether operators are developed to construct the nonlocal Cls for the equations . Some interesting figures for the obtained explicit solutions are presented.

  15. Damage to the surface of the small intestinal villus: an objective scale of assessment of the effects of single and fractionated radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, K.E.; Watt, C. (Glasgow Univ. (UK). Dept. of Anatomy); Hamlet, R.; Nias, A.H.W. (Glasgow Inst. of Radiotherapeutics and Oncology (UK))

    1983-07-01

    Scanning electron microscopy has been used to compare damage to mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation with different doses of photons and neutrons. Various stages of the collapse of villous structure seen after radiation include the production of conical and rudimentary villi and a flattened mucosa. A scale is proposed to relate radiation to villous damage. Points from this scale are taken to produce comparative ratios for equivalent damage produced by different radiation conditions. RBE values are quoted for neutron, X and gamma radiation given as single or fractionated irradiation doses and as whole or partial body irradiation. The relationship between the stroma in intravillous pegs and that of the pericryptal compartment is explored.

  16. Damage to the surface of the small intestinal villus: an objective scale of assessment of the effects of single and fractionated radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, K.E.; Watt, C.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy has been used to compare damage to mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation with different doses of photons and neutrons. Various stages of the collapse of villous structure seen after radiation include the production of conical and rudimentary villi and a flattened mucosa. A scale is proposed to relate radiation to villous damage. Points from this scale are taken to produce comparative ratios for equivalent damage produced by different radiation conditions. RBE values are quoted for neutron, X and gamma radiation given as single or fractionated irradiation doses and as whole or partial body irradiation. The relationship between the stroma in intravillous pegs and that of the pericryptal compartment is explored. (author)

  17. Psychometric Analysis of Role Conflict and Ambiguity Scales in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anwar; Yusoff, Rosman Bin Md.; Khan, Muhammad Muddassar; Yasir, Muhammad; Khan, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive Psychometric Analysis of Rizzo et al.'s (1970) Role Conflict & Ambiguity (RCA) scales were performed after its distribution among 600 academic staff working in six universities of Pakistan. The reliability analysis includes calculation of Cronbach Alpha Coefficients and Inter-Items statistics, whereas validity was determined by…

  18. Three-dimensional fluorescence analysis of chernozem humic acids and their electrophoretic fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoi, O. A.; Trubetskaya, O. E.

    2017-09-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in combination with size-exclusion chromatography (SEC-PAGE) has been used to obtain stable electrophoretic fractions of different molecular size (MS) from chernozem humic acids (HAs). Three-dimensional fluorescence charts of chernozem HAs and their fractions have been obtained for the first time, and all fluorescence excitation-emission maxima have been identified in the excitation wavelength range of 250-500 nm. It has been found that fractionation by the SEC-PAGE method results in a nonuniform distribution of protein- and humin-like fluorescence of the original HA preparation among the electrophoretic fractions. The electrophoretic fractions of the highest and medium MSs have only the main protein-like fluorescence maximum and traces of humin-like fluorescence. In the electrophoretic fraction of the lowest MS, the intensity of protein-like fluorescence is low, but the major part of humin-like fluorescence is localized there. Relationships between the intensity of protein-like fluorescence and the weight distribution of amino acids have been revealed, as well as between the degree of aromaticity and the intensity of humin-like fluorescence in electrophoretic fractions of different MSs. The obtained relationships can be useful in the interpretation of the spatial structural organization and ecological functions of soil HAs.

  19. Metagenomic analysis of size-fractionated picoplankton in a marine oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Sangita; Parris, Darren J; DeLong, Edward F; Stewart, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) support diverse microbial communities with roles in major elemental cycles. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition and metabolism of OMZ microorganisms vary between particle-associated and free-living size fractions. We used amplicon (16S rRNA gene) and shotgun metagenome sequencing to compare microbial communities from large (>1.6 μm) and small (0.2-1.6 μm) filter size fractions along a depth gradient in the OMZ off Chile. Despite steep vertical redox gradients, size fraction was a significantly stronger predictor of community composition compared to depth. Phylogenetic diversity showed contrasting patterns, decreasing towards the anoxic OMZ core in the small size fraction, but exhibiting maximal values at these depths within the larger size fraction. Fraction-specific distributions were evident for key OMZ taxa, including anammox planctomycetes, whose coding sequences were enriched up to threefold in the 0.2-1.6 μm community. Functional gene composition also differed between fractions, with the >1.6 μm community significantly enriched in genes mediating social interactions, including motility, adhesion, cell-to-cell transfer, antibiotic resistance and mobile element activity. Prokaryotic transposase genes were three to six fold more abundant in this fraction, comprising up to 2% of protein-coding sequences, suggesting that particle surfaces may act as hotbeds for transposition-based genome changes in marine microbes. Genes for nitric and nitrous oxide reduction were also more abundant (three to seven fold) in the larger size fraction, suggesting microniche partitioning of key denitrification steps. These results highlight an important role for surface attachment in shaping community metabolic potential and genome content in OMZ microorganisms.

  20. Schizophrenia symptomatic associations with diffusion tensor imaging measured fractional anisotropy of brain: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Cao, Ding; Liang, Xiumei; Zhao, Jiannong

    2017-07-01

    Several studies have examined the relationships between diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-measured fractional anisotropy (FA) and the symptoms of schizophrenia, but results vary across the studies. The aim of this study was to carry out a meta-analysis of correlation coefficients reported by relevant studies to evaluate the correlative relationships between FA of various parts of the brain and schizophrenia symptomatic assessments. Literature was searched in several electronic databases, and study selection was based on précised eligibility criteria. Correlation coefficients between FA of a part of the brain and schizophrenia symptom were first converted into Fisher's z-scores for meta-analyses, and then overall effect sizes were back transformed to correlation coefficients. Thirty-three studies (1121 schizophrenia patients; age 32.66 years [95% confidence interval (CI) 30.19, 35.13]; 65.95 % [57.63, 74.28] males) were included in this meta-analysis. Age was inversely associated with brain FA (z-scores [95% CI] -0.23 [-0.14, -0.32]; p ˂ 0.00001). Brain FA of various areas was inversely associated with negative symptoms of schizophrenia (z-score -0.30 [-0.23, -0.36]; p ˂ 0.00001) but was positively associated with positive symptoms of schizophrenia (z-score 0.16 [0.04, 0.27]; p = 0.007) and general psychopathology of schizophrenia (z-score 0.26 [0.15, 0.37]; p = 0.00001). Although, DTI-measured brain FA is found to be inversely associated with negative symptoms and positively associated with positive symptoms and general psychopathology of schizophrenia, the effect sizes of these correlations are low and may not be clinically significant. Moreover, brain FA was also negatively associated with age of patients.

  1. Schizophrenia symptomatic associations with diffusion tensor imaging measured fractional anisotropy of brain: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xu; Cao, Ding; Liang, Xiumei; Zhao, Jiannong

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have examined the relationships between diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-measured fractional anisotropy (FA) and the symptoms of schizophrenia, but results vary across the studies. The aim of this study was to carry out a meta-analysis of correlation coefficients reported by relevant studies to evaluate the correlative relationships between FA of various parts of the brain and schizophrenia symptomatic assessments. Literature was searched in several electronic databases, and study selection was based on precised eligibility criteria. Correlation coefficients between FA of a part of the brain and schizophrenia symptom were first converted into Fisher's z-scores for meta-analyses, and then overall effect sizes were back transformed to correlation coefficients. Thirty-three studies (1121 schizophrenia patients; age 32.66 years [95% confidence interval (CI) 30.19, 35.13]; 65.95 % [57.63, 74.28] males) were included in this meta-analysis. Age was inversely associated with brain FA (z-scores [95% CI] -0.23 [-0.14, -0.32]; p %<0.00001). Brain FA of various areas was inversely associated with negative symptoms of schizophrenia (z-score -0.30 [-0.23, -0.36]; p %<0.00001) but was positively associated with positive symptoms of schizophrenia (z-score 0.16 [0.04, 0.27]; p = 0.007) and general psychopathology of schizophrenia (z-score 0.26 [0.15, 0.37]; p = 0.00001). Although, DTI-measured brain FA is found to be inversely associated with negative symptoms and positively associated with positive symptoms and general psychopathology of schizophrenia, the effect sizes of these correlations are low and may not be clinically significant. Moreover, brain FA was also negatively associated with age of patients. (orig.)

  2. Schizophrenia symptomatic associations with diffusion tensor imaging measured fractional anisotropy of brain: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xu [Chongqing Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging, Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing (China); Fifth People' s Hospital of Chongqing, Department of Medical Imaging, Chongqing (China); Cao, Ding [Chongqing Medical University, Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing (China); Liang, Xiumei [Fifth People' s Hospital of Chongqing, Department of Medical Imaging, Chongqing (China); Zhao, Jiannong [Chongqing Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging, Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing (China)

    2017-07-15

    Several studies have examined the relationships between diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-measured fractional anisotropy (FA) and the symptoms of schizophrenia, but results vary across the studies. The aim of this study was to carry out a meta-analysis of correlation coefficients reported by relevant studies to evaluate the correlative relationships between FA of various parts of the brain and schizophrenia symptomatic assessments. Literature was searched in several electronic databases, and study selection was based on precised eligibility criteria. Correlation coefficients between FA of a part of the brain and schizophrenia symptom were first converted into Fisher's z-scores for meta-analyses, and then overall effect sizes were back transformed to correlation coefficients. Thirty-three studies (1121 schizophrenia patients; age 32.66 years [95% confidence interval (CI) 30.19, 35.13]; 65.95 % [57.63, 74.28] males) were included in this meta-analysis. Age was inversely associated with brain FA (z-scores [95% CI] -0.23 [-0.14, -0.32]; p %<0.00001). Brain FA of various areas was inversely associated with negative symptoms of schizophrenia (z-score -0.30 [-0.23, -0.36]; p %<0.00001) but was positively associated with positive symptoms of schizophrenia (z-score 0.16 [0.04, 0.27]; p = 0.007) and general psychopathology of schizophrenia (z-score 0.26 [0.15, 0.37]; p = 0.00001). Although, DTI-measured brain FA is found to be inversely associated with negative symptoms and positively associated with positive symptoms and general psychopathology of schizophrenia, the effect sizes of these correlations are low and may not be clinically significant. Moreover, brain FA was also negatively associated with age of patients. (orig.)

  3. Reproducibility in the analysis of multigated radionuclide studies of left ventricular ejection fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjorup, T.; Kelbaek, H.; Vestergaard, B.; Fogh, J.; Munck, O.; Jensen, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The authors determined the reproducibility (the standard deviation [SD]) in the analysis of multigated radionuclide studies of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Radionuclide studies from a consecutive series of 38 patients suspected of ischemic heart disease were analyzed independently by four nuclear medicine physiologists and four laboratory technicians. Each study was analyzed three times by each of the observers. Based on the analyses of the eight observers, the SD could be estimated by the use of a variance component model for LVEF determinations calculated as the average of the analyses of an arbitrary number of observers making an arbitrary number of analyses. This study presents the SDs for LVEF determinations based on the analyses of one to five observers making one to five analyses each. The SD of a LVEF determination decreased from 3.96% to 2.98% when an observer increased his number of analyses from one to five. A more pronounced decrease in the SD from 3.96% to 1.77% was obtained when the LVEF determinations were based on the average of a single analysis made by one to five observers. However, when dealing with the difference between LVEF determinations from two studies, the highest reproducibility was obtained if the LVEF determinations at both studies were based on the analyses made by the same observer. No significant difference was found in the reproducibility of analyses made by nuclear medicine physicians and laboratory technicians. Our study revealed that to increase the reproducibility of LVEF determinations, special efforts should be made to standardize the outlining of the end-systolic region interest

  4. Analysis of fractional non-linear diffusion behaviors based on Adomian polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Guo-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A time-fractional non-linear diffusion equation of two orders is considered to investigate strong non-linearity through porous media. An equivalent integral equation is established and Adomian polynomials are adopted to linearize non-linear terms. With the Taylor expansion of fractional order, recurrence formulae are proposed and novel numerical solutions are obtained to depict the diffusion behaviors more accurately. The result shows that the method is suitable for numerical simulation of the fractional diffusion equations of multi-orders.

  5. Stability analysis of fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with time delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Yu, Yongguang; Wen, Guoguang

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates the stability for fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with time delays. Firstly, the fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with hub structure and time delays are studied. Some sufficient conditions for stability of the systems are obtained. Next, two fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with different ring structures and time delays are developed. By studying the developed neural networks, the corresponding sufficient conditions for stability of the systems are also derived. It is shown that the stability conditions are independent of time delays. Finally, numerical simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results obtained in this paper. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Void fraction correlations analysis and their influence on heat transfer of helical double-pipe vertical evaporator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrales, Arianna; Colorado, Dario; Huicochea, Armando; Díaz, Juan; Alfredo Hernández, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 50 void fraction correlations were evaluated on heat transfer in vertical evaporators. • Two-phase flow model based on control volume formulation was used. • The drift flux parameter is common in all correlations with satisfactory results. - Abstract: An analysis of 50 void fraction correlations available in the literature was performed to describe two-phase flow mechanism inside two helical double-pipe vertical evaporators. The evaporators considered water as working fluid connected in countercurrent so the change of phase was carried out into the internal tube. The discretized equations of continuity, momentum and energy in each flow were coupled using an implicit step by step method. The selection of the void fraction correlations for the mathematical model was based on inclusion of some theoretical limits. The results of this analysis were compared with the experimental data in steady state for two different evaporators, obtaining good agreement in the evaporation process for only 7 void fraction correlations. The Armand and Massena correlation had a mean percentage error (MPE) of 3.08%, followed by Rouhanni and Axelsson I adquired MPE=3.16%, Chisholm and Armand obtained MPE=3.18%, Steiner as well as Rouhanni and Axelsson II with MPE=3.19%, Bestion reached MPE=3.20% and Flanigan presented MPE=3.21%. Furthermore, the experimental and simulated heat flux were acceptable (R 2 =0.939). Finally, the results showed that the drift flux parameter was important to evaluate the void fraction

  7. Scaling analysis for a Savannah River reactor scaled model integral system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, T.J.; Larson, T.K.; McCreery, G.E.; Anderson, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    801The Savannah River Laboratory has requested that the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory perform an analysis to help define, examine, and assess potential concepts for the design of a scaled integral hydraulics test facility representative of the current Savannah River Plant reactor design. In this report the thermal-hydraulic phenomena of importance (based on the knowledge and experience of the authors and the results of the joint INEL/TPG/SRL phenomena identification and ranking effort) to reactor safety during the design basis loss-of-coolant accident were examined and identified. Established scaling methodologies were used to develop potential concepts for integral hydraulic testing facilities. Analysis is conducted to examine the scaling of various phenomena in each of the selected concepts. Results generally support that a one-fourth (1/4) linear scale visual facility capable of operating at pressures up to 350 kPa (51 psia) and temperatures up to 330 K (134 degree F) will scale most hydraulic phenomena reasonably well. However, additional research will be necessary to determine the most appropriate method of simulating several of the reactor components, since the scaling methodology allows for several approaches which may only be assessed via appropriate research. 34 refs., 20 figs., 14 tabs

  8. Sampling and chemical analysis by TXRF of size-fractionated ambient aerosols and emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, A.C.; Kuhlbusch, T.A.J.; Fissan, H.; Schmidt, K.-G-; Schmidt, F.; Pfeffer, H.-U.; Gladtke, D.

    2000-01-01

    Results of recent epidemiological studies led to new European air quality standards which require the monitoring of particles with aerodynamic diameters ≤ 10 μm (PM 10) and ≤ 2.5 μm (PM 2.5) instead of TSP (total suspended particulate matter). As these ambient air limit values will be exceeded most likely at several locations in Europe, so-called 'action plans' have to be set up to reduce particle concentrations, which requires information about sources and processes of PMx aerosols. For chemical characterization of the aerosols, different samplers were used and total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) was applied beside other methods (elemental and organic carbon analysis, ion chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry). For TXRF analysis, a specially designed sampling unit was built where the particle size classes 10-2.5 μm and 2.5-1.0 μm were directly impacted on TXRF sample carriers. An electrostatic precipitator (ESP) was used as a back-up filter to collect particles <1 μm directly on a TXRF sample carrier. The sampling unit was calibrated in the laboratory and then used for field measurements to determine the elemental composition of the mentioned particle size fractions. One of the field campaigns was carried out at a measurement site in Duesseldorf, Germany, in November 1999. As the composition of the ambient aerosols may have been influenced by a large construction site directly in the vicinity of the station during the field campaign, not only the aerosol particles, but also construction material was sampled and analyzed by TXRF. As air quality is affected by natural and anthropogenic sources, the emissions of particles ≤ 10 μm and ≤ 2.5 μm, respectively, have to be determined to estimate their contributions to the so called coarse and fine particle modes of ambient air. Therefore, an in-stack particle sampling system was developed according to the new ambient air quality standards. This PM 10/PM 2.5 cascade impactor was

  9. Scheme-scale ambiguity in analysis of QCD observable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirjalili, A.; Kniehl, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    The scheme-scale ambiguity that has plagued perturbative analysis in QCD remains on obstacle to making precise tests of the theory. Many attempts have been done to resolve the scale ambiguity. In this regard the BLM, EC, PMS and CORGI approaches are more distinct. We try to employ these methods to fix the scale ambiguity at NLO, NNLO and even in more higher order approximations. By optimizing the renormalization scale, there will be a possibility to predicate higher order terms. We present general results for predicted terms at any order, using different optimization methods. Some observable as specific examples will be used to indicate the validity of scale fixing to predicate the higher order terms. (authors)

  10. CMR reference values for left ventricular volumes, mass, and ejection fraction using computer-aided analysis : The Framingham Heart Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuang, Michael L.; Gona, Philimon; Hautvast, Gilion L.T.F.; Salton, Carol J.; Breeuwer, Marcel; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Manning, Warren J.

    Purpose To determine sex-specific reference values for left ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, and ejection fraction (EF) in healthy adults using computer-aided analysis and to examine the effect of age on LV parameters. Materials and Methods We examined data from 1494 members of the Framingham Heart

  11. Determination of isotope fractionation effect using a double spike (242Pu+240Pu) during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitambar, S.A.; Parab, A.R.; Khodade, P.S.; Jain, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    Isotope fractionation effect during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium has been investigated using a double spike ( 242 Pu+ 240 Pu) and the determination of concentration of plutonium in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel is reported. (author). 6 refs., 2 tables

  12. Factorial analysis of the trihalomethane formation in the reaction of colloidal, hydrophobic, and transphilic fractions of DOM with free chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platikanov, Stefan; Tauler, Roma; Rodrigues, Pedro M S M; Antunes, Maria Cristina G; Pereira, Dilson; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2010-09-01

    This study focuses on the factors that affect trihalomethane (THMs) formation when dissolved organic matter (DOM) fractions (colloidal, hydrophobic, and transphilic fractions) in aqueous solutions were disinfected with chlorine. DOM fractions were isolated and fractionated from filtered lake water and were characterized by elemental analysis. The investigation involved a screening Placket-Burman factorial analysis design of five factors (DOM concentration, chlorine dose, temperature, pH, and bromide concentration) and a Box-Behnken design for a detailed assessment of the three most important factor effects (DOM concentration, chlorine dose, and temperature). The results showed that colloidal fraction has a relatively low contribution to THM formation; transphilic fraction was responsible for about 50% of the chloroform generation, and the hydrophobic fraction was the most important to the brominated THM formation. When colloidal and hydrophobic fraction solutions were disinfected, the most significant factors were the following: higher DOM fraction concentration led to higher THM concentration, an increase of pH corresponded to higher concentration levels of chloroform and reduced bromoform, higher levels of chlorine dose and temperature produced a rise in the total THM formation, especially of the chlorinated THMs; higher bromide concentration generates higher concentrations of brominated THMs. Moreover, linear models were implemented and response surface plots were obtained for the four THM concentrations and their total sum in the disinfection solution as a function of the DOM concentration, chlorine dose, and temperature. Overall, results indicated that THM formation models were very complex due to individual factor effects and significant interactions among the factors. In order to reduce the concentration of THMs in drinking water, DOM concentrations must be reduced in the water prior to the disinfection. Fractionation of DOM, together with an elemental

  13. Performance Analysis of Fractional-Order PID Controller for a Parabolic Distributed Solar Collector

    KAUST Repository

    Elmetennani, Shahrazed; N'Doye, Ibrahima; Salama, Khaled N.; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the performance of a fractional-order proportional integral derivative (FOPID) controller designed for parabolic distributed solar collectors. The control problem addressed in concentrated solar collectors aims at forcing

  14. Complexity Analysis and DSP Implementation of the Fractional-Order Lorenz Hyperchaotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobo He

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The fractional-order hyperchaotic Lorenz system is solved as a discrete map by applying the Adomian decomposition method (ADM. Lyapunov Characteristic Exponents (LCEs of this system are calculated according to this deduced discrete map. Complexity of this system versus parameters are analyzed by LCEs, bifurcation diagrams, phase portraits, complexity algorithms. Results show that this system has rich dynamical behaviors. Chaos and hyperchaos can be generated by decreasing fractional order q in this system. It also shows that the system is more complex when q takes smaller values. SE and C 0 complexity algorithms provide a parameter choice criteria for practice applications of fractional-order chaotic systems. The fractional-order system is implemented by digital signal processor (DSP, and a pseudo-random bit generator is designed based on the implemented system, which passes the NIST test successfully.

  15. The response analysis of fractional-order stochastic system via generalized cell mapping method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Xue, Lili; Sun, Chunyan; Yue, Xiaole; Xu, Wei

    2018-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the response of a fractional-order stochastic system. The short memory principle is introduced to ensure that the response of the system is a Markov process. The generalized cell mapping method is applied to display the global dynamics of the noise-free system, such as attractors, basins of attraction, basin boundary, saddle, and invariant manifolds. The stochastic generalized cell mapping method is employed to obtain the evolutionary process of probability density functions of the response. The fractional-order ϕ 6 oscillator and the fractional-order smooth and discontinuous oscillator are taken as examples to give the implementations of our strategies. Studies have shown that the evolutionary direction of the probability density function of the fractional-order stochastic system is consistent with the unstable manifold. The effectiveness of the method is confirmed using Monte Carlo results.

  16. Source Code Analysis Laboratory (SCALe) for Energy Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    technical competence for the type of tests and calibrations SCALe undertakes. Testing and calibration laboratories that comply with ISO / IEC 17025 ...and exec t [ ISO / IEC 2005]. f a software system indicates that the SCALe analysis di by a CERT secure coding standard. Successful conforma antees that...to be more secure than non- systems. However, no study has yet been performed to p t ssment in accordance with ISO / IEC 17000: “a demonstr g to a

  17. Analysis and functional consequences of increased Fab-sialylation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) after lectin fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käsermann, Fabian; Boerema, David J; Rüegsegger, Monika; Hofmann, Andreas; Wymann, Sandra; Zuercher, Adrian W; Miescher, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that the anti-inflammatory effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) might be due to the small fraction of Fc-sialylated IgG. In this study we biochemically and functionally characterized sialic acid-enriched IgG obtained by Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) lectin fractionation. Two main IgG fractions isolated by elution with lactose (E1) or acidified lactose (E2) were analyzed for total IgG, F(ab')(2) and Fc-specific sialic acid content, their pattern of specific antibodies and anti-inflammatory potential in a human in vitro inflammation system based on LPS- or PHA-stimulated whole blood. HPLC and LC-MS testing revealed an increase of sialylated IgG in E1 and more substantially in the E2 fraction. Significantly, the increased amount of sialic acid residues was primarily found in the Fab region whereas only a minor increase was observed in the Fc region. This indicates preferential binding of the Fab sialic acid to SNA. ELISA analyses of a representative range of pathogen and auto-antigens indicated a skewed antibody pattern of the sialylated IVIG fractions. Finally, the E2 fraction exerted a more profound anti-inflammatory effect compared to E1 or IVIG, evidenced by reduced CD54 expression on monocytes and reduced secretion of MCP-1 (CCL2); again these effects were Fab- but not Fc-dependent. Our results show that SNA fractionation of IVIG yields a minor fraction (approx. 10%) of highly sialylated IgG, wherein the sialic acid is mainly found in the Fab region. The tested anti-inflammatory activity was associated with Fab not Fc sialylation.

  18. Analysis and functional consequences of increased Fab-sialylation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG after lectin fractionation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Käsermann

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that the anti-inflammatory effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG might be due to the small fraction of Fc-sialylated IgG. In this study we biochemically and functionally characterized sialic acid-enriched IgG obtained by Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA lectin fractionation. Two main IgG fractions isolated by elution with lactose (E1 or acidified lactose (E2 were analyzed for total IgG, F(ab'(2 and Fc-specific sialic acid content, their pattern of specific antibodies and anti-inflammatory potential in a human in vitro inflammation system based on LPS- or PHA-stimulated whole blood. HPLC and LC-MS testing revealed an increase of sialylated IgG in E1 and more substantially in the E2 fraction. Significantly, the increased amount of sialic acid residues was primarily found in the Fab region whereas only a minor increase was observed in the Fc region. This indicates preferential binding of the Fab sialic acid to SNA. ELISA analyses of a representative range of pathogen and auto-antigens indicated a skewed antibody pattern of the sialylated IVIG fractions. Finally, the E2 fraction exerted a more profound anti-inflammatory effect compared to E1 or IVIG, evidenced by reduced CD54 expression on monocytes and reduced secretion of MCP-1 (CCL2; again these effects were Fab- but not Fc-dependent. Our results show that SNA fractionation of IVIG yields a minor fraction (approx. 10% of highly sialylated IgG, wherein the sialic acid is mainly found in the Fab region. The tested anti-inflammatory activity was associated with Fab not Fc sialylation.

  19. Analysis of Liquid Fraction in Venturi Scrubber by E-E Method Using CFX

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Ali; Yan Changqi; Sun Zhongning; Wang Jianjun; Gu HaiFeng

    2012-01-01

    In this research, the distribution of liquid fraction in cylindrical venturi scrubber is analyzed in ANSYS CFX by Eulerian-Eulerian regime. Liquid gaps allow the aerosols to escape from the venturi scrubber. Therefore, it is vital to investigate the liquid fraction in venturi scrubber at different operating condition. The mesh model is developed in ANSYS ICEM and simulation is conducted in ANSYS CFX. k- ε turbulence model is used for simulation of two phase flow in venturi scrubber. The analy...

  20. Groundwater flow analysis on local scale. Setting boundary conditions for groundwater flow analysis on site scale model in step 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Takuya; Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Onoe, Hironori

    2005-05-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute has been conducting a wide range of geoscientific research in order to build a foundation for multidisciplinary studies of the deep geological environment as a basis of research and development for geological disposal of nuclear wastes. Ongoing geoscientific research programs include the Regional Hydrogeological Study (RHS) project and Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) project in the Tono region, Gifu Prefecture. The main goal of these projects is to establish comprehensive techniques for investigation, analysis, and assessment of the deep geological environment at several spatial scales. The RHS project is a local scale study for understanding the groundwater flow system from the recharge area to the discharge area. The surface-based Investigation Phase of the MIU project is a site scale study for understanding the groundwater flow system immediately surrounding the MIU construction site. The MIU project is being conducted using a multiphase, iterative approach. In this study, the hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis of the local scale were carried out in order to set boundary conditions of the site scale model based on the data obtained from surface-based investigations in Step 1 in site scale of the MIU project. As a result of the study, head distribution to set boundary conditions for groundwater flow analysis on the site scale model could be obtained. (author)

  1. Determination of Cu-Zn Fraction of an Ancient Brass Pipe by Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, G. M.; Lee, Y. N.; Moon, J. H.; Lee, K. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA) has an advantage over most other methods in the investigation of archeological and cultural objects which must be dealt with a non-destructive method. In this study, we study about how to determine the copper-zinc fraction in archeological objects such as a smoking pipe made from brass, where the proportions of copper and zinc can be varied to create a range of brasses with varying properties. In this study, a Japanese smoking pipe was analyzed to determine the copper-zinc fraction at the KAERI-SNU PGAA facility.

  2. Global Mittag-Leffler stability analysis of fractional-order impulsive neural networks with one-side Lipschitz condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Niu, Peifeng; Ma, Yunpeng; Wei, Yanqiao; Li, Guoqiang

    2017-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the stability analysis issue of fractional-order impulsive neural networks. Under the one-side Lipschitz condition or the linear growth condition of activation function, the existence of solution is analyzed respectively. In addition, the existence, uniqueness and global Mittag-Leffler stability of equilibrium point of the fractional-order impulsive neural networks with one-side Lipschitz condition are investigated by the means of contraction mapping principle and Lyapunov direct method. Finally, an example with numerical simulation is given to illustrate the validity and feasibility of the proposed results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Using biased image analysis for improving unbiased stereological number estimation - a pilot simulation study of the smooth fractionator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardi, Jonathan Eyal; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb

    2006-01-01

    uniformly random sampling design and the ordinary simple random sampling design. The smooth protocol is performed using biased information from crude (but fully automatic) image analysis of the fields of view. The different design paradigms are compared using simulation in three different cell distributions......The smooth fractionator was introduced in 2002. The combination of a smoothing protocol with a computer-aided stereology tool provides better precision and a lighter workload. This study uses simulation to compare fractionator sampling based on the smooth design, the commonly used systematic...

  4. 3D DEM simulation and analysis of void fraction distribution in a pebble bed high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xingtuan; Gui, Nan; Tu, Jiyuan; Jiang, Shengyao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We show a detailed analysis of void fraction (VF) in HTR-10 of China using DEM. • Radial distribution (RD) of VF is uniform in the core and oscillated near the wall. • Axial distribution (AD) is linearly varied along height due to effect of gravity. • Steady RD of VF in the conical base is Gaussian-like, larger than packing bed. • Joint linear and normal distribution of VF is analyzed and explained. - Abstract: The current work analyzes the radial and axial distributions of void fraction of a pebble bed high temperature reactor. A three-dimensional pebble bed corresponding to our test facility of pebble bed type gas-cooled high temperature reactor (HTR-10) in Tsinghua University is simulated via discrete element method, and the radial and axial void fraction profiles are calculated. It validates the oscillating characteristics of radial void fraction near the wall. Detailed calculations show the differences of void fraction profiles between the stationary packing bed and the dynamically discharging bed. Based on the vertically and circumferentially averaged radial distribution and horizontally averaged axial distribution of void fraction, a fully three-dimensional analytical distribution of void fraction throughout the bed is established. The results show the combined effects of gravity and void variation in the pebble bed caused by the pebble discharging. It indicates the linearly increased packing effect caused by gravity in the vertical (axial) direction and the normal distribution of void in the horizontal (radial) direction by pebble drainage. These two effects coexist in the conical base of the bed whereas only the former effect exists in the cylindrical volume of the bed

  5. Rasch analysis of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misajon Rose

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a degenerative neurological disease that causes impairments, including spasticity, pain, fatigue, and bladder dysfunction, which negatively impact on quality of life. The Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29 is a disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL instrument, developed using the patient's perspective on disease impact. It consists of two subscales assessing the physical (MSIS-29-PHYS and psychological (MSIS-29-PSYCH impact of MS. Although previous studies have found support for the psychometric properties of the MSIS-29 using traditional methods of scale evaluation, the scale has not been subjected to a detailed Rasch analysis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use Rasch analysis to assess the internal validity of the scale, and its response format, item fit, targeting, internal consistency and dimensionality. Methods Ninety-two persons with definite MS residing in the community were recruited from a tertiary hospital database. Patients completed the MSIS-29 as part of a larger study. Rasch analysis was undertaken to assess the psychometric properties of the MSIS-29. Results Rasch analysis showed overall support for the psychometric properties of the two MSIS-29 subscales, however it was necessary to reduce the response format of the MSIS-29-PHYS to a 3-point response scale. Both subscales were unidimensional, had good internal consistency, and were free from item bias for sex and age. Dimensionality testing indicated it was not appropriate to combine the two subscales to form a total MSIS score. Conclusion In this first study to use Rasch analysis to fully assess the psychometric properties of the MSIS-29 support was found for the two subscales but not for the use of the total scale. Further use of Rasch analysis on the MSIS-29 in larger and broader samples is recommended to confirm these findings.

  6. Rasch analysis of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramp, Melina; Khan, Fary; Misajon, Rose Anne; Pallant, Julie F

    2009-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a degenerative neurological disease that causes impairments, including spasticity, pain, fatigue, and bladder dysfunction, which negatively impact on quality of life. The Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) is a disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument, developed using the patient's perspective on disease impact. It consists of two subscales assessing the physical (MSIS-29-PHYS) and psychological (MSIS-29-PSYCH) impact of MS. Although previous studies have found support for the psychometric properties of the MSIS-29 using traditional methods of scale evaluation, the scale has not been subjected to a detailed Rasch analysis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use Rasch analysis to assess the internal validity of the scale, and its response format, item fit, targeting, internal consistency and dimensionality. Methods Ninety-two persons with definite MS residing in the community were recruited from a tertiary hospital database. Patients completed the MSIS-29 as part of a larger study. Rasch analysis was undertaken to assess the psychometric properties of the MSIS-29. Results Rasch analysis showed overall support for the psychometric properties of the two MSIS-29 subscales, however it was necessary to reduce the response format of the MSIS-29-PHYS to a 3-point response scale. Both subscales were unidimensional, had good internal consistency, and were free from item bias for sex and age. Dimensionality testing indicated it was not appropriate to combine the two subscales to form a total MSIS score. Conclusion In this first study to use Rasch analysis to fully assess the psychometric properties of the MSIS-29 support was found for the two subscales but not for the use of the total scale. Further use of Rasch analysis on the MSIS-29 in larger and broader samples is recommended to confirm these findings. PMID:19545445

  7. Estimating the attributable fraction for melanoma: a meta-analysis of pigmentary characteristics and freckling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Catherine M; Carroll, Heidi J; Whiteman, David C

    2010-11-15

    Epidemiologic research has demonstrated convincingly that certain pigmentary characteristics are associated with increased relative risks of melanoma; however there has been no comprehensive review to rank these characteristics in order of their importance on a population level. We conducted a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis to quantify the contribution of pigmentary characteristics to melanoma, estimated by the population-attributable fraction (PAF). Eligible studies were those that permitted quantitative assessment of the association between histologically confirmed melanoma and hair colour, eye colour, skin phototype and presence of freckling; we identified 66 such studies using citation databases, followed by manual review of retrieved references. We calculated summary relative risks using weighted averages of the log RR, taking into account random effects, and used these to estimate the PAF. The pooled RRs for pigmentary characteristics were: 2.64 for red/red-blond, 2.0 for blond and 1.46 for light brown hair colour (vs. dark); 1.57 for blue/blue-grey and 1.51 for green/grey/hazel eye colour (vs. dark); 2.27, 1.99 and 1.35 for skin phototypes I, II and III respectively (vs. IV); and 1.99 for presence of freckling. The highest PAFs were observed for skin phototypes 1/II (0.27), presence of freckling (0.23), and blond hair colour (0.23). For eye colour, the PAF for blue/blue-grey eye colour was higher than for green/grey/hazel eye colour (0.18 vs. 0.13). The PAF of melanoma associated with red hair colour was 0.10. These estimates of melanoma burden attributable to pigmentary characteristics provide a basis for designing prevention strategies for melanoma.

  8. AN ANALYSIS OF THE DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION OF STAR-FORMING CORES IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, R. K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Rd., Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Kirk, H. M. [Origins Institute, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Shirley, Y. L., E-mail: friesen@di.utoronto.ca [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    We have performed a pointed survey of N{sub 2}D{sup +} 2-1 and N{sub 2}D{sup +} 3-2 emission toward 64 N{sub 2}H{sup +}-bright starless and protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope and Kitt Peak 12 m telescope. We find a mean deuterium fractionation in N{sub 2}H{sup +}, R{sub D} = N(N{sub 2}D{sup +})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}), of 0.08, with a maximum R{sub D} = 0.2. In detected sources, we find no significant difference in the deuterium fractionation between starless and protostellar cores, nor between cores in clustered or isolated environments. We compare the deuterium fraction in N{sub 2}H{sup +} with parameters linked to advanced core evolution. We only find significant correlations between the deuterium fraction and increased H{sub 2} column density, as well as with increased central core density, for all cores. Toward protostellar sources, we additionally find a significant anticorrelation between R{sub D} and bolometric temperature. We show that the Perseus cores are characterized by low CO depletion values relative to previous studies of star-forming cores, similar to recent results in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. We suggest that the low average CO depletion is the dominant mechanism that constrains the average deuterium fractionation in the Perseus cores to small values. While current equilibrium and dynamic chemical models are able to reproduce the range of deuterium fractionation values we find in Perseus, reproducing the scatter across the cores requires variation in parameters such as the ionization fraction or the ortho-to-para-H{sub 2} ratio across the cloud, or a range in core evolution timescales.

  9. SCALE 5: Powerful new criticality safety analysis tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, Stephen M.; Hollenbach, Daniel F.; Dehart, Mark D.; Rearden, Bradley T.; Gauld, Ian C.; Goluoglu, Sedat

    2003-01-01

    Version 5 of the SCALE computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, scheduled for release in December 2003, contains several significant new modules and sequences for criticality safety analysis and marks the most important update to SCALE in more than a decade. This paper highlights the capabilities of these new modules and sequences, including continuous energy flux spectra for processing multigroup problem-dependent cross sections; one- and three-dimensional sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for criticality safety evaluations; two-dimensional flexible mesh discrete ordinates code; automated burnup-credit analysis sequence; and one-dimensional material distribution optimization for criticality safety. (author)

  10. Numerical analysis of fractional MHD Maxwell fluid with the effects of convection heat transfer condition and viscous dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Bai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the incompressible fractional MHD Maxwell fluid due to a power function accelerating plate with the first order slip, and the numerical analysis on the flow and heat transfer of fractional Maxwell fluid has been done. Moreover the deformation motion of fluid micelle is simply analyzed. Nonlinear velocity equation are formulated with multi-term time fractional derivatives in the boundary layer governing equations, and convective heat transfer boundary condition and viscous dissipation are both taken into consideration. A newly finite difference scheme with L1-algorithm of governing equations are constructed, whose convergence is confirmed by the comparison with analytical solution. Numerical solutions for velocity and temperature show the effects of pertinent parameters on flow and heat transfer of fractional Maxwell fluid. It reveals that the fractional derivative weakens the effects of motion and heat conduction. The larger the Nusselt number is, the greater the heat transfer capacity of fluid becomes, and the temperature gradient at the wall becomes more significantly. The lower Reynolds number enhances the viscosity of the fluid because it is the ratio of the viscous force and the inertia force, which resists the flow and heat transfer.

  11. Numerical analysis of fractional MHD Maxwell fluid with the effects of convection heat transfer condition and viscous dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yu; Jiang, Yuehua; Liu, Fawang; Zhang, Yan

    2017-12-01

    This paper investigates the incompressible fractional MHD Maxwell fluid due to a power function accelerating plate with the first order slip, and the numerical analysis on the flow and heat transfer of fractional Maxwell fluid has been done. Moreover the deformation motion of fluid micelle is simply analyzed. Nonlinear velocity equation are formulated with multi-term time fractional derivatives in the boundary layer governing equations, and convective heat transfer boundary condition and viscous dissipation are both taken into consideration. A newly finite difference scheme with L1-algorithm of governing equations are constructed, whose convergence is confirmed by the comparison with analytical solution. Numerical solutions for velocity and temperature show the effects of pertinent parameters on flow and heat transfer of fractional Maxwell fluid. It reveals that the fractional derivative weakens the effects of motion and heat conduction. The larger the Nusselt number is, the greater the heat transfer capacity of fluid becomes, and the temperature gradient at the wall becomes more significantly. The lower Reynolds number enhances the viscosity of the fluid because it is the ratio of the viscous force and the inertia force, which resists the flow and heat transfer.

  12. Mathematical analysis and numerical simulation of patterns in fractional and classical reaction-diffusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owolabi, Kolade M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine pattern formation in the sub— and super-diffusive scenarios and compare it with that of classical or standard diffusive processes in two-component fractional reaction-diffusion systems that modeled a predator-prey dynamics. The focus of the work concentrates on the use of two separate mathematical techniques, we formulate a Fourier spectral discretization method as an efficient alternative technique to solve fractional reaction-diffusion problems in higher-dimensional space, and later advance the resulting systems of ODEs in time with the adaptive exponential time-differencing solver. Obviously, the fractional Fourier approach is able to achieve spectral convergence up to machine precision regardless of the fractional order α, owing to the fact that our approach is able to give full diagonal representation of the fractional operator. The complexity of the dynamics in this system is theoretically discussed and graphically displayed with some examples and numerical simulations in one, two and three dimensions.

  13. Multi scale analysis of ITER pre-compression rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ben, E-mail: ben.park@sener.es [SENER Ingeniería y Sistemas S.A., Barcelona (Spain); Foussat, Arnaud [ITER Organization, St. Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Rajainmaki, Hannu [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain); Knaster, Juan [IFMIF, Aomori (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • A multi-scale analysis approach employing various scales of ABAQUS FEM models have been used to calculate the response and performance of the rings. • We have studied the effects of various defects on the performance of the rings under the operating temperatures and loading that will be applied to the PCRs. • The multi scale analysis results are presented here. -- Abstract: The Pre-compression Rings of ITER (PCRs) represent one of the largest and most highly stressed composite structures ever designed for long term operation at 4 K. Six rings, each 5 m in diameter and 337 mm × 288 mm in cross-section, will be manufactured from S2 fiber-glass/epoxy composite and installed three at the top and three at the bottom of the eighteen D shaped toroidal field (TF) coils to apply a total centripetal pre-load of 70 MN per TF coil. The composite rings will be fabricated with a high content (65% by volume) of S2 fiber-glass in an epoxy resin matrix. During the manufacture emphasis will be placed on obtaining a structure with a very low void content and minimal presence of critical defects, such as delaminations. This paper presents a unified framework for the multi-scale analysis of the composite structure of the PCRs. A multi-scale analysis approach employing various scales of ABAQUS FEM models and other analysis tools have been used to calculate the response and performance of the rings over the design life of the structure. We have studied the effects of various defects on the performance of the rings under the operating temperatures and loading that will be applied to the PCRs. The results are presented here.

  14. New enhancements to SCALE for criticality safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenbach, D.F.; Bowman, S.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Parks, C.V.

    1995-01-01

    As the speed, available memory, and reliability of computer hardware increases and the cost decreases, the complexity and usability of computer software will increase, taking advantage of the new hardware capabilities. Computer programs today must be more flexible and user friendly than those of the past. Within available resources, the SCALE staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is committed to upgrading its computer codes to keep pace with the current level of technology. This paper examines recent additions and enhancements to the criticality safety analysis sections of the SCALE code package. These recent additions and enhancements made to SCALE can be divided into nine categories: (1) new analytical computer codes, (2) new cross-section libraries, (3) new criticality search sequences, (4) enhanced graphical capabilities, (5) additional KENO enhancements, (6) enhanced resonance processing capabilities, (7) enhanced material information processing capabilities, (8) portability of the SCALE code package, and (9) other minor enhancements, modifications, and corrections to SCALE. Each of these additions and enhancements to the criticality safety analysis capabilities of the SCALE code system are discussed below

  15. Scale-free crystallization of two-dimensional complex plasmas: Domain analysis using Minkowski tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böbel, A.; Knapek, C. A.; Räth, C.

    2018-05-01

    Experiments of the recrystallization processes in two-dimensional complex plasmas are analyzed to rigorously test a recently developed scale-free phase transition theory. The "fractal-domain-structure" (FDS) theory is based on the kinetic theory of Frenkel. It assumes the formation of homogeneous domains, separated by defect lines, during crystallization and a fractal relationship between domain area and boundary length. For the defect number fraction and system energy a scale-free power-law relation is predicted. The long-range scaling behavior of the bond-order correlation function shows clearly that the complex plasma phase transitions are not of the Kosterlitz, Thouless, Halperin, Nelson, and Young type. Previous preliminary results obtained by counting the number of dislocations and applying a bond-order metric for structural analysis are reproduced. These findings are supplemented by extending the use of the bond-order metric to measure the defect number fraction and furthermore applying state-of-the-art analysis methods, allowing a systematic testing of the FDS theory with unprecedented scrutiny: A morphological analysis of lattice structure is performed via Minkowski tensor methods. Minkowski tensors form a complete family of additive, motion covariant and continuous morphological measures that are sensitive to nonlinear properties. The FDS theory is rigorously confirmed and predictions of the theory are reproduced extremely well. The predicted scale-free power-law relation between defect fraction number and system energy is verified for one more order of magnitude at high energies compared to the inherently discontinuous bond-order metric. It is found that the fractal relation between crystalline domain area and circumference is independent of the experiment, the particular Minkowski tensor method, and the particular choice of parameters. Thus, the fractal relationship seems to be inherent to two-dimensional phase transitions in complex plasmas. Minkowski

  16. Characterization of taste-active fractions in red wine combining HPLC fractionation, sensory analysis and ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz-Navajas, María-Pilar; Ferreira, Vicente; Dizy, Marta; Fernández-Zurbano, Purificación

    2010-07-19

    Five Tempranillo wines exhibiting marked differences in taste and/or astringency were selected for the study. In each wine the non-volatile extract was obtained by freeze-drying and further liquid extraction in order to eliminate remaining volatile compounds. This extract was fractionated by semipreparative C18-reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography (C18-RP-HPLC) into nine fractions which were freeze-dried, reconstituted with water and sensory assessed for taste attributes and astringency by a specifically trained sensory panel. Results have shown that wine bitterness and astringency cannot be easily related to the bitter and astringent character of the HPLC fractions, what can be due to the existence of perceptual and physicochemical interactions. While the bitter character of the bitterest fractions may be attributed to some flavonols (myricetin, quercetin and their glycosides) the development of a sensitive UPLC-MS method to quantify astringent compounds present in wines has made it possible to demonstrate that proanthocyanidins monomers, dimers, trimers and tetramers, both galloylated or non-galloylated are not relevant compounds for the perceived astringency of the fractions, while cis-aconitic acid, and secondarily vainillic, and syringic acids and ethyl syringate, are the most important molecules driving astringency in two of the fractions (F5 and F6). The identity of the chemicals responsible for the astringency of the third fraction could be assigned to some proanthocyanidins (higher than the tetramer) capable to precipitate with ovalbumin. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Rasch Analysis of the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Roger C.; Rose, Debra J.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: This cross-sectional study explores the psychometric properties and dimensionality of the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) Scale, a multi-item balance test for higher-functioning older adults. Methods: Participants (n=480) were community-dwelling adults able to ambulate independently. Data gathering consisted of survey and balance performance assessment. Psychometric properties were assessed using Rasch analysis. Results: Mean age of participants was 76.4 (SD=7.1) years. Mean FAB Scale scores were 24.7/40 (SD=7.5). Analyses for scale dimensionality showed that 9 of the 10 items fit a unidimensional measure of balance. Item 10 (Reactive Postural Control) did not fit the model. The reliability of the scale to separate persons was 0.81 out of 1.00; the reliability of the scale to separate items in terms of their difficulty was 0.99 out of 1.00. Cronbach's alpha for a 10-item model was 0.805. Items of differing difficulties formed a useful ordinal hierarchy for scaling patterns of expected balance ability scoring for a normative population. Conclusion: The FAB Scale appears to be a reliable and valid tool to assess balance function in higher-functioning older adults. The test was found to discriminate among participants of varying balance abilities. Further exploration of concurrent validity of Rasch-generated expected item scoring patterns should be undertaken to determine the test's diagnostic and prescriptive utility. PMID:22210989

  18. Rasch Analysis of the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Penelope J; Fiedler, Roger C; Rose, Debra J

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study explores the psychometric properties and dimensionality of the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) Scale, a multi-item balance test for higher-functioning older adults. Participants (n=480) were community-dwelling adults able to ambulate independently. Data gathering consisted of survey and balance performance assessment. Psychometric properties were assessed using Rasch analysis. Mean age of participants was 76.4 (SD=7.1) years. Mean FAB Scale scores were 24.7/40 (SD=7.5). Analyses for scale dimensionality showed that 9 of the 10 items fit a unidimensional measure of balance. Item 10 (Reactive Postural Control) did not fit the model. The reliability of the scale to separate persons was 0.81 out of 1.00; the reliability of the scale to separate items in terms of their difficulty was 0.99 out of 1.00. Cronbach's alpha for a 10-item model was 0.805. Items of differing difficulties formed a useful ordinal hierarchy for scaling patterns of expected balance ability scoring for a normative population. The FAB Scale appears to be a reliable and valid tool to assess balance function in higher-functioning older adults. The test was found to discriminate among participants of varying balance abilities. Further exploration of concurrent validity of Rasch-generated expected item scoring patterns should be undertaken to determine the test's diagnostic and prescriptive utility.

  19. Multi-scale symbolic transfer entropy analysis of EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wenpo; Wang, Jun

    2017-10-01

    From both global and local perspectives, we symbolize two kinds of EEG and analyze their dynamic and asymmetrical information using multi-scale transfer entropy. Multi-scale process with scale factor from 1 to 199 and step size of 2 is applied to EEG of healthy people and epileptic patients, and then the permutation with embedding dimension of 3 and global approach are used to symbolize the sequences. The forward and reverse symbol sequences are taken as the inputs of transfer entropy. Scale factor intervals of permutation and global way are (37, 57) and (65, 85) where the two kinds of EEG have satisfied entropy distinctions. When scale factor is 67, transfer entropy of the healthy and epileptic subjects of permutation, 0.1137 and 0.1028, have biggest difference. And the corresponding values of the global symbolization is 0.0641 and 0.0601 which lies in the scale factor of 165. Research results show that permutation which takes contribution of local information has better distinction and is more effectively applied to our multi-scale transfer entropy analysis of EEG.

  20. Differential branching fraction and angular analysis of the $B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Abellan Beteta, C; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, V; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Maino, M; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voss, H; Voß, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The angular distribution and differential branching fraction of the decay $B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+\\mu^-$ are studied with a dataset corresponding to 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity, collected by the LHCb experiment. The angular distribution is measured in bins of dimuon invariant mass squared and found to be consistent with Standard Model expectations. Integrating the differential branching fraction over the full dimuon invariant mass range yields a total branching fraction of $B(B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+\\mu^-) = (4.36 ± 0.15 ± 0.18) \\times 10^{−7}$. These measurements are the most precise to date of the $B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay.

  1. Dynamic Analysis and Adaptive Sliding Mode Controller for a Chaotic Fractional Incommensurate Order Financial System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajipour, Ahmad; Tavakoli, Hamidreza

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the dynamic behavior and chaos control of a chaotic fractional incommensurate-order financial system are investigated. Using well-known tools of nonlinear theory, i.e. Lyapunov exponents, phase diagrams and bifurcation diagrams, we observe some interesting phenomena, e.g. antimonotonicity, crisis phenomena and route to chaos through a period doubling sequence. Adopting largest Lyapunov exponent criteria, we find that the system yields chaos at the lowest order of 2.15. Next, in order to globally stabilize the chaotic fractional incommensurate order financial system with uncertain dynamics, an adaptive fractional sliding mode controller is designed. Numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  2. Fractional analysis for nonlinear electrical transmission line and nonlinear Schroedinger equations with incomplete sub-equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendzi-Donfack, Emmanuel; Nguenang, Jean Pierre; Nana, Laurent

    2018-02-01

    We use the fractional complex transform with the modified Riemann-Liouville derivative operator to establish the exact and generalized solutions of two fractional partial differential equations. We determine the solutions of fractional nonlinear electrical transmission lines (NETL) and the perturbed nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) equation with the Kerr law nonlinearity term. The solutions are obtained for the parameters in the range (0<α≤1) of the derivative operator and we found the traditional solutions for the limiting case of α =1. We show that according to the modified Riemann-Liouville derivative, the solutions found can describe physical systems with memory effect, transient effects in electrical systems and nonlinear transmission lines, and other systems such as optical fiber.

  3. Review and statistical analysis of the ultrasonic velocity method for estimating the porosity fraction in polycrystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, D.J.; Swickard, S.M.; Stang, D.B.; Deguire, M.R.

    1990-03-01

    A review and statistical analysis of the ultrasonic velocity method for estimating the porosity fraction in polycrystalline materials is presented. Initially, a semi-empirical model is developed showing the origin of the linear relationship between ultrasonic velocity and porosity fraction. Then, from a compilation of data produced by many researchers, scatter plots of velocity versus percent porosity data are shown for Al2O3, MgO, porcelain-based ceramics, PZT, SiC, Si3N4, steel, tungsten, UO2,(U0.30Pu0.70)C, and YBa2Cu3O(7-x). Linear regression analysis produced predicted slope, intercept, correlation coefficient, level of significance, and confidence interval statistics for the data. Velocity values predicted from regression analysis for fully-dense materials are in good agreement with those calculated from elastic properties

  4. Single-Fraction Versus 5-Fraction Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression in Patients With Limited Survival Prognoses: Results of a Matched-Pair Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Huttenlocher, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Šegedin, Barbara; Perpar, Ana [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Conde, Antonio J.; Garcia, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Consorcio Hospital Provincial de Castellón, Castellón (Spain); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cacicedo, Jon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cruces University Hospital, Barakaldo, Vizcaya (Spain); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: This study compared single-fraction to multi-fraction short-course radiation therapy (RT) for symptomatic metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) in patients with limited survival prognosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 121 patients who received 8 Gy × 1 fraction were matched (1:1) to 121 patients treated with 4 Gy × 5 fractions for 10 factors including age, sex, performance status, primary tumor type, number of involved vertebrae, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, interval between tumor diagnosis and MESCC, pre-RT ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits prior to RT. Endpoints included in-field repeated RT (reRT) for MESCC, overall survival (OS), and impact of RT on motor function. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test for in-field reRT for MESCC and OS and with the ordered-logit model for effect of RT on motor function. Results: Doses of 8 Gy × 1 fraction and 4 Gy × 5 fractions were not significantly different with respect to the need for in-field reRT for MESCC (P=.11) at 6 months (18% vs 9%, respectively) and 12 months (30% vs 22%, respectively). The RT regimen also had no significant impact on OS (P=.65) and post-RT motor function (P=.21). OS rates at 6 and 12 months were 24% and 9%, respectively, after 8 Gy × 1 fraction versus 25% and 13%, respectively, after 4 Gy × 5 fractions. Improvement of motor function was observed in 17% of patients after 8 Gy × 1 fraction and 23% after 4 Gy × 5 fractions, respectively. Conclusions: There were no significant differences with respect to need for in-field reRT for MESCC, OS, and motor function by dose fractionation regimen. Thus, 8 Gy × 1 fraction may be a reasonable option for patients with survival prognosis of a few months.

  5. Comparison of layer grain size analysis with pipette and sieve analysis: a solution for the underestimation of the clay fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konert, M.; Vandenberghe, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Classically, the grain size of soil and sediment samples is determined by the sieve method for the coarse fractions and by the pipette method, based on the 'Stokes' sedimentation rates, for the fine fractions. Results from the two methods are compared with results from laser diffraction size

  6. Dynamic stability analysis of fractional order leaky integrator echo state neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahnehkolaei, Seyed Mehdi Abedi; Alfi, Alireza; Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2017-06-01

    The Leaky integrator echo state neural network (Leaky-ESN) is an improved model of the recurrent neural network (RNN) and adopts an interconnected recurrent grid of processing neurons. This paper presents a new proof for the convergence of a Lyapunov candidate function to zero when time tends to infinity by means of the Caputo fractional derivative with order lying in the range (0, 1). The stability of Fractional-Order Leaky-ESN (FO Leaky-ESN) is then analyzed, and the existence, uniqueness and stability of the equilibrium point are provided. A numerical example demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed method.

  7. Metagenomic analysis of size-fractionated picoplankton in a marine oxygen minimum zone

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesh, Sangita; Parris, Darren J; DeLong, Edward F; Stewart, Frank J

    2013-01-01

    Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) support diverse microbial communities with roles in major elemental cycles. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition and metabolism of OMZ microorganisms vary between particle-associated and free-living size fractions. We used amplicon (16S rRNA gene) and shotgun metagenome sequencing to compare microbial communities from large (>1.6 μm) and small (0.2–1.6 μm) filter size fractions along a depth gradient in the OMZ off Chile. Despite steep vertical redox ...

  8. Measuring condensate fraction in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, Sudip; Kee, Hae-Young

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of off-diagonal long-range order in superconductors shows that the spin-spin correlation function is significantly influenced by the order if the order parameter is anisotropic on a microscopic scale. Thus, magnetic neutron scattering can provide a direct measurement of the condensate fraction of a superconductor. It is also argued that recent measurements in high-temperature superconductors come very close to achieving this goal. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  9. Metabolic Profiling Analysis of the Alleviation Effect of the Fractions of Niuhuang Jiedu Tablet on Realgar Induced Toxicity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Niuhuang Jiedu Tablet (NJT is a classical formula in treating acute tonsillitis, pharyngitis, and so on. In the formula, significant level of Realgar as a potentially toxic element is contained. Our previous experiments revealed that it was less toxic for combined Realgar in NJT. However, the active fraction of this prescription with toxicity alleviation effect on Realgar was still obscure. NJT was divided into five different polar fractions (NJT-PET, NJT-25, NJT-50, NJT-75, and NJT-95, and we explored the toxicity alleviation effect on Realgar. Based on 1H NMR spectra of urine and serum from rats, PCA and PLS-DA were performed to identify different metabolic profiles. Liver and kidney histopathology examinations and serum clinical chemistry analysis were also performed. With pattern recognition analysis of metabolites in urine and serum, Realgar group showed a clear separation from control group, while the metabolic profiles of NJT-PET, NJT-25, NJT-50, and NJT-95 groups were similar to Realgar group, and the metabolic profiles of NJT and NJT-75 groups were very close to control group. Statistics results were confirmed by the histopathological examination and biochemical assay. The present work indicated that 75% EtOH fraction of NJT was the most valid fraction with the toxicity alleviation effect on Realgar.

  10. Gait in children with cerebral palsy : observer reliability of Physician Rating Scale and Edinburgh Visual Gait Analysis Interval Testing scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maathuis, KGB; van der Schans, CP; van Iperen, A; Rietman, HS; Geertzen, JHB

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the inter- and intra-observer reliability of the Physician Rating Scale (PRS) and the Edinburgh Visual Gait Analysis Interval Testing (GAIT) scale for use in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Both assessment scales are quantitative observational scales, evaluating

  11. Economic Analysis of Small Scale Egg Production in Gombe Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to determine the economic profitability of small-scale egg production in Gombe L.G.A. Gombe State. Data were collected from 36 famers using simple random sampling technique. The data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistics, gross margin and farm financial ratio analysis. The study ...

  12. Exploring Incomplete Rating Designs with Mokken Scale Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Stefanie A.; Patil, Yogendra J.

    2018-01-01

    Recent research has explored the use of models adapted from Mokken scale analysis as a nonparametric approach to evaluating rating quality in educational performance assessments. A potential limiting factor to the widespread use of these techniques is the requirement for complete data, as practical constraints in operational assessment systems…

  13. Analysis of Decision Making Skills for Large Scale Disaster Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-21

    Capability to influence and collaborate Compassion Teamwork Communication Leadership Provide vision of outcome / set priorities Confidence, courage to make...project evaluates the viability of expanding the use of serious games to augment classroom training, tabletop and full scale exercise, and actual...training, evaluation, analysis, and technology ex- ploration. Those techniques have found successful niches, but their wider applicability faces

  14. Fractional Stochastic Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkonen, Juha

    2018-02-01

    Models describing evolution of physical, chemical, biological, social and financial processes are often formulated as differential equations with the understanding that they are large-scale equations for averages of quantities describing intrinsically random processes. Explicit account of randomness may lead to significant changes in the asymptotic behaviour (anomalous scaling) in such models especially in low spatial dimensions, which in many cases may be captured with the use of the renormalization group. Anomalous scaling and memory effects may also be introduced with the use of fractional derivatives and fractional noise. Construction of renormalized stochastic field theory with fractional derivatives and fractional noise in the underlying stochastic differential equations and master equations and the interplay between fluctuation-induced and built-in anomalous scaling behaviour is reviewed and discussed.

  15. Fuel Fraction Analysis of 500 MWth Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with Nitride (UN-PuN) Fuel without Refueling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi Syarifah, Ratna; Su'ud, Zaki; Basar, Khairul; Irwanto, Dwi

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is one of candidates which can support electricity demand in the world. The Generation IV NPP has fourth main objective, i.e. sustainability, economics competitiveness, safety and reliability, and proliferation and physical protection. One of Gen-IV reactor type is Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). In this study, the analysis of fuel fraction in small GFR with nitride fuel has been done. The calculation was performed by SRAC code, both Pij and CITATION calculation. SRAC2002 system is a code system applicable to analyze the neutronics of variety reactor type. And for the data library used JENDL-3.2. The step of SRAC calculation is fuel pin calculated by Pij calculation until the data homogenized, after it homogenized we calculate core reactor. The variation of fuel fraction is 40% up to 65%. The optimum design of 500MWth GFR without refueling with 10 years burn up time reach when radius F1:F2:F3 = 50cm:30cm:30cm and height F1:F2:F3 = 50cm:40cm:30cm, variation percentage Plutonium in F1:F2:F3 = 7%:10%:13%. The optimum fuel fraction is 41% with addition 2% Plutonium weapon grade mix in the fuel. The excess reactivity value in this case 1.848% and the k-eff value is 1.01883. The high burn up reached when the fuel fraction is low. In this study 41% fuel fraction produce faster fissile fuel, so it has highest burn-up level than the other fuel fraction.

  16. Genetic Analysis of Cortical Thickness and Fractional Anisotropy of Water Diffusion in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eKochunov

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesThe thickness of the brain’s cortical gray matter (GM and the fractional anisotropy (FA of the cerebral white matter (WM each follow an inverted U-shape trajectory with age. Both measures are positively correlated, suggesting a common biological mechanism. We employed bivariate genetic analyses to localize quantitative trait loci (QTLs and individual genes acting pleiotropically upon these phenotypes.MethodsWhole-brain and regional GM thickness and FA values were measured from high-resolution anatomical (0.8mm isotropic and diffusion tensor MR images (1.7x1.7x3.0mm, 55 directions collected for 712 active participants (274/438 male/females, age=47.9±13.2years in the Genetics of Brain Structure study.ResultsBivariate, whole-genome quantitative trait loci (QTL analyses of the whole brain measures localized significant (LOD≥3.0 QTLs within chromosome region 15q22-23. More detailed localization was achieved using single nuclear polymorphism (SNP association and gene expression analyses. No significant association (p<510-5 was observed for 1565 SNPs located within the QTLs. However, post-hoc analysis indicated that 40% of the potentially significant (p≤10-3 polymorphisms were localized to the RORA and NARG2 genes. A potentially significant association (p=310-4 was also observed for the rs2456930 polymorphism that was previously reported as a significant GWAS finding in ADNI subjects. Lymphocyte expression measurements for two genes, located under QTL, RORA and ADAM10 were significantly (p<0.05 correlated with both FA and GM thickness values. Expression measurements for NARG2 was significantly correlated with GM thickness (p<0.05 but failed to show a significant correlation (p=0.09 with FA.Discussion This study identified a novel, significant QTL at 15q22-23. SNP association and correlation with gene-expression analyses indicated that RORA, NARG2 and ADAM10 jointly influence GM thickness and cerebral WM integrity.

  17. Nonlinear analysis and analog simulation of a piezoelectric buckled beam with fractional derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokem Fokou, I. S.; Buckjohn, C. Nono Dueyou; Siewe Siewe, M.; Tchawoua, C.

    2017-08-01

    In this article, an analog circuit for implementing fractional-order derivative and a harmonic balance method for a vibration energy harvesting system under pure sinusoidal vibration source is proposed in order to predict the system response. The objective of this paper is to discuss the performance of the system with fractional derivative and nonlinear damping (μb). Bifurcation diagram, phase portrait and power spectral density (PSD) are provided to deeply characterize the dynamics of the system. These results are corroborated by the 0-1 test. The appearance of the chaotic vibrations reduces the instantaneous voltage. The pre-experimental investigation is carried out through appropriate software electronic circuit (Multisim). The corresponding electronic circuit is designed, exhibiting periodic and chaotic behavior, in accord with numerical simulations. The impact of fractional derivative and nonlinear damping is presented with detail on the output voltage and power of the system. The agreement between numerical and analytical results justifies the efficiency of the analytical technique used. In addition, by combining the harmonic excitation with the random force, the stochastic resonance phenomenon occurs and improves the harvested energy. It emerges from these results that the order of fractional derivative μ and nonlinear damping μb play an important role in the response of the system.

  18. Finite-mode analysis by means of intensity information in fractional optical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alieva, T.; Bastiaans, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown how a coherent optical signal that contains only a finite number of Hermite-Gauss modes, can be reconstructed from the knowledge of its Radon-Wigner transform -- associated with the intensity distribution in a fractional Fourier transform optical system -- at only two transversal points.

  19. Differential branching fraction and angular analysis of the decay B-0 -> K*(0)mu(+)mu(-)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassen, R.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Baesso, C.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bauer, Th.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Pellegrino, A.; Tolk, S.

    The angular distribution and differential branching fraction of the decay B-0 -> K*(0)mu(+)mu(-) are studied using a data sample, collected by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions at root s = 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb(-1). Several angular observables are measured in

  20. Analysis and application of diffusion equations involving a new fractional derivative without singular kernel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a family of nonlinear diffusion equations involving multi-term Caputo-Fabrizio time fractional derivative is investigated. Some maximum principles are obtained. We also demonstrate the application of the obtained results by deriving some estimation for solution to reaction-diffusion equations.

  1. Final Report Scalable Analysis Methods and In Situ Infrastructure for Extreme Scale Knowledge Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, Patrick [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States)

    2017-09-13

    The primary challenge motivating this project is the widening gap between the ability to compute information and to store it for subsequent analysis. This gap adversely impacts science code teams, who can perform analysis only on a small fraction of the data they calculate, resulting in the substantial likelihood of lost or missed science, when results are computed but not analyzed. Our approach is to perform as much analysis or visualization processing on data while it is still resident in memory, which is known as in situ processing. The idea in situ processing was not new at the time of the start of this effort in 2014, but efforts in that space were largely ad hoc, and there was no concerted effort within the research community that aimed to foster production-quality software tools suitable for use by Department of Energy (DOE) science projects. Our objective was to produce and enable the use of production-quality in situ methods and infrastructure, at scale, on DOE high-performance computing (HPC) facilities, though we expected to have an impact beyond DOE due to the widespread nature of the challenges, which affect virtually all large-scale computational science efforts. To achieve this objective, we engaged in software technology research and development (R&D), in close partnerships with DOE science code teams, to produce software technologies that were shown to run efficiently at scale on DOE HPC platforms.

  2. SINEX: SCALE shielding analysis GUI for X-Windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browman, S.M.; Barnett, D.L.

    1997-12-01

    SINEX (SCALE Interface Environment for X-windows) is an X-Windows graphical user interface (GUI), that is being developed for performing SCALE radiation shielding analyses. SINEX enables the user to generate input for the SAS4/MORSE and QADS/QAD-CGGP shielding analysis sequences in SCALE. The code features will facilitate the use of both analytical sequences with a minimum of additional user input. Included in SINEX is the capability to check the geometry model by generating two-dimensional (2-D) color plots of the geometry model using a new version of the SCALE module, PICTURE. The most sophisticated feature, however, is the 2-D visualization display that provides a graphical representation on screen as the user builds a geometry model. This capability to interactively build a model will significantly increase user productivity and reduce user errors. SINEX will perform extensive error checking and will allow users to execute SCALE directly from the GUI. The interface will also provide direct on-line access to the SCALE manual

  3. Scaling effects concerning the analysis of small break experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austregesilo Filho, H.

    1985-01-01

    Some scaling effects related to the experimental facilities as well as to the analytical models used for the design and safety analysis of nuclear power plants are discussed or the basis of phenomena expected to occur during small-break loss - of - coolant accidents. The results of isolated small-break experiments should not be directly extrapolated to the safety analysis of commercial reactors, due to the scaling distortions inherent to the test facilities. With respect to the analytical models used to simulate thermohydraulic processes in experimental facilities, their eventual dependence relative to the system dimension should be examined in order to assess their applicability to the safety analysis of commercial power plants. (Author) [pt

  4. Angular analysis and differential branching fraction of the decay $B^0_s\\to\\phi\\mu^+\\mu^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusardi, Nicola; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Matthieu, Kecke; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Ninci, Daniele; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-09-25

    An angular analysis and a measurement of the differential branching fraction of the decay $B^0_s\\to\\phi\\mu^+\\mu^-$ are presented, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0\\, {\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions recorded by the LHCb experiment at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ and $8\\, {\\rm TeV}$. Measurements are reported as a function of $q^{2}$, the square of the dimuon invariant mass and results of the angular analysis are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. In the range $1fraction is found to be more than $3\\, \\sigma$ below the Standard Model predictions.

  5. Fraction of boroxol rings in vitreous boron oxide from a first-principles analysis of Raman and NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, P; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2005-09-23

    We determine the fraction f of B atoms belonging to boroxol rings in vitreous boron oxide through a first-principles analysis. After generating a model structure of vitreous B2O3 by first-principles molecular dynamics, we address a large set of properties, including the neutron structure factor, the neutron density of vibrational states, the infrared spectra, the Raman spectra, and the 11B NMR spectra, and find overall good agreement with corresponding experimental data. From the analysis of Raman and 11B NMR spectra, we yield consistently for both probes a fraction f of approximately 0.75. This result indicates that the structure of vitreous boron oxide is largely dominated by boroxol rings.

  6. SCALE system cross-section validation for criticality safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hathout, A.M.; Westfall, R.M.; Dodds, H.L. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to test selected data from three cross-section libraries for use in the criticality safety analysis of UO 2 fuel rod lattices. The libraries, which are distributed with the SCALE system, are used to analyze potential criticality problems which could arise in the industrial fuel cycle for PWR and BWR reactors. Fuel lattice criticality problems could occur in pool storage, dry storage with accidental moderation, shearing and dissolution of irradiated elements, and in fuel transport and storage due to inadequate packing and shipping cask design. The data were tested by using the SCALE system to analyze 25 recently performed critical experiments

  7. Size fraction assaying of gold bearing rocks (for gold extraction) by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.; Dampare, S.B.; Addo, M.A.; Osae, S.; Adotey, D.K.; Adomako, D.

    2005-01-01

    A novel method has been developed for processing and extraction of gold from gold bearing rocks for use by small-scale gold miners in Ghana. The methodology involved crushing of gold bearing hard rocks to fine particles to form a composite sample and screening at a range of sizes. Gold distribution in the composite sample was determined as a function of particle size by using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The concentrations of gold for the corresponding particle sizes were 16.4 ± 0.17mg/kg for sizes <63μm; 161± 0.75 mg/kg for 63 - 125 μm, 0.53 + 0.03 mg/kg for 125 - 250 μm, 4.66± 0.07 mg/kg for 250 - 355 μm, 1.55 ± 0.06 for 355 - 425 μm, 0.80 ± 0.008 mg/kg for 425 -1000 μm, and 1.27 + 0.05 mg/kg for 1000-2000 μm. The average gold content in a 7.127 kg composite sample based on particle size found to be 3.08 mg/kg. (au)

  8. Method to account for dose fractionation in analysis of IMRT plans: Modified equivalent uniform dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Clinton S.; Kim, Yongbok; Lee, Nancy; Bucci, Kara M.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Verhey, Lynn J.; Xia Ping

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) to account for dose fractionation using the biologically effective dose without losing the advantages of the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) and to report the calculated mEUD and gEUD in clinically used intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. Methods and Materials: The proposed mEUD replaces the dose to each voxel in the gEUD formulation by a biologically effective dose with a normalization factor. We propose to use the term mEUD D o /n o that includes the total dose (D o ) and number of fractions (n o ) and to use the term mEUD o that includes the same total dose but a standard fraction size of 2 Gy. A total of 41 IMRT plans for patients with nasopharyngeal cancer treated at our institution between October 1997 and March 2002 were selected for the study. The gEUD and mEUD were calculated for the planning gross tumor volume (pGTV), planning clinical tumor volume (pCTV), parotid glands, and spinal cord. The prescription dose for these patients was 70 Gy to >95% of the pGTV and 59.4 Gy to >95% of the pCTV in 33 fractions. Results: The calculated average gEUD was 72.2 ± 2.4 Gy for the pGTV, 54.2 ± 7.1 Gy for the pCTV, 26.7 ± 4.2 Gy for the parotid glands, and 34.1 ± 6.8 Gy for the spinal cord. The calculated average mEUD D o /n o using 33 fractions was 71.7 ± 3.5 Gy for mEUD 70/33 of the pGTV, 49.9 ± 7.9 Gy for mEUD 59.5/33 of the pCTV, 27.6 ± 4.8 Gy for mEUD 26/33 of the parotid glands, and 32.7 ± 7.8 Gy for mEUD 45/33 of the spinal cord. Conclusion: The proposed mEUD, combining the gEUD with the biologically effective dose, preserves all advantages of the gEUD while reflecting the fractionation effects and linear and quadratic survival characteristics

  9. Complexity and Hopf Bifurcation Analysis on a Kind of Fractional-Order IS-LM Macroeconomic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junhai; Ren, Wenbo

    On the basis of our previous research, we deepen and complete a kind of macroeconomics IS-LM model with fractional-order calculus theory, which is a good reflection on the memory characteristics of economic variables, we also focus on the influence of the variables on the real system, and improve the analysis capabilities of the traditional economic models to suit the actual macroeconomic environment. The conditions of Hopf bifurcation in fractional-order system models are briefly demonstrated, and the fractional order when Hopf bifurcation occurs is calculated, showing the inherent complex dynamic characteristics of the system. With numerical simulation, bifurcation, strange attractor, limit cycle, waveform and other complex dynamic characteristics are given; and the order condition is obtained with respect to time. We find that the system order has an important influence on the running state of the system. The system has a periodic motion when the order meets the conditions of Hopf bifurcation; the fractional-order system gradually stabilizes with the change of the order and parameters while the corresponding integer-order system diverges. This study has certain significance to policy-making about macroeconomic regulation and control.

  10. Long-term analysis of carbon dioxide and methane column-averaged mole fractions retrieved from SCIAMACHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Schneising

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 are the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases contributing to global climate change. SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT (launch 2002 was the first and is now with TANSO onboard GOSAT (launch 2009 one of only two satellite instruments currently in space whose measurements are sensitive to CO2 and CH4 concentration changes in the lowest atmospheric layers where the variability due to sources and sinks is largest.

    We present long-term SCIAMACHY retrievals (2003–2009 of column-averaged dry air mole fractions of both gases (denoted XCO2 and XCH4 derived from absorption bands in the near-infrared/shortwave-infrared (NIR/SWIR spectral region focusing on large-scale features. The results are obtained using an upgraded version (v2 of the retrieval algorithm WFM-DOAS including several improvements, while simultaneously maintaining its high processing speed. The retrieved mole fractions are compared to global model simulations (CarbonTracker XCO2 and TM5 XCH4 being optimised by assimilating highly accurate surface measurements from the NOAA/ESRL network and taking the SCIAMACHY averaging kernels into account. The comparisons address seasonal variations and long-term characteristics.

    The steady increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide primarily caused by the burning of fossil fuels can be clearly observed with SCIAMACHY globally. The retrieved global annual mean XCO2 increase agrees with CarbonTracker within the error bars (1.80±0.13 ppm yr−1 compared to 1.81±0.09 ppm yr−1. The amplitude of the XCO2 seasonal cycle as retrieved by SCIAMACHY, which is 4.3±0.2 ppm for the Northern Hemisphere and 1.4±0.2 ppm for the Southern Hemisphere, is on average about 1 ppm larger than for CarbonTracker.

    An investigation of the boreal forest carbon uptake during the

  11. Analysis of the cable equation with non-local and non-singular kernel fractional derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaagac, Berat

    2018-02-01

    Recently a new concept of differentiation was introduced in the literature where the kernel was converted from non-local singular to non-local and non-singular. One of the great advantages of this new kernel is its ability to portray fading memory and also well defined memory of the system under investigation. In this paper the cable equation which is used to develop mathematical models of signal decay in submarine or underwater telegraphic cables will be analysed using the Atangana-Baleanu fractional derivative due to the ability of the new fractional derivative to describe non-local fading memory. The existence and uniqueness of the more generalized model is presented in detail via the fixed point theorem. A new numerical scheme is used to solve the new equation. In addition, stability, convergence and numerical simulations are presented.

  12. Error Analysis of a Finite Element Method for the Space-Fractional Parabolic Equation

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Bangti; Lazarov, Raytcho; Pasciak, Joseph; Zhou, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics We consider an initial boundary value problem for a one-dimensional fractional-order parabolic equation with a space fractional derivative of Riemann-Liouville type and order α ∈ (1, 2). We study a spatial semidiscrete scheme using the standard Galerkin finite element method with piecewise linear finite elements, as well as fully discrete schemes based on the backward Euler method and the Crank-Nicolson method. Error estimates in the L2(D)- and Hα/2 (D)-norm are derived for the semidiscrete scheme and in the L2(D)-norm for the fully discrete schemes. These estimates cover both smooth and nonsmooth initial data and are expressed directly in terms of the smoothness of the initial data. Extensive numerical results are presented to illustrate the theoretical results.

  13. Analysis of water hammer in pipelines by partial fraction expansion of transfer function in frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jun Shin; Lee, Wook Ryun; Oh, Ki Yong; Kim, Bong Ki

    2010-01-01

    Understanding water hammer is very important to the prevention of excessive pressure build-up in pipelines. Many researchers have studied this phenomenon, drawing effective solutions through the time- and frequency-domain approaches. For the purposes of enhancing the advantages of the frequency-domain approach and, thereby, rendering investigations of the dynamic characteristics of pipelines more effective, we propose partial fraction expansion of the transfer function between the unsteady flow source and a given section. We simulate the proposed approach using a vibration element inserted into a simple pipeline, deducing much useful physical information pertaining to pipeline design. We conclude that locating the resonance of the vibration element between the first and second resonances of the pipeline can mitigate the excessive pressure build-up attendant on the occurrence of water hammer. Our method of partial fraction expansion is expected to be useful and effective in analyses of unsteady flows in pipelines

  14. Two-dimensional DFA scaling analysis applied to encrypted images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Olmos, C.; Murguía, J. S.; Ramírez-Torres, M. T.; Mejía Carlos, M.; Rosu, H. C.; González-Aguilar, H.

    2015-01-01

    The technique of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) has been widely used to unveil scaling properties of many different signals. In this paper, we determine scaling properties in the encrypted images by means of a two-dimensional DFA approach. To carry out the image encryption, we use an enhanced cryptosystem based on a rule-90 cellular automaton and we compare the results obtained with its unmodified version and the encryption system AES. The numerical results show that the encrypted images present a persistent behavior which is close to that of the 1/f-noise. These results point to the possibility that the DFA scaling exponent can be used to measure the quality of the encrypted image content.

  15. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Procrastination Assessment Scale for Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald D. Yockey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The relative fit of one- and two-factor models of the Procrastination Assessment Scale for Students (PASS was investigated using confirmatory factor analysis on an ethnically diverse sample of 345 participants. The results indicated that although the two-factor model provided better fit to the data than the one-factor model, neither model provided optimal fit. However, a two-factor model which accounted for common item theme pairs used by Solomon and Rothblum in the creation of the scale provided good fit to the data. In addition, a significant difference by ethnicity was also found on the fear of failure subscale of the PASS, with Whites having significantly lower scores than Asian Americans or Latino/as. Implications of the results are discussed and recommendations made for future work with the scale.

  16. Stored energy analysis in the scaled-down test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Chengcheng; Chang, Huajian; Qin, Benke; Wu, Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three methods are developed to evaluate stored energy in the scaled-down test facilities. • The mechanism behind stored energy distortion in the test facilities is revealed. • The application of stored energy analysis is demonstrated for the ACME facility of China. - Abstract: In the scaled-down test facilities that simulate the accident transient process of the prototype nuclear power plant, the stored energy release in the metal structures has an important influence on the accuracy and effectiveness of the experimental data. Three methods of stored energy analysis are developed, and the mechanism behind stored energy distortion in the test facilities is revealed. Moreover, the application of stored energy analysis is demonstrated for the ACME test facility newly built in China. The results show that the similarity requirements of three methods analyzing the stored energy release decrease gradually. The physical mechanism of stored energy release process can be characterized by the dimensionless numbers including Stanton number, Fourier number and Biot number. Under the premise of satisfying the overall similarity of natural circulation, the stored energy release process in the scale-down test facilities cannot maintain exact similarity. The results of the application of stored energy analysis illustrate that both the transient release process and integral total stored energy of the reactor pressure vessel wall of CAP1400 power plant can be well reproduced in the ACME test facility.

  17. A Mokken scale analysis of the peer physical examination questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Brett; Grace, Sandra

    2018-01-01

    Peer physical examination (PPE) is a teaching and learning strategy utilised in most health profession education programs. Perceptions of participating in PPE have been described in the literature, focusing on areas of the body students are willing, or unwilling, to examine. A small number of questionnaires exist to evaluate these perceptions, however none have described the measurement properties that may allow them to be used longitudinally. The present study undertook a Mokken scale analysis of the Peer Physical Examination Questionnaire (PPEQ) to evaluate its dimensionality and structure when used with Australian osteopathy students. Students enrolled in Year 1 of the osteopathy programs at Victoria University (Melbourne, Australia) and Southern Cross University (Lismore, Australia) were invited to complete the PPEQ prior to their first practical skills examination class. R, an open-source statistics program, was used to generate the descriptive statistics and perform a Mokken scale analysis. Mokken scale analysis is a non-parametric item response theory approach that is used to cluster items measuring a latent construct. Initial analysis suggested the PPEQ did not form a single scale. Further analysis identified three subscales: 'comfort', 'concern', and 'professionalism and education'. The properties of each subscale suggested they were unidimensional with variable internal structures. The 'comfort' subscale was the strongest of the three identified. All subscales demonstrated acceptable reliability estimation statistics (McDonald's omega > 0.75) supporting the calculation of a sum score for each subscale. The subscales identified are consistent with the literature. The 'comfort' subscale may be useful to longitudinally evaluate student perceptions of PPE. Further research is required to evaluate changes with PPE and the utility of the questionnaire with other health profession education programs.

  18. Dynamic Analysis and Circuit Design of a Novel Hyperchaotic System with Fractional-Order Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Lassoued

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel hyperchaotic system with fractional-order (FO terms is designed. Its highly complex dynamics are investigated in terms of equilibrium points, Lyapunov spectrum, and attractor forms. It will be shown that the proposed system exhibits larger Lyapunov exponents than related hyperchaotic systems. Finally, to enhance its potential application, a related circuit is designed by using the MultiSIM Software. Simulation results verify the effectiveness of the suggested circuit.

  19. Stability Analysis for Fractional-Order Linear Singular Delay Differential Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the delay-independently asymptotic stability of fractional-order linear singular delay differential systems. Based on the algebraic approach, the sufficient conditions are presented to ensure the asymptotic stability for any delay parameter. By applying the stability criteria, one can avoid solving the roots of transcendental equations. An example is also provided to illustrate the effectiveness and applicability of the theoretical results.

  20. Error Analysis of a Fractional Time-Stepping Technique for Incompressible Flows with Variable Density

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, J.-L.; Salgado, Abner J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the convergence properties of a new fractional time-stepping technique for the solution of the variable density incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The main feature of this method is that, contrary to other existing algorithms, the pressure is determined by just solving one Poisson equation per time step. First-order error estimates are proved, and stability of a formally second-order variant of the method is established. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  1. FRACTIONAL BANKING

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Klimikova

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the reasons of the present financial problems lies In understanding the substance of fractional reserve banking. The substance of fractional banking is in lending more money than the bankers have. Banking of partial reserves is an alternative form which links deposit banking and credit banking. Fractional banking is causing many unfavorable economic impacts in the worldwide system, specifically an inflation.

  2. Analysis of two colliding fractionally damped spherical shells in modelling blunt human head impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossikhin, Yury A.; Shitikova, Marina V.

    2013-06-01

    The collision of two elastic or viscoelastic spherical shells is investigated as a model for the dynamic response of a human head impacted by another head or by some spherical object. Determination of the impact force that is actually being transmitted to bone will require the model for the shock interaction of the impactor and human head. This model is indended to be used in simulating crash scenarios in frontal impacts, and provide an effective tool to estimate the severity of effect on the human head and to estimate brain injury risks. The model developed here suggests that after the moment of impact quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse shock waves are generated, which then propagate along the spherical shells. The solution behind the wave fronts is constructed with the help of the theory of discontinuities. It is assumed that the viscoelastic features of the shells are exhibited only in the contact domain, while the remaining parts retain their elastic properties. In this case, the contact spot is assumed to be a plane disk with constant radius, and the viscoelastic features of the shells are described by the fractional derivative standard linear solid model. In the case under consideration, the governing differential equations are solved analytically by the Laplace transform technique. It is shown that the fractional parameter of the fractional derivative model plays very important role, since its variation allows one to take into account the age-related changes in the mechanical properties of bone.

  3. Thermodynamic analysis of 6xxx series Al alloys: Phase fraction diagrams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui S.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microstructural evolution of 6xxx Al alloys during various metallurgical processes was analyzed using accurate thermodynamic database. Phase fractions of all the possible precipitate phases which can form in the as-cast and equilibrium states of the Al-Mg-Si-Cu-Fe-Mn-Cr alloys were calculated over the technically useful composition range. The influence of minor elements such as Cu, Fe, Mn, and Cr on the amount of each type of precipitate in the as-cast and equilibrium conditions were analyzed. Phase fraction diagrams at 500 °C were mapped in the composition range of 0-1.1 wt.% Mg and 0-0.7 wt.% Si to investigate the as-homogenized microstructure. In addition, phase fraction diagram of Mg2Si at 177 °C was mapped to understand the microstructure after final annealing of 6xxx Al alloy. Based on the calculated diagrams, the design strategy of 6xxx Al alloy to produce highest strength due to Mg2Si is discussed.

  4. Differential branching fraction and angular analysis of the decay $B^{0} \\rightarrow K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    The angular distributions and the partial branching fraction of the decay $B^{0} \\rightarrow K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ are studied using an integrated luminosity of $0.37\\,fb^{-1}$ of data collected with the LHCb detector. The forward-backward asymmetry of the muons, $A_{\\mathrm{FB}}$, the fraction of longitudinal polarisation, $F_{\\mathrm{L}}$, and the partial branching fraction, $\\mathrm{d}{\\mathcal B}/\\mathrm{d}q^{2}$, are determined as a function of the dimuon invariant mass. The measurements are in good agreement with the Standard Model predictions and are the most precise to date. In the dimuon invariant mass squared range $1.00-6.00{\\mathrm{\\,Ge\\kern -0.1em V}}^2/c^4$, the results are $A_{\\mathrm{FB}}=-0.06\\,^{+0.13}_{-0.14} \\pm 0.04$, $F_{\\mathrm{L}}=0.55\\pm 0.10\\pm 0.03$ and $\\mathrm{d}{\\mathcal B}/\\mathrm{d}q^{2}=(0.42 \\pm 0.06\\pm 0.03) \\times 10^{-7}c^4/{\\mathrm{\\,Ge\\kern -0.1em V}}^2$. In each case, the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  5. PURIFICATION AND FRACTIONAL ANALYSIS OF METHANOLIC EXTRACT OF WEDELIA TRILOBATA POSSESSING APOPTOTIC AND ANTI-LEUKEMIC ACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Uday; Javarasetty, Chethan; Murari, Satish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Wedelia trilobata (L.) Hitch (WT), commonly known as yellow dots or creeping daisy, is a shrub possessing potent biological activities, and is traditionally used a medicinal plant in Ayurveda, Siddha and Unani systems of medicines, and it has also been tried against leukemia cell line MEG- 01. In the present study, purification and screening of the plant was done for bioactive compounds in methanolic extract of WT for apoptotic and anti-leukemia activity. Materials and methods: The methanolic extract of WT was initially purified through thin layer chromatography (TLC) and screened for the apoptotic and anti-leukemia activities. The positive band of TLC was subjected to silica gel column chromatography for further purification and the fractions obtained from it were screened again for anti-leukemia activity through thymidine uptake assay and apoptotic activity by DNA fragmentation, nuclear staining and flow cytometry assays. The fraction with positive result was subjected to HPLC for analysis of bioactive components. Results: Out of many combinations of solvents, the methanol and dichloromethane combination in the ratio 6:4 has revealed two bands in TLC, among which the second band showed positive results for apoptotic and anti-leukemic activities. Further purification of second band through silica gel chromatography gave five fractions in which the 3rd fraction gave positive results and it shows single peak during compositional analysis through HPLC. Conclusion: The single peak revealed through HPLC indicates the presence of pure compound with apoptotic and anti-leukemia activities encouraging for further structural analysis. PMID:28480428

  6. Fractional thermoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Povstenko, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to fractional thermoelasticity, i.e. thermoelasticity based on the heat conduction equation with differential operators of fractional order. Readers will discover how time-fractional differential operators describe memory effects and space-fractional differential operators deal with the long-range interaction. Fractional calculus, generalized Fourier law, axisymmetric and central symmetric problems and many relevant equations are featured in the book. The latest developments in the field are included and the reader is brought up to date with current research.  The book contains a large number of figures, to show the characteristic features of temperature and stress distributions and to represent the whole spectrum of order of fractional operators.  This work presents a picture of the state-of-the-art of fractional thermoelasticity and is suitable for specialists in applied mathematics, physics, geophysics, elasticity, thermoelasticity and engineering sciences. Corresponding sections of ...

  7. The scale analysis sequence for LWR fuel depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, O.W.; Parks, C.V.

    1991-01-01

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system is used extensively to perform away-from-reactor safety analysis (particularly criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer analyses) for spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel. Spent fuel characteristics such as radiation sources, heat generation sources, and isotopic concentrations can be computed within SCALE using the SAS2 control module. A significantly enhanced version of the SAS2 control module, which is denoted as SAS2H, has been made available with the release of SCALE-4. For each time-dependent fuel composition, SAS2H performs one-dimensional (1-D) neutron transport analyses (via XSDRNPM-S) of the reactor fuel assembly using a two-part procedure with two separate unit-cell-lattice models. The cross sections derived from a transport analysis at each time step are used in a point-depletion computation (via ORIGEN-S) that produces the burnup-dependent fuel composition to be used in the next spectral calculation. A final ORIGEN-S case is used to perform the complete depletion/decay analysis using the burnup-dependent cross sections. The techniques used by SAS2H and two recent applications of the code are reviewed in this paper. 17 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Empirical analysis of scaling and fractal characteristics of outpatients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li-Jiang; Liu, Zi-Xian; Guo, Jin-Li

    2014-01-01

    The paper uses power-law frequency distribution, power spectrum analysis, detrended fluctuation analysis, and surrogate data testing to evaluate outpatient registration data of two hospitals in China and to investigate the human dynamics of systems that use the “first come, first served” protocols. The research results reveal that outpatient behavior follow scaling laws. The results also suggest that the time series of inter-arrival time exhibit 1/f noise and have positive long-range correlation. Our research may contribute to operational optimization and resource allocation in hospital based on FCFS admission protocols.

  9. Empirical analysis of scaling and fractal characteristics of outpatients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li-Jiang, E-mail: zljjiang@gmail.com [College of Management and Economics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Management Institute, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang 453003, Henan (China); Liu, Zi-Xian, E-mail: liuzixian@tju.edu.cn [College of Management and Economics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Guo, Jin-Li, E-mail: phd5816@163.com [Business School, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China)

    2014-01-31

    The paper uses power-law frequency distribution, power spectrum analysis, detrended fluctuation analysis, and surrogate data testing to evaluate outpatient registration data of two hospitals in China and to investigate the human dynamics of systems that use the “first come, first served” protocols. The research results reveal that outpatient behavior follow scaling laws. The results also suggest that the time series of inter-arrival time exhibit 1/f noise and have positive long-range correlation. Our research may contribute to operational optimization and resource allocation in hospital based on FCFS admission protocols.

  10. Bioactivity-guided fractionation and analysis of compounds with anti-influenza virus activity from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Quanjun; Wu, Bin; Shi, Yujing; Du, Xiaowei; Fan, Mingsong; Sun, Zhaolin; Cui, Xiaolan; Huang, Chenggang

    2012-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of extracts from Fructus Gardeniae led to analysis of its bioactive natural products. After infection by influenza virus strain A/FM/1/47-MA in vivo, antiviral activity of the extracts were investigated. The target fraction was orally administered to rats and blood was collected. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photo diode array detector and electrospray ion trap multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry was applied to screen the compounds absorbed into the blood. A structural characterization based on the retention time, ultraviolet spectra, parent ions and fragmentation ions was performed. Thirteen compounds were confirmed or tentatively identified. This provides an accurate profile of the composition of bioactive compounds responsible for the anti-influenza properties.

  11. Combined process automation for large-scale EEG analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondouris, John L; Quebedeaux, Tabitha M; Holdgraf, Chris; Musto, Alberto E

    2012-01-01

    Epileptogenesis is a dynamic process producing increased seizure susceptibility. Electroencephalography (EEG) data provides information critical in understanding the evolution of epileptiform changes throughout epileptic foci. We designed an algorithm to facilitate efficient large-scale EEG analysis via linked automation of multiple data processing steps. Using EEG recordings obtained from electrical stimulation studies, the following steps of EEG analysis were automated: (1) alignment and isolation of pre- and post-stimulation intervals, (2) generation of user-defined band frequency waveforms, (3) spike-sorting, (4) quantification of spike and burst data and (5) power spectral density analysis. This algorithm allows for quicker, more efficient EEG analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stability Analysis and Application for Delayed Neural Networks Driven by Fractional Brownian Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wuneng; Zhou, Xianghui; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Jun; Tong, Dongbing

    2018-05-01

    This paper deals with two types of the stability problem for the delayed neural networks driven by fractional Brownian noise (FBN). The existence and the uniqueness of the solution to the main system with respect to FBN are proved via fixed point theory. Based on Hilbert-Schmidt operator theory and analytic semigroup principle, the mild solution of the stochastic neural networks is obtained. By applying the stochastic analytic technique and some well-known inequalities, the asymptotic stability criteria and the exponential stability condition are established. Both numerical example and practical application for synchronization control of multiagent system are provided to illustrate the effectiveness and potential of the proposed techniques.

  13. An analysis of heat conduction in polar bear hairs using one-dimensional fractional model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Wei-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hairs of a polar bear are of superior properties such as the excellent thermal protection. The polar bears can perennially live in an extremely cold environment and can maintain body temperature at around 37 °C. Why do polar bears can resist such cold environment? Its membrane-pore structure plays an important role. In the previous work, we established a 1-D fractional heat conduction equation to reveal the hidden mechanism for the hairs. In this paper, we further discuss solutions and parameters of the equation established and analyze heat conduction in polar bear hairs.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of 6xxx series Al alloys: Phase fraction diagrams

    OpenAIRE

    Cui S.; Mishra R.; Jung I.-H.

    2018-01-01

    Microstructural evolution of 6xxx Al alloys during various metallurgical processes was analyzed using accurate thermodynamic database. Phase fractions of all the possible precipitate phases which can form in the as-cast and equilibrium states of the Al-Mg-Si-Cu-Fe-Mn-Cr alloys were calculated over the technically useful composition range. The influence of minor elements such as Cu, Fe, Mn, and Cr on the amount of each type of precipitate in the as-cast and equilibrium conditions were analyzed...

  15. Horizontal Variability of Water and Its Relationship to Cloud Fraction near the Tropical Tropopause: Using Aircraft Observations of Water Vapor to Improve the Representation of Grid-scale Cloud Formation in GEOS-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Molod, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale models such as GEOS-5 typically calculate grid-scale fractional cloudiness through a PDF parameterization of the sub-gridscale distribution of specific humidity. The GEOS-5 moisture routine uses a simple rectangular PDF varying in height that follows a tanh profile. While below 10 km this profile is informed by moisture information from the AIRS instrument, there is relatively little empirical basis for the profile above that level. ATTREX provides an opportunity to refine the profile using estimates of the horizontal variability of measurements of water vapor, total water and ice particles from the Global Hawk aircraft at or near the tropopause. These measurements will be compared with estimates of large-scale cloud fraction from CALIPSO and lidar retrievals from the CPL on the aircraft. We will use the variability measurements to perform studies of the sensitivity of the GEOS-5 cloud-fraction to various modifications to the PDF shape and to its vertical profile.

  16. Elders Health Empowerment Scale: Spanish adaptation and psychometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrani Azcurra, Daniel Jorge Luis

    2014-01-01

    Empowerment refers to patient skills that allow them to become primary decision-makers in control of daily self-management of health problems. As important the concept as it is, particularly for elders with chronic diseases, few available instruments have been validated for use with Spanish speaking people. Translate and adapt the Health Empowerment Scale (HES) for a Spanish-speaking older adults sample and perform its psychometric validation. The HES was adapted based on the Diabetes Empowerment Scale-Short Form. Where "diabetes" was mentioned in the original tool, it was replaced with "health" terms to cover all kinds of conditions that could affect health empowerment. Statistical and Psychometric Analyses were conducted on 648 urban-dwelling seniors. The HES had an acceptable internal consistency with a Cronbach's α of 0.89. The convergent validity was supported by significant Pearson's Coefficient correlations between the HES total and item scores and the General Self Efficacy Scale (r= 0.77), Swedish Rheumatic Disease Empowerment Scale (r= 0.69) and Making Decisions Empowerment Scale (r= 0.70). Construct validity was evaluated using item analysis, half-split test and corrected item to total correlation coefficients; with good internal consistency (α> 0.8). The content validity was supported by Scale and Item Content Validity Index of 0.98 and 1.0, respectively. HES had acceptable face validity and reliability coefficients; which added to its ease administration and users' unbiased comprehension, could set it as a suitable tool in evaluating elder's outpatient empowerment-based medical education programs.

  17. Large volume TENAX {sup registered} extraction of the bioaccessible fraction of sediment-associated organic compounds for a subsequent effect-directed analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, K.; Brack, W. [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre or Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Effect-Directed Analysis

    2007-06-15

    Background, Aim and Scope: Effect-directed analysis (EDA) is a powerful tool for the identification of key toxicants in complex environmental samples. In most cases, EDA is based on total extraction of organic contaminants leading to an erroneous prioritization with regard to hazard and risk. Bioaccessibility-directed extraction aims to discriminate between contaminants that take part in partitioning between sediment and biota in a relevant time frame and those that are enclosed in structures, that do not allow rapid desorption. Standard protocols of targeted extraction of rapidly desorbing, and thus bioaccessible fraction using TENAX {sup registered} are based only on small amounts of sediment. In order to get sufficient amounts of extracts for subsequent biotesting, fractionation, and structure elucidation a large volume extraction technique needs to be developed applying one selected extraction time and excluding toxic procedural blanks. Materials and Methods: Desorption behaviour of sediment contaminants was determined by a consecutive solid-solid extraction of sediment using TENAX {sup registered} fitting a tri-compartment model on experimental data. Time needed to remove the rapidly desorbing fraction trap was calculated to select a fixed extraction time for single extraction procedures. Up-scaling by about a factor of 100 provided a large volume extraction technique for EDA. Reproducibility and comparability to small volume approach were proved. Blanks of respective TENAX {sup registered} mass were investigated using Scenedesmus vacuolatus and Artemia salina as test organisms. Results: Desorption kinetics showed that 12 to 30 % of sediment associated pollutants are available for rapid desorption. t{sub r}ap is compound dependent and covers a range of 2 to 18 h. On that basis a fixed extraction time of 24 h was selected. Validation of large volume approach was done by the means of comparison to small method and reproducibility. The large volume showed a good

  18. Deformation analysis of polymers composites: rheological model involving time-based fractional derivative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H. W.; Yi, H. Y.; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2017-01-01

    A modeling approach to time-dependent property of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymers (GFRP) composites is of special interest for quantitative description of long-term behavior. An electronic creep machine is employed to investigate the time-dependent deformation of four specimens of dog-bond-shaped......A modeling approach to time-dependent property of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymers (GFRP) composites is of special interest for quantitative description of long-term behavior. An electronic creep machine is employed to investigate the time-dependent deformation of four specimens of dog......-bond-shaped GFRP composites at various stress level. A negative exponent function based on structural changes is introduced to describe the damage evolution of material properties in the process of creep test. Accordingly, a new creep constitutive equation, referred to fractional derivative Maxwell model...... by the fractional derivative Maxwell model proposed in the paper are in a good agreement with the experimental data. It is shown that the new creep constitutive model proposed in the paper needs few parameters to represent various time-dependent behaviors....

  19. Simulation and analysis of multi-stage centrifugal fractional extraction process of 4-nitrobenzene glycine enantiomers☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Wen; Kewen Tang; Jicheng Zhou; Panliang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Based on the interfacial ligand exchange model and the law of conservation of mass, the multi-stage enantioselective liquid–liquid extraction model has been established to analyze and discuss on multi-stage centrifugal fractional extraction process of 4-nitrobenzene glycine (PGL) enantiomers. The influence of phase ratio, extractant concentra-tion, and PF6−concentration on the concentrations of enantiomers in the extract and raffinate was investigated by experiment and simulation. A good agreement between model and experiment was obtained. On this basis, the influence of many parameters such as location of stage, concentration levels, extractant excess, and number of stages on the symmetric separation performance was simulated. The optimal location of feed stage is the middle of fractional extraction equipment. The feed flow must satisfy a restricted relationship on flow ratios and the liquid throughout of centrifugal device. For desired purity specification, the required flow ratios decrease with extractant concentration and increase with PF6−concentration. When the number of stages is 18 stages at extractant excess of 1.0 or 14 stages at extractant excess of 2.0, the eeeq (equal enantiomeric excess) can reach to 99%.

  20. Analysis of panthers full-scale heat transfer tests with RELAP5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlatan, Y.; Boyer, B.D.; Jo, J.; Rohatgi, S.

    1996-01-01

    The RELAP5 code is being assessed on the full-scale Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) in the Performance ANalysis and Testing of HEat Removal Systems (PANTHERS) facility at Societa Informazioni Termoidrauliche (SIET) in Italy. PANTHERS is a test facility with fall-size prototype beat exchangers for the PCCS in support of the General Electric's (GE) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) program. PANTHERS tests with a low noncondensable gas concentration and with a high noncondensable gas concentration were analyzed with RELAP5. The results showed that beat transfer rate decreases significantly along the PCCS tubes. In the test case with a higher inlet noncondensable gas fraction, the PCCS removed 35% less heat than in the test case with the lower noncondensable gas fraction. The dominant resistance to the overall heat transfer is the condensation beat transfer resistance inside the tubes. This resistance increased by about 5-fold between the inlet and exit of the tube due to the build up of noncondensable gases along the tube. The RELAP5 calculations also predicted that 4% to 5% of the heat removed to the PCCS pool occurs in the inlet steam piping and PCCS upper and lower headers. These piping needs to be modeled for other tests systems. The full-scale PANTHERS predictions are also compared against 1/400 scale GIRAFFE tests. GIRAFFE has 33% larger heat surface area, but its efficiency is only 15% and 23% higher than PANTHERS for the two cases analyzed This was explained by the high heat transfer resistance inside the tubes near the exit

  1. Perceptual security of encrypted images based on wavelet scaling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Olmos, C.; Murguía, J. S.; Ramírez-Torres, M. T.; Mejía Carlos, M.; Rosu, H. C.; González-Aguilar, H.

    2016-08-01

    The scaling behavior of the pixel fluctuations of encrypted images is evaluated by using the detrended fluctuation analysis based on wavelets, a modern technique that has been successfully used recently for a wide range of natural phenomena and technological processes. As encryption algorithms, we use the Advanced Encryption System (AES) in RBT mode and two versions of a cryptosystem based on cellular automata, with the encryption process applied both fully and partially by selecting different bitplanes. In all cases, the results show that the encrypted images in which no understandable information can be visually appreciated and whose pixels look totally random present a persistent scaling behavior with the scaling exponent α close to 0.5, implying no correlation between pixels when the DFA with wavelets is applied. This suggests that the scaling exponents of the encrypted images can be used as a perceptual security criterion in the sense that when their values are close to 0.5 (the white noise value) the encrypted images are more secure also from the perceptual point of view.

  2. Multi-scaling allometric analysis for urban and regional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanguang

    2017-01-01

    The concept of allometric growth is based on scaling relations, and it has been applied to urban and regional analysis for a long time. However, most allometric analyses were devoted to the single proportional relation between two elements of a geographical system. Few researches focus on the allometric scaling of multielements. In this paper, a process of multiscaling allometric analysis is developed for the studies on spatio-temporal evolution of complex systems. By means of linear algebra, general system theory, and by analogy with the analytical hierarchy process, the concepts of allometric growth can be integrated with the ideas from fractal dimension. Thus a new methodology of geo-spatial analysis and the related theoretical models emerge. Based on the least squares regression and matrix operations, a simple algorithm is proposed to solve the multiscaling allometric equation. Applying the analytical method of multielement allometry to Chinese cities and regions yields satisfying results. A conclusion is reached that the multiscaling allometric analysis can be employed to make a comprehensive evaluation for the relative levels of urban and regional development, and explain spatial heterogeneity. The notion of multiscaling allometry may enrich the current theory and methodology of spatial analyses of urban and regional evolution.

  3. Efficient population-scale variant analysis and prioritization with VAPr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, Amanda; Mark, Adam M; Mazzaferro, Carlo; Xu, Guorong; Fisch, Kathleen M

    2018-04-06

    With the growing availability of population-scale whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing, demand for reproducible, scalable variant analysis has spread within genomic research communities. To address this need, we introduce the Python package VAPr (Variant Analysis and Prioritization). VAPr leverages existing annotation tools ANNOVAR and MyVariant.info with MongoDB-based flexible storage and filtering functionality. It offers biologists and bioinformatics generalists easy-to-use and scalable analysis and prioritization of genomic variants from large cohort studies. VAPr is developed in Python and is available for free use and extension under the MIT License. An install package is available on PyPi at https://pypi.python.org/pypi/VAPr, while source code and extensive documentation are on GitHub at https://github.com/ucsd-ccbb/VAPr. kfisch@ucsd.edu.

  4. Estimating returns to scale in imprecise data envelopment analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatami-Marbini, Adel; Beigi, Zahra Ghelej; Hougaard, Jens Leth

    The economic concept of Returns-to-Scale (RTS) has been intensively studied in the context of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). The conventional DEA models that are used for RTS classification require well-defined and accurate data whereas in reality data are often imprecise, vague, uncertain......-decreasing and variable RTS. The situation for non-increasing (non-decreasing) RTS is then divided into two partitions; constant or decreasing (constant or increasing) RTS using sensitivity analysis. Additionally, the situation for variable RTS is split into three partitions consisting of constant, decreasing...... and increasing RTS using sensitivity analysis. Finally, we present the stability region of an observation while preserving its current RTS classification using the optimal values of a set of proposed DEA-based models....

  5. New Developments in Mokken Scale Analysis in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Andries van der Ark

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mokken (1971 developed a scaling procedure for both dichotomous and polytomous items that was later coined Mokken scale analysis (MSA. MSA has been developed ever since, and the developments until 2000 have been implemented in the software package MSP (Molenaar and Sijtsma 2000 and the R package mokken (Van der Ark 2007. This paper describes the new developments in MSA since 2000 that have been implemented in mokken since its first release in 2007. These new developments pertain to invariant item ordering, a new automated item selection procedure based on a genetic algorithm, inclusion of reliability coefficients, and the computation of standard errors for the scalability coefficients. We demonstrate all new applications using data obtained with a transitive reasoning test and a personality test.

  6. ECG scaling properties of cardiac arrhythmias using detrended fluctuation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, E; Echeverria, J C; Alvarez-Ramirez, J; Lerma, C

    2008-01-01

    We applied detrended fluctuation analysis to characterize at very short time scales during episodes of cardiac arrhythmias the raw electrocardiogram (ECG) waveform, aiming to get a global insight into its dynamical behaviour in patients who experienced sudden death. We found that in 15 recordings involving different types of arrhythmias (taken from PhysioNet's Sudden Cardiac Death Holter Database), the ECG waveform, besides showing a less-random dynamics, becomes more regular during bigeminy, ventricular tachycardia or even atrial fibrillation and ventricular fibrillation. The ECG waveform scaling properties thus suggest that reduced complexity dominates the underlying mechanisms of arrhythmias. Among other explanations, this may result from shorted or restricted (i.e. less diverse) pathways of conduction of the electrical activity within ventricles

  7. Two-Field Analysis of No-Scale Supergravity Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Olive, Keith A

    2015-01-01

    Since the building-blocks of supersymmetric models include chiral superfields containing pairs of effective scalar fields, a two-field approach is particularly appropriate for models of inflation based on supergravity. In this paper, we generalize the two-field analysis of the inflationary power spectrum to supergravity models with arbitrary K\\"ahler potential. We show how two-field effects in the context of no-scale supergravity can alter the model predictions for the scalar spectral index $n_s$ and the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$, yielding results that interpolate between the Planck-friendly Starobinsky model and BICEP2-friendly predictions. In particular, we show that two-field effects in a chaotic no-scale inflation model with a quadratic potential are capable of reducing $r$ to very small values $\\ll 0.1$. We also calculate the non-Gaussianity measure $f_{\\rm NL}$, finding that is well below the current experimental sensitivity.

  8. The Ca, Cl, Mg, Na, and P mass fractions in benign and malignant giant cell tumors of bone investigated by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir Zaichick; German Davydov; Tatyana Epatova; Sofia Zaichick

    2015-01-01

    The Ca, Cl, Mg, Na, and P content and Ca/P, Ca/Mg, Ca/Na, Cl/Ca, and Cl/Na ratios in samples of intact bone, benign and malignant giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone were investigated by neutron activation analysis with high resolution spectrometry of short-lived radionuclides. It was found that in GCT tissue the mass fractions of Cl and Na are higher and the mass fraction of Ca and P are lower than in normal bone tissues. Moreover, it was shown that higher Cl/Na mass fraction ratios as well as lower Ca/Cl, Ca/Mg, and Ca/Na mass fraction ratios are typical of the GCT tissue compared to intact bone. Finally, we propose to use the estimation of such parameters as the Cl mass fraction and the Ca/Cl mass fraction ratio as an additional test for differential diagnosis between benign and malignant GCT. (author)

  9. Error analysis of semidiscrete finite element methods for inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, B.; Lazarov, R.; Pasciak, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved. We consider the initial-boundary value problem for an inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion equation with a homogeneous Dirichlet boundary condition, a vanishing initial data and a nonsmooth right-hand side in a bounded convex polyhedral domain. We analyse two semidiscrete schemes based on the standard Galerkin and lumped mass finite element methods. Almost optimal error estimates are obtained for right-hand side data f (x, t) ε L∞ (0, T; Hq(ω)), ≤1≥ 1, for both semidiscrete schemes. For the lumped mass method, the optimal L2(ω)-norm error estimate requires symmetric meshes. Finally, twodimensional numerical experiments are presented to verify our theoretical results.

  10. Analysis of a solid-phase radioimmunoassay for antibodies to cytoplasmic antigen fractions of Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauch, H.; Bromback, J.

    1981-01-01

    An indirect solid-phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) in individual polystyrene microtiter cups has been adapted for measurement of antibody to various cytoplasmic and carbohydrate antigen fractions of Candida albicans. The assay was optimized for sensitivity, precision and linearization of serum dilution curves. The optimized procedure allows computerized measurement of anti-Candida antibodies and can be used for measurement of antibody over a wide concentration range. The procedure obviates variation due to changes in day-to-day counts as a result of isotope decay and end-point antibody dilutions. The assay has been used to demonstrate a Poisson-like distribution of antibody levels in the sera of persons showing no symptoms of candidiasis. The minimum antibody level detectable by the assay is about two orders of magnitude lower than the lowest level found in human serum and 4 orders of magnitude lower than the most sensitive test used hitherto, the hemagglutination test. (Auth.)

  11. Factor analysis of radionuclide ejection fraction response during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamuro, Masashi

    1986-01-01

    In 204 patients with ischemic heart disease and 25 normal subjects who underwent exercise radionuclide ventriculography (RNV), multivariate analyses and other statistical methods were employed to study factors affecting changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (ΔEF). Twenty one variables were obtained from clinical diagnosis, cardiac catheterization, and RNV. Multivariate analyses showed that coronary score for the severity of coronary artery lesions was the most significant factor, followed by exercise duration, resting heart rate, the number of diseased vessels, and exercise heart rate. Statistically significant decrease in ΔEF was associated with regional wall motion abnormality, ECG changes, and chest pain. Lesions in the left main trunk and the proximal area of left anterior descending artery were greatly involved in the decrease of ΔEF. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Error analysis of semidiscrete finite element methods for inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, B.

    2014-05-30

    © 2014 Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved. We consider the initial-boundary value problem for an inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion equation with a homogeneous Dirichlet boundary condition, a vanishing initial data and a nonsmooth right-hand side in a bounded convex polyhedral domain. We analyse two semidiscrete schemes based on the standard Galerkin and lumped mass finite element methods. Almost optimal error estimates are obtained for right-hand side data f (x, t) ε L∞ (0, T; Hq(ω)), ≤1≥ 1, for both semidiscrete schemes. For the lumped mass method, the optimal L2(ω)-norm error estimate requires symmetric meshes. Finally, twodimensional numerical experiments are presented to verify our theoretical results.

  13. Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Examples of disorders that ...

  14. Development of small scale cluster computer for numerical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkifli, N. H. N.; Sapit, A.; Mohammed, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, two units of personal computer were successfully networked together to form a small scale cluster. Each of the processor involved are multicore processor which has four cores in it, thus made this cluster to have eight processors. Here, the cluster incorporate Ubuntu 14.04 LINUX environment with MPI implementation (MPICH2). Two main tests were conducted in order to test the cluster, which is communication test and performance test. The communication test was done to make sure that the computers are able to pass the required information without any problem and were done by using simple MPI Hello Program where the program written in C language. Additional, performance test was also done to prove that this cluster calculation performance is much better than single CPU computer. In this performance test, four tests were done by running the same code by using single node, 2 processors, 4 processors, and 8 processors. The result shows that with additional processors, the time required to solve the problem decrease. Time required for the calculation shorten to half when we double the processors. To conclude, we successfully develop a small scale cluster computer using common hardware which capable of higher computing power when compare to single CPU processor, and this can be beneficial for research that require high computing power especially numerical analysis such as finite element analysis, computational fluid dynamics, and computational physics analysis.

  15. Reply to: Analysis of the effects of fractionated irradiation to the rat heart (by E. van Rongen)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttenberger, R.

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of the linear quadratic (LQ) model in the analysis of the data presented by Lauk et al. (Radiotherapy. Oncol. 8: 363-367, 1987) is investigated with the linear regression method of Tucker, by simulating fractionated irradiation experiments on tissues with α/β values varying from 1 to 20, starting from theoretical iso-effect doses. It turns out that the LQ model is unreliable for small (∼ 1) α/β values using the error probability p=0.05 and that the sensitivity of the linear regression method is dependent on the underlying α/β. 3 refs.; 1 table

  16. Method for the calculation of volumetric fraction of retained austenite through the software for analysis of digital images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, S.; Costa, F.H.; Hashimoto, T.M.; Pereira, M.S.; Abdalla, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to calculate the volume fraction of the retained austenite in aeronautic multiphase steels, it was used a digital analysis software for image processing. The materials studied were steels AISI 43XX with carbon content between 30, 40 and 50%, heat treated by conventional quenching and isothermal cooling in bainitic and intercritical region, characterized by optical microscopy, etching by reagent Sodium Metabisulfite (10%) for 30 seconds, with forced drying. The results were compared with the methods of X-Ray Diffraction and Magnetic Saturation through photomicrographs, showing that with this technic it is possible to quantify the percentage of retained austenite in the martensitic matrix, in the different types of steels. (author)

  17. Large-Scale Analysis of Network Bistability for Human Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Tetsuya; Matsuyama, Shinako; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    Protein–protein interaction and gene regulatory networks are likely to be locked in a state corresponding to a disease by the behavior of one or more bistable circuits exhibiting switch-like behavior. Sets of genes could be over-expressed or repressed when anomalies due to disease appear, and the circuits responsible for this over- or under-expression might persist for as long as the disease state continues. This paper shows how a large-scale analysis of network bistability for various human cancers can identify genes that can potentially serve as drug targets or diagnosis biomarkers. PMID:20628618

  18. Applications of finite-element scaling analysis in primatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richtsmeier, J T

    1989-01-01

    The study of biological shape in three dimensions using landmark data can now be accomplished using several alternative methods. This report focuses on the use of finite-element scaling analysis in primate craniofacial morphology. The method is particularly useful in its ability to localize the differences between forms, thereby indicating those loci that differ most between specimens. Several examples of this feature are provided from primatological research. Particulars of the methods are also discussed in an attempt to provide the reader with cautionary knowledge for prudent application of the method in future research.

  19. Dimensional analysis of small-scale steam explosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, K.; Corradini, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Dimensional analysis applied to Nelson's small-scale steam explosion experiments to determine the qualitative effect of each relevant parameter for triggering a steam explosion. According to experimental results, the liquid entrapment model seems to be a consistent explanation for the steam explosion triggering mechanism. The three-dimensional oscillatory wave motion of the vapor/liquid interface is analyzed to determine the necessary conditions for local condensation and production of a coolant microjet to be entrapped in fuel. It is proposed that different contact modes between fuel and coolant may involve different initiation mechanisms of steam explosions

  20. Crater ejecta scaling laws: fundamental forms based on dimensional analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Housen, K.R.; Schmidt, R.M.; Holsapple, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A model of crater ejecta is constructed using dimensional analysis and a recently developed theory of energy and momentum coupling in cratering events. General relations are derived that provide a rationale for scaling laboratory measurements of ejecta to larger events. Specific expressions are presented for ejection velocities and ejecta blanket profiles in two limiting regimes of crater formation: the so-called gravity and strength regimes. In the gravity regime, ejectra velocities at geometrically similar launch points within craters vary as the square root of the product of crater radius and gravity. This relation implies geometric similarity of ejecta blankets. That is, the thickness of an ejecta blanket as a function of distance from the crater center is the same for all sizes of craters if the thickness and range are expressed in terms of crater radii. In the strength regime, ejecta velocities are independent of crater size. Consequently, ejecta blankets are not geometrically similar in this regime. For points away from the crater rim the expressions for ejecta velocities and thickness take the form of power laws. The exponents in these power laws are functions of an exponent, α, that appears in crater radius scaling relations. Thus experimental studies of the dependence of crater radius on impact conditions determine scaling relations for ejecta. Predicted ejection velocities and ejecta-blanket profiles, based on measured values of α, are compared to existing measurements of velocities and debris profiles

  1. A Multiple-Scale Analysis of Evaporation Induced Marangoni Convection

    KAUST Repository

    Hennessy, Matthew G.

    2013-04-23

    This paper considers the stability of thin liquid layers of binary mixtures of a volatile (solvent) species and a nonvolatile (polymer) species. Evaporation leads to a depletion of the solvent near the liquid surface. If surface tension increases for lower solvent concentrations, sufficiently strong compositional gradients can lead to Bénard-Marangoni-type convection that is similar to the kind which is observed in films that are heated from below. The onset of the instability is investigated by a linear stability analysis. Due to evaporation, the base state is time dependent, thus leading to a nonautonomous linearized system which impedes the use of normal modes. However, the time scale for the solvent loss due to evaporation is typically long compared to the diffusive time scale, so a systematic multiple scales expansion can be sought for a finite-dimensional approximation of the linearized problem. This is determined to leading and to next order. The corrections indicate that the validity of the expansion does not depend on the magnitude of the individual eigenvalues of the linear operator, but it requires these eigenvalues to be well separated. The approximations are applied to analyze experiments by Bassou and Rharbi with polystyrene/toluene mixtures [Langmuir, 25 (2009), pp. 624-632]. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  2. A Multiple-Scale Analysis of Evaporation Induced Marangoni Convection

    KAUST Repository

    Hennessy, Matthew G.; Mü nch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the stability of thin liquid layers of binary mixtures of a volatile (solvent) species and a nonvolatile (polymer) species. Evaporation leads to a depletion of the solvent near the liquid surface. If surface tension increases for lower solvent concentrations, sufficiently strong compositional gradients can lead to Bénard-Marangoni-type convection that is similar to the kind which is observed in films that are heated from below. The onset of the instability is investigated by a linear stability analysis. Due to evaporation, the base state is time dependent, thus leading to a nonautonomous linearized system which impedes the use of normal modes. However, the time scale for the solvent loss due to evaporation is typically long compared to the diffusive time scale, so a systematic multiple scales expansion can be sought for a finite-dimensional approximation of the linearized problem. This is determined to leading and to next order. The corrections indicate that the validity of the expansion does not depend on the magnitude of the individual eigenvalues of the linear operator, but it requires these eigenvalues to be well separated. The approximations are applied to analyze experiments by Bassou and Rharbi with polystyrene/toluene mixtures [Langmuir, 25 (2009), pp. 624-632]. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  3. Scaling analysis and model estimation of solar corona index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Samujjwal; Ray, Rajdeep; Khondekar, Mofazzal Hossain; Ghosh, Koushik

    2018-04-01

    A monthly average solar green coronal index time series for the period from January 1939 to December 2008 collected from NOAA (The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) has been analysed in this paper in perspective of scaling analysis and modelling. Smoothed and de-noising have been done using suitable mother wavelet as a pre-requisite. The Finite Variance Scaling Method (FVSM), Higuchi method, rescaled range (R/S) and a generalized method have been applied to calculate the scaling exponents and fractal dimensions of the time series. Autocorrelation function (ACF) is used to find autoregressive (AR) process and Partial autocorrelation function (PACF) has been used to get the order of AR model. Finally a best fit model has been proposed using Yule-Walker Method with supporting results of goodness of fit and wavelet spectrum. The results reveal an anti-persistent, Short Range Dependent (SRD), self-similar property with signatures of non-causality, non-stationarity and nonlinearity in the data series. The model shows the best fit to the data under observation.

  4. Analysis on the Multiplication Factor with the Change of Corium Mass and Void Fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hae Sun; Park, Chang Je; Song, Jin Ho; Ha, Kwang Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The neutron absorbing materials and fuel rods would be separately arranged and relocated, since the control materials in metallic structures have lower melting points than that of the oxide fuel (UO{sub 2}) rod materials. In addition, core reflood for a BWR is normally accomplished by supplying unborated water unlikely for a PWR. Therefore, a potential for a recriticality event to occur may exist, if unborated coolant injection is initiated with this configuration in the reactor core. The re-criticality in this system, however, brings into question what the uranium mass is required to achieve a critical level. Furthermore, the additional decay heat from molten fuel (corium) will produce an increase of void and eventually results in under-moderation of neutrons. The prior verification of these consequential physical variations in criticality eigenvalue (effective multiplication factor, k{sub eff}) should be greatly contributed to control and termination of re-criticality. Therefore, this study addresses what uranium mass of corium could achieve re-criticality of an accident core, and how effect the coolant void fraction has on eigenvalue (k{sub eff}) and its reactivity. To analyze the critical mass and the effect on criticality upon changing coolant density, k{sub eff} values were calculated using the MCNPX 2.5.0 code, and the reactivity change was also investigated. As a result, a large change in corium mass leads to a little change in k{sub eff} value, nevertheless, only about 60 kg of uranium is necessary to achieve a critical level. Thus, the amounts to reach a re-criticality are not fairly large, considering the actual uranium quantities loaded in the reactor core. Based on the condition with k{sub eff} greater than unity, the absolute values of k{sub eff} decrease rate and the coolant density coefficient were gradually increased due to the steady increments of coolant void (i.e., decrease in coolant density). In addition, the k{sub eff} value approaches the

  5. Full scale experimental analysis of wind direction changes (EOD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2007-01-01

    wind direction gust amplitudes associated with the investigated European sites are low compared to the recommended IEC- values. However, these values, as function of the mean wind speed, are difficult to validate thoroughly due to the limited number of fully correlated measurements....... the magnitudes of a joint gust event defined by a simultaneously wind speed- and direction change in order to obtain an indication of the validity of the magnitudes specified in the IEC code. The analysis relates to pre-specified recurrence periods and is based on full-scale wind field measurements. The wind......A coherent wind speed and wind direction change (ECD) load case is defined in the wind turbine standard. This load case is an essential extreme load case that e.g. may be design driving for flap defection of active stall controlled wind turbines. The present analysis identifies statistically...

  6. Trace Analysis of Mutagenic Heterocyclic Aromatic Amines in Cigarette Smoke Condensate and its Base Fractions via Silylation-GC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the more than 5000 chemicals reported in cigarette smoke condensate (CSC, heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs are considered to be a contributor to observed biological activity. HAAs are non-volatile and are reported at ppb levels in CSC. A new method for HAA analysis at the trace level is reported here. N, O-Bis(trimethylsilyl trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA containing 1% trimethylchlorosilane was employed to derivatize amino groups by heating the reagent containing a sample of CSC at 80 °C for 30 min followed by analysis employing gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS in the selected-ion-monitoring (SIM mode. This derivatization method afforded symmetrical peak shapes on a ZB-50 stationary phase and achieved instrumental limits of quantification (LOQ at 10:1 S/N from -1 ng/mL for AαC to120 ng/mL for Glu-P-1. The chemical identity of each derivative was confirmed by comparison of retention time and mass spectra of standards. The latter were characterized by the following ions: M·+ or [M-1]+, [M-15]+, and m/z 73 (i.e., trimethylsilyl. CSC and its base sub-fractions were studied using the GC-MS method. Ten HAAs were screened and five were quantified in cigarette smoke condensate, while 2-5 HAAs were quantified in each of three base sub-fractions. Values obtained with the new procedure agree well with values reported in the literature and with results obtained from a commercial laboratory via a different analytical method. The potential contribution of each HAA to the overall mutagenic activity observed for CSC and its base fractions is discussed. When considered together, HAAs account for only a small portion (-7.8% of the observed mutagenicity of the CSC.

  7. Problems of allometric scaling analysis: examples from mammalian reproductive biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robert D; Genoud, Michel; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K

    2005-05-01

    Biological scaling analyses employing the widely used bivariate allometric model are beset by at least four interacting problems: (1) choice of an appropriate best-fit line with due attention to the influence of outliers; (2) objective recognition of divergent subsets in the data (allometric grades); (3) potential restrictions on statistical independence resulting from phylogenetic inertia; and (4) the need for extreme caution in inferring causation from correlation. A new non-parametric line-fitting technique has been developed that eliminates requirements for normality of distribution, greatly reduces the influence of outliers and permits objective recognition of grade shifts in substantial datasets. This technique is applied in scaling analyses of mammalian gestation periods and of neonatal body mass in primates. These analyses feed into a re-examination, conducted with partial correlation analysis, of the maternal energy hypothesis relating to mammalian brain evolution, which suggests links between body size and brain size in neonates and adults, gestation period and basal metabolic rate. Much has been made of the potential problem of phylogenetic inertia as a confounding factor in scaling analyses. However, this problem may be less severe than suspected earlier because nested analyses of variance conducted on residual variation (rather than on raw values) reveals that there is considerable variance at low taxonomic levels. In fact, limited divergence in body size between closely related species is one of the prime examples of phylogenetic inertia. One common approach to eliminating perceived problems of phylogenetic inertia in allometric analyses has been calculation of 'independent contrast values'. It is demonstrated that the reasoning behind this approach is flawed in several ways. Calculation of contrast values for closely related species of similar body size is, in fact, highly questionable, particularly when there are major deviations from the best

  8. A fractional Fourier transform analysis of the scattering of ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tant, Katherine M.M.; Mulholland, Anthony J.; Langer, Matthias; Gachagan, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Many safety critical structures, such as those found in nuclear plants, oil pipelines and in the aerospace industry, rely on key components that are constructed from heterogeneous materials. Ultrasonic non-destructive testing (NDT) uses high-frequency mechanical waves to inspect these parts, ensuring they operate reliably without compromising their integrity. It is possible to employ mathematical models to develop a deeper understanding of the acquired ultrasonic data and enhance defect imaging algorithms. In this paper, a model for the scattering of ultrasonic waves by a crack is derived in the time–frequency domain. The fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) is applied to an inhomogeneous wave equation where the forcing function is prescribed as a linear chirp, modulated by a Gaussian envelope. The homogeneous solution is found via the Born approximation which encapsulates information regarding the flaw geometry. The inhomogeneous solution is obtained via the inverse Fourier transform of a Gaussian-windowed linear chirp excitation. It is observed that, although the scattering profile of the flaw does not change, it is amplified. Thus, the theory demonstrates the enhanced signal-to-noise ratio permitted by the use of coded excitation, as well as establishing a time–frequency domain framework to assist in flaw identification and classification. PMID:25792967

  9. Analysis of triso packing fraction and fissile material to DB-MHR using LWR reprocessed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Clarysson A.M. da; Pereira, Claubia; Costa, Antonella L.; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Gual, Maritza R.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor is being considered the next generation of nuclear power plants because of its characteristic to operate with reprocessed fuel. The typical fuel element consists of a hexagonal block with coolant and fuel channels. The fuel pin is manufactured into compacted ceramic-coated particles (TRISO) which are used to achieve both a high burnup and a high degree of passive safety. This work uses the MCNPX 2.6.0 to simulate the active core of Deep Burn Modular Helium Reactor (DB-MHR) employing PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) reprocessed fuel. However, before a complete study of DB-MHR fuel cycle and recharge, it is necessary to evaluate the neutronic parameters to some values of TRISO Packing Fractions (PF) and Fissile Material (FM). Each PF and FM combination would generate the best behaviour of neutronic parameters. Therefore, this study configures several PF and FM combinations considering the heterogeneity of TRISO layers and lattice. The results present the best combination of PF and FM values according with the more appropriated behaviour of the neutronic parameters during the burnup. In this way, the optimized combination can be used to future works of MHR fuel cycle and recharge. (author)

  10. Performance Analysis of Fractional-Order PID Controller for a Parabolic Distributed Solar Collector

    KAUST Repository

    Elmetennani, Shahrazed

    2017-09-01

    This paper studies the performance of a fractional-order proportional integral derivative (FOPID) controller designed for parabolic distributed solar collectors. The control problem addressed in concentrated solar collectors aims at forcing the produced heat to follow a desired reference despite the unevenly varying solar irradiance. In addition to the unpredictable variations of the energy source, the parabolic solar collectors are subject to inhomogeneous distributed efficiency parameters affecting the heat production. The FOPID controller is well known for its simplicity with better tuning flexibility along with robustness with respect to disturbances. Thus, we propose a control strategy based on FOPID to achieve the control objectives. First, the FOPID controller is designed based on a linear approximate model describing the system dynamics under nominal working conditions. Then, the FOPID gains and differentiation orders are optimally tuned in order to fulfill the robustness design specifications by solving a nonlinear optimization problem. Numerical simulations are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed FOPID controller. A comparison to the robust integer order PID is also provided. Robustness tests are performed for the nominal model to show the effectiveness of the FOPID. Furthermore, the proposed FOPID is numerically tested to control the distributed solar collector under real working conditions.

  11. Analysis of Organic Anionic Surfactants in Fine and Coarse Fractions of Freshly Emitted Sea Spray Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Richard E.; Laskina, Olga; Jayarathne, Thilina; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Lin, Peng; Sultana, Camile M.; Lee, Christopher; Moore, Kathryn A.; Cappa, Christopher; Bertram, Timothy; Prather, Kimberly; Grassian, Vicki H.; Stone, Elizabeth

    2016-02-01

    The inclusion of organic compounds in freshly emitted sea spray aerosol (SSA) has been shown to be size-dependent, with an increasing organic fraction in smaller particles. Defining the molecular composition of sea spray aerosol has proven challenging, due to the mix of continental and background particles even in remote marine environments. Here we have used electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry in negative ion mode to identify organic compounds in nascent sea spray collected throughout a 25-day mesocosm experiment. Over 280 organic compounds from ten major homologous series were identified. These compounds were operationally defined as molecules containing a hydrophobic alkyl chain with a hydrophilic head group making them surface active. The most abundant class of molecules detected were saturated (C8–C24) and unsaturated (C12–C22) fatty acids. Fatty acid derivatives (including saturated oxo-fatty acids (C5–C18) and saturated hydroxy-fatty acids (C5–C18) were also identified. Interestingly, anthropogenic influences on SSA from the seawater were observed in the form of sulfate (C2–C7, C12–C17) and sulfonate (C16–C22) species. During the mesocosm, the distributions of molecules within each homologous series were observed to respond to variations among the levels of phytoplankton and bacteria in the seawater, indicating an important role of biological processes in determining the composition of SSA.

  12. Animal manure phosphorus characterization by sequential chemical fractionation, release kinetics and 31P-NMR analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tales Tiecher

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate release kinetics from manures are of global interest because sustainable plant nutrition with phosphate will be a major concern in the future. Although information on the bioavailability and chemical composition of P present in manure used as fertilizer are important to understand its dynamics in the soil, such studies are still scarce. Therefore, P extraction was evaluated in this study by sequential chemical fractionation, desorption with anion-cation exchange resin and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR spectroscopy to assess the P forms in three different dry manure types (i.e. poultry, cattle and swine manure. All three methods showed that the P forms in poultry, cattle and swine dry manures are mostly inorganic and highly bioavailable. The estimated P pools showed that organic and recalcitrant P forms were negligible and highly dependent on the Ca:P ratio in manures. The results obtained here showed that the extraction of P with these three different methods allows a better understanding and complete characterization of the P pools present in the manures.

  13. Analysis of fractional anisotropy facilitates differentiation of glioblastoma and brain metastases in a clinical setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bette, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.bette@tum.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Huber, Thomas; Wiestler, Benedikt; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias [Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Gempt, Jens; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard [Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Zimmer, Claus; Kirschke, Jan S. [Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Purpose: Differentiating glioblastoma from brain metastases is important for therapy planning. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was described as a promising tool, however with conflicting results. Aim: of this study was to analyze the clinical utility of DTI for the differentiation of brain metastases and glioblastoma. Methods: 294 patients (165 glioblastoma, 129 brain metastases) with preoperative DTI were included in this retrospective study. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was measured via regions of interest (ROIs) in the contrast-enhancing tumor, the necrosis and the FLAIR-hyperintense non-enhancing peritumoral region (NEPTR). Two neuroradiologists classified patient cases as glioblastoma or brain metastases without and with knowledge of FA values. Results: Glioblastoma showed significantly higher FA{sub contrast} (median glioblastoma = 0.33, metastases = 0.23; P < 0.001) whereas no significant difference was observed for FA{sub NEPTR} (0.21 vs. 0.22; P = 0.28) and for FA{sub necrosis} (0.17 vs. 0.18, P = 0.37). FA improved diagnostic accuracy of the neuroradiologists significantly from an AUC of 0.84/0.85 (Reader1/Reader2) to 0.89/0.92. Conclusions: Glioblastoma show significantly higher FA values in the contrast enhancing tumor part than brain metastases. Implementation of a ROI-based measurement of FA values and FA color maps in clinical routine helps to differentiate between glioblastoma and brain metastases.

  14. Scalable Analysis Methods and In Situ Infrastructure for Extreme Scale Knowledge Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-07-24

    The primary challenge motivating this team’s work is the widening gap between the ability to compute information and to store it for subsequent analysis. This gap adversely impacts science code teams, who are able to perform analysis only on a small fraction of the data they compute, resulting in the very real likelihood of lost or missed science, when results are computed but not analyzed. Our approach is to perform as much analysis or visualization processing on data while it is still resident in memory, an approach that is known as in situ processing. The idea in situ processing was not new at the time of the start of this effort in 2014, but efforts in that space were largely ad hoc, and there was no concerted effort within the research community that aimed to foster production-quality software tools suitable for use by DOE science projects. In large, our objective was produce and enable use of production-quality in situ methods and infrastructure, at scale, on DOE HPC facilities, though we expected to have impact beyond DOE due to the widespread nature of the challenges, which affect virtually all large-scale computational science efforts. To achieve that objective, we assembled a unique team of researchers consisting of representatives from DOE national laboratories, academia, and industry, and engaged in software technology R&D, as well as engaged in close partnerships with DOE science code teams, to produce software technologies that were shown to run effectively at scale on DOE HPC platforms.

  15. Geometrical study of astrocytomas through fractals and scaling analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres H, F.; Baena N, R.; Vergara V, J.; Guerrero M, M.

    2017-10-01

    The tumor growth is a complex process characterized by the proliferation of uncontrollable cells which invade neighbor tissues. The understanding process of this type of phenomena is very relevant in order to establish diagnosis and proper therapy strategies and to start the valorization of its complexity with proper descriptors produced by the scaling analysis, which define the tumor growth geometry. In this work, obtained results through the scaling analysis for pilocytic astrocytomas, anaplastic and diffuse, are shown, which tumors of primary origin are. On them, it is calculated the fractal dimension and critic exponents of local roughness to characterize in vivo three-dimensional tumor growth. The acquisition of the images for this type of injuries was carried out according to the standard protocol used for brain radiotherapy and radiosurgery, i.e., axial, coronal and sagittal magnetic resonance T1 weighted images and comprising the brain volume for image registration. Image segmentation was performed by the application the K-means procedure upon contrasted images. The results show significant variations of the parameters depending on the tumor stage and its histological origin. (Author)

  16. Meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies shows altered fractional anisotropy occurring in distinct brain areas in association with depression

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Melissa L

    2011-09-27

    Abstract Fractional anisotropy anomalies occurring in the white matter tracts in the brains of depressed patients may reflect microstructural changes underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy abnormalities occurring in major depressive disorder using voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging studies. Using the Embase, PubMed and Google Scholar databases, 89 relevant data sets were identified, of which 7 (including 188 patients with major depressive disorder and 221 healthy controls) met our inclusion criteria. Authors were contacted to retrieve any additional data required. Coordinates were extracted from clusters of significant white matter fractional anisotropy differences between patients and controls. Relevant demographic, clinical and methodological variables were extracted from each study or obtained directly from authors. The meta-analysis was carried out using Signed Differential Mapping. Patients with depression showed decreased white matter fractional anisotropy values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and increased fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-occipital fasciculus compared to controls. Using quartile and jackknife sensitivity analysis, we found that reduced fractional anisotropy in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus was very stable, with increases in the right fronto-occipital fasciculus driven by just one study. In conclusion, our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which may ultimately play an important role in the pathology of depression.

  17. Meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging studies shows altered fractional anisotropy occurring in distinct brain areas in association with depression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Melissa L

    2011-09-01

    Fractional anisotropy anomalies occurring in the white matter tracts in the brains of depressed patients may reflect microstructural changes underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy abnormalities occurring in major depressive disorder using voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging studies. Using the Embase, PubMed and Google Scholar databases, 89 relevant data sets were identified, of which 7 (including 188 patients with major depressive disorder and 221 healthy controls) met our inclusion criteria. Authors were contacted to retrieve any additional data required. Coordinates were extracted from clusters of significant white matter fractional anisotropy differences between patients and controls. Relevant demographic, clinical and methodological variables were extracted from each study or obtained directly from authors. The meta-analysis was carried out using Signed Differential Mapping. Patients with depression showed decreased white matter fractional anisotropy values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and increased fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-occipital fasciculus compared to controls. Using quartile and jackknife sensitivity analysis, we found that reduced fractional anisotropy in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus was very stable, with increases in the right fronto-occipital fasciculus driven by just one study. In conclusion, our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which may ultimately play an important role in the pathology of depression.

  18. The Effect of Essential Oils and Bioactive Fractions on Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans Biofilms: A Confocal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irlan Almeida Freires

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oils (EO and bioactive fractions (BF from Aloysia gratissima, Baccharis dracunculifolia, Coriandrum sativum, Cyperus articulatus, and Lippia sidoides were proven to have strong antimicrobial activity on planktonic microorganisms; however, little is known about their effects on the morphology or viability of oral biofilms. Previously, we determined the EO/fractions with the best antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Candida spp. In this report, we used a confocal analysis to investigate the effect of these EO and BF on the morphology of S. mutans biofilms (thickness, biovolume, and architecture and on the metabolic viability of C. albicans biofilms. The analysis of intact treated S. mutans biofilms showed no statistical difference for thickness in all groups compared to the control. However, a significant reduction in the biovolume of extracellular polysaccharides and bacteria was observed for A. gratissima and L. sidoides groups, indicating that these BF disrupt biofilm integrity and may have created porosity in the biofilm. This phenomenon could potentially result in a weakened structure and affect biofilm dynamics. Finally, C. sativum EO drastically affected C. albicans viability when compared to the control. These results highlight the promising antimicrobial activity of these plant species and support future translational research on the treatment of dental caries and oral candidiasis.

  19. Determination of concentration levels of arsenic, gold and antimony in particle-size fractions of gold ore using Neutron Activation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyarku, M.

    2009-02-01

    Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) has been used to quantify the concentrations of arsenic, gold and antimony in particle-size fractions of a gold ore. The ore, which was taken from the Ahafo project site of Newmont Ghana Gold Ltd, was first fractionated into fourteen (14) particle-size fractions using state-of-the-art analytical sieve machine. The minimum sieve mesh size used was 36 microns and grains >2000 microns were not considered for analysis. Results of the sieving were analysed with easysieve software. The < 36 microns sub fraction was found to be the optimum, hosting bulk of all three elements. For arsenic, the element was found to be highly concentrated in < 36 to +100 microns size fractions and erratically distributed from +150 microns fraction and above. For gold, in exception of the sub fraction <36 which had exceptionally high concentration, the element is distributed in all the size fractions but slightly 'plays out' in the +150 to +400 microns fractions. Antimony occurrence in the sample was relatively high in <36 microns size fraction followed by 600 - 800, 800 - 1000, 400 - 600 and 36 - 40 microns size fractions in that order. Gold content in the sample was far higher than that of arsenic and antimony. Gold concentration in the composite sample was in the range 564 - 8420 ppm. Arsenic levels were higher as compared to antimony. The range of arsenic concentration in the composite sample was 14.33 - 186.92 ppm. Antimony concentration was in the range 1.09 - 9.48 ppm. (au)

  20. Micro-scaled high-throughput digestion of plant tissue samples for multi-elemental analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husted Søren

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative multi-elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectrometry depends on a complete digestion of solid samples. However, fast and thorough sample digestion is a challenging analytical task which constitutes a bottleneck in modern multi-elemental analysis. Additional obstacles may be that sample quantities are limited and elemental concentrations low. In such cases, digestion in small volumes with minimum dilution and contamination is required in order to obtain high accuracy data. Results We have developed a micro-scaled microwave digestion procedure and optimized it for accurate elemental profiling of plant materials (1-20 mg dry weight. A commercially available 64-position rotor with 5 ml disposable glass vials, originally designed for microwave-based parallel organic synthesis, was used as a platform for the digestion. The novel micro-scaled method was successfully validated by the use of various certified reference materials (CRM with matrices rich in starch, lipid or protein. When the micro-scaled digestion procedure was applied on single rice grains or small batches of Arabidopsis seeds (1 mg, corresponding to approximately 50 seeds, the obtained elemental profiles closely matched those obtained by conventional analysis using digestion in large volume vessels. Accumulated elemental contents derived from separate analyses of rice grain fractions (aleurone, embryo and endosperm closely matched the total content obtained by analysis of the whole rice grain. Conclusion A high-throughput micro-scaled method has been developed which enables digestion of small quantities of plant samples for subsequent elemental profiling by ICP-spectrometry. The method constitutes a valuable tool for screening of mutants and transformants. In addition, the method facilitates studies of the distribution of essential trace elements between and within plant organs which is relevant for, e.g., breeding programmes aiming at

  1. Experimental studies and model analysis of noble gas fractionation in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xin; Kennedy, B. Mack.; Evans, William C.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The noble gases, which are chemically inert under normal terrestrial conditions but vary systematically across a wide range of atomic mass and diffusivity, offer a multicomponent approach to investigating gas dynamics in unsaturated soil horizons, including transfer of gas between saturated zones, unsaturated zones, and the atmosphere. To evaluate the degree to which fractionation of noble gases in the presence of an advective–diffusive flux agrees with existing theory, a simple laboratory sand column experiment was conducted. Pure CO2 was injected at the base of the column, providing a series of constant CO2 fluxes through the column. At five fixed sampling depths within the system, samples were collected for CO2 and noble gas analyses, and ambient pressures were measured. Both the advection–diffusion and dusty gas models were used to simulate the behavior of CO2 and noble gases under the experimental conditions, and the simulations were compared with the measured depth-dependent concentration profiles of the gases. Given the relatively high permeability of the sand column (5 ´ 10−11 m2), Knudsen diffusion terms were small, and both the dusty gas model and the advection–diffusion model accurately predicted the concentration profiles of the CO2 and atmospheric noble gases across a range of CO2 flux from ?700 to 10,000 g m−2 d−1. The agreement between predicted and measured gas concentrations demonstrated that, when applied to natural systems, the multi-component capability provided by the noble gases can be exploited to constrain component and total gas fluxes of non-conserved (CO2) and conserved (noble gas) species or attributes of the soil column relevant to gas transport, such as porosity, tortuosity, and gas saturation.

  2. Spectrophotometric analysis of the lipid fraction of microwave heated and soaked soybeans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelista, C. M.

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The flavor of soybean products, particularly soy milk, is one of the main problems to its acceptance by Western people. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of different microwave pre-heating times on soybean oxidative quality by monitoring the spectrophotometric absorptivity at 232 nm of its lipid fraction during soaking for soymilk production. A decrease in oxidation level was observed in microwave heated soybeans and the longer the exposure time was, the lower was the absorptivity. Absorptivity of non-heated soybeans was 5,36, while those heated for 150s, reached a temperature of 142,5°C and presented 2.93. Data could be represented by a polynomial equation of second order.

    Uno de los principales problemas para la aceptación de los productos de la soja por las poblaciones del Occidente es el «flavor», sobre todo de la leche de soja. Con este trabajo se buscó evaluar los efectos del pre-calentamiento con microondas a diferentes tiempos sobre la calidad oxidativa de la soja, midiendo la absortividad a 232 nm de la fracción lipídica después de la maceración para la producción de la leche de soja. Con este método fue posible detectar la disminución de la oxidación durante la maceración y comprobar que fue menor cuanto más largo fue el tiempo de exposición a las microondas. La soja no calentada presentó una absortividad de 5,36 y las calentadas durante 150 segundos, 2,93, a una temperatura final de 142,5°G. Los datos se ajustaron a una ecuación de segundo orden.

  3. Fractional charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saminadayar, L.

    2001-01-01

    20 years ago fractional charges were imagined to explain values of conductivity in some materials. Recent experiments have proved the existence of charges whose value is the third of the electron charge. This article presents the experimental facts that have led theorists to predict the existence of fractional charges from the motion of quasi-particles in a linear chain of poly-acetylene to the quantum Hall effect. According to the latest theories, fractional charges are neither bosons nor fermions but anyons, they are submitted to an exclusive principle that is less stringent than that for fermions. (A.C.)

  4. Fractionated-combustion analysis of carbonate-containing phases in composite materials of the hydroxyapatite-calcium carbonate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, M. A.; Shibaeva, T. V.; Smirnov, V. V.; Kutsev, S. V.; Barinov, S. M.; Grigorovich, K. V.

    2012-12-01

    Materials in the hydroxyapatite (HA)-calcium carbonate (CC) system were synthesized by a precipitation method from aqueous solutions. According to the data of X-ray phase analysis and IR spectroscopy, the powders consisted of CC and AB-type carbonate-substituted HA (CHA). In order to determine the content of carbonate-containing phases in materials, the temperature-temporal mode of fractionated-combustion analysis of carbon was developed. The quantitative phase ratios and the degree of substitution of carbonate groups in CHA were determined. It was shown that the degree of substitution of carbonate groups in CHA increased from 2.47 to 5.31 wt % as the CC content increased from 13.50 to 88.33 wt %.

  5. A Breast Cell Atlas: Organelle analysis of the MDA-MB-231 cell line by density-gradient fractionation using isotopic marking and label-free analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Sandin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein translocation between organelles in the cell is an important process that regulates many cellular functions. However, organelles can rarely be isolated to purity so several methods have been developed to analyse the fractions obtained by density gradient centrifugation. We present an analysis of the distribution of proteins amongst organelles in the human breast cell line, MDA-MB-231 using two approaches: an isotopic labelling and a label-free approach.

  6. Fractional fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackiw, R.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1984-01-01

    The theory of fermion fractionization due to topologically generated fermion ground states is presented. Applications to one-dimensional conductors, to the MIT bag, and to the Hall effect are reviewed. (author)

  7. Energy Contribution of OFMSW (Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste to Energy-Environmental Sustainability in Urban Areas at Small Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Di Matteo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Urban waste management is one of the most challenging issues in energy planning of medium and large cities. In addition to the traditional landfill method, many studies are investigating energy harvesting from waste, not as a panacea but as a foreseeable solution. Thermo-chemical conversion to biogas, or even bio-methane under certain conditions, could be an option to address this challenge. This study focuses on municipal solid waste conversion to biogas as a local energy supply for the cities. Three urban models and their subdivision into urban areas were identified along with a typical Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW matrix for each urban area. Then, an energy analysis was carried out to provide an optimization map for an informed choice by urban policy-makers and stakeholders. The results highlighted how the urban context and its use could affect the opportunity to produce energy from waste or to convert it in fuel. So, in this case, sustainability means waste turning from a problem to a renewable resource.

  8. Comparative analysis of procoagulant and fibrinogenolytic activity of crude protease fractions of turmeric species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Nafeesa, Zohara; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-08-22

    Turmeric rhizome is a traditional herbal medicine, which has been widely used as a remedy to stop bleeding on fresh cuts and for wound healing by the rural and tribal population of India. To validate scientific and therapeutic application of turmeric rhizomes to stop bleeding on fresh cuts and its role in wound healing process. The water extracts of thoroughly scrubbed and washed turmeric rhizomes viz., Curcuma aromatica Salisb., Curcuma longa L., Curcuma caesia Roxb., Curcuma amada Roxb. and Curcuma zedoria (Christm.) Roscoe. were subjected to salting out and dialysis. The dialyzed crude enzyme fractions (CEFs) were assessed for proteolytic activity using casein as substrate and were also confirmed by caseinolytic zymography. Its coagulant activity and fibrinogenolytic activity were assessed using human citrated plasma and fibrinogen, respectively. The type of protease(s) in CEFs was confirmed by inhibition studies using specific protease inhibitors. The CEFs of C. aromatica, C. longa and C. caesia showed 1.89, 1.21 and 1.07 folds higher proteolytic activity, respectively, compared to papain. In contrast to these, C. amada and C. zedoria exhibited moderate proteolytic activity. CEFs showed low proteolytic activities compared to trypsin. The proteolytic activities of CEFs were confirmed by caseinolytic zymography. The CEFs of C. aromatica, C. longa and C. caesia showed complete hydrolysis of Aα, Bβ and γ subunits of human fibrinogen, while C. amada and C. zedoria showed partial hydrolysis. The CEFs viz., C. aromatica, C. longa, C. caesia, C. amada and C. zedoria exhibited strong procoagulant activity by reducing the human plasma clotting time from 172s (Control) to 66s, 84s 88s, 78s and 90s, respectively. The proteolytic activity of C. aromatica, C. longa, C. caesia and C. amada was inhibited (>82%) by PMSF, suggesting the possible presence of a serine protease(s). However, C. zedoria showed significant inhibition (60%) against IAA and moderate inhibition (30

  9. Are pitch and roll compensations required in all pathologies? A data analysis of 2945 fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Reggiori, Giacomo; Gaudino, Anna; Lobefalo, Francesca; Paganini, Lucia; Palumbo, Valentina; Stravato, Antonella; Tomatis, Stefano; Scorsetti, Marta

    2015-01-01

    New linear accelerators can be equipped with a 6D robotic couch, providing two additional rotational motion axes: pitch and roll. These shifts in kilo voltage-cone beam CT (kV-CBCT) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) were evaluated over the first 6 months of usage of a 6D robotic couch-top, ranking the treatment sites for which the two compensations are larger for patient set-up. The couch compensations of 2945 fractions for 376 consecutive patients treated on the PerfectPitch™ 6D couch (Varian(®) Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were analysed. Among these patients, 169 were treated for brain, 111 for lung, 54 for liver, 26 for pancreas and 16 for prostate tumours. During the set-up, patient anatomy from planning CT was aligned to kV-CBCT, and 6D movements were executed. Information related to pitch and roll were extracted by proper querying of the Microsoft(®) SQL server (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA) ARIA database (Varian Medical Systems). Mean values and standard deviations were calculated for all sites. Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test was performed. Considering all the data, mean pitch and roll adjustments were -0.10° ± 0.92° and 0.12° ± 0.96°, respectively; mean absolute values for both adjustments were 0.58° ± 0.69° and 0.69° ± 0.72°, respectively. Brain treatments showed the highest mean absolute values for pitch and roll rotations (0.73° ± 0.69° and 0.80° ± 0.78°, respectively); the lowest values of 0.36° ± 0.47° and 0.49° ± 0.58° were found for pancreas. KS test was significant for brain vs liver, pancreas and prostate. Collective corrections (pitch + roll) >0.5°, >1.0° and >2.0° were observed in, respectively, 79.8%, 61.0% and 29.1% for brain and 56.7%, 39.4% and 6.7% for pancreas. Adjustments in all six dimensions, including unconventional pitch and roll rotations, improve the patient set-up in all treatment sites. The greatest improvement was observed for patients with brain tumours. To

  10. The distinction between chondroma and chondrosarcoma using chemical element mass fractions in tumors determined by neutron activation analysis as diagnostic markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaichick, Vladimir; Zaichick, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    The Ca, Cl, Mg, Na, and P content and Ca/P, Ca/Mg, Ca/Na, Cl/Ca, and Cl/Na ratios in tissue of intact bone, chondroma and chondrosarcoma were investigated by neutron activation analysis. It was shown that higher mass fraction of Cl and Na and also Cl/Na mass fraction ratio as well as lower Ca/Cl and Ca/Na mass fraction ratios are typical of the chondrosarcoma tissue compared to chondroma. Finally, it was proposed to use the estimation of such parameters as the Cl mass fraction and the Ca/Cl and Ca/Na mass fraction ratios as an additional test for differential diagnosis between chondroma and chondrosarcoma. (author)

  11. Finite size scaling analysis of disordered electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markos, P.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrated the application of the finite size scaling method to the analysis of the transition of the disordered system from the metallic to the insulating regime. The method enables us to calculate the critical point and the critical exponent which determines the divergence of the correlation length in the vicinity of the critical point. The universality of the metal-insulator transition was verified by numerical analysis of various physical parameters and the critical exponent was calculated with high accuracy for different disordered models. Numerically obtained value of the critical exponent for the three dimensional disordered model (1) has been recently supported by the semi-analytical work and verified by experimental optical measurements equivalent to the three dimensional disordered model (1). Another unsolved problem of the localization is the disagreement between numerical results and predictions of the analytical theories. At present, no analytical theory confirms numerically obtained values of critical exponents. The reason for this disagreement lies in the statistical character of the process of localization. The theory must consider all possible scattering processes on randomly distributed impurities. All physical variables are statistical quantities with broad probability distributions. It is in general not know how to calculate analytically their mean values. We believe that detailed numerical analysis of various disordered systems bring inspiration for the formulation of analytical theory. (authors)

  12. Comprehensive analysis of proteins of pH fractionated samples using monolithic LC/MS/MS, intact MW measurement and MALDI-QIT-TOF MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Chul; Patwa, Tasneem H.; Kreunin, Paweena; Miller, Fred R.; Huber, Christian G.; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Lubman, David M.

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive platform that integrates information from the protein and peptide levels by combining various MS techniques has been employed for the analysis of proteins in fully malignant human breast cancer cells. The cell lysates were subjected to chromatofocusing fractionation, followed by tryptic digestion of pH fractions for on-line monolithic RP-HPLC interfaced with linear ion trap MS analysis for rapid protein identification. This unique approach of direct analysis of pH fractions resulted in the identification of large numbers of proteins from several selected pH fractions, in which approximately 1.5 μg of each of the pH fraction digests was consumed for an analysis time of ca 50 min. In order to combine valuable information retained at the protein level with the protein identifications obtained from the peptide level information, the same pH fraction was analyzed using nonporous (NPS)-RP-HPLC/ESI-TOF MS to obtain intact protein MW measurements. In order to further validate the protein identification procedures from the fraction digest analysis, NPS-RP-HPLC separation was performed for off-line protein collection to closely examine each protein using MALDI-TOF MS and MALDI-quadrupole ion trap (QIT)-TOF MS, and excellent agreement of protein identifications was consistently observed. It was also observed that the comparison to intact MW and other MS information was particularly useful for analyzing proteins whose identifications were suggested by one sequenced peptide from fraction digest analysis. PMID:17206599

  13. Parallel Index and Query for Large Scale Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Jerry; Wu, Kesheng; Ruebel, Oliver; Howison, Mark; Qiang, Ji; Prabhat,; Austin, Brian; Bethel, E. Wes; Ryne, Rob D.; Shoshani, Arie

    2011-07-18

    Modern scientific datasets present numerous data management and analysis challenges. State-of-the-art index and query technologies are critical for facilitating interactive exploration of large datasets, but numerous challenges remain in terms of designing a system for process- ing general scientific datasets. The system needs to be able to run on distributed multi-core platforms, efficiently utilize underlying I/O infrastructure, and scale to massive datasets. We present FastQuery, a novel software framework that address these challenges. FastQuery utilizes a state-of-the-art index and query technology (FastBit) and is designed to process mas- sive datasets on modern supercomputing platforms. We apply FastQuery to processing of a massive 50TB dataset generated by a large scale accelerator modeling code. We demonstrate the scalability of the tool to 11,520 cores. Motivated by the scientific need to search for inter- esting particles in this dataset, we use our framework to reduce search time from hours to tens of seconds.

  14. Regional scale analysis of the altimetric stream network evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ghizzoni

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Floods result from the limited carrying capacity of stream channels when compared to the discharge peak value. The transit of flood waves - with the associated erosion and sedimentation processes - often modifies local stream geometry. In some cases this results in a reduction of the stream carrying capacity, and consequently in an enhancement of the flooding risk. A mathematical model for the prediction of potential altimetric stream network evolution due to erosion and sedimentation processes is here formalized. It works at the regional scale, identifying the tendency of river segments to sedimentation, stability, or erosion. The model builds on geomorphologic concepts, and derives its parameters from extensive surveys. As a case study, tendencies of rivers pertaining to the Valle d'Aosta region are analyzed. Some validation is provided both at regional and local scales of analysis. Local validation is performed both through a mathematical model able to simulate the temporal evolution of the stream profile, and through comparison of the prediction with ante and post-event river surveys, where available. Overall results are strongly encouraging. Possible use of the information derived from the model in the context of flood and landslide hazard mitigation is briefly discussed.

  15. Analysis of two human parvovirus PARV4 genotypes identified in human plasma for fractionation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fryer, Jacqueline F.; Delwart, Eric; Bernardin, Flavien; Tuke, Philip W.; Lukashov, Vladimir V.; Baylis, Sally A.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of the novel parvovirus PARV4 and a related variant, PARV5, was recently demonstrated in pooled plasma used in the manufacture of blood and plasma-derived medicinal products. DNA sequence analysis of nearly full-length genomes of four PARV4 and two PARV5 strains from manufacturing

  16. Modal Analysis Using the Singular Value Decomposition and Rational Fraction Polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    also consistent. In the subsequent analysis, the normal direction at each node is computed using the cross product of the connected element edges...For this mode in particular, the revised RFP mode shape is much cleaner than the original SVD mode shape. The algorithm for computing the revised

  17. Large-scale quantitative analysis of painting arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daniel; Son, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Hawoong

    2014-12-11

    Scientists have made efforts to understand the beauty of painting art in their own languages. As digital image acquisition of painting arts has made rapid progress, researchers have come to a point where it is possible to perform statistical analysis of a large-scale database of artistic paints to make a bridge between art and science. Using digital image processing techniques, we investigate three quantitative measures of images - the usage of individual colors, the variety of colors, and the roughness of the brightness. We found a difference in color usage between classical paintings and photographs, and a significantly low color variety of the medieval period. Interestingly, moreover, the increment of roughness exponent as painting techniques such as chiaroscuro and sfumato have advanced is consistent with historical circumstances.

  18. Small-scale wind power design, analysis, and environmental impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, John P

    2014-01-01

    In today's world, clean and robust energy sources are being sought to provide power to residences, commercial operations, and manufacturing enterprises. Among the most appealing energy sources is wind power-with its high reliability and low environmental impact. Wind power's rapid penetration into markets throughout the world has taken many forms, and this book discusses the types of wind power, as well as the appropriate decisions that need to be made regarding wind power design, testing, installation, and analysis. Inside, the authors detail the design of various small-wind systems including horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) and vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs). The design of wind turbines takes advantage of many avenues of investigation, all of which are included in the book. Analytical methods that have been developed over the past few decades are major methods used for design. Alternatively, experimentation (typically using scaled models in wind tunnels) and numerical simulation (using modern comp...

  19. Investigating concentration distributions of arsenic, gold and antimony in grain-size fractions of gold ore using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyarku, M.; Nyarko, B.J.B.; Serfor-Armah, Y.; Osae, S.

    2010-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) has been used to quantify concentrations of arsenic (As), gold (Au) and antimony (Sb) in grain-size fractions of a gold ore. The ore, which was taken from the Ahafo project site of Newmont Ghana Gold Ltd., was fractionated into 14 grain-size fractions using state-of-the-art analytical sieve machine. The minimum sieve mesh size used was 36 μm and grains >2000 μm were not considered for analysis. Result of the sieving was analysed with easysieve (registered) software. The<36 μm subfraction was found to be the optimum, hosting bulk of all three elements. Arsenic was found to be highly concentrated in<36-100 μm size fractions and erratically distributed in from 150 μm fraction and above. For gold, with the exception of the subfraction <36 μm which had exceptionally high concentration, the element was found to be approximately equally distributed in all the size fractions but slightly 'played out' in 150-400 μm size fractions. Antimony occurrence in the sample was relatively high in <36 μm size fraction followed by 600, 800, 400 and 36 μm size fractions in that order. Gold content in the sample was comparatively far greater than arsenic and antimony; this is indicative of level of gold mineralization in the concession where the sample ore was taken. The concentration of gold in the composite sample was in the range 564-8420 ppm as compared to 14.33-186.92 ppm for arsenic and 1.09-9.48 ppm for antimony. Elemental concentrations were correlated with each other and with grain-size fractions and the relationships between these descriptive parameters were established.

  20. Analysis of albedo versus cloud fraction relationships in liquid water clouds using heuristic models and large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Graham; Balsells, Joseph; Glassmeier, Franziska; Yamaguchi, Takanobu; Kazil, Jan; McComiskey, Allison

    2017-07-01

    The relationship between the albedo of a cloudy scene A and cloud fraction fc is studied with the aid of heuristic models of stratocumulus and cumulus clouds. Existing work has shown that scene albedo increases monotonically with increasing cloud fraction but that the relationship varies from linear to superlinear. The reasons for these differences in functional dependence are traced to the relationship between cloud deepening and cloud widening. When clouds deepen with no significant increase in fc (e.g., in solid stratocumulus), the relationship between A and fc is linear. When clouds widen as they deepen, as in cumulus cloud fields, the relationship is superlinear. A simple heuristic model of a cumulus cloud field with a power law size distribution shows that the superlinear A-fc behavior is traced out either through random variation in cloud size distribution parameters or as the cloud field oscillates between a relative abundance of small clouds (steep slopes on a log-log plot) and a relative abundance of large clouds (flat slopes). Oscillations of this kind manifest in large eddy simulation of trade wind cumulus where the slope and intercept of the power law fit to the cloud size distribution are highly correlated. Further analysis of the large eddy model-generated cloud fields suggests that cumulus clouds grow larger and deeper as their underlying plumes aggregate; this is followed by breakup of large plumes and a tendency to smaller clouds. The cloud and thermal size distributions oscillate back and forth approximately in unison.

  1. Differential branching fraction and angular analysis of $\\Lambda^{0}_{b} \\rightarrow \\Lambda^0 \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The differential branching fraction of the rare decay $\\Lambda^{0}_{b} \\rightarrow \\Lambda^0 \\mu^+\\mu^-$ is measured as a function of $q^{2}$, the square of the dimuon invariant mass. The analysis is performed using proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0 \\mbox{ fb}^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment. Evidence of signal is observed in the $q^2$ region below the square of the $J/\\psi$ mass. Integrating over $15 < q^{2} < 20 \\mbox{ GeV}^2/c^4$ the branching fraction is measured as $d\\mathcal{B}(\\Lambda^{0}_{b} \\rightarrow \\Lambda^0 \\mu^+\\mu^-)/dq^2 = (1.18 ^{+ 0.09} _{-0.08} \\pm 0.03 \\pm 0.27) \\times 10^{-7} ( \\mbox{GeV}^{2}/c^{4})^{-1}$, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic and due to the normalisation mode, $\\Lambda^{0}_{b} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Lambda^0$, respectively. In the $q^2$ intervals where the signal is observed, angular distributions are studied and the forward-backward asymmetries in the dimuon ($A^{l}_{\\rm FB}$) and hadron ($A^{h}_{\\r...

  2. A novel equivalent definition of Caputo fractional derivative without singular kernel and superconvergent analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengguang; Li, Xiaoli

    2018-05-01

    In this article, we present a new second-order finite difference discrete scheme for a fractal mobile/immobile transport model based on equivalent transformative Caputo formulation. The new transformative formulation takes the singular kernel away to make the integral calculation more efficient. Furthermore, this definition is also effective where α is a positive integer. Besides, the T-Caputo derivative also helps us to increase the convergence rate of the discretization of the α-order(0 < α < 1) Caputo derivative from O(τ2-α) to O(τ3-α), where τ is the time step. For numerical analysis, a Crank-Nicolson finite difference scheme to solve the fractal mobile/immobile transport model is introduced and analyzed. The unconditional stability and a priori estimates of the scheme are given rigorously. Moreover, the applicability and accuracy of the scheme are demonstrated by numerical experiments to support our theoretical analysis.

  3. Analysis of electrophoretic soil humic acids fractions by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography with on-line absorbance and fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoj, Oleg A; Richard, Claire; Guyot, Ghislain; Voyard, Guillaume; Trubetskaya, Olga E

    2012-06-22

    A combination of reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP HPLC) with on-line absorbance and fluorescence detection was used for analysis of chernozem soil humic acids (HAs) and their fractions A, B and C+D with different electrophoretic mobility (EM) and molecular size (MS). Samples were injected onto the column at the identical volume and absorbance. All chromatograms exhibit the resolution of seven peaks. The estimation of relative recovery of HAs and fractions from the reverse-phase column has been done. High MS fraction A, which possesses the low EM, is essentially more hydrophobic (73% of the fraction amount remained adsorbed on the column) and aliphatic than medium MS and EM fraction B (33% of the fraction amount remained adsorbed on the column). The most hydrophilic and aromatic properties belong to low MS fraction C+D, which possess the highest EM and practically was not adsorbed on the column. The hydrophobicity of the bulk HAs lies within the range of fractions hydrophobicity. The absorption spectra of bulk HAs, electrophoretic fractions A, B, C+D and corresponding RP HPLC peaks were featureless but had differences in the values of absorbance ratio at 300 and 400 nm (A3/A4). For fractions A and B this ratio gradually decreased from peak 1 to 7 (from 3.05 to 2.80 and 3.00 to 2.40, respectively). This trend was less pronounced in HAs and practically absent in fraction C+D, where ratio A3/A4 varied within a small range. The strong relationship between fluorescence properties, EM, MS, polarity and aliphaticity/aromaticity of HAs fractions was found. Humic and protein-like fluorescence had different polarity nature. The protein-like fluorescence is located in humic material which irreversibly adsorbed on the reverse-phase column and not subjected to RP HPLC characterization. The humic-like fluorescence at Ex/Em 270/450 nm is mostly located in the hydrophilic peak of low MS fraction C+D. Taking into account that high MS fraction A consisted

  4. Ion beam analysis techniques applied to large scale pollution studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D D; Bailey, G; Martin, J; Garton, D; Noorman, H; Stelcer, E; Johnson, P [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques are ideally suited to analyse the thousands of filter papers a year that may originate from a large scale aerosol sampling network. They are fast multi-elemental and, for the most part, non-destructive so other analytical methods such as neutron activation and ion chromatography can be performed afterwards. ANSTO in collaboration with the NSW EPA, Pacific Power and the Universities of NSW and Macquarie has established a large area fine aerosol sampling network covering nearly 80,000 square kilometres of NSW with 25 fine particle samplers. This network known as ASP was funded by the Energy Research and Development Corporation (ERDC) and commenced sampling on 1 July 1991. The cyclone sampler at each site has a 2.5 {mu}m particle diameter cut off and runs for 24 hours every Sunday and Wednesday using one Gillman 25mm diameter stretched Teflon filter for each day. These filters are ideal targets for ion beam analysis work. Currently ANSTO receives 300 filters per month from this network for analysis using its accelerator based ion beam techniques on the 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. One week a month of accelerator time is dedicated to this analysis. Four simultaneous accelerator based IBA techniques are used at ANSTO, to analyse for the following 24 elements: H, C, N, O, F, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, Co, Zn, Br and Pb. The IBA techniques were proved invaluable in identifying sources of fine particles and their spatial and seasonal variations accross the large area sampled by the ASP network. 3 figs.

  5. Ion beam analysis techniques applied to large scale pollution studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D.D.; Bailey, G.; Martin, J.; Garton, D.; Noorman, H.; Stelcer, E.; Johnson, P. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques are ideally suited to analyse the thousands of filter papers a year that may originate from a large scale aerosol sampling network. They are fast multi-elemental and, for the most part, non-destructive so other analytical methods such as neutron activation and ion chromatography can be performed afterwards. ANSTO in collaboration with the NSW EPA, Pacific Power and the Universities of NSW and Macquarie has established a large area fine aerosol sampling network covering nearly 80,000 square kilometres of NSW with 25 fine particle samplers. This network known as ASP was funded by the Energy Research and Development Corporation (ERDC) and commenced sampling on 1 July 1991. The cyclone sampler at each site has a 2.5 {mu}m particle diameter cut off and runs for 24 hours every Sunday and Wednesday using one Gillman 25mm diameter stretched Teflon filter for each day. These filters are ideal targets for ion beam analysis work. Currently ANSTO receives 300 filters per month from this network for analysis using its accelerator based ion beam techniques on the 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. One week a month of accelerator time is dedicated to this analysis. Four simultaneous accelerator based IBA techniques are used at ANSTO, to analyse for the following 24 elements: H, C, N, O, F, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, Co, Zn, Br and Pb. The IBA techniques were proved invaluable in identifying sources of fine particles and their spatial and seasonal variations accross the large area sampled by the ASP network. 3 figs.

  6. CFD analysis of laboratory scale phase equilibrium cell operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jama, Mohamed Ali; Nikiforow, Kaj; Qureshi, Muhammad Saad; Alopaeus, Ville

    2017-10-01

    For the modeling of multiphase chemical reactors or separation processes, it is essential to predict accurately chemical equilibrium data, such as vapor-liquid or liquid-liquid equilibria [M. Šoóš et al., Chem. Eng. Process.: Process Intensif. 42(4), 273-284 (2003)]. The instruments used in these experiments are typically designed based on previous experiences, and their operation verified based on known equilibria of standard components. However, mass transfer limitations with different chemical systems may be very different, potentially falsifying the measured equilibrium compositions. In this work, computational fluid dynamics is utilized to design and analyze laboratory scale experimental gas-liquid equilibrium cell for the first time to augment the traditional analysis based on plug flow assumption. Two-phase dilutor cell, used for measuring limiting activity coefficients at infinite dilution, is used as a test case for the analysis. The Lagrangian discrete model is used to track each bubble and to study the residence time distribution of the carrier gas bubbles in the dilutor cell. This analysis is necessary to assess whether the gas leaving the cell is in equilibrium with the liquid, as required in traditional analysis of such apparatus. Mass transfer for six different bio-oil compounds is calculated to determine the approach equilibrium concentration. Also, residence times assuming plug flow and ideal mixing are used as reference cases to evaluate the influence of mixing on the approach to equilibrium in the dilutor. Results show that the model can be used to predict the dilutor operating conditions for which each of the studied gas-liquid systems reaches equilibrium.

  7. CFD analysis of laboratory scale phase equilibrium cell operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jama, Mohamed Ali; Nikiforow, Kaj; Qureshi, Muhammad Saad; Alopaeus, Ville

    2017-10-01

    For the modeling of multiphase chemical reactors or separation processes, it is essential to predict accurately chemical equilibrium data, such as vapor-liquid or liquid-liquid equilibria [M. Šoóš et al., Chem. Eng. Process Intensif. 42(4), 273-284 (2003)]. The instruments used in these experiments are typically designed based on previous experiences, and their operation verified based on known equilibria of standard components. However, mass transfer limitations with different chemical systems may be very different, potentially falsifying the measured equilibrium compositions. In this work, computational fluid dynamics is utilized to design and analyze laboratory scale experimental gas-liquid equilibrium cell for the first time to augment the traditional analysis based on plug flow assumption. Two-phase dilutor cell, used for measuring limiting activity coefficients at infinite dilution, is used as a test case for the analysis. The Lagrangian discrete model is used to track each bubble and to study the residence time distribution of the carrier gas bubbles in the dilutor cell. This analysis is necessary to assess whether the gas leaving the cell is in equilibrium with the liquid, as required in traditional analysis of such apparatus. Mass transfer for six different bio-oil compounds is calculated to determine the approach equilibrium concentration. Also, residence times assuming plug flow and ideal mixing are used as reference cases to evaluate the influence of mixing on the approach to equilibrium in the dilutor. Results show that the model can be used to predict the dilutor operating conditions for which each of the studied gas-liquid systems reaches equilibrium.

  8. Discrete fractional calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Goodrich, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This text provides the first comprehensive treatment of the discrete fractional calculus. Experienced researchers will find the text useful as a reference for discrete fractional calculus and topics of current interest. Students who are interested in learning about discrete fractional calculus will find this text to provide a useful starting point. Several exercises are offered at the end of each chapter and select answers have been provided at the end of the book. The presentation of the content is designed to give ample flexibility for potential use in a myriad of courses and for independent study. The novel approach taken by the authors includes a simultaneous treatment of the fractional- and integer-order difference calculus (on a variety of time scales, including both the usual forward and backwards difference operators). The reader will acquire a solid foundation in the classical topics of the discrete calculus while being introduced to exciting recent developments, bringing them to the frontiers of the...

  9. Analysis of errors in the measurement of unattached fractions of radon and thoron progeny in a Canadian uranium mine using wire screen methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Phillips, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The unattached fraction of radon/thoron progeny in uranium mines is generally small and therefore difficult to measure accurately. The simple wire screen method provides a direct estimate of the unattached fraction from the screen count, or an indirect estimate from the difference between the reference and back-up filter counts. Wire screen method results are often difficult to analyse, especially when the unattached activity is small. Experimental data obtained in Canadian uranium mines are presented here, together with a detailed error analysis. The method consisting of counting the wire screen and the back-up filter is found to be the most precise method for unattached fraction determination. (author)

  10. Analysis of the efficiency of the linearization techniques for solving multi-objective linear fractional programming problems by goal programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunjo Perić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and analyzes the applicability of three linearization techniques used for solving multi-objective linear fractional programming problems using the goal programming method. The three linearization techniques are: (1 Taylor’s polynomial linearization approximation, (2 the method of variable change, and (3 a modification of the method of variable change proposed in [20]. All three linearization techniques are presented and analyzed in two variants: (a using the optimal value of the objective functions as the decision makers’ aspirations, and (b the decision makers’ aspirations are given by the decision makers. As the criteria for the analysis we use the efficiency of the obtained solutions and the difficulties the analyst comes upon in preparing the linearization models. To analyze the applicability of the linearization techniques incorporated in the linear goal programming method we use an example of a financial structure optimization problem.

  11. Synchronisation, electronic circuit implementation, and fractional-order analysis of 5D ordinary differential equations with hidden hyperchaotic attractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhouchao; Rajagopal, Karthikeyan; Zhang, Wei; Kingni, Sifeu Takougang; Akgül, Akif

    2018-04-01

    Hidden hyperchaotic attractors can be generated with three positive Lyapunov exponents in the proposed 5D hyperchaotic Burke-Shaw system with only one stable equilibrium. To the best of our knowledge, this feature has rarely been previously reported in any other higher-dimensional systems. Unidirectional linear error feedback coupling scheme is used to achieve hyperchaos synchronisation, which will be estimated by using two indicators: the normalised average root-mean squared synchronisation error and the maximum cross-correlation coefficient. The 5D hyperchaotic system has been simulated using a specially designed electronic circuit and viewed on an oscilloscope, thereby confirming the results of the numerical integration. In addition, fractional-order hidden hyperchaotic system will be considered from the following three aspects: stability, bifurcation analysis and FPGA implementation. Such implementations in real time represent hidden hyperchaotic attractors with important consequences for engineering applications.

  12. Ultrasound extraction and thin layer chromatography-flame ionization detection analysis of the lipid fraction in marine mucilage samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecozzi, M; Amici, M; Romanelli, G; Pietrantonio, E; Deluca, A

    2002-07-19

    This paper reports an analytical procedure based on ultrasound to extract lipids in marine mucilage samples. The experimental conditions of the ultrasound procedure (solvent and time) were identified by a FT-IR study performed on different standard samples of lipids and of a standard humic sample, before and after the sonication treatment. This study showed that diethyl ether was a more suitable solvent than methanol for the ultrasonic extraction of lipids from environmental samples because it allowed to minimize the possible oxidative modifications of lipids due to the acoustic cavitation phenomena. The optimized conditions were applied to the extraction of total lipid amount in marine mucilage samples and TLC-flame ionization detection analysis was used to identify the relevant lipid sub-fractions present in samples.

  13. Large Scale Analysis of Geospatial Data with Dask and XArray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zender, C. S.; Hamman, J.; Abernathey, R.; Evans, K. J.; Rocklin, M.; Zender, C. S.; Rocklin, M.

    2017-12-01

    The analysis of geospatial data with high level languages has acceleratedinnovation and the impact of existing data resources. However, as datasetsgrow beyond single-machine memory, data structures within these high levellanguages can become a bottleneck. New libraries like Dask and XArray resolve some of these scalability issues,providing interactive workflows that are both familiar tohigh-level-language researchers while also scaling out to much largerdatasets. This broadens the access of researchers to larger datasets on highperformance computers and, through interactive development, reducestime-to-insight when compared to traditional parallel programming techniques(MPI). This talk describes Dask, a distributed dynamic task scheduler, Dask.array, amulti-dimensional array that copies the popular NumPy interface, and XArray,a library that wraps NumPy/Dask.array with labeled and indexes axes,implementing the CF conventions. We discuss both the basic design of theselibraries and how they change interactive analysis of geospatial data, and alsorecent benefits and challenges of distributed computing on clusters ofmachines.

  14. Performance Analysis, Modeling and Scaling of HPC Applications and Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatele, Abhinav [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-13

    E cient use of supercomputers at DOE centers is vital for maximizing system throughput, mini- mizing energy costs and enabling science breakthroughs faster. This requires complementary e orts along several directions to optimize the performance of scienti c simulation codes and the under- lying runtimes and software stacks. This in turn requires providing scalable performance analysis tools and modeling techniques that can provide feedback to physicists and computer scientists developing the simulation codes and runtimes respectively. The PAMS project is using time allocations on supercomputers at ALCF, NERSC and OLCF to further the goals described above by performing research along the following fronts: 1. Scaling Study of HPC applications; 2. Evaluation of Programming Models; 3. Hardening of Performance Tools; 4. Performance Modeling of Irregular Codes; and 5. Statistical Analysis of Historical Performance Data. We are a team of computer and computational scientists funded by both DOE/NNSA and DOE/ ASCR programs such as ECRP, XStack (Traleika Glacier, PIPER), ExaOSR (ARGO), SDMAV II (MONA) and PSAAP II (XPACC). This allocation will enable us to study big data issues when analyzing performance on leadership computing class systems and to assist the HPC community in making the most e ective use of these resources.

  15. Spatial data analysis for exploration of regional scale geothermal resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Majid Kiavarz; Noorollahi, Younes; Samadzadegan, Farhad; Sharifi, Mohammad Ali; Itoi, Ryuichi

    2013-10-01

    Defining a comprehensive conceptual model of the resources sought is one of the most important steps in geothermal potential mapping. In this study, Fry analysis as a spatial distribution method and 5% well existence, distance distribution, weights of evidence (WofE), and evidential belief function (EBFs) methods as spatial association methods were applied comparatively to known geothermal occurrences, and to publicly-available regional-scale geoscience data in Akita and Iwate provinces within the Tohoku volcanic arc, in northern Japan. Fry analysis and rose diagrams revealed similar directional patterns of geothermal wells and volcanoes, NNW-, NNE-, NE-trending faults, hotsprings and fumaroles. Among the spatial association methods, WofE defined a conceptual model correspondent with the real world situations, approved with the aid of expert opinion. The results of the spatial association analyses quantitatively indicated that the known geothermal occurrences are strongly spatially-associated with geological features such as volcanoes, craters, NNW-, NNE-, NE-direction faults and geochemical features such as hotsprings, hydrothermal alteration zones and fumaroles. Geophysical data contains temperature gradients over 100 °C/km and heat flow over 100 mW/m2. In general, geochemical and geophysical data were better evidence layers than geological data for exploring geothermal resources. The spatial analyses of the case study area suggested that quantitative knowledge from hydrothermal geothermal resources was significantly useful for further exploration and for geothermal potential mapping in the case study region. The results can also be extended to the regions with nearly similar characteristics.

  16. In situ vitrification large-scale operational acceptance test analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.; Carter, J.G.

    1986-05-01

    A thermal treatment process is currently under study to provide possible enhancement of in-place stabilization of transuranic and chemically contaminated soil sites. The process is known as in situ vitrification (ISV). In situ vitrification is a remedial action process that destroys solid and liquid organic contaminants and incorporates radionuclides into a glass-like material that renders contaminants substantially less mobile and less likely to impact the environment. A large-scale operational acceptance test (LSOAT) was recently completed in which more than 180 t of vitrified soil were produced in each of three adjacent settings. The LSOAT demonstrated that the process conforms to the functional design criteria necessary for the large-scale radioactive test (LSRT) to be conducted following verification of the performance capabilities of the process. The energy requirements and vitrified block size, shape, and mass are sufficiently equivalent to those predicted by the ISV mathematical model to confirm its usefulness as a predictive tool. The LSOAT demonstrated an electrode replacement technique, which can be used if an electrode fails, and techniques have been identified to minimize air oxidation, thereby extending electrode life. A statistical analysis was employed during the LSOAT to identify graphite collars and an insulative surface as successful cold cap subsidence techniques. The LSOAT also showed that even under worst-case conditions, the off-gas system exceeds the flow requirements necessary to maintain a negative pressure on the hood covering the area being vitrified. The retention of simulated radionuclides and chemicals in the soil and off-gas system exceeds requirements so that projected emissions are one to two orders of magnitude below the maximum permissible concentrations of contaminants at the stack

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Volatile Fraction of Fruit Juice from Different Citrus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamar, M. Carmen; Gutiérrez, Abelardo; Granell, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The volatile composition of fruit from four Citrus varieties (Powell Navel orange, Clemenules mandarine, and Fortune mandarine and Chandler pummelo) covering four different species has been studied. Over one hundred compounds were profiled after HS-SPME-GC-MS analysis, including 27 esters, 23 aldehydes, 21 alcohols, 13 monoterpene hydrocarbons, 10 ketones, 5 sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, 4 monoterpene cyclic ethers, 4 furans, and 2 aromatic hydrocarbons, which were all confirmed with standards. The differences in the volatile profile among juices of these varieties were essentially quantitative and only a few compounds were found exclusively in a single variety, mainly in Chandler. The volatile profile however was able to differentiate all four varieties and revealed complex interactions between them including the participation in the same biosynthetic pathway. Some compounds (6 esters, 2 ketones, 1 furan and 2 aromatic hydrocarbons) had never been reported earlier in Citrus juices. This volatile profiling platform for Citrus juice by HS-SPME-GC-MS and the interrelationship detected among the volatiles can be used as a roadmap for future breeding or biotechnological applications. PMID:21818287

  18. Scaling Care : An analysis of the structural, social and symbolic dimensions of scale in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Postma (Jeroen)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ “The Cabinet will promote small-scale healthcare institutions. An optimal scale of healthcare institutions will lead to more efficiency, lower costs, more integrated care, higher customer satisfaction and better care. The Cabinet will ensure the optimisation of the

  19. A Simple Fractionated Extraction Method for the Comprehensive Analysis of Metabolites, Lipids, and Proteins from a Single Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed; Bernach, Michal; Bajdzienko, Krzysztof; Giavalisco, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Understanding of complex biological systems requires the measurement, analysis and integration of multiple compound classes of the living cell, usually determined by transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics and lipidomic measurements. In this protocol, we introduce a simple method for the reproducible extraction of metabolites, lipids and proteins from biological tissues using a single aliquot per sample. The extraction method is based on a methyl tert-butyl ether: methanol: water system for liquid: liquid partitioning of hydrophobic and polar metabolites into two immiscible phases along with the precipitation of proteins and other macromolecules as a solid pellet. This method, therefore, provides three different fractions of specific molecular composition, which are fully compatible with common high throughput 'omics' technologies such as liquid chromatography (LC) or gas chromatography (GC) coupled to mass spectrometers. Even though the method was initially developed for the analysis of different plant tissue samples, it has proved to be fully compatible for the extraction and analysis of biological samples from systems as diverse as algae, insects, and mammalian tissues and cell cultures.

  20. Analysis of small-scale rotor hover performance data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaplioglu, Cahit

    1990-01-01

    Rotor hover-performance data from a 1/6-scale helicopter rotor are analyzed and the data sets compared for the effects of ambient wind, test stand configuration, differing test facilities, and scaling. The data are also compared to full scale hover data. The data exhibited high scatter, not entirely due to ambient wind conditions. Effects of download on the test stand proved to be the most significant influence on the measured data. Small-scale data correlated resonably well with full scale data; the correlation did not improve with Reynolds number corrections.

  1. Secondary Analysis of Large-Scale Assessment Data: An Alternative to Variable-Centred Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Kui Foon; Kennedy, Kerry John

    2014-01-01

    International large-scale assessments are now part of the educational landscape in many countries and often feed into major policy decisions. Yet, such assessments also provide data sets for secondary analysis that can address key issues of concern to educators and policymakers alike. Traditionally, such secondary analyses have been based on a…

  2. Solid/solution Cu fractionations/speciation of a Cu contaminated soil after pilot-scale electrokinetic remediation and their relationships with soil microbial and enzyme activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Quanying; Zhou Dongmei; Cang Long; Li Lianzhen; Wang Peng

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed metal speciation/fractionations of a Cu contaminated soil before and after electrokinetic remediation as well as their relationships with the soil microbial and enzyme activities. Significant changes in the exchangeable and adsorbed-Cu fractionations occurred after electrokinetic treatment, while labile soil Cu in the solution had a tendency to decrease from the anode to the cathode, and the soil free Cu 2+ ions were mainly accumulated in the sections close to the cathode. The results of regression analyses revealed that both the soil Cu speciation in solution phase and the Cu fractionations in solid phase could play important roles in the changes of the soil microbial and enzyme activities. Our findings suggest that the bioavailability of soil heavy metals and their ecotoxicological effects on the soil biota before and after electroremediation can be better understood in terms of their chemical speciation and fractionations. - The assessment of the roles of soil solution speciation and solid-phase fractionations in metal bioavailability after electrokinetic remediation deserves close attention.

  3. Mystery Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  4. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of an alkaloid fraction from Piper longum L. using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuiyong; Fan, Yunpeng; Wang, Hui; Fu, Qing; Jin, Yu; Liang, Xinmiao

    2015-05-10

    In a previous research, an alkaloid fraction and 18 alkaloid compounds were prepared from Piper longum L. by series of purification process. In this paper, a qualitative and quantitative analysis method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-DAD-MS) was developed to evaluate the alkaloid fraction. Qualitative analysis of the alkaloid fraction was firstly completed by UHPLC-DAD method and 18 amide alkaloid compounds were identified. A further qualitative analysis of the alkaloid fraction was accomplished by UHPLC-MS/MS method. Another 25 amide alkaloids were identified according to their characteristic ions and neutral losses. At last, a quantitative method for the alkaloid fraction was established using four marker compounds including piperine, pipernonatine, guineensine and N-isobutyl-2E,4E-octadecadienamide. After the validation of this method, the contents of above four marker compounds in the alkaloid fraction were 57.5mg/g, 65.6mg/g, 17.7mg/g and 23.9mg/g, respectively. Moreover, the relative response factors of other three compounds to piperine were calculated. A comparative study between external standard quantification and relative response factor quantification proved no remarkable difference. UHPLC-DAD-MS method was demonstrated to be a powerful tool for the characterization of the alkaloid fraction from P. longum L. and the result proved that the quality of alkaloid fraction was efficiently improved after appropriate purification. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. α-Glucosidase inhibition and antioxidant activity of an oenological commercial tannin. Extraction, fractionation and analysis by HPLC/ESI-MS/MS and (1)H NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muccilli, Vera; Cardullo, Nunzio; Spatafora, Carmela; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Tringali, Corrado

    2017-01-15

    Two batches of the oenological tannin Tan'Activ R, (toasted oak wood - Quercus robur), were extracted with ethanol. A fractionation on XAD-16 afforded four fractions for each extract. Extracts and fractions were evaluated for antioxidant activity (DPPH), polyphenol content (GAE) and yeast α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Comparable results were obtained for both columns, fractions X1B and X2B showing the highest antioxidant activity. Fractions X1C and X2C notably inhibited α-glucosidase, with IC50=9.89 and 8.05μg/mL, respectively. Fractions were subjected to HPLC/ESI-MS/MS and (1)H NMR analysis. The main phenolic constituents of both X1B and X2B were a monogalloylglucose isomer (1), a HHDP-glucose isomer (2), castalin (3) gallic acid (4), vescalagin (5), and grandinin (or its isomer roburin E, 6). X1C and X2C showed a complex composition, including non-phenolic constituents. Fractionation of X2C gave a subfraction, with enhanced α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50=6.15μg/mL), with castalagin (7) as the main constituent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Multifractal scaling analysis of autopoisoning reactions over a rough surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhari, Ajay; Yan, Ching-Cher Sanders; Lee, S.-L.

    2003-01-01

    Decay type diffusion-limited reactions (DLR) over a rough surface generated by a random deposition model were performed. To study the effect of the decay profile on the reaction probability distribution (RPD), multifractal scaling analysis has been carried out. The dynamics of these autopoisoning reactions are controlled by the two parameters in the decay function, namely, the initial sticking probability (P ini ) of every site and the decay rate (m). The smaller the decay rate, the narrower is the range of α values in the α-f(α) multifractal spectrum. The results are compared with the earlier work of DLR over a surface of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). We also considered here the autopoisoning reactions over a smooth surface for comparing our results, which show clearly how the roughness affects the chemical reactions. The q-τ(q) multifractal curves for the smooth surface are linear whereas those for the rough surface are nonlinear. The range of α values in the case of a rough surface is wider than that of the smooth surface

  7. Large-scale exploration and analysis of drug combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Huang, Chao; Fu, Yingxue; Wang, Jinan; Wu, Ziyin; Ru, Jinlong; Zheng, Chunli; Guo, Zihu; Chen, Xuetong; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Wenjuan; Li, Yan; Chen, Jianxin; Lu, Aiping; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-06-15

    Drug combinations are a promising strategy for combating complex diseases by improving the efficacy and reducing corresponding side effects. Currently, a widely studied problem in pharmacology is to predict effective drug combinations, either through empirically screening in clinic or pure experimental trials. However, the large-scale prediction of drug combination by a systems method is rarely considered. We report a systems pharmacology framework to predict drug combinations (PreDCs) on a computational model, termed probability ensemble approach (PEA), for analysis of both the efficacy and adverse effects of drug combinations. First, a Bayesian network integrating with a similarity algorithm is developed to model the combinations from drug molecular and pharmacological phenotypes, and the predictions are then assessed with both clinical efficacy and adverse effects. It is illustrated that PEA can predict the combination efficacy of drugs spanning different therapeutic classes with high specificity and sensitivity (AUC = 0.90), which was further validated by independent data or new experimental assays. PEA also evaluates the adverse effects (AUC = 0.95) quantitatively and detects the therapeutic indications for drug combinations. Finally, the PreDC database includes 1571 known and 3269 predicted optimal combinations as well as their potential side effects and therapeutic indications. The PreDC database is available at http://sm.nwsuaf.edu.cn/lsp/predc.php. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Multi-scale sensitivity analysis of pile installation using DEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Ricardo Gurevitz; Velloso, Raquel Quadros; , Eurípedes do Amaral Vargas, Jr.; Danziger, Bernadete Ragoni

    2017-12-01

    The disturbances experienced by the soil due to the pile installation and dynamic soil-structure interaction still present major challenges to foundation engineers. These phenomena exhibit complex behaviors, difficult to measure in physical tests and to reproduce in numerical models. Due to the simplified approach used by the discrete element method (DEM) to simulate large deformations and nonlinear stress-dilatancy behavior of granular soils, the DEM consists of an excellent tool to investigate these processes. This study presents a sensitivity analysis of the effects of introducing a single pile using the PFC2D software developed by Itasca Co. The different scales investigated in these simulations include point and shaft resistance, alterations in porosity and stress fields and particles displacement. Several simulations were conducted in order to investigate the effects of different numerical approaches showing indications that the method of installation and particle rotation could influence greatly in the conditions around the numerical pile. Minor effects were also noted due to change in penetration velocity and pile-soil friction. The difference in behavior of a moving and a stationary pile shows good qualitative agreement with previous experimental results indicating the necessity of realizing a force equilibrium process prior to any load-test to be simulated.

  9. A comparative mathematical analysis of RL and RC electrical circuits via Atangana-Baleanu and Caputo-Fabrizio fractional derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abro, Kashif Ali; Memon, Anwar Ahmed; Uqaili, Muhammad Aslam

    2018-03-01

    This research article is analyzed for the comparative study of RL and RC electrical circuits by employing newly presented Atangana-Baleanu and Caputo-Fabrizio fractional derivatives. The governing ordinary differential equations of RL and RC electrical circuits have been fractionalized in terms of fractional operators in the range of 0 ≤ ξ ≤ 1 and 0 ≤ η ≤ 1. The analytic solutions of fractional differential equations for RL and RC electrical circuits have been solved by using the Laplace transform with its inversions. General solutions have been investigated for periodic and exponential sources by implementing the Atangana-Baleanu and Caputo-Fabrizio fractional operators separately. The investigated solutions have been expressed in terms of simple elementary functions with convolution product. On the basis of newly fractional derivatives with and without singular kernel, the voltage and current have interesting behavior with several similarities and differences for the periodic and exponential sources.

  10. Mokken scaling analysis of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in individuals with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosco, Theodore D; Doyle, Frank; Watson, Roger; Ward, Mark; McGee, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is a prolifically used scale of anxiety and depression. The original bidimensional anxiety-depression latent structure of the HADS has come under significant scrutiny, with previous studies revealing one-, two-, three- and four-dimensional structures. The current study examines the latent structure of the HADS using a non-parametric item response theory method. Using data conglomerated from four independent studies of cardiovascular disease employing the HADS (n=893), Mokken scaling procedure was conducted to assess the latent structure of the HADS. A single scale consisting of 12 of 14 HADS items was revealed, indicating a unidimensional latent HADS structure. The HADS was initially intended to measure mutually exclusive levels of anxiety and depression; however, the current study indicates that a single dimension of general psychological distress is captured. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Weight Scale Analysis Fairbanks Weight Scale Evaluation Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOHNSON, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    Fairbanks Weight Scales are used at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility to determine the weight of waste drums as they are received, processed, and shipped. Due to recent problems, discovered during calibration, the WRAP Engineering Department has completed this document which outlines both the investigation of the infeed conveyor scale failure in September of 1999 and recommendations for calibration procedure modifications designed to correct deficiencies in the current procedures

  12. Systematic analysis of scaling properties in deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuf, Guillaume; Peschanski, Robi; Royon, Christophe; Salek, David

    2008-01-01

    Using the 'quality factor' method, we analyze the scaling properties of deep inelastic processes at the accelerator HERA and fixed target experiments for x≤10 -2 . We look for scaling formulas of the form σ γ * p (τ), where τ(L=logQ 2 ,Y) is a scaling variable suggested by the asymptotic properties of QCD evolution equations with rapidity Y. We consider four cases: 'fixed coupling', corresponding to the original geometric scaling proposal and motivated by the asymptotic properties of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation with fixed QCD coupling constant; two versions, 'running coupling I, II,' of the scaling suggested by the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation with running coupling; and 'diffusive scaling' suggested by the QCD evolution equation with Pomeron loops. The quality factors, quantifying the phenomenological validity of the candidate scaling variables, are fitted on the total and deeply virtual Compton scattering cross-section data from HERA and predictions are made for the elastic vector meson and for the diffractive cross sections at fixed small x P or β. The first three scaling formulas have comparably good quality factors while the fourth one is disfavored. Adjusting initial conditions gives a significant improvement of the running coupling II scaling.

  13. Isotope dilution analysis for urinary fentanyl and its main metabolite, norfentanyl, in patients by isotopic fractionation using capillary gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sera, Shoji; Goromaru, Tsuyoshi [Fukuyama Univ., Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Sameshima, Teruko; Kawasaki, Koichi; Oda, Toshiyuki

    1998-07-01

    Isotope dilution analysis was applied to determine urinary excretion of fentanyl (FT) and its main metabolite, norfentanyl (Nor-FT), by isotopic fractionation using a capillary gas chromatograph equipped with a surface ionization detector (SID). Urinary FT was determined quantitatively in the range of 0.4-40 ng/ml using deuterium labeled FT (FT-{sup 2}H{sub 19}), as an internal standard. We also performed isotope dilution analysis of Nor-FT in urine. N-Alkylation was necessary to sensitively detect Nor-FT with SID. Methyl derivative was selected from 3 kinds of N-alkyl derivatives to increase sensitivity and peak resolution, and to prevent interference with urinary compound. Nor-FT concentration was quantitatively determined in the range of 10-400 ng/ml using deuterium labeled Nor-FT (Nor-FT-{sup 2}H{sub 10}). No endogenous compounds or concomitant drugs interfered with the detection of FT and Nor-FT in the urine of patients. The present method will be useful for pharmacokinetic studies and the evaluation of drug interactions in FT metabolism. (author)

  14. Amplitude analysis and the branching fraction measurement of $\\bar{B}^0_s \\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Dogaru, M; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nisar, S; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    An amplitude analysis of the final state structure in the $\\overline{B}_s^0 \\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ decay mode is performed using $1.0~\\rm fb^{-1}$ of data collected by the LHCb experiment in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy $pp$ collisions produced by the LHC. A modified Dalitz plot analysis of the final state is performed using both the invariant mass spectra and the decay angular distributions. Resonant structures are observed in the $K^+K^-$ mass spectrum as well as a significant non-resonant S-wave contribution. The largest resonant component is the $\\phi(1020)$, accompanied by $f_0(980)$, $f_2'(1525)$, and four additional resonances. The overall branching fraction is measured to be $\\mathcal{B}(\\overline{B}_s^0 \\to J/\\psi K^+K^-)=(7.70\\pm0.08\\pm 0.39\\pm 0.60)\\times 10^{-4}$, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic, and the third due to the ratio of the number of $\\overline{B}_s^0$ to $B^-$ mesons produced. The mass and width of the $ f_2'(1525)$ are measured to be $1522.2\\pm 2.8^{+5....

  15. Isotope dilution analysis for urinary fentanyl and its main metabolite, norfentanyl, in patients by isotopic fractionation using capillary gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sera, Shoji; Goromaru, Tsuyoshi; Sameshima, Teruko; Kawasaki, Koichi; Oda, Toshiyuki

    1998-01-01

    Isotope dilution analysis was applied to determine urinary excretion of fentanyl (FT) and its main metabolite, norfentanyl (Nor-FT), by isotopic fractionation using a capillary gas chromatograph equipped with a surface ionization detector (SID). Urinary FT was determined quantitatively in the range of 0.4-40 ng/ml using deuterium labeled FT (FT- 2 H 19 ), as an internal standard. We also performed isotope dilution analysis of Nor-FT in urine. N-Alkylation was necessary to sensitively detect Nor-FT with SID. Methyl derivative was selected from 3 kinds of N-alkyl derivatives to increase sensitivity and peak resolution, and to prevent interference with urinary compound. Nor-FT concentration was quantitatively determined in the range of 10-400 ng/ml using deuterium labeled Nor-FT (Nor-FT- 2 H 10 ). No endogenous compounds or concomitant drugs interfered with the detection of FT and Nor-FT in the urine of patients. The present method will be useful for pharmacokinetic studies and the evaluation of drug interactions in FT metabolism. (author)

  16. The Impact of Objective Mathematical Analysis During Fractional Flow Reserve Measurement. Results from the OMA-FFR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciola, Martina I; Morris, Paul D; Gosling, Rebecca; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2018-02-13

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR), the reference-standard for guiding coronary revascularisation, is most commonly acquired during intravenous adenosine infusion. Results may be sensitive to system- and operator-dependent variability in how pressure data are analysed and interpreted. We developed a computational protocol to process the recorded pressure signals in a consistent manner to objectively quantify FFR. We studied the impact upon lesion (re)classification and compared this with the operator-selected FFR obtained during cardiac catheterisation. The algorithm used a moving average and Fourier transformation to identify the Pd/Pa ratio at its nadir (FFRmin) and during the stable hyperaemic period (FFRstable) in <2s with 100% repeatability, in 163 coronary stenoses (93 patients). The mean operator-selected FFR (FFRCL) was higher than FFRmin and lower than FFRstable (0.779 vs 0.762 vs 0.806, P=<0.01). Compared with FFRmin, FFRstable resulted in 16.5% of all lesions being re-classified, all from significant to non-significant (p<0.01). FFRCL classified lesion significance differently to both FFRstable and FFRmin (11.7% and 6.1% lesions reclassified respectively, p<0.01). Subtle differences in how pressure data are analysed and interpreted by the operator during adenosine infusion result in significant differences in the classification of physiological lesion significance. An algorithmic analysis may be helpful in standardising FFR analysis providing an objective and repeatable result.

  17. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Combined Social Phobia Scale and Social Interaction Anxiety Scale: Support for a Bifactor Model

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, Rapson; Watson, Shaun D.

    2017-01-01

    For the Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) together, this study examined support for a bifactor model, and also the internal consistency reliability and external validity of the factors in this model. Participants (N = 526) were adults from the general community who completed the SPS and SIAS. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of their ratings indicated good support for the bifactor model. For this model, the loadings for all but six items were higher o...

  18. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  19. Scaling Analysis of Ocean Surface Turbulent Heterogeneities from Satellite Remote Sensing: Use of 2D Structure Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P R Renosh

    Full Text Available Satellite remote sensing observations allow the ocean surface to be sampled synoptically over large spatio-temporal scales. The images provided from visible and thermal infrared satellite observations are widely used in physical, biological, and ecological oceanography. The present work proposes a method to understand the multi-scaling properties of satellite products such as the Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a, and the Sea Surface Temperature (SST, rarely studied. The specific objectives of this study are to show how the small scale heterogeneities of satellite images can be characterised using tools borrowed from the fields of turbulence. For that purpose, we show how the structure function, which is classically used in the frame of scaling time series analysis, can be used also in 2D. The main advantage of this method is that it can be applied to process images which have missing data. Based on both simulated and real images, we demonstrate that coarse-graining (CG of a gradient modulus transform of the original image does not provide correct scaling exponents. We show, using a fractional Brownian simulation in 2D, that the structure function (SF can be used with randomly sampled couple of points, and verify that 1 million of couple of points provides enough statistics.

  20. Impact and fracture analysis of fish scales from Arapaima gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, F G; Malásquez, M; Troncoso, O P

    2015-06-01

    Fish scales from the Amazonian fish Arapaima gigas have been characterised to study their impact and fracture behaviour at three different environmental conditions. Scales were cut in two different directions to analyse the influence of the orientation of collagen layers. The energy absorbed during impact tests was measured for each sample and SEM images were taken after each test in order to analyse the failure mechanisms. The results showed that scales tested at cryogenic temperatures display fragile behaviour, while scales tested at room temperature did not fracture. Different failure mechanisms have been identified, analysed and compared with the failure modes that occur in bone. The impact energy obtained for fish scales was two to three times higher than the values reported for bone in the literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of the Psychometric Properties of a Parental Alienation Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Inez Cunha Gomide

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of forensic evaluation scales is fundamental. This study's purpose was to explore the psychometric properties of a parental alienation scale. Forensic technicians completed 193 scales concerning parents involved in a lawsuit: 48 families with at least one parent indicated as the alienator (group A and 48 families with no parental alienation claim (group B. The scale consisted of five categories and 69 items: denying access to the child; derogatory comparisons; emotional manipulation; behavior of parent and child during assessment. The results show Cronbach's alpha = .965 and split-half = .745; KMO = .884 and Bartlett's sphericity test ( p < .001. Concurrent criterion validity applied to data showed that the scale is able to distinguish between the alienator and target parent. The results showed significant and consistent standards in the instrument's psychometric characteristics.

  2. Fractionated Spacecraft Architectures Seeding Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathieu, Charlotte; Weigel, Annalisa

    2006-01-01

    .... Models were developed from a customer-centric perspective to assess different fractionated spacecraft architectures relative to traditional spacecraft architectures using multi-attribute analysis...

  3. Analysis of small scale turbulent structures and the effect of spatial scales on gas transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnieders, Jana; Garbe, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The exchange of gases through the air-sea interface strongly depends on environmental conditions such as wind stress and waves which in turn generate near surface turbulence. Near surface turbulence is a main driver of surface divergence which has been shown to cause highly variable transfer rates on relatively small spatial scales. Due to the cool skin of the ocean, heat can be used as a tracer to detect areas of surface convergence and thus gather information about size and intensity of a turbulent process. We use infrared imagery to visualize near surface aqueous turbulence and determine the impact of turbulent scales on exchange rates. Through the high temporal and spatial resolution of these types of measurements spatial scales as well as surface dynamics can be captured. The surface heat pattern is formed by distinct structures on two scales - small-scale short lived structures termed fish scales and larger scale cold streaks that are consistent with the footprints of Langmuir Circulations. There are two key characteristics of the observed surface heat patterns: 1. The surface heat patterns show characteristic features of scales. 2. The structure of these patterns change with increasing wind stress and surface conditions. In [2] turbulent cell sizes have been shown to systematically decrease with increasing wind speed until a saturation at u* = 0.7 cm/s is reached. Results suggest a saturation in the tangential stress. Similar behaviour has been observed by [1] for gas transfer measurements at higher wind speeds. In this contribution a new model to estimate the heat flux is applied which is based on the measured turbulent cell size und surface velocities. This approach allows the direct comparison of the net effect on heat flux of eddies of different sizes and a comparison to gas transfer measurements. Linking transport models with thermographic measurements, transfer velocities can be computed. In this contribution, we will quantify the effect of small scale

  4. GAS MIXING ANALYSIS IN A LARGE-SCALED SALTSTONE FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S

    2008-05-28

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to estimate the flow patterns mainly driven by temperature gradients inside vapor space in a large-scaled Saltstone vault facility at Savannah River site (SRS). The purpose of this work is to examine the gas motions inside the vapor space under the current vault configurations by taking a three-dimensional transient momentum-energy coupled approach for the vapor space domain of the vault. The modeling calculations were based on prototypic vault geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Solidification Engineering. The modeling analysis was focused on the air flow patterns near the ventilated corner zones of the vapor space inside the Saltstone vault. The turbulence behavior and natural convection mechanism used in the present model were benchmarked against the literature information and theoretical results. The verified model was applied to the Saltstone vault geometry for the transient assessment of the air flow patterns inside the vapor space of the vault region using the potential operating conditions. The baseline model considered two cases for the estimations of the flow patterns within the vapor space. One is the reference nominal case. The other is for the negative temperature gradient between the roof inner and top grout surface temperatures intended for the potential bounding condition. The flow patterns of the vapor space calculated by the CFD model demonstrate that the ambient air comes into the vapor space of the vault through the lower-end ventilation hole, and it gets heated up by the Benard-cell type circulation before leaving the vault via the higher-end ventilation hole. The calculated results are consistent with the literature information. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

  5. Continuous fraction collection of gas chromatographic separations with parallel mass spectrometric detection applied to cell-based bioactivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Willem; Zwart, Nick; Stockl, Jan B.; de Koning, Sjaak; Schaap, Jaap; Lamoree, Marja H.; Somsen, Govert W.; Hamers, Timo; Kool, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    We describe the development and evaluation of a GC-MS fractionation platform that combines high-resolution fraction collection of full chromatograms with parallel MS detection. A y-split at the column divides the effluent towards the MS detector and towards an inverted y-piece where vaporized trap

  6. Multi-Scale Entropy Analysis as a Method for Time-Series Analysis of Climate Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Balzter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is mounting that the temporal dynamics of the climate system are changing at the same time as the average global temperature is increasing due to multiple climate forcings. A large number of extreme weather events such as prolonged cold spells, heatwaves, droughts and floods have been recorded around the world in the past 10 years. Such changes in the temporal scaling behaviour of climate time-series data can be difficult to detect. While there are easy and direct ways of analysing climate data by calculating the means and variances for different levels of temporal aggregation, these methods can miss more subtle changes in their dynamics. This paper describes multi-scale entropy (MSE analysis as a tool to study climate time-series data and to identify temporal scales of variability and their change over time in climate time-series. MSE estimates the sample entropy of the time-series after coarse-graining at different temporal scales. An application of MSE to Central European, variance-adjusted, mean monthly air temperature anomalies (CRUTEM4v is provided. The results show that the temporal scales of the current climate (1960–2014 are different from the long-term average (1850–1960. For temporal scale factors longer than 12 months, the sample entropy increased markedly compared to the long-term record. Such an increase can be explained by systems theory with greater complexity in the regional temperature data. From 1961 the patterns of monthly air temperatures are less regular at time-scales greater than 12 months than in the earlier time period. This finding suggests that, at these inter-annual time scales, the temperature variability has become less predictable than in the past. It is possible that climate system feedbacks are expressed in altered temporal scales of the European temperature time-series data. A comparison with the variance and Shannon entropy shows that MSE analysis can provide additional information on the

  7. Risks of using membrane filtration for trace metal analysis and assessing the dissolved metal fraction of aqueous media - A study on zinc, copper and nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedberg, Yolanda; Herting, Gunilla; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall

    2011-01-01

    Membrane filtration is commonly performed for solid-liquid separation of aqueous solutions prior to trace metal analysis and when assessing 'dissolved' metal fractions. Potential artifacts induced by filtration such as contamination and/or adsorption of metals within the membrane have been investigated for different membrane materials, metals, applied pressures and pre-cleaning steps. Measurements have been conducted on aqueous solutions including well-defined metal standards, ultrapure water, and on runoff water from corroded samples. Filtration using both non-cleaned and pre-cleaned filters revealed contamination and adsorption effects, in particular pronounced for zinc, evident for copper but non-significant for nickel. The results clearly show these artifacts to be non-systematic both for non-cleaned and pre-cleaned membranes. The applied pressure was of minor importance. Measurements of the labile fraction by means of stripping voltammetry clearly elucidate that membrane filtration followed by total metal analysis cannot accurately assess the labile or the dissolved metal fraction. - Highlights: → Membrane filtration for trace metal analysis can introduce significant artifacts. → The dissolved metal fraction cannot be assessed by membrane filtration. → Non-specified filtration procedures are inadequate for scientific studies. → Artifacts caused by membrane filtration need to be addressed by regulators. - Membrane filtration cannot be used to assess the dissolved metal fraction of aqueous media and needs to be defined in detail in standard tests.

  8. Numerical analysis of non-linear vibrations of a fractionally damped cylindrical shell under the conditions of combinational internal resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossikhin Yury A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-linear damped vibrations of a cylindrical shell embedded into a fractional derivative medium are investigated for the case of the combinational internal resonance, resulting in modal interaction, using two different numerical methods with further comparison of the results obtained. The damping properties of the surrounding medium are described by the fractional derivative Kelvin-Voigt model utilizing the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives. Within the first method, the generalized displacements of a coupled set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations of the second order are estimated using numerical solution of nonlinear multi-term fractional differential equations by the procedure based on the reduction of the problem to a system of fractional differential equations. According to the second method, the amplitudes and phases of nonlinear vibrations are estimated from the governing nonlinear differential equations describing amplitude-and-phase modulations for the case of the combinational internal resonance. A good agreement in results is declared.

  9. Fractional order models of viscoelasticity as an alternative in the analysis of red blood cell (RBC) membrane mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craiem, Damian; Magin, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    New lumped-element models of red blood cell mechanics can be constructed using fractional order generalizations of springs and dashpots. Such 'spring-pots' exhibit a fractional order viscoelastic behavior that captures a wide spectrum of experimental results through power-law expressions in both the time and frequency domains. The system dynamics is fully described by linear fractional order differential equations derived from first order stress–strain relationships using the tools of fractional calculus. Changes in the composition or structure of the membrane are conveniently expressed in the fractional order of the model system. This approach provides a concise way to describe and quantify the biomechanical behavior of membranes, cells and tissues. (perspective)

  10. Fractional order models of viscoelasticity as an alternative in the analysis of red blood cell (RBC) membrane mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craiem, Damian; Magin, Richard L

    2010-01-20

    New lumped-element models of red blood cell mechanics can be constructed using fractional order generalizations of springs and dashpots. Such 'spring-pots' exhibit a fractional order viscoelastic behavior that captures a wide spectrum of experimental results through power-law expressions in both the time and frequency domains. The system dynamics is fully described by linear fractional order differential equations derived from first order stress-strain relationships using the tools of fractional calculus. Changes in the composition or structure of the membrane are conveniently expressed in the fractional order of the model system. This approach provides a concise way to describe and quantify the biomechanical behavior of membranes, cells and tissues.

  11. Advanced computed tomographic anatomical and morphometric plaque analysis for prediction of fractional flow reserve in intermediate coronary lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opolski, Maksymilian P.; Kepka, Cezary; Achenbach, Stephan; Pregowski, Jerzy; Kruk, Mariusz; Staruch, Adam D.; Kadziela, Jacek; Ruzyllo, Witold; Witkowski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the application of advanced coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) plaque analysis for predicting invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) in intermediate coronary lesions. Methods: Sixty-one patients with 71 single intermediate coronary lesions (≥50–80% stenosis) on CCTA prospectively underwent coronary angiography and FFR. Advanced anatomical and morphometric plaque analysis was performed based on CCTA data set to determine optimal criteria for significant flow impairment. A significant stenosis was defined as FFR ≤ 0.80. Results: FFR averaged 0.85 ± 0.09, and 19 lesions (27%) were functionally significant. FFR correlated with minimum lumen area (MLA) (r = 0.456, p < 0.001), minimum lumen diameter (MLD) (r = 0.326, p = 0.006), reference lumen diameter (RLD) (r = 0.245, p = 0.039), plaque burden (r = −0.313, p = 0.008), lumen area stenosis (r = −0.305, p = 0.01), lesion length (r = −0.692, p < 0.001), and plaque volume (r = −0.668, p < 0.001). There was no relationship between FFR and CCTA morphometric plaque parameters. By multivariate analysis the independent predictors of FFR were lesion length (beta = −0.581, p < 0.001), MLA (beta = 0.360, p = 0.041), and RLD (beta = −0.255, p = 0.036). The optimal cutoffs for lesion length, MLA, MLD, RLD, and lumen area stenosis were >18.5 mm, ≤3.0 mm 2 , ≤2.1 mm, ≤3.2 mm, and >69%, respectively (max. sensitivity: 100% for MLA, max. specificity: 79% for lumen area stenosis). Conclusions: CCTA predictors for FFR support the mathematical relationship between stenosis pressure drop and coronary flow. CCTA could prove to be a useful rule-out test for significant hemodynamic effects of intermediate coronary stenoses

  12. Development of achiral and chiral 2D HPLC methods for analysis of albendazole metabolites in microsomal fractions using multivariate analysis for the in vitro metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaz, Kátia Roberta A; Pereira-Filho, Edenir Rodrigues; Oliveira, Regina V

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the development of two multidimensional liquid chromatography methods coupled to a fluorescence detector is described for direct analysis of microsomal fractions obtained from rat livers. The chiral multidimensional method was then applied for the optimization of the in vitro metabolism of albendazole by experimental design. Albendazole was selected as a model drug because of its anthelmintics properties and recent potential for cancer treatment. The development of two fully automated achiral-chiral and chiral-chiral high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods for the determination of albendazole (ABZ) and its metabolites albendazole sulphoxide (ABZ-SO), albendazole sulphone (ABZ-SO2) and albendazole 2-aminosulphone (ABZ-SO2NH2) in microsomal fractions are described. These methods involve the use of a phenyl (RAM-phenyl-BSA) or octyl (RAM-C8-BSA) restricted access media bovine serum albumin column for the sample clean-up, followed by an achiral phenyl column (15.0×0.46cmI.D.) or a chiral amylose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) column (15.0×0.46cmI.D.). The chiral 2D HPLC method was applied to the development of a compromise condition for the in vitro metabolism of ABZ by means of experimental design involving multivariate analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. CFD Analysis of Scale Effects on Conventional and Tip-Modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Keun Woo; Andersen, Poul

    2017-01-01

    Full-scale propeller performance is traditionally predictedby scaling model-scale test results, but the traditionalscaling methods do not take into account hydrodynamicdistinctions of tip-modified propellers in full-scaleperformance. An open-water CFD analysis is made onscale effects of tip...... the transition model shows that laminar and transitionalflow modeling is crucial in model-scale computations.Grid-independent solutions at model and full scale areachieved by grid verification studies. The CFD analysis of scale effects shows that theefficiency gain of the tip-modified propeller is increasedat...

  14. Groundwater flow analysis on local scale. Setting boundary conditions of groundwater flow analysis on site scale model in the former part of the step 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoe, Hironori; Saegusa, Hiromitsu

    2005-07-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute has been conducting a wide range of geoscientific research in order to build a foundation for multidisciplinary studies of the deep geological environment as a basis of research and development for geological disposal of nuclear wastes. Ongoing geoscientific research programs include the Regional Hydrogeological Study (RHS) project and Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) project in the Tono region, Gifu Prefecture. The main goal of these projects is to establish comprehensive techniques for investigation, analysis, and assessment of the deep geological environment at several spatial scales. The RHS project is a local scale study for understanding the groundwater flow system from the recharge area to the discharge area. The Surface-based Investigation Phase of the MIU project is a mainly site scale study for understanding the deep geological environment immediately surrounding the MIU construction site using a multiphase, iterative approach. In this study, the hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis on the Local scale were carried out in order to set boundary conditions of the site scale model based on the data obtained from surface-based investigations in the former part of the Step 3 in site scale of the MIU project. As a result of the study, the uncertainty of hydrogeological model of the local scale and boundary conditions for the site scale model is decreased as stepwise investigation, and boundary conditions for groundwater flow analysis on the site scale model for the former part of the Step 3 could be obtained. (author)

  15. Translation Fidelity of Psychological Scales: An Item Response Theory Analysis of an Individualism-Collectivism Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontempo, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes a method for assessing the quality of translations based on item response theory (IRT). Results from the IRT technique with French and Chinese versions of a scale measuring individualism-collectivism for samples of 250 U.S., 357 French, and 290 Chinese undergraduates show how several biased items are detected. (SLD)

  16. Refining a self-assessment of informatics competency scale using Mokken scaling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sunmoo; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Bakken, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare environments are increasingly implementing health information technology (HIT) and those from various professions must be competent to use HIT in meaningful ways. In addition, HIT has been shown to enable interprofessional approaches to health care. The purpose of this article is to describe the refinement of the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale (SANICS) using analytic techniques based upon item response theory (IRT) and discuss its relevance to interprofessional education and practice. In a sample of 604 nursing students, the 93-item version of SANICS was examined using non-parametric IRT. The iterative modeling procedure included 31 steps comprising: (1) assessing scalability, (2) assessing monotonicity, (3) assessing invariant item ordering, and (4) expert input. SANICS was reduced to an 18-item hierarchical scale with excellent reliability. Fundamental skills for team functioning and shared decision making among team members (e.g. "using monitoring systems appropriately," "describing general systems to support clinical care") had the highest level of difficulty, and "demonstrating basic technology skills" had the lowest difficulty level. Most items reflect informatics competencies relevant to all health professionals. Further, the approaches can be applied to construct a new hierarchical scale or refine an existing scale related to informatics attitudes or competencies for various health professions.

  17. Universal signatures of fractionalized quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, Sergei V; Melko, Roger G; Hastings, Matthew B

    2012-01-13

    Ground states of certain materials can support exotic excitations with a charge equal to a fraction of the fundamental electron charge. The condensation of these fractionalized particles has been predicted to drive unusual quantum phase transitions. Through numerical and theoretical analysis of a physical model of interacting lattice bosons, we establish the existence of such an exotic critical point, called XY*. We measure a highly nonclassical critical exponent η = 1.493 and construct a universal scaling function of winding number distributions that directly demonstrates the distinct topological sectors of an emergent Z(2) gauge field. The universal quantities used to establish this exotic transition can be used to detect other fractionalized quantum critical points in future model and material systems.

  18. Quantitative analysis of semivolatile organic compounds in selected fractions of air sample extracts by GC/MI-IR spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childers, J.W.; Wilson, N.K.; Barbour, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    The authors are currently investigating the capabilities of gas chromatography/matrix isolation infrared (GC/MI-IR) spectrometry for the determination of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in environmental air sample extracts. Their efforts are focused on the determination of SVOCs such as alkylbenzene positional isomers, which are difficult to separate chromatographically and to distinguish by conventional electron-impact ionization GC/mass spectrometry. They have performed a series of systematic experiments to identify sources of error in quantitative GC/MI-IR analyses. These experiments were designed to distinguish between errors due to instrument design or performance and errors that arise from some characteristic inherent to the GC/MI-IR technique, such as matrix effects. They have investigated repeatability as a function of several aspects of GC/MI IR spectrometry, including sample injection, spectral acquisition, cryogenic disk movement, and matrix deposition. The precision, linearity, dynamic range, and detection limits of a commercial GC/MI-IR system for target SVOCs were determined and compared to those obtained with the system's flame ionization detector. The use of deuterated internal standards in the quantitative GC/MI-IR analysis of selected fractions of ambient air sample extracts will be demonstrated. They will also discuss the current limitations of the technique in quantitative analyses and suggest improvements for future consideration

  19. Multidimensional protein fractionation of blood proteins coupled to data-independent nanoLC-MS/MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Yishai; Jaros, Julian A J; Schwarz, Emanuel; Bahn, Sabine

    2010-01-03

    In order to exploit human blood as a source of protein disease biomarkers, robust analytical methods are needed to overcome the inherent molecular complexity of this bio-fluid. We present the coupling of label-free SAX chromatography and IMAC to a data-independent nanoLC-MS/MS (nanoLC-MS(E)) platform for analysis of blood plasma and serum proteins. The methods were evaluated using protein standards added at different concentrations to two groups of samples. The results demonstrate that both techniques enable accurate protein quantitation using low sample volumes and a minimal number of fractions. Combining both methods, 883 unique proteins were identified, of which 423 proteins showed high reproducibility. The two approaches resulted in identification of unique molecular signatures with an overlap of approximately 30%, thus providing complimentary information on sub-proteomes. These methods are potentially useful for systems biology, biomarker discovery, and investigation of phosphoproteins in blood. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Stromal vascular fraction isolated from lipo-aspirates using an automated processing system: bench and bed analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Kentaro; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Iida, Hideo; Eto, Hitomi; Kato, Harunosuke; Aoi, Noriyuki; Kuno, Shinichiro; Hirohi, Toshitsugu; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2013-11-01

    The heterogeneous stromal vascular fraction (SVF), containing adipose-derived stem/progenitor cells (ASCs), can be easily isolated through enzymatic digestion of aspirated adipose tissue. In clinical settings, however, strict control of technical procedures according to standard operating procedures and validation of cell-processing conditions are required. Therefore, we evaluated the efficiency and reliability of an automated system for SVF isolation from adipose tissue. SVF cells, freshly isolated using the automated procedure, showed comparable number and viability to those from manual isolation. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed an SVF cell composition profile similar to that after manual isolation. In addition, the ASC yield after 1 week in culture was also not significantly different between the two groups. Our clinical study, in which SVF cells isolated with the automated system were transplanted with aspirated fat tissue for soft tissue augmentation/reconstruction in 42 patients, showed satisfactory outcomes with no serious side-effects. Taken together, our results suggested that the automated isolation system is as reliable a method as manual isolation and may also be useful in clinical settings. Automated isolation is expected to enable cell-based clinical trials in small facilities with an aseptic room, without the necessity of a good manufacturing practice-level cell processing area. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. MR signal-fat-fraction analysis and T2* weighted imaging measure BAT reliably on humans without cold exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstila, Milja; Pesola, Marko; Saari, Teemu; Koskensalo, Kalle; Raiko, Juho; Borra, Ronald J H; Nuutila, Pirjo; Parkkola, Riitta; Virtanen, Kirsi A

    2017-05-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is compositionally distinct from white adipose tissue (WAT) in terms of triglyceride and water content. In adult humans, the most significant BAT depot is localized in the supraclavicular area. Our aim is to differentiate brown adipose tissue from white adipose tissue using fat T2* relaxation time mapping and signal-fat-fraction (SFF) analysis based on a commercially available modified 2-point-Dixon (mDixon) water-fat separation method. We hypothesize that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can reliably measure BAT regardless of the cold-induced metabolic activation, with BAT having a significantly higher water and iron content compared to WAT. The supraclavicular area of 13 volunteers was studied on 3T PET-MRI scanner using T2* relaxation time and SFF mapping both during cold exposure and at ambient temperature; and 18 F-FDG PET during cold exposure. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were defined semiautomatically in the supraclavicular fat depot, subcutaneous WAT and muscle. The supraclavicular fat depot (assumed to contain BAT) had a significantly lower SFF and fat T2* relaxation time compared to subcutaneous WAT. Cold exposure did not significantly affect MR-based measurements. SFF and T2* values measured during cold exposure and at ambient temperature correlated inversely with the glucose uptake measured by 18 F-FDG PET. Human BAT can be reliably and safely assessed using MRI without cold activation and PET-related radiation exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rasch Analysis of the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Penelope J.; Fiedler, Roger C.; Rose, Debra J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This cross-sectional study explores the psychometric properties and dimensionality of the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) Scale, a multi-item balance test for higher-functioning older adults.

  3. Fractional power operation of tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mau, T.K.; Vold, E.L.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Methods to operate a tokamak fusion reactor at fractions of its rated power, identify the more effective control knobs and assess the impact of the requirements of fractional power operation on full power reactor design are explored. In particular, the role of burn control in maintaining the plasma at thermal equilibrium throughout these operations is studied. As a prerequisite to this task, the critical physics issues relevant to reactor performance predictions are examined and some insight into their impact on fractional power operation is offered. The basic tool of analysis consists of a zero-dimensional (0-D) time-dependent plasma power balance code which incorporates the most advanced data base and models in transport and burn plasma physics relevant to tokamaks. Because the plasma power balance is dominated by the transport loss and given the large uncertainty in the confinement model, the authors have studied the problem for a wide range of energy confinement scalings. The results of this analysis form the basis for studying the temporal behavior of the plasma under various thermal control mechanisms. Scenarios of thermally stable full and fractional power operations have been determined for a variety of transport models, with either passive or active feedback burn control. Important power control parameters, such as gas fueling rate, auxiliary power and other plasma quantities that affect transport losses, have also been identified. The results of these studies vary with the individual transport scaling used and, in particular, with respect to the effect of alpha heating power on confinement

  4. Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Weight Scale Analysis Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOHNSON, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    Fairbanks Weight Scales are used at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility to determine the weight of waste drums as they are received, processed, and shipped. Due to recent problems, discovered during calibration, the WRAP Engineering Department has completed this document which outlines both the investigation of the infeed conveyor scale failure in September of 1999 and recommendations for calibration procedure modifications designed to correct deficiencies in the current procedures

  5. Analysis of full scale impact into an abutment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullard, K.; Dowler, H.J.; Soanes, T.P.T.

    1985-01-01

    A 60mph impact into a tunnel abutment, of a flask on a railway flatrol with following vehicles, is shown to be a much less severe event for the flask than a 9 metre drop test to IAEA regulations. This involves the use of mathematical models of the full scale event of the same type as were employed in studying the behaviour of quarter scale models. The latter were subject to actual impact testing as part of the validation process. (author)

  6. Comparative Analysis of Different Protocols to Manage Large Scale Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Anil Rao Pimplapure; Dr Jayant Dubey; Prashant Sen

    2013-01-01

    In recent year the numbers, complexity and size is increased in Large Scale Network. The best example of Large Scale Network is Internet, and recently once are Data-centers in Cloud Environment. In this process, involvement of several management tasks such as traffic monitoring, security and performance optimization is big task for Network Administrator. This research reports study the different protocols i.e. conventional protocols like Simple Network Management Protocol and newly Gossip bas...

  7. Schinus terebinthifolius scale-up countercurrent chromatography (Part I): High performance countercurrent chromatography fractionation of triterpene acids with off-line detection using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Mariana Neves; Costa, Fernanda das Neves; Leitão, Gilda Guimarães; Garrard, Ian; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana; Winterhalter, Peter; Jerz, Gerold

    2015-04-10

    'Countercurrent chromatography' (CCC) is an ideal technique for the recovery, purification and isolation of bioactive natural products, due to the liquid nature of the stationary phase, process predictability and the possibility of scale-up from analytical to preparative scale. In this work, a method developed for the fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi berries dichloromethane extract was thoroughly optimized to achieve maximal throughput with minimal solvent and time consumption per gram of processed crude extract, using analytical, semi-preparative and preparative 'high performance countercurrent chromatography' (HPCCC) instruments. The method using the biphasic solvent system composed of n-heptane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was volumetrically scaled up to increase sample throughput up to 120 times, while maintaining separation efficiency and time. As a fast and specific detection alternative, the fractions collected from the CCC-separations were injected to an 'atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometer' (APCI-MS/MS) and reconstituted molecular weight MS-chromatograms of the APCI-ionizable compounds from S. terebinthifolius were obtained. This procedure led to the direct isolation of tirucallane type triterpenes such as masticadienonic and 3β-masticadienolic acids. Also oleanonic and moronic acids have been identified for the first time in the species. In summary, this approach can be used for other CCC scale-up processes, enabling MS-target-guided isolation procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis, scale modeling, and full-scale test of a railcar and spent-nuclear-fuel shipping cask in a high-velocity impact against a rigid barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huerta, M.

    1981-06-01

    This report describes the mathematical analysis, the physical scale modeling, and a full-scale crash test of a railcar spent-nuclear-fuel shipping system. The mathematical analysis utilized a lumped-parameter model to predict the structural response of the railcar and the shipping cask. The physical scale modeling analysis consisted of two crash tests that used 1/8-scale models to assess railcar and shipping cask damage. The full-scale crash test, conducted with retired railcar equipment, was carefully monitored with onboard instrumentation and high-speed photography. Results of the mathematical and scale modeling analyses are compared with the full-scale test. 29 figures

  9. An item response theory analysis of the Olweus Bullying scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Kyrre; Olweus, Dan

    2014-12-02

    In the present article, we used IRT (graded response) modeling as a useful technology for a detailed and refined study of the psychometric properties of the various items of the Olweus Bullying scale and the scale itself. The sample consisted of a very large number of Norwegian 4th-10th grade students (n = 48 926). The IRT analyses revealed that the scale was essentially unidimensional and had excellent reliability in the upper ranges of the latent bullying tendency trait, as intended and desired. Gender DIF effects were identified with regard to girls' use of indirect bullying by social exclusion and boys' use of physical bullying by hitting and kicking but these effects were small and worked in opposite directions, having negligible effects at the scale level. Also scale scores adjusted for DIF effects differed very little from non-adjusted scores. In conclusion, the empirical data were well characterized by the chosen IRT model and the Olweus Bullying scale was considered well suited for the conduct of fair and reliable comparisons involving different gender-age groups. Information Aggr. Behav. 9999:XX-XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Analysis of chromosome aberration data by hybrid-scale models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indrawati, Iwiq; Kumazawa, Shigeru

    2000-02-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for analyzing data of chromosome aberrations, which is useful to understand the characteristics of dose-response relationships and to construct the calibration curves for the biological dosimetry. The hybrid scale of linear and logarithmic scales brings a particular plotting paper, where the normal section paper, two types of semi-log papers and the log-log paper are continuously connected. The hybrid-hybrid plotting paper may contain nine kinds of linear relationships, and these are conveniently called hybrid scale models. One can systematically select the best-fit model among the nine models by among the conditions for a straight line of data points. A biological interpretation is possible with some hybrid-scale models. In this report, the hybrid scale models were applied to separately reported data on chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes as well as on chromosome breaks in Tradescantia. The results proved that the proposed models fit the data better than the linear-quadratic model, despite the demerit of the increased number of model parameters. We showed that the hybrid-hybrid model (both variables of dose and response using the hybrid scale) provides the best-fit straight lines to be used as the reliable and readable calibration curves of chromosome aberrations. (author)

  11. Estimating the number of fractions by tumour site for European countries in 2012 and 2025: An ESTRO-HERO analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borras, Josep M; Grau, Cai; Corral, Julieta; Wong, Karen; Barton, Michael B; Ferlay, Jacques; Bray, Freddie; Lievens, Yolande

    2018-02-01

    The optimal number of radiotherapy fractions is a relevant input for planning resource needs. An estimation of the total number of fractions by country and tumour site is assessed for 2012 and 2025. European cancer incidence data by tumour site and country for 2012 and 2025 were extracted from the GLOBOCAN database. Incidence and stage data were introduced in the Australian Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CCORE) model, producing an evidence-based proportion of incident cases with an indication for radiotherapy and fractions by indication. An indication was defined as a clinical situation in which radiotherapy was the treatment of choice. The total number of fractions if radiotherapy was given according to guidelines to all patients with an indication in Europe was estimated to be 30 million for 2012; with a forecasted increase of 16.1% by 2025, yet with differences by country and tumour. The average number of fractions per course was 17.6 with a small range of differences following stage at diagnosis. Among the treatments with radical intent the average was 24 fractions, while it decreased to 2.5 among palliative treatments. An increase in the total number of fractions is expected in many European countries in the coming years following the trends in cancer incidence. In planning radiotherapy resources, these increases should be balanced to the evolution towards hypofractionation, along with increased complexity and quality assurance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid determination of chemical composition and classification of bamboo fractions using visible-near infrared spectroscopy coupled with multivariate data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong; Li, Kang; Zhang, Maomao; Xin, Donglin; Zhang, Junhua

    2016-01-01

    During conversion of bamboo into biofuels and chemicals, it is necessary to efficiently predict the chemical composition and digestibility of biomass. However, traditional methods for determination of lignocellulosic biomass composition are expensive and time consuming. In this work, a novel and fast method for quantitative and qualitative analysis of chemical composition and enzymatic digestibilities of juvenile bamboo and mature bamboo fractions (bamboo green, bamboo timber, bamboo yellow, bamboo node, and bamboo branch) using visible-near infrared spectra was evaluated. The developed partial least squares models yielded coefficients of determination in calibration of 0.88, 0.94, and 0.96, for cellulose, xylan, and lignin of bamboo fractions in raw spectra, respectively. After visible-near infrared spectra being pretreated, the corresponding coefficients of determination in calibration yielded by the developed partial least squares models are 0.994, 0.990, and 0.996, respectively. The score plots of principal component analysis of mature bamboo, juvenile bamboo, and different fractions of mature bamboo were obviously distinguished in raw spectra. Based on partial least squares discriminant analysis, the classification accuracies of mature bamboo, juvenile bamboo, and different fractions of bamboo (bamboo green, bamboo timber, bamboo yellow, and bamboo branch) all reached 100 %. In addition, high accuracies of evaluation of the enzymatic digestibilities of bamboo fractions after pretreatment with aqueous ammonia were also observed. The results showed the potential of visible-near infrared spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis in efficiently analyzing the chemical composition and hydrolysabilities of lignocellulosic biomass, such as bamboo fractions.

  13. Psychometric analysis of two new scales: the evidence-based practice nursing leadership and work environment scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryse, Yvette; McDaniel, Anna; Schafer, John

    2014-08-01

    Those in nursing have been charged with practicing to the full extent of their education and training by the Institute of Medicine. Therefore, evidence-based practice (EBP) has never been more important to nursing than in the current healthcare environment. Frequently the burden of EBP is the responsibility of the bedside practitioner, but has been found to be a process that requires leadership and organizational support. A key underlying component of a strong EBP environment includes effective communications and collaboration among staff and nursing leadership. Developing measurement tools that examine the milieu and nursing leadership in which the staff nurse practices is an important component of understanding the factors that support or hinder EBP. The aim of this study is to report on the development and analysis of two new scales designed to explore leadership and organizational support for EBP. The EBP Nursing Leadership Scale (10 items) examines the staff nurses perception of support provided by the nurse manager for EBP, and the EBP Work Environment Scale (8 items) examines organizational support for EBP. Staff nurses who worked at least .5 FTE in direct patient care, from two inner city hospitals (n = 422) completed the scales. The scales were evaluated for internal consistency reliability with the Cronbach alpha technique, content validity using a panel of experts, and construct validity by The content validity index computed from expert rankings was .78 to 1.0 with an average of.96. Cronbach's alpha was .96 (n = 422) for the EBP Nursing Leadership Scale and .86 (n = 422) for the EBP Work Environment Scale. Factor analysis confirmed that each scale measured a unidimensional construct (p organizational influences on EBP. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  14. Near infrared spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis for monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I + II + III supernatant in human albumin separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Can; Wang, Fei; Zang, Lixuan; Zang, Hengchang; Alcalà, Manel; Nie, Lei; Wang, Mingyu; Li, Lian

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, as a powerful process analytical tool, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been widely applied in process monitoring. In present work, NIRS combined with multivariate analysis was used to monitor the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I + II + III (FI + II + III) supernatant in human albumin (HA) separation to achieve qualitative and quantitative monitoring at the same time and assure the product's quality. First, a qualitative model was established by using principal component analysis (PCA) with 6 of 8 normal batches samples, and evaluated by the remaining 2 normal batches and 3 abnormal batches. The results showed that the first principal component (PC1) score chart could be successfully used for fault detection and diagnosis. Then, two quantitative models were built with 6 of 8 normal batches to determine the content of the total protein (TP) and HA separately by using partial least squares regression (PLS-R) strategy, and the models were validated by 2 remaining normal batches. The determination coefficient of validation (Rp2), root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and ratio of performance deviation (RPD) were 0.975, 0.501 g/L, 0.465 g/L and 5.57 for TP, and 0.969, 0.530 g/L, 0.341 g/L and 5.47 for HA, respectively. The results showed that the established models could give a rapid and accurate measurement of the content of TP and HA. The results of this study indicated that NIRS is an effective tool and could be successfully used for qualitative and quantitative monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of FI + II + III supernatant simultaneously. This research has significant reference value for assuring the quality and improving the recovery ratio of HA in industrialization scale by using NIRS.

  15. Near infrared spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis for monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I+II+III supernatant in human albumin separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Can; Wang, Fei; Zang, Lixuan; Zang, Hengchang; Alcalà, Manel; Nie, Lei; Wang, Mingyu; Li, Lian

    2017-03-15

    Nowadays, as a powerful process analytical tool, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been widely applied in process monitoring. In present work, NIRS combined with multivariate analysis was used to monitor the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I+II+III (FI+II+III) supernatant in human albumin (HA) separation to achieve qualitative and quantitative monitoring at the same time and assure the product's quality. First, a qualitative model was established by using principal component analysis (PCA) with 6 of 8 normal batches samples, and evaluated by the remaining 2 normal batches and 3 abnormal batches. The results showed that the first principal component (PC1) score chart could be successfully used for fault detection and diagnosis. Then, two quantitative models were built with 6 of 8 normal batches to determine the content of the total protein (TP) and HA separately by using partial least squares regression (PLS-R) strategy, and the models were validated by 2 remaining normal batches. The determination coefficient of validation (R p 2 ), root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and ratio of performance deviation (RPD) were 0.975, 0.501g/L, 0.465g/L and 5.57 for TP, and 0.969, 0.530g/L, 0.341g/L and 5.47 for HA, respectively. The results showed that the established models could give a rapid and accurate measurement of the content of TP and HA. The results of this study indicated that NIRS is an effective tool and could be successfully used for qualitative and quantitative monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of FI+II+III supernatant simultaneously. This research has significant reference value for assuring the quality and improving the recovery ratio of HA in industrialization scale by using NIRS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chromatographic finger print analysis of anti-inflammatory active extract fractions of aerial parts of Tribulus terrestris by HPTLC technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mona Salih; Alajmi, Mohamed Fahad; Alam, Perwez; Khalid, Hassan Subki; Mahmoud, Abelkhalig Muddathir; Ahmed, Wadah Jamal

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop HPTLC fingerprint profile of anti-inflammatory active extract fractions of Tribulus terrestris (family Zygophyllaceae). Methods The anti-inflammatory activity was tested for the methanol and its fractions (chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous) and chloroform extract of Tribulus terrestris (aerial parts) by injecting different groups of rats (6 each) with carrageenan in hind paw and measuring the edema volume before and 1, 2 and 3 h after carrageenan injection. Control group received saline i.p. The extracts treatment was injected i.p. in doses of 200 mg/kg 1 h before carrageenan administration. Indomethacin (30 mg/kg) was used as standard. HPTLC studies were carried out using CAMAG HPTLC system equipped with Linomat IV applicator, TLC scanner 3, Reprostar 3, CAMAG ADC 2 and WIN CATS-4 software for the active fractions of chloroform fraction of methanol extract. Results The methanol extract showed good antiedematous effect with percentage of inhibition more than 72%, indicating its ability to inhibit the inflammatory mediators. The methanol extract was re-dissolved in 100 mL of distilled water and fractionated with chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol. The four fractions (chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous) were subjected to anti-inflammatory activity. Chloroform fraction showed good anti-inflammatory activity at dose of 200 mg/kg. Chloroform fraction was then subjected to normal phase silica gel column chromatography and eluted with petroleum ether-chloroform, chloroform-ethyl acetate mixtures of increasing polarity which produced 15 fractions (F1-F15). Only fractions F1, F2, F4, F5, F7, F9, F11 and F14 were found to be active, hence these were analyzed with HPTLC to develop their finger print profile. These fractions showed different spots with different Rf values. Conclusions The different chloroform fractions F1, F2, F4, F5, F7, F9, F11 and F14 revealed 4, 7, 7, 8, 9, 7, 7 and 6 major spots, respectively. The

  17. Numerical analysis for trajectory controllability of a coupled multi-order fractional delay differential system via the shifted Jacobi method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, B. Ganesh; Muthukumar, P.

    2018-02-01

    This paper deals with the trajectory controllability for a class of multi-order fractional linear systems subject to a constant delay in state vector. The solution for the coupled fractional delay differential equation is established by the Mittag-Leffler function. The necessary and sufficient condition for the trajectory controllability is formulated and proved by the generalized Gronwall's inequality. The approximate trajectory for the proposed system is obtained through the shifted Jacobi operational matrix method. The numerical simulation of the approximate solution shows the theoretical results. Finally, some remarks and comments on the existing results of constrained controllability for the fractional dynamical system are also presented.

  18. Chromatographic finger print analysis of anti-inflammatory active extract fractions of aerial parts of Tribulus terrestris by HPTLC technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mona Salih; Alajmi, Mohamed Fahad; Alam, Perwez; Khalid, Hassan Subki; Mahmoud, Abelkhalig Muddathir; Ahmed, Wadah Jamal

    2014-03-01

    To develop HPTLC fingerprint profile of anti-inflammatory active extract fractions of Tribulus terrestris (family Zygophyllaceae). The anti-inflammatory activity was tested for the methanol and its fractions (chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous) and chloroform extract of Tribulus terrestris (aerial parts) by injecting different groups of rats (6 each) with carrageenan in hind paw and measuring the edema volume before and 1, 2 and 3 h after carrageenan injection. Control group received saline i.p. The extracts treatment was injected i.p. in doses of 200 mg/kg 1 h before carrageenan administration. Indomethacin (30 mg/kg) was used as standard. HPTLC studies were carried out using CAMAG HPTLC system equipped with Linomat IV applicator, TLC scanner 3, Reprostar 3, CAMAG ADC 2 and WIN CATS-4 software for the active fractions of chloroform fraction of methanol extract. The methanol extract showed good antiedematous effect with percentage of inhibition more than 72%, indicating its ability to inhibit the inflammatory mediators. The methanol extract was re-dissolved in 100 mL of distilled water and fractionated with chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol. The four fractions (chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous) were subjected to anti-inflammatory activity. Chloroform fraction showed good anti-inflammatory activity at dose of 200 mg/kg. Chloroform fraction was then subjected to normal phase silica gel column chromatography and eluted with petroleum ether-chloroform, chloroform-ethyl acetate mixtures of increasing polarity which produced 15 fractions (F1-F15). Only fractions F1, F2, F4, F5, F7, F9, F11 and F14 were found to be active, hence these were analyzed with HPTLC to develop their finger print profile. These fractions showed different spots with different Rf values. The different chloroform fractions F1, F2, F4, F5, F7, F9, F11 and F14 revealed 4, 7, 7, 8, 9, 7, 7 and 6 major spots, respectively. The results obtained in this experiment

  19. Comparison of scale analysis and numerical simulation for saturated zone convective mixing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    Scale analysis can be used to predict a variety of quantities arising from natural systems where processes are described by partial differential equations. For example, scale analysis can be applied to estimate the effectiveness of convective missing on the dilution of contaminants in groundwater. Scale analysis involves substituting simple quotients for partial derivatives and identifying and equating the dominant terms in an order-of-magnitude sense. For free convection due to sidewall heating of saturated porous media, scale analysis shows that vertical convective velocity in the thermal boundary layer region is proportional to the Rayleigh number, horizontal convective velocity is proportional to the square root of the Rayleigh number, and thermal boundary layer thickness is proportional to the inverse square root of the Rayleigh number. These scale analysis estimates are corroborated by numerical simulations of an idealized system. A scale analysis estimate of mixing time for a tracer mixing by hydrodynamic dispersion in a convection cell also agrees well with numerical simulation for two different Rayleigh numbers. Scale analysis for the heating-from-below scenario produces estimates of maximum velocity one-half as large as the sidewall case. At small values of the Rayleigh number, this estimate is confirmed by numerical simulation. For larger Rayleigh numbers, simulation results suggest maximum velocities are similar to the sidewall heating scenario. In general, agreement between scale analysis estimates and numerical simulation results serves to validate the method of scale analysis. Application is to radioactive repositories

  20. High pH reversed-phase chromatography as a superior fractionation scheme compared to off-gel isoelectric focusing for complex proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Derek R; Hu, Xiaojie; McCorrister, Stuart J; Westmacott, Garrett R; Plummer, Francis A; Ball, Terry B; Carpenter, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    MS/MS is the technology of choice for analyzing complex protein mixtures. However, due to the intrinsic complexity and dynamic range present in higher eukaryotic proteomes, prefractionation is an important step to maximize the number of proteins identified. Off-gel IEF (OG-IEF) and high pH RP (Hp-RP) column chromatography have both been successfully utilized as a first-dimension peptide separation technique in shotgun proteomic experiments. Here, a direct comparison of the two methodologies was performed on ex vivo peripheral blood mononuclear cell lysate. In 12-fraction replicate analysis, Hp-RP resulted in more peptides and proteins identified than OG-IEF fractionation. Distributions of peptide pIs and hydropathy did not reveal any appreciable bias in either technique. Resolution, defined here as the ability to limit a specific peptide to one particular fraction, was significantly better for Hp-RP. This leads to a more uniform distribution of total and unique peptides for Hp-RP across all fractions collected. These results suggest that fractionation by Hp-RP over OG-IEF is the better choice for typical complex proteome analysis. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Estimation of the algal-available phosphorus pool in sediments of a large, shallow eutrophic lake (Taihu, China) using profiled SMT fractional analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Mengyuan; Zhu Guangwei; Li Wei; Zhang Yunlin; Zhao Linlin; Gu Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Because large, shallow lakes are heavily influenced by wind–wave disturbance, it is difficult to estimate internal phosphorus load using traditional methods. To estimate the potential contribution of phosphorus from sediment to overlying water in eutrophic Lake Taihu, phosphorus fractions of surface and deep layer sediments were quantified and analyzed for algal bloom potential using a Standard Measurements and Testing (SMT) sequential extraction method and incubation experiments. Phosphorus bound to Fe, Al and Mn oxides and hydroxides (Fe–P) and organic phosphorus (OP) were to be found bioactive. The difference in Fe–P and OP contents between surface and deep layers equates to the sediment pool of potentially algal-available phosphorus. This pool was estimated at 5168 tons for the entire lake and was closely related to pollution input and algal blooms. Profiled SMT fractionation analysis is thus a potentially useful tool for estimating internal phosphorus loading in large, shallow lakes. - Highlights: ► We used profiled sediment P activity by SMT fractionation to evaluate the P release potential in large and shallow lakes. ► We built the relationship between sediment SMT fractionations of P and the P release by algal bloom degradation process. ► We discussed the supporting mechanism of sediment P release to Microcystis algal bloom in a large and shallow lake. ► We discussed the nutrient control strategy of algal bloom in shallow lakes in highly human activities disturbance catchment. - Profiled SMT fractional analysis of internal phosphorus pool in large, shallow lake.

  2. Multiple Scale Analysis of the Dynamic State Index (DSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, A.; Névir, P.

    2016-12-01

    The Dynamic State Index (DSI) is a novel parameter that indicates local deviations of the atmospheric flow field from a stationary, inviscid and adiabatic solution of the primitive equations of fluid mechanics. This is in contrast to classical methods, which often diagnose deviations from temporal or spatial mean states. We show some applications of the DSI to atmospheric flow phenomena on different scales. The DSI is derived from the Energy-Vorticity-Theory (EVT) which is based on two global conserved quantities, the total energy and Ertel's potential enstrophy. Locally, these global quantities lead to the Bernoulli function and the PV building together with the potential temperature the DSI.If the Bernoulli function and the PV are balanced, the DSI vanishes and the basic state is obtained. Deviations from the basic state provide an indication of diabatic and non-stationary weather events. Therefore, the DSI offers a tool to diagnose and even prognose different atmospheric events on different scales.On synoptic scale, the DSI can help to diagnose storms and hurricanes, where also the dipole structure of the DSI plays an important role. In the scope of the collaborative research center "Scaling Cascades in Complex Systems" we show high correlations between the DSI and precipitation on convective scale. Moreover, we compare the results with reduced models and different spatial resolutions.

  3. Elements of dual scaling an introduction to practical data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Nishisato, Shizuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Quantification methodology of categorical data is a popular topic in many branches of science. Most books, however, are either too advanced for those who need it, or too elementary to gain insight into its potential. This book fills the gap between these extremes, and provides specialists with an easy and comprehensive reference, and others with a complete treatment of dual scaling methodology -- starting with motivating examples, followed by an introductory discussion of necessary quantitative skills, and ending with different perpsectives on dual scaling with examples, advanced topics, and f

  4. Multi-scale analysis of lung computed tomography images

    CERN Document Server

    Gori, I; Fantacci, M E; Preite Martinez, A; Retico, A; De Mitri, I; Donadio, S; Fulcheri, C

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of lung internal nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical Computed Tomography (CT) images was developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 project. The three modules of our lung CAD system, a segmentation algorithm for lung internal region identification, a multi-scale dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a multi-scale neural technique for false positive finding reduction, are described. The results obtained on a dataset of low-dose and thin-slice CT scans are shown in terms of free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curves and discussed.

  5. Application of GC–MS chromatography for the analysis of the oil fractions extracted by supercritical CO2 at high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Spirov, Pavel; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2013-01-01

    GC–MS chromatographic analysis has been applied for the investigation of the fractions of oil extracted by supercritical carbon dioxide at a temperature of 60 °C and at pressure values ranging from 22 to 56 MPa. The observations revealed, that the whole extraction process is clearly reflected...... in the chromatograms, demonstrating how the heavier hydrocarbon fractions were gradually involved in the extraction process. The shape of the chromatograms alters with increasing pressure from triangle to trapezoid, approaching the shape of the chromatogram of the crude oil. The observation of the fingerprints...

  6. Fast Virtual Fractional Flow Reserve Based Upon Steady-State Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis: Results From the VIRTU-Fast Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul D; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Feher, Jeroen F A; Rafiroiu, Dan; Lungu, Angela; Varma, Susheel; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2017-08-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR)-guided percutaneous intervention is superior to standard assessment but remains underused. The authors have developed a novel "pseudotransient" analysis protocol for computing virtual fractional flow reserve (vFFR) based upon angiographic images and steady-state computational fluid dynamics. This protocol generates vFFR results in 189 s (cf >24 h for transient analysis) using a desktop PC, with <1% error relative to that of full-transient computational fluid dynamics analysis. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that physiological lesion significance was influenced less by coronary or lesion anatomy (33%) and more by microvascular physiology (59%). If coronary microvascular resistance can be estimated, vFFR can be accurately computed in less time than it takes to make invasive measurements.

  7. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Single Fraction of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Compared With Single Fraction of External Beam Radiation Therapy for Palliation of Vertebral Bone Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hayeon, E-mail: kimh2@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Smith, Kenneth J. [Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been proposed for the palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases because higher radiation doses may result in superior and more durable pain control. A phase III clinical trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0631) comparing single fraction SBRT with single fraction external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in palliative treatment of painful vertebral bone metastases is now ongoing. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis to compare these strategies. Methods and Materials: A Markov model, using a 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon, was developed to compare the cost-effectiveness of SBRT (16 or 18 Gy in 1 fraction) with that of 8 Gy in 1 fraction of EBRT. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and EBRT were captured in the model. Costs were based on Medicare reimbursement in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account for uncertainty, 1-way, 2-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: Base case pain relief after the treatment was assumed as 20% higher in SBRT. Base case treatment costs for SBRT and EBRT were $9000 and $1087, respectively. In the base case analysis, SBRT resulted in an ICER of $124,552 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of the utility of unrelieved pain; the utility of relieved pain after initial treatment and median survival were also sensitive to variation. If median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT cost <$100,000 per QALY gained. Conclusion: SBRT for palliation of vertebral bone metastases is not cost-effective compared with EBRT at a $100,000 per QALY gained WTP threshold. However, if median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT costs ≤$100

  8. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Single Fraction of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Compared With Single Fraction of External Beam Radiation Therapy for Palliation of Vertebral Bone Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hayeon; Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M. Saiful; Smith, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been proposed for the palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases because higher radiation doses may result in superior and more durable pain control. A phase III clinical trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0631) comparing single fraction SBRT with single fraction external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in palliative treatment of painful vertebral bone metastases is now ongoing. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis to compare these strategies. Methods and Materials: A Markov model, using a 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon, was developed to compare the cost-effectiveness of SBRT (16 or 18 Gy in 1 fraction) with that of 8 Gy in 1 fraction of EBRT. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and EBRT were captured in the model. Costs were based on Medicare reimbursement in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account for uncertainty, 1-way, 2-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: Base case pain relief after the treatment was assumed as 20% higher in SBRT. Base case treatment costs for SBRT and EBRT were $9000 and $1087, respectively. In the base case analysis, SBRT resulted in an ICER of $124,552 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of the utility of unrelieved pain; the utility of relieved pain after initial treatment and median survival were also sensitive to variation. If median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT cost <$100,000 per QALY gained. Conclusion: SBRT for palliation of vertebral bone metastases is not cost-effective compared with EBRT at a $100,000 per QALY gained WTP threshold. However, if median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT costs ≤$100

  9. Two-scale analysis of intermittency in fully developed turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badii, R; Talkner, P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    A self-affinity test for turbulent time series is applied to experimental data for the estimation of intermittency exponents. The method employs exact relations satisfied by joint expectations of observables computed across two different length scales. One of these constitutes a verification tool for the existence and the extent of the inertial range. (author) 2 figs., 13 refs.