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Sample records for fourier imaging correlation

  1. Fourier-transform ghost imaging with pure far-field correlated thermal light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Honglin; Shen Xia; Han Shensheng; Zhu Daming

    2007-01-01

    Pure far-field correlated thermal light beams are created with phase grating, and Fourier-transform ghost imaging depending only on the far-field correlation is demonstrated experimentally. Theoretical analysis and the results of experimental investigation of this pure far-field correlated thermal light are presented. Applications which may be exploited with this imaging scheme are discussed

  2. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.dominguez@ttu.edu; Peralta, Luis Grave de [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Bernussi, Ayrton A. [Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  3. General Correlation Theorem for Trinion Fourier Transform

    OpenAIRE

    Bahri, Mawardi

    2017-01-01

    - The trinion Fourier transform is an extension of the Fourier transform in the trinion numbers setting. In this work we derive the correlation theorem for the trinion Fourier transform by using the relation between trinion convolution and correlation definitions in the trinion Fourier transform domains.

  4. Estimation bias from using nonlinear Fourier plane correlators for sub-pixel image shift measurement and implications for the binary joint transform correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grycewicz, Thomas J.; Florio, Christopher J.; Franz, Geoffrey A.; Robinson, Ross E.

    2007-09-01

    When using Fourier plane digital algorithms or an optical correlator to measure the correlation between digital images, interpolation by center-of-mass or quadratic estimation techniques can be used to estimate image displacement to the sub-pixel level. However, this can lead to a bias in the correlation measurement. This bias shifts the sub-pixel output measurement to be closer to the nearest pixel center than the actual location. The paper investigates the bias in the outputs of both digital and optical correlators, and proposes methods to minimize this effect. We use digital studies and optical implementations of the joint transform correlator to demonstrate optical registration with accuracies better than 0.1 pixels. We use both simulations of image shift and movies of a moving target as inputs. We demonstrate bias error for both center-of-mass and quadratic interpolation, and discuss the reasons that this bias is present. Finally, we suggest measures to reduce or eliminate the bias effects. We show that when sub-pixel bias is present, it can be eliminated by modifying the interpolation method. By removing the bias error, we improve registration accuracy by thirty percent.

  5. Electro-optic imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Znod, Hanying (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (EOIFTS) for Hyperspectral Imaging is described. The EOIFTS includes an input polarizer, an output polarizer, and a plurality of birefringent phase elements. The relative orientations of the polarizers and birefringent phase elements can be changed mechanically or via a controller, using ferroelectric liquid crystals, to substantially measure the spectral Fourier components of light propagating through the EIOFTS. When achromatic switches are used as an integral part of the birefringent phase elements, the EIOFTS becomes suitable for broadband applications, with over 1 micron infrared bandwidth.

  6. Fourier analysis: from cloaking to imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kedi; Cheng, Qiluan; Wang, Guo Ping

    2016-04-01

    Regarding invisibility cloaks as an optical imaging system, we present a Fourier approach to analytically unify both Pendry cloaks and complementary media-based invisibility cloaks into one kind of cloak. By synthesizing different transfer functions, we can construct different devices to realize a series of interesting functions such as hiding objects (events), creating illusions, and performing perfect imaging. In this article, we give a brief review on recent works of applying Fourier approach to analysis invisibility cloaks and optical imaging through scattering layers. We show that, to construct devices to conceal an object, no constructive materials with extreme properties are required, making most, if not all, of the above functions realizable by using naturally occurring materials. As instances, we experimentally verify a method of directionally hiding distant objects and create illusions by using all-dielectric materials, and further demonstrate a non-invasive method of imaging objects completely hidden by scattering layers.

  7. Fourier analysis: from cloaking to imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Kedi; Ping Wang, Guo; Cheng, Qiluan

    2016-01-01

    Regarding invisibility cloaks as an optical imaging system, we present a Fourier approach to analytically unify both Pendry cloaks and complementary media-based invisibility cloaks into one kind of cloak. By synthesizing different transfer functions, we can construct different devices to realize a series of interesting functions such as hiding objects (events), creating illusions, and performing perfect imaging. In this article, we give a brief review on recent works of applying Fourier approach to analysis invisibility cloaks and optical imaging through scattering layers. We show that, to construct devices to conceal an object, no constructive materials with extreme properties are required, making most, if not all, of the above functions realizable by using naturally occurring materials. As instances, we experimentally verify a method of directionally hiding distant objects and create illusions by using all-dielectric materials, and further demonstrate a non-invasive method of imaging objects completely hidden by scattering layers. (review)

  8. Multi-band Image Registration Method Based on Fourier Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庹红娅; 刘允才

    2004-01-01

    This paper presented a registration method based on Fourier transform for multi-band images which is involved in translation and small rotation. Although different band images differ a lot in the intensity and features,they contain certain common information which we can exploit. A model was given that the multi-band images have linear correlations under the least-square sense. It is proved that the coefficients have no effect on the registration progress if two images have linear correlations. Finally, the steps of the registration method were proposed. The experiments show that the model is reasonable and the results are satisfying.

  9. Fourier transform based scalable image quality measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwaria, Manish; Lin, Weisi; McLoughlin, Ian; Emmanuel, Sabu; Chia, Liang-Tien

    2012-08-01

    We present a new image quality assessment (IQA) algorithm based on the phase and magnitude of the 2D (twodimensional) Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). The basic idea is to compare the phase and magnitude of the reference and distorted images to compute the quality score. However, it is well known that the Human Visual Systems (HVSs) sensitivity to different frequency components is not the same. We accommodate this fact via a simple yet effective strategy of nonuniform binning of the frequency components. This process also leads to reduced space representation of the image thereby enabling the reduced-reference (RR) prospects of the proposed scheme. We employ linear regression to integrate the effects of the changes in phase and magnitude. In this way, the required weights are determined via proper training and hence more convincing and effective. Lastly, using the fact that phase usually conveys more information than magnitude, we use only the phase for RR quality assessment. This provides the crucial advantage of further reduction in the required amount of reference image information. The proposed method is therefore further scalable for RR scenarios. We report extensive experimental results using a total of 9 publicly available databases: 7 image (with a total of 3832 distorted images with diverse distortions) and 2 video databases (totally 228 distorted videos). These show that the proposed method is overall better than several of the existing fullreference (FR) algorithms and two RR algorithms. Additionally, there is a graceful degradation in prediction performance as the amount of reference image information is reduced thereby confirming its scalability prospects. To enable comparisons and future study, a Matlab implementation of the proposed algorithm is available at http://www.ntu.edu.sg/home/wslin/reduced_phase.rar.

  10. Three dimensional image reconstruction in the Fourier domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stearns, C.W.; Chesler, D.A.; Brownell, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    Filtered backprojection reconstruction algorithms are based upon the relationship between the Fourier transform of the imaged object and the Fourier transforms of its projections. A new reconstruction algorithm has been developed which performs the image assembly operation in Fourier space, rather than in image space by backprojection. This represents a significant decrease in the number of operations required to assemble the image. The new Fourier domain algorithm has resolution comparable to the filtered backprojection algorithm, and, after correction by a pointwise multiplication, demonstrates proper recovery throughout image space. Although originally intended for three-dimensional imaging applications, the Fourier domain algorithm can also be developed for two-dimensional imaging applications such as planar positron imaging systems

  11. Generalized formulation of an encryption system based on a joint transform correlator and fractional Fourier transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilardy, Juan M; Millán, María S; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet; Torres, Yezid

    2014-01-01

    We propose a generalization of the encryption system based on double random phase encoding (DRPE) and a joint transform correlator (JTC), from the Fourier domain to the fractional Fourier domain (FrFD) by using the fractional Fourier operators, such as the fractional Fourier transform (FrFT), fractional traslation, fractional convolution and fractional correlation. Image encryption systems based on a JTC architecture in the FrFD usually produce low quality decrypted images. In this work, we present two approaches to improve the quality of the decrypted images, which are based on nonlinear processing applied to the encrypted function (that contains the joint fractional power spectrum, JFPS) and the nonzero-order JTC in the FrFD. When the two approaches are combined, the quality of the decrypted image is higher. In addition to the advantages introduced by the implementation of the DRPE using a JTC, we demonstrate that the proposed encryption system in the FrFD preserves the shift-invariance property of the JTC-based encryption system in the Fourier domain, with respect to the lateral displacement of both the key random mask in the decryption process and the retrieval of the primary image. The feasibility of this encryption system is verified and analyzed by computer simulations. (paper)

  12. A fourier transform quality measure for iris images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makinana, S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available to ensure that good quality images are selected for feature extraction, in order to improve iris recognition system. In addition, this research proposes a measure of iris image quality using a Fourier Transform. The experimental results demonstrate...

  13. Generalized Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuang-Ren; Jiang, Dazong; Yang, Kevin; Yang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    The cone-beam reconstruction theory has been proposed by Kirillov in 1961, Tuy in 1983, Feldkamp in 1984, Smith in 1985, Pierre Grangeat in 1990. The Fourier slice theorem is proposed by Bracewell 1956, which leads to the Fourier image reconstruction method for parallel-beam geometry. The Fourier slice theorem is extended to fan-beam geometry by Zhao in 1993 and 1995. By combining the above mentioned cone-beam image reconstruction theory and the above mentioned Fourier slice theory of fan-beam geometry, the Fourier slice theorem in cone-beam geometry is proposed by Zhao 1995 in short conference publication. This article offers the details of the derivation and implementation of this Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam geometry. Especially the problem of the reconstruction from Fourier domain has been overcome, which is that the value of in the origin of Fourier space is 0/0. The 0/0 type of limit is proper handled. As examples, the implementation results for the single circle and two perpendicular circle source orbits are shown. In the cone-beam reconstruction if a interpolation process is considered, the number of the calculations for the generalized Fourier slice theorem algorithm is O(N^4), which is close to the filtered back-projection method, here N is the image size of 1-dimension. However the interpolation process can be avoid, in that case the number of the calculations is O(N5).

  14. Fan beam image reconstruction with generalized Fourier slice theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuangren; Yang, Kang; Yang, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    For parallel beam geometry the Fourier reconstruction works via the Fourier slice theorem (or central slice theorem, projection slice theorem). For fan beam situation, Fourier slice can be extended to a generalized Fourier slice theorem (GFST) for fan-beam image reconstruction. We have briefly introduced this method in a conference. This paper reintroduces the GFST method for fan beam geometry in details. The GFST method can be described as following: the Fourier plane is filled by adding up the contributions from all fanbeam projections individually; thereby the values in the Fourier plane are directly calculated for Cartesian coordinates such avoiding the interpolation from polar to Cartesian coordinates in the Fourier domain; inverse fast Fourier transform is applied to the image in Fourier plane and leads to a reconstructed image in spacial domain. The reconstructed image is compared between the result of the GFST method and the result from the filtered backprojection (FBP) method. The major differences of the GFST and the FBP methods are: (1) The interpolation process are at different data sets. The interpolation of the GFST method is at projection data. The interpolation of the FBP method is at filtered projection data. (2) The filtering process are done in different places. The filtering process of the GFST is at Fourier domain. The filtering process of the FBP method is the ramp filter which is done at projections. The resolution of ramp filter is variable with different location but the filter in the Fourier domain lead to resolution invariable with location. One advantage of the GFST method over the FBP method is in short scan situation, an exact solution can be obtained with the GFST method, but it can not be obtained with the FBP method. The calculation of both the GFST and the FBP methods are at O(N^3), where N is the number of pixel in one dimension.

  15. Non-rigid registration of tomographic images with Fourier transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, Ar; Isoardi, Ra; Mato, G

    2007-01-01

    Spatial image registration of deformable body parts such as thorax and abdomen has important medical applications, but at the same time, it represents an important computational challenge. In this work we propose an automatic algorithm to perform non-rigid registration of tomographic images using a non-rigid model based on Fourier transforms. As a measure of similarity, we use the correlation coefficient, finding that the optimal order of the transformation is n = 3 (36 parameters). We apply this method to a digital phantom and to 7 pairs of patient images corresponding to clinical CT scans. The preliminary results indicate a fairly good agreement according to medical experts, with an average registration error of 2 mm for the case of clinical images. For 2D images (dimensions 512x512), the average running time for the algorithm is 15 seconds using a standard personal computer. Summarizing, we find that intra-modality registration of the abdomen can be achieved with acceptable accuracy for slight deformations and can be extended to 3D with a reasonable execution time

  16. Quaternion Fourier transforms for signal and image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Ell, Todd A; Sangwine, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Based on updates to signal and image processing technology made in the last two decades, this text examines the most recent research results pertaining to Quaternion Fourier Transforms. QFT is a central component of processing color images and complex valued signals. The book's attention to mathematical concepts, imaging applications, and Matlab compatibility render it an irreplaceable resource for students, scientists, researchers, and engineers.

  17. Applied Fourier analysis from signal processing to medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The first of its kind, this focused textbook serves as a self-contained resource for teaching from scratch the fundamental mathematics of Fourier analysis and illustrating some of its most current, interesting applications, including medical imaging and radar processing. Developed by the author from extensive classroom teaching experience, it provides a breadth of theory that allows students to appreciate the utility of the subject, but at as accessible a depth as possible. With myriad applications included, this book can be adapted to a one or two semester course in Fourier Analysis or serve as the basis for independent study. Applied Fourier Analysis assumes no prior knowledge of analysis from its readers, and begins by making the transition from linear algebra to functional analysis. It goes on to cover basic Fourier series and Fourier transforms before delving into applications in sampling and interpolation theory, digital communications, radar processing, medical i maging, and heat and wave equations. Fo...

  18. Fast Fourier single-pixel imaging via binary illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zibang; Wang, Xueying; Zheng, Guoan; Zhong, Jingang

    2017-09-20

    Fourier single-pixel imaging (FSI) employs Fourier basis patterns for encoding spatial information and is capable of reconstructing high-quality two-dimensional and three-dimensional images. Fourier-domain sparsity in natural scenes allows FSI to recover sharp images from undersampled data. The original FSI demonstration, however, requires grayscale Fourier basis patterns for illumination. This requirement imposes a limitation on the imaging speed as digital micro-mirror devices (DMDs) generate grayscale patterns at a low refreshing rate. In this paper, we report a new strategy to increase the speed of FSI by two orders of magnitude. In this strategy, we binarize the Fourier basis patterns based on upsampling and error diffusion dithering. We demonstrate a 20,000 Hz projection rate using a DMD and capture 256-by-256-pixel dynamic scenes at a speed of 10 frames per second. The reported technique substantially accelerates image acquisition speed of FSI. It may find broad imaging applications at wavebands that are not accessible using conventional two-dimensional image sensors.

  19. Electro-Optical Imaging Fourier-Transform Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Zhou, Hanying

    2006-01-01

    An electro-optical (E-O) imaging Fourier-transform spectrometer (IFTS), now under development, is a prototype of improved imaging spectrometers to be used for hyperspectral imaging, especially in the infrared spectral region. Unlike both imaging and non-imaging traditional Fourier-transform spectrometers, the E-O IFTS does not contain any moving parts. Elimination of the moving parts and the associated actuator mechanisms and supporting structures would increase reliability while enabling reductions in size and mass, relative to traditional Fourier-transform spectrometers that offer equivalent capabilities. Elimination of moving parts would also eliminate the vibrations caused by the motions of those parts. Figure 1 schematically depicts a traditional Fourier-transform spectrometer, wherein a critical time delay is varied by translating one the mirrors of a Michelson interferometer. The time-dependent optical output is a periodic representation of the input spectrum. Data characterizing the input spectrum are generated through fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) post-processing of the output in conjunction with the varying time delay.

  20. Comparative analysis of imaging configurations and objectives for Fourier microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurvits, Jonathan A; Jiang, Mingming; Zia, Rashid

    2015-11-01

    Fourier microscopy is becoming an increasingly important tool for the analysis of optical nanostructures and quantum emitters. However, achieving quantitative Fourier space measurements requires a thorough understanding of the impact of aberrations introduced by optical microscopes that have been optimized for conventional real-space imaging. Here we present a detailed framework for analyzing the performance of microscope objectives for several common Fourier imaging configurations. To this end, we model objectives from Nikon, Olympus, and Zeiss using parameters that were inferred from patent literature and confirmed, where possible, by physical disassembly. We then examine the aberrations most relevant to Fourier microscopy, including the alignment tolerances of apodization factors for different objective classes, the effect of magnification on the modulation transfer function, and vignetting-induced reductions of the effective numerical aperture for wide-field measurements. Based on this analysis, we identify an optimal objective class and imaging configuration for Fourier microscopy. In addition, the Zemax files for the objectives and setups used in this analysis have been made publicly available as a resource for future studies.

  1. Fourier beamformation of multistatic synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimirad, Elahe; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Mahloojifar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A new Fourier beamformation (FB) algorithm is presented for multistatic synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging. It can reduce the number of computations by a factor of 20 compared to conventional Delay-and-Sum (DAS) beamformers. The concept is based on the wavenumber algorithm from radar and sonar...

  2. Grid-Independent Compressive Imaging and Fourier Phase Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wenjing

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is composed of two parts. In the first part techniques of band exclusion(BE) and local optimization(LO) are proposed to solve linear continuum inverse problems independently of the grid spacing. The second part is devoted to the Fourier phase retrieval problem. Many situations in optics, medical imaging and signal processing call…

  3. Correlated diffusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Alexander; Glaister, Jeffrey; Cameron, Andrew; Haider, Masoom

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the male population. Fortunately, the prognosis is excellent if detected at an early stage. Hence, the detection and localization of prostate cancer is crucial for diagnosis, as well as treatment via targeted focal therapy. New imaging techniques can potentially be invaluable tools for improving prostate cancer detection and localization. In this study, we introduce a new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging, where the tissue being imaged is characterized by the joint correlation of diffusion signal attenuation across multiple gradient pulse strengths and timings. By taking into account signal attenuation at different water diffusion motion sensitivities, correlated diffusion imaging can provide improved delineation between cancerous tissue and healthy tissue when compared to existing diffusion imaging modalities. Quantitative evaluation using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, tissue class separability analysis, and visual assessment by an expert radiologist were performed to study correlated diffusion imaging for the task of prostate cancer diagnosis. These results are compared with that obtained using T2-weighted imaging and standard diffusion imaging (via the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)). Experimental results suggest that correlated diffusion imaging provide improved delineation between healthy and cancerous tissue and may have potential as a diagnostic tool for cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. A new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging (CDI) was developed for the purpose of aiding radiologists in cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. Preliminary results show CDI shows considerable promise as a diagnostic aid for radiologists in the detection and localization of prostate cancer

  4. Fourier power spectrum characteristics of face photographs: attractiveness perception depends on low-level image properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Claudia; Hayn-Leichsenring, Gregor U; Langner, Oliver; Wiese, Holger; Redies, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether low-level processed image properties that are shared by natural scenes and artworks - but not veridical face photographs - affect the perception of facial attractiveness and age. Specifically, we considered the slope of the radially averaged Fourier power spectrum in a log-log plot. This slope is a measure of the distribution of special frequency power in an image. Images of natural scenes and artworks possess - compared to face images - a relatively shallow slope (i.e., increased high spatial frequency power). Since aesthetic perception might be based on the efficient processing of images with natural scene statistics, we assumed that the perception of facial attractiveness might also be affected by these properties. We calculated Fourier slope and other beauty-associated measurements in face images and correlated them with ratings of attractiveness and age of the depicted persons (Study 1). We found that Fourier slope - in contrast to the other tested image properties - did not predict attractiveness ratings when we controlled for age. In Study 2A, we overlaid face images with random-phase patterns with different statistics. Patterns with a slope similar to those in natural scenes and artworks resulted in lower attractiveness and higher age ratings. In Studies 2B and 2C, we directly manipulated the Fourier slope of face images and found that images with shallower slopes were rated as more attractive. Additionally, attractiveness of unaltered faces was affected by the Fourier slope of a random-phase background (Study 3). Faces in front of backgrounds with statistics similar to natural scenes and faces were rated as more attractive. We conclude that facial attractiveness ratings are affected by specific image properties. An explanation might be the efficient coding hypothesis.

  5. Hyperspectral imaging using the single-pixel Fourier transform technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Senlin; Hui, Wangwei; Wang, Yunlong; Huang, Kaicheng; Shi, Qiushuai; Ying, Cuifeng; Liu, Dongqi; Ye, Qing; Zhou, Wenyuan; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging technology is playing an increasingly important role in the fields of food analysis, medicine and biotechnology. To improve the speed of operation and increase the light throughput in a compact equipment structure, a Fourier transform hyperspectral imaging system based on a single-pixel technique is proposed in this study. Compared with current imaging spectrometry approaches, the proposed system has a wider spectral range (400-1100 nm), a better spectral resolution (1 nm) and requires fewer measurement data (a sample rate of 6.25%). The performance of this system was verified by its application to the non-destructive testing of potatoes.

  6. Image restoration from non-uniform magnetic field influence for direct Fourier NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekihara, K.; Kuroda, M.; Kohno, H.

    1984-01-01

    A new technique is proposed for NMR image restoration from the influence of main magnetic field non-uniformities. This technique is applicable to direct Fourier NMR imaging. The mathematical basis and details of this technique are fully described. Modification to include image restoration from non-linear field gradient influence is also presented. Computer simulation demonstrates the effectiveness of this technique for both Fourier zeugmatography and spin-warp imaging. (author)

  7. Fourier transform digital holographic adaptive optics imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changgeng; Yu, Xiao; Kim, Myung K.

    2013-01-01

    A Fourier transform digital holographic adaptive optics imaging system and its basic principles are proposed. The CCD is put at the exact Fourier transform plane of the pupil of the eye lens. The spherical curvature introduced by the optics except the eye lens itself is eliminated. The CCD is also at image plane of the target. The point-spread function of the system is directly recorded, making it easier to determine the correct guide-star hologram. Also, the light signal will be stronger at the CCD, especially for phase-aberration sensing. Numerical propagation is avoided. The sensor aperture has nothing to do with the resolution and the possibility of using low coherence or incoherent illumination is opened. The system becomes more efficient and flexible. Although it is intended for ophthalmic use, it also shows potential application in microscopy. The robustness and feasibility of this compact system are demonstrated by simulations and experiments using scattering objects. PMID:23262541

  8. Evaluation of gastric motility by Fourier analysis of condensed images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, R.; Muenzing, W.; Hahn, K.; Tatsch, K.

    2000-01-01

    In this study Fourier analysis was applied to condensed images of gastric emptying with the aim of evaluating the amplitude and frequency of gastric contractions as well as gastric emptying in patients with various well-defined disorders. In 15 controls, 65 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), 41 patients with diabetes mellitus type I (DM), 12 patients with pyloric stenosis and 9 patients who had undergone gastric surgery, gastric emptying was determined after ingestion of a semi-solid test meal. In addition, condensed images were generated to evaluate the amplitude and frequency of gastric contractions by means of Fourier analysis. In PSS and DM patients, gastric emptying and contraction amplitudes were significantly reduced (P<0.01). Patients with pyloric stenosis displayed regular peristalsis but significantly delayed emptying (P<0.01). Patients who had undergone gastric surgery showed normal or rapid gastric emptying associated with decreased amplitudes (P<0.01). The frequency of gastric contractions in the patient groups was not different from that in controls. This study showed Fourier analysis of condensed images to be a rapid and feasible approach for the evaluation of gastric contractions. Depending on the underlying disorder, gastric emptying and peristalsis showed both corresponding and discrepant findings. Data on gastric contractions provided additional information compared with results obtained by conventional emptying studies. Therefore, both parameters should be routinely assessed to further improve characterisation of gastric dysfunction by scintigraphy. (orig.)

  9. Evaluation of gastric motility by Fourier analysis of condensed images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, R.; Muenzing, W.; Hahn, K.; Tatsch, K. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2000-10-01

    In this study Fourier analysis was applied to condensed images of gastric emptying with the aim of evaluating the amplitude and frequency of gastric contractions as well as gastric emptying in patients with various well-defined disorders. In 15 controls, 65 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), 41 patients with diabetes mellitus type I (DM), 12 patients with pyloric stenosis and 9 patients who had undergone gastric surgery, gastric emptying was determined after ingestion of a semi-solid test meal. In addition, condensed images were generated to evaluate the amplitude and frequency of gastric contractions by means of Fourier analysis. In PSS and DM patients, gastric emptying and contraction amplitudes were significantly reduced (P<0.01). Patients with pyloric stenosis displayed regular peristalsis but significantly delayed emptying (P<0.01). Patients who had undergone gastric surgery showed normal or rapid gastric emptying associated with decreased amplitudes (P<0.01). The frequency of gastric contractions in the patient groups was not different from that in controls. This study showed Fourier analysis of condensed images to be a rapid and feasible approach for the evaluation of gastric contractions. Depending on the underlying disorder, gastric emptying and peristalsis showed both corresponding and discrepant findings. Data on gastric contractions provided additional information compared with results obtained by conventional emptying studies. Therefore, both parameters should be routinely assessed to further improve characterisation of gastric dysfunction by scintigraphy. (orig.)

  10. Mesh adaptation technique for Fourier-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.

    2006-01-01

    A novel adaptive mesh technique in the Fourier domain is introduced for problems in fluorescence lifetime imaging. A dynamical adaptation of the three-dimensional scheme based on the finite volume formulation reduces computational time and balances the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. Light propagation in the medium is modeled by the telegraph equation, while the lifetime reconstruction algorithm is derived from the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Stability and computational efficiency of the method are demonstrated by image reconstruction of two spherical fluorescent objects embedded in a tissue phantom

  11. Effects of illumination on image reconstruction via Fourier ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xinrui; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    The Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) technique provides high-resolution images by combining a traditional imaging system, e.g. a microscope or a 4f-imaging system, with a multiplexing illumination system, e.g. an LED array and numerical image processing for enhanced image reconstruction. In order to numerically combine images that are captured under varying illumination angles, an iterative phase-retrieval algorithm is often applied. However, in practice, the performance of the FPM algorithm degrades due to the imperfections of the optical system, the image noise caused by the camera, etc. To eliminate the influence of the aberrations of the imaging system, an embedded pupil function recovery (EPRY)-FPM algorithm has been proposed [Opt. Express 22, 4960-4972 (2014)]. In this paper, we study how the performance of FPM and EPRY-FPM algorithms are affected by imperfections of the illumination system using both numerical simulations and experiments. The investigated imperfections include varying and non-uniform intensities, and wavefront aberrations. Our study shows that the aberrations of the illumination system significantly affect the performance of both FPM and EPRY-FPM algorithms. Hence, in practice, aberrations in the illumination system gain significant influence on the resulting image quality.

  12. Influences of overlap index on Fourier ptychography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honghong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Xu; Zhai, Changchao; Panezai, Spozmai; Wang, Yunxin; Zhao, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Fourier ptychography is a new type of synthetic aperture imaging technique based on phase retrieval method which can improve microscopeic imaging performance beyond the diffraction limit of the employed optical components by illuminating the object with oblique waves of different incident angles where the field of view remains unchanged. illumination angle and the overlap rate of spectrum will have a certain impact on the quality of reconstruction. In this paper, we study the effects of illumination angle and spectral overlap rate on the image quality of Fourier ptychography. The simulation results show that increasing the illumination angle and spectral overlap can improve the resolution, but there is a threshold for the key parameters of spectral overlap rate. The convergence rate decreases when the overlap rate exceeds 70%, and the reconstruction process is more time-consuming due to the high overlap rate. However the results of proposed study shows that an overlap of 60% is the optimal choice to acquire a high-quality recovery with high speed.

  13. The gridding method for image reconstruction by Fourier transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schomberg, H.; Timmer, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper explores a computational method for reconstructing an n-dimensional signal f from a sampled version of its Fourier transform f. The method involves a window function w and proceeds in three steps. First, the convolution g = w * f is computed numerically on a Cartesian grid, using the available samples of f. Then, g = wf is computed via the inverse discrete Fourier transform, and finally f is obtained as g/w. Due to the smoothing effect of the convolution, evaluating w * f is much less error prone than merely interpolating f. The method was originally devised for image reconstruction in radio astronomy, but is actually applicable to a broad range of reconstructive imaging methods, including magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. In particular, it provides a fast and accurate alternative to the filtered backprojection. The basic method has several variants with other applications, such as the equidistant resampling of arbitrarily sampled signals or the fast computation of the Radon (Hough) transform

  14. Quantum Color Image Encryption Algorithm Based on A Hyper-Chaotic System and Quantum Fourier Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ru-Chao; Lei, Tong; Zhao, Qing-Min; Gong, Li-Hua; Zhou, Zhi-Hong

    2016-12-01

    To improve the slow processing speed of the classical image encryption algorithms and enhance the security of the private color images, a new quantum color image encryption algorithm based on a hyper-chaotic system is proposed, in which the sequences generated by the Chen's hyper-chaotic system are scrambled and diffused with three components of the original color image. Sequentially, the quantum Fourier transform is exploited to fulfill the encryption. Numerical simulations show that the presented quantum color image encryption algorithm possesses large key space to resist illegal attacks, sensitive dependence on initial keys, uniform distribution of gray values for the encrypted image and weak correlation between two adjacent pixels in the cipher-image.

  15. Fourier-Mellin moment-based intertwining map for image encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Vijay

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a robust image encryption technique that utilizes Fourier-Mellin moments and intertwining logistic map is proposed. Fourier-Mellin moment-based intertwining logistic map has been designed to overcome the issue of low sensitivity of an input image. Multi-objective Non-Dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II) based on Reinforcement Learning (MNSGA-RL) has been used to optimize the required parameters of intertwining logistic map. Fourier-Mellin moments are used to make the secret keys more secure. Thereafter, permutation and diffusion operations are carried out on input image using secret keys. The performance of proposed image encryption technique has been evaluated on five well-known benchmark images and also compared with seven well-known existing encryption techniques. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique outperforms others in terms of entropy, correlation analysis, a unified average changing intensity and the number of changing pixel rate. The simulation results reveal that the proposed technique provides high level of security and robustness against various types of attacks.

  16. Spatial Specificity in Spatiotemporal Encoding and Fourier Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerke, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ultrafast imaging techniques based on spatiotemporal-encoding (SPEN), such as RASER (rapid acquisition with sequential excitation and refocusing), is a promising new class of sequences since they are largely insensitive to magnetic field variations which cause signal loss and geometric distortion in EPI. So far, attempts to theoretically describe the point-spread-function (PSF) for the original SPEN-imaging techniques have yielded limited success. To fill this gap a novel definition for an apparent PSF is proposed. Theory Spatial resolution in SPEN-imaging is determined by the spatial phase dispersion imprinted on the acquired signal by a frequency-swept excitation or refocusing pulse. The resulting signal attenuation increases with larger distance from the vertex of the quadratic phase profile. Methods Bloch simulations and experiments were performed to validate theoretical derivations. Results The apparent PSF quantifies the fractional contribution of magnetization to a voxel’s signal as a function of distance to the voxel. In contrast, the conventional PSF represents the signal intensity at various locations. Conclusion The definition of the conventional PSF fails for SPEN-imaging since only the phase of isochromats, but not the amplitude of the signal varies. The concept of the apparent PSF is shown to be generalizable to conventional Fourier- imaging techniques. PMID:26712657

  17. Image registration under translation and rotation in two-dimensional planes using Fourier slice theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohit, M; Sharma, J

    2015-05-10

    Image recognition in the presence of both rotation and translation is a longstanding problem in correlation pattern recognition. Use of log polar transform gives a solution to this problem, but at a cost of losing the vital phase information from the image. The main objective of this paper is to develop an algorithm based on Fourier slice theorem for measuring the simultaneous rotation and translation of an object in a 2D plane. The algorithm is applicable for any arbitrary object shift for full 180° rotation.

  18. High-Throughput Screening Using Fourier-Transform Infrared Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Sasmaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Efficient parallel screening of combinatorial libraries is one of the most challenging aspects of the high-throughput (HT heterogeneous catalysis workflow. Today, a number of methods have been used in HT catalyst studies, including various optical, mass-spectrometry, and gas-chromatography techniques. Of these, rapid-scanning Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR imaging is one of the fastest and most versatile screening techniques. Here, the new design of the 16-channel HT reactor is presented and test results for its accuracy and reproducibility are shown. The performance of the system was evaluated through the oxidation of CO over commercial Pd/Al2O3 and cobalt oxide nanoparticles synthesized with different reducer-reductant molar ratios, surfactant types, metal and surfactant concentrations, synthesis temperatures, and ramp rates.

  19. Causal Correlation Functions and Fourier Transforms: Application in Calculating Pressure Induced Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.; Lavrentieva, N. N.

    2012-01-01

    By adopting a concept from signal processing, instead of starting from the correlation functions which are even, one considers the causal correlation functions whose Fourier transforms become complex. Their real and imaginary parts multiplied by 2 are the Fourier transforms of the original correlations and the subsequent Hilbert transforms, respectively. Thus, by taking this step one can complete the two previously needed transforms. However, to obviate performing the Cauchy principal integrations required in the Hilbert transforms is the greatest advantage. Meanwhile, because the causal correlations are well-bounded within the time domain and band limited in the frequency domain, one can replace their Fourier transforms by the discrete Fourier transforms and the latter can be carried out with the FFT algorithm. This replacement is justified by sampling theory because the Fourier transforms can be derived from the discrete Fourier transforms with the Nyquis rate without any distortions. We apply this method in calculating pressure induced shifts of H2O lines and obtain more reliable values. By comparing the calculated shifts with those in HITRAN 2008 and by screening both of them with the pair identity and the smooth variation rules, one can conclude many of shift values in HITRAN are not correct.

  20. Imaging through scattering media by Fourier filtering and single-pixel detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui-Sánchez, Y.; Clemente, P.; Lancis, J.; Tajahuerce, E.

    2018-02-01

    We present a novel imaging system that combines the principles of Fourier spatial filtering and single-pixel imaging in order to recover images of an object hidden behind a turbid medium by transillumination. We compare the performance of our single-pixel imaging setup with that of a conventional system. We conclude that the introduction of Fourier gating improves the contrast of images in both cases. Furthermore, we show that the combination of single-pixel imaging and Fourier spatial filtering techniques is particularly well adapted to provide images of objects transmitted through scattering media.

  1. Improved detection of chronic myocardial infarction with Fourier amplitude and phase imaging in two projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akins, E.W.; Scott, E.A.; Williams, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with 33 chronic myocaridal infarctions underwent MR imaging and radionuclide ventriculography at rest. The radionuclide ventriculographs, in left anterior oblique (LAO) and left posterior oblique (LPO) projections, were analyzed by two independent observers by visual inspection and combined Fourier-transformed amplitude and phase imaging. Only 15 (45%) of the 33 infarctions were detected by visual inspection, but 21 (64%) were detected on the LAO Fourier-transformed images along. Thirty (91%) were detected by using both LAO and LPO Fourier-transformed images. On MR imaging, 28 (85%) of the myocardial infarctions appeared as areas of focal wall thinning. Combined Fourier-transformed amplitude and phase imaging in both LAO and LPO views discloses more myocardial infarctions than visual inspection or LAO Fourier-transformed images alone because inferior infarctions, which are frequently missed in the LAO view, are easily seen in the LPO view

  2. Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging analysis of dental pulp inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, E; Sabbatini, S; Conti, C; Rubini, C; Rocchetti, R; Fioroni, M; Memè, L; Orilisi, G

    2017-05-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared microspectroscopy let characterize the macromolecular composition and distribution of tissues and cells, by studying the interaction between infrared radiation and matter. Therefore, we hypothesize to exploit this analytical tool in the analysis of inflamed pulps, to detect the different biochemical features related to various degrees of inflammation. IR maps of 13 irreversible and 12 hyperplastic pulpitis, together with 10 normal pulps, were acquired, compared with histological findings and submitted to multivariate (HCA, PCA, SIMCA) and statistical (one-way ANOVA) analysis. The fit of convoluted bands let calculate meaningful band area ratios (means ± s.d., P < 0.05). The infrared imaging analysis pin-pointed higher amounts of water and lower quantities of type I collagen in all inflamed pulps. Specific vibrational markers were defined for irreversible pulpitis (Lipids/Total Biomass, PhII/Total Biomass, CH 2 /CH 3 , and Ty/AII) and hyperplastic ones (OH/Total Biomass, Collagen/Total Biomass, and CH 3 Collagen/Total Biomass). The study confirmed that FTIR microspectroscopy let discriminate tissues' biological features. The infrared imaging analysis evidenced, in inflamed pulps, alterations in tissues' structure and composition. Changes in lipid metabolism, increasing amounts of tyrosine, and the occurrence of phosphorylative processes were highlighted in irreversible pulpitis, while high amounts of water and low quantities of type I collagen were detected in hyperplastic samples. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The DSP-based RTOF-correlator for high resolution Fourier diffractometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butenko, V A; Drozdov, V A; Kirilov, A S [Frank Lab. of Neutron Physics of the Academy of Sciences of Slovakia, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    To improve efficiency of the time-of-flight analysis, the correlation and the Fourier methods are used with a preliminary neutron flux modulation. In this case the elastically scattered neutron spectrum is calculated as a function of the cross-correlation of the detector signal and the neutron flux modulation. 10 refs.; 5 figs.

  4. Differences between time domain and Fourier domain optical coherence tomography in imaging tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, W; Wu, X

    2017-11-01

    It has been numerously demonstrated that both time domain and Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) can generate high-resolution depth-resolved images of living tissues and cells. In this work, we compare the common points and differences between two methods when the continuous and random properties of live tissue are taken into account. It is found that when relationships that exist between the scattered light and tissue structures are taken into account, spectral interference measurements in Fourier domain OCT (FDOCT) is more advantageous than interference fringe envelope measurements in time domain OCT (TDOCT) in the cases where continuous property of tissue is taken into account. It is also demonstrated that when random property of tissue is taken into account FDOCT measures the Fourier transform of the spatial correlation function of the refractive index and speckle phenomena will limit the effective limiting imaging resolution in both TDOCT and FDOCT. Finally, the effective limiting resolution of both TDOCT and FDOCT are given which can be used to estimate the effective limiting resolution in various practical applications. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Fourier domain image fusion for differential X-ray phase-contrast breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coello, Eduardo; Sperl, Jonathan I.; Bequé, Dirk; Benz, Tobias; Scherer, Kai; Herzen, Julia; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Hellerhoff, Karin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Cozzini, Cristina; Grandl, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    X-Ray Phase-Contrast (XPC) imaging is a novel technology with a great potential for applications in clinical practice, with breast imaging being of special interest. This work introduces an intuitive methodology to combine and visualize relevant diagnostic features, present in the X-ray attenuation, phase shift and scattering information retrieved in XPC imaging, using a Fourier domain fusion algorithm. The method allows to present complementary information from the three acquired signals in one single image, minimizing the noise component and maintaining visual similarity to a conventional X-ray image, but with noticeable enhancement in diagnostic features, details and resolution. Radiologists experienced in mammography applied the image fusion method to XPC measurements of mastectomy samples and evaluated the feature content of each input and the fused image. This assessment validated that the combination of all the relevant diagnostic features, contained in the XPC images, was present in the fused image as well.

  6. Fourier domain image fusion for differential X-ray phase-contrast breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coello, Eduardo, E-mail: eduardo.coello@tum.de [GE Global Research, Garching (Germany); Lehrstuhl für Informatikanwendungen in der Medizin & Augmented Reality, Institut für Informatik, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Sperl, Jonathan I.; Bequé, Dirk [GE Global Research, Garching (Germany); Benz, Tobias [Lehrstuhl für Informatikanwendungen in der Medizin & Augmented Reality, Institut für Informatik, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Scherer, Kai; Herzen, Julia [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Hellerhoff, Karin [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Munich (Germany); Pfeiffer, Franz [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Cozzini, Cristina [GE Global Research, Garching (Germany); Grandl, Susanne [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Munich (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    X-Ray Phase-Contrast (XPC) imaging is a novel technology with a great potential for applications in clinical practice, with breast imaging being of special interest. This work introduces an intuitive methodology to combine and visualize relevant diagnostic features, present in the X-ray attenuation, phase shift and scattering information retrieved in XPC imaging, using a Fourier domain fusion algorithm. The method allows to present complementary information from the three acquired signals in one single image, minimizing the noise component and maintaining visual similarity to a conventional X-ray image, but with noticeable enhancement in diagnostic features, details and resolution. Radiologists experienced in mammography applied the image fusion method to XPC measurements of mastectomy samples and evaluated the feature content of each input and the fused image. This assessment validated that the combination of all the relevant diagnostic features, contained in the XPC images, was present in the fused image as well.

  7. Comparison of Fourier transform and continuous wavelet transform to study echo-planar imaging flow maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez G, A.; Bowtell, R.; Mansfield, P. [Area de Procesamiento Digital de Senales e Imagenes Biomedicas. Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa. Mexico D.F. 09340 Mexico (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    Velocity maps were studied combining Doyle and Mansfield method (1986) with each of the following transforms: Fourier, window Fourier and wavelet (Mexican hat). Continuous wavelet transform was compared against the two Fourier transform to determine which technique is best suited to study blood maps generated by Half Fourier Echo-Planar Imaging. Coefficient images were calculated and plots of the pixel intensity variation are presented. Finally, contour maps are shown to visualize the behavior of the blood flow in the cardiac chambers for the wavelet technique. (Author)

  8. Comparison of Fourier transform and continuous wavelet transform to study echo-planar imaging flow maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez G, A.; Bowtell, R.; Mansfield, P.

    1998-01-01

    Velocity maps were studied combining Doyle and Mansfield method (1986) with each of the following transforms: Fourier, window Fourier and wavelet (Mexican hat). Continuous wavelet transform was compared against the two Fourier transform to determine which technique is best suited to study blood maps generated by Half Fourier Echo-Planar Imaging. Coefficient images were calculated and plots of the pixel intensity variation are presented. Finally, contour maps are shown to visualize the behavior of the blood flow in the cardiac chambers for the wavelet technique. (Author)

  9. Image reconstruction from pairs of Fourier-transform magnitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, B.R.; Overman, T.L.; Gough, P.

    1998-01-01

    The retrieval of phase information from only the magnitude of the Fourier transform of a signal remains an important problem for many applications. We present an algorithm for phase retrieval when there exist two related sets of Fourier-transform magnitude data. The data are assumed to come from a single object observed in two different polarizations through a distorting medium, so the phase component of the Fourier transform of the object is corrupted. Phase retrieval is accomplished by minimization of a suitable criterion function, which can take three different forms. copyright 1998 Optical Society of America

  10. Self-calibrated correlation imaging with k-space variant correlation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Edalati, Masoud; Du, Xingfu; Wang, Hui; Cao, Jie J

    2018-03-01

    Correlation imaging is a previously developed high-speed MRI framework that converts parallel imaging reconstruction into the estimate of correlation functions. The presented work aims to demonstrate this framework can provide a speed gain over parallel imaging by estimating k-space variant correlation functions. Because of Fourier encoding with gradients, outer k-space data contain higher spatial-frequency image components arising primarily from tissue boundaries. As a result of tissue-boundary sparsity in the human anatomy, neighboring k-space data correlation varies from the central to the outer k-space. By estimating k-space variant correlation functions with an iterative self-calibration method, correlation imaging can benefit from neighboring k-space data correlation associated with both coil sensitivity encoding and tissue-boundary sparsity, thereby providing a speed gain over parallel imaging that relies only on coil sensitivity encoding. This new approach is investigated in brain imaging and free-breathing neonatal cardiac imaging. Correlation imaging performs better than existing parallel imaging techniques in simulated brain imaging acceleration experiments. The higher speed enables real-time data acquisition for neonatal cardiac imaging in which physiological motion is fast and non-periodic. With k-space variant correlation functions, correlation imaging gives a higher speed than parallel imaging and offers the potential to image physiological motion in real-time. Magn Reson Med 79:1483-1494, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Real-time quantitative Schlieren imaging by fast Fourier demodulation of a checkered backdrop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildeman, Sander

    2018-06-01

    A quantitative synthetic Schlieren imaging (SSI) method based on fast Fourier demodulation is presented. Instead of a random dot pattern (as usually employed in SSI), a 2D periodic pattern (such as a checkerboard) is used as a backdrop to the refractive object of interest. The range of validity and accuracy of this "Fast Checkerboard Demodulation" (FCD) method are assessed using both synthetic data and experimental recordings of patterns optically distorted by small waves on a water surface. It is found that the FCD method is at least as accurate as sophisticated, multi-stage, digital image correlation (DIC) or optical flow (OF) techniques used with random dot patterns, and it is significantly faster. Efficient, fully vectorized, implementations of both the FCD and DIC/OF schemes developed for this study are made available as open source Matlab scripts.

  12. Imaging properties of the mesooptical Fourier transform microscope for nuclear research emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencze, Gy.L.; Soroko, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    The optical signal transformation in the Mesooptical Fourier Transform Microscope (MFTM) for nuclear emulsion is treated in terms of Fourier Optics. A continuous conversion of the traditional optical microscope into the MFTM is followed. The images of dot-like and straight line objects given by the MFTM are discussed

  13. Meniscal tears: comparison of half-Fourier technique and conventional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabana, Wael; Maeseneer, Michel de; Machiels, Freddy; Ridder, Filip de; Osteaux, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether half-Fourier MR image acquisition technique can provide similar information to that of conventional MR acquisition technique for evaluation of meniscal tears. Materials and methods: We studied 101 menisci in 52 patients who were referred for evaluation of meniscal tears. Sagittal MR images of the knee were obtained for all patients by using proton density and T2-weighted SE sequences on a 1-T clinical system. The half-Fourier technique and conventional technique were used for all patients. All other imaging parameters were identical for both sequences (TR/TE=2400/20,70; 3 mm slice thickness; 200x256 matrix; field of view, 200; one signal acquired). Both sets of images were filmed with standard window and level settings. Images were randomised and interpreted independently by two radiologists for the presence of meniscal tears. Images were also subjectively assessed for image quality using a five-point grading scale. Results: On half-Fourier images, Reader 1 interpreted 23 menisci as torn, compared to 28 for Reader 2. On conventional images, Reader 1 interpreted 24 menisci as torn, compared to 26 for Reader 2. Agreement between interpretation of the conventional and that of the half-Fourier images was 99% for Reader 1, and 98% for Reader 2. Agreement between readers for the half-Fourier images was 95%, and for the conventional images 96%. No statistically significant difference was found in the subjective evaluation of image quality between the conventional and half-Fourier images. Conclusion: The half-Fourier acquisition technique compares favourably with the conventional technique for the evaluation of meniscal tears

  14. Fourier imaging of non-linear structure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandbyge, Jacob; Hannestad, Steen

    2017-01-01

    We perform a Fourier space decomposition of the dynamics of non-linear cosmological structure formation in ΛCDM models. From N -body simulations involving only cold dark matter we calculate 3-dimensional non-linear density, velocity divergence and vorticity Fourier realizations, and use these to calculate the fully non-linear mode coupling integrals in the corresponding fluid equations. Our approach allows for a reconstruction of the amount of mode coupling between any two wavenumbers as a function of redshift. With our Fourier decomposition method we identify the transfer of power from larger to smaller scales, the stable clustering regime, the scale where vorticity becomes important, and the suppression of the non-linear divergence power spectrum as compared to linear theory. Our results can be used to improve and calibrate semi-analytical structure formation models.

  15. Fourier imaging of non-linear structure formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandbyge, Jacob; Hannestad, Steen, E-mail: jacobb@phys.au.dk, E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2017-04-01

    We perform a Fourier space decomposition of the dynamics of non-linear cosmological structure formation in ΛCDM models. From N -body simulations involving only cold dark matter we calculate 3-dimensional non-linear density, velocity divergence and vorticity Fourier realizations, and use these to calculate the fully non-linear mode coupling integrals in the corresponding fluid equations. Our approach allows for a reconstruction of the amount of mode coupling between any two wavenumbers as a function of redshift. With our Fourier decomposition method we identify the transfer of power from larger to smaller scales, the stable clustering regime, the scale where vorticity becomes important, and the suppression of the non-linear divergence power spectrum as compared to linear theory. Our results can be used to improve and calibrate semi-analytical structure formation models.

  16. Quantum diffraction and interference of spatially correlated photon pairs and its Fourier-optical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Ryosuke; Edamatsu, Keiichi; Itoh, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    We present one- and two-photon diffraction and interference experiments involving parametric down-converted photon pairs. By controlling the divergence of the pump beam in parametric down-conversion, the diffraction-interference pattern produced by an object changes from a quantum (perfectly correlated) case to a classical (uncorrelated) one. The observed diffraction and interference patterns are accurately reproduced by Fourier-optical analysis taking into account the quantum spatial correlation. We show that the relation between the spatial correlation and the object size plays a crucial role in the formation of both one- and two-photon diffraction-interference patterns

  17. Fourier and granulometry methods on 3D images of soil surfaces for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.; Green, O.; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to present and compare two methods for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution based on high resolution 3D images of the soil surface. The methods for analyzing the images are discrete Fourier transform and granulometry. The results of these methods correlate...... with a measured weight distribution of the soil aggregates. The results have shown that it is possible to distinguish between the cultivated and the uncultivated soil surface. A sensor system suitable for capturing in-situ high resolution 3D images of the soil surface is also described. This sensor system...

  18. On the computation of molecular surface correlations for protein docking using fourier techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakk, Eric

    2007-08-01

    The computation of surface correlations using a variety of molecular models has been applied to the unbound protein docking problem. Because of the computational complexity involved in examining all possible molecular orientations, the fast Fourier transform (FFT) (a fast numerical implementation of the discrete Fourier transform (DFT)) is generally applied to minimize the number of calculations. This approach is rooted in the convolution theorem which allows one to inverse transform the product of two DFTs in order to perform the correlation calculation. However, such a DFT calculation results in a cyclic or "circular" correlation which, in general, does not lead to the same result as the linear correlation desired for the docking problem. In this work, we provide computational bounds for constructing molecular models used in the molecular surface correlation problem. The derived bounds are then shown to be consistent with various intuitive guidelines previously reported in the protein docking literature. Finally, these bounds are applied to different molecular models in order to investigate their effect on the correlation calculation.

  19. THE IMAGE REGISTRATION OF FOURIER-MELLIN BASED ON THE COMBINATION OF PROJECTION AND GRADIENT PREPROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Image registration is one of the most important applications in the field of image processing. The method of Fourier Merlin transform, which has the advantages of high precision and good robustness to change in light and shade, partial blocking, noise influence and so on, is widely used. However, not only this method can’t obtain the unique mutual power pulse function for non-parallel image pairs, even part of image pairs also can’t get the mutual power function pulse. In this paper, an image registration method based on Fourier-Mellin transformation in the view of projection-gradient preprocessing is proposed. According to the projection conformational equation, the method calculates the matrix of image projection transformation to correct the tilt image; then, gradient preprocessing and Fourier-Mellin transformation are performed on the corrected image to obtain the registration parameters. Eventually, the experiment results show that the method makes the image registration of Fourier-Mellin transformation not only applicable to the registration of the parallel image pairs, but also to the registration of non-parallel image pairs. What’s more, the better registration effect can be obtained

  20. Edge-augmented Fourier partial sums with applications to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larriva-Latt, Jade; Morrison, Angela; Radgowski, Alison; Tobin, Joseph; Iwen, Mark; Viswanathan, Aditya

    2017-08-01

    Certain applications such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) require the reconstruction of functions from Fourier spectral data. When the underlying functions are piecewise-smooth, standard Fourier approximation methods suffer from the Gibbs phenomenon - with associated oscillatory artifacts in the vicinity of edges and an overall reduced order of convergence in the approximation. This paper proposes an edge-augmented Fourier reconstruction procedure which uses only the first few Fourier coefficients of an underlying piecewise-smooth function to accurately estimate jump information and then incorporate it into a Fourier partial sum approximation. We provide both theoretical and empirical results showing the improved accuracy of the proposed method, as well as comparisons demonstrating superior performance over existing state-of-the-art sparse optimization-based methods.

  1. Limitations in imaging common conjunctival and corneal pathologies with fourier-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Hakan; Steen, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    To describe the limitations of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) in imaging common conjunctival and corneal pathology. Retrospective, single-center case series of 40 patients with conjunctival and cornea pathology. Fourier-domain OCT imaged laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) flaps in detail, including its relation to other corneal structures and abnormalities. Similarly, in infectious or degenerative corneal disorders, Fourier-domain OCT successfully showed the extent of infiltration or material deposition, which appeared as hyper-reflective areas. In cases with pterygium, the underlying cornea could not be imaged. All cases of common conjunctival pathologies, such as nevus or pinguecula, were successfully imaged in detail. Nevi, scleritis, pterygium, pinguecula, and subconjunctival hemorrhage were hyper-reflective lesions, while cysts and lymphangiectasia were hyporeflective. The details of the underlying sclera were not uniformly imaged in conjunctival pathologies. Fourier-domain OCT imaged the trabeculectomy bleb in detail, whereas the details of structures of the anterior chamber angle were not routinely visualized in all cases. Light scatter through vascularized, densely inflamed, or thick lesions limits the imaging capabilities of Fourier-domain anterior segment OCT.

  2. Image/patient registration from (partial) projection data by the Fourier phase matching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiguo Lu; You, J.

    1999-01-01

    A technique for 2D or 3D image/patient registration, PFPM (projection based Fourier phase matching method), is proposed. This technique provides image/patient registration directly from sequential tomographic projection data. The method can also deal with image files by generating 2D Radon transforms slice by slice. The registration in projection space is done by calculating a Fourier invariant (FI) descriptor for each one-dimensional projection datum, and then registering the FI descriptor by the Fourier phase matching (FPM) method. The algorithm has been tested on both synthetic and experimental data. When dealing with translated, rotated and uniformly scaled 2D image registration, the performance of the PFPM method is comparable to that of the IFPM (image based Fourier phase matching) method in robustness, efficiency, insensitivity to the offset between images, and registration time. The advantages of the former are that subpixel resolution is feasible, and it is more insensitive to image noise due to the averaging effect of the projection acquisition. Furthermore, the PFPM method offers the ability to generalize to 3D image/patient registration and to register partial projection data. By applying patient registration directly from tomographic projection data, image reconstruction is not needed in the therapy set-up verification, thus reducing computational time and artefacts. In addition, real time registration is feasible. Registration from partial projection data meets the geometry and dose requirements in many application cases and makes dynamic set-up verification possible in tomotherapy. (author)

  3. Fourier analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities: MR imaging study. The Scandinavian Flow Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F; Stubgaard, M

    1990-01-01

    images. The phase information in the resultant image was converted to flow velocity with a calibration curve with the slope 26.5 radian.m-1.sec. The velocity versus time function was Fourier transformed and a continuous curve was fitted to the measured data with use of the first three harmonics...

  4. Two-dimensional 220 MHz Fourier transform EPR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Placidi, Giuseppe; Brivati, John A.; Alecci, Marcello; Testa, Luca; Sotgiu, Antonello

    1998-01-01

    In the last decade radiofrequency continuous-wave EPR spectrometers have been developed to detect and localize free radicals in vivo. Only recently, pulsed radiofrequency EPR spectrometers have been described for imaging applications with small samples. In the present work, we show the first two-dimensional image obtained at 220 MHz on a large phantom (40 ml) that simulates typical conditions of in vivo EPR imaging. This pulsed EPR apparatus has the potential to make the time required for three-dimensional imaging compatible with the biological half-life of normally used paramagnetic probes. (author)

  5. Digital double random amplitude image encryption method based on the symmetry property of the parametric discrete Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkouche, Toufik; Bouguezel, Saad

    2018-03-01

    We propose a real-to-real image encryption method. It is a double random amplitude encryption method based on the parametric discrete Fourier transform coupled with chaotic maps to perform the scrambling. The main idea behind this method is the introduction of a complex-to-real conversion by exploiting the inherent symmetry property of the transform in the case of real-valued sequences. This conversion allows the encrypted image to be real-valued instead of being a complex-valued image as in all existing double random phase encryption methods. The advantage is to store or transmit only one image instead of two images (real and imaginary parts). Computer simulation results and comparisons with the existing double random amplitude encryption methods are provided for peak signal-to-noise ratio, correlation coefficient, histogram analysis, and key sensitivity.

  6. Fast data reconstructed method of Fourier transform imaging spectrometer based on multi-core CPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunchao; Du, Debiao; Xia, Zongze; Song, Li; Zheng, Weijian; Yan, Min; Lei, Zhenggang

    2017-10-01

    Imaging spectrometer can gain two-dimensional space image and one-dimensional spectrum at the same time, which shows high utility in color and spectral measurements, the true color image synthesis, military reconnaissance and so on. In order to realize the fast reconstructed processing of the Fourier transform imaging spectrometer data, the paper designed the optimization reconstructed algorithm with OpenMP parallel calculating technology, which was further used for the optimization process for the HyperSpectral Imager of `HJ-1' Chinese satellite. The results show that the method based on multi-core parallel computing technology can control the multi-core CPU hardware resources competently and significantly enhance the calculation of the spectrum reconstruction processing efficiency. If the technology is applied to more cores workstation in parallel computing, it will be possible to complete Fourier transform imaging spectrometer real-time data processing with a single computer.

  7. Scaled nonuniform Fourier transform for image reconstruction in swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezgebo, Biniyam; Nagib, Karim; Fernando, Namal; Kordi, Behzad; Sherif, Sherif

    2018-02-01

    Swept Source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) is an important imaging modality for both medical and industrial diagnostic applications. A cross-sectional SS-OCT image is obtained by applying an inverse discrete Fourier transform (DFT) to axial interferograms measured in the frequency domain (k-space). This inverse DFT is typically implemented as a fast Fourier transform (FFT) that requires the data samples to be equidistant in k-space. As the frequency of light produced by a typical wavelength-swept laser is nonlinear in time, the recorded interferogram samples will not be uniformly spaced in k-space. Many image reconstruction methods have been proposed to overcome this problem. Most such methods rely on oversampling the measured interferogram then use either hardware, e.g., Mach-Zhender interferometer as a frequency clock module, or software, e.g., interpolation in k-space, to obtain equally spaced samples that are suitable for the FFT. To overcome the problem of nonuniform sampling in k-space without any need for interferogram oversampling, an earlier method demonstrated the use of the nonuniform discrete Fourier transform (NDFT) for image reconstruction in SS-OCT. In this paper, we present a more accurate method for SS-OCT image reconstruction from nonuniform samples in k-space using a scaled nonuniform Fourier transform. The result is demonstrated using SS-OCT images of Axolotl salamander eggs.

  8. Color image cryptosystem using Fresnel diffraction and phase modulation in an expanded fractional Fourier transform domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hang; Liu, Zhengjun; Chen, Qi; Blondel, Walter; Varis, Pierre

    2018-05-01

    In this letter, what we believe is a new technique for optical color image encryption by using Fresnel diffraction and a phase modulation in an extended fractional Fourier transform domain is proposed. Different from the RGB component separation based method, the color image is converted into one component by improved Chirikov mapping. The encryption system is addressed with Fresnel diffraction and phase modulation. A pair of lenses is placed into the fractional Fourier transform system for the modulation of beam propagation. The structure parameters of the optical system and parameters in Chirikov mapping serve as extra keys. Some numerical simulations are given to test the validity of the proposed cryptosystem.

  9. Edge-based correlation image registration for multispectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Prabal [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-11-17

    Registration information for images of a common target obtained from a plurality of different spectral bands can be obtained by combining edge detection and phase correlation. The images are edge-filtered, and pairs of the edge-filtered images are then phase correlated to produce phase correlation images. The registration information can be determined based on these phase correlation images.

  10. The Performance and Scientific Rationale for an Infrared Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrograph on a Large Space Telescope

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graham, James R; Abrams, Mark; Bennett, C; Carr, J; Cook, K; Dey, A; Najita, J; Wishnow, E

    1998-01-01

    .... We consider the relationship between pixel size, spectral resolution, and diameter of the beam splitter for imaging and nonimaging Fourier transform spectrographs and give the condition required...

  11. Some notes concerning the fourier transformation of auto-correlation functions; Quelques notes sur la transformee de fourier des fonctions d'autocorrelation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froelicher, B; Dalfes, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    A study is made of the passage of the auto-correlation function to the frequency spectrum by a numerical Fourier transformation. Two principal characteristics of auto-correlation functions, the time between two points and the total time, are related to two oscillations which appear in the frequency spectrum and which deform it. Various methods are proposed for reducing the effect of these two parasitic oscillations and for re-obtaining the real spectrum. (authors) [French] On etudie le passage de la fonction d'autocorrelation au spectre de frequence par transformee de Fourier numerique. Deux caracteristiques principales des fonctions d'autocorrelation, la duree entre points et la duree totale sont reliees a deux oscillations qui apparaissent dans le spectre de frequence et le deforment. Diverses methodes sont proposees pour reduire l'effet de ces deux oscillations parasites, et retrouver le spectre reel. (auteurs)

  12. Study of turbulent flow using Half-Fourier Echo-Planar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.O.

    2006-01-01

    The Echo-Planar Imaging technique combined with a partial Fourier acquisition method was used to obtain velocity images for liquid flows in a circular cross-section pipe at Reynolds number of up to 8000. This partial-Fourier imaging scheme is able to generate shorter echo times than the full-Fourier Echo-Planar Imaging methods, reducing the signal attenuation due to T2 * and flow. Velocity images along the z axis were acquired with a time-scale of 80 ms thus obtaining a real-time description of flow in both the laminar and turbulent regimes. Velocity values and velocity fluctuations were computed with the flow image data. A comparison plot of NMR velocity and bulk velocity and a plot of velocity fluctuations were calculated to investigate the feasibility of this imaging technique. Flow encoded Echo-Planar Imaging together with a reduced data acquisition method can provide us with a real-time technique to capture instantaneous images of the flow field for both laminar and turbulent regimes. (author)

  13. Partial fourier and parallel MR image reconstruction with integrated gradient nonlinearity correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shengzhen; Trzasko, Joshua D; Shu, Yunhong; Weavers, Paul T; Huston, John; Gray, Erin M; Bernstein, Matt A

    2016-06-01

    To describe how integrated gradient nonlinearity (GNL) correction can be used within noniterative partial Fourier (homodyne) and parallel (SENSE and GRAPPA) MR image reconstruction strategies, and demonstrate that performing GNL correction during, rather than after, these routines mitigates the image blurring and resolution loss caused by postreconstruction image domain based GNL correction. Starting from partial Fourier and parallel magnetic resonance imaging signal models that explicitly account for GNL, noniterative image reconstruction strategies for each accelerated acquisition technique are derived under the same core mathematical assumptions as their standard counterparts. A series of phantom and in vivo experiments on retrospectively undersampled data were performed to investigate the spatial resolution benefit of integrated GNL correction over conventional postreconstruction correction. Phantom and in vivo results demonstrate that the integrated GNL correction reduces the image blurring introduced by the conventional GNL correction, while still correcting GNL-induced coarse-scale geometrical distortion. Images generated from undersampled data using the proposed integrated GNL strategies offer superior depiction of fine image detail, for example, phantom resolution inserts and anatomical tissue boundaries. Noniterative partial Fourier and parallel imaging reconstruction methods with integrated GNL correction reduce the resolution loss that occurs during conventional postreconstruction GNL correction while preserving the computational efficiency of standard reconstruction techniques. Magn Reson Med 75:2534-2544, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A method of Moessbauer Fourier spectroscopy for determination of the biopolimer coordinate correlation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basovets, S.K.; Krupyanskij, Yu.F.; Kurinov, I.V.; Suzdalev, I.P.; Goldanskij, V.I.; Uporov, I.V.; Shaitan, K.V.; Rubin, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    A method of Moessbauer Fourier spectroscopy is developed to determine the correlation function of coordinates of a macromolecular system. The method does not require the use of an a priori dynamic model. The application of the method to the analysis of RSMR data for human serum albumin has demonstrated considerable changes in the dynamic behavior of the protein globule when the temperature is changed from 270 to 310 K. The main conclusions of the present work is the simultaneous observation of low-frequency (τ≥10 -9 sec) and high-frequency (τ -9 sec) large-scaled motions, that is the two-humped distribution of correlation times of protein motions. (orig.)

  15. Femtosecond X-ray Fourier holography imaging of freeflying nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorkhover, Tais; Ulmer, Anatoli; Ferguson, Ken R.; Bucher, Max; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Bielecki, Johan; Ekeberg, Tomas; Hantke, Max F.; Daurer, Benedikt J.; Bostedt, Christoph

    2018-02-26

    Ultrafast X-ray imaging on individual fragile specimens such as aerosols1, metastable particles2, superfluid quantum systems3 and live biospecimen4 provides high resolution information, which is inaccessible with conventional imaging techniques. Coherent X-ray diffractive imag- 2 ing, however, suffers from intrinsic loss of phase, and therefore structure recovery is often complicated and not always uniquely-defined4, 5. Here, we introduce the method of in-flight holography, where we use nanoclusters as reference X-ray scatterers in order to encode relative phase information into diffraction patterns of a virus. The resulting hologram contains an unambiguous three-dimensional map of a virus and two nanoclusters with the highest lateral resolution so far achieved via single shot X-ray holography. Our approach unlocks the benefits of holography for ultrafast X-ray imaging of nanoscale, non-periodic systems and paves the way to direct observation of complex electron dynamics down to the attosecond time scale.

  16. Three-dimensional imaging using computer-generated holograms synthesized from 3-D Fourier spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatagai, Toyohiko; Miura, Ken-ichi; Sando, Yusuke; Itoh, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    Computer-generated holograms(CGHs) synthesized from projection images of real existing objects are considered. A series of projection images are recorded both vertically and horizontally with an incoherent light source and a color CCD. According to the principles of computer tomography(CT), the 3-D Fourier spectrum is calculated from several projection images of objects and the Fresnel CGH is synthesized using a part of the 3-D Fourier spectrum. This method has following advantages. At first, no-blur reconstructed images in any direction are obtained owing to two-dimensionally scanning in recording. Secondarily, since not interference fringes but simple projection images of objects are recorded, a coherent light source is not necessary. Moreover, when a color CCD is used in recording, it is easily possible to record and reconstruct colorful objects. Finally, we demonstrate reconstruction of biological objects.

  17. Three-dimensional imaging using computer-generated holograms synthesized from 3-D Fourier spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatagai, Toyohiko; Miura, Ken-ichi; Sando, Yusuke; Itoh, Masahide [University of Tsukba, Institute of Applied Physics, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan)], E-mail: yatagai@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp

    2008-11-01

    Computer-generated holograms(CGHs) synthesized from projection images of real existing objects are considered. A series of projection images are recorded both vertically and horizontally with an incoherent light source and a color CCD. According to the principles of computer tomography(CT), the 3-D Fourier spectrum is calculated from several projection images of objects and the Fresnel CGH is synthesized using a part of the 3-D Fourier spectrum. This method has following advantages. At first, no-blur reconstructed images in any direction are obtained owing to two-dimensionally scanning in recording. Secondarily, since not interference fringes but simple projection images of objects are recorded, a coherent light source is not necessary. Moreover, when a color CCD is used in recording, it is easily possible to record and reconstruct colorful objects. Finally, we demonstrate reconstruction of biological objects.

  18. Investigations of new cardiac functional imaging using Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, H.; Takeda, K.; Nakagawa, T.; Yamaguchi, N.; Taguchi, M.; Konishi, T.; Hamada, M.

    1982-01-01

    A new cardiac functional imaging, using temporal Fourier analysis of 28-frame gated cardiac blood-pool studies, was developed. A time-activity curve of each pixel was approximated by its Fourier series. Approximation by the sum for terms to the 3rd frequency of its Fourier series was considered to be most reasonable because of having the least aberration due to statistical fluctuation and close agreement between the global left ventricular curve and the regional fitted curves in normal subjects. To evaluate the ventricular systolic and diastolic performances, 9 parameters were analyzed from thus fitted curves on a pixel-by-pixel basis and displayed on a colour CRT in 64x64 matrix form. In patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and other cardiac lesions, detailed information on the regional ventricular systolic and diastolic performances was clearly visualized by this method, which was difficult to obtain from the usual functional images of phase and amplitude at the fundamental frequency alone

  19. High-resolution magnetic-domain imaging by Fourier transform holography at 21 nm wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffert, Stefan; Pfau, Bastian; Günther, Christian M; Schneider, Michael; Korff Schmising, Clemens von; Eisebitt, Stefan; Geilhufe, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Exploiting x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the L-edges of 3d transition metals, Fourier transform holography has become a standard technique to investigate magnetic samples with sub-100 nm spatial resolution. Here, magnetic imaging in the 21 nm wavelength regime using M-edge circular dichroism is demonstrated. Ultrafast pulses in this wavelength regime are increasingly available from both laser- and accelerator-driven soft x-ray sources. We explain the adaptations concerning sample preparation and data evaluation compared to conventional holography in the 1 nm wavelength range. We find the correction of the Fourier transform hologram to in-plane Fourier components to be critical for high-quality reconstruction and demonstrate 70 nm spatial resolution in magnetization imaging with this approach. (paper)

  20. A high-speed computerized tomography image reconstruction using direct two-dimensional Fourier transform method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Noboru; Mizutani, Toshio; Takahashi, Yoshizo; Inouye, Tamon.

    1983-01-01

    The nescessity for developing real-time computerized tomography (CT) aiming at the dynamic observation of organs such as hearts has lately been advocated. It is necessary for its realization to reconstruct the images which are markedly faster than present CTs. Although various reconstructing methods have been proposed so far, the method practically employed at present is the filtered backprojection (FBP) method only, which can give high quality image reconstruction, but takes much computing time. In the past, the two-dimensional Fourier transform (TFT) method was regarded as unsuitable to practical use because the quality of images obtained was not good, in spite of the promising method for high speed reconstruction because of its less computing time. However, since it was revealed that the image quality by TFT method depended greatly on interpolation accuracy in two-dimensional Fourier space, the authors have developed a high-speed calculation algorithm that can obtain high quality images by pursuing the relationship between the image quality and the interpolation method. In this case, radial data sampling points in Fourier space are increased to β-th power of 2 times, and the linear or spline interpolation is used. Comparison of this method with the present FBP method resulted in the conclusion that the image quality is almost the same in practical image matrix, the computational time by TFT method becomes about 1/10 of FBP method, and the memory capacity also reduces by about 20 %. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  1. An L1-norm phase constraint for half-Fourier compressed sensing in 3D MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guobin; Hennig, Jürgen; Raithel, Esther; Büchert, Martin; Paul, Dominik; Korvink, Jan G; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2015-10-01

    In most half-Fourier imaging methods, explicit phase replacement is used. In combination with parallel imaging, or compressed sensing, half-Fourier reconstruction is usually performed in a separate step. The purpose of this paper is to report that integration of half-Fourier reconstruction into iterative reconstruction minimizes reconstruction errors. The L1-norm phase constraint for half-Fourier imaging proposed in this work is compared with the L2-norm variant of the same algorithm, with several typical half-Fourier reconstruction methods. Half-Fourier imaging with the proposed phase constraint can be seamlessly combined with parallel imaging and compressed sensing to achieve high acceleration factors. In simulations and in in-vivo experiments half-Fourier imaging with the proposed L1-norm phase constraint enables superior performance both reconstruction of image details and with regard to robustness against phase estimation errors. The performance and feasibility of half-Fourier imaging with the proposed L1-norm phase constraint is reported. Its seamless combination with parallel imaging and compressed sensing enables use of greater acceleration in 3D MR imaging.

  2. 3D spectral imaging with synchrotron Fourier transform infrared spectro-microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael C. Martin; Charlotte Dabat-Blondeau; Miriam Unger; Julia Sedlmair; Dilworth Y. Parkinson; Hans A. Bechtel; Barbara Illman; Jonathan M. Castro; Marco Keiluweit; David Buschke; Brenda Ogle; Michael J. Nasse; Carol J. Hirschmugl

    2013-01-01

    We report Fourier transform infrared spectro-microtomography, a nondestructive three-dimensional imaging approach that reveals the distribution of distinctive chemical compositions throughout an intact biological or materials sample. The method combines mid-infrared absorption contrast with computed tomographic data acquisition and reconstruction to enhance chemical...

  3. A Novel Medical Image Watermarking in Three-dimensional Fourier Compressed Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoru Han

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Digital watermarking is a research hotspot in the field of image security, which is protected digital image copyright. In order to ensure medical image information security, a novel medical image digital watermarking algorithm in three-dimensional Fourier compressed domain is proposed. The novel medical image digital watermarking algorithm takes advantage of three-dimensional Fourier compressed domain characteristics, Legendre chaotic neural network encryption features and robust characteristics of differences hashing, which is a robust zero-watermarking algorithm. On one hand, the original watermarking image is encrypted in order to enhance security. It makes use of Legendre chaotic neural network implementation. On the other hand, the construction of zero-watermarking adopts differences hashing in three-dimensional Fourier compressed domain. The novel watermarking algorithm does not need to select a region of interest, can solve the problem of medical image content affected. The specific implementation of the algorithm and the experimental results are given in the paper. The simulation results testify that the novel algorithm possesses a desirable robustness to common attack and geometric attack.

  4. Advances in hyperspectral remote sensing I: The visible Fourier transform hyperspectral imager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bruce Rafert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss early hyperspectral research and development activities during the 1990s that led to the deployment of aircraft and satellite payloads whose heritage was based on the use of visible, spatially modulated, imaging Fourier transform spectrometers, beginning with early experiments at the Florida Institute of Technology, through successful launch and deployment of the Visible Fourier Transform Hyperspectral Imager on MightySat II.1 on 19 July 2000. In addition to a brief chronological overview, we also discuss several of the most interesting optical engineering challenges that were addressed over this timeframe, present some as-yet un-exploited features of field-widened (slit-less SMIFTS instruments, and present some images from ground-based, aircraft-based and satellite-based instruments that helped provide the impetus for the proliferation and development of entire new families of instruments and countless new applications for hyperspectral imaging.

  5. Gaseous effluent monitoring and identification using an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.R.; Bennett, C.L.; Fields, D.J.; Hernandez, J.

    1993-10-01

    We are developing an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer for chemical effluent monitoring. The system consists of a 2-D infrared imaging array in the focal plane of a Michelson interferometer. Individual images are coordinated with the positioning of a moving mirror in the Michelson interferometer. A three dimensional data cube with two spatial dimensions and one interferogram dimension is then Fourier transformed to produce a hyperspectral data cube with one spectral dimension and two spatial dimensions. The spectral range of the instrument is determined by the choice of optical components and the spectral range of the focal plane array. Measurements in the near UV, visible, near IR, and mid-IR ranges are possible with the existing instrument. Gaseous effluent monitoring and identification measurements will be primarily in the ``fingerprint`` region of the spectrum, ({lambda} = 8 to 12 {mu}m). Initial measurements of effluent using this imaging interferometer in the mid-IR will be presented.

  6. [Evaluation of Image Quality of Readout Segmented EPI with Readout Partial Fourier Technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yuuki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Miyahara, Kanae

    Readout segmented EPI (readout segmentation of long variable echo-trains: RESOLVE) segmented k-space in the readout direction. By using the partial Fourier method in the readout direction, the imaging time was shortened. However, the influence on image quality due to insufficient data sampling is concerned. The setting of the partial Fourier method in the readout direction in each segment was changed. Then, we examined signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and distortion ratio for changes in image quality due to differences in data sampling. As the number of sampling segments decreased, SNR and CNR showed a low value. In addition, the distortion ratio did not change. The image quality of minimum sampling segments is greatly different from full data sampling, and caution is required when using it.

  7. Incubator embedded cell culture imaging system (EmSight) based on Fourier ptychographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinho; Henley, Beverley M; Kim, Charlene H; Lester, Henry A; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-08-01

    Multi-day tracking of cells in culture systems can provide valuable information in bioscience experiments. We report the development of a cell culture imaging system, named EmSight, which incorporates multiple compact Fourier ptychographic microscopes with a standard multiwell imaging plate. The system is housed in an incubator and presently incorporates six microscopes. By using the same low magnification objective lenses as the objective and the tube lens, the EmSight is configured as a 1:1 imaging system that, providing large field-of-view (FOV) imaging onto a low-cost CMOS imaging sensor. The EmSight improves the image resolution by capturing a series of images of the sample at varying illumination angles; the instrument reconstructs a higher-resolution image by using the iterative Fourier ptychographic algorithm. In addition to providing high-resolution brightfield and phase imaging, the EmSight is also capable of fluorescence imaging at the native resolution of the objectives. We characterized the system using a phase Siemens star target, and show four-fold improved coherent resolution (synthetic NA of 0.42) and a depth of field of 0.2 mm. To conduct live, long-term dopaminergic neuron imaging, we cultured ventral midbrain from mice driving eGFP from the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter. The EmSight system tracks movements of dopaminergic neurons over a 21 day period.

  8. Noise analysis of the measurement of group delay in Fourier white-light interferometric cross correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    The problem of noise analysis in measuring the group delay introduced by a dispersive optical element by use of white-light interferometric cross correlation is investigated. Two noise types, detection noise and position noise, are specifically analyzed. Detection noise is shown to be highly sensitive to the spectral content of the white-light source at the frequency considered and to the temporal acquisition window. Position noise, which arises from the finite accuracy of the measurement of the scanning mirror's position, can severely damage the estimation of the group delay. Such is shown to be the case for fast Fourier transform-based estimation algorithms. A new algorithm that is insensitive to scanning delay errors is proposed, and subfemtosecond accuracy is obtained without any postprocessing

  9. Improvements in image quality with pseudo-parallel imaging in the phase-scrambling fourier transform technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Satoshi; Kawawa, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Yoshifumi

    2010-01-01

    The signal obtained in the phase-scrambling Fourier transform (PSFT) imaging technique can be transformed to the signal described by the Fresnel transform of the objects, in which the amplitude of the PSFT presents some kind of blurred image of the objects. Therefore, the signal can be considered to exist in the object domain as well as the Fourier domain of the object. This notable feature makes it possible to assign weights to the reconstructed images by applying a weighting function to the PSFT signal after data acquisition, and as a result, pseudo-parallel image reconstruction using these aliased image data with different weights on the images is feasible. In this study, the improvements in image quality with such pseudo-parallel imaging were examined and demonstrated. The weighting function of the PSFT signal that provides a given weight on the image is estimated using the obtained image data and is iteratively updated after sensitivity encoding (SENSE)-based image reconstruction. Simulation studies showed that reconstruction errors were dramatically reduced and that the spatial resolution was also improved in almost all image spaces. The proposed method was applied to signals synthesized from MR image data with phase variations to verify its effectiveness. It was found that the image quality was improved and that images almost entirely free of aliasing artifacts could be obtained. (author)

  10. An image hiding method based on cascaded iterative Fourier transform and public-key encryption algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B.; Sang, Jun; Alam, Mohammad S.

    2013-03-01

    An image hiding method based on cascaded iterative Fourier transform and public-key encryption algorithm was proposed. Firstly, the original secret image was encrypted into two phase-only masks M1 and M2 via cascaded iterative Fourier transform (CIFT) algorithm. Then, the public-key encryption algorithm RSA was adopted to encrypt M2 into M2' . Finally, a host image was enlarged by extending one pixel into 2×2 pixels and each element in M1 and M2' was multiplied with a superimposition coefficient and added to or subtracted from two different elements in the 2×2 pixels of the enlarged host image. To recover the secret image from the stego-image, the two masks were extracted from the stego-image without the original host image. By applying public-key encryption algorithm, the key distribution was facilitated, and also compared with the image hiding method based on optical interference, the proposed method may reach higher robustness by employing the characteristics of the CIFT algorithm. Computer simulations show that this method has good robustness against image processing.

  11. Spatial correlation in 3D MIMO channels using fourier coefficients of power spectrums

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, an exact closed-form expression for the Spatial Correlation Function (SCF) is derived for the standardized three-dimensional (3D) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) channel. This novel SCF is developed for a uniform linear array of antennas with non-isotropic antenna patterns. The proposed method resorts to the spherical harmonic expansion (SHE) of plane waves and the trigonometric expansion of Legendre and associated Legendre polynomials to obtain a closed-form expression for the SCF for arbitrary angular distributions and antenna patterns. The resulting expression depends on the underlying angular distributions and antenna patterns through the Fourier Series (FS) coefficients of power azimuth and elevation spectrums. The novelty of the proposed method lies in the SCF being valid for any 3D propagation environment. Numerical results validate the proposed analytical expression and study the impact of angular spreads on the correlation. The derived SCF will help evaluate the performance of correlated 3D MIMO channels in the future. © 2015 IEEE.

  12. Robust alignment of chromatograms by statistically analyzing the shifts matrix generated by moving window fast Fourier transform cross-correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingjing; Wen, Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Lu, Hongmei; Liang, Yizeng; Zhan, Dejian

    2015-03-01

    Retention time shift is one of the most challenging problems during the preprocessing of massive chromatographic datasets. Here, an improved version of the moving window fast Fourier transform cross-correlation algorithm is presented to perform nonlinear and robust alignment of chromatograms by analyzing the shifts matrix generated by moving window procedure. The shifts matrix in retention time can be estimated by fast Fourier transform cross-correlation with a moving window procedure. The refined shift of each scan point can be obtained by calculating the mode of corresponding column of the shifts matrix. This version is simple, but more effective and robust than the previously published moving window fast Fourier transform cross-correlation method. It can handle nonlinear retention time shift robustly if proper window size has been selected. The window size is the only one parameter needed to adjust and optimize. The properties of the proposed method are investigated by comparison with the previous moving window fast Fourier transform cross-correlation and recursive alignment by fast Fourier transform using chromatographic datasets. The pattern recognition results of a gas chromatography mass spectrometry dataset of metabolic syndrome can be improved significantly after preprocessing by this method. Furthermore, the proposed method is available as an open source package at https://github.com/zmzhang/MWFFT2. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Fourier-based linear systems description of free-breathing pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, D. P. I.; Svenningsen, S.; Cunningham, I. A.; Parraga, G.

    2015-03-01

    Fourier-decomposition of free-breathing pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging (FDMRI) was recently piloted as a way to provide rapid quantitative pulmonary maps of ventilation and perfusion without the use of exogenous contrast agents. This method exploits fast pulmonary MRI acquisition of free-breathing proton (1H) pulmonary images and non-rigid registration to compensate for changes in position and shape of the thorax associated with breathing. In this way, ventilation imaging using conventional MRI systems can be undertaken but there has been no systematic evaluation of fundamental image quality measurements based on linear systems theory. We investigated the performance of free-breathing pulmonary ventilation imaging using a Fourier-based linear system description of each operation required to generate FDMRI ventilation maps. Twelve subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchiectasis underwent pulmonary function tests and MRI. Non-rigid registration was used to co-register the temporal series of pulmonary images. Pulmonary voxel intensities were aligned along a time axis and discrete Fourier transforms were performed on the periodic signal intensity pattern to generate frequency spectra. We determined the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the FDMRI ventilation maps using a conventional approach (SNRC) and using the Fourier-based description (SNRF). Mean SNR was 4.7 ± 1.3 for subjects with bronchiectasis and 3.4 ± 1.8, for COPD subjects (p>.05). SNRF was significantly different than SNRC (p<.01). SNRF was approximately 50% of SNRC suggesting that the linear system model well-estimates the current approach.

  14. Intensity correlation imaging with sunlight-like source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao; Tang, Zhiguo; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Hui; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Jinbin; Liu, Yanyan; Xu, Zhuo

    2018-05-01

    We show a method of intensity correlation imaging of targets illuminated by a sunlight-like source both theoretically and experimentally. With a Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), we have modulated the coherence time of a thermal source up to 0.167 ns. And we carried out measurements of temporal and spatial correlations, respectively, with an intensity interferometer setup. By skillfully using the even Fourier fitting on the very sparse sampling data, the images of targets are successfully reconstructed from the low signal-noise-ratio(SNR) interference pattern by applying an iterative phase retrieval algorithm. The resulting imaging quality is as well as the one obtained by the theoretical fitting. The realization of such a case will bring this technique closer to geostationary satellite imaging illuminated by sunlight.

  15. An Image Matching Method Based on Fourier and LOG-Polar Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijia Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This Traditional template matching methods are not appropriate for the situation of large angle rotation between two images in the online detection for industrial production. Aiming at this problem, Fourier transform algorithm was introduced to correct image rotation angle based on its rotatary invariance in time-frequency domain, orienting image under test in the same direction with reference image, and then match these images using matching algorithm based on log-polar transform. Compared with the current matching algorithms, experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can not only match two images with rotation of arbitrary angle, but also possess a high matching accuracy and applicability. In addition, the validity and reliability of algorithm was verified by simulated matching experiment targeting circular images.

  16. Aliasless fresnel transform image reconstruction in phase scrambling fourier transform technique by data interpolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshifumi; Liu, Na; Ito, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    The signal in the Fresnel transform technique corresponds to a blurred one of the spin density image. Because the amplitudes of adjacent sampled signals have a high interrelation, the signal amplitude at a point between sampled points can be estimated with a high degree of accuracy even if the sampling is so coarse as to generate aliasing in the reconstructed images. In this report, we describe a new aliasless image reconstruction technique in the phase scrambling Fourier transform (PSFT) imaging technique in which the PSFT signals are converted to Fresnel transform signals by multiplying them by a quadratic phase term and are then interpolated using polynomial expressions to generate fully encoded signals. Numerical simulation using MR images showed that almost completely aliasless images are reconstructed by this technique. Experiments using ultra-low-field PSFT MRI were conducted, and aliasless images were reconstructed from coarsely sampled PSFT signals. (author)

  17. Application of the fractional Fourier transform to image reconstruction in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parot, Vicente; Sing-Long, Carlos; Lizama, Carlos; Tejos, Cristian; Uribe, Sergio; Irarrazaval, Pablo

    2012-07-01

    The classic paradigm for MRI requires a homogeneous B(0) field in combination with linear encoding gradients. Distortions are produced when the B(0) is not homogeneous, and several postprocessing techniques have been developed to correct them. Field homogeneity is difficult to achieve, particularly for short-bore magnets and higher B(0) fields. Nonlinear magnetic components can also arise from concomitant fields, particularly in low-field imaging, or intentionally used for nonlinear encoding. In any of these situations, the second-order component is key, because it constitutes the first step to approximate higher-order fields. We propose to use the fractional Fourier transform for analyzing and reconstructing the object's magnetization under the presence of quadratic fields. The fractional fourier transform provides a precise theoretical framework for this. We show how it can be used for reconstruction and for gaining a better understanding of the quadratic field-induced distortions, including examples of reconstruction for simulated and in vivo data. The obtained images have improved quality compared with standard Fourier reconstructions. The fractional fourier transform opens a new paradigm for understanding the MR signal generated by an object under a quadratic main field or nonlinear encoding. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Accurate determination of the diffusion coefficient of proteins by Fourier analysis with whole column imaging detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarabadi, Atefeh S; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2015-02-17

    Analysis in the frequency domain is considered a powerful tool to elicit precise information from spectroscopic signals. In this study, the Fourier transformation technique is employed to determine the diffusion coefficient (D) of a number of proteins in the frequency domain. Analytical approaches are investigated for determination of D from both experimental and data treatment viewpoints. The diffusion process is modeled to calculate diffusion coefficients based on the Fourier transformation solution to Fick's law equation, and its results are compared to time domain results. The simulations characterize optimum spatial and temporal conditions and demonstrate the noise tolerance of the method. The proposed model is validated by its application for the electropherograms from the diffusion path of a set of proteins. Real-time dynamic scanning is conducted to monitor dispersion by employing whole column imaging detection technology in combination with capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) and the imaging plug flow (iPF) experiment. These experimental techniques provide different peak shapes, which are utilized to demonstrate the Fourier transformation ability in extracting diffusion coefficients out of irregular shape signals. Experimental results confirmed that the Fourier transformation procedure substantially enhanced the accuracy of the determined values compared to those obtained in the time domain.

  19. Combustion stratification study of partially premixed combustion using Fourier transform analysis of OH* chemiluminescence images

    KAUST Repository

    Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad

    2017-11-06

    A relatively high level of stratification (qualitatively: lack of homogeneity) is one of the main advantages of partially premixed combustion over the homogeneous charge compression ignition concept. Stratification can smooth the heat release rate and improve the controllability of combustion. In order to compare stratification levels of different partially premixed combustion strategies or other combustion concepts, an objective and meaningful definition of “stratification level” is required. Such a definition is currently lacking; qualitative/quantitative definitions in the literature cannot properly distinguish various levels of stratification. The main purpose of this study is to objectively define combustion stratification (not to be confused with fuel stratification) based on high-speed OH* chemiluminescence imaging, which is assumed to provide spatial information regarding heat release. Stratification essentially being equivalent to spatial structure, we base our definition on two-dimensional Fourier transforms of photographs of OH* chemiluminescence. A light-duty optical diesel engine has been used to perform the OH* bandpass imaging on. Four experimental points are evaluated, with injection timings in the homogeneous regime as well as in the stratified partially premixed combustion regime. Two-dimensional Fourier transforms translate these chemiluminescence images into a range of spatial frequencies. The frequency information is used to define combustion stratification, using a novel normalization procedure. The results indicate that this new definition, based on Fourier analysis of OH* bandpass images, overcomes the drawbacks of previous definitions used in the literature and is a promising method to compare the level of combustion stratification between different experiments.

  20. Fourier plane colorimetric sensing using broadband imaging of surface plasmons and application to biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, P.; Krishnan, A.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an optical technique for refractive index and thickness sensing of sub-wavelength-thick dielectric analytes. The technique utilizes the broadband, multimode, directional leakage radiation arising from the excitation of hybrid mode surface plasmons (SP) on low aspect ratio periodic plasmonic substrates with period ≈λ. The approach requires relaxed fabrication tolerances compared to extra ordinary transmission-based sensing techniques, wherein minor shifts in the fabricated dimensions result in a very large change from the designed resonant wavelength. We show that refractive index perturbations due to about 10-nm-thick dielectric can be captured optically by the usage of carefully designed plasmonic substrates, a halogen lamp source, free-space optical components, polarizers, and a low-end, consumer-grade charge coupled device camera. The plasmonic substrates were designed for converting the signature of hybrid mode SP excitation into a transmission peak by utilizing a thin homogeneous metal layer sandwiched between the periodic plasmonic structures and the substrate. The resonance is highly sensitive to the refractive index and thickness of the analyte superstrate. The excitation of hybrid mode SP results in a polarization rotation of 90° of the leaked radiation at resonant wavelength. In order to eliminate the problem of image registration (i.e., placing the same feature in the same pixel of the image, for comparison before and after a change in refractive index) for sensing, we perform the color analysis in the Fourier plane. The change in color of the bright emitted spot with highest momentum, corresponding to the leakage of fundamental SP mode, was used to measure the changes in refractive index, whereas the number and color of spots of lower momenta, corresponding to higher-order Fabry Perot modes, was used to measure the variation in thickness. We further show that the Fourier plane analysis can also be used to sense the index of thicker

  1. Fourier plane colorimetric sensing using broadband imaging of surface plasmons and application to biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, P.; Krishnan, A., E-mail: ananthk@iitm.ac.in [Centre for NEMS and Nano Photonics (CNNP), Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036 (India); Experimental Optics Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036 (India)

    2015-12-21

    We demonstrate an optical technique for refractive index and thickness sensing of sub-wavelength-thick dielectric analytes. The technique utilizes the broadband, multimode, directional leakage radiation arising from the excitation of hybrid mode surface plasmons (SP) on low aspect ratio periodic plasmonic substrates with period ≈λ. The approach requires relaxed fabrication tolerances compared to extra ordinary transmission-based sensing techniques, wherein minor shifts in the fabricated dimensions result in a very large change from the designed resonant wavelength. We show that refractive index perturbations due to about 10-nm-thick dielectric can be captured optically by the usage of carefully designed plasmonic substrates, a halogen lamp source, free-space optical components, polarizers, and a low-end, consumer-grade charge coupled device camera. The plasmonic substrates were designed for converting the signature of hybrid mode SP excitation into a transmission peak by utilizing a thin homogeneous metal layer sandwiched between the periodic plasmonic structures and the substrate. The resonance is highly sensitive to the refractive index and thickness of the analyte superstrate. The excitation of hybrid mode SP results in a polarization rotation of 90° of the leaked radiation at resonant wavelength. In order to eliminate the problem of image registration (i.e., placing the same feature in the same pixel of the image, for comparison before and after a change in refractive index) for sensing, we perform the color analysis in the Fourier plane. The change in color of the bright emitted spot with highest momentum, corresponding to the leakage of fundamental SP mode, was used to measure the changes in refractive index, whereas the number and color of spots of lower momenta, corresponding to higher-order Fabry Perot modes, was used to measure the variation in thickness. We further show that the Fourier plane analysis can also be used to sense the index of thicker

  2. Fourier plane colorimetric sensing using broadband imaging of surface plasmons and application to biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, P.; Krishnan, A.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate an optical technique for refractive index and thickness sensing of sub-wavelength-thick dielectric analytes. The technique utilizes the broadband, multimode, directional leakage radiation arising from the excitation of hybrid mode surface plasmons (SP) on low aspect ratio periodic plasmonic substrates with period ≈λ. The approach requires relaxed fabrication tolerances compared to extra ordinary transmission-based sensing techniques, wherein minor shifts in the fabricated dimensions result in a very large change from the designed resonant wavelength. We show that refractive index perturbations due to about 10-nm-thick dielectric can be captured optically by the usage of carefully designed plasmonic substrates, a halogen lamp source, free-space optical components, polarizers, and a low-end, consumer-grade charge coupled device camera. The plasmonic substrates were designed for converting the signature of hybrid mode SP excitation into a transmission peak by utilizing a thin homogeneous metal layer sandwiched between the periodic plasmonic structures and the substrate. The resonance is highly sensitive to the refractive index and thickness of the analyte superstrate. The excitation of hybrid mode SP results in a polarization rotation of 90° of the leaked radiation at resonant wavelength. In order to eliminate the problem of image registration (i.e., placing the same feature in the same pixel of the image, for comparison before and after a change in refractive index) for sensing, we perform the color analysis in the Fourier plane. The change in color of the bright emitted spot with highest momentum, corresponding to the leakage of fundamental SP mode, was used to measure the changes in refractive index, whereas the number and color of spots of lower momenta, corresponding to higher-order Fabry Perot modes, was used to measure the variation in thickness. We further show that the Fourier plane analysis can also be used to sense the index of thicker

  3. Study on the algorithm of computational ghost imaging based on discrete fourier transform measurement matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leihong; Liang, Dong; Li, Bei; Kang, Yi; Pan, Zilan; Zhang, Dawei; Gao, Xiumin; Ma, Xiuhua

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of analyzing the cosine light field with determined analytic expression and the pseudo-inverse method, the object is illuminated by a presetting light field with a determined discrete Fourier transform measurement matrix, and the object image is reconstructed by the pseudo-inverse method. The analytic expression of the algorithm of computational ghost imaging based on discrete Fourier transform measurement matrix is deduced theoretically, and compared with the algorithm of compressive computational ghost imaging based on random measurement matrix. The reconstruction process and the reconstruction error are analyzed. On this basis, the simulation is done to verify the theoretical analysis. When the sampling measurement number is similar to the number of object pixel, the rank of discrete Fourier transform matrix is the same as the one of the random measurement matrix, the PSNR of the reconstruction image of FGI algorithm and PGI algorithm are similar, the reconstruction error of the traditional CGI algorithm is lower than that of reconstruction image based on FGI algorithm and PGI algorithm. As the decreasing of the number of sampling measurement, the PSNR of reconstruction image based on FGI algorithm decreases slowly, and the PSNR of reconstruction image based on PGI algorithm and CGI algorithm decreases sharply. The reconstruction time of FGI algorithm is lower than that of other algorithms and is not affected by the number of sampling measurement. The FGI algorithm can effectively filter out the random white noise through a low-pass filter and realize the reconstruction denoising which has a higher denoising capability than that of the CGI algorithm. The FGI algorithm can improve the reconstruction accuracy and the reconstruction speed of computational ghost imaging.

  4. Geometrical optics in correlated imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Dezhong; Xiong Jun; Wang Kaige

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the geometrical optics of correlated imaging for two kinds of spatial correlations corresponding, respectively, to a classical thermal light source and a quantum two-photon entangled source. Due to the different features in the second-order spatial correlation, the two sources obey different imaging equations. The quantum entangled source behaves as a mirror, whereas the classical thermal source looks like a phase-conjugate mirror in the correlated imaging

  5. Mechanical shape correlation : a novel integrated digital image correlation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinendorst, S.M.; Hoefnagels, J.P.M.; Geers, M.G.D.; Lamberti, L.; Lin, M.-T.; Furlong, C.; Sciammarella, C.

    2018-01-01

    Mechanical Shape Correlation (MSC) is a novel integrated digital image correlation technique, used to determine the optimal set of constitutive parameters to describe the experimentally observed mechanical behavior of a test specimen, based on digital images taken during the experiment. In contrast

  6. Depth resolved hyperspectral imaging spectrometer based on structured light illumination and Fourier transform interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heejin; Wadduwage, Dushan; Matsudaira, Paul T.; So, Peter T.C.

    2014-01-01

    A depth resolved hyperspectral imaging spectrometer can provide depth resolved imaging both in the spatial and the spectral domain. Images acquired through a standard imaging Fourier transform spectrometer do not have the depth-resolution. By post processing the spectral cubes (x, y, λ) obtained through a Sagnac interferometer under uniform illumination and structured illumination, spectrally resolved images with depth resolution can be recovered using structured light illumination algorithms such as the HiLo method. The proposed scheme is validated with in vitro specimens including fluorescent solution and fluorescent beads with known spectra. The system is further demonstrated in quantifying spectra from 3D resolved features in biological specimens. The system has demonstrated depth resolution of 1.8 μm and spectral resolution of 7 nm respectively. PMID:25360367

  7. Fourier transform imaging of impurities in the unit cells of crystals: Mn in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.-L.; Bihler, C.; Schoch, W.; Limmer, W.; Daeubler, J.; Thieß, S.; Brandt, M. S.; Zegenhagen, J.

    2010-06-01

    The lattice sites of Mn in ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As thin films were imaged using the x-ray standing wave technique. The model-free images, obtained straightforwardly by Fourier inversion, disclose immediately that the Mn mostly substitutes the Ga with a small fraction residing on minority sites. The images further reveal variations in the Mn concentrations of the different sites upon post-growth treatments. Subsequent model refinement based on the directly reconstructed images resolves with high precision the complete Mn site distributions. It is found that post-growth annealing increases the fraction of substitutional Mn at the expense of interstitial Mn whereas hydrogenation has little influence on the Mn site distribution. Our study offers an element-specific high-resolution imaging approach for accurately determining the detailed site distributions of dilute concentrations of atoms in crystals.

  8. Mapping agroecological zones and time lag in vegetation growth by means of Fourier analysis of time series of NDVI images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menenti, M.; Azzali, S.; Verhoef, W.; Van Swol, R.

    1993-01-01

    Examples are presented of applications of a fast Fourier transform algorithm to analyze time series of images of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index values. The results obtained for a case study on Zambia indicated that differences in vegetation development among map units of an existing agroclimatic map were not significant, while reliable differences were observed among the map units obtained using the Fourier analysis.

  9. High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Laut, Sophie P.; Jones, Steven M.

    2010-09-07

    This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

  10. Image security based on iterative random phase encoding in expanded fractional Fourier transform domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Chen, Hang; Blondel, Walter; Shen, Zhenmin; Liu, Shutian

    2018-06-01

    A novel image encryption method is proposed by using the expanded fractional Fourier transform, which is implemented with a pair of lenses. Here the centers of two lenses are separated at the cross section of axis in optical system. The encryption system is addressed with Fresnel diffraction and phase modulation for the calculation of information transmission. The iterative process with the transform unit is utilized for hiding secret image. The structure parameters of a battery of lenses can be used for additional keys. The performance of encryption method is analyzed theoretically and digitally. The results show that the security of this algorithm is enhanced markedly by the added keys.

  11. Spatial correlation in 3D MIMO channels using fourier coefficients of power spectrums

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain; Kammoun, Abla; Debbah, Mé rouane; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2015-01-01

    for arbitrary angular distributions and antenna patterns. The resulting expression depends on the underlying angular distributions and antenna patterns through the Fourier Series (FS) coefficients of power azimuth and elevation spectrums. The novelty

  12. Fourier domain optical coherence tomography achieves full range complex imaging in vivo by introducing a carrier frequency during scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ruikang K

    2007-01-01

    The author describes a Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) system that is capable of full range complex imaging in vivo. This is achieved by introducing a constant carrier frequency into the OCT spectral interferograms at the time when imaging is performed. The complex functions of the spatial interferograms formed by each single wavelength are constructed before performing the Fourier transformation to localize the scatters within a sample. Two algorithms, based on Fourier filtering and Hilbert transformation, respectively, are described to achieve the full range complex FDOCT imaging. It is shown that the Hilbert transformation approach delivers better performance than the Fourier filtering method does in terms of tolerating the sample movement in vivo. The author finally demonstrates experimentally the system and algorithms for true in vivo imaging at a rate of 20 000 axial scans per second

  13. Organic and inorganic correlations for Northwest Africa 852 by synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesiltas, Mehmet; Peale, Robert E.; Unger, Miriam; Sedlmair, Julia; Hirschmugl, Carol J.

    2015-10-01

    Relationships between organic molecules and inorganic minerals are investigated in a single 34 μm diameter grain of the CR2 chondrite Northwest Africa 852 (NWA) 852 with submicron spatial resolution using synchrotron-based imaging micro-FTIR spectroscopy. Correlations based on absorption strength for the various constituents are determined using statistical correlation analysis. The silicate band is found to be correlated with the hydration band, and the latter is highly correlated with stretching modes of aliphatic hydrocarbons. Spatial distribution maps show that water+organic combination, silicate, OH, and C-H distributions overlap, suggesting a possible catalytic role of phyllosilicates in the formation of organics. In contrast, the carbonate band is anticorrelated with water+organic combination, however uncorrelated with any other spectral feature. The average ratio of asymmetric CH2 and CH3 band strengths (CH2/CH3 = 2.53) for NWA 852 is similar to the average ratio of interplanetary dust particles (~2.40) and Wild 2 cometary dust particles (2.50), but it significantly exceeds that of interstellar medium objects (~1.00) and several aqueously altered carbonaceous chondrites (~1.40). This suggests organics of similar length/branching, and perhaps similar formation regions, for NWA 852, Wild 2 dust particles, and interplanetary dust particles. The heterogeneous spatial distribution of ratio values indicates the presence of a mixture of aliphatic organic material with different length/branching, and thus a wide range of parent body processes, which occurred before the considered grain was formed.

  14. Improving the time efficiency of the Fourier synthesis method for slice selection in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahayori, B; Khaneja, N; Johnston, L A; Farrell, P M; Mareels, I M Y

    2016-01-01

    The design of slice selective pulses for magnetic resonance imaging can be cast as an optimal control problem. The Fourier synthesis method is an existing approach to solve these optimal control problems. In this method the gradient field as well as the excitation field are switched rapidly and their amplitudes are calculated based on a Fourier series expansion. Here, we provide a novel insight into the Fourier synthesis method via representing the Bloch equation in spherical coordinates. Based on the spherical Bloch equation, we propose an alternative sequence of pulses that can be used for slice selection which is more time efficient compared to the original method. Simulation results demonstrate that while the performance of both methods is approximately the same, the required time for the proposed sequence of pulses is half of the original sequence of pulses. Furthermore, the slice selectivity of both sequences of pulses changes with radio frequency field inhomogeneities in a similar way. We also introduce a measure, referred to as gradient complexity, to compare the performance of both sequences of pulses. This measure indicates that for a desired level of uniformity in the excited slice, the gradient complexity for the proposed sequence of pulses is less than the original sequence. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adaptive ISAR Imaging of Maneuvering Targets Based on a Modified Fourier Transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binbin; Xu, Shiyou; Wu, Wenzhen; Hu, Pengjiang; Chen, Zengping

    2018-04-27

    Focusing on the inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging of maneuvering targets, this paper presents a new imaging method which works well when the target's maneuvering is not too severe. After translational motion compensation, we describe the equivalent rotation of maneuvering targets by two variables-the relative chirp rate of the linear frequency modulated (LFM) signal and the Doppler focus shift. The first variable indicates the target's motion status, and the second one represents the possible residual error of the translational motion compensation. With them, a modified Fourier transform matrix is constructed and then used for cross-range compression. Consequently, the imaging of maneuvering is converted into a two-dimensional parameter optimization problem in which a stable and clear ISAR image is guaranteed. A gradient descent optimization scheme is employed to obtain the accurate relative chirp rate and Doppler focus shift. Moreover, we designed an efficient and robust initialization process for the gradient descent method, thus, the well-focused ISAR images of maneuvering targets can be achieved adaptively. Human intervention is not needed, and it is quite convenient for practical ISAR imaging systems. Compared to precedent imaging methods, the new method achieves better imaging quality under reasonable computational cost. Simulation results are provided to validate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed method.

  16. Pathological Brain Detection by a Novel Image Feature—Fractional Fourier Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuihua Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To detect pathological brain conditions early is a core procedure for patients so as to have enough time for treatment. Traditional manual detection is either cumbersome, or expensive, or time-consuming. We aim to offer a system that can automatically identify pathological brain images in this paper. Method: We propose a novel image feature, viz., Fractional Fourier Entropy (FRFE, which is based on the combination of Fractional Fourier Transform (FRFT and Shannon entropy. Afterwards, the Welch’s t-test (WTT and Mahalanobis distance (MD were harnessed to select distinguishing features. Finally, we introduced an advanced classifier: twin support vector machine (TSVM. Results: A 10 × K-fold stratified cross validation test showed that this proposed “FRFE + WTT + TSVM” yielded an accuracy of 100.00%, 100.00%, and 99.57% on datasets that contained 66, 160, and 255 brain images, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed “FRFE + WTT + TSVM” method is superior to 20 state-of-the-art methods.

  17. Direct Fourier imaging of distortions in LaAlO{sub 3} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlueter, Christoph; Zegenhagen, Joerg [ESRF, Grenoble (France); Lee, Tien-Lin [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Didcot (United Kingdom); Aruta, Carmela [CNR-SPIN, Naples (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    The formation of a quasi-2dimensional electron gas at interface of SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) and LaAlO{sub 3} (LAO) attracted considerable attention in the recent years. The polar LAO layer was expected to cause the build-up of an electric potential. Distortions in the overlayer are discussed as one possible response of the system. The highly sensitive X-ray standing wave (XSW) imaging technique is well suited to study theses films because of its chemical and spacial resolution. LAO thin films below and above the critical thickness for conductivity were studied at the hard X-ray photo electron spectroscopy end station of ID32 at the ESRF. The XSW modulated core level photo electron yield was recorded for the five elements present in film and substrate for seven different Bragg reflections. Subsequent analysis provided for each reflection and element the amplitude and phase of one Fourier coefficient of the elemental atomic distribution function. The three dimensional real space image of the atomic distribution for each of the elements is reconstructed by direct Fourier inversion. The reconstructed 3D images obtained by this model free approach reveal significant atomic displacements.

  18. Complete Fourier Direct Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CFD-MRI for Diffusion MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpay eÖzcan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The foundation for an accurate and unifying Fourier based theory of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI is constructed by carefully re-examining the first principles of DW-MRI signal formation and deriving its mathematical model from scratch. The derivations are specifically obtained for DW-MRI signal by including all of its elements (e.g., imaging gradients using complex values. Particle methods are utilized in contrast to conventional partial differential equations approach. The signal is shown to be the Fourier transform of the joint distribution of number of the magnetic moments (at a given location at the initial time and magnetic moment displacement integrals. In effect, the k-space is augmented by three more dimensions, corresponding to the frequency variables dual to displacement integral vectors. The joint distribution function is recovered by applying the Fourier transform to the complete high-dimensional data set. In the process, to obtain a physically meaningful real valued distribution function, phase corrections are applied for the re-establishment of Hermitian symmetry in the signal. Consequently, the method is fully unconstrained and directly presents the distribution of displacement integrals without any assumptions such as symmetry or Markovian property. The joint distribution function is visualized with isosurfaces, which describe the displacement integrals, overlaid on the distribution map of the number of magnetic moments with low mobility. The model provides an accurate description of the molecular motion measurements via DW-MRI. The improvement of the characterization of tissue microstructure leads to a better localization, detection and assessment of biological properties such as white matter integrity. The results are demonstrated on the experimental data obtained from an ex-vivo baboon brain.

  19. Beyond MOS and fibers: Optical Fourier-transform Imaging Unit for Cananea Observatory (OFIUCO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Suárez, M. A.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Castillo, E.; García, P.; Escobedo, G.; Sánchez, S. F.; González, J.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Mollá, M.; Chávez, M.; Bertone, E.; et al.

    2017-11-01

    Many physical processes in astronomy are still hampered by the lack of spatial and spectral resolution, and also restricted to the field-of-view (FoV) of current 2D spectroscopy instruments available worldwide. It is due to that, many of the ongoing or proposed studies are based on large-scale imaging and/or spectroscopic surveys. Under this philosophy, large aperture telescopes are dedicated to the study of intrinsically faint and/or distance objects, covering small FoVs, with high spatial resolution, while smaller telescopes are devoted to wide-field explorations. However, future astronomical surveys, should be addressed by acquiring un-biases, spatially resolved, high-quality spectroscopic information for a wide FoV. Therefore, and in order to improve the current instrumental offer in the Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro (OAGH) in Cananea, Mexico (INAOE); and to explore a possible instrument for the future Telescopio San Pedro Mártir (6.5m), we are currently integrating at INAOE an instrument prototype that will provide us with un-biased wide-field (few arcmin) spectroscopic information, and with the flexibility of operating at different spectral resolutions (R 1-20000), with a spatial resolution limited by seeing, and therefore, to be used in a wide range of astronomical problems. This instrument called OFIUCO: Optical Fourier-transform Imaging Unit for Cananea Observatory, will make use of the Fourier Transform Spectroscopic technique, which has been proved to be feasible in the optical wavelength range (350-1000 nm) with designs such as SITELLE (CFHT). We describe here the basic technical description of a Fourier transform spectrograph with important modifications from previous astronomical versions, as well as the technical advantages and weakness, and the science cases in which this instrument can be implemented.

  20. Transformada fraccional de Fourier en el caso de un plano imagen inclinado Fraccional Fourier transform in the case of an inclined image plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Torres

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La conocida fórmula de difracción de Fresnel relaciona la distribución de amplitud compleja de una onda en el plano objeto (campo ondulatorio de entrada con la distribución de amplitud compleja de la onda en el plano imagen(campo ondulatorio de salida cuando se trata de propagación en el espaciolibre; esto significa que si los planos objeto e imagen son paralelos entre sí, el sistema imagen correspondiente se dice que es un sistema lineal invariantea desplazamiento (LSI. Esta propiedad ventajosa es esencial para el desarrollo de técnicas de imagen sensitivas a fase; sin embargo, si el plano imagen está inclinado con respecto al haz incidente, la distancia efectiva de propagación cambiará sobre el plano imagen, consecuentemente el sistema imagen será no invariante a desplazamiento. En este artículo es propuesta una extensión del formalismo de la difracción de Fresnel al caso de un plano imageninclinado utilizando la transformada de Fourier de orden fraccional.The well-known Fresnel integral relates a known complex wave defined in the object plane (the input wave field to the observable complex wave (the output wave field defined in the image plane after free-space propagation; this means that if the object and image plane are parallel to each other, corresponding imaging system is said to be linear-shift-invariant (LSI. This advantageous property was essential for the development of phase sensitive imaging techniques; however, if the image plane is inclined with respect to the incident beam, the effective propagation distance will vary over the image plane, consequently, the imaging system is not shiftinvariant. In this paper an extension of the theoretical formalism of Fresnel diffraction to the case of an inclined image plane is proposed using the fractional Fourier transform.

  1. Application of Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation imaging to the rat cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, T Y; Sangha, H K; Chien, E K; McFarlin, B L; Wagoner Johnson, A J; Toussaint, K C

    2013-07-01

    We present the application of Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation (FT-SHG) imaging to evaluate the arrangement of collagen fibers in five nonpregnant rat cervices. Tissue slices from the mid-cervix and near the external orifice of the cervix were analyzed in both two-dimensions (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). We validate that the cervical microstructure can be quantitatively assessed in three dimensions using FT-SHG imaging and observe collagen fibers oriented both in and out-of-plane in the outermost and the innermost layers, which cannot be observed using 2D FT-SHG analysis alone. This approach has the potential to be a clinically applicable method for measuring progressive changes in collagen organization during cervical remodeling in humans. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Fully 3D PET image reconstruction using a fourier preconditioned conjugate-gradient algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessler, J.A.; Ficaro, E.P.

    1996-01-01

    Since the data sizes in fully 3D PET imaging are very large, iterative image reconstruction algorithms must converge in very few iterations to be useful. One can improve the convergence rate of the conjugate-gradient (CG) algorithm by incorporating preconditioning operators that approximate the inverse of the Hessian of the objective function. If the 3D cylindrical PET geometry were not truncated at the ends, then the Hessian of the penalized least-squares objective function would be approximately shift-invariant, i.e. G'G would be nearly block-circulant, where G is the system matrix. We propose a Fourier preconditioner based on this shift-invariant approximation to the Hessian. Results show that this preconditioner significantly accelerates the convergence of the CG algorithm with only a small increase in computation

  3. Observation of Correlated Azimuthal Anisotropy Fourier Harmonics in p p and p +Pb Collisions at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

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V.; Seixas, J.; Strong, G.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Voytishin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Stepennov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Aushev, T.; Bylinkin, A.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Parygin, P.; Philippov, D.; Polikarpov, S.; Tarkovskii, E.; Zhemchugov, E.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Terkulov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kaminskiy, A.; Kodolova, O.; Korotkikh, V.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Vardanyan, I.; Blinov, V.; Skovpen, Y.; Shtol, D.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Dordevic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Stojanovic, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Barrio Luna, M.; Cerrada, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. 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A.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Padeken, K.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Joyce, M.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Sturdy, J.; Zaleski, S.; Brodski, M.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Hussain, U.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    The azimuthal anisotropy Fourier coefficients (vn) in 8.16 TeV p +Pb data are extracted via long-range two-particle correlations as a function of the event multiplicity and compared to corresponding results in p p and PbPb collisions. Using a four-particle cumulant technique, vn correlations are measured for the first time in p p and p +Pb collisions. The v2 and v4 coefficients are found to be positively correlated in all collision systems. For high-multiplicity p +Pb collisions, an anticorrelation of v2 and v3 is observed, with a similar correlation strength as in PbPb data at the same multiplicity. The new correlation results strengthen the case for a common origin of the collectivity seen in p +Pb and PbPb collisions in the measured multiplicity range.

  4. Observation of Correlated Azimuthal Anisotropy Fourier Harmonics in pp and p+Pb Collisions at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Cumalat, J P; Ford, W T; Jensen, F; Johnson, A; Krohn, M; Leontsinis, S; Mulholland, T; Stenson, K; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chaves, J; Chu, J; Dittmer, S; Mcdermott, K; Mirman, N; Patterson, J R; Rinkevicius, A; Ryd, A; Skinnari, L; Soffi, L; Tan, S M; Tao, Z; Thom, J; Tucker, J; Wittich, P; Zientek, M; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Apyan, A; Banerjee, S; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Bolla, G; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Canepa, A; Cerati, G B; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cremonesi, M; Duarte, J; Elvira, V D; Freeman, J; Gecse, Z; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Harris, R M; Hasegawa, S; Hirschauer, J; Hu, Z; Jayatilaka, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kreis, B; Lammel, S; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, M; Liu, T; Lopes De Sá, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Magini, N; Marraffino, J M; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Merkel, P; Mrenna, S; Nahn, S; O'Dell, V; Pedro, K; Prokofyev, O; Rakness, G; Ristori, L; Schneider, B; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Stoynev, S; Strait, J; Strobbe, N; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vernieri, C; Verzocchi, M; Vidal, R; Wang, M; Weber, H A; Whitbeck, A; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bortignon, P; Bourilkov, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Carnes, A; Carver, M; Curry, D; Field, R D; Furic, I K; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Ma, P; Matchev, K; Mei, H; Mitselmakher, G; Rank, D; Sperka, D; Terentyev, N; Thomas, L; Wang, J; Wang, S; Yelton, J; Joshi, Y R; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Rodriguez, J L; Ackert, A; Adams, T; Askew, A; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Kolberg, T; Martinez, G; Perry, T; Prosper, H; Saha, A; Santra, A; Sharma, V; Yohay, R; Baarmand, M M; Bhopatkar, V; Colafranceschi, S; Hohlmann, M; Noonan, D; Roy, T; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Cavanaugh, R; Chen, X; Evdokimov, O; Gerber, C E; Hangal, D A; Hofman, D J; Jung, K; Kamin, J; Sandoval Gonzalez, I D; Tonjes, M B; Trauger, H; Varelas, N; Wang, H; Wu, Z; Zhang, J; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Durgut, S; Gandrajula, R P; Haytmyradov, M; Khristenko, V; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Snyder, C; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yi, K; Blumenfeld, B; Cocoros, A; Eminizer, N; Fehling, D; Feng, L; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Roskes, J; Sarica, U; Swartz, M; Xiao, M; You, C; Al-Bataineh, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Boren, S; Bowen, J; Castle, J; Khalil, S; Kropivnitskaya, A; Majumder, D; Mcbrayer, W; Murray, M; Royon, C; Sanders, S; Schmitz, E; Tapia Takaki, J D; Wang, Q; Ivanov, A; Kaadze, K; Maravin, Y; Mohammadi, A; Saini, L K; Skhirtladze, N; Toda, S; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Anelli, C; Baden, A; Baron, O; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Ferraioli, C; Hadley, N J; Jabeen, S; Jeng, G Y; Kellogg, R G; Kunkle, J; Mignerey, A C; Ricci-Tam, F; Shin, Y H; Skuja, A; Tonwar, S C; Abercrombie, D; Allen, B; Azzolini, V; Barbieri, R; Baty, A; Bi, R; 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Rorie, J; Tu, Z; Zabel, J; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Duh, Y T; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Han, J; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Lo, K H; Tan, P; Verzetti, M; Ciesielski, R; Goulianos, K; Mesropian, C; Agapitos, A; Chou, J P; Gershtein, Y; Gómez Espinosa, T A; Halkiadakis, E; Heindl, M; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Kyriacou, S; Lath, A; Montalvo, R; Nash, K; Osherson, M; Saka, H; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Delannoy, A G; Foerster, M; Heideman, J; Riley, G; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Thapa, K; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Celik, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Delgado, A; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Gilmore, J; Huang, T; Kamon, T; Mueller, R; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Perniè, L; Rathjens, D; Safonov, A; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Damgov, J; De Guio, F; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Gurpinar, E; Kunori, S; Lamichhane, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Peltola, T; Undleeb, S; Volobouev, I; Wang, Z; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Janjam, R; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Ni, H; Padeken, K; Sheldon, P; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Xu, Q; Barria, P; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Joyce, M; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Neu, C; Sinthuprasith, T; Wang, Y; Wolfe, E; Xia, F; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Sturdy, J; Zaleski, S; Brodski, M; Buchanan, J; Caillol, C; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Gomber, B; Grothe, M; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Hussain, U; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Savin, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N

    2018-03-02

    The azimuthal anisotropy Fourier coefficients (v_{n}) in 8.16 TeV p+Pb data are extracted via long-range two-particle correlations as a function of the event multiplicity and compared to corresponding results in pp and PbPb collisions. Using a four-particle cumulant technique, v_{n} correlations are measured for the first time in pp and p+Pb collisions. The v_{2} and v_{4} coefficients are found to be positively correlated in all collision systems. For high-multiplicity p+Pb collisions, an anticorrelation of v_{2} and v_{3} is observed, with a similar correlation strength as in PbPb data at the same multiplicity. The new correlation results strengthen the case for a common origin of the collectivity seen in p+Pb and PbPb collisions in the measured multiplicity range.

  5. Observation of correlated azimuthal anisotropy Fourier harmonics in pp and pPb collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    2017-09-26

    The azimuthal anisotropy Fourier coefficients ($v_n$) in 8.16 TeV pPb data are extracted via long-range two-particle correlations as a function of event multiplicity and compared to corresponding results in pp and PbPb collisions. Using a four-particle cumulant technique, $v_n$ correlations are measured for the first time in pp and pPb collisions. The $v_2$ and $v_4$ coefficients are found to be positively correlated in all collision systems. For high multiplicity pPb collisions an anticorrelation of $v_2$ and $v_3$ is observed, with a similar correlation strength as in PbPb data at the same multiplicity. The new correlation results strengthen the case for a common origin of the collectivity seen in pPb and PbPb collisions in the measured multiplicity range.

  6. Image correlation method for DNA sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curilem Saldías, Millaray; Villarroel Sassarini, Felipe; Muñoz Poblete, Carlos; Vargas Vásquez, Asticio; Maureira Butler, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of searches and the volume of genomic data make sequence alignment one of bioinformatics most active research areas. New alignment approaches have incorporated digital signal processing techniques. Among these, correlation methods are highly sensitive. This paper proposes a novel sequence alignment method based on 2-dimensional images, where each nucleic acid base is represented as a fixed gray intensity pixel. Query and known database sequences are coded to their pixel representation and sequence alignment is handled as object recognition in a scene problem. Query and database become object and scene, respectively. An image correlation process is carried out in order to search for the best match between them. Given that this procedure can be implemented in an optical correlator, the correlation could eventually be accomplished at light speed. This paper shows an initial research stage where results were "digitally" obtained by simulating an optical correlation of DNA sequences represented as images. A total of 303 queries (variable lengths from 50 to 4500 base pairs) and 100 scenes represented by 100 x 100 images each (in total, one million base pair database) were considered for the image correlation analysis. The results showed that correlations reached very high sensitivity (99.01%), specificity (98.99%) and outperformed BLAST when mutation numbers increased. However, digital correlation processes were hundred times slower than BLAST. We are currently starting an initiative to evaluate the correlation speed process of a real experimental optical correlator. By doing this, we expect to fully exploit optical correlation light properties. As the optical correlator works jointly with the computer, digital algorithms should also be optimized. The results presented in this paper are encouraging and support the study of image correlation methods on sequence alignment.

  7. Robust Fourier Watermarking for ID Images on Smart Card Plastic Supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RIAD, R.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Security checking can be improved by watermarking identity (ID images printed on smart cards plastic supports. The major challenge is resistance to attacks: printing the images on the plastic cards, durability and other attacks then scanning the image from the plastic card. In this work, a robust watermarking technique is presented in this context. It is composed of three main mechanisms. The first is a watermarking algorithm based on the Fourier transform to cope with global geometric distortions. The second comprises a filter that reduces image blurring. The third attenuates color degradations. Experiments on 400 ID images show that the Wiener filter strongly improves the detection rate and outperforms competitive algorithms (blind deconvolution and unsharp filter. Color corrections also enhance the watermarking score. The whole scheme has a high efficiency and a low computational cost. It makes it compatible with the desired industrial constraints, i.e. the watermark is to be invisible, the error rate must be lower than 1%, and the detection of the mark should be fast and simple for the user.

  8. Automated magnification calibration in transmission electron microscopy using Fourier analysis of replica images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laak, Jeroen A.W.M. van der; Dijkman, Henry B.P.M.; Pahlplatz, Martin M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The magnification factor in transmission electron microscopy is not very precise, hampering for instance quantitative analysis of specimens. Calibration of the magnification is usually performed interactively using replica specimens, containing line or grating patterns with known spacing. In the present study, a procedure is described for automated magnification calibration using digital images of a line replica. This procedure is based on analysis of the power spectrum of Fourier transformed replica images, and is compared to interactive measurement in the same images. Images were used with magnification ranging from 1,000x to 200,000x. The automated procedure deviated on average 0.10% from interactive measurements. Especially for catalase replicas, the coefficient of variation of automated measurement was considerably smaller (average 0.28%) compared to that of interactive measurement (average 3.5%). In conclusion, calibration of the magnification in digital images from transmission electron microscopy may be performed automatically, using the procedure presented here, with high precision and accuracy

  9. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared imaging of large areas using inverted prism crystals and combining imaging and mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2008-10-01

    Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) imaging is a very useful tool for capturing chemical images of various materials due to the simple sample preparation and the ability to measure wet samples or samples in an aqueous environment. However, the size of the array detector used for image acquisition is often limited and there is usually a trade off between spatial resolution and the field of view (FOV). The combination of mapping and imaging can be used to acquire images with a larger FOV without sacrificing spatial resolution. Previous attempts have demonstrated this using an infrared microscope and a Germanium hemispherical ATR crystal to achieve images of up to 2.5 mm x 2.5 mm but with varying spatial resolution and depth of penetration across the imaged area. In this paper, we demonstrate a combination of mapping and imaging with a different approach using an external optics housing for large ATR accessories and inverted ATR prisms to achieve ATR-FT-IR images with a large FOV and reasonable spatial resolution. The results have shown that a FOV of 10 mm x 14 mm can be obtained with a spatial resolution of approximately 40-60 microm when using an accessory that gives no magnification. A FOV of 1.3 mm x 1.3 mm can be obtained with spatial resolution of approximately 15-20 microm when using a diamond ATR imaging accessory with 4x magnification. No significant change in image quality such as spatial resolution or depth of penetration has been observed across the whole FOV with this method and the measurement time was approximately 15 minutes for an image consisting of 16 image tiles.

  10. High-resolution wave-theory-based ultrasound reflection imaging using the split-step fourier and globally optimized fourier finite-difference methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lianjie

    2013-10-29

    Methods for enhancing ultrasonic reflection imaging are taught utilizing a split-step Fourier propagator in which the reconstruction is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wave number domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wave number domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the tissue being imaged (e.g., breast tissue). Results from various data input to the method indicate significant improvements are provided in both image quality and resolution.

  11. MEMS-based handheld fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography for intraoperative microvascular anastomosis imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Huang

    Full Text Available To demonstrate the feasibility of a miniature handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT imager for real time intraoperative vascular patency evaluation in the setting of super-microsurgical vessel anastomosis.A novel handheld imager Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography based on a 1.3-µm central wavelength swept source for extravascular imaging was developed. The imager was minimized through the adoption of a 2.4-mm diameter microelectromechanical systems (MEMS scanning mirror, additionally a 12.7-mm diameter lens system was designed and combined with the MEMS mirror to achieve a small form factor that optimize functionality as a handheld extravascular OCT imager. To evaluate in-vivo applicability, super-microsurgical vessel anastomosis was performed in a mouse femoral vessel cut and repair model employing conventional interrupted suture technique as well as a novel non-suture cuff technique. Vascular anastomosis patency after clinically successful repair was evaluated using the novel handheld OCT imager.With an adjustable lateral image field of view up to 1.5 mm by 1.5 mm, high-resolution simultaneous structural and flow imaging of the blood vessels were successfully acquired for BALB/C mouse after orthotopic hind limb transplantation using a non-suture cuff technique and BALB/C mouse after femoral artery anastomosis using a suture technique. We experimentally quantify the axial and lateral resolution of the OCT to be 12.6 µm in air and 17.5 µm respectively. The OCT has a sensitivity of 84 dB and sensitivity roll-off of 5.7 dB/mm over an imaging range of 5 mm. Imaging with a frame rate of 36 Hz for an image size of 1000(lateral×512(axial pixels using a 50,000 A-lines per second swept source was achieved. Quantitative vessel lumen patency, lumen narrowing and thrombosis analysis were performed based on acquired structure and Doppler images.A miniature handheld OCT imager that can be used for intraoperative evaluation of

  12. Subwavelength Fourier-transform imaging without a lens or a beamsplitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Rui-Feng; Yuan Xin-Xing; Fang Yi-Zhen; Zhang Pei; Zhou Yu; Gao Hong; Li Fu-Li

    2014-01-01

    The fourier-transform patterns of an object are usually observed in the far-field region or obtained in the near-field region with the help of lenses. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a scheme of Fourier-transform patterns in the Fresnel diffraction region with thermal light. In this scheme, neither a lens nor a beamsplitter is used, and only one single charge coupled device (CCD) is employed. It means that dividing one beam out of a light source into signal and reference beams is not as necessary as the one done by the use of a beamsplitter in usual ghost interference experiments. Moreover, the coincidence measurement of two point detectors is not necessary and data recorded on a single CCD are sufficient for reconstructing the ghost diffraction patterns. The feature of the scheme promises a great potential application in the fields of X-ray and neutron diffraction imaging processes. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  13. Ultrasonic Detection Using Correlation Images (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cepel, Raini; Ho, K. C; Rinker, Brett A; Palmer, Donald D; Neal, Steven P

    2006-01-01

    .... In this paper, we describe an amplitude independent approach for imaging and detection based on the similarity of adjacent signals, quantified by the correlation coefficient calculated between A-scans...

  14. Neurocysticercosis: Correlative pathomorphology and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotz, J.; Hewlett, R.; Alheit, B.; Bowen, R.

    1988-02-01

    CT and MR images of 32 patients with neurocysticercosis were correlated with pathomorphology. Gross morphological features of cystic larvae, complex arachnoid cysts, granulomatous abscesses, basal meningitis and mineralised nodules correlated closely with the images obtained, especially on MR, where resolution permitted visualisation of larval protoscolices. Our material indicates three forms of the natural history of neurocysticercosis related chiefly to anatomic location, and provides details of the evolution of large, complex arachnoid cysts.

  15. Neurocysticercosis: Correlative pathomorphology and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotz, J.; Hewlett, R.; Alheit, B.; Tygerberg Hospital, Stellenbosch; Bowen, R.

    1988-01-01

    CT and MR images of 32 patients with neurocysticercosis were correlated with pathomorphology. Gross morphological features of cystic larvae, complex arachnoid cysts, granulomatous abscesses, basal meningitis and mineralised nodules correlated closely with the images obtained, especially on MR, where resolution permitted visualisation of larval protoscolices. Our material indicates three forms of the natural history of neurocysticercosis related chiefly to anatomic location, and provides details of the evolution of large, complex arachnoid cysts. (orig.)

  16. A Fourier-based compressed sensing technique for accelerated CT image reconstruction using first-order methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kihwan; Li, Ruijiang; Nam, Haewon; Xing, Lei

    2014-01-01

    As a solution to iterative CT image reconstruction, first-order methods are prominent for the large-scale capability and the fast convergence rate O(1/k 2 ). In practice, the CT system matrix with a large condition number may lead to slow convergence speed despite the theoretically promising upper bound. The aim of this study is to develop a Fourier-based scaling technique to enhance the convergence speed of first-order methods applied to CT image reconstruction. Instead of working in the projection domain, we transform the projection data and construct a data fidelity model in Fourier space. Inspired by the filtered backprojection formalism, the data are appropriately weighted in Fourier space. We formulate an optimization problem based on weighted least-squares in the Fourier space and total-variation (TV) regularization in image space for parallel-beam, fan-beam and cone-beam CT geometry. To achieve the maximum computational speed, the optimization problem is solved using a fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm with backtracking line search and GPU implementation of projection/backprojection. The performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated through a series of digital simulation and experimental phantom studies. The results are compared with the existing TV regularized techniques based on statistics-based weighted least-squares as well as basic algebraic reconstruction technique. The proposed Fourier-based compressed sensing (CS) method significantly improves both the image quality and the convergence rate compared to the existing CS techniques. (paper)

  17. A Fourier-based compressed sensing technique for accelerated CT image reconstruction using first-order methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kihwan; Li, Ruijiang; Nam, Haewon; Xing, Lei

    2014-06-21

    As a solution to iterative CT image reconstruction, first-order methods are prominent for the large-scale capability and the fast convergence rate [Formula: see text]. In practice, the CT system matrix with a large condition number may lead to slow convergence speed despite the theoretically promising upper bound. The aim of this study is to develop a Fourier-based scaling technique to enhance the convergence speed of first-order methods applied to CT image reconstruction. Instead of working in the projection domain, we transform the projection data and construct a data fidelity model in Fourier space. Inspired by the filtered backprojection formalism, the data are appropriately weighted in Fourier space. We formulate an optimization problem based on weighted least-squares in the Fourier space and total-variation (TV) regularization in image space for parallel-beam, fan-beam and cone-beam CT geometry. To achieve the maximum computational speed, the optimization problem is solved using a fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm with backtracking line search and GPU implementation of projection/backprojection. The performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated through a series of digital simulation and experimental phantom studies. The results are compared with the existing TV regularized techniques based on statistics-based weighted least-squares as well as basic algebraic reconstruction technique. The proposed Fourier-based compressed sensing (CS) method significantly improves both the image quality and the convergence rate compared to the existing CS techniques.

  18. Imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for 3D cloud profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Carlson, David; Evans, Thomas; Schundler, Elizabeth; Todd, Lori; Mottus, Kathleen

    2010-04-01

    OPTRA has developed an imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared (I-OP-FTIR) spectrometer for 3D profiling of chemical and biological agent simulant plumes released into test ranges and chambers. An array of I-OP-FTIR instruments positioned around the perimeter of the test site, in concert with advanced spectroscopic algorithms, enables real time tomographic reconstruction of the plume. The approach is intended as a referee measurement for test ranges and chambers. This Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) effort combines the instrumentation and spectroscopic capabilities of OPTRA, Inc. with the computed tomographic expertise of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. In this paper, we summarize the design and build and detail system characterization and test of a prototype I-OP-FTIR instrument. System characterization includes radiometric performance and spectral resolution. Results from a series of tomographic reconstructions of sulfur hexafluoride plumes in a laboratory setting are also presented.

  19. Long-distance super-resolution imaging assisted by enhanced spatial Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Heng-He; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2015-09-07

    A new gradient-index (GRIN) lens that can realize enhanced spatial Fourier transform (FT) over optically long distances is demonstrated. By using an anisotropic GRIN metamaterial with hyperbolic dispersion, evanescent wave in free space can be transformed into propagating wave in the metamaterial and then focused outside due to negative-refraction. Both the results based on the ray tracing and the finite element simulation show that the spatial frequency bandwidth of the spatial FT can be extended to 2.7k(0) (k(0) is the wave vector in free space). Furthermore, assisted by the enhanced spatial FT, a new long-distance (in the optical far-field region) super-resolution imaging scheme is also proposed and the super resolved capability of λ/5 (λ is the wavelength in free space) is verified. The work may provide technical support for designing new-type high-speed microscopes with long working distances.

  20. Quantum Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Image Correlation Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Tianxiang; Chen, Jiamin; Pei, Dongju; Zhang, Wenquan; Zhou, Nanrun

    2015-02-01

    A novel quantum gray-level image encryption and decryption algorithm based on image correlation decomposition is proposed. The correlation among image pixels is established by utilizing the superposition and measurement principle of quantum states. And a whole quantum image is divided into a series of sub-images. These sub-images are stored into a complete binary tree array constructed previously and then randomly performed by one of the operations of quantum random-phase gate, quantum revolving gate and Hadamard transform. The encrypted image can be obtained by superimposing the resulting sub-images with the superposition principle of quantum states. For the encryption algorithm, the keys are the parameters of random phase gate, rotation angle, binary sequence and orthonormal basis states. The security and the computational complexity of the proposed algorithm are analyzed. The proposed encryption algorithm can resist brute force attack due to its very large key space and has lower computational complexity than its classical counterparts.

  1. Speckle pattern processing by digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gubarev Fedor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Testing the method of speckle pattern processing based on the digital image correlation is carried out in the current work. Three the most widely used formulas of the correlation coefficient are tested. To determine the accuracy of the speckle pattern processing, test speckle patterns with known displacement are used. The optimal size of a speckle pattern template used for determination of correlation and corresponding the speckle pattern displacement is also considered in the work.

  2. Fast Imaging Detector Readout Circuits with In-Pixel ADCs for Fourier Transform Imaging Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, D.; Blavier, J-F.; Cunningham, T.; Hancock, B.; Key, R.; Pannell, Z.; Sander, S.; Seshadri, S.; Sun, C.; Wrigley, C.

    2011-01-01

    Focal plane arrays (FPAs) with high frame rates and many pixels benefit several upcoming Earth science missions including GEO-CAPE, GACM, and ACE by enabling broader spatial coverage and higher spectral resolution. FPAs for the PanFTS, a high spatial resolution Fourier transform spectrometer and a candidate instrument for the GEO-CAPE mission are the focus of the developments reported here, but this FPA technology has the potential to enable a variety of future measurements and instruments. The ESTO ACT Program funded the developed of a fast readout integrated circuit (ROIC) based on an innovative in-pixel analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC features 60 ?m pixels, a 14-bit ADC in each pixel and operates at a continuous frame rate of 14 kHz consuming only 1.1 W of power. The ROIC outputs digitized data completely eliminating the bulky, power consuming signal chains needed by conventional FPAs. The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC has been fabricated in CMOS and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The current version is designed to be hybridized with PIN photodiode arrays via indium bump bonding for light detection in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. However, the ROIC design incorporates a small photodiode in each cell to permit detailed characterization of the ROICperformance without the need for hybridization. We will describe the essential features of the ROIC design and present results of ROIC performance measurements.

  3. Correction for Eddy Current-Induced Echo-Shifting Effect in Partial-Fourier Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Song, Allen W; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2015-01-01

    In most diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies, images are acquired with either a partial-Fourier or a parallel partial-Fourier echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence, in order to shorten the echo time and increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, eddy currents induced by the diffusion-sensitizing gradients can often lead to a shift of the echo in k-space, resulting in three distinct types of artifacts in partial-Fourier DTI. Here, we present an improved DTI acquisition and reconstruction scheme, capable of generating high-quality and high-SNR DTI data without eddy current-induced artifacts. This new scheme consists of three components, respectively, addressing the three distinct types of artifacts. First, a k-space energy-anchored DTI sequence is designed to recover eddy current-induced signal loss (i.e., Type 1 artifact). Second, a multischeme partial-Fourier reconstruction is used to eliminate artificial signal elevation (i.e., Type 2 artifact) associated with the conventional partial-Fourier reconstruction. Third, a signal intensity correction is applied to remove artificial signal modulations due to eddy current-induced erroneous T2(∗) -weighting (i.e., Type 3 artifact). These systematic improvements will greatly increase the consistency and accuracy of DTI measurements, expanding the utility of DTI in translational applications where quantitative robustness is much needed.

  4. Research on fast Fourier transforms algorithm of huge remote sensing image technology with GPU and partitioning technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Li, Xue-You; Li, Jia-Guo; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Li; Yang, Jan; Du, Quan-Ye

    2014-02-01

    Fast Fourier transforms (FFT) is a basic approach to remote sensing image processing. With the improvement of capacity of remote sensing image capture with the features of hyperspectrum, high spatial resolution and high temporal resolution, how to use FFT technology to efficiently process huge remote sensing image becomes the critical step and research hot spot of current image processing technology. FFT algorithm, one of the basic algorithms of image processing, can be used for stripe noise removal, image compression, image registration, etc. in processing remote sensing image. CUFFT function library is the FFT algorithm library based on CPU and FFTW. FFTW is a FFT algorithm developed based on CPU in PC platform, and is currently the fastest CPU based FFT algorithm function library. However there is a common problem that once the available memory or memory is less than the capacity of image, there will be out of memory or memory overflow when using the above two methods to realize image FFT arithmetic. To address this problem, a CPU and partitioning technology based Huge Remote Fast Fourier Transform (HRFFT) algorithm is proposed in this paper. By improving the FFT algorithm in CUFFT function library, the problem of out of memory and memory overflow is solved. Moreover, this method is proved rational by experiment combined with the CCD image of HJ-1A satellite. When applied to practical image processing, it improves effect of the image processing, speeds up the processing, which saves the time of computation and achieves sound result.

  5. Skeletal MR imaging: Correlation with skeletal scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletti, P.M.; Raval, J.K.; Ford, P.V.; Benson, R.C.; Kerr, R.M.; Boswell, W.D.; Siegel, M.E.; Ralls, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    Skeletal MR images bone marrow while skeletal scintigraphy uses bone metabolism to demonstrate abnormalities. The purpose of this paper is to correlate these MR and scintigraphic findings. T1 and T2 MR images at 0.5 T were correlated with planar bone scintigraphy (RN) using Tc-99m MDP in 56 patients. Of 23 cases with suspected spinal metastases, 19 were positive by MR imaging, 16 by RN. Individual lesions were shown better by MR imaging in five and by RN in two. These two cases had scoliosis, a potential difficulty with MR imaging. In 14 cases of suspected avascular necrosis (AVN), MR imaging was positive in 13 while RN was positive in ten. One negative case by RN had bilateral AVN by MR imaging. Four skull lesions shown easily by RN were seen only in retrospect on MR images. MR imaging is advantageous in evaluating bones with predominant marrow such as vertebrae or the femoral head, while RN is superior in areas primarily composed of cortical bone such as the skull

  6. Atmospheric Transmission Measurements Using IR Lasers, Fourier Transform Spectroscopy, and Gas-Filter Correlation Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dowling, J

    1977-01-01

    ... and a gas filter correlation spectrometer. Results obtained from three concurrent experiments used to generate a data base appropriate to high resolution transmission model validation are displayed...

  7. Measurement of spatial correlation functions using image processing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for using digital image processing techniques to measure the spatial correlation functions of composite heterogeneous materials is presented. Methods for eliminating undesirable biases and warping in digitized photographs are discussed. Fourier transform methods and array processor techniques for calculating the spatial correlation functions are treated. By introducing a minimal set of lattice-commensurate triangles, a method of sorting and storing the values of three-point correlation functions in a compact one-dimensional array is developed. Examples are presented at each stage of the analysis using synthetic photographs of cross sections of a model random material (the penetrable sphere model) for which the analytical form of the spatial correlations functions is known. Although results depend somewhat on magnification and on relative volume fraction, it is found that photographs digitized with 512 x 512 pixels generally have sufficiently good statistics for most practical purposes. To illustrate the use of the correlation functions, bounds on conductivity for the penetrable sphere model are calculated with a general numerical scheme developed for treating the singular three-dimensional integrals which must be evaluated

  8. Design and implementation in VHDL code of the two-dimensional fast Fourier transform for frequency filtering, convolution and correlation operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardy, Juan M.; Giacometto, F.; Torres, C. O.; Mattos, L.

    2011-01-01

    The two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (FFT 2D) is an essential tool in the two-dimensional discrete signals analysis and processing, which allows developing a large number of applications. This article shows the description and synthesis in VHDL code of the FFT 2D with fixed point binary representation using the programming tool Simulink HDL Coder of Matlab; showing a quick and easy way to handle overflow, underflow and the creation registers, adders and multipliers of complex data in VHDL and as well as the generation of test bench for verification of the codes generated in the ModelSim tool. The main objective of development of the hardware architecture of the FFT 2D focuses on the subsequent completion of the following operations applied to images: frequency filtering, convolution and correlation. The description and synthesis of the hardware architecture uses the XC3S1200E family Spartan 3E FPGA from Xilinx Manufacturer.

  9. Agreement between Gonioscopic Examination and Swept Source Fourier Domain Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Rigi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate interobserver, intervisit, and interinstrument agreements for gonioscopy and Fourier domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (FD ASOCT for classifying open and narrow angle eyes. Methods. Eighty-six eyes with open or narrow anterior chamber angles were included. The superior angle was classified open or narrow by 2 of 5 glaucoma specialists using gonioscopy and imaged by FD ASOCT in the dark. The superior angle of each FD ASOCT image was graded as open or narrow by 2 masked readers. The same procedures were repeated within 6 months. Kappas for interobserver and intervisit agreements for each instrument and interinstrument agreements were calculated. Results. The mean age was 50.9 (±18.4 years. Interobserver agreements were moderate to good for both gonioscopy (0.57 and 0.69 and FD ASOCT (0.58 and 0.75. Intervisit agreements were moderate to excellent for both gonioscopy (0.53 to 0.86 and FD ASOCT (0.57 and 0.85. Interinstrument agreements were fair to good (0.34 to 0.63, with FD ASOCT classifying more angles as narrow than gonioscopy. Conclusions. Both gonioscopy and FD ASOCT examiners were internally consistent with similar interobserver and intervisit agreements for angle classification. Agreement between instruments was fair to good, with FD ASOCT classifying more angles as narrow than gonioscopy.

  10. Agreement between Gonioscopic Examination and Swept Source Fourier Domain Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Donna; Minnal, Vandana R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate interobserver, intervisit, and interinstrument agreements for gonioscopy and Fourier domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (FD ASOCT) for classifying open and narrow angle eyes. Methods. Eighty-six eyes with open or narrow anterior chamber angles were included. The superior angle was classified open or narrow by 2 of 5 glaucoma specialists using gonioscopy and imaged by FD ASOCT in the dark. The superior angle of each FD ASOCT image was graded as open or narrow by 2 masked readers. The same procedures were repeated within 6 months. Kappas for interobserver and intervisit agreements for each instrument and interinstrument agreements were calculated. Results. The mean age was 50.9 (±18.4) years. Interobserver agreements were moderate to good for both gonioscopy (0.57 and 0.69) and FD ASOCT (0.58 and 0.75). Intervisit agreements were moderate to excellent for both gonioscopy (0.53 to 0.86) and FD ASOCT (0.57 and 0.85). Interinstrument agreements were fair to good (0.34 to 0.63), with FD ASOCT classifying more angles as narrow than gonioscopy. Conclusions. Both gonioscopy and FD ASOCT examiners were internally consistent with similar interobserver and intervisit agreements for angle classification. Agreement between instruments was fair to good, with FD ASOCT classifying more angles as narrow than gonioscopy. PMID:27990300

  11. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy microscopic imaging classification based on spatial-spectral features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lian; Yang, Xiukun; Zhong, Mingliang; Liu, Yao; Jing, Xiaojun; Yang, Qin

    2018-04-01

    The discrete fractional Brownian incremental random (DFBIR) field is used to describe the irregular, random, and highly complex shapes of natural objects such as coastlines and biological tissues, for which traditional Euclidean geometry cannot be used. In this paper, an anisotropic variable window (AVW) directional operator based on the DFBIR field model is proposed for extracting spatial characteristics of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) microscopic imaging. Probabilistic principal component analysis first extracts spectral features, and then the spatial features of the proposed AVW directional operator are combined with the former to construct a spatial-spectral structure, which increases feature-related information and helps a support vector machine classifier to obtain more efficient distribution-related information. Compared to Haralick’s grey-level co-occurrence matrix, Gabor filters, and local binary patterns (e.g. uniform LBPs, rotation-invariant LBPs, uniform rotation-invariant LBPs), experiments on three FTIR spectroscopy microscopic imaging datasets show that the proposed AVW directional operator is more advantageous in terms of classification accuracy, particularly for low-dimensional spaces of spatial characteristics.

  12. Image encryption based on fractal-structured phase mask in fractional Fourier transform domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng-Dan; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2018-04-01

    We present an optical encryption approach based on the combination of fractal Fresnel lens (FFL) and fractional Fourier transform (FrFT). Our encryption approach is in fact a four-fold encryption scheme, including the random phase encoding produced by the Gerchberg–Saxton algorithm, a FFL, and two FrFTs. A FFL is composed of a Sierpinski carpet fractal plate and a Fresnel zone plate. In our encryption approach, the security is enhanced due to the more expandable key spaces and the use of FFL overcomes the alignment problem of the optical axis in optical system. Only using the perfectly matched parameters of the FFL and the FrFT, the plaintext can be recovered well. We present an image encryption algorithm that from the ciphertext we can get two original images by the FrFT with two different phase distribution keys, obtained by performing 100 iterations between the two plaintext and ciphertext, respectively. We test the sensitivity of our approach to various parameters such as the wavelength of light, the focal length of FFL, and the fractional orders of FrFT. Our approach can resist various attacks.

  13. Detection of fast oscillating magnetic fields using dynamic multiple TR imaging and Fourier analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Hwan Kim

    Full Text Available Neuronal oscillations produce oscillating magnetic fields. There have been trials to detect neuronal oscillations using MRI, but the detectability in in vivo is still in debate. Major obstacles to detecting neuronal oscillations are (i weak amplitudes, (ii fast oscillations, which are faster than MRI temporal resolution, and (iii random frequencies and on/off intervals. In this study, we proposed a new approach for direct detection of weak and fast oscillating magnetic fields. The approach consists of (i dynamic acquisitions using multiple times to repeats (TRs and (ii an expanded frequency spectral analysis. Gradient echo echo-planar imaging was used to test the feasibility of the proposed approach with a phantom generating oscillating magnetic fields with various frequencies and amplitudes and random on/off intervals. The results showed that the proposed approach could precisely detect the weak and fast oscillating magnetic fields with random frequencies and on/off intervals. Complex and phase spectra showed reliable signals, while no meaningful signals were observed in magnitude spectra. A two-TR approach provided an absolute frequency spectrum above Nyquist sampling frequency pixel by pixel with no a priori target frequency information. The proposed dynamic multiple-TR imaging and Fourier analysis are promising for direct detection of neuronal oscillations and potentially applicable to any pulse sequences.

  14. Ghost imaging based on Pearson correlation coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Wen-Kai; Yao Xu-Ri; Liu Xue-Feng; Li Long-Zhen; Zhai Guang-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Correspondence imaging is a new modality of ghost imaging, which can retrieve a positive/negative image by simple conditional averaging of the reference frames that correspond to relatively large/small values of the total intensity measured at the bucket detector. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a more rigorous and general approach in which a ghost image is retrieved by calculating a Pearson correlation coefficient between the bucket detector intensity and the brightness at a given pixel of the reference frames, and at the next pixel, and so on. Furthermore, we theoretically provide a statistical interpretation of these two imaging phenomena, and explain how the error depends on the sample size and what kind of distribution the error obeys. According to our analysis, the image signal-to-noise ratio can be greatly improved and the sampling number reduced by means of our new method. (paper)

  15. OPTICAL correlation identification technology applied in underwater laser imaging target identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Guang-tao; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Ge, Wei-long

    2012-01-01

    The underwater laser imaging detection is an effective method of detecting short distance target underwater as an important complement of sonar detection. With the development of underwater laser imaging technology and underwater vehicle technology, the underwater automatic target identification has gotten more and more attention, and is a research difficulty in the area of underwater optical imaging information processing. Today, underwater automatic target identification based on optical imaging is usually realized with the method of digital circuit software programming. The algorithm realization and control of this method is very flexible. However, the optical imaging information is 2D image even 3D image, the amount of imaging processing information is abundant, so the electronic hardware with pure digital algorithm will need long identification time and is hard to meet the demands of real-time identification. If adopt computer parallel processing, the identification speed can be improved, but it will increase complexity, size and power consumption. This paper attempts to apply optical correlation identification technology to realize underwater automatic target identification. The optics correlation identification technology utilizes the Fourier transform characteristic of Fourier lens which can accomplish Fourier transform of image information in the level of nanosecond, and optical space interconnection calculation has the features of parallel, high speed, large capacity and high resolution, combines the flexibility of calculation and control of digital circuit method to realize optoelectronic hybrid identification mode. We reduce theoretical formulation of correlation identification and analyze the principle of optical correlation identification, and write MATLAB simulation program. We adopt single frame image obtained in underwater range gating laser imaging to identify, and through identifying and locating the different positions of target, we can improve

  16. A method of mössbauer fourier spectroscopy for determination of the biopolimer coordinate correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basovets, S. K.; Uporov, I. V.; Shaitan, K. V.; Krupyanskii, Yu. F.; Kurinov, I. V.; Suzdalev, I. P.; Rubin, A. B.; Goldanskii, V. I.

    1988-12-01

    A method of Mössbauer Fourier spectroscopy is developed to determine the correlation function of coordinates of a macromolecular system. The method does not require the use of an a priori dynamic model. The application of the method to the analysis of RSMR data for human serum albumin has demonstrated considerable changes in the dynamic behavior of the protein globule when the temperature is changed from 270 to 310 K. The main conclusions of the present work is the simultaneous observation of low-frequency (τ≥10-9 sec) and high-frequency (τ≪10-9 sec) large-scaled motions, that is the two-humped distribution of correlation times of protein motions.

  17. The propagation of stochastic pixel noise into magnitude and phase values in the Fourier analysis of digital images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, J.E.; Halama, J.R.; Hasegawa, B.H.

    1986-01-01

    The use of Fourier analysis in nuclear medicine gated blood ventriculography provides a useful example of the application of Fourier methods to digital medical imaging. In particular, the nuclear medicine experience demonstrates that there is diagnostic significance not only in the pixel averages of temporal Fourier magnitude and phase computed in various image regions, but also in the distributions of the individual pixel values about those averages. However, a region containing pixels that are perfectly synchronous on average would still yield a finite distribution of calculated Fourier coefficients due to the propagation of stochastic pixel noise into the calculated values. The authors have studied this noise component of both the magnitude and phase distributions using phantom studies and computer simulation. In both approaches, several thousand one-pixel 'ventriculograms' were generated, all identical to each other except for stochastic noise. Fourier magnitudes and phases at several frequencies were calculated and histograms generated. A theoretical prediction of the distributions was developed and shown to fit the experimental results well. The authors' formalism can be used to estimate study count requirements or, for fixed study counts, to assess the stochastic noise contribution in the interpretation of measured phase and magnitude distributions. (author)

  18. Proposal of AAA-battery-size one-shot ATR Fourier spectroscopic imager for on-site analysis: Simultaneous measurement of multi-components with high accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Satsuki; Qi, Wei; Sato, Shun; Suzuki, Yo; Fujiwara, Masaru; Hiramatsu, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satoru; Abeygunawardhana, P. K. W.; Wada, Kenji; Nishiyama, Akira; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    For simultaneous measurement of multi-components on-site like factories, the ultra-compact (diameter: 9[mm], length: 45[mm], weight: 200[g]) one-shot ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) Fourier spectroscopic imager was proposed. Because the proposed one-shot Fourier spectroscopic imaging is based on spatial-phase-shift interferometer, interferograms could be obtained with simple optical configurations. We introduced the transmission-type relativeinclined phase-shifter, that was constructed with a cuboid prism and a wedge prism, onto the optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected optical systems. And also, small light-sources and cameras in the mid-infrared light region, whose size are several millimeter on a side, are essential components for the ultra-compact spectroscopic configuration. We selected the Graphite light source (light source area: 1.7×1.7[mm], maker: Hawkeye technologies) whose radiation factor was high. Fortunately, in these days we could apply the cost-effective 2-dimensional light receiving device for smartphone (e.g. product name: LEPTON, maker: FLIR, price: around 400USD). In the case of alcoholic drinks factory, conventionally workers measure glucose and ethanol concentrations by bringing liquid solution back to laboratories every day. The high portable spectroscopy will make it possible to measure multi-components simultaneously on manufacturing scene. But we found experimentally that absorption spectrum of glucose and water and ethanol were overlapped each other in near infrared light region. But for mid-infrared light region, we could distinguish specific absorption peaks of glucose (@10.5[μm]) and ethanol (@11.5[μm]) independently from water absorption. We obtained standard curve between absorption (@9.6[μm]) and ethanol concentration with high correlation coefficient 0.98 successfully by ATR imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy (wavelength resolution: 0.057[μm]) with the graphite light source (maker: Hawkeye

  19. Reliability-guided digital image correlation for image deformation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Bing

    2009-01-01

    A universally applicable reliability-guided digital image correlation (DIC) method is proposed for reliable image deformation measurement. The zero-mean normalized cross correlation (ZNCC) coefficient is used to identify the reliability of the point computed. The correlation calculation begins with a seed point and is then guided by the ZNCC coefficient. That means the neighbors of the point with the highest ZNCC coefficient in a queue for computed points will be processed first. Thus the calculation path is always along the most reliable direction, and possible error propagation of the conventional DIC method can be avoided. The proposed novel DIC method is universally applicable to the images with shadows, discontinuous areas, and deformation discontinuity. Two image pairs were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique, and the successful results clearly demonstrate its robustness and effectiveness

  20. Fourier Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (FIXS) for the Argentinian, Scout-launched satelite de Aplicaciones Cienficas-1 (SAC-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, B.R.; Crannell, C.J.; Desai, U.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Fourier Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (FIXS) is one of four instruments on SAC-1, the Argentinian satellite being proposed for launch by NASA on a Scout rocket in 1992/3. The FIXS is designed to provide solar flare images at X-ray energies between 5 and 35 keV. Observations will be made on arcsecond size scales and subsecond time scales of the processes that modify the electron spectrum and the thermal distribution in flaring magnetic structures

  1. Interferogram conditioning for improved Fourier analysis and application to X-ray phase imaging by grating interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaux-Lambert, Antoine; Mercère, Pascal; Primot, Jérôme

    2015-11-02

    An interferogram conditioning procedure, for subsequent phase retrieval by Fourier demodulation, is presented here as a fast iterative approach aiming at fulfilling the classical boundary conditions imposed by Fourier transform techniques. Interference fringe patterns with typical edge discontinuities were simulated in order to reveal the edge artifacts that classically appear in traditional Fourier analysis, and were consecutively used to demonstrate the correction efficiency of the proposed conditioning technique. Optimization of the algorithm parameters is also presented and discussed. Finally, the procedure was applied to grating-based interferometric measurements performed in the hard X-ray regime. The proposed algorithm enables nearly edge-artifact-free retrieval of the phase derivatives. A similar enhancement of the retrieved absorption and fringe visibility images is also achieved.

  2. Discrete Fourier Transform-Based Multivariate Image Analysis: Application to Modeling of Aromatase Inhibitory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barigye, Stephen J; Freitas, Matheus P; Ausina, Priscila; Zancan, Patricia; Sola-Penna, Mauro; Castillo-Garit, Juan A

    2018-02-12

    We recently generalized the formerly alignment-dependent multivariate image analysis applied to quantitative structure-activity relationships (MIA-QSAR) method through the application of the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), allowing for its application to noncongruent and structurally diverse chemical compound data sets. Here we report the first practical application of this method in the screening of molecular entities of therapeutic interest, with human aromatase inhibitory activity as the case study. We developed an ensemble classification model based on the two-dimensional (2D) DFT MIA-QSAR descriptors, with which we screened the NCI Diversity Set V (1593 compounds) and obtained 34 chemical compounds with possible aromatase inhibitory activity. These compounds were docked into the aromatase active site, and the 10 most promising compounds were selected for in vitro experimental validation. Of these compounds, 7419 (nonsteroidal) and 89 201 (steroidal) demonstrated satisfactory antiproliferative and aromatase inhibitory activities. The obtained results suggest that the 2D-DFT MIA-QSAR method may be useful in ligand-based virtual screening of new molecular entities of therapeutic utility.

  3. Cryo-EM image alignment based on nonuniform fast Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengfan; Penczek, Pawel A

    2008-08-01

    In single particle analysis, two-dimensional (2-D) alignment is a fundamental step intended to put into register various particle projections of biological macromolecules collected at the electron microscope. The efficiency and quality of three-dimensional (3-D) structure reconstruction largely depends on the computational speed and alignment accuracy of this crucial step. In order to improve the performance of alignment, we introduce a new method that takes advantage of the highly accurate interpolation scheme based on the gridding method, a version of the nonuniform fast Fourier transform, and utilizes a multi-dimensional optimization algorithm for the refinement of the orientation parameters. Using simulated data, we demonstrate that by using less than half of the sample points and taking twice the runtime, our new 2-D alignment method achieves dramatically better alignment accuracy than that based on quadratic interpolation. We also apply our method to image to volume registration, the key step in the single particle EM structure refinement protocol. We find that in this case the accuracy of the method not only surpasses the accuracy of the commonly used real-space implementation, but results are achieved in much shorter time, making gridding-based alignment a perfect candidate for efficient structure determination in single particle analysis.

  4. Cryo-EM image alignment based on nonuniform fast Fourier transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhengfan; Penczek, Pawel A.

    2008-01-01

    In single particle analysis, two-dimensional (2-D) alignment is a fundamental step intended to put into register various particle projections of biological macromolecules collected at the electron microscope. The efficiency and quality of three-dimensional (3-D) structure reconstruction largely depends on the computational speed and alignment accuracy of this crucial step. In order to improve the performance of alignment, we introduce a new method that takes advantage of the highly accurate interpolation scheme based on the gridding method, a version of the nonuniform fast Fourier transform, and utilizes a multi-dimensional optimization algorithm for the refinement of the orientation parameters. Using simulated data, we demonstrate that by using less than half of the sample points and taking twice the runtime, our new 2-D alignment method achieves dramatically better alignment accuracy than that based on quadratic interpolation. We also apply our method to image to volume registration, the key step in the single particle EM structure refinement protocol. We find that in this case the accuracy of the method not only surpasses the accuracy of the commonly used real-space implementation, but results are achieved in much shorter time, making gridding-based alignment a perfect candidate for efficient structure determination in single particle analysis

  5. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging and multivariate regression for prediction of proteoglycan content of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassi Rieppo

    Full Text Available Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging has been earlier applied for the spatial estimation of the collagen and the proteoglycan (PG contents of articular cartilage (AC. However, earlier studies have been limited to the use of univariate analysis techniques. Current analysis methods lack the needed specificity for collagen and PGs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of partial least squares regression (PLSR and principal component regression (PCR methods for the analysis of the PG content of AC. Multivariate regression models were compared with earlier used univariate methods and tested with a sample material consisting of healthy and enzymatically degraded steer AC. Chondroitinase ABC enzyme was used to increase the variation in PG content levels as compared to intact AC. Digital densitometric measurements of Safranin O-stained sections provided the reference for PG content. The results showed that multivariate regression models predict PG content of AC significantly better than earlier used absorbance spectrum (i.e. the area of carbohydrate region with or without amide I normalization or second derivative spectrum univariate parameters. Increased molecular specificity favours the use of multivariate regression models, but they require more knowledge of chemometric analysis and extended laboratory resources for gathering reference data for establishing the models. When true molecular specificity is required, the multivariate models should be used.

  6. Practical protocols for fast histopathology by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Frances N.; Reddy, Rohith K.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2008-02-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is an emerging technique that combines the molecular selectivity of spectroscopy with the spatial specificity of optical microscopy. We demonstrate a new concept in obtaining high fidelity data using commercial array detectors coupled to a microscope and Michelson interferometer. Next, we apply the developed technique to rapidly provide automated histopathologic information for breast cancer. Traditionally, disease diagnoses are based on optical examinations of stained tissue and involve a skilled recognition of morphological patterns of specific cell types (histopathology). Consequently, histopathologic determinations are a time consuming, subjective process with innate intra- and inter-operator variability. Utilizing endogenous molecular contrast inherent in vibrational spectra, specially designed tissue microarrays and pattern recognition of specific biochemical features, we report an integrated algorithm for automated classifications. The developed protocol is objective, statistically significant and, being compatible with current tissue processing procedures, holds potential for routine clinical diagnoses. We first demonstrate that the classification of tissue type (histology) can be accomplished in a manner that is robust and rigorous. Since data quality and classifier performance are linked, we quantify the relationship through our analysis model. Last, we demonstrate the application of the minimum noise fraction (MNF) transform to improve tissue segmentation.

  7. ORBS: A data reduction software for the imaging Fourier transform spectrometers SpIOMM and SITELLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T.; Drissen, L.; Joncas, G.

    2012-09-01

    SpIOMM (Spectromètre-Imageur de l'Observatoire du Mont Mégantic) is still the only operational astronomical Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) capable of obtaining the visible spectrum of every source of light in a field of view of 12 arc-minutes. Even if it has been designed to work with both outputs of the Michelson interferometer, up to now only one output has been used. Here we present ORBS (Outils de Réduction Binoculaire pour SpIOMM/SITELLE), the reduction software we designed in order to take advantage of the two output data. ORBS will also be used to reduce the data of SITELLE (Spectromètre-Imageur pour l' Étude en Long et en Large des raies d' Émissions) { the direct successor of SpIOMM, which will be in operation at the Canada-France- Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) in early 2013. SITELLE will deliver larger data cubes than SpIOMM (up to 2 cubes of 34 Go each). We thus have made a strong effort in optimizing its performance efficiency in terms of speed and memory usage in order to ensure the best compliance with the quality characteristics discussed with the CFHT team. As a result ORBS is now capable of reducing 68 Go of data in less than 20 hours using only 5 Go of random-access memory (RAM).

  8. Correlation in the statistical analysis of a reverse Fourier neutron time-of-flight experiment. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilli, K.J.

    1982-01-01

    The significance of the correlation in the statistical analysis of reverse Fourier neutron time-of-flight observations has been evaluated by applying different methods of estimation to diffraction patterns containing peaks with Gaussian line shapes. Effects of the correlation between adjacent channels of a spectrum arise both from the incorrect weighting of the experiment's independent variables and from the misinterpretation of the number of independent observations in the data. The incorrect weighting bears the greatest effects on the width parameter of a Gaussian profile, and it leads to an increase in the relative weights of the broadest peaks of the diffraction pattern. If the correlation is ignored in the analysis, the estimates obtained for the parameters of a model will not be exactly the same as those evaluated from the minimum variance estimation, in which the correlation is taken into account. However, the differences will not be statistically significant. Nevertheless, the standard deviations will then be underestimated typically by a factor of two, which will have serious consequences on every aspect of the statistical inference. (orig.)

  9. Radiometric modeling and calibration of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) ground based measurement experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.; Gazarik, Michael J.

    2008-12-01

    The ultimate remote sensing benefits of the high resolution Infrared radiance spectrometers will be realized with their geostationary satellite implementation in the form of imaging spectrometers. This will enable dynamic features of the atmosphere's thermodynamic fields and pollutant and greenhouse gas constituents to be observed for revolutionary improvements in weather forecasts and more accurate air quality and climate predictions. As an important step toward realizing this application objective, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) was successfully developed under the NASA New Millennium Program, 2000-2006. The GIFTS-EDU instrument employs three focal plane arrays (FPAs), which gather measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The GIFTS calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient (260 K) and hot (286 K) temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes Principle Component (PC) analysis to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, enhancing the absolute calibration accuracy. This method is applied to data collected during the GIFTS Ground Based Measurement (GBM) experiment, together with simultaneous observations by the accurately calibrated AERI (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer), both simultaneously zenith viewing the sky through the same external scene mirror at ten-minute intervals throughout a cloudless day at Logan Utah on September 13, 2006. The accurately calibrated GIFTS radiances are produced using the first four PC scores in the GIFTS-AERI regression model. Temperature and moisture profiles retrieved from the PC-calibrated GIFTS radiances are verified against radiosonde measurements collected throughout the GIFTS sky measurement period. Using the GIFTS GBM calibration model, we compute the calibrated radiances from data

  10. Fourier transform infrared imaging and infrared fiber optic probe spectroscopy identify collagen type in connective tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Hanifi

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage and mechanically inferior fibrocartilage consisting of mixed collagen types are frequently found together in repairing articular cartilage. The present study seeks to develop methodology to identify collagen type and other tissue components using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectral evaluation of matrix composition in combination with multivariate analyses. FTIR spectra of the primary molecular components of repair cartilage, types I and II collagen, and aggrecan, were used to develop multivariate spectral models for discrimination of the matrix components of the tissues of interest. Infrared imaging data were collected from bovine bone, tendon, normal cartilage, meniscus and human repair cartilage tissues, and composition predicted using partial least squares analyses. Histology and immunohistochemistry results were used as standards for validation. Infrared fiber optic probe spectral data were also obtained from meniscus (a tissue with mixed collagen types to evaluate the potential of this method for identification of collagen type in a minimally-invasive clinical application. Concentration profiles of the tissue components obtained from multivariate analysis were in excellent agreement with histology and immunohistochemistry results. Bone and tendon showed a uniform distribution of predominantly type I collagen through the tissue. Normal cartilage showed a distribution of type II collagen and proteoglycan similar to the known composition, while in repair cartilage, the spectral distribution of both types I and II collagen were similar to that observed via immunohistochemistry. Using the probe, the outer and inner regions of the meniscus were shown to be primarily composed of type I and II collagen, respectively, in accordance with immunohistochemistry data. In summary, multivariate analysis of infrared spectra can indeed be used to differentiate collagen type I and type II, even in the presence of proteoglycan, in

  11. Fourier Transform Near Infrared Microspectroscopy, Infrared Chemical Imaging, High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Microspectroscopy Detection of Single Cancer Cells and Single Viral Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu,I C; Hofmann, N E; Korban, S S; Lozano, P; You, T

    2004-01-01

    Single Cancer Cells from Human tumors are being detected and imaged by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Fourier Transform Near Infrared (FT-NIR)Hyperspectral Imaging and Fluorescence Correlation Microspectroscopy. The first FT-NIR chemical, microscopic images of biological systems approaching one micron resolution are here reported. Chemical images obtained by FT-NIR and FT-IR Microspectroscopy are also presented for oil in soybean seeds and somatic embryos under physiological conditions. FT-NIR spectra of oil and proteins were obtained for volumes as small as two cubic microns. Related, HR-NMR analyses of oil contents in somatic embryos as well as 99% accurate calibrations are also presented here with nanoliter precision. Such high-resolution, 400 MHz H-1 NMR analyses allowed the selection of mutagenized embryos with higher oil content (e.g. >~20%) compared to the average levels in non-mutagenized control embryos. Moreover, developmental changes in single soybean seeds and/or somatic embryos may be monito...

  12. Prospects for the design of an ultraviolet imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    Recent results from solar observations in the far and extremeultraviolet (FUV/EUV) obtained from SOHO (SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory) and TRACE (Transition Region Camera) show the extreme variability of the solar atmosphere. Within the limited resolution of the instruments (1-2 arcseconds) horizontal and vertical velocities up-to 100 to 400 km s-1 have been measured. With an horizontal velocity of 100 km s-1 an one arsecond structure crosses the one arcsecond slit width of a classical slit spectrometer in less than 10 seconds. In the future, with higher angular resolution (e.g. 0.1 arcsecond), the capability to study small structures will be greatly reduced by a classical slit spectrometer. To be able to characterize the small scale solar atmospheric structures formed in the 104 K to 106 K temperature range (which emit in the 30 to 180 nm wavelength range) a spectrometer without slit (or with wide slit) is required. At the same time to obtain an accurate measurement of the doppler velocity an high spectral resolution is needed. The two requirements, high spectral resolution and large slit, are difficult to be simultaneously fulfilled with a classical slit spectrometer within the limited volume of a space instrumentation. Also, we propose to use an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) to provide simultaneously a bidimensionnal field and an accurate determination of line profiles and positions. The development of Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS), although popular in the infrared, has been very limited in the UV/FUV by the lack of very high quality beam splitter. Since 10 years, the use of diffraction gratings as beam splitters has been suggested and few intruments have been built ([Chak 94]; [Clea 92]; [File 00]). These instruments illustrate some applications in the new wavelength domain opened by using a beam splitter grating, but do not yet provide the full capabilities of an FTS. In this paper we present several optical schemes which can

  13. Physicochemical properties determining the detection probability of tryptic peptides in Fourier transform mass spectrometry. A correlation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael L; Savitski, Mikhail M; Kjeldsen, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Sequence verification and mapping of posttranslational modifications require nearly 100% sequence coverage in the "bottom-up" protein analysis. Even in favorable cases, routine liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detects from protein digests peptides covering 50-90% of the sequence. Here we...... investigated the reasons for limited peptide detection, considering various physicochemical aspects of peptide behavior in liquid chromatography-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LC-FTMS). No overall correlation was found between the detection probability and peptide mass. In agreement with literature data...... between pI and signal response. An explanation of this paradoxal behavior was found through the observation that more acidic tryptic peptide lengths tend to be longer. Longer peptides tend to acquire higher average charge state in positive mode electrospray ionization than more basic but shorter...

  14. Evaluation of alias-less reconstruction by pseudo-parallel imaging in a phase-scrambling fourier transform technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Satoshi; Kawawa, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Yoshifumi

    2010-01-01

    We propose an image reconstruction technique in which parallel image reconstruction is performed based on the sensitivity encoding (SENSE) algorithm using only a single set of signals. The signal obtained in the phase-scrambling Fourier transform (PSFT) imaging technique can be transformed to the signal described by the Fresnel transform of the objects, which is known as the diffracted wave-front equation of the object in acoustics or optics. Since the Fresnel transform is a convolution integral on the object space, the space where the PSFT signal exists can be considered as both in the Fourier domain and in the object domain. This notable feature indicates that weighting functions corresponding to the sensitivity of radiofrequency (RF) coils can be approximately given in the PSFT signal space. Therefore, we can obtain two folded images from a single set of signals with different weighting functions, and image reconstruction based on the SENSE parallel imaging algorithm is possible using a series of folded images. Simulation and experimental studies showed that almost alias-free images can be synthesized using a single signal that does not satisfy the sampling theorem. (author)

  15. Application of fast Fourier transform cross-correlation and mass spectrometry data for accurate alignment of chromatograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi-Bao; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Liang, Yi-Zeng; Zhan, De-Jian; Huang, Jian-Hua; Yun, Yong-Huan; Xie, Hua-Lin

    2013-04-19

    Chromatography has been established as one of the most important analytical methods in the modern analytical laboratory. However, preprocessing of the chromatograms, especially peak alignment, is usually a time-consuming task prior to extracting useful information from the datasets because of the small unavoidable differences in the experimental conditions caused by minor changes and drift. Most of the alignment algorithms are performed on reduced datasets using only the detected peaks in the chromatograms, which means a loss of data and introduces the problem of extraction of peak data from the chromatographic profiles. These disadvantages can be overcome by using the full chromatographic information that is generated from hyphenated chromatographic instruments. A new alignment algorithm called CAMS (Chromatogram Alignment via Mass Spectra) is present here to correct the retention time shifts among chromatograms accurately and rapidly. In this report, peaks of each chromatogram were detected based on Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) with Haar wavelet and were aligned against the reference chromatogram via the correlation of mass spectra. The aligning procedure was accelerated by Fast Fourier Transform cross correlation (FFT cross correlation). This approach has been compared with several well-known alignment methods on real chromatographic datasets, which demonstrates that CAMS can preserve the shape of peaks and achieve a high quality alignment result. Furthermore, the CAMS method was implemented in the Matlab language and available as an open source package at http://www.github.com/matchcoder/CAMS. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Radiometric and spectral calibrations of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) using principle component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.; Gazarik, Michael J.

    2008-10-01

    The ultimate remote sensing benefits of the high resolution Infrared radiance spectrometers will be realized with their geostationary satellite implementation in the form of imaging spectrometers. This will enable dynamic features of the atmosphere's thermodynamic fields and pollutant and greenhouse gas constituents to be observed for revolutionary improvements in weather forecasts and more accurate air quality and climate predictions. As an important step toward realizing this application objective, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) was successfully developed under the NASA New Millennium Program, 2000-2006. The GIFTS-EDU instrument employs three focal plane arrays (FPAs), which gather measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The raw GIFTS interferogram measurements are radiometrically and spectrally calibrated to produce radiance spectra, which are further processed to obtain atmospheric profiles via retrieval algorithms. The radiometric calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient (260 K) and hot (286 K) temperatures. The absolute radiometric performance of the instrument is affected by several factors including the FPA off-axis effect, detector/readout electronics induced nonlinearity distortions, and fore-optics offsets. The GIFTS-EDU, being the very first imaging spectrometer to use ultra-high speed electronics to readout its large area format focal plane array detectors, operating at wavelengths as large as 15 microns, possessed non-linearity's not easily removable in the initial calibration process. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes Principle Component (PC) analysis to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts remaining after the initial radiometric calibration process, thus, further enhance the absolute calibration accuracy. This method is

  17. Correlation between peak energy and Fourier power density spectrum slope in gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichiara, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Amati, L.; Frontera, F.; Margutti, R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The origin of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission still defies explanation, in spite of recent progress made, for example, on the occasional presence of a thermal component in the spectrum along with the ubiquitous non-thermal component that is modelled with a Band function. The combination of finite duration and aperiodic modulations make GRBs hard to characterise temporally. Although correlations between GRB luminosity and spectral hardness on one side and time variability on the other side have long been known, the loose and often arbitrary definition of the latter makes the interpretation uncertain. Aims: We characterise the temporal variability in an objective way and search for a connection with rest-frame spectral properties for a number of well-observed GRBs. Methods: We studied the individual power density spectra (PDS) of 123 long GRBs with measured redshift, rest-frame peak energy Ep,I of the time-averaged ν Fν spectrum, and well-constrained PDS slope α detected with Swift, Fermi and past spacecraft. The PDS were modelled with a power law either with or without a break adopting a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. Results: We find a highly significant Ep,I-α anti-correlation. The null hypothesis probability is ~10-9. Conclusions: In the framework of the internal shock synchrotron model, the Ep,I-α anti-correlation can hardly be reconciled with the predicted Ep,I ∝ Γ-2, unless either variable microphysical parameters of the shocks or continual electron acceleration are assumed. Alternatively, in the context of models based on magnetic reconnection, the PDS slope and Ep,I are linked to the ejecta magnetisation at the dissipation site, so that more magnetised outflows would produce more variable GRB light curves at short timescales (≲1 s), shallower PDS, and higher values of Ep,I. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  18. A Generalized Spatial Correlation Model for 3D MIMO Channels based on the Fourier Coefficients of Power Spectrums

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain

    2015-05-07

    Previous studies have confirmed the adverse impact of fading correlation on the mutual information (MI) of two-dimensional (2D) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems. More recently, the trend is to enhance the system performance by exploiting the channel’s degrees of freedom in the elevation, which necessitates the derivation and characterization of three-dimensional (3D) channels in the presence of spatial correlation. In this paper, an exact closed-form expression for the Spatial Correlation Function (SCF) is derived for 3D MIMO channels. This novel SCF is developed for a uniform linear array of antennas with nonisotropic antenna patterns. The proposed method resorts to the spherical harmonic expansion (SHE) of plane waves and the trigonometric expansion of Legendre and associated Legendre polynomials. The resulting expression depends on the underlying arbitrary angular distributions and antenna patterns through the Fourier Series (FS) coefficients of power azimuth and elevation spectrums. The novelty of the proposed method lies in the SCF being valid for any 3D propagation environment. The developed SCF determines the covariance matrices at the transmitter and the receiver that form the Kronecker channel model. In order to quantify the effects of correlation on the system performance, the information-theoretic deterministic equivalents of the MI for the Kronecker model are utilized in both mono-user and multi-user cases. Numerical results validate the proposed analytical expressions and elucidate the dependence of the system performance on azimuth and elevation angular spreads and antenna patterns. Some useful insights into the behaviour of MI as a function of downtilt angles are provided. The derived model will help evaluate the performance of correlated 3D MIMO channels in the future.

  19. Optical Bench Breadboard Of An Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (iFTS) For Climate Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G.; McElroy, C. T.; Vaziri, Z.; Barton, D.; Blair, G.; Grandmont, F. J.

    2017-12-01

    The fifth assessment report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) states that the warming of zonal mean surface temperature at higher latitudes exceeds the global average temperature change. This poses a great problem as the warming leads to the thawing of the permafrost in the Arctic region that acts as an envelope to trap greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop scientific instruments that can be flown in space over the Arctic to provide atmospheric information to quantify the evolution and transport of these gases. The Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sounding from Space (LARSS) at York University is developing an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (IFTS) for climate observations by atmospheric sounding. The spectrometer has two individual channels, one centred at 1650 nm to measure the atmospheric column of carbon dioxide and methane, and another centred at 762 nm to measure the temperature-pressure profile by making measurements of the O2A band. A Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) modulator has been purchased from ABB Inc. of Quebec City. Interferometers are widely used in many scientific laboratories to measure concentrations of different constituents in a given sample. The performance of these instruments is highly dependent on environmental effects and various properties of the input beam such as coherence, polarity, etc. Thus, the use of such instruments to measure atmospheric concentration is complicated and challenging. The immediate goal of this project is to develop an IFTS system which can measure backscattered radiation in a laboratory environment and develop design elements that will make it operable in the space environment. Progress on the project and information concerning some of the issues listed above will be discussed. The developments which flow from this research project will support efforts by Environment and Climate Change Canada, the Canadian Space

  20. Fractional Fourier domain optical image hiding using phase retrieval algorithm based on iterative nonlinear double random phase encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaogang; Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2014-09-22

    We present a novel image hiding method based on phase retrieval algorithm under the framework of nonlinear double random phase encoding in fractional Fourier domain. Two phase-only masks (POMs) are efficiently determined by using the phase retrieval algorithm, in which two cascaded phase-truncated fractional Fourier transforms (FrFTs) are involved. No undesired information disclosure, post-processing of the POMs or digital inverse computation appears in our proposed method. In order to achieve the reduction in key transmission, a modified image hiding method based on the modified phase retrieval algorithm and logistic map is further proposed in this paper, in which the fractional orders and the parameters with respect to the logistic map are regarded as encryption keys. Numerical results have demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of temporal partial coherence using 3D Fourier transforms of through-focus TEM images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimoto, Koji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Sasaki, Takeo; Sato, Yuta; Nagai, Takuro; Ohwada, Megumi; Suenaga, Kazu; Ishizuka, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the temporal partial coherence of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using the three-dimensional (3D) Fourier transform (FT) of through-focus images. Young's fringe method often indicates the unexpected high-frequency information due to non-linear imaging terms. We have already used the 3D FT of axial (non-tilted) through-focus images to reduce the effect of non-linear terms on the linear imaging term, and demonstrated the improvement of monochromated lower-voltage TEM performance [Kimoto et al., Ultramicroscopy 121 (2012) 31–39]. Here we apply the 3D FT method with intentionally tilted incidence to normalize various factors associated with a TEM specimen and an imaging device. The temporal partial coherence of two microscopes operated at 30, 60 and 80 kV is evaluated. Our method is applicable to such cases where the non-linear terms become more significant in lower acceleration voltage or aberration-corrected high spatial resolution TEM. - Highlights: • We assess the temporal partial coherence of TEM using a 3-dimensional (3D) Fourier transform (FT) of through-focus images. • We apply the 3D FT method with intentionally tilted incidence to normalize various factors associated with a TEM specimen and an imaging device. • The spatial frequency at which information transfer decreases to 1/e 2 (13.5%) is determined for two lower-voltage TEM systems

  2. Discrimination of different red wine by Fourier-transform infrared and two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-ling; Chen, Jian-bo; Lei, Yu; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Su-qin; Noda, Isao

    2010-06-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) correlation spectroscopy were applied to analyze main components of liquid red wine with different sugar contents and volatilization residues of dry red wine from different manufactures. The infrared spectra, second derivative spectra of dry red wine show the typical peaks of alcohol, while the spectra of sweet wine are composed of the peaks of both alcohol and sugar, and the contribution of sugar enhanced as the increase of sugar content. Using principal component analysis (PCA) method, dry and sweet wine can be readily classified. Analysis of the infrared spectra of the volatilization residues of dry red wine samples from five different manufactures indicates that dry red wine may be composed of glycerol, carboxylic acids or esters and carboxyl ate, at the same time, different dry red wine show different characteristic peaks in the second derivative spectra and 2D IR correlation spectra, which can be used to discriminate the different manufactures and evaluate the quality of wine samples. The results suggested that infrared spectroscopy is a direct and effective method for the analysis of principle components of different red wines and discrimination of different red wines.

  3. Study on Senna alata and its different extracts by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiana, M. A.; Mazura, M. P.

    2011-04-01

    Senna alata L. commonly known as candle bush belongs to the family of Fabaceae and the plant has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, analgesic, laxative and antiplatelet-aggregating activity. In order to develop a rapid and effective analysis method for studying integrally the main constituents in the medicinal materials and their extracts, discriminating the extracts from different extraction process, comparing the categories of chemical constituents in the different extracts and monitoring the qualities of medicinal materials, we applied Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) associated with second derivative infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy (2D-IR) to study the main constituents of S. alata and its different extracts (extracted by hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and methanol in turn). The findings indicated that FT-IR and 2D-IR can provide many holistic variation rules of chemical constituents. Use of the macroscopical fingerprint characters of FT-IR and 2D-IR spectrum can identify the main chemical constituents in medicinal materials and their extracts, but also compare the components differences among similar samples. In a conclusion, FT-IR spectroscopy combined with 2D correlation analysis provides a powerful method for the quality control of traditional medicines.

  4. Design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope for particle sizing via goniometry and optical scatter imaging in transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Vincent M; Jacques, Steven L

    2016-06-13

    Goniometry and optical scatter imaging have been used for optical determination of particle size based upon optical scattering. Polystyrene microspheres in suspension serve as a standard for system validation purposes. The design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope (DFHM) are reported. Of crucial importance is the appropriate scaling of scattering angle space in the conjugate Fourier plane. A detailed description of this calibration process is described. Spatial filtering of the acquired digital hologram to use photons scattered within a restricted angular range produces an image. A pair of images, one using photons narrowly scattered within 8 - 15° (LNA), and one using photons broadly scattered within 8 - 39° (HNA), are produced. An image based on the ratio of these two images, OSIR = HNA/LNA, following Boustany et al. (2002), yields a 2D Optical Scatter Image (OSI) whose contrast is based on the angular dependence of photon scattering and is sensitive to the microsphere size, especially in the 0.5-1.0µm range. Goniometric results are also given for polystyrene microspheres in suspension as additional proof of principle for particle sizing via the DFHM.

  5. Application of Fourier-wavelet regularized deconvolution for improving image quality of free space propagation x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongxing; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Lixin

    2012-11-21

    New x-ray phase contrast imaging techniques without using synchrotron radiation confront a common problem from the negative effects of finite source size and limited spatial resolution. These negative effects swamp the fine phase contrast fringes and make them almost undetectable. In order to alleviate this problem, deconvolution procedures should be applied to the blurred x-ray phase contrast images. In this study, three different deconvolution techniques, including Wiener filtering, Tikhonov regularization and Fourier-wavelet regularized deconvolution (ForWaRD), were applied to the simulated and experimental free space propagation x-ray phase contrast images of simple geometric phantoms. These algorithms were evaluated in terms of phase contrast improvement and signal-to-noise ratio. The results demonstrate that the ForWaRD algorithm is most appropriate for phase contrast image restoration among above-mentioned methods; it can effectively restore the lost information of phase contrast fringes while reduce the amplified noise during Fourier regularization.

  6. Non-invasive quantitative pulmonary V/Q imaging using Fourier decomposition MRI at 1.5T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjoerstad, Aasmund; Corteville, Dominique M.R.; Zoellner, Frank G.; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Medical Faculty Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Henzler, Thomas [Heidelberg Univ., Medical Faculty Mannheim (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Schmid-Bindert, Gerald [Heidelberg Univ., Medical Faculty Mannheim (Germany). Interdisciplinary Thoracic Oncology

    2015-07-01

    Techniques for quantitative pulmonary perfusion and ventilation using the Fourier Decomposition method were recently demonstrated. We combine these two techniques and show that ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) imaging is possible using only a single MR acquisition of less than thirty seconds. The Fourier Decomposition method is used in combination with two quantification techniques, which extract baselines from within the images themselves and thus allows quantification. For the perfusion, a region assumed to consist of 100% blood is utilized, while for the ventilation the zero-frequency component is used. V/Q-imaging is then done by dividing the quantified ventilation map with the quantified perfusion map. The techniques were used on ten healthy volunteers and fifteen patients diagnosed with lung cancer. A mean V/Q-ratio of 1.15±0.22 was found for the healthy volunteers and a mean V/Q-ratio of 1.93±0.83 for the non-afflicted lung in the patients. Mean V/Q-ratio in the afflicted (tumor-bearing) lung was found to be 1.61±1.06. Functional defects were clearly visible in many of the patient images, but 5 of 15 patient images had to be excluded due to artifacts or low SNR, indicating a lack of robustness. Conclusion Non-invasive, quantitative V/Q-imaging is possible using Fourier Decomposition MRI. The method requires only a single acquisition of less than 30 seconds, but robustness in patients remains an issue.

  7. Non-invasive quantitative pulmonary V/Q imaging using Fourier decomposition MRI at 1.5T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjørstad, Åsmund; Corteville, Dominique M R; Henzler, Thomas; Schmid-Bindert, Gerald; Zöllner, Frank G; Schad, Lothar R

    2015-12-01

    Techniques for quantitative pulmonary perfusion and ventilation using the Fourier Decomposition method were recently demonstrated. We combine these two techniques and show that ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) imaging is possible using only a single MR acquisition of less than thirty seconds. The Fourier Decomposition method is used in combination with two quantification techniques, which extract baselines from within the images themselves and thus allows quantification. For the perfusion, a region assumed to consist of 100% blood is utilized, while for the ventilation the zero-frequency component is used. V/Q-imaging is then done by dividing the quantified ventilation map with the quantified perfusion map. The techniques were used on ten healthy volunteers and fifteen patients diagnosed with lung cancer. A mean V/Q-ratio of 1.15 ± 0.22 was found for the healthy volunteers and a mean V/Q-ratio of 1.93 ± 0.83 for the non-afflicted lung in the patients. Mean V/Q-ratio in the afflicted (tumor-bearing) lung was found to be 1.61 ± 1.06. Functional defects were clearly visible in many of the patient images, but 5 of 15 patient images had to be excluded due to artifacts or low SNR, indicating a lack of robustness. Non-invasive, quantitative V/Q-imaging is possible using Fourier Decomposition MRI. The method requires only a single acquisition of less than 30 seconds, but robustness in patients remains an issue. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  8. A proposal of Fourier-Bessel expansion with optimized ensembles of bases to analyse two dimensional image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.

    2017-09-01

    It is a critical issue to find the best set of fitting function bases in mode structural analysis of two dimensional images like plasma emission profiles. The paper proposes a method to optimize a set of the bases in the case of Fourier-Bessel function series, using their orthonormal property, for more efficient and precise analysis. The method is applied on a tomography image of plasma emission obtained with the Maximum-likelihood expectation maximization method in a linear cylindrical device. The result demonstrates the excellency of the method that realizes the smaller residual error and minimum Akaike information criterion using smaller number of fitting function bases.

  9. From regular text to artistic writing and artworks: Fourier statistics of images with low and high aesthetic appeal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara eMelmer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The spatial characteristics of letters and their influence on readability and letter identification have been intensely studied during the last decades. There have been few studies, however, on statistical image properties that reflect more global aspects of text, for example properties that may relate to its aesthetic appeal. It has been shown that natural scenes and a large variety of visual artworks possess a scale-invariant Fourier power spectrum that falls off linearly with increasing frequency in log-log plots. We asked whether images of text share this property. As expected, the Fourier spectrum of images of regular typed or handwritten text is highly anisotropic, i.e. the spectral image properties in vertical, horizontal and oblique orientations differ. Moreover, the spatial frequency spectra of text images are not scale invariant in any direction. The decline is shallower in the low-frequency part of the spectrum for text than for aesthetic artworks, whereas, in the high-frequency part, it is steeper. These results indicate that, in general, images of regular text contain less global structure (low spatial frequencies relative to fine detail (high spatial frequencies than images of aesthetics artworks. Moreover, we studied images of text with artistic claim (ornate print and calligraphy and ornamental art. For some measures, these images assume average values intermediate between regular text and aesthetic artworks. Finally, to answer the question of whether the statistical properties measured by us are universal amongst humans or are subject to intercultural differences, we compared images from three different cultural backgrounds (Western, East Asian and Arabic. Results for different categories (regular text, aesthetic writing, ornamental art and fine art were similar across cultures.

  10. From regular text to artistic writing and artworks: Fourier statistics of images with low and high aesthetic appeal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melmer, Tamara; Amirshahi, Seyed A.; Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The spatial characteristics of letters and their influence on readability and letter identification have been intensely studied during the last decades. There have been few studies, however, on statistical image properties that reflect more global aspects of text, for example properties that may relate to its aesthetic appeal. It has been shown that natural scenes and a large variety of visual artworks possess a scale-invariant Fourier power spectrum that falls off linearly with increasing frequency in log-log plots. We asked whether images of text share this property. As expected, the Fourier spectrum of images of regular typed or handwritten text is highly anisotropic, i.e., the spectral image properties in vertical, horizontal, and oblique orientations differ. Moreover, the spatial frequency spectra of text images are not scale-invariant in any direction. The decline is shallower in the low-frequency part of the spectrum for text than for aesthetic artworks, whereas, in the high-frequency part, it is steeper. These results indicate that, in general, images of regular text contain less global structure (low spatial frequencies) relative to fine detail (high spatial frequencies) than images of aesthetics artworks. Moreover, we studied images of text with artistic claim (ornate print and calligraphy) and ornamental art. For some measures, these images assume average values intermediate between regular text and aesthetic artworks. Finally, to answer the question of whether the statistical properties measured by us are universal amongst humans or are subject to intercultural differences, we compared images from three different cultural backgrounds (Western, East Asian, and Arabic). Results for different categories (regular text, aesthetic writing, ornamental art, and fine art) were similar across cultures. PMID:23554592

  11. A Panchromatic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer for the NASA Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yen-Hung; Key, Richard; Sander, Stanley; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Rider, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design and development of the Panchromatic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (PanFTS) for the NASA Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) Mission. The PanFTS instrument will advance the understanding of the global climate and atmospheric chemistry by measuring spectrally resolved outgoing thermal and reflected solar radiation. With continuous spectral coverage from the near-ultraviolet through the thermal infrared, this instrument is designed to measure pollutants, greenhouse gases, and aerosols as called for by the U.S. National Research Council Decadal Survey; Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond1. The PanFTS instrument is a hybrid instrument based on spectrometers like the Tropospheric Emissions Spectrometer (TES) that measures thermal emission, and those like the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) that measure scattered solar radiation. Simultaneous measurements over the broad spectral range from IR to UV is accomplished by a two sided interferometer with separate optical trains and detectors for the ultraviolet-visible and infrared spectral domains. This allows each side of the instrument to be independently optimized for its respective spectral domain. The overall interferometer design is compact because the two sides share a single high precision cryogenic optical path difference mechanism (OPDM) and metrology laser as well as a number of other instrument systems including the line-of-sight pointing mirror, the data management system, thermal control system, electrical system, and the mechanical structure. The PanFTS breadboard instrument has been tested in the laboratory and demonstrated the basic functionality for simultaneous measurements in the visible and infrared. It is set to begin operations in the field at the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) observatory on Mt. Wilson

  12. A three-dimensional correlation method for registration of medical images in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiou, Michalakis; Sfakianakis, George N.; Nagel, Joachim H.

    1998-01-01

    The availability of methods to register multi-modality images in order to 'fuse' them to correlate their information is increasingly becoming an important requirement for various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. A variety of image registration methods have been developed but they remain limited to specific clinical applications. Assuming rigid body transformation, two images can be registered if their differences are calculated in terms of translation, rotation and scaling. This paper describes the development and testing of a new correlation based approach for three-dimensional image registration. First, the scaling factors introduced by the imaging devices are calculated and compensated for. Then, the two images become translation invariant by computing their three-dimensional Fourier magnitude spectra. Subsequently, spherical coordinate transformation is performed and then the three-dimensional rotation is computed using a novice approach referred to as p olar Shells . The method of polar shells maps the three angles of rotation into one rotation and two translations of a two-dimensional function and then proceeds to calculate them using appropriate transformations based on the Fourier invariance properties. A basic assumption in the method is that the three-dimensional rotation is constrained to one large and two relatively small angles. This assumption is generally satisfied in normal clinical settings. The new three-dimensional image registration method was tested with simulations using computer generated phantom data as well as actual clinical data. Performance analysis and accuracy evaluation of the method using computer simulations yielded errors in the sub-pixel range. (authors)

  13. Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: imaging-pathology correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Stephen M.; Hansell, David M.

    2002-01-01

    The terminology related to idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) remains confusing and in some cases wholly inaccurate. In addition, a greater understanding of the correlation between high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) appearances and the corresponding histopathological changes found in the interstitial pneumonias has resulted in a crucial role for HRCT in the investigation of IIPs. The role of the radiologist is becoming increasingly important with a strong emphasis on establishing a diagnosis without resorting to lung biopsy. We aim to clarify the current classification of the IIPs highlighting their clinical, pathological and imaging characteristics in order to assist the radiologist in performing their increasingly important diagnostic role. (orig.)

  14. Fourier-transform imaging of cotton and botanical and field trash mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botanical and field cotton trash comingled with cotton lint can greatly reduce the marketability and quality of cotton. Trash can be found comingled with cotton lint during harvesting, ginning, and processing, thus this study is of interest. Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (A...

  15. Study on Angelica and its different extracts by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-xia; Sun, Su-qin; Lv, Guang-hua; Chan, Kelvin K. C.

    2006-05-01

    In order to develop a rapid and effective analysis method for studying integrally the main constituents in the medicinal materials and their extracts, discriminating the extracts from different extraction process, comparing the categories of chemical constituents in the different extracts and monitoring the qualities of medicinal materials, we applied Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) associated with second derivative infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR) to study the main constituents in traditional Chinese medicine Angelica and its different extracts (extracted by petroleum ether, ethanol and water in turn). The findings indicated that FT-IR spectrum can provide many holistic variation rules of chemical constituents. Use of the macroscopical fingerprint characters of FT-IR and 2D-IR spectrum can not only identify the main chemical constituents in medicinal materials and their different extracts, but also compare the components differences among the similar samples. This analytical method is highly rapid, effective, visual and accurate for pharmaceutical research.

  16. High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopic Imaging of Human Tissue Sections towards Improving Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Peter L.; Davidson, Bennett; Akkina, Sanjeev; Guzman, Grace; Setty, Suman; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Walsh, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is an emerging approach to obtain detailed images that have associated biochemical information. FT-IR imaging of tissue is based on the principle that different regions of the mid-infrared are absorbed by different chemical bonds (e.g., C=O, C-H, N-H) within cells or tissue that can then be related to the presence and composition of biomolecules (e.g., lipids, DNA, glycogen, protein, collagen). In an FT-IR image, every pixel within the image comprises an entire Infrared (IR) spectrum that can give information on the biochemical status of the cells that can then be exploited for cell-type or disease-type classification. In this paper, we show: how to obtain IR images from human tissues using an FT-IR system, how to modify existing instrumentation to allow for high-definition imaging capabilities, and how to visualize FT-IR images. We then present some applications of FT-IR for pathology using the liver and kidney as examples. FT-IR imaging holds exciting applications in providing a novel route to obtain biochemical information from cells and tissue in an entirely label-free non-perturbing route towards giving new insight into biomolecular changes as part of disease processes. Additionally, this biochemical information can potentially allow for objective and automated analysis of certain aspects of disease diagnosis. PMID:25650759

  17. Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Mineral to Matrix Ratios Correlate with Physical Chemical Properties of Model Compounds and Native Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erik A; Lloyd, Ashley A; Salazar-Lara, Carolina; Donnelly, Eve

    2017-10-01

    Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging techniques can be used to characterize bone composition. In this study, our objective was to validate the Raman mineral:matrix ratios (ν 1 PO 4 :amide III, ν 1 PO 4 :amide I, ν 1 PO 4 :Proline + hydroxyproline, ν 1 PO 4 :Phenylalanine, ν 1 PO 4 :δ CH 2 peak area ratios) by correlating them to ash fraction and the IR mineral:matrix ratio (ν 3 PO 4 :amide I peak area ratio) in chemical standards and native bone tissue. Chemical standards consisting of varying ratios of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) and collagen, as well as bone tissue from humans, sheep, and mice, were characterized with confocal Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy and gravimetric analysis. Raman and IR mineral:matrix ratio values from chemical standards increased reciprocally with ash fraction (Raman ν 1 PO 4 /Amide III: P Raman ν 1 PO 4 /Amide I: P Raman ν 1 PO 4 /Proline + Hydroxyproline: P Raman ν 1 PO 4 /Phenylalanine: P Raman ν 1 PO 4 /δ CH 2 : P Raman and IR mineral:matrix ratio values were strongly correlated ( P Raman mineral:matrix bone composition parameter correlates strongly to ash fraction and to its IR counterpart. Finally, the mineral:matrix ratio values of the native bone tissue are similar to those of both chemical standards and theoretical values, confirming the biological relevance of the chemical standards and the characterization techniques.

  18. Correlation between Onset Oxidation Temperature (OOT) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for monitoring the restabilization of Recycled Low-density Polyethylene (LDPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruvolo-Filho, Adhemar; Pelozzi, Tadeu Luiz Alonso, E-mail: adhemar@power.ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2013-07-01

    In this work a new method was developed for monitoring the oxidative stability of restabilized and non-restabilized low-density polyethylene (LDPE) during multiple extrusion cycles. The method is based on correlations between Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Onset Oxidation Temperature (OOT). Non-linear calibration curves correlating the concentration of primary or secondary antioxidants and the OOT values were obtained. (author)

  19. Finite element formulation for a digital image correlation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yaofeng; Pang, John H. L.; Wong, Chee Khuen; Su Fei

    2005-01-01

    A finite element formulation for a digital image correlation method is presented that will determine directly the complete, two-dimensional displacement field during the image correlation process on digital images. The entire interested image area is discretized into finite elements that are involved in the common image correlation process by use of our algorithms. This image correlation method with finite element formulation has an advantage over subset-based image correlation methods because it satisfies the requirements of displacement continuity and derivative continuity among elements on images. Numerical studies and a real experiment are used to verify the proposed formulation. Results have shown that the image correlation with the finite element formulation is computationally efficient, accurate, and robust

  20. Level 0 to 1 processing of the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kleinert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA is an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer that is capable of operating on various high-altitude research aircraft. It measures the atmospheric emission in the thermal infrared spectral region in limb and nadir geometry. GLORIA consists of a classical Michelson interferometer combined with an infrared camera. The infrared detector has a usable area of 128 × 128 pixels, measuring up to 16 384 interferograms simultaneously. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometers impose a number of challenges with respect to instrument calibration and algorithm development. The optical setup with extremely high optical throughput requires the development of new methods and algorithms for spectral and radiometric calibration. Due to the vast amount of data there is a high demand for scientifically intelligent optimisation of the data processing. This paper outlines the characterisation and processing steps required for the generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra. Methods for performance optimisation of the processing algorithm are presented. The performance of the data processing and the quality of the calibrated spectra are demonstrated for measurements collected during the first deployments of GLORIA on aircraft.

  1. TH-E-17A-08: Estimation of Image Quality of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) Via Fourier Analysis of Corresponding 1D Breathing Surrogate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caraveo, M; McNamara, J; Rimner, A; Yorke, E; Li, G [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wei, J [City College of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Motion artifacts are common in patient 4DCT, leading to an illdefined tumor volume with variation up to 110% or setting up a poor foundation with low imaging fidelity for tumor motion study. We developed a method to estimate 4DCT image quality by establishing a correlation between the severity of motion artifacts in 4DCT images and the periodicity of corresponding 1D respiratory wave-function (1DRW) surrogate used for 4DCT reconstruction. Methods: Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) was applied to analyze 1DRW periodicity, defined as the sum of the 5 largest Fourier coefficients, ranging in 0–1. Distortional motion artifacts of cine-scan 4DCT at the junctions of adjacent couchposition scans around the diaphragm were identified in 3 categories: incomplete, overlapping and duplicate. To quantify these artifacts, the discontinuity of the diaphragm at the junctions was measured in distance and averaged along 6 directions in 3 orthogonal views. Mean and sum artifacts per junction (APJ) across the entire diaphragm were calculated in each breathing phase. To make the APJ inter-patient comparable, patientspecific motion was removed from APJ by dividing patient-specific diaphragmatic velocity (displacement divided by the mean period, from FFT analysis of the 1DRW) and the normalized APJ was defined as motion artifact severity (MAS). Twenty-five patients with free-breathing 10-phase 4DCT and corresponding 1DRW surrogate datasets were studied. Results: A mild correlation of 0.56 was found between 1DRW periodicity and 4DCT artifact severity. Higher MAS tends to appear around mid inhalation and mid exhalation and the lowest MAS tends to be around full exhalation. The breathing periodicity of >0.8 possesses minimal motion artifacts. Conclusion: The 1D-4D correlation provides a fast means to estimate 4DCT image quality. Using 1DRW signal, we can retrospectively screen out high-quality 4DCT images for clinical research (periodicity>0.8) and prospectively identify poor

  2. TH-E-17A-08: Estimation of Image Quality of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) Via Fourier Analysis of Corresponding 1D Breathing Surrogate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caraveo, M; McNamara, J; Rimner, A; Yorke, E; Li, G; Wei, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Motion artifacts are common in patient 4DCT, leading to an illdefined tumor volume with variation up to 110% or setting up a poor foundation with low imaging fidelity for tumor motion study. We developed a method to estimate 4DCT image quality by establishing a correlation between the severity of motion artifacts in 4DCT images and the periodicity of corresponding 1D respiratory wave-function (1DRW) surrogate used for 4DCT reconstruction. Methods: Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) was applied to analyze 1DRW periodicity, defined as the sum of the 5 largest Fourier coefficients, ranging in 0–1. Distortional motion artifacts of cine-scan 4DCT at the junctions of adjacent couchposition scans around the diaphragm were identified in 3 categories: incomplete, overlapping and duplicate. To quantify these artifacts, the discontinuity of the diaphragm at the junctions was measured in distance and averaged along 6 directions in 3 orthogonal views. Mean and sum artifacts per junction (APJ) across the entire diaphragm were calculated in each breathing phase. To make the APJ inter-patient comparable, patientspecific motion was removed from APJ by dividing patient-specific diaphragmatic velocity (displacement divided by the mean period, from FFT analysis of the 1DRW) and the normalized APJ was defined as motion artifact severity (MAS). Twenty-five patients with free-breathing 10-phase 4DCT and corresponding 1DRW surrogate datasets were studied. Results: A mild correlation of 0.56 was found between 1DRW periodicity and 4DCT artifact severity. Higher MAS tends to appear around mid inhalation and mid exhalation and the lowest MAS tends to be around full exhalation. The breathing periodicity of >0.8 possesses minimal motion artifacts. Conclusion: The 1D-4D correlation provides a fast means to estimate 4DCT image quality. Using 1DRW signal, we can retrospectively screen out high-quality 4DCT images for clinical research (periodicity>0.8) and prospectively identify poor

  3. Ghost imaging with third-order correlated thermal light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, L-H; Kuang, L-M

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a ghost imaging scheme with third-order correlated thermal light. We show that it is possible to produce the spatial information of an object at two different places in a nonlocal fashion by means of a third-order correlated imaging process with a third-order correlated thermal source and third-order correlation measurement. Concretely, we propose a protocol to create two ghost images at two different places from one object. This protocol involves two optical configurations. We derive the Gaussian thin lens equations and plot the geometrical optics of the ghost imaging processes for the two configurations. It is indicated that third-order correlated ghost imaging with thermal light exhibits richer correlated imaging effects than second-order correlated ghost imaging with thermal light

  4. Refractometry of melanocyte cell nuclei using optical scatter images recorded by digital Fourier microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seet, Katrina Y T; Nieminen, Timo A; Zvyagin, Andrei V

    2009-01-01

    The cell nucleus is the dominant optical scatterer in the cell. Neoplastic cells are characterized by cell nucleus polymorphism and polychromism-i.e., the nuclei exhibits an increase in the distribution of both size and refractive index. The relative size parameter, and its distribution, is proportional to the product of the nucleus size and its relative refractive index and is a useful discriminant between normal and abnormal (cancerous) cells. We demonstrate a recently introduced holographic technique, digital Fourier microscopy (DFM), to provide a sensitive measure of this relative size parameter. Fourier holograms were recorded and optical scatter of individual scatterers were extracted and modeled with Mie theory to determine the relative size parameter. The relative size parameter of individual melanocyte cell nuclei were found to be 16.5+/-0.2, which gives a cell nucleus refractive index of 1.38+/-0.01 and is in good agreement with previously reported data. The relative size parameters of individual malignant melanocyte cell nuclei are expected to be greater than 16.5.

  5. Quantitation of pulmonary nodule's border structure by means of Fourier transform by using chest X-ray CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikata, Hidenori; Masuyama, Hiroshi; Kido, Shoji

    1998-01-01

    In order to evaluate quantitatively the border structure of pulmonary nodules by using chest X-ray CT images, we investigated whether the sum of high-frequency elements of the power spectrum in a Fourier-transformed nodule's contour line becomes a valuable measure of the border structure of pulmonary nodules. We expect that this measure clearly reflects the radiologic characteristics of a nodule, that is, the contour line is clear or unclear in benign or malignant nodules, respectively. We evaluated and analyzed images statistically for 31 patients (15 benign, 16 malignant), and we were able to recognize a measurable difference between the benign and malignant cases. We conclude that we can evaluate the border structure of a nodule by our proposed measure, and that this measure is valuable for quantitative differential diagnosis. (author)

  6. Algorithm for three dimension reconstruction of magnetic resonance tomographs and X-ray images based on Fast Fourier Transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, Josiane M.; Traina, Agma Juci M.; Cruvinel, Paulo E.

    1995-01-01

    This work presents an algorithm for three-dimensional digital image reconstruction. Such algorithms based on the combination of both a Fast Fourier Transform method with Hamming Window and the use of a tri-linear interpolation function. The algorithm allows not only the generation of three-dimensional spatial spin distribution maps for Magnetic Resonance Tomography data but also X and Y-rays linear attenuation coefficient maps for CT scanners. Results demonstrates the usefulness of the algorithm in three-dimensional image reconstruction by doing first two-dimensional reconstruction and rather after interpolation. The algorithm was developed in C++ language, and there are two available versions: one under the DOS environment, and the other under the UNIX/Sun environment. (author)

  7. Fourier series

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstov, Georgi P

    1962-01-01

    Richard A. Silverman's series of translations of outstanding Russian textbooks and monographs is well-known to people in the fields of mathematics, physics, and engineering. The present book is another excellent text from this series, a valuable addition to the English-language literature on Fourier series.This edition is organized into nine well-defined chapters: Trigonometric Fourier Series, Orthogonal Systems, Convergence of Trigonometric Fourier Series, Trigonometric Series with Decreasing Coefficients, Operations on Fourier Series, Summation of Trigonometric Fourier Series, Double Fourie

  8. Quantum Correlated Multi-Fragment Reaction Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feagin, James M. [California State Univ., Fullerton, CA (United States)

    2017-06-30

    This grant supported research in basic atomic, molecular and optical physics related to the interactions of atoms with particles and fields. This report will focus on the 12 year period from 2004 to 2017, although the DOE–BES has supported my research every year since 1986. All of the support from the grant was used to pay summer salaries of the PI and students and travel to conferences and meetings. The results were in the form of publications in peer reviewed journals as well as conference invited talks and colloquiums. There were 12 peer reviewed publications in these 12+ years. Innovations in few-body science at molecular and nano levels are a critical component of on- going efforts to establish sustainable environmental and energy resources. The varied research paths taken will require the development of basic science on broad fronts with increasing flexi- bility to crossover technologies. We thus worked to extract understanding and quantum control of few-body microscopic systems based on our long-time experience with more conventional studies of correlated electrons and ions. Given the enormous advances over the past 20 years to our understanding of quantum cor- relations with photon interferometry, AMO collision science generally is ready to move beyond the one-particle, single-port momentum detection that has dominated collision physics since Rutherford. Nevertheless, our familiar theoretical tools for collision theory need to be up- graded to incorporate these more generalized measurement formalisms and ultimately to give incentive for a new generation of experiments. Our interest in these topics remains motivated by the recent surge in and success of exper- iments involving few-body atomic and molecular fragmentation and the detection of all the fragments. The research described here thus involved two parallel efforts with (i) emphasis on reaction imaging while (ii) pursuing longtime work on quantum correlated collective excitations.

  9. Two Dimensional Symmetric Correlation Functions of the S Operator and Two Dimensional Fourier Transforms: Considering the Line Coupling for P and R Lines of Linear Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Boulet, C.; Tipping, R. H.

    2014-01-01

    The refinement of the Robert-Bonamy (RB) formalism by considering the line coupling for isotropic Raman Q lines of linear molecules developed in our previous study [Q. Ma, C. Boulet, and R. H. Tipping, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 034305 (2013)] has been extended to infrared P and R lines. In these calculations, the main task is to derive diagonal and off-diagonal matrix elements of the Liouville operator iS1 - S2 introduced in the formalism. When one considers the line coupling for isotropic Raman Q lines where their initial and final rotational quantum numbers are identical, the derivations of off-diagonal elements do not require extra correlation functions of the ^S operator and their Fourier transforms except for those used in deriving diagonal elements. In contrast, the derivations for infrared P and R lines become more difficult because they require a lot of new correlation functions and their Fourier transforms. By introducing two dimensional correlation functions labeled by two tensor ranks and making variable changes to become even functions, the derivations only require the latters' two dimensional Fourier transforms evaluated at two modulation frequencies characterizing the averaged energy gap and the frequency detuning between the two coupled transitions. With the coordinate representation, it is easy to accurately derive these two dimensional correlation functions. Meanwhile, by using the sampling theory one is able to effectively evaluate their two dimensional Fourier transforms. Thus, the obstacles in considering the line coupling for P and R lines have been overcome. Numerical calculations have been carried out for the half-widths of both the isotropic Raman Q lines and the infrared P and R lines of C2H2 broadened by N2. In comparison with values derived from the RB formalism, new calculated values are significantly reduced and become closer to measurements.

  10. Digital Image Correlation for Performance Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaviccini, Miguel; Turner, Dan; Herzberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the health of a mechanism requires more than just a binary evaluation of whether an operation was completed. It requires analyzing more comprehensive, full-field data. Health monitoring is a process of non-destructively identifying characteristics that indicate the fitness of an engineered component. In order to monitor unit health in a production setting, an automated test system must be created to capture the motion of mechanism parts in a real-time and non-intrusive manner. One way to accomplish this is by using high-speed video and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). In this approach, individual frames of the video are analyzed to track the motion of mechanism components. The derived performance metrics allow for state-of-health monitoring and improved fidelity of mechanism modeling. The results are in-situ state-of-health identification and performance prediction. This paper introduces basic concepts of this test method, and discusses two main themes: the use of laser marking to add fiducial patterns to mechanism components, and new software developed to track objects with complex shapes, even as they move behind obstructions. Finally, the implementation of these tests into an automated tester is discussed.

  11. Automated processing of shoeprint images based on the Fourier transform for use in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chazal, Philip; Flynn, John; Reilly, Richard B

    2005-03-01

    The development of a system for automatically sorting a database of shoeprint images based on the outsole pattern in response to a reference shoeprint image is presented. The database images are sorted so that those from the same pattern group as the reference shoeprint are likely to be at the start of the list. A database of 476 complete shoeprint images belonging to 140 pattern groups was established with each group containing two or more examples. A panel of human observers performed the grouping of the images into pattern categories. Tests of the system using the database showed that the first-ranked database image belongs to the same pattern category as the reference image 65 percent of the time and that a correct match appears within the first 5 percent of the sorted images 87 percent of the time. The system has translational and rotational invariance so that the spatial positioning of the reference shoeprint images does not have to correspond with the spatial positioning of the shoeprint images of the database. The performance of the system for matching partial-prints was also determined.

  12. Fourier Analysis of Single-Shot Dual-Energy X-ray Imaging Characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Woo; Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2016-01-01

    The sandwich detector was realized by stacking two scintillator-based flat-panel detectors (FPDs) between which an intermediate copper (Cu) filter layer was placed to further enhance spectral energy separation. As a result, the proper selection of filter material and its thickness could be a trade-off between the extent of energy separation (hence, DE image quality) and image noise due to reduction in the number of x-ray quanta reaching the rear FPD. Although the conventional kVp-switching dual-shot method showed better image qualities than the single-shot method because of larger spectral energy separation, the motion-artifact-free DE image with reasonably good image quality was a potential prospect of the single-shot method. For the reliable and better use of the sandwich detector for specific imaging applications, the sandwich detector should be optimally designed with a proper selection of scintillator material and thickness in each detector layer (i.e. the front and rear detectors), and aforementioned intermediate filter material and thickness. It is noted that glue is used to adhere the fragile photodiode array onto the ceramic substrate and these glue patterns are apparent in the rear and DE images. The glue pattern in the rear image comes from the front FPD. Unlike the conventional ESF as shown in Fig. 3(a), the ESF obtained from the subtracted image showed an enhancement as shown in Fig. 3(b). Consequently, the MTF obtained from the subtraction ESF showed a bandpass filter characteristic, as shown in Fig. 3(c), unlike the conventional low-pass filter characteristic (i.e., monotonic decrease of MTF value with increasing the spatial frequency). This MTF characteristic is due to the subtraction of two images with different spatial resolving powers (i.e., different thicknesses of phosphors between the front and rear detectors) as can be seen in unsharp masking digital image processing, which subtracts Gaussian-blurred image from the original image

  13. Fourier Analysis of Single-Shot Dual-Energy X-ray Imaging Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Woo; Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Ho Kyung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The sandwich detector was realized by stacking two scintillator-based flat-panel detectors (FPDs) between which an intermediate copper (Cu) filter layer was placed to further enhance spectral energy separation. As a result, the proper selection of filter material and its thickness could be a trade-off between the extent of energy separation (hence, DE image quality) and image noise due to reduction in the number of x-ray quanta reaching the rear FPD. Although the conventional kVp-switching dual-shot method showed better image qualities than the single-shot method because of larger spectral energy separation, the motion-artifact-free DE image with reasonably good image quality was a potential prospect of the single-shot method. For the reliable and better use of the sandwich detector for specific imaging applications, the sandwich detector should be optimally designed with a proper selection of scintillator material and thickness in each detector layer (i.e. the front and rear detectors), and aforementioned intermediate filter material and thickness. It is noted that glue is used to adhere the fragile photodiode array onto the ceramic substrate and these glue patterns are apparent in the rear and DE images. The glue pattern in the rear image comes from the front FPD. Unlike the conventional ESF as shown in Fig. 3(a), the ESF obtained from the subtracted image showed an enhancement as shown in Fig. 3(b). Consequently, the MTF obtained from the subtraction ESF showed a bandpass filter characteristic, as shown in Fig. 3(c), unlike the conventional low-pass filter characteristic (i.e., monotonic decrease of MTF value with increasing the spatial frequency). This MTF characteristic is due to the subtraction of two images with different spatial resolving powers (i.e., different thicknesses of phosphors between the front and rear detectors) as can be seen in unsharp masking digital image processing, which subtracts Gaussian-blurred image from the original image.

  14. Asymmetric double-image encryption method by using iterative phase retrieval algorithm in fractional Fourier transform domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Liansheng; Lu, Haiwei; Ning, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yinghui

    2014-02-01

    A double-image encryption scheme is proposed based on an asymmetric technique, in which the encryption and decryption processes are different and the encryption keys are not identical to the decryption ones. First, a phase-only function (POF) of each plain image is retrieved by using an iterative process and then encoded into an interim matrix. Two interim matrices are directly modulated into a complex image by using the convolution operation in the fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) domain. Second, the complex image is encrypted into the gray scale ciphertext with stationary white-noise distribution by using the FrFT. In the encryption process, three random phase functions are used as encryption keys to retrieve the POFs of plain images. Simultaneously, two decryption keys are generated in the encryption process, which make the optical implementation of the decryption process convenient and efficient. The proposed encryption scheme has high robustness to various attacks, such as brute-force attack, known plaintext attack, cipher-only attack, and specific attack. Numerical simulations demonstrate the validity and security of the proposed method.

  15. Image scale measurement with correlation filters in a volume holographic optical correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianxiang; Cao, Liangcai; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2013-08-01

    A search engine containing various target images or different part of a large scene area is of great use for many applications, including object detection, biometric recognition, and image registration. The input image captured in realtime is compared with all the template images in the search engine. A volume holographic correlator is one type of these search engines. It performs thousands of comparisons among the images at a super high speed, with the correlation task accomplishing mainly in optics. However, the inputted target image always contains scale variation to the filtering template images. At the time, the correlation values cannot properly reflect the similarity of the images. It is essential to estimate and eliminate the scale variation of the inputted target image. There are three domains for performing the scale measurement, as spatial, spectral and time domains. Most methods dealing with the scale factor are based on the spatial or the spectral domains. In this paper, a method with the time domain is proposed to measure the scale factor of the input image. It is called a time-sequential scaled method. The method utilizes the relationship between the scale variation and the correlation value of two images. It sends a few artificially scaled input images to compare with the template images. The correlation value increases and decreases with the increasing of the scale factor at the intervals of 0.8~1 and 1~1.2, respectively. The original scale of the input image can be measured by estimating the largest correlation value through correlating the artificially scaled input image with the template images. The measurement range for the scale can be 0.8~4.8. Scale factor beyond 1.2 is measured by scaling the input image at the factor of 1/2, 1/3 and 1/4, correlating the artificially scaled input image with the template images, and estimating the new corresponding scale factor inside 0.8~1.2.

  16. [Research of dual-photoelastic-modulator-based beat frequency modulation and Fourier-Bessel transform imaging spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yao-Li; Huang, Yan-Fei; Chen, You-Hua; Wang, Li-Fu; Yang, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    As the existing photoelastic-modulator(PEM) modulating frequency in the tens of kHz to hundreds of kHz between, leading to frequency of modulated interference signal is higher, so ordinary array detector cannot effectively caprure interference signal..A new beat frequency modulation method based on dual-photoelastic-modulator (Dual-PEM) and Fourier-Bessel transform is proposed as an key component of dual-photoelastic-modulator-based imaging spectrometer (Dual-PEM-IS) combined with charge coupled device (CCD). The dual-PEM are operated as an electro-optic circular retardance modulator, Operating the PEMs at slightly different resonant frequencies w1 and w2 respectively, generates a differential signal at a much lower heterodyne frequency that modulates the incident light. This method not only retains the advantages of the existing PEM, but also the frequency of modulated photocurrent decreased by 2-3 orders of magnitude (10-500 Hz) and can be detected by common array detector, and the incident light spectra can be obtained by Fourier-Bessel transform of low frequency component in the modulated signal. The method makes the PEM has the dual capability of imaging and spectral measurement. The basic principle is introduced, the basic equations is derived, and the feasibility is verified through the corresponding numerical simulation and experiment. This method has' potential applications in imaging spectrometer technology, and analysis of the effect of deviation of the optical path difference. This work provides the necessary theoretical basis for remote sensing of new Dual-PEM-IS and for engineering implementation of spectra inversion.

  17. MR imaging of the gastrointestinal tract with half-fourier single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boku, Houjun; Takehara, Yasuo; Isoda, Haruo; Isogai, Satoshi; Kaneko, Masao

    1999-01-01

    Our objective was to implement a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique combined with concentrated milk ingestion for depicting the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and detecting gastrointestinal motility and transit. The half-Fourier SSFSE (single-shot fast spin echo) sequence was optimized on the basis of a phantom study. In order to determine the feasibility of milk ingestion as a substitute for contrast medium, ten human volunteers were examined with SSFSE after two types of liquid ingestion (i.e., milk and water). The snapshot images provided subsecond data acquisition for each coronal plane, allowing visualization of peristalsis in the gastrointestinal tract in an almost real-time fashion, without motion-related image degradation, as would normally be seen using conventional MRI. There was no significant difference between concentrated milk and water in terms of depiction of the upper gastrointestinal tract; however, 10 min and 30 min after ingestion, concentrated milk showed better delineation of the intestine than that observed after water ingestion (p<0.01). MR gastrointestinal imaging is a non-invasive method that allows gastrointestinal depiction as well as analysis of motility and passage. Especially with concentrated milk ingestion, the distal intestines were well depicted with adequate contrast filling and distention. (author)

  18. Digital Correlation based on Wavelet Transform for Image Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barba, L; Vargas, L; Torres, C; Mattos, L

    2011-01-01

    In this work is presented a method for the optimization of digital correlators to improve the characteristic detection on images using wavelet transform as well as subband filtering. It is proposed an approach of wavelet-based image contrast enhancement in order to increase the performance of digital correlators. The multiresolution representation is employed to improve the high frequency content of images taken into account the input contrast measured for the original image. The energy of correlation peaks and discrimination level of several objects are improved with this technique. To demonstrate the potentiality in extracting characteristics using the wavelet transform, small objects inside reference images are detected successfully.

  19. Beyond Fourier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Jeffrey C.

    2017-10-01

    Non-Fourier methods of spectrum analysis are gaining traction in NMR spectroscopy, driven by their utility for processing nonuniformly sampled data. These methods afford new opportunities for optimizing experiment time, resolution, and sensitivity of multidimensional NMR experiments, but they also pose significant challenges not encountered with the discrete Fourier transform. A brief history of non-Fourier methods in NMR serves to place different approaches in context. Non-Fourier methods reflect broader trends in the growing importance of computation in NMR, and offer insights for future software development.

  20. Beyond Fourier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Jeffrey C

    2017-10-01

    Non-Fourier methods of spectrum analysis are gaining traction in NMR spectroscopy, driven by their utility for processing nonuniformly sampled data. These methods afford new opportunities for optimizing experiment time, resolution, and sensitivity of multidimensional NMR experiments, but they also pose significant challenges not encountered with the discrete Fourier transform. A brief history of non-Fourier methods in NMR serves to place different approaches in context. Non-Fourier methods reflect broader trends in the growing importance of computation in NMR, and offer insights for future software development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct and simultaneous detection of organic and inorganic ingredients in herbal powder preparations by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Bo; Sun, Su-Qin; Tang, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Jing-Zhao; Zhou, Qun

    2016-08-05

    Herbal powder preparation is a kind of widely-used herbal product in the form of powder mixture of herbal ingredients. Identification of herbal ingredients is the first and foremost step in assuring the quality, safety and efficacy of herbal powder preparations. In this research, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopic identification method is proposed for the direct and simultaneous recognition of multiple organic and inorganic ingredients in herbal powder preparations. First, the reference spectrum of characteristic particles of each herbal ingredient is assigned according to FT-IR results and other available information. Next, a statistical correlation threshold is determined as the lower limit of correlation coefficients between the reference spectrum and a larger number of calibration characteristic particles. After validation, the reference spectrum and correlation threshold can be used to identify herbal ingredient in mixture preparations. A herbal ingredient is supposed to be present if correlation coefficients between the reference spectrum and some sample particles are above the threshold. Using this method, all kinds of herbal materials in powder preparation Kouqiang Kuiyang San are identified successfully. This research shows the potential of FT-IR microspectroscopic identification method for the accurate and quick identification of ingredients in herbal powder preparations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging of the Ocular Anterior Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNabb, Ryan Palmer

    Clinical imaging within ophthalmology has had transformative effects on ocular health over the last century. Imaging has guided clinicians in their pharmaceutical and surgical treatments of macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataracts and numerous other pathologies. Many of the imaging techniques currently used are photography based and are limited to imaging the surface of ocular structures. This limitation forces clinicians to make assumptions about the underlying tissue which may reduce the efficacy of their diagnoses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality that has been widely adopted within the field of ophthalmology in the last 15 years. As an optical imaging technique, OCT utilizes low-coherence interferometry to produce micron-scale three-dimensional datasets of a tissue's structure. Much of the human body consists of tissues that significantly scatter and attenuate optical signals limiting the imaging depth of OCT in those tissues to only 1-2mm. However, the ocular anterior segment is unique among human tissue in that it is primarily transparent or translucent. This allows for relatively deep imaging of tissue structure with OCT and is no longer limited by the optical scattering properties of the tissue. This goal of this work is to develop methods utilizing OCT that offer the potential to reduce the assumptions made by clinicians in their evaluations of their patients' ocular anterior segments. We achieved this by first developing a method to reduce the effects of patient motion during OCT volume acquisitions allowing for accurate, three dimensional measurements of corneal shape. Having accurate corneal shape measurements then allowed us to determine corneal spherical and astigmatic refractive contribution in a given individual. This was then validated in a clinical study that showed OCT better measured refractive change due to surgery than other clinical devices. Additionally, a method was developed to combine

  3. Mechanistic insights into nanotoxicity determined by synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared imaging and multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riding, Matthew J; Trevisan, Júlio; Hirschmugl, Carol J; Jones, Kevin C; Semple, Kirk T; Martin, Francis L

    2012-12-01

    Our ability to identify the mechanisms by which carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) exert toxicity in cells is constrained by the lack of standardized methodologies to assay endpoint effects. Herein we describe a method of mechanistically identifying the effects of various CBN types in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells using multi-beam synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared imaging (SR-FTIRI) at diffraction-limited resolution. This technique overcomes many of the inherent difficulties of assaying nanotoxicity and demonstrates exceptional sensitivity in identifying the effects of CBNs in cells at environmentally-relevant concentrations. We identify key mechanisms of nanotoxicity as the alteration of Amide and lipid biomolecules, but propose more specific bioactivity of CBNs occurs as a result of specific interactions between CBN structural conformation and cellular characteristics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A three-dimensional correlation method for registration of medical images in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiou, Michalakis; Sfakianakis, George N [Department of Radiology, University of Miami, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Nagel, Joachim H [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart 70174 (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    The availability of methods to register multi-modality images in order to `fuse` them to correlate their information is increasingly becoming an important requirement for various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. A variety of image registration methods have been developed but they remain limited to specific clinical applications. Assuming rigid body transformation, two images can be registered if their differences are calculated in terms of translation, rotation and scaling. This paper describes the development and testing of a new correlation based approach for three-dimensional image registration. First, the scaling factors introduced by the imaging devices are calculated and compensated for. Then, the two images become translation invariant by computing their three-dimensional Fourier magnitude spectra. Subsequently, spherical coordinate transformation is performed and then the three-dimensional rotation is computed using a novice approach referred to as {sup p}olar Shells{sup .} The method of polar shells maps the three angles of rotation into one rotation and two translations of a two-dimensional function and then proceeds to calculate them using appropriate transformations based on the Fourier invariance properties. A basic assumption in the method is that the three-dimensional rotation is constrained to one large and two relatively small angles. This assumption is generally satisfied in normal clinical settings. The new three-dimensional image registration method was tested with simulations using computer generated phantom data as well as actual clinical data. Performance analysis and accuracy evaluation of the method using computer simulations yielded errors in the sub-pixel range. (authors) 6 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Fast Fourier transform telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegmark, Max; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2009-01-01

    We propose an all-digital telescope for 21 cm tomography, which combines key advantages of both single dishes and interferometers. The electric field is digitized by antennas on a rectangular grid, after which a series of fast Fourier transforms recovers simultaneous multifrequency images of up to half the sky. Thanks to Moore's law, the bandwidth up to which this is feasible has now reached about 1 GHz, and will likely continue doubling every couple of years. The main advantages over a single dish telescope are cost and orders of magnitude larger field-of-view, translating into dramatically better sensitivity for large-area surveys. The key advantages over traditional interferometers are cost (the correlator computational cost for an N-element array scales as Nlog 2 N rather than N 2 ) and a compact synthesized beam. We argue that 21 cm tomography could be an ideal first application of a very large fast Fourier transform telescope, which would provide both massive sensitivity improvements per dollar and mitigate the off-beam point source foreground problem with its clean beam. Another potentially interesting application is cosmic microwave background polarization.

  6. Sidescan Sonar Image Matching Using Cross Correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisen, Erik; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Stage, Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    When surveying an area for sea mines with a sidescan sonar, the ability to find the same object in two different sonar images is helpful to determine the nature of the object. The main problem with matching two sidescan sonar images is that a scene changes appearance when viewed from different vi...

  7. Functional imaging of hemodynamic stimulus response in the rat retina with ultrahigh-speed spectral / Fourier domain OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, WooJhon; Baumann, Bernhard; Clermont, Allen C.; Feener, Edward P.; Boas, David A.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2013-03-01

    Measuring retinal hemodynamics in response to flicker stimulus is important for investigating pathophysiology in small animal models of diabetic retinopathy, because a reduction in the hyperemic response is thought to be one of the earliest changes in diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we investigated functional imaging of retinal hemodynamics in response to flicker stimulus in the rat retina using an ultrahigh speed spectral / Fourier domain OCT system at 840nm with an axial scan rate of 244kHz. At 244kHz the nominal axial velocity range that could be measured without phase wrapping was +/-37.7mm/s. Pulsatile total retinal arterial blood flow as a function of time was measured using an en face Doppler approach where a 200μm × 200μm area centered at the central retinal artery was repeatedly raster scanned at a volume acquisition rate of 55Hz. Three-dimensional capillary imaging was performed using speckle decorrelation which has minimal angle dependency compared to other angiography techniques based on OCT phase information. During OCT imaging, a flicker stimulus could be applied to the retina synchronously by inserting a dichroic mirror in the imaging interface. An acute transient increase in total retinal blood flow could be detected. At the capillary level, an increase in the degree of speckle decorrelation in capillary OCT angiography images could also be observed, which indicates an increase in the velocity of blood at the capillary level. This method promises to be useful for the investigation of small animal models of ocular diseases.

  8. High-Spatial- and High-Temporal-Resolution Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Breast Imaging with Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transformation: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, John C.; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Snyder, Angela L.; Snyder, Carl J.; Hutter, Diane; Everson, Lenore I.; Eberly, Lynn E.; Nelson, Michael T.; Garwood, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the results of sweep imaging with Fourier transformation (SWIFT) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for diagnostic breast imaging. Materials and Methods Informed consent was obtained from all participants under one of two institutional review board–approved, HIPAA-compliant protocols. Twelve female patients (age range, 19–54 years; mean age, 41.2 years) and eight normal control subjects (age range, 22–56 years; mean age, 43.2 years) enrolled and completed the study from January 28, 2011, to March 5, 2013. Patients had previous lesions that were Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System 4 and 5 based on mammography and/or ultrasonographic imaging. Contrast-enhanced SWIFT imaging was completed by using a 4-T research MR imaging system. Noncontrast studies were completed in the normal control subjects. One of two sized single-breast SWIFT-compatible transceiver coils was used for nine patients and five controls. Three patients and five control subjects used a SWIFT-compatible dual breast coil. Temporal resolution was 5.9–7.5 seconds. Spatial resolution was 1.00 mm isotropic, with later examinations at 0.67 mm isotropic, and dual breast at 1.00 mm or 0.75 mm isotropic resolution. Results Two nonblinded breast radiologists reported SWIFT image findings of normal breast tissue, benign fibroadenomas (six of six lesions), and malignant lesions (10 of 12 lesions) concordant with other imaging modalities and pathologic reports. Two lesions in two patients were not visualized because of coil field of view. The images yielded by SWIFT showed the presence and extent of known breast lesions. Conclusion The SWIFT technique could become an important addition to breast imaging modalities because it provides high spatial resolution at all points during the dynamic contrast-enhanced examination. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:25247405

  9. [Apply fourier transform infrared spectra coupled with two-dimensional correlation analysis to study the evolution of humic acids during composting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Gui-jun; Yu, Jing; Di, Hui-hui; Luo, Shi-jia; Zhou, Da-zhai; Xiao, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    The composition and structure of humic acids formed during composting play an important influence on the quality and mature of compost. In order to explore the composition and evolution mechanism, municipal solid wastes were collected to compost and humic and fulvic acids were obtained from these composted municipal solid wastes. Furthermore, fourier transform infrared spectra and two-dimensional correlation analysis were applied to study the composition and transformation of humic and fulvic acids during composting. The results from fourier transform infrared spectra showed that, the composition of humic acids was complex, and several absorbance peaks were observed at 2917-2924, 2844-2852, 2549, 1662, 1622, 1566, 1454, 1398, 1351, 990-1063, 839 and 711 cm(-1). Compared to humic acids, the composition of fulvci acids was simple, and only three peaks were detected at 1725, 1637 and 990 cm(-1). The appearance of these peaks showed that both humic and fulvic acids comprised the benzene originated from lignin and the polysaccharide. In addition, humic acids comprised a large number of aliphatic and protein which were hardly detected in fulvic acids. Aliphatic, polysaccharide, protein and lignin all were degraded during composting, however, the order of degradation was different between humic and fulvci acids. The result from two-dimensional correlation analysis showed that, organic compounds in humic acids were degraded in the following sequence: aliphatic> protein> polysaccharide and lignin, while that in fulvic acids was as following: protein> polysaccharide and aliphatic. A large number of carboxyl, alcohols and ethers were formed during the degradation process, and the carboxyl was transformed into carbonates. It can be concluded that, fourier transform infrared spectra coupled with two-dimensional correlation analysis not only can analyze the function group composition of humic substances, but also can characterize effectively the degradation sequence of these

  10. Clinical application of Half Fourier Acquisition Single Shot Turbo Spin Echo (HASTE) imaging accelerated by simultaneous multi-slice acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jenni; P Marques, José; Ter Telgte, Annemieke; van Dorst, Anouk; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Meijer, Frederick J A; Norris, David G

    2018-01-01

    As a single-shot sequence with a long train of refocusing pulses, Half-Fourier Acquisition Single-Shot Turbo-Spin-Echo (HASTE) suffers from high power deposition limiting use at high resolutions and high field strengths, particularly if combined with acceleration techniques such as simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) imaging. Using a combination of multiband (MB)-excitation and PINS-refocusing pulses will effectively accelerate the acquisition time while staying within the SAR limitations. In particular, uncooperative and young patients will profit from the speed of the MB-PINS HASTE sequence, as clinical diagnosis can be possible without sedation. Materials and MethodsMB-excitation and PINS-refocusing pulses were incorporated into a HASTE-sequence with blipped CAIPIRINHA and TRAPS including an internal FLASH reference scan for online reconstruction. Whole brain MB-PINS HASTE data were acquired on a Siemens 3T-Prisma system from 10 individuals and compared to a clinical HASTE protocol. ResultsThe proposed MB-PINS HASTE protocol accelerates the acquisition by about a factor 2 compared to the clinical HASTE. The diagnostic image quality proved to be comparable for both sequences for the evaluation of the overall aspect of the brain, the detection of white matter changes and areas of tissue loss, and for the evaluation of the CSF spaces although artifacts were more frequently encountered with MB-PINS HASTE. ConclusionsMB-PINS HASTE enables acquisition of slice accelerated highly T2-weighted images and provides good diagnostic image quality while reducing acquisition time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Imaging retinal degeneration in mice by combining Fourier domain optical coherence tomography and fluorescent scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein-Javaheri, Nima; Molday, Laurie L.; Xu, Jing; Molday, Robert S.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2009-02-01

    Visualization of the internal structures of the retina is critical for clinical diagnosis and monitoring of pathology as well as for medical research investigating the root causes of retinal degeneration. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is emerging as the preferred technique for non-contact sub-surface depth-resolved imaging of the retina. The high resolution cross sectional images acquired in vivo by OCT can be compared to histology to visually delineate the retinal layers. The recent demonstration of the significant sensitivity increase obtained through use of Fourier domain (FD) detection with OCT has been used to facilitate high speed scanning for volumetric reconstruction of the retina in software. The images acquired by OCT are purely structural, relying on refractive index differences in the tissue for contrast, and do not provide information on the molecular content of the sample. We have constructed a FDOCT prototype and combined it with a fluorescent Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (fSLO) to permit real time alignment of the field of view on the retina. The alignment of the FDOCT system to the specimen is crucial for the registration of measurements taken throughout longitudinal studies. In addition, fluorescence detection has been integrated with the SLO to enable the en face localization of a molecular contrast signal, which is important for retinal angiography, and also for detection of autofluorescence associated with some forms of retinal degeneration, for example autofluorescence lipofuscin accumulations are associated with Stargardt's Macular Dystrophy. The integrated FD OCT/fSLO system was investigated for imaging the retina of the mice in vivo.

  12. Fourier transform infrared imaging showing reduced unsaturated lipid content in the hippocampus of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovjan, Andreana C; Kretlow, Ariane; Miller, Lisa M

    2010-04-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential to brain functions such as membrane fluidity, signal transduction, and cell survival. It is also thought that low levels of unsaturated lipid in the brain may contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk or severity. However, it is not known how accumulation of unsaturated lipids is affected in different regions of the hippocampus, which is a central target of AD plaque pathology, during aging. In this study, we used Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) to visualize the unsaturated lipid content in specific regions of the hippocampus in the PSAPP mouse model of AD as a function of plaque formation. Specifically, the unsaturated lipid content was imaged using the olefinic =CH stretching mode at 3012 cm(-1). The axonal, dendritic, and somatic layers of the hippocampus were examined in the mice at 13, 24, 40, and 56 weeks old. Results showed that lipid unsaturation in the axonal layer was significantly increased with normal aging in control (CNT) mice (p avoiding progression of the disease.

  13. Image correlation spectroscopy: mapping correlations in space, time, and reciprocal space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of two recent implementations of image correlation spectroscopy (ICS). The background theory is presented for spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy and image cross-correlation spectroscopy (STICS and STICCS, respectively) as well as k-(reciprocal) space image correlation spectroscopy (kICS). An introduction to the background theory is followed by sections outlining procedural aspects for properly implementing STICS, STICCS, and kICS. These include microscopy image collection, sampling in space and time, sample and fluorescent probe requirements, signal to noise, and background considerations that are all required to properly implement the ICS methods. Finally, procedural steps for immobile population removal and actual implementation of the ICS analysis programs to fluorescence microscopy image time stacks are described. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Three-dimensional Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady state magnetic resonance imaging of the inner ear in patients with unilateral and bilateral Meniere's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateijsen, DJM; Van Hengel, PWJ; Krikke, AP; Van Huffelen, WM; Wit, HP; Albers, FWJ

    Objective: In this study, three-dimensional Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady state (3DFT-CISS) magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify the distance between the vertical part of the posterior semicircular canal and the posterior fossa as a measure of the

  15. Image processing by use of the digital cross-correlator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katou, Yoshinori

    1982-01-01

    We manufactured for trial an instrument which achieved the image processing using digital correlators. A digital correlator perform 64-bit parallel correlation at 20 MH. The output of a digital correlator is a 7-bit word representing. An A-D converter is used to quantize it a precision of six bits. The resulting 6-bit word is fed to six correlators, wired in parallel. The image processing achieved in 12 bits, whose digital outputs converted an analog signal by a D-A converter. This instrument is named the digital cross-correlator. The method which was used in the image processing system calculated the convolution with the digital correlator. It makes various digital filters. In the experiment with the image processing video signals from TV camera were used. The digital image processing time was approximately 5 μs. The contrast was enhanced and smoothed. The digital cross-correlator has the image processing of 16 sorts, and was produced inexpensively. (author)

  16. Slow Light Based On-Chip High Resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer For Geostationary Imaging of Atmospheric Greenhouse Gases, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) in infrared wavelength range is an effective measure for global greenhouse gas monitoring. However, conventional FTS instruments...

  17. Changing image of correlation optics: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelsky, Oleg V; Desyatnikov, Anton S; Gbur, Gregory J; Hanson, Steen G; Lee, Tim; Miyamoto, Yoko; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Wyant, James C

    2016-04-20

    This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting recent progress of correlation optics and illustrating current trends in vector singular optics, internal energy flows at light fields, optical science of materials, and new biomedical applications of lasers.

  18. Changing image of correlation optics: introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Desyatnikov, Anton S.; Gbur, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting recent progress of correlation optics and illustrating current trends in vector singular optics, internal energy flows at light fields, optical science of materials, and new biomedical applications of lasers. (C...

  19. Preliminary investigations into macroscopic attenuated total reflection-fourier transform infrared imaging of intact spherical domains: spatial resolution and image distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everall, Neil J; Priestnall, Ian M; Clarke, Fiona; Jayes, Linda; Poulter, Graham; Coombs, David; George, Michael W

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes preliminary investigations into the spatial resolution of macro attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging and the distortions that arise when imaging intact, convex domains, using spheres as an extreme example. The competing effects of shallow evanescent wave penetration and blurring due to finite spatial resolution meant that spheres within the range 20-140 microm all appeared to be approximately the same size ( approximately 30-35 microm) when imaged with a numerical aperture (NA) of approximately 0.2. A very simple model was developed that predicted this extreme insensitivity to particle size. On the basis of these studies, it is anticipated that ATR imaging at this NA will be insensitive to the size of intact highly convex objects. A higher numerical aperture device should give a better estimate of the size of small spheres, owing to superior spatial resolution, but large spheres should still appear undersized due to the shallow sampling depth. An estimate of the point spread function (PSF) was required in order to develop and apply the model. The PSF was measured by imaging a sharp interface; assuming an Airy profile, the PSF width (distance from central maximum to first minimum) was estimated to be approximately 20 and 30 microm for IR bands at 1600 and 1000 cm(-1), respectively. This work has two significant limitations. First, underestimation of domain size only arises when imaging intact convex objects; if surfaces are prepared that randomly and representatively section through domains, the images can be analyzed to calculate parameters such as domain size, area, and volume. Second, the model ignores reflection and refraction and assumes weak absorption; hence, the predicted intensity profiles are not expected to be accurate; they merely give a rough estimate of the apparent sphere size. Much further work is required to place the field of quantitative ATR-FT-IR imaging on a sound basis.

  20. The Fourier Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (FIXS) for the Argentinian, Scout-launched satelite de Aplicaciones Cienficas-1 (SAC-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Crannell, Carol JO; Desai, Upendra D.; Orwig, Larry E.; Kiplinger, Alan L.; Schwartz, Richard A.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Machado, Marcos; Wood, Kent

    1988-01-01

    The Fourier Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (FIXS) is one of four instruments on SAC-1, the Argentinian satellite being proposed for launch by NASA on a Scout rocket in 1992/3. The FIXS is designed to provide solar flare images at X-ray energies between 5 and 35 keV. Observations will be made on arcsecond size scales and subsecond time scales of the processes that modify the electron spectrum and the thermal distribution in flaring magnetic structures.

  1. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia: MR imaging and anatomic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atlas, S.W.; Grossman, R.I.; Savino, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Internuclear ophthalmoplegia is a gaze disorder characterized by impaired adduction of the side of a lesion in the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) with dissociated nystagmus of the abducting eye. Eleven patients with internuclear ophthalmoplegia (nine with multiple sclerosis, two with infarction) were examined with spin-echo MR imaging performed at 1.5 T. Nine of the 11 patients also underwent CT. MR imaging was highly sensitive (10 of 11 cases) and CT was of no value (0 of 9 cases) in detecting clinically suspected MLF lesions. These lesions must be distinguished from ''pseudo-MLF hyperintensity,'' which appears as a thin, strictly midline, linear hyperintensity just interior to the fourth ventricle and aqueduct in healthy subjects. True MLF lesions are nodular, more prominent, and slightly off the midline, corresponding to the paramedian anatomic site of the MLF

  2. A high-accuracy image registration algorithm using phase-only correlation for dental radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Koichi; Nikaido, Akira; Aoki, Takafumi; Kosuge, Eiko; Kawamata, Ryota; Kashima, Isamu

    2008-01-01

    Dental radiographs have been used for the accurate assessment and treatment of dental diseases. The nonlinear deformation between two dental radiographs may be observed, even if they are taken from the same oral regions of the subject. For an accurate diagnosis, the complete geometric registration between radiographs is required. This paper presents an efficient dental radiograph registration algorithm using Phase-Only Correlation (POC) function. The use of phase components in 2D (two-dimensional) discrete Fourier transforms of dental radiograph images makes possible to achieve highly robust image registration and recognition. Experimental evaluation using a dental radiograph database indicates that the proposed algorithm exhibits efficient recognition performance even for distorted radiographs. (author)

  3. Integrated global digital image correlation for interface delamination characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Hoefnagels, Johan P.M.; Blaysat, Benoî t; Lubineau, Gilles; Geers, Marc G D

    2013-01-01

    , but require accurate interface models to capture (irreversible) crack initiation and propagation behavior observed in experiments. Therefore, an Integrated Global Digital Image Correlation (I-GDIC) strategy is developed for accurate determination of mechanical

  4. Development of digital image correlation method to analyse crack ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    samples were performed to verify the performance of the digital image correlation method. ... development cannot be measured accurately. ..... Mendelson A 1983 Plasticity: Theory and application (USA: Krieger Publishing company Malabar,.

  5. Automation and Control of an Imaging Internal Laser Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometer (I2LD-FTMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McJunkin, Timothy R; Tranter, Troy Joseph; Scott, Jill Rennee

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the automation of an imaging internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (I2LD-FTMS). The I2LD-FTMS consists of a laser-scanning device [Scott and Tremblay, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 2002, 73, 1108–1116] that has been integrated with a laboratory-built FTMS using a commercial data acquisition system (ThermoFinnigan FT/MS, Bremen, Germany). A new user interface has been developed in National Instrument's (Austin, Texas) graphical programming language LabVIEW to control the motors of the laser positioning system and the commercial FTMS data acquisition system. A feature of the FTMS software that allows the user to write macros in a scripting language is used creatively to our advantage in creating a mechanism to control the FTMS from outside its graphical user interface. The new user interface also allows the user to configure target locations. Automation of the data analysis along with data display using commercial graphing software is also described.

  6. Pilomatricomas in children: imaging characteristics with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hyun Wook; Im, Soo Ah; Lim, Gye-Yeon; Park, Hyun Jin; Lee, Heejeong; Sung, Mi Sook; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Jee Young

    2007-01-01

    Although pilomatricoma commonly occurs in children, there is still a poor understanding of the imaging characteristics of pilomatricoma and lack of agreement regarding its imaging findings and histopathologic features. To characterize the radiologic appearance of pilomatricomas on US, CT, and MR and to correlate the imaging findings with histopathologic features. The imaging findings of 47 pilomatricomas on US (n = 17), CT (n = 31), and MR (n = 5) were retrospectively evaluated. Pathologic specimens of all cases were reviewed and compared with imaging findings. All lesions were well-circumscribed, subcutaneous nodules with partial attachment to the overlying skin. On US, the lesions were mostly hyperechoic with posterior acoustic shadowing and hypoechoic rim. On CT, they appeared as enhancing soft-tissue masses with varying amounts of calcification. MR findings were internal reticulations and patchy areas on T2-weighted images and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, corresponding to edematous stroma on pathology. Peritumoral inflammatory changes and connective capsule on pathology were well correlated with imaging findings. Pilomatricoma should be considered when US or CT shows a well-defined hyperechoic or calcific nodule in subcutaneous fat attached to the skin in children. MR images may be helpful in diagnosis. Pathologic findings are well correlated with imaging findings. (orig.)

  7. Verification of Ganoderma (lingzhi) commercial products by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional IR correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Yew-Keong; Sun, Su-Qin; Zhou, Qun; Lan, Jin; Lee, Han-Lim; Chen, Xiang-Dong

    2014-07-01

    Ganoderma commercial products are typically based on two sources, raw material (powder form and/or spores) and extract (water and/or solvent). This study compared three types of Ganoderma commercial products using 1 Dimensional Fourier Transform infrared and second derivative spectroscopy. The analyzed spectra of Ganoderma raw material products were compared with spectra of cultivated Ganoderma raw material powder from different mushroom farms in Malaysia. The Ganoderma extract product was also compared with three types of cultivated Ganoderma extracts. Other medicinal Ganoderma contents in commercial extract product that included glucan and triterpenoid were analyzed by using FTIR and 2DIR. The results showed that water extract of cultivated Ganoderma possessed comparable spectra with that of Ganoderma product water extract. By comparing the content of Ganoderma commercial products using FTIR and 2DIR, product content profiles could be detected. In addition, the geographical origin of the Ganoderma products could be verified by comparing their spectra with Ganoderma products from known areas. This study demonstrated the possibility of developing verification tool to validate the purity of commercial medicinal herbal and mushroom products.

  8. Application of second derivative spectroscopy for increasing molecular specificity of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieppo, L; Saarakkala, S; Närhi, T; Helminen, H J; Jurvelin, J S; Rieppo, J

    2012-05-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is a promising method that enables the analysis of spatial distribution of biochemical components within histological sections. However, analysis of FT-IR spectroscopic data is complicated since absorption peaks often overlap with each other. Second derivative spectroscopy is a technique which enhances the separation of overlapping peaks. The objective of this study was to evaluate the specificity of the second derivative peaks for the main tissue components of articular cartilage (AC), i.e., collagen and proteoglycans (PGs). Histological bovine AC sections were measured before and after enzymatic removal of PGs. Both formalin-fixed sections (n = 10) and cryosections (n = 6) were investigated. Relative changes in the second derivative peak heights caused by the removal of PGs were calculated for both sample groups. The results showed that numerous peaks, e.g., peaks located at 1202 cm(-1) and 1336 cm(-1), altered less than 5% in the experiment. These peaks were assumed to be specific for collagen. In contrast, two peaks located at 1064 cm(-1) and 1376 cm(-1) were seen to alter notably, approximately 50% or more. These peaks were regarded to be specific for PGs. The changes were greater in cryosections than formalin-fixed sections. The results of this study suggest that the second derivative spectroscopy offers a practical and more specific method than routinely used absorption spectrum analysis methods to obtain compositional information on AC with FT-IR spectroscopic imaging. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optical image-hiding method with false information disclosure based on the interference principle and partial-phase-truncation in the fractional Fourier domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Chaoqing; Wang, Xiaogang; Zhou, Guoquan; Chen, Junlang

    2014-01-01

    An image-hiding method based on the optical interference principle and partial-phase-truncation in the fractional Fourier domain is proposed. The primary image is converted into three phase-only masks (POMs) using an analytical algorithm involved partial-phase-truncation and a fast random pixel exchange process. A procedure of a fake silhouette for a decryption key is suggested to reinforce the encryption and give a hint of the position of the key. The fractional orders of FrFT effectively enhance the security of the system. In the decryption process, the POM with false information and the other two POMs are, respectively, placed in the input and fractional Fourier planes to recover the primary image. There are no unintended information disclosures and iterative computations involved in the proposed method. Simulation results are presented to verify the validity of the proposed approach. (letters)

  10. A Generalized Spatial Correlation Model for 3D MIMO Channels based on the Fourier Coefficients of Power Spectrums

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain; Kammoun, Abla; Debbah, Merouane; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have confirmed the adverse impact of fading correlation on the mutual information (MI) of two-dimensional (2D) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems. More recently, the trend is to enhance the system performance

  11. A hybrid correlation analysis with application to imaging genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenxing; Fang, Jian; Calhoun, Vince D.; Wang, Yu-Ping

    2018-03-01

    Investigating the association between brain regions and genes continues to be a challenging topic in imaging genetics. Current brain region of interest (ROI)-gene association studies normally reduce data dimension by averaging the value of voxels in each ROI. This averaging may lead to a loss of information due to the existence of functional sub-regions. Pearson correlation is widely used for association analysis. However, it only detects linear correlation whereas nonlinear correlation may exist among ROIs. In this work, we introduced distance correlation to ROI-gene association analysis, which can detect both linear and nonlinear correlations and overcome the limitation of averaging operations by taking advantage of the information at each voxel. Nevertheless, distance correlation usually has a much lower value than Pearson correlation. To address this problem, we proposed a hybrid correlation analysis approach, by applying canonical correlation analysis (CCA) to the distance covariance matrix instead of directly computing distance correlation. Incorporating CCA into distance correlation approach may be more suitable for complex disease study because it can detect highly associated pairs of ROI and gene groups, and may improve the distance correlation level and statistical power. In addition, we developed a novel nonlinear CCA, called distance kernel CCA, which seeks the optimal combination of features with the most significant dependence. This approach was applied to imaging genetic data from the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC). Experiments showed that our hybrid approach produced more consistent results than conventional CCA across resampling and both the correlation and statistical significance were increased compared to distance correlation analysis. Further gene enrichment analysis and region of interest (ROI) analysis confirmed the associations of the identified genes with brain ROIs. Therefore, our approach provides a powerful tool for finding

  12. Immobilisation-induced changes in forearm bone quantity and quality: radiographic fourier image analysis vs bone densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.; Price, R.I.; Buck, A.M.; University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA; Price, R.L.; University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA; Sweetman, I.M.; Ho, S.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Determinants of bone fracture risk include indices of bone 'quantity' such as bone mineral content (BMC, mineral mass per unit scanned bone length), plus 'environmental' (eg impact force) and 'quality' factors (Melton L.J. III et al, Bone and Min 2: 321, 1987). Bone 'quality' refers largely to the micro-geometry of bone (∼ 10-200μ), but has been less well studied because of the need for bone slices from (invasive) bone biopsies. Such studies often compare the geometry of trabecular networks (eg trabecular bone volume, trabecular number) with clinical outcomes such as fracture rates. Another (invasive) approach is to examine the two-dimensional (2-D) Fourier transform (FT) of a high-resolution radiographic image of the bone slice, since structural information is in theory encoded in the 2-D spatial-frequency (ν) spectrum. Additionally, the FT method can be applied to bone images obtained in-vivo, though superposition of information from the third dimension is a major confounding factor in their interpretation. Quantitative radiography of the ultradistal (UD) forearm permits determination of BMC (Price R et al; ACPSEM 6: 128- 137, 1983 and ACPSEM 11: 36-43, 1988), and (as a bonus) reveals a pattern (suitable for FT analysis) of the radiographic shadows of the 3-D trabecular network projected onto the image plane. Hemiplegia is associated with excessive bone loss in the paralysed (hemi) forearm, and is a model for the study of immobilisation osteoporosis. Thus, by comparing hemiplegia-induced changes in BMC and trabecular structure, derived from the same in vivo radiographic image, it is possible to compare directly the effects of disease on both bone quantity and quality, using the image of the non-paralysed (non-hemi) arm as a control. Seventy-four patients with hemiplegia of duration 3.6±3.6 (Mean±SD) years were studied cross-sectionally for radiographic BMC of their normal and paralysed UD forearms in AP view, each arm in duplicate. Methods

  13. Centrically reordered inversion recovery half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin-echo sequence: improvement of the image quality of oxygen-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Hatabu, Hiroto; Higashino, Takanori; Kawamitsu, Hideaki; Watanabe, Hirokazu; Takenaka, Daisuke; Cauteren, Marc van; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study presented here was to determine the improvement in image quality of oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) subtraction imaging obtained with a centrically reordered inversion recovery half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin-echo (c-IR-HASTE) sequence compared with that obtained with a conventional sequentially reordered inversion recovery single-shot HASTE (s-IR-HASTE) sequence for pulmonary imaging. Materials and methods: Oxygen-enhanced MR imaging using a 1.5 T whole body scanner was performed on 12 healthy, non-smoking volunteers. Oxygen-enhanced MR images were obtained with the coronal two-dimensional (2D) c-IR-HASTE sequence and 2D s-IR-HASTE sequence combined with respiratory triggering. For a 256x256 matrix, 132 phase-encoding steps were acquired including four steps for phase correction. Inter-echo spacing for each sequence was 4.0 ms. The effective echo time (TE) for c-IR-HASTE was 4.0 ms, and 16 ms for s-IR-HASTE. The inversion time (TI) was 900 ms. To determine the improvement in oxygen-enhanced MR subtraction imaging by c-IR-HASTE, CNRs of subtraction image, overall image quality, and image degradation of the c-IR-HASTE and s-IR-HASTE techniques were statistically compared. Results: CNR, overall image quality, and image degradation of c-IR-HASTE images showed significant improvement compared to those s-IR-HASTE images (P<0.05). Conclusion: Centrically reordered inversion recovery half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin-echo (c-IR-HASTE) sequence enhanced the signal from the lung and improved the image quality of oxygen-enhanced MR subtraction imaging

  14. A Generic and Efficient E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator for Next-Generation Radio Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Beardsley, Adam P.; Bowman, Judd D.; Morales, Miguel F.

    2017-05-01

    Modern radio telescopes are favouring densely packed array layouts with large numbers of antennas (NA ≳ 1000). Since the complexity of traditional correlators scales as O(N_A^2), there will be a steep cost for realizing the full imaging potential of these powerful instruments. Through our generic and efficient E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator (epic), we present the first software demonstration of a generalized direct imaging algorithm, namely the Modular Optimal Frequency Fourier imager. Not only does it bring down the cost for dense layouts to O(N_A log _2N_A) but can also image from irregular layouts and heterogeneous arrays of antennas. epic is highly modular, parallelizable, implemented in object-oriented python, and publicly available. We have verified the images produced to be equivalent to those from traditional techniques to within a precision set by gridding coarseness. We have also validated our implementation on data observed with the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). We provide a detailed framework for imaging with heterogeneous arrays and show that epic robustly estimates the input sky model for such arrays. Antenna layouts with dense filling factors consisting of a large number of antennas such as LWA, the Square Kilometre Array, Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array, and Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment will gain significant computational advantage by deploying an optimized version of epic. The algorithm is a strong candidate for instruments targeting transient searches of fast radio bursts as well as planetary and exoplanetary phenomena due to the availability of high-speed calibrated time-domain images and low output bandwidth relative to visibility-based systems.

  15. A no-key-exchange secure image sharing scheme based on Shamir's three-pass cryptography protocol and the multiple-parameter fractional Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jun

    2012-01-30

    In this paper, we propose a novel secure image sharing scheme based on Shamir's three-pass protocol and the multiple-parameter fractional Fourier transform (MPFRFT), which can safely exchange information with no advance distribution of either secret keys or public keys between users. The image is encrypted directly by the MPFRFT spectrum without the use of phase keys, and information can be shared by transmitting the encrypted image (or message) three times between users. Numerical simulation results are given to verify the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  16. Fourier Series

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    polynomials are dense in the class of continuous functions! The body of literature dealing with Fourier series has reached epic proportions over the last two centuries. We have only given the readers an outline of the topic in this article. For the full length episode we refer the reader to the monumental treatise of. A Zygmund.

  17. Fourier Series

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The theory of Fourier series deals with periodic functions. By a periodic ..... including Dirichlet, Riemann and Cantor occupied themselves with the problem of ... to converge only on a set which is negligible in a certain sense (Le. of measure ...

  18. Self-adaptive isogeometric global digital image correlation and digital height correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefnagels, J. P M; Kleinendorst, S. M.; Ruybalid, A. P.; Verhoosel, C. V.; Geers, M. G D; Yoshida, S.; Lamberti, L.; Sciammarella, C.

    2017-01-01

    This work explores the full potential of isogeometric shape functions for global digital image correlation. To this end, a novel DIC and DHC (digital height correlation) methodology have been developed based on adaptive refinement of isogeometric shape functions. Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline

  19. Chemical profiling and adulteration screening of Aquilariae Lignum Resinatum by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lei; Chen, Jian-bo; Zhang, Gui-Jun; Sun, Su-qin; Zheng, Jing

    2017-03-01

    As a kind of expensive perfume and valuable herb, Aquilariae Lignum Resinatum (ALR) is often adulterated for economic motivations. In this research, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is employed to establish a simple and quick method for the adulteration screening of ALR. First, the principal chemical constituents of ALR are characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy at room temperature and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy with thermal perturbation. Besides the common cellulose and lignin compounds, a certain amount of resin is the characteristic constituent of ALR. Synchronous and asynchronous 2D-IR spectra indicate that the resin (an unstable secondary metabolite) is more sensitive than cellulose and lignin (stable structural constituents) to the thermal perturbation. Using a certified ALR sample as the reference, the infrared spectral correlation threshold is determined by 30 authentic samples and 6 adulterated samples. The spectral correlation coefficient of an authentic ALR sample to the standard reference should be not less than 0.9886 (p = 0.01). Three commercial adulterated ALR samples are identified by the correlation threshold. Further interpretation of the infrared spectra of the adulterated samples indicates the common adulterating methods - counterfeiting with other kind of wood, adding ingredient such as sand to increase the weight, and adding the cheap resin such as rosin to increase the content of resin compounds. Results of this research prove that FT-IR spectroscopy can be used as a simple and accurate quality control method of ALR.

  20. Measurement of correlated azimuthal anisotropy Fourier harmonics with subevent cumulants in pPb collisions at 8.16 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Event-by-event correlations of azimuthal anisotropy Fourier coefficients ($v_n$) in 8.16 TeV pPb data are extracted using a subevent four-particle cumulant technique with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Each combination of four particles is required to fall into two, three or four distinct subevents within the full pseudorapidity range from -2.4 to 2.4 using tracks with transverse momentum between 0.3 and 3.0 GeV/c. Using the subevent technique, $v_n$ correlations are measured as a function of particle multiplicity and compared to the standard method without using subevents. At high multiplicity, $v_2$ and $v_3$ anticorrelation exhibits a consistent behavior among the various methods. The $v_2$ and $v_4$ correlation strength is found to depend on the number of subevents used in the calculation. Toward the low-multiplicity region, data from different methods diverge because of different contributions of few-particle correlations. The results presented represent a key step in understanding the onset of collectiv...

  1. Simulating Optical Correlation on a Digital Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Bryan

    1998-04-01

    Optical Correlation is a useful tool for recognizing objects in video scenes. In this paper, we explore the characteristics of a composite filter known as the equal correlation peak synthetic discriminant function (ECP SDF). Although the ECP SDF is commonly used in coherent optical correlation systems, the authors simulated the operation of a correlator using an EPIX frame grabber/image processor board to complete this work. Issues pertaining to simulating correlation using an EPIX board will be discussed. Additionally, the ability of the ECP SDF to detect objects that have been subjected to inplane rotation and small scale changes will be addressed by correlating filters against true-class objects placed randomly within a scene. To test the robustness of the filters, the results of correlating the filter against false-class objects that closely resemble the true class will also be presented.

  2. Spatial correlation genetic algorithm for fractal image compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, M.-S.; Teng, W.-C.; Jeng, J.-H.; Hsieh, J.-G.

    2006-01-01

    Fractal image compression explores the self-similarity property of a natural image and utilizes the partitioned iterated function system (PIFS) to encode it. This technique is of great interest both in theory and application. However, it is time-consuming in the encoding process and such drawback renders it impractical for real time applications. The time is mainly spent on the search for the best-match block in a large domain pool. In this paper, a spatial correlation genetic algorithm (SC-GA) is proposed to speed up the encoder. There are two stages for the SC-GA method. The first stage makes use of spatial correlations in images for both the domain pool and the range pool to exploit local optima. The second stage is operated on the whole image to explore more adequate similarities if the local optima are not satisfied. With the aid of spatial correlation in images, the encoding time is 1.5 times faster than that of traditional genetic algorithm method, while the quality of the retrieved image is almost the same. Moreover, about half of the matched blocks come from the correlated space, so fewer bits are required to represent the fractal transform and therefore the compression ratio is also improved

  3. Comparison of diagnostic capability of macular ganglion cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer among primary open angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal population using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and determining their functional correlation in Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabanita Barua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Analysis of diagnostic ability of macular ganglionic cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL in glaucoma. Aim: To correlate functional and structural parameters and comparing predictive value of each of the structural parameters using Fourier-domain (FD optical coherence tomography (OCT among primary open angle glaucoma (POAG and ocular hypertension (OHT versus normal population. Setting and Design: Single centric, cross-sectional study done in 234 eyes. Materials and Methods: Patients were enrolled in three groups: POAG, ocular hypertensive and normal (40 patients in each group. After comprehensive ophthalmological examination, patients underwent standard automated perimetry and FD-OCT scan in optic nerve head and ganglion cell mode. The relationship was assessed by correlating ganglion cell complex (GCC parameters with mean deviation. Results were compared with RNFL parameters. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed with SPSS, analysis of variance, t-test, Pearson′s coefficient, and receiver operating curve. Results: All parameters showed strong correlation with visual field (P 0.5 when compared with other parameters. None of the parameters showed significant diagnostic capability to detect OHT from normal population. In diagnosing early glaucoma from OHT and normal population, only inferior GCC had statistically significant AUC value (0.715. Conclusion: In this study, GCC and RNFL parameters showed equal predictive capability in perimetric versus normal group. In early stage, inferior GCC was the best parameter. In OHT population, single day cross-sectional imaging was not valuable.

  4. Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging Shows Reduced Unsaturated Lipid Content in the Hippocampus of a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leskovjan, Andreana C.; Kretlow, Ariane; Miller, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential to brain functions such as membrane fluidity, signal transduction, and cell survival. It is also thought that low levels of unsaturated lipid in the brain may contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) risk or severity. However, it is not known how accumulation of unsaturated lipids is affected in different regions of the hippocampus, which is a central target of AD plaque pathology, during aging. In this study, we used Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging ...

  5. Quantitative characterization of chitosan in the skin by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic imaging and ninhydrin assay: application in transdermal sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, A; Wong, T W

    2016-07-01

    The chitosan has been used as the primary excipient in transdermal particulate dosage form design. Its distribution pattern across the epidermis and dermis is not easily accessible through chemical assay and limited to radiolabelled molecules via quantitative autoradiography. This study explored Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy imaging technique with built-in microscope as the means to examine chitosan molecular distribution over epidermis and dermis with the aid of histology operation. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy skin imaging was conducted using chitosan of varying molecular weights, deacetylation degrees, particle sizes and zeta potentials, obtained via microwave ligation of polymer chains at solution state. Both skin permeation and retention characteristics of chitosan increased with the use of smaller chitosan molecules with reduced acetyl content and size, and increased positive charge density. The ratio of epidermal to dermal chitosan content decreased with the use of these chitosan molecules as their accumulation in dermis (3.90% to 18.22%) was raised to a greater extent than epidermis (0.62% to 1.92%). A larger dermal chitosan accumulation nonetheless did not promote the transdermal polymer passage more than the epidermal chitosan. A small increase in epidermal chitosan content apparently could fluidize the stratum corneum and was more essential to dictate molecular permeation into dermis and systemic circulation. The histology technique aided Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy imaging approach introduces a new dimension to the mechanistic aspect of chitosan in transdermal delivery. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Real time implementation of the parametric imaging correlation algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogorodski, Piotr; Wolek, Tomasz; Wasielewski, Jaroslaw; Piatkowski, Adam [Medical and Nuclear Electronics Division, Institute of Radioelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-665 Warsaw, Nowowiejska 15/19 (Poland)

    1999-12-31

    A novel method for functional image evaluation from image set obtained in contrast aided Ultrafast Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging will be presented. The method converts temporal set of images of first-pass transit of injected contrast, to a single parametric image. The main difference between proposed procedure and other widely accepted methods is fast, that our method applies correlation and discrimination analysis to each concentration-time curve, instead of fitting them to the given a priori tracer kinetics model. A stress will be put on execution speed (i.e. shortening of the time required to obtain a perfusion relevant image), and easiest user interface allowing the physician to utilize the system without any technical assistance. Both execution speed and user interface should satisfy requirements in the interventional procedures. (authors)

  7. Smartphone based scalable reverse engineering by digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidvans, Amey; Basu, Saurabh

    2018-03-01

    There is a need for scalable open source 3D reconstruction systems for reverse engineering. This is because most commercially available reconstruction systems are capital and resource intensive. To address this, a novel reconstruction technique is proposed. The technique involves digital image correlation based characterization of surface speeds followed by normalization with respect to angular speed during rigid body rotational motion of the specimen. Proof of concept of the same is demonstrated and validated using simulation and empirical characterization. Towards this, smart-phone imaging and inexpensive off the shelf components along with those fabricated additively using poly-lactic acid polymer with a standard 3D printer are used. Some sources of error in this reconstruction methodology are discussed. It is seen that high curvatures on the surface suppress accuracy of reconstruction. Reasons behind this are delineated in the nature of the correlation function. Theoretically achievable resolution during smart-phone based 3D reconstruction by digital image correlation is derived.

  8. Cross Correlation versus Normalized Mutual Information on Image Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bin; Tilton, James C.; Lin, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study to quantitatively assess and compare cross correlation and normalized mutual information methods used to register images in subpixel scale. The study shows that the normalized mutual information method is less sensitive to unaligned edges due to the spectral response differences than is cross correlation. This characteristic makes the normalized image resolution a better candidate for band to band registration. Improved band-to-band registration in the data from satellite-borne instruments will result in improved retrievals of key science measurements such as cloud properties, vegetation, snow and fire.

  9. In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, Paul W. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Shrout, J. D. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Sweedler, J. V. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Farrand, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-01-25

    This document constitutes the final technical report for DE-SC0006642, In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities, a project carried out collaboratively by investigators at Notre Dame and UIUC. The work carried out under DOE support in this project produced advances in two areas: development of new highly sophisticated correlated imaging approaches and the application of these new tools to the growth and differentiation of microbial communities under a variety of environmental conditions. A significant effort involved the creation of technical enhancements and sampling approaches to allow us to advance heterocorrelated mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and correlated Raman microscopy (CRM) from bacterial cultures and biofilms. We then exploited these measurement advances in heterocorrelated MS/CRM imaging to determine relationship of signaling molecules and excreted signaling molecules produced by P. aeruginosa to conditions relevant to the rhizosphere. In particular, we: (1) developed a laboratory testbed mimic for the rhizosphere to enable microbial growth on slides under controlled conditions; (2) integrated specific measurements of (a) rhamnolipids, (b) quinolone/quinolones, and (c) phenazines specific to P. aeruginosa; and (3) utilized the imaging tools to probe how messenger secretion, quorum sensing and swarming behavior are correlated with behavior.

  10. Correlated statistical uncertainties in coded-aperture imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleenor, Matthew C.; Blackston, Matthew A.; Ziock, Klaus P.

    2015-01-01

    In nuclear security applications, coded-aperture imagers can provide a wealth of information regarding the attributes of both the radioactive and nonradioactive components of the objects being imaged. However, for optimum benefit to the community, spatial attributes need to be determined in a quantitative and statistically meaningful manner. To address a deficiency of quantifiable errors in coded-aperture imaging, we present uncertainty matrices containing covariance terms between image pixels for MURA mask patterns. We calculated these correlated uncertainties as functions of variation in mask rank, mask pattern over-sampling, and whether or not anti-mask data are included. Utilizing simulated point source data, we found that correlations arose when two or more image pixels were summed. Furthermore, we found that the presence of correlations was heightened by the process of over-sampling, while correlations were suppressed by the inclusion of anti-mask data and with increased mask rank. As an application of this result, we explored how statistics-based alarming is impacted in a radiological search scenario

  11. Speckle correlation resolution enhancement of wide-field fluorescence imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hasan

    2016-03-01

    Structured illumination enables high-resolution fluorescence imaging of nanostructures [1]. We demonstrate a new high-resolution fluorescence imaging method that uses a scattering layer with a high-index substrate as a solid immersion lens [2]. Random scattering of coherent light enables a speckle pattern with a very fine structure that illuminates the fluorescent nanospheres on the back surface of the high-index substrate. The speckle pattern is raster-scanned over the fluorescent nanospheres using a speckle correlation effect known as the optical memory effect. A series of standard-resolution fluorescence images per each speckle pattern displacement are recorded by an electron-multiplying CCD camera using a commercial microscope objective. We have developed a new phase-retrieval algorithm to reconstruct a high-resolution, wide-field image from several standard-resolution wide-field images. We have introduced phase information of Fourier components of standard-resolution images as a new constraint in our algorithm which discards ambiguities therefore ensures convergence to a unique solution. We demonstrate two-dimensional fluorescence images of a collection of nanospheres with a deconvolved Abbe resolution of 116 nm and a field of view of 10 µm × 10 µm. Our method is robust against optical aberrations and stage drifts, therefore excellent for imaging nanostructures under ambient conditions. [1] M. G. L. Gustafsson, J. Microsc. 198, 82-87 (2000). [2] H. Yilmaz, E. G. van Putten, J. Bertolotti, A. Lagendijk, W. L. Vos, and A. P. Mosk, Optica 2, 424-429 (2015).

  12. Application of group analysis to the spatially homogeneous and isotropic Boltzmann equation with source using its Fourier image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, Yurii N; Meleshko, Sergey V; Suriyawichitseranee, Amornrat

    2015-01-01

    Group analysis of the spatially homogeneous and molecular energy dependent Boltzmann equations with source term is carried out. The Fourier transform of the Boltzmann equation with respect to the molecular velocity variable is considered. The correspondent determining equation of the admitted Lie group is reduced to a partial differential equation for the admitted source. The latter equation is analyzed by an algebraic method. A complete group classification of the Fourier transform of the Boltzmann equation with respect to a source function is given. The representation of invariant solutions and corresponding reduced equations for all obtained source functions are also presented. (paper)

  13. App. 1. Fourier series and Fourier transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Definitions, formulas and practical properties in quantum mechanics are presented: Fourier series (development of periodic function, Bessel-Parseval equality); Fourier transform (Parseval-Plancherel formula, Fourier transform in three-dimensional space) [fr

  14. Using Spatial Structure Analysis of Hyperspectral Imaging Data and Fourier Transformed Infrared Analysis to Determine Bioactivity of Surface Pesticide Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Nansen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Many food products are subjected to quality control analyses for detection of surface residue/contaminants, and there is a trend of requiring more and more documentation and reporting by farmers regarding their use of pesticides. Recent outbreaks of food borne illnesses have been a major contributor to this trend. With a growing need for food safety measures and “smart applications” of insecticides, it is important to develop methods for rapid and accurate assessments of surface residues on food and feed items. As a model system, we investigated detection of a miticide applied to maize leaves and its miticidal bioactivity over time, and we compared two types of reflectance data: fourier transformed infrared (FTIR data and hyperspectral imaging (HI data. The miticide (bifenazate was applied at a commercial field rate to maize leaves in the field, with or without application of a surfactant, and with or without application of a simulated “rain event”. In addition, we collected FTIR and HI from untreated control leaves (total of five treatments. Maize leaf data were collected at seven time intervals from 0 to 48 hours after application. FTIR data were analyzed using conventional analysis of variance of miticide-specific vibration peaks. Two unique FTIR vibration peaks were associated with miticide application (1,700 cm−1 and 763 cm−1. The integrated intensities of these two peaks, miticide application, surfactant, rain event, time between miticide application, and rain event were used as explanatory variables in a linear multi-regression fit to spider mite mortality. The same linear multi-regression approach was applied to variogram parameters derived from HI data in five selected spectral bands (664, 683, 706, 740, and 747 nm. For each spectral band, we conducted a spatial structure analysis, and the three standard variogram parameters (“sill”, “range”, and “nugget” were examined as possible “indicators” of miticide

  15. Chemical profiling and adulteration screening of Aquilariae Lignum Resinatum by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lei; Chen, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Gui-Jun; Sun, Su-Qin; Zheng, Jing

    2017-03-05

    As a kind of expensive perfume and valuable herb, Aquilariae Lignum Resinatum (ALR) is often adulterated for economic motivations. In this research, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is employed to establish a simple and quick method for the adulteration screening of ALR. First, the principal chemical constituents of ALR are characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy at room temperature and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy with thermal perturbation. Besides the common cellulose and lignin compounds, a certain amount of resin is the characteristic constituent of ALR. Synchronous and asynchronous 2D-IR spectra indicate that the resin (an unstable secondary metabolite) is more sensitive than cellulose and lignin (stable structural constituents) to the thermal perturbation. Using a certified ALR sample as the reference, the infrared spectral correlation threshold is determined by 30 authentic samples and 6 adulterated samples. The spectral correlation coefficient of an authentic ALR sample to the standard reference should be not less than 0.9886 (p=0.01). Three commercial adulterated ALR samples are identified by the correlation threshold. Further interpretation of the infrared spectra of the adulterated samples indicates the common adulterating methods - counterfeiting with other kind of wood, adding ingredient such as sand to increase the weight, and adding the cheap resin such as rosin to increase the content of resin compounds. Results of this research prove that FT-IR spectroscopy can be used as a simple and accurate quality control method of ALR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of Chuanxiong Rhizoma and its active components by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy combined with two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yizhen; Lv, Beiran; Wang, Jingjuan; Liu, Yang; Sun, Suqin; Xiao, Yao; Lu, Lina; Xiang, Li; Yang, Yanfang; Qu, Lei; Meng, Qinghong

    2016-01-15

    As complicated mixture systems, active components of Chuanxiong Rhizoma are very difficult to identify and discriminate. In this paper, the macroscopic IR fingerprint method including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), the second derivative infrared spectroscopy (SD-IR) and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2DCOS-IR), was applied to study and identify Chuanxiong raw materials and its different segmented production of HPD-100 macroporous resin. Chuanxiong Rhizoma is rich in sucrose. In the FT-IR spectra, water eluate is more similar to sucrose than the powder and the decoction. Their second derivative spectra amplified the differences and revealed the potentially characteristic IR absorption bands and combined with the correlation coefficient, concluding that 50% ethanol eluate had more ligustilide than other eluates. Finally, it can be found from 2DCOS-IR spectra that proteins were extracted by ethanol from Chuanxiong decoction by HPD-100 macroporous resin. It was demonstrated that the above three-step infrared spectroscopy could be applicable for quick, non-destructive and effective analysis and identification of very complicated and similar mixture systems of traditional Chinese medicines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy of a carbosilane dendrimer with peripheral ammonium groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, Maria-Cristina, E-mail: cpopescu@icmpp.ro [' Petru Poni' Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry (Romania); Gomez, Rafael; Mata, Fco Javier de la; Rasines, Beatriz [Universidad de Alcala, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica (Spain); Simionescu, Bogdan C. [' Petru Poni' Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry (Romania)

    2013-06-15

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and 2D correlation spectroscopy were used to study the microstructural changes occurring on heating of a new carbosilane dendrimer with peripheral ammonium groups. Temperature-dependent spectral variations in the 3,010-2,710, 1,530-1,170, and 1,170-625 cm{sup -1} regions were monitored during the heating process. The dependence, on temperature, of integral absorptions and position of spectral bands was established and the spectral modifications associated with molecular conformation rearrangements, allowing molecular shape changes, were found. Before 180 Degree-Sign C, the studied carbosilane dendrimer proved to be stable, while at higher temperatures it oxidizes and Si-O groups appear. 2D IR correlation spectroscopy gives new information about the effect of temperature on the structure and dynamics of the system. Synchronous and asynchronous spectra indicate that, at low temperature, conformational changes of CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}-N{sup +} groups take place first. With increasing temperature, the intensity variation of the CH{sub 2}, C-N, Si-C and C-C groups from the dendritic core is faster than that of the terminal units. This indicates that, with increasing temperature, the segments of the dendritic core obtain enough energy to change their conformation more easily as compared to the terminal units, due to their internal flexibility.

  18. Characterization by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy of a carbosilane dendrimer with peripheral ammonium groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Maria-Cristina; Gómez, Rafael; Mata, Fco Javier de la; Rasines, Beatriz; Simionescu, Bogdan C.

    2013-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and 2D correlation spectroscopy were used to study the microstructural changes occurring on heating of a new carbosilane dendrimer with peripheral ammonium groups. Temperature-dependent spectral variations in the 3,010–2,710, 1,530–1,170, and 1,170–625 cm −1 regions were monitored during the heating process. The dependence, on temperature, of integral absorptions and position of spectral bands was established and the spectral modifications associated with molecular conformation rearrangements, allowing molecular shape changes, were found. Before 180 °C, the studied carbosilane dendrimer proved to be stable, while at higher temperatures it oxidizes and Si–O groups appear. 2D IR correlation spectroscopy gives new information about the effect of temperature on the structure and dynamics of the system. Synchronous and asynchronous spectra indicate that, at low temperature, conformational changes of CH 3 and CH 3 –N + groups take place first. With increasing temperature, the intensity variation of the CH 2 , C–N, Si–C and C–C groups from the dendritic core is faster than that of the terminal units. This indicates that, with increasing temperature, the segments of the dendritic core obtain enough energy to change their conformation more easily as compared to the terminal units, due to their internal flexibility.

  19. Cross-correlated imaging of distributed mode filtering rod fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko; Barankov, Roman; Jørgensen, Mette Marie

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the modal properties of an 85μm core distributed mode filtering rod fiber using cross-correlated (C2) imaging. We evaluate suppression of higher-order modes (HOMs) under severely misaligned mode excitation and identify a single-mode regime where HOMs are suppressed by more than 20dB....

  20. Application of digital image correlation method for analysing crack ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    centrated strain by imitating the treatment of micro-cracks using the finite element ... water and moisture to penetrate the concrete leading to serious rust of the ... The correlations among various grey values of digital images are analysed for ...

  1. Application of digital-image-correlation techniques in analysing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Basis theory of strain analysis using the digital image correlation method .... Type 304N Stainless Steel (Modulus of Elasticity = 193 MPa, Tensile Yield .... also proves the accuracy of the qualitative analyses by using the DIC ... We thank the National Science Council of Taiwan for supporting this research through grant. No.

  2. Imaging in scattering media using correlation image sensors and sparse convolutional coding

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix; Xiao, Lei; Kolb, Andreas; Hullin, Matthias B.; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Correlation image sensors have recently become popular low-cost devices for time-of-flight, or range cameras. They usually operate under the assumption of a single light path contributing to each pixel. We show that a more thorough analysis of the sensor data from correlation sensors can be used can be used to analyze the light transport in much more complex environments, including applications for imaging through scattering and turbid media. The key of our method is a new convolutional sparse coding approach for recovering transient (light-in-flight) images from correlation image sensors. This approach is enabled by an analysis of sparsity in complex transient images, and the derivation of a new physically-motivated model for transient images with drastically improved sparsity.

  3. Imaging in scattering media using correlation image sensors and sparse convolutional coding

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-10-17

    Correlation image sensors have recently become popular low-cost devices for time-of-flight, or range cameras. They usually operate under the assumption of a single light path contributing to each pixel. We show that a more thorough analysis of the sensor data from correlation sensors can be used can be used to analyze the light transport in much more complex environments, including applications for imaging through scattering and turbid media. The key of our method is a new convolutional sparse coding approach for recovering transient (light-in-flight) images from correlation image sensors. This approach is enabled by an analysis of sparsity in complex transient images, and the derivation of a new physically-motivated model for transient images with drastically improved sparsity.

  4. Correlation Filters for Detection of Cellular Nuclei in Histopathology Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Asif; Asif, Amina; Rajpoot, Nasir; Arif, Muhammad; Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir Afsar

    2017-11-21

    Nuclei detection in histology images is an essential part of computer aided diagnosis of cancers and tumors. It is a challenging task due to diverse and complicated structures of cells. In this work, we present an automated technique for detection of cellular nuclei in hematoxylin and eosin stained histopathology images. Our proposed approach is based on kernelized correlation filters. Correlation filters have been widely used in object detection and tracking applications but their strength has not been explored in the medical imaging domain up till now. Our experimental results show that the proposed scheme gives state of the art accuracy and can learn complex nuclear morphologies. Like deep learning approaches, the proposed filters do not require engineering of image features as they can operate directly on histopathology images without significant preprocessing. However, unlike deep learning methods, the large-margin correlation filters developed in this work are interpretable, computationally efficient and do not require specialized or expensive computing hardware. A cloud based webserver of the proposed method and its python implementation can be accessed at the following URL: http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/software.html#corehist .

  5. Imaging vibration of the cochlear partition of an excised guinea pig cochlea using phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Niloy; Zeng, Yaguang; Fridberger, Anders; Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2011-03-01

    Studying the sound stimulated vibrations of various membranes that form the complex structure of the organ of Corti in the cochlea of the inner ear is essential for understanding how the travelling sound wave of the basilar membrane couples its energy to the organ structures. In this paper we report the feasibility of using phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) to image the vibration of various micro-structures of the cochlea at the same time. An excised cochlea of a guinea pig was stimulated using sounds at various frequencies and vibration image was obtained. When measuring the apex area, vibration signal from different turns, which have different best response frequencies are obtained in the same image. The method has the potential to measure the response from a much wider region of the cochlea than any other currently used method. The noise floor for vibration image for the system at 200 Hz was ~0.3nm.

  6. MR imaging of symptomatic osteochondromas with pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, M.; Knapp, T.; White, L.M.; Wunder, J.S.; Bell, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the value of MR imaging in the diagnosis and differentiation of the various symptomatic complications of osteochondromas, providing pathological correlation with emphasis on the usefulness of MR imaging as a single imaging modality in these patients. Design. We retrospectively reviewed all MR examinations of clinically symptomatic osteochondromas (30 patients) performed at our institution between March 1990 and October 1997. Patients. Thirty patients had clinically symptomatic osteochondromas during the study period. Twenty patients were male and 10 were female. There were five cases of multiple osteochondromatosis. Pathological correlation was available in 24 patients. Results and conclusion. Symptomatic complications included fracture (7%), osseous deformity limiting range of motion (23%), vascular injury (7%), neurological compromise (10%), bursa formation (27%) and malignant transformation (27%). MR imaging was able to diagnose or suggest the etiology for the clinical symptomatology in all cases, demonstrating that it is an ideal imaging modality in the diagnostic evaluation of symptomatic complications of osteochondromas and often avoids the need for further imaging. (orig.)

  7. Fluorescence decay time imaging using an imaging photon detector with a radio frequency photon correlation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Christopher G.; Mitchell, A. C.; Murray, J. G.

    1990-05-01

    An imaging photon detector has been modified to incorporate fast timing electronics coupled to a custom built photon correlator interfaced to a RISC computer. Using excitation with intensity- muodulated light, fluorescence images can be readily obtained where contrast is determined by the decay time of emission, rather than by intensity. This technology is readily extended to multifrequency phase/demodulation fluorescence imaging or to differential polarised phase fluorometry. The potential use of the correlator for confocal imaging with a laser scanner is also briefly discussed.

  8. Hippocampal sclerosis: correlation of MR imaging findings with surgical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Kyung Won; Han, Moon Hee; Park, Sung Ho; Nam, Hyun Woo; Choi, Kyu Ho; Cho, Woo Ho

    2001-01-01

    Atrophy and a high T2 signal of the hippocampus are known to be the principal MR imaging findings of hippocampal sclerosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not individual MRI findings correlate with surgical outcome in patients with this condition. Preoperative MR imaging findings in 57 consecutive patients with pathologically-proven hippocampal sclerosis who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy and were followed-up for 24 months or more were retrospectively reviewed, and the results were compared with the postsurgical outcome (Engel classification). The MR images included routine sagittal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted spin-echo images, and oblique coronal T1-weighted 3D gradient-echo and T2-weighted 2D fast spin-echo images obtained on either a 1.5 T or 1.0 T unit. The images were visually evaluated by two neuroradiologists blinded to the outcome; their focus was the presence or absence of atrophy and a high T2 hippocampal signal. Hippocampal atrophy was seen in 96% of cases (55/57) [100% (53/53) of the good outcome group (Engel class I and II), and 50% (2/4) of the poor outcome group (class III and IV)]. A high T2 hippocampal signal was seen in 61% of cases (35/57) [62% (33/53) of the good outcome group and 50% (2/4) of the poor outcome group]. All 35 patients with a high T2 signal had hippocampal atrophy. 'Normal' hippocampus, as revealed by MR imaging, occurred in 4% of patients (2/57), both of whom showed a poor outcome (Engel class III). The presence or absence of hippocampal atrophy correlated well with surgical outcome (p 0.05). Compared with a high T2 hippocampal signal, hippocampal atrophy is more common and correlates better with surgical outcome. For the prediction of this, it thus appears to be the more useful indicator

  9. Correlation of angiography and MR imaging in cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloft, H.J.; Phillips, C.D.; Dix, J.E.; McNulty, B.C.; Kallmes, D.F.; Zagardo, M.T.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: MR imaging and cerebral angiography were correlated in patients with primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) to assess the relative roles of these imaging modalities in the diagnosis. Material and Methods: In 9 patients, MR imaging and angiography were compared with regard to the relative involvement of each major vascular territory. Vascular territories assessed were the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral arteries, and the posterior fossa. Results: All patients had angiographic findings consistent with vasculitis in multiple vascular territories. MR findings ranged from normal to diffusely abnormal. One patient had a completely normal MR investigation. Of 50 territories affected by vasculitis on angiography, 17 (34%) were normal on MR. Conclusion: Relative to cerebral angiography, MR imaging is a poor indicator of the presence or absence of PACNS. Angiography is indicated when clinical suspicion of PACNS is strong, regardless of the findings on MR. (orig.)

  10. Vaginal Masses: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features with Pathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsayes, K.M.; Narra, V.R.; Dillman, J.R.; Velcheti, V.; Hameed, O.; Tongdee, R.; Menias, C.O.

    2007-01-01

    The detection of vaginal lesions has increased with the expanding use of cross-sectional imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - with its high-contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities - is often useful for characterizing vaginal masses. Vaginal masses can be classified as congenital, inflammatory, cystic (benign), and neoplastic (benign or malignant) in etiology. Recognition of the typical MR imaging features of such lesions is important because it often determines the treatment approach and may obviate surgery. Finally, vaginal MR imaging can be used to evaluate post-treatment changes related to previous surgery and radiation therapy. In this article, we will review pertinent vaginal anatomy, vaginal and pelvic MRI technique, and the MRI features of a variety of vaginal lesions with pathological correlation

  11. Imaging pediatric magnet ingestion with surgical-pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otjen, Jeffrey P.; Iyer, Ramesh S.; Rohrmann, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common problem in the pediatric population and a frequent cause for emergency room visits. Magnets are common household objects that when ingested can bring about severe, possibly fatal gastrointestinal complications. Radiography is an integral component of the management of these children. Pediatric and emergency radiologists alike must be aware of imaging manifestations of magnet ingestion, as their identification drives decision-making for consulting surgeons and gastroenterologists. Radiology can thus substantially augment the clinical history and physical exam, facilitating appropriate management. This manuscript sequentially presents cases of magnet ingestion featuring imaging findings coupled with surgical and pathological correlation. Each case is presented to highlight ways in which the radiologist can make impactful contributions to diagnosis and management. Clinical overview with pitfalls of magnet ingestion imaging and an imaging decision tree will also be presented. (orig.)

  12. Imaging pediatric magnet ingestion with surgical-pathological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otjen, Jeffrey P; Rohrmann, Charles A; Iyer, Ramesh S

    2013-07-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common problem in the pediatric population and a frequent cause for emergency room visits. Magnets are common household objects that when ingested can bring about severe, possibly fatal gastrointestinal complications. Radiography is an integral component of the management of these children. Pediatric and emergency radiologists alike must be aware of imaging manifestations of magnet ingestion, as their identification drives decision-making for consulting surgeons and gastroenterologists. Radiology can thus substantially augment the clinical history and physical exam, facilitating appropriate management. This manuscript sequentially presents cases of magnet ingestion featuring imaging findings coupled with surgical and pathological correlation. Each case is presented to highlight ways in which the radiologist can make impactful contributions to diagnosis and management. Clinical overview with pitfalls of magnet ingestion imaging and an imaging decision tree will also be presented.

  13. Correlation and image compression for limited-bandwidth CCD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Douglas G.

    2005-07-01

    As radars move to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles with limited-bandwidth data downlinks, the amount of data stored and transmitted with each image becomes more significant. This document gives the results of a study to determine the effect of lossy compression in the image magnitude and phase on Coherent Change Detection (CCD). We examine 44 lossy compression types, plus lossless zlib compression, and test each compression method with over 600 CCD image pairs. We also derive theoretical predictions for the correlation for most of these compression schemes, which compare favorably with the experimental results. We recommend image transmission formats for limited-bandwidth programs having various requirements for CCD, including programs which cannot allow performance degradation and those which have stricter bandwidth requirements at the expense of CCD performance.

  14. Imaging of brain tumors with histological correlations. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevelegas, Antonios (ed.)

    2011-07-01

    This volume provides a deeper understanding of the diagnosis of brain tumors by correlating radiographic imaging features with the underlying pathological abnormalities. All modern imaging modalities are used to complete a diagnostic overview of brain tumors with emphasis on recent advances in diagnostic neuroradiology. High-quality illustrations depicting common and uncommon imaging characteristics of a wide range of brain tumors are presented and analysed, drawing attention to the ways in which these characteristics reflect different aspects of pathology. Important theoretical considerations are also discussed. Since the first edition, chapters have been revised and updated and new material has been added, including detailed information on the clinical application of functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. Radiologists and other clinicians interested in the current diagnostic approach to brain tumors will find this book to be an invaluable and enlightening clinical tool. (orig.)

  15. Photon-number correlation for quantum enhanced imaging and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meda, A.; Losero, E.; Samantaray, N.; Scafirimuto, F.; Pradyumna, S.; Avella, A.; Ruo-Berchera, I.; Genovese, M.

    2017-09-01

    In this review we present the potentialities and the achievements of the use of non-classical photon-number correlations in twin-beam states for many applications, ranging from imaging to metrology. Photon-number correlations in the quantum regime are easily produced and are rather robust against unavoidable experimental losses, and noise in some cases, if compared to the entanglement, where losing one photon can completely compromise the state and its exploitable advantages. Here, we will focus on quantum enhanced protocols in which only phase-insensitive intensity measurements (photon-number counting) are performed, which allow probing the transmission/absorption properties of a system, leading, for example, to innovative target detection schemes in a strong background. In this framework, one of the advantages is that the sources experimentally available emit a wide number of pair-wise correlated modes, which can be intercepted and exploited separately, for example by many pixels of a camera, providing a parallelism, essential in several applications, such as wide-field sub-shot-noise imaging and quantum enhanced ghost imaging. Finally, non-classical correlation enables new possibilities in quantum radiometry, e.g. the possibility of absolute calibration of a spatial resolving detector from the on-off single-photon regime to the linear regime in the same setup.

  16. Assessing the Accuracy and Reliability of Root Crack and Fracture Detection in Teeth Using Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transform (SWIFT) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurmans, Tyler J.

    Introduction: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has the potential to aid in determining the presence and extent of cracks/fractures in teeth due to more advantageous contrast, without ionizing radiation. An MRI technique called Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transform (SWIFT) has overcome many of the inherent difficulties of conventional MRI with detecting fast-relaxing signals from densely mineralized dental tissues. The objectives of this in vitro investigation were to develop MRI criteria for root crack/fracture identification in teeth and to establish intra- and inter-rater reliabilities and corresponding sensitivity and specificity values for the detection of tooth-root cracks/fractures in SWIFT MRI and limited field of view (FOV) CBCT. Materials and Methods: MRI-based criteria for crack/fracture appearance was developed by an MRI physicist and 6 dentists, including 3 endodontists and 1 Oral and Maxillofacial (OMF) radiologist. Twenty-nine human adult teeth previously extracted following clinical diagnosis by a board-certified endodontist of a root crack/fracture were frequency-matched to 29 non-cracked controls. Crack/fracture status confirmation was performed with magnified visual inspection, transillumination and vital staining. Samples were scanned with two 3D imaging modalities: 1) SWIFT MRI (10 teeth/scan) via a custom oral radiofrequency (RF) coil and a 90cm, 4-T magnet; 2) Limited FOV CBCT (1 tooth/scan) via a Carestream (CS) 9000 (Rochester, NY). Following a training period, a blinded 4-member panel (3 endodontists, 1 OMF radiologist) evaluated the images with a proportion randomly re-tested to establish intra-rater reliability. Overall observer agreement was measured using Cohen's kappa and levels of agreement judged using the criteria of Landis and Koch. Sensitivity and specificity were computed with 95% confidence interval (CI); statistical significance was set at alpha ≤ 0.05. Results: MRI-based crack/fracture criteria were defined as 1-2 sharply

  17. Correlation of breast image alignment using biomechanical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Angela; Rajagopal, Vijay; Bier, Peter; Nielsen, Poul M. F.; Nash, Martyn P.

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death among women around the world. Researchers have found that a combination of imaging modalities (such as x-ray mammography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound) leads to more effective diagnosis and management of breast cancers because each imaging modality displays different information about the breast tissues. In order to aid clinicians in interpreting the breast images from different modalities, we have developed a computational framework for generating individual-specific, 3D, finite element (FE) models of the breast. Medical images are embedded into this model, which is subsequently used to simulate the large deformations that the breasts undergo during different imaging procedures, thus warping the medical images to the deformed views of the breast in the different modalities. In this way, medical images of the breast taken in different geometric configurations (compression, gravity, etc.) can be aligned according to physically feasible transformations. In order to analyse the accuracy of the biomechanical model predictions, squared normalised cross correlation (NCC2) was used to provide both local and global comparisons of the model-warped images with clinical images of the breast subject to different gravity loaded states. The local comparison results were helpful in indicating the areas for improvement in the biomechanical model. To improve the modelling accuracy, we will need to investigate the incorporation of breast tissue heterogeneity into the model and altering the boundary conditions for the breast model. A biomechanical image registration tool of this kind will help radiologists to provide more reliable diagnosis and localisation of breast cancer.

  18. Chondrosarcoma : MR imaging findings correlated with pathologic classification and grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seong Whi; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Sam Soo; Lee, Sang Hyun; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the MR imaging findings of chondrosarcomas by correlation with pathologic classification and grade. We performed MR imaging-pathologic correlation of nineteen chondrosarcomas. Conventional chondrosarcomas accounted for 15 cases (grade I:6, II:6, III:3) and the mesenchymal and dedifferentiated types each accounted for two. MR signal intensity (SI) of the tumor on T1- and T2-weighted images (T1WI and T2WI, respectively), was classified as homogeneous or heterogeneous low-, iso- or high SI, and enhancing pattern as marginal, marginal and septal, marginal and nodular, or diffuse enhancement. Eighteen cases of chondrosarcomas (95%) showed homogeneous or heterogeneous low- or iso SI on T1WI and high SI on T2WI. Low grade conventional chondrosarcomas showed marginal and septal (n=8/10) or marginal (n=2/10) enhancement on Gd-enhanced MR images. Grade III conventional chondrosarcomas showed marginal or marginal and nodular enhancement. Dedifferentiated and mesenchymal chondrosarcomas showed marginal and nodular or diffuse enhancement. Chondrosarcomas showed iso- or low SI on T1WI and high SI on T2WI. Marginal and septal enhancement was demonstrated on Gd-enhanced MR images of grade I and II conventional chondrosarcomas. If a tumor showed a marginal and nodular or diffuse enhancing pattern, this suggested it was a of high grade chondrosarcoma

  19. Referential processing: reciprocity and correlates of naming and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paivio, A; Clark, J M; Digdon, N; Bons, T

    1989-03-01

    To shed light on the referential processes that underlie mental translation between representations of objects and words, we studied the reciprocity and determinants of naming and imaging reaction times (RT). Ninety-six subjects pressed a key when they had covertly named 248 pictures or imaged to their names. Mean naming and imagery RTs for each item were correlated with one another, and with properties of names, images, and their interconnections suggested by prior research and dual coding theory. Imagery RTs correlated .56 (df = 246) with manual naming RTs and .58 with voicekey naming RTs from prior studies. A factor analysis of the RTs and of 31 item characteristics revealed 7 dimensions. Imagery and naming RTs loaded on a common referential factor that included variables related to both directions of processing (e.g., missing names and missing images). Naming RTs also loaded on a nonverbal-to-verbal factor that included such variables as number of different names, whereas imagery RTs loaded on a verbal-to-nonverbal factor that included such variables as rated consistency of imagery. The other factors were verbal familiarity, verbal complexity, nonverbal familiarity, and nonverbal complexity. The findings confirm the reciprocity of imaging and naming, and their relation to constructs associated with distinct phases of referential processing.

  20. Extracting flat-field images from scene-based image sequences using phase correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caron, James N., E-mail: Caron@RSImd.com [Research Support Instruments, 4325-B Forbes Boulevard, Lanham, Maryland 20706 (United States); Montes, Marcos J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7231, 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Obermark, Jerome L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 8231, 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Flat-field image processing is an essential step in producing high-quality and radiometrically calibrated images. Flat-fielding corrects for variations in the gain of focal plane array electronics and unequal illumination from the system optics. Typically, a flat-field image is captured by imaging a radiometrically uniform surface. The flat-field image is normalized and removed from the images. There are circumstances, such as with remote sensing, where a flat-field image cannot be acquired in this manner. For these cases, we developed a phase-correlation method that allows the extraction of an effective flat-field image from a sequence of scene-based displaced images. The method uses sub-pixel phase correlation image registration to align the sequence to estimate the static scene. The scene is removed from sequence producing a sequence of misaligned flat-field images. An average flat-field image is derived from the realigned flat-field sequence.

  1. The methods for generating tomographic images using transmition, emission and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. II. Fourier method and iterative methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursu, I.; Demco, D.E.; Gligor, T.D.; Pop, G.; Dollinger, R.

    1987-01-01

    In a wide variety of applications it is necessary to infer the structure of a multidimensional object from a set of its projections. Computed tomography is at present largely extended in the medical field, but the industrial application may ultimately far exceed its medical applications. Two techniques for reconstructing objects from their projections are presented: Fourier methods and iterative techniques. The paper also contains a brief comparative study of the reconstruction algorithms. (authors)

  2. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR FT-IR) for Rapid Determination of Microbial Cell Lipid Content: Correlation with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan-Oropeza, Aaron; Rebois, Rolando; David, Michelle; Moussa, Fathi; Dazzi, Alexandre; Bleton, Jean; Virolle, Marie-Joelle; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane

    2017-10-01

    There is a growing interest worldwide for the production of renewable oil without mobilizing agriculture lands; fast and reliable methods are needed to identify highly oleaginous microorganisms of potential industrial interest. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the relevance of attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy to achieve this goal. To do so, the total lipid content of lyophilized samples of five Streptomyces strains with varying lipid content was assessed with two classical quantitative but time-consuming methods, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ATR Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy in transmission mode with KBr pellets and the fast ATR method, often questioned for its lack of reliability. A linear correlation between these three methods was demonstrated allowing the establishment of equations to convert ATR values expressed as CO/amide I ratio, into micrograms of lipid per milligram of biomass. The ATR method proved to be as reliable and quantitative as the classical GC-MS and FT-IR in transmission mode methods but faster and more reproducible than the latter since it involves far less manipulation for sample preparation than the two others. Attenuated total reflection could be regarded as an efficient fast screening method to identify natural or genetically modified oleaginous microorganisms by the scientific community working in the field of bio-lipids.

  3. Monitoring of civil engineering structures using Digital Image Correlation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malesa, M.; Szczepanek, D.; Kujawińska, M.; Świercz, A.; Kołakowski, P.

    2010-06-01

    The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique enables full field, noncontact measurements of displacements and strains of a wide variety of objects. An adaptation of the DIC technique for monitoring of civil-engineering structures is presented in the paper. A general concept of the complex, automatic monitoring system, in which the DIC sensor plays an important role is described. Some new software features, which aim to facilitate outdoor measurements and speed up the correlation analysis, is also introduced. As an example of application, measurements of a railway bridge in Nieporet (Poland) are presented. The experimental results are compared with displacements of a FEM model of the bridge.

  4. Resolving Fast, Confined Diffusion in Bacteria with Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, David J; Tuson, Hannah H; Biteen, Julie S

    2016-05-24

    By following single fluorescent molecules in a microscope, single-particle tracking (SPT) can measure diffusion and binding on the nanometer and millisecond scales. Still, although SPT can at its limits characterize the fastest biomolecules as they interact with subcellular environments, this measurement may require advanced illumination techniques such as stroboscopic illumination. Here, we address the challenge of measuring fast subcellular motion by instead analyzing single-molecule data with spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) with a focus on measurements of confined motion. Our SPT and STICS analysis of simulations of the fast diffusion of confined molecules shows that image blur affects both STICS and SPT, and we find biased diffusion rate measurements for STICS analysis in the limits of fast diffusion and tight confinement due to fitting STICS correlation functions to a Gaussian approximation. However, we determine that with STICS, it is possible to correctly interpret the motion that blurs single-molecule images without advanced illumination techniques or fast cameras. In particular, we present a method to overcome the bias due to image blur by properly estimating the width of the correlation function by directly calculating the correlation function variance instead of using the typical Gaussian fitting procedure. Our simulation results are validated by applying the STICS method to experimental measurements of fast, confined motion: we measure the diffusion of cytosolic mMaple3 in living Escherichia coli cells at 25 frames/s under continuous illumination to illustrate the utility of STICS in an experimental parameter regime for which in-frame motion prevents SPT and tight confinement of fast diffusion precludes stroboscopic illumination. Overall, our application of STICS to freely diffusing cytosolic protein in small cells extends the utility of single-molecule experiments to the regime of fast confined diffusion without requiring advanced

  5. Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Correlated Spin Orbit Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Unlimited UU UU UU UU 14-06-2016 15-Mar-2013 14-Mar-2016 Final Report: Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Correlated Spin-Orbit Phases The views...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Ultrafast optical spectroscopy , nonlinear optical spectroscopy , iridates, cuprates REPORT...California Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91125 -0001 ABSTRACT Number of Papers published in peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Optical Spectroscopy and

  6. Image denoising by exploring external and internal correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Huanjing; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jingyu; Wu, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Single image denoising suffers from limited data collection within a noisy image. In this paper, we propose a novel image denoising scheme, which explores both internal and external correlations with the help of web images. For each noisy patch, we build internal and external data cubes by finding similar patches from the noisy and web images, respectively. We then propose reducing noise by a two-stage strategy using different filtering approaches. In the first stage, since the noisy patch may lead to inaccurate patch selection, we propose a graph based optimization method to improve patch matching accuracy in external denoising. The internal denoising is frequency truncation on internal cubes. By combining the internal and external denoising patches, we obtain a preliminary denoising result. In the second stage, we propose reducing noise by filtering of external and internal cubes, respectively, on transform domain. In this stage, the preliminary denoising result not only enhances the patch matching accuracy but also provides reliable estimates of filtering parameters. The final denoising image is obtained by fusing the external and internal filtering results. Experimental results show that our method constantly outperforms state-of-the-art denoising schemes in both subjective and objective quality measurements, e.g., it achieves >2 dB gain compared with BM3D at a wide range of noise levels.

  7. Three-dimensional facial digitization using advanced digital image correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hieu; Kieu, Hien; Wang, Zhaoyang; Le, Hanh N D

    2018-03-20

    Presented in this paper is an effective technique to acquire the three-dimensional (3D) digital images of the human face without the use of active lighting and artificial patterns. The technique is based on binocular stereo imaging and digital image correlation, and it includes two key steps: camera calibration and image matching. The camera calibration involves a pinhole model and a bundle-adjustment approach, and the governing equations of the 3D digitization process are described. For reliable pixel-to-pixel image matching, the skin pores and freckles or lentigines on the human face serve as the required pattern features to facilitate the process. It employs feature-matching-based initial guess, multiple subsets, iterative optimization algorithm, and reliability-guided computation path to achieve fast and accurate image matching. Experiments have been conducted to demonstrate the validity of the proposed technique. The simplicity of the approach and the affordable cost of the implementation show its practicability in scientific and engineering applications.

  8. Integrated global digital image correlation for interface delamination characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Hoefnagels, Johan P.M.

    2013-07-23

    Interfacial delamination is a key reliability challenge in composites and micro-electronic systems due to (high-density) integration of dissimilar materials. Predictive finite element models are used to minimize delamination failures during design, but require accurate interface models to capture (irreversible) crack initiation and propagation behavior observed in experiments. Therefore, an Integrated Global Digital Image Correlation (I-GDIC) strategy is developed for accurate determination of mechanical interface behavior from in-situ delamination experiments. Recently, a novel miniature delamination setup was presented that enables in-situ microscopic characterization of interface delamination while sensitively measuring global load-displacement curves for all mode mixities. Nevertheless, extraction of detailed mechanical interface behavior from measured images is challenging, because deformations are tiny and measurement noise large. Therefore, an advanced I-GDIC methodology is developed which correlates the image patterns by only deforming the images using kinematically-admissible \\'eigenmodes\\' that correspond to the few parameters controlling the interface tractions in an analytic description of the crack tip deformation field, thereby greatly enhancing accuracy and robustness. This method is validated on virtual delamination experiments, simulated using a recently developed self-adaptive cohesive zone (CZ) finite element framework. © The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2014.

  9. Salivary gland masses. Dynamic MR imaging and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jinho; Inoue, Shingo; Ishizuka, Yasuhito; Shindo, Hiroaki; Kawanishi, Masayuki; Kakizaki, Dai; Abe, Kimihiko; Ebihara, Yoshiro

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of salivary gland masses. We retrospectively examined 19 salivary gland masses that were pathologically diagnosed by surgical operation or biopsy. We obtained T1- and T2-weighted images on MRI, performed dynamic studies on each mass and examined the correlation between enhancement patterns and pathological findings. Four enhancement patterns were recognized on contrast-enhanced MRI: type 1 showed marked, homogeneous enhancement; type 2 slights, homogeneous enhancement; type 3 marginal enhancement; and type 4 poor enhancement of the mass. Most pleomorphic adenomas had a type 1 enhancement pattern, but two had a type 2 pattern. Pathologically, each mass enhancement pattern had different tumor cell and matrix components. Warthin's tumor generally showed the type 4 pattern. Primary malignant tumors of the salivary gland all showed the type 3 pattern, and pathological specimens showed many tumor cells along the marginal portion of the tumor. One inflammatory cyst and one Warthin's tumor also showed the type 3 pattern. Except for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, the enhancement patterns of late phase images and dynamic study images were the same. Dynamic MRI added little diagnostic information about salivary gland masses, but the contrast-enhanced MR features correlated well with the pathological findings. (author)

  10. Preoperative assessment of trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm using constructive interference in steady state-three-dimensional fourier transformation magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamakami, Iwao; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Hirai, Shinji; Yamaura, Akira [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-11-01

    Results of microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and hemifacial spasm (HFS) may be improved by accurate preoperative assessment of neurovascular relationships at the root entry/exit zone (REZ). Constructive interference in steady state (CISS)-three-dimensional Fourier transformation (3DFT) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was evaluated for visualizing the neurovascular relationships at the REZ. Fourteen patients with TN and eight patients with HFS underwent MR imaging using CISS-3DFT and 3D fast inflow with steady-state precession (FISP) sequences. Axial images of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) obtained by the two sequences were reviewed to assess the neurovascular relationships at the REZ of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Eleven patients subsequently underwent MVD. Preoperative MR imaging findings were related to surgical observations and results. CISS MR imaging provided excellent contrast between the cranial nerves, small vessels, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the CPA. CISS was significantly better than FISP for delineating anatomic detail in the CPA (trigeminal and facial nerves, petrosal vein) and abnormal neurovascular relationships responsible for TN and HFS (vascular contact and deformity at the REZ). Preoperative CISS MR imaging demonstrated precisely the neurovascular relationships at the REZ and identified the offending artery in all seven patients with TN undergoing MVD. CISS MR imaging has high resolution and excellent contrast between cranial nerves, small vessels, and CSF, so can precisely and accurately delineate normal and abnormal neurovascular relationships at the REZ in the CPA, and is a valuable preoperative examination for MVD. (author)

  11. Preoperative assessment of trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm using constructive interference in steady state-three-dimensional fourier transformation magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakami, Iwao; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Hirai, Shinji; Yamaura, Akira

    2000-01-01

    Results of microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and hemifacial spasm (HFS) may be improved by accurate preoperative assessment of neurovascular relationships at the root entry/exit zone (REZ). Constructive interference in steady state (CISS)-three-dimensional Fourier transformation (3DFT) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was evaluated for visualizing the neurovascular relationships at the REZ. Fourteen patients with TN and eight patients with HFS underwent MR imaging using CISS-3DFT and 3D fast inflow with steady-state precession (FISP) sequences. Axial images of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) obtained by the two sequences were reviewed to assess the neurovascular relationships at the REZ of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Eleven patients subsequently underwent MVD. Preoperative MR imaging findings were related to surgical observations and results. CISS MR imaging provided excellent contrast between the cranial nerves, small vessels, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the CPA. CISS was significantly better than FISP for delineating anatomic detail in the CPA (trigeminal and facial nerves, petrosal vein) and abnormal neurovascular relationships responsible for TN and HFS (vascular contact and deformity at the REZ). Preoperative CISS MR imaging demonstrated precisely the neurovascular relationships at the REZ and identified the offending artery in all seven patients with TN undergoing MVD. CISS MR imaging has high resolution and excellent contrast between cranial nerves, small vessels, and CSF, so can precisely and accurately delineate normal and abnormal neurovascular relationships at the REZ in the CPA, and is a valuable preoperative examination for MVD. (author)

  12. Global correlation imaging of magnetic total field gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Lianghui; Meng, Xiaohong; Shi, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Firstly we introduce the correlation imaging approach for the x-, y- and z-gradients of a magnetic total field anomaly for deriving the distribution of equivalent magnetic sources of the subsurface. In this approach, the subsurface space is divided into a regular grid, and then a correlation coefficient function is computed at each grid node, based on the cross-correlation between the x-gradient (or y-gradient or z-gradient) of the observed magnetic total field anomaly and the x-gradient (or y-gradient or z-gradient) of the theoretical magnetic total field anomaly due to a magnetic dipole. The resultant correlation coefficient is used to describe the probability of a magnetic dipole occurring at the node. We then define a global correlation coefficient function for comprehensively delineating the probability of an occurrence of a magnetic dipole, which takes, at each node, the maximum positive value of the corresponding correlation coefficient function of the three gradients. We finally test the approach both on synthetic data and real data from a metallic deposit area in the middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River, China. (paper)

  13. An image correlation procedure for digitally reconstructed radiographs and electronic portal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Lei; Boyer, Arthur L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To study a procedure that uses megavoltage digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) calculated from patient's three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) data as a reference image for correlation with on-line electronic portal images (EPIs) to detect patient setup errors. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage DRRs were generated by ray tracing through a modified volumetric CT data set in which CT numbers were converted into linear attenuation coefficients for the therapeutic beam energy. The DRR transmission image was transformed to the grayscale window of the EPI by a histogram-matching technique. An alternative approach was to calibrate the transmission DRR using a measured response curve of the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). This forces the calculated transmission fluence values to be distributed in the same range as that of the EPID image. A cross-correlation technique was used to determine the degree of alignment of the patient anatomy found in the EPID image relative to the reference DRR. Results: Phantom studies demonstrated that the correlation procedure had a standard deviation of 0.5 mm and 0.5 deg. in aligning translational shifts and in-plane rotations. Systematic errors were found between a reference DRR and a reference EPID image. The automated grayscale image-correlation process was completed within 3 s on a workstation computer or 12 s on a PC. Conclusion: The alignment procedure allows the direct comparison of a patient's treatment portal designed with a 3D planning computer with a patient's on-line portal image acquired at the treatment unit. The image registration process is automated to the extent that it requires minimal user intervention, and it is fast and accurate enough for on-line clinical applications

  14. Imaging of congenital mesoblastic nephroma with pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R.; Ngan, Bo Yee; Gundogan, Munire; Daneman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    There are a variety of imaging findings for congenital mesoblastic nephroma (CMN) and two main pathological variants: classic and cellular. To determine whether imaging findings in children can predict the likely pathological variant. We reviewed imaging in children with pathology-proven CMN. Imaging findings correlated with gross and histological appearance. In 15 boys and 15 girls with CMN, US was performed in 27, CT in 19, and MRI in 7. Cystic components were readily identified on US; central hemorrhage was better differentiated on CT. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for both. Histology confirmed classic CMN in 13 children, cellular CMN in 14 and ''mixed'' CMN in 3. Age at presentation was significantly higher in children with the cellular variant. Of 15 solid or predominantly solid tumors and 10 lesions with a hypoechoic ring, 12 and 7, respectively, had pathology consistent with classic CMN. In contrast, five of seven with intratumoral hemorrhage and all with a large cystic/necrotic component had pathology consistent with the cellular variant. The imaging appearance of CMN is often determined by the pathological type of tumor. Findings suggestive of the classic variant include a peripheral hypoechoic ring or large solid component. In comparison, cystic/necrotic change and hemorrhage is much more common in cellular CMN. (orig.)

  15. Digital image correlation based on a fast convolution strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Zhan, Qin; Xiong, Chunyang; Huang, Jianyong

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, the efficiency of digital image correlation (DIC) methods has attracted increasing attention because of its increasing importance for many engineering applications. Based on the classical affine optical flow (AOF) algorithm and the well-established inverse compositional Gauss-Newton algorithm, which is essentially a natural extension of the AOF algorithm under a nonlinear iterative framework, this paper develops a set of fast convolution-based DIC algorithms for high-efficiency subpixel image registration. Using a well-developed fast convolution technique, the set of algorithms establishes a series of global data tables (GDTs) over the digital images, which allows the reduction of the computational complexity of DIC significantly. Using the pre-calculated GDTs, the subpixel registration calculations can be implemented efficiently in a look-up-table fashion. Both numerical simulation and experimental verification indicate that the set of algorithms significantly enhances the computational efficiency of DIC, especially in the case of a dense data sampling for the digital images. Because the GDTs need to be computed only once, the algorithms are also suitable for efficiently coping with image sequences that record the time-varying dynamics of specimen deformations.

  16. Bessel Fourier Orientation Reconstruction (BFOR): An Analytical Diffusion Propagator Reconstruction for Hybrid Diffusion Imaging and Computation of q-Space Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinbor, A. Pasha; Chung, Moo K.; Wu, Yu-Chien; Alexander, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The ensemble average propagator (EAP) describes the 3D average diffusion process of water molecules, capturing both its radial and angular contents. The EAP can thus provide richer information about complex tissue microstructure properties than the orientation distribution function (ODF), an angular feature of the EAP. Recently, several analytical EAP reconstruction schemes for multiple q-shell acquisitions have been proposed, such as diffusion propagator imaging (DPI) and spherical polar Fourier imaging (SPFI). In this study, a new analytical EAP reconstruction method is proposed, called Bessel Fourier orientation reconstruction (BFOR), whose solution is based on heat equation estimation of the diffusion signal for each shell acquisition, and is validated on both synthetic and real datasets. A significant portion of the paper is dedicated to comparing BFOR, SPFI, and DPI using hybrid, non-Cartesian sampling for multiple b-value acquisitions. Ways to mitigate the effects of Gibbs ringing on EAP reconstruction are also explored. In addition to analytical EAP reconstruction, the aforementioned modeling bases can be used to obtain rotationally invariant q-space indices of potential clinical value, an avenue which has not yet been thoroughly explored. Three such measures are computed: zero-displacement probability (Po), mean squared displacement (MSD), and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA). PMID:22963853

  17. Atlantoaxial subluxation. Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging correlated to myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kojima, R.

    Twenty-nine patients with atlantoaxial subluxation (18 with rheumatoid arthritis, 2 due to trauma, 4 with os odontoideum, and one each with polyarteritis nodosa, rheumatic fever, Klippel-Feil syndrome, achondroplasia, and cause unknown) were evaluated using a 0.22 tesla resistive MRI unit. Cord compression was classified into four grades according to the degree on magnetic resonance imaging. There were 7 patients with no thecal sac compression (grade 0), 10 with a minimal degree of subarachnoid space compression without cord compression (grade 1), 7 with mild cord compression (grade 2), and 5 with severe cord compression or cord atrophy (grade 3). Although the severity of myelopathy showed poor correlation with the atlantodental interval on conventional radiography, high correlation was observed between MR grading and the degree of myelopathy. The high signal intensity foci were observed in 7 or 12 patients with cord compression (grades 2 and 3) on T2 weighted images. Other frequently observed findings in rheumatoid arthritis included soft tissue masses of low to intermediate signal intensity in the paraodontoid space, erosions of the odontoid processes, and atlanto-axial impaction on T1 and T2 weighted images.

  18. Cell Matrix Remodeling Ability Shown by Image Spatial Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chi-Li; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling is a critical step of many biological and pathological processes. However, most of the studies to date lack a quantitative method to measure ECM remodeling at a scale comparable to cell size. Here, we applied image spatial correlation to collagen second harmonic generation (SHG) images to quantitatively evaluate the degree of collagen remodeling by cells. We propose a simple statistical method based on spatial correlation functions to determine the size of high collagen density area around cells. We applied our method to measure collagen remodeling by two breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7), which display different degrees of invasiveness, and a fibroblast cell line (NIH/3T3). We found distinct collagen compaction levels of these three cell lines by applying the spatial correlation method, indicating different collagen remodeling ability. Furthermore, we quantitatively measured the effect of Latrunculin B and Marimastat on MDA-MB-231 cell line collagen remodeling ability and showed that significant collagen compaction level decreases with these treatments. PMID:23935614

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of massive bone allografts with histologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffner, E.G.; Soulen, R.L.; Ryan, J.R.; Qureshi, F.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to better understand the MRI appearance of massive bone allografts. The MRI findings of three massive bone allografts imaged in vivo were correlated with the histologic findings following removal of the allografts. A fourth allograft, never implanted, was imaged and evaluated histologically. Allografts were placed for the treatment of primary or recurrent osteosarcoma. The in-vivo allografts have a heterogeneous appearance on MRI which we attribute to the revascularization process. Fibrovascular connective tissue grows into the graft in a patchy, focal fashion, down the medullary canal from the graft-host junction and adjacent to the periosteum. The marrow spaces are initially devoid of normal cellular elements and occupied by fat and gelatinous material. This normal postoperative appearance of massive bone allografts must not be interpreted as recurrent neoplasm or infection in the allograft. Recognition of these complications rests on features outside the marrow. (orig./MG)

  20. Accuracy evaluation of optical distortion calibration by digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zeren; Zhang, Qingchuan; Su, Yong; Wu, Shangquan

    2017-11-01

    Due to its convenience of operation, the camera calibration algorithm, which is based on the plane template, is widely used in image measurement, computer vision and other fields. How to select a suitable distortion model is always a problem to be solved. Therefore, there is an urgent need for an experimental evaluation of the accuracy of camera distortion calibrations. This paper presents an experimental method for evaluating camera distortion calibration accuracy, which is easy to implement, has high precision, and is suitable for a variety of commonly used lens. First, we use the digital image correlation method to calculate the in-plane rigid body displacement field of an image displayed on a liquid crystal display before and after translation, as captured with a camera. Next, we use a calibration board to calibrate the camera to obtain calibration parameters which are used to correct calculation points of the image before and after deformation. The displacement field before and after correction is compared to analyze the distortion calibration results. Experiments were carried out to evaluate the performance of two commonly used industrial camera lenses for four commonly used distortion models.

  1. Neuropsychological Correlates of Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Paul G.; Kubicki, Marek; Gurrera, Ronald J.; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; Frumin, Melissa; McCarley, Robert W.; Shenton, Martha E.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia (n = 41) and healthy comparison participants (n = 46) completed neuropsychological measures of intelligence, memory, and executive function. A subset of each group also completed magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies (fractional anisotropy and cross-sectional area) of the uncinate fasciculus (UF) and cingulate bundle (CB). Patients with schizophrenia showed reduced levels of functioning across all neuropsychological measures. In addition, selective neuropsychological–DTI relationships emerged. Among patients but not controls, lower levels of declarative–episodic verbal memory correlated with reduced left UF, whereas executive function errors related to performance monitoring correlated with reduced left CB. The data suggested abnormal DTI patterns linking declarative–episodic verbal memory deficits to the left UF and executive function deficits to the left CB among patients with schizophrenia. PMID:15506830

  2. Multimodal imaging in cerebral gliomas and its neuropathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gempt, Jens, E-mail: jens.gempt@lrz.tum.de [Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Soehngen, Eric [Abteilung für Neuroradiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Abteilung für Neuropathologie des Instituts für Allgemeine Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Förster, Stefan [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Ryang, Yu-Mi [Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Schlegel, Jürgen [Abteilung für Neuropathologie des Instituts für Allgemeine Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); and others

    2014-05-15

    Introduction: Concerning the preoperative clinical diagnostic work-up of glioma patients, tumor heterogeneity challenges the oncological therapy. The current study assesses the performance of a multimodal imaging approach to differentiate between areas in malignant gliomas and to investigate the extent to which such a combinatorial imaging approach might predict the underlying histology. Methods: Prior to surgical resection, patients harboring intracranial gliomas underwent MRIs (MR-S, PWI) and {sup 18}F-FET-PETs. Intratumoral and peritumoral biopsy targets were defined, by MRI only, by FET-PET only, and by MRI and FET-PET combined, and biopsied prior to surgical resection and which then received separate histopathological examinations. Results: In total, 38 tissue samples were acquired (seven glioblastomas, one anaplastic astrocytoma, one anaplastic oligoastrocytoma, one diffuse astrocytoma, and one oligoastrocytoma) and underwent histopathological analysis. The highest mean values of Mib1 and CD31 were found in the target point “T’ defined by MRI and FET-PET combined. A significant correlation between NAA/Cr and PET tracer uptake (−0.845, p < 0.05) as well as Cho/Cr ratio and cell density (0.742, p < 0.05) and NAA/Cr ratio and MIB-1 (−0761, p < 0.05) was disclosed for this target point, though not for target points defined by MRI and FET-PET alone. Conclusion: Multimodal-imaging-guided stereotactic biopsy correlated more with histological malignancy indices, such as cell density and MIB-1 labeling, than targets that were based solely on the highest amino acid uptake or contrast enhancement on MRI. The results of our study indicate that a combined PET-MR multimodal imaging approach bears potential benefits in detecting glioma heterogeneity.

  3. Fourier phase in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttam, Shikhar; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Phase of an electromagnetic wave propagating through a sample-of-interest is well understood in the context of quantitative phase imaging in transmission-mode microscopy. In the past decade, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography has been used to extend quantitative phase imaging to the reflection-mode. Unlike transmission-mode electromagnetic phase, however, the origin and characteristics of reflection-mode Fourier phase are poorly understood, especially in samples with a slowly varying refractive index. In this paper, the general theory of Fourier phase from first principles is presented, and it is shown that Fourier phase is a joint estimate of subresolution offset and mean spatial frequency of the coherence-gated sample refractive index. It is also shown that both spectral-domain phase microscopy and depth-resolved spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy are special cases of this general theory. Analytical expressions are provided for both, and simulations are presented to explain and support the theoretical results. These results are further used to show how Fourier phase allows the estimation of an axial mean spatial frequency profile of the sample, along with depth-resolved characterization of localized optical density change and sample heterogeneity. Finally, a Fourier phase-based explanation of Doppler optical coherence tomography is also provided. PMID:26831383

  4. Fourier phase in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttam, Shikhar; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Phase of an electromagnetic wave propagating through a sample-of-interest is well understood in the context of quantitative phase imaging in transmission-mode microscopy. In the past decade, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography has been used to extend quantitative phase imaging to the reflection-mode. Unlike transmission-mode electromagnetic phase, however, the origin and characteristics of reflection-mode Fourier phase are poorly understood, especially in samples with a slowly varying refractive index. In this paper, the general theory of Fourier phase from first principles is presented, and it is shown that Fourier phase is a joint estimate of subresolution offset and mean spatial frequency of the coherence-gated sample refractive index. It is also shown that both spectral-domain phase microscopy and depth-resolved spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy are special cases of this general theory. Analytical expressions are provided for both, and simulations are presented to explain and support the theoretical results. These results are further used to show how Fourier phase allows the estimation of an axial mean spatial frequency profile of the sample, along with depth-resolved characterization of localized optical density change and sample heterogeneity. Finally, a Fourier phase-based explanation of Doppler optical coherence tomography is also provided.

  5. Novel hybrid optical correlator: theory and optical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, D; Herold, R L

    1975-02-01

    The inverse transform of the product of two Fourier transform holograms is analyzed and shown to contain the correlation of the two images from which the holograms were formed. The theory, analysis, and initial experimental demonstration of the feasibility of a novel correlation scheme using this multiplied Fourier transform hologram system are presented.

  6. Correlating Function and Imaging Measures of the Medial Longitudinal Fasciculus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Sakaie

    Full Text Available To test the validity of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI measures of tissue injury by examining such measures in a white matter structure with well-defined function, the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF. Injury to the MLF underlies internuclear ophthalmoparesis (INO.40 MS patients with chronic INO and 15 healthy controls were examined under an IRB-approved protocol. Tissue integrity of the MLF was characterized by DTI parameters: longitudinal diffusivity (LD, transverse diffusivity (TD, mean diffusivity (MD and fractional anisotropy (FA. Severity of INO was quantified by infrared oculography to measure versional disconjugacy index (VDI.LD was significantly lower in patients than in controls in the medulla-pons region of the MLF (p < 0.03. FA was also lower in patients in the same region (p < 0.0004. LD of the medulla-pons region correlated with VDI (R = -0.28, p < 0.05 as did FA in the midbrain section (R = 0.31, p < 0.02.This study demonstrates that DTI measures of brain tissue injury can detect injury to a functionally relevant white matter pathway, and that such measures correlate with clinically accepted evaluation indices for INO. The results validate DTI as a useful imaging measure of tissue integrity.

  7. A generic, time-resolved, integrated digital image correlation, identification approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefnagels, J.P.M.; Neggers, J.; Blaysat, Benoît; Hild, François; Geers, M.G.D.; Jin, H.; Sciammarella, C.; Yoshida, S.; Lamberti, L.

    2015-01-01

    A generic one-step Integrated Digital Image Correlation (I-DIC) inverse parameter identification approach is introduced that enables direct identification of constitutive model parameters by intimately integrating a Finite Elements Method (FEM) with Digital Image Correlation (DIC), directly

  8. Observation of superconducting fluxons by transmission electron microscopy: A Fourier space approach to calculate the electron optical phase shifts and images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beleggia, M.; Pozzi, G.

    2001-01-01

    An approach is presented for the calculation of the electron optical phase shift experienced by high-energy electrons in a transmission electron microscope, when they interact with the magnetic field associated with superconducting fluxons in a thin specimen tilted with respect to the beam. It is shown that by decomposing the vector potential in its Fourier components and by calculating the phase shift of each component separately, it is possible to obtain the Fourier transform of the electron optical phase shift, which can be inverted either analytically or numerically. It will be shown how this method can be used to recover the result, previously obtained by the real-space approach, relative to the case of a straight flux tube perpendicular to the specimen surfaces. Then the method is applied to the case of a London fluxon in a thin film, where the bending and the broadening of the magnetic-field lines due to the finite specimen thickness are now correctly taken into account and not treated approximately by means of a parabolic fit. Finally, it will be shown how simple models for the pancake structure of the fluxon can be analyzed within this framework and the main features of electron transmission images predicted

  9. Primary colorectal lymphoma: spectrum of imaging findings with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Ju; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Kyoung Won; Choi, Ja Young; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2002-01-01

    Primary colorectal lymphoma is a very uncommon disease; therefore, it has received little attention in the radiology literature. Moreover, imaging features of newly described pathologic subtypes have not been reported such as low-grade B-cell lymphoma arising from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue and peripheral T-cell lymphoma that involves colorectal area. We retrospectively reviewed double-contrast barium enema and CT scans in the patients with primary colorectal lymphoma. In this article the radiologic appearances of primary colorectal lymphoma are categorized into focal lesion and diffuse lesion. Focal lesion includes polypoid mass, circumferential infiltration with smooth mucosal surface, circumferential infiltration with extensive ulceration, cavitary mass, mucosal nodularity, and mucosal fold thickening. Diffuse lesion includes diffuse ulcerative lesion and diffuse nodular lesion. Peripheral T-cell lymphomas that involve the colon manifested as either a diffuse or focal segmental lesion and showed extensive mucosal ulceration. These findings are similar to those of Crohn's disease or tuberculous colitis and are different from those of previously reported colorectal lymphoma. Low-grade B-cell lymphoma arising from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue manifest as multiple mucosal nodularity. The imaging features of primary colorectal lymphoma are quite variable and overlap with other colonic pathology; however, it is important for radiologists to know the imaging features of primary colorectal lymphoma with their pathologic correlation. (orig.)

  10. Quantum correlated imaging is a promising new technique in medical imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Zhang; Zhaohua Yang

    2017-01-01

    Cardio-cerebral vascular diseases are common and frequently occurring serious diseases that threaten humans. In recent years, Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) has played a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of cardio-cerebral vascular diseases. However, DSA is not able to visualize intravascular structures in real time, and it is especially difficult to evaluate each layer of the vascular wall and the composition of atherosclerotic plaques with DSA. Quantum correlated imaging is a new technique that can be used to perform real-time online imaging of intravascular flow, vascular wall structure, and atherosclerotic plaque composition. Quantum correlated imaging is a promising new technique that will soon be used in the diagnosis and treatment of cardio-cerebral vascular diseases.

  11. Fourier transform infrared imaging and microscopy studies of Pinus radiata pulps regarding the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Rosario del P., E-mail: rosariocastillo@udec.cl [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Biotechnology Center, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Araya, Juan [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Biotechnology Center, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Troncoso, Eduardo [Consorcio Bioenercel S.A, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Vinet, Silenne; Freer, Juanita [Biotechnology Center, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Faculty of Chemical Sciences, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile)

    2015-03-25

    The distribution and chemical patterns of lignocellulosic components at microscopic scale and their effect on the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process (SSF) in the production of bioethanol from Pinus radiata pulps were analyzed by the application of diverse microscopical techniques, including scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) – Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. This last technique was accompanied with multivariate methods, including principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to evaluate the distribution patterns and to generate pure spectra of the lignocellulosic components of fibers. The results indicate that the information obtained by the techniques is complementary (ultrastructure, confocality and chemical characterization) and that the distribution of components affects the SSF yield, identifying lignin coalescence droplets as a characteristic factor to increase the SSF yield. Therefore, multivariate analysis of the infrared spectra enabled the in situ identification of the cellulose, lignin and lignin-carbohydrates arrangements. These techniques could be used to investigate the lignocellulosic components distribution and consequently their recalcitrance in many applications where minimal sample manipulation and microscale chemical information is required.

  12. Fourier transform infrared imaging and microscopy studies of Pinus radiata pulps regarding the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, Rosario del P.; Araya, Juan; Troncoso, Eduardo; Vinet, Silenne; Freer, Juanita

    2015-01-01

    The distribution and chemical patterns of lignocellulosic components at microscopic scale and their effect on the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process (SSF) in the production of bioethanol from Pinus radiata pulps were analyzed by the application of diverse microscopical techniques, including scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) – Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. This last technique was accompanied with multivariate methods, including principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to evaluate the distribution patterns and to generate pure spectra of the lignocellulosic components of fibers. The results indicate that the information obtained by the techniques is complementary (ultrastructure, confocality and chemical characterization) and that the distribution of components affects the SSF yield, identifying lignin coalescence droplets as a characteristic factor to increase the SSF yield. Therefore, multivariate analysis of the infrared spectra enabled the in situ identification of the cellulose, lignin and lignin-carbohydrates arrangements. These techniques could be used to investigate the lignocellulosic components distribution and consequently their recalcitrance in many applications where minimal sample manipulation and microscale chemical information is required

  13. Theoretical scheme of thermal-light many-ghost imaging by Nth-order intensity correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yingchuan; Kuang Leman

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a theoretical scheme of many-ghost imaging in terms of Nth-order correlated thermal light. We obtain the Gaussian thin lens equations in the many-ghost imaging protocol. We show that it is possible to produce N-1 ghost images of an object at different places in a nonlocal fashion by means of a higher order correlated imaging process with an Nth-order correlated thermal source and correlation measurements. We investigate the visibility of the ghost images in the scheme and obtain the upper bounds of the visibility for the Nth-order correlated thermal-light ghost imaging. It is found that the visibility of the ghost images can be dramatically enhanced when the order of correlation becomes larger. It is pointed out that the many-ghost imaging phenomenon is an observable physical effect induced by higher order coherence or higher order correlations of optical fields.

  14. High-speed technique based on a parallel projection correlation procedure for digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaripov, D. I.; Renfu, Li

    2018-05-01

    The implementation of high-efficiency digital image correlation methods based on a zero-normalized cross-correlation (ZNCC) procedure for high-speed, time-resolved measurements using a high-resolution digital camera is associated with big data processing and is often time consuming. In order to speed-up ZNCC computation, a high-speed technique based on a parallel projection correlation procedure is proposed. The proposed technique involves the use of interrogation window projections instead of its two-dimensional field of luminous intensity. This simplification allows acceleration of ZNCC computation up to 28.8 times compared to ZNCC calculated directly, depending on the size of interrogation window and region of interest. The results of three synthetic test cases, such as a one-dimensional uniform flow, a linear shear flow and a turbulent boundary-layer flow, are discussed in terms of accuracy. In the latter case, the proposed technique is implemented together with an iterative window-deformation technique. On the basis of the results of the present work, the proposed technique is recommended to be used for initial velocity field calculation, with further correction using more accurate techniques.

  15. Prediction of fracture profile using digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya, G. M. S. K.; Sasi, B.; Kumar, Anish; Babu Rao, C.; Purnachandra Rao, B.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-04-01

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) based full field strain mapping methodology is used for mapping strain on an aluminum sample subjected to tensile deformation. The local strains on the surface of the specimen are calculated at different strain intervals. Early localization of strain is observed at a total strain of 0.050ɛ; itself, whereas a visually apparent localization of strain is observed at a total strain of 0.088ɛ;. Orientation of the line of fracture (12.0°) is very close to the orientation of locus of strain maxima (11.6°) computed from the strain mapping at 0.063ɛ itself. These results show the efficacy of the DIC based method to predict the location as well as the profile of the fracture, at an early stage.

  16. Imaging of compound palmar ganglion with pathologic correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Talukder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Compound palmar ganglion, or chronic flexor tenosynovitis, most commonly of tuberculousorigin, is a rare extrapulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis (TB. The flexor synovialsheath is not a common site for TB but, once involved, causes rapid involvement of all flexortendons. We discuss the case of a 70-year-old farmer who presented to us with pain and progressive swelling of the palmar aspect of the wrist. On clinical examination, swelling both above and below the proximal wrist crease was found, with positive cross-fluctuation. Onultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, features suggestive of compound palmarganglion were present. The patient underwent surgical resection (extensive tenosynovectomyand chemotherapy. Post-operative histopatholgical findings correlated with the radiological features.

  17. Fourier-muunnoksesta

    OpenAIRE

    NIEMELÄ, EERO

    2008-01-01

    Tutkielman aiheena on Fourier-muunnoksen esittely. Tarkoituksena on erityisesti johdatella lukija Fourier-sarjan ja -muunnoksen käsitteisiin. Fourier-muunnosten teoria kuuluu yleisempään Fourier-analyysin aihepiiriin. Fourier-analyysin keskiössä on tulos, jonka mukaan tietyt ehdot täyttävää funktiota voidaan approksimoida mielivaltaisen tarkasti niin sanotun Fourier-sarjan avulla. Osoitamme, että 2\\pi-jaksollisen funktion Lebesgue-neliöintegroituvuus takaa suppenevan Fourier-sarjakehitelm...

  18. Depth-Dependent Anisotropies of Amides and Sugar in Perpendicular and Parallel Sections of Articular Cartilage by Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging (FTIRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yang; Mittelstaedt, Daniel; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Szarko, Matthew; Bidthanapally, Aruna

    2010-01-01

    Full thickness blocks of canine humeral cartilage were microtomed into both perpendicular sections and a series of 100 parallel sections, each 6 μm thick. Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging (FTIRI) was used to image each tissue section eleven times under different infrared polarizations (from 0° to 180° polarization states in 20° increments and with an additional 90° polarization), at a spatial resolution of 6.25 μm and a wavenumber step of 8 cm−1. With increasing depth from the articular surface, amide anisotropies increased in the perpendicular sections and decreased in the parallel sections. Both types of tissue sectioning identified a 90° difference between amide I and amide II in the superficial zone of cartilage. The fibrillar distribution in the parallel sections from the superficial zone was shown to not be random. Sugar had the greatest anisotropy in the upper part of the radial zone in the perpendicular sections. The depth-dependent anisotropic data were fitted with a theoretical equation that contained three signature parameters, which illustrate the arcade structure of collagens with the aid of a fibril model. Infrared imaging of both perpendicular and parallel sections provides the possibility of determining the three-dimensional macromolecular structures in articular cartilage. Being sensitive to the orientation of the macromolecular structure in healthy articular cartilage aids the prospect of detecting the early onset of the tissue degradation that may lead to pathological conditions such as osteoarthritis. PMID:21274999

  19. Correlation of Imaging Findings with Pathologic Findings of Sclerosing Adenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Bae; Shu, Kwang Sun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mammographic and sonographic findings of pure sclerosing adenosis. We retrospectively reviewed the mammographic and sonographic findings in 40 cases of pure sclerosing adenosis confirmed by core needle biopsy (n = 23), vacuum-assisted biopsy (n = 7), excision biopsy (n = 9), and lumpectomy (n = 1) from January 2002 to March 2010. All imaging findings were analyzed according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS). Radiologic features were correlated with pathologic findings. Although most mammograms showed negative findings (57%), calcification was the most common abnormal finding of sclerosing adenosis. On sonography, the most common finding was a circumscribed oval hypoechoic mass without posterior features (78%). Most masses showed BI-RADS category 3, (75%, 27/36). Five cases showed categories 4 or 5 (14%, 5/36). Most mammographic and sonographic findings of sclerosing adenosis are non-specific and non-pathognomonic, even though sometimes sclerosing adenosis can be radiologically or histopathologically confused with malignancy

  20. Imaging Correlations in Heterodyne Spectra for Quantum Displacement Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontin, A.; Lang, J. E.; Chowdhury, A.; Vezio, P.; Marino, F.; Morana, B.; Serra, E.; Marin, F.; Monteiro, T. S.

    2018-01-01

    The extraordinary sensitivity of the output field of an optical cavity to small quantum-scale displacements has led to breakthroughs such as the first detection of gravitational waves and of the motions of quantum ground-state cooled mechanical oscillators. While heterodyne detection of the output optical field of an optomechanical system exhibits asymmetries which provide a key signature that the mechanical oscillator has attained the quantum regime, important quantum correlations are lost. In turn, homodyning can detect quantum squeezing in an optical quadrature but loses the important sideband asymmetries. Here we introduce and experimentally demonstrate a new technique, subjecting the autocorrelators of the output current to filter functions, which restores the lost heterodyne correlations (whether classical or quantum), drastically augmenting the useful information accessible. The filtering even adjusts for moderate errors in the locking phase of the local oscillator. Hence we demonstrate the single-shot measurement of hundreds of different field quadratures allowing the rapid imaging of detailed features from a simple heterodyne trace. We also obtain a spectrum of hybrid homodyne-heterodyne character, with motional sidebands of combined amplitudes comparable to homodyne. Although investigated here in a thermal regime, the method's robustness and generality represents a promising new approach to sensing of quantum-scale displacements.

  1. Correlates of Body Image in Polish Weight Trainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guszkowska Monika

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine body image and body satisfaction in Polish adult men involved in resistance training and to investigate their relationships with objective anthropometric and training characteristics. Methods. The study included 176 males aged 18-31 years with 1-14 years resistance training experience. The Figure Rating Scale, Body Satisfaction Scale and a self-designed questionnaire were administered. Results. Approximately 62% of the participants would like to be more muscular, only 29% accepted their appearance and 9% would like to be less muscular. The body selected as the personal ideal (M = 5.34 was less muscular than the body considered by the participants to be ideal by other men (normative body; M = 6.07 and was more muscular than the body thought to be most attractive to women (M = 5.10. Actual and ideal body muscularity correlated positively with age and body mass, height and BMI. Dissatisfaction with trunk and motor characteristics correlated positively with ideal body and the body considered most attractive to women as well as with the discrepancy indices between the above factors and the actual body. Conclusions. Men regularly involved in resistance training were found to strive for a muscular physique. The normative body, the physique believed to be desired by other men, was more muscular than what was considered preferential to women. However, the latter constitutes a stronger determinant of the level of body satisfaction in men engaged in resistance training.

  2. Applications of three-dimensional image correlation in conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Herk, M.; Gilhuijs, K.; Kwa, S.; Lebesque, J.; Muller, S.; De Munck, J.; Touw, A.; Kooy, H.

    1995-01-01

    The development of techniques for the registration of CT, MRI and SPECT creates new possibilities for improved target volume definition and quantitative image analysis. The discussed technique is based on chamfer matching and is suitable for automatic 3-D matching of CT with CT, CT with MRI, CT with SPECT and MRI with SPECT. By integrating CT with MRI, the diagnostic qualities of MRI are combined with the geometric accuracy of the planning CT. Significant differences in the delineation of the target volume for brain, head and neck and prostate tumors have been demonstrated when using integrated CT and MRI compared with using CT alone. In addition, integration of the planning CT with pre-operative scans improves knowledge of possible tumor extents. By first matching scans based on the bony anatomy and subsequently matching on an organ of study, relative motion of the organ is quantified accurately. In a study with 42 CT scans of 11 patients, magnitude and causes of prostate motion have been analysed. The most important motion of the prostate is a forward-backward rotation around a point near the apex caused by rectal volume difference. Significant correlations were also found between motion of the legs and the prostate. By integrating functional images made before and after radiotherapy with the planning CT, the relation between local change of lung function and delivered dose has been quantified accurately. The technique of chamfer matching is a convenient and more accurate alternative for the use of external markers in a CT/SPECT lung damage study. Also, damage visible in diagnostic scans can be related to radiation dose, thereby improving follow-up diagnostics. It can be concluded that 3-D image integration plays an important role in assessing and improving the accuracy of radiotherapy and is therefore indispensable for conformal therapy. However, user-friendly implementation of these techniques remains to be done to facilitate clinical application on a large

  3. Applications of three-dimensional image correlation in conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Herk, M; Gilhuijs, K; Kwa, S; Lebesque, J; Muller, S; De Munck, J; Touw, A [Nederlands Kanker Inst. ` Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis` , Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kooy, H [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The development of techniques for the registration of CT, MRI and SPECT creates new possibilities for improved target volume definition and quantitative image analysis. The discussed technique is based on chamfer matching and is suitable for automatic 3-D matching of CT with CT, CT with MRI, CT with SPECT and MRI with SPECT. By integrating CT with MRI, the diagnostic qualities of MRI are combined with the geometric accuracy of the planning CT. Significant differences in the delineation of the target volume for brain, head and neck and prostate tumors were demonstrated when using integrated CT and MRI compared with using CT alone. In addition, integration of the planning CT with pre-operative scans improves knowledge of possible tumor extents. By first matching scans based on the bony anatomy and subsequently matching on an organ of study, relative motion of the organ is quantified accurately. In a study with 42 CT scans of 11 patients, magnitude and causes of prostate motion were analysed. The most important motion of the prostate is a forward-backward rotation around a point near the apex caused by rectal volume difference. Significant correlations were also found between motion of the legs and the prostate. By integrating functional images made before and after radiotherapy with the planning CT, the relation between local change of lung function and delivered dose has been quantified accurately. The technique of chamfer matching is a convenient and more accurate alternative for the use of external markers in a CT/SPECT lung damage study. Also, damage visible in diagnostic scans can be related to radiation dose, thereby improving follow-up diagnostics. It can be concluded that 3-D image integration plays an important role in assessing and improving the accuracy of radiotherapy and is therefore indispensable for conformal therapy. However, user-friendly implementation of these techniques remains to be done to facilitate clinical application on a large scale.

  4. The role of MR imaging with Half Fourier Acquired Single Shot Turbo Spin Echo sequence in the diagnosis of lung lesions in comparison with multislice CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hekimoglu, B.; Gurgen, F.; Tatar, I.G.; Aydin, H.; Kizilgoz, V.; Keyik, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic values of magnetic resonance imaging using Half Fourier Acquired Single Shot Turbo Spin Echo sequence and multidetector computed tomography in patients with pathologically examined pulmonary lesions. Methods: The retrospective, descriptive study was conducted at Radiology Department, Diskapi Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, and comprised records of patients with pathologically examined pulmonary lesions between May 2009 and March 2012. Patients were divided into three groups and examined by both multi dedector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. During the imaging, patients were not administered any intravenous contrast medium. Electrocardiogram gating and breath holding were not performed in echo sequence. Pulmonary lesions were evaluated on the basis of their dimensions, numbers, differentiation from atelectasis and consolidation, invasion to the thoracic wall-mediastinal structures and presence of lymphadenopathies. Results: Sensitivity of all patients was 50% (p=0.214) and specificity of CT and MRI were 82.5% (p=0.134) for the detectability of submilimetric nodules . For differentiation of the mass from atelectasis and consolidation, the sensitivity of computed tomography was statistically more significant compared to magnetic resonance imaging (86.6%; p=0.035). For the invasion of the mass to the mediastinal structures and the thoracic wall, the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging was statistically more significant compared to tomography (86.6%; p=0.035). Conclusion: HASTE sequence can be used to determine the invasion of the pulmonary mass to the mediastinal structures and the thoracic wall since it is more sensitive than computed tomography. It can also be used to detect submilimetric nodules. It has equal sensitivity and specificity compared to computed tomography. But computed tomography is superior for the differentiation of the mass from atelectasis and consolidation. (author)

  5. Wavelet-space correlation imaging for high-speed MRI without motion monitoring or data segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Wang, Hui; Tkach, Jean; Roach, David; Woods, Jason; Dumoulin, Charles

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to (i) develop a new high-speed MRI approach by implementing correlation imaging in wavelet-space, and (ii) demonstrate the ability of wavelet-space correlation imaging to image human anatomy with involuntary or physiological motion. Correlation imaging is a high-speed MRI framework in which image reconstruction relies on quantification of data correlation. The presented work integrates correlation imaging with a wavelet transform technique developed originally in the field of signal and image processing. This provides a new high-speed MRI approach to motion-free data collection without motion monitoring or data segmentation. The new approach, called "wavelet-space correlation imaging", is investigated in brain imaging with involuntary motion and chest imaging with free-breathing. Wavelet-space correlation imaging can exceed the speed limit of conventional parallel imaging methods. Using this approach with high acceleration factors (6 for brain MRI, 16 for cardiac MRI, and 8 for lung MRI), motion-free images can be generated in static brain MRI with involuntary motion and nonsegmented dynamic cardiac/lung MRI with free-breathing. Wavelet-space correlation imaging enables high-speed MRI in the presence of involuntary motion or physiological dynamics without motion monitoring or data segmentation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Non-invasive retinal imaging in mice with fluorescent Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy and Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein-Javaheri, Nima

    2010-01-01

    Visualization of the internal structures of the retina is critical for clinical diagnosis and monitoring of pathology as well as for medical research investigating the root causes of retinal degeneration. The aim of this thesis is to develop multi-modal non-invasive imaging technology for studying retinal degeneration and gene therapy in mice. We have constructed a FD-OCT prototype and combined it with a Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (SLO) to permit real time alignment of the retinal field of...

  7. MR imaging of meniscal tears: correlation with history of trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Cheul; Yang, Seoung Oh; Choi, Sun Seob; Son, Seok Hyun; Lee, Yung Il; Chung, Duck Hwan; Kim, Kyung Taek; Sohn, Sung Keun; Lee, Jung Yoon

    1994-01-01

    The medial meniscus is injured much more than the lateral meniscus. Because the medial meniscus is much larger in diameter, is thinner in its periphery and narrower in body than the lateral meniscus, and dose not attach to either cruciate ligament. We evaluated correlations with sites of tear and history of trauma. We reviewed retrospectively in 43 patients with meniscal tears on MR(51 cases) and correlated them with history of trauma. The most common site of injury was the posterior horn of the medial meniscuc(32/51), but high incidence of lateral meniscal tear compared with previous reports was seen. In the cases which had history of trauma, the posterior horn of medial meniscus was most commonly injured(26/34) and 5 meniscal tears were combined with meniscal tear in the other site. The tear in the anterior horn of the medial meniscus was seen only in a patient which had history of trauma and combined with meniscal tear in the other site. But in the meniscal tears without definite history of trauma, the incidence of meniscal tear was different from the meniscal tear with history of trauma. The incidence of lateral meniscal tear(11/17) was higher than medial meniscal tear and the posterior horn of lateral meniscus was commonly injured. We concluded that the medial meniscus was commonly injured, especially posterior horn, but in the cases which had no definite history of trauma, the lateral meniscus was commonly injured. An awareness of prevalent site of meniscal injuries may be helpful in the diagnostic interpretation of MR imaging of knee

  8. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: III. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by a Fourier-Domain Study of Anti-correlated Transit Timing Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /Lick Observ.; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fressin, Francois; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Lissauer, Jack J.; /NASA, Ames; Rowe, Jason F.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Welsh, William F.; /Caltech; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames /UC, Santa Barbara

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anticorrelations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems, Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27 and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate.

  9. Study of morphological changes in scattering and optically anisotropic medium through correlation images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Neha; Shukla, Prashant; Singh, Jai

    2018-05-01

    Correlation images are very useful in determining the morphological changes. We have investigated the correlation image analysis on depolarization and retardance matrices of polystyrene and gelatine samples respectively. We observed that that correlation images have a potential to show a significant variation with change in the concentration of samples (polystyrene and gelatine). For polystyrene microspheres the correlation value decreases with increasing scattering coefficient. In gelatine samples the correlation also decreases with sample concentration. This variation in correlation for retardance shows the change in a birefringence property of gelatine solution.

  10. Correlation of the clinical and physical image quality in chest radiography for average adults with a computed radiography imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the quality of visually graded patient (clinical) chest images and a quantitative assessment of chest phantom (physical) images acquired with a computed radiography (CR) imaging system. The results of a previously published study, in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer-simulated postero-anterior chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme, were used for the clinical image quality measurement. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and effective dose efficiency (eDE) were used as physical image quality metrics measured in a uniform chest phantom. Although optimal values of these physical metrics for chest radiography were not derived in this work, their correlation with VGAS in images acquired without an antiscatter grid across the diagnostic range of X-ray tube voltages was determined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Clinical and physical image quality metrics increased with decreasing tube voltage. Statistically significant correlations between VGAS and CNR (R=0.87, pchest CR images acquired without an antiscatter grid. A statistically significant correlation has been found between the clinical and physical image quality in CR chest imaging. The results support the value of using CNR and eDE in the evaluation of quality in clinical thorax radiography.

  11. Metasurface Enabled Wide-Angle Fourier Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenwei; Li, Zhancheng; Cheng, Hua; Tang, Chengchun; Li, Junjie; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2018-06-01

    Fourier optics, the principle of using Fourier transformation to understand the functionalities of optical elements, lies at the heart of modern optics, and it has been widely applied to optical information processing, imaging, holography, etc. While a simple thin lens is capable of resolving Fourier components of an arbitrary optical wavefront, its operation is limited to near normal light incidence, i.e., the paraxial approximation, which puts a severe constraint on the resolvable Fourier domain. As a result, high-order Fourier components are lost, resulting in extinction of high-resolution information of an image. Other high numerical aperture Fourier lenses usually suffer from the bulky size and costly designs. Here, a dielectric metasurface consisting of high-aspect-ratio silicon waveguide array is demonstrated experimentally, which is capable of performing 1D Fourier transform for a large incident angle range and a broad operating bandwidth. Thus, the device significantly expands the operational Fourier space, benefitting from the large numerical aperture and negligible angular dispersion at large incident angles. The Fourier metasurface will not only facilitate efficient manipulation of spatial spectrum of free-space optical wavefront, but also be readily integrated into micro-optical platforms due to its compact size. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. MR Imaging of Rotator Cuff Tears: Correlation with Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandary, Sudarshan; Khandige, Ganesh; Kabra, Utkarsh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Rotator cuff tears are quite common and can cause significant disability. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has now emerged as the modality of choice in the preoperative evaluation of patients with rotator cuff injuries, in view of its improved inherent soft tissue contrast and resolution. Aim To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of routine MRI in the detection and characterisation of rotator cuff tears, by correlating the findings with arthroscopy. Materials and Methods This prospective study was carried out between July 2014 and August 2016 at the AJ Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore, Karnataka, India. A total of 82 patients were diagnosed with rotator cuff injury on MRI during this period, out of which 45 patients who underwent further evaluation with arthroscopy were included in this study. The data collected was analysed for significant correlation between MRI diagnosis and arthroscopic findings using kappa statistics. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and accuracy of MRI for the diagnosis of full and partial thickness tears were calculated using arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Results There were 27 males and 18 females in this study. The youngest patient was 22 years and the oldest was 74 years. Majority of rotator cuff tears (78%) were seen in patients above the age of 40 years. MRI showed a sensitivity of 89.6%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 83.3% for the diagnosis of full thickness rotator cuff tears. For partial thickness tears, MRI showed a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 86.6%, positive predictive value of 78.9% and negative predictive value of 100%. The accuracy was 93.1% for full thickness tears and 91.1% for partial thickness tears. The p-value was less than 0.01 for both full and partial thickness tears. There was good agreement between the MRI and arthroscopic findings, with kappa value of 0.85 for full thickness tears and 0.81 for partial

  13. Full-Field Indentation Damage Measurement Using Digital Image Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías López-Alba

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach based on full-field indentation measurements to characterize and quantify the effect of contact in thin plates is presented. The proposed method has been employed to evaluate the indentation damage generated in the presence of bending deformation, resulting from the contact between a thin plate and a rigid sphere. For this purpose, the 3D Digital Image Correlation (3D-DIC technique has been adopted to quantify the out of plane displacements at the back face of the plate. Tests were conducted using aluminum thin plates and a rigid bearing sphere to evaluate the influence of the thickness and the material behavior during contact. Information provided by the 3D-DIC technique has been employed to perform an indirect measurement of the contact area during the loading and unloading path of the test. A symmetrical distribution in the contact damage region due to the symmetry of the indenter was always observed. In the case of aluminum plates, the presence of a high level of plasticity caused shearing deformation as the load increased. Results show the full-field contact damage area for different plates’ thicknesses at different loads. The contact damage region was bigger when the thickness of the specimen increased, and therefore, bending deformation was reduced. With the proposed approach, the elastic recovery at the contact location was quantified during the unloading, as well as the remaining permanent indentation damage after releasing the load. Results show the information obtained by full-field measurements at the contact location during the test, which implies a substantial improvement compared with pointwise techniques.

  14. Results of measurements with the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer onboard Mars Express: Clouds and dust at the end of southern summer. A comparison with OMEGA images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasova, L. V.; Formisano, V.; Moroz, V. I.; Bibring, J.-P.; Grassi, D.; Ignatiev, N. I.; Giuranna, M.; Bellucci, G.; Altieri, F.; Blecka, M.; Gnedykh, V. N.; Grigoriev, A. V.; Lellouch, E.; Mattana, A.; Maturilli, A.; Moshkin, B. E.; Nikolsky, Yu. V.; Patsaev, D. V.; Piccioni, G.; Ratai, M.; Saggin, B.; Fonti, S.; Khatuntsev, I. V.; Hirsh, H.; Ekonomov, A. P.

    2006-07-01

    We discuss the results of measurements made with the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) onboard the Mars Express spacecraft. The data were obtained in the beginning of the mission and correspond to the end of summer in the southern hemisphere of Mars ( L s ˜ 340°). Three orbits are considered, two of which passed through volcanoes Olympus and Ascraeus Mons (the height above the surface is about +20 km), while the third orbit intersects lowland Hellas (-7 km). The influence of the relief on the properties of the aerosol observed is demonstrated: clouds of water ice with a visual optical thickness of 0.1-0.5 were observed above volcanoes, while only dust was found during the observations (close in time) along the orbit passing through Hellas in low and middle latitudes. This dust is homogeneously mixed with gas and has a reduced optical thickness of 0.25±0.05 (at v = 1100 cm-1). In addition to orographic clouds, ice clouds were observed in this season in the northern polar region. The clouds seen in the images obtained simultaneously by the mapping spectrometer OMEGA confirm the PFS results. Temperature inversion is discovered in the north polar hood below the level 1 mbar with a temperature maximum at about 0.6 mbar. This inversion is associated with descending movements in the Hadley cell.

  15. Fourier transform NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallenga, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of Fourier transformation one of the many precious legacies of the French mathematician Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier, essential for understanding the link between continuous-wave (CW) and Fourier transform (FT) NMR. Although in modern FT NMR the methods used to obtain a frequency spectrum from the time-domain signal may vary greatly, from the efficient Cooley-Tukey algorithm to very elaborate iterative least-square methods based other maximum entropy method or on linear prediction, the principles for Fourier transformation are unchanged and give invaluable insight into the interconnection of many pairs of physical entities called Fourier pairs

  16. Snapping Sharks, Maddening Mindreaders, and Interactive Images: Teaching Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mark L.

    Understanding correlation coefficients is difficult for students. A free computer program that helps introductory psychology students distinguish between positive and negative correlation, and which also teaches them to understand the differences between correlation coefficients of different size is described in this paper. The program is…

  17. Principles of Fourier analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Kenneth B

    2001-01-01

    Fourier analysis is one of the most useful and widely employed sets of tools for the engineer, the scientist, and the applied mathematician. As such, students and practitioners in these disciplines need a practical and mathematically solid introduction to its principles. They need straightforward verifications of its results and formulas, and they need clear indications of the limitations of those results and formulas.Principles of Fourier Analysis furnishes all this and more. It provides a comprehensive overview of the mathematical theory of Fourier analysis, including the development of Fourier series, "classical" Fourier transforms, generalized Fourier transforms and analysis, and the discrete theory. Much of the author''s development is strikingly different from typical presentations. His approach to defining the classical Fourier transform results in a much cleaner, more coherent theory that leads naturally to a starting point for the generalized theory. He also introduces a new generalized theory based ...

  18. Atise: a miniature Fourier-transform spectro-imaging concept for surveying auroras and airglow monitoring from a 6/12u cubesat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Courer, E.; Barthelemy, M.; Vialatte, A.; Prugniaux, M.; Bourdarot, G.; Sequies, T.; Monsinjon, P.; Puget, R.; Guerineau, N.

    2017-09-01

    The nanosatellite ATISE is a mission dedicated to the observation of the emission spectra of the upper atmosphere (i.e. Airglow and Auroras) mainly related to both the solar UV flux and the precipitation of suprathermal particles coming from the solar wind through the magnetosphere. ATISE will measure specifically the auroral emissions, and the airglow (day- and night) in the spectral range between 380 and 900 nm at altitudes between 100 and 350 km. The exposure time will be 1 second in auroral region and 20 s at low latitude regions. The 5 year expected lifetime of this mission should cover almost a half of solar cycle (2 years nominal). This instrument concept is based on an innovative miniaturized Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) allowing simultaneous 1 Rayleigh sensitivity detection along six 1.5°x1° limb lines of sight. This 1-2kg payload instrument is hosted in a 12U cubeSat where 6U are allocated to the payload and 6U to the plateform subsystems. This represents a miniaturisation by a factor of 500 on weight and volume compared to previous Arizona-GLO instrument for equivalent performances in the visible. The instrument is based on microSPOC concept developed by ONERA and IPAG using one Fizeau interferometer per line of sight directly glued on top of the half of a very sensitive CMOS Pyxalis HDPYX detector. Three detectors are necessary with a total electrical consumption compatible with a 6U nanoSat. Each interferometer occupies a 1.4 M pixel part of detector, each is placed on an image of the entrance pupil corresponding to a unique direction of the six lines of sight, this in order to have a uniform illumination permitting good spectral Fourier reconstruction from fringes created between the Fizeau plate and the detector itself. Despite a limited 8x6 cm telescope, this configuration takes advantage of FTS multiplex effect and permits us to maximize the throughput and to integrate very faint emission lines over a wide field of view even if the 1

  19. Optimum slicing of radical prostatectomy specimens for correlation between histopathology and medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Li Hong; Ng, Wan Sing; Ho, Henry; Yuen, John; Cheng, Chris; Lazaro, Richie; Thng, Choon Hua

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for methods which enable precise correlation of histologic sections with in vivo prostate images. Such methods would allow direct comparison between imaging features and functional or histopathological heterogeneity of tumors. Correlation would be particularly useful for validating the accuracy of imaging modalities, developing imaging techniques, assessing image-guided therapy, etc. An optimum prostate slicing method for accurate correlation between the histopathological and medical imaging planes in terms of section angle, thickness and level was sought. Literature review (51 references from 1986-2009 were cited) was done on the various sectioning apparatus or techniques used to slice the prostate specimen for accurate correlation between histopathological data and medical imaging. Technology evaluation was performed with review and discussion of various methods used to section other organs and their possible applications for sectioning prostatectomy specimens. No consensus has been achieved on how the prostate should be dissected to achieve a good correlation. Various customized sectioning instruments and techniques working with different mechanism are used in different research institutes to improve the correlation. Some of the methods have convincingly shown significant potential for improving image-specimen correlation. However, the semisolid consistent property of prostate tissue and the lack of identifiable landmarks remain challenges to be overcome, especially for fresh prostate sectioning and microtomy without external fiducials. A standardized optimum protocol to dissect prostatectomy specimens is needed for the validation of medical imaging modalities by histologic correlation. These standards can enhance disease management by improving the comparability between different modalities. (orig.)

  20. Maximum-entropy data restoration using both real- and Fourier-space analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.M.; Martin, D.C.; Thomas, E.L.

    1989-01-01

    An extension of the maximum-entropy (ME) data-restoration method is presented that is sensitive to periodic correlations in data. The method takes advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio for periodic information in Fourier space, thus enhancing statistically significant frequencies in a manner which avoids the user bias inherent in conventional Fourier filtering. This procedure incorporates concepts underlying new approaches in quantum mechanics that consider entropies in both position and momentum spaces, although the emphasis here is on data restoration rather than quantum physics. After a fast Fourier transform of the image, the phases are saved and the array of Fourier moduli are restored using the maximum-entropy criterion. A first-order continuation method is introduced that speeds convergence of the ME computation. The restored moduli together with the original phases are then Fourier inverted to yield a new image; traditional real-space ME restoration is applied to this new image completing one stage in the restoration process. In test cases improvement can be obtained from two to four stages of iteration. It is shown that in traditional Fourier filtering spurious features can be induced by selection or elimination of Fourier components without regard to their statistical significance. With the present approach there is no such freedom for the user to exert personal bias, so that features present in the final image and power spectrum are those which have survived the tests of statistical significance in both real and Fourier space. However, it is still possible for periodicities to 'bleed' across sharp boundaries. An 'uncertainty' relation is derived describing the inverse relationship between the resolution of these boundaries and the level of noise that can be eliminated. (orig./BHO)

  1. Considerations on the correlation between real body and body image

    OpenAIRE

    Beatrice ABALAȘEI; Florin TROFIN

    2017-01-01

    very individual in the society has a representation of it’s own body in relation to the spatial cues, postural cues, time cues, etc., considered by specialists the body scheme. Throughout its development, the human being goes through different stages of organization of both the image the and body scheme. We start carrying out this study from the idea that there could be, in male individuals, a link between body representation (own image projected outwardly apparent by reference to an image pr...

  2. METHODS OF DISTANCE MEASUREMENT’S ACCURACY INCREASING BASED ON THE CORRELATION ANALYSIS OF STEREO IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Kozlov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem of increasing the accuracy of restoring a three-dimensional picture of space using two-dimensional digital images, it is necessary to use new effective techniques and algorithms for processing and correlation analysis of digital images. Actively developed tools that allow you to reduce the time costs for processing stereo images, improve the quality of the depth maps construction and automate their construction. The aim of the work is to investigate the possibilities of using various techniques for processing digital images to improve the measurements accuracy of the rangefinder based on the correlation analysis of the stereo image. The results of studies of the influence of color channel mixing techniques on the distance measurements accuracy for various functions realizing correlation processing of images are presented. Studies on the analysis of the possibility of using integral representation of images to reduce the time cost in constructing a depth map areproposed. The results of studies of the possibility of using images prefiltration before correlation processing when distance measuring by stereo imaging areproposed.It is obtained that using of uniform mixing of channels leads to minimization of the total number of measurement errors, and using of brightness extraction according to the sRGB standard leads to an increase of errors number for all of the considered correlation processing techniques. Integral representation of the image makes it possible to accelerate the correlation processing, but this method is useful for depth map calculating in images no more than 0.5 megapixels. Using of image filtration before correlation processing can provide, depending on the filter parameters, either an increasing of the correlation function value, which is useful for analyzing noisy images, or compression of the correlation function.

  3. Automated method and system for the alignment and correlation of images from two different modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giger, Maryellen L.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Armato, Samuel; Doi, Kunio

    1999-10-26

    A method and system for the computerized registration of radionuclide images with radiographic images, including generating image data from radiographic and radionuclide images of the thorax. Techniques include contouring the lung regions in each type of chest image, scaling and registration of the contours based on location of lung apices, and superimposition after appropriate shifting of the images. Specific applications are given for the automated registration of radionuclide lungs scans with chest radiographs. The method in the example given yields a system that spatially registers and correlates digitized chest radiographs with V/Q scans in order to correlate V/Q functional information with the greater structural detail of chest radiographs. Final output could be the computer-determined contours from each type of image superimposed on any of the original images, or superimposition of the radionuclide image data, which contains high activity, onto the radiographic chest image.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the menisci of the knee. Normal images. Pitfalls. Meniscus degeneration. Anatomical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helenon, O.; Laval-Jeantet, M.; Bastian, D.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a study on 5 knees of fresh corpses explored with magnetic resonance imaging are reported, including 1 examined before and after intraarticular contrast injection, and on 15 asymptomatic subjects examined with the same procedure. A very thorough study of the menisci and of their attachment, ie. The tibial insertion of the menisceal horns, the transverse ligament, and the meniscofemoral ligament, is possible with T1-weighted MR sequences. The T2-weighted sequences, either following intraarticular contrast injection or in cases of articular effusion, allow analyzing the capsular attachments of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus and its relationships with the tendon of the popliteal muscle. Five misleading images must be known for the exploration of the menisci, in order to avoid a number of interpretation problems. Images of type I and II initial meniscus degeneration are observed in 47% of all cases (control group). One case of menisceal cyst developing in the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus, with anatomical correlation, is also reported [fr

  5. Microstructure imaging of the YBCO thin film/MgO substrate interface: HRTEM and Fourier analysis of the Moire fringe pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auzary, S.; Pailloux, F.; Denanot, M.F.; Gaboriaud, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed microstructural aspects of the interface between YBaCuO thin films and MgO substrate are studied by means of a Fourier analysis of Moire fringe pattern obtained from HRTEM investigations of plan view samples. The main features of the observations are large, well oriented crystallographic domains surrounded by wide boundaries. HRTEM investigations together with the Fourier analysis show evidence of both orthorhombic and pseudo-tetragonal structure in the YBaCuO film. An accommodation mechanism is suggested from the Fourier analysis of the Moire fringe pattern. (orig.)

  6. A study of correlation technique on pyramid processed images

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    generated according to the REDUCE function, defined as gk Еi, jЖ И REDUCE ... (Intel user's guide 1985). The application program is ... As the information content in the reduced image of size is 5 ┬ 5 negligible, the 5 ┬ 5 image case is not ...

  7. Correlative neuroanatomy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, J.

    1984-01-01

    Since the development of computed tomography (CT) more than a decade ago, still another form of imaging has become available that provides displays of normal and abnormal human structures. Magnetic resonance imaging is given complete coverage in this book. It describes both CT and MR anatomy that explains basic principles and the current status of imaging the brain and spine. The author uses three-dimensional concepts to provide the reader with a simple means to compare the main structures of the brain, skull and spine. Combining normal, gross neuroanatomic illustrations with CT and MR images of normal and abnormal conditions, the book provides diagnostic guidance. Drawings, photographs and radiologic images are used to help

  8. Content adaptive illumination for Fourier ptychography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Zheng, Guoan; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2014-12-01

    Fourier ptychography (FP) is a recently reported technique, for large field-of-view and high-resolution imaging. Specifically, FP captures a set of low-resolution images, under angularly varying illuminations, and stitches them together in the Fourier domain. One of FP's main disadvantages is its long capturing process, due to the requisite large number of incident illumination angles. In this Letter, utilizing the sparsity of natural images in the Fourier domain, we propose a highly efficient method, termed adaptive Fourier ptychography (AFP), which applies content adaptive illumination for FP, to capture the most informative parts of the scene's spatial spectrum. We validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the reported framework, with both simulated and real experiments. Results show that the proposed AFP could shorten the acquisition time of conventional FP, by around 30%-60%.

  9. Imaging the square of the correlated two-electron wave function of a hydrogen molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitz, M; Bello, R Y; Metz, D; Lower, J; Trinter, F; Schober, C; Keiling, M; Lenz, U; Pitzer, M; Mertens, K; Martins, M; Viefhaus, J; Klumpp, S; Weber, T; Schmidt, L Ph H; Williams, J B; Schöffler, M S; Serov, V V; Kheifets, A S; Argenti, L; Palacios, A; Martín, F; Jahnke, T; Dörner, R

    2017-12-22

    The toolbox for imaging molecules is well-equipped today. Some techniques visualize the geometrical structure, others the electron density or electron orbitals. Molecules are many-body systems for which the correlation between the constituents is decisive and the spatial and the momentum distribution of one electron depends on those of the other electrons and the nuclei. Such correlations have escaped direct observation by imaging techniques so far. Here, we implement an imaging scheme which visualizes correlations between electrons by coincident detection of the reaction fragments after high energy photofragmentation. With this technique, we examine the H 2 two-electron wave function in which electron-electron correlation beyond the mean-field level is prominent. We visualize the dependence of the wave function on the internuclear distance. High energy photoelectrons are shown to be a powerful tool for molecular imaging. Our study paves the way for future time resolved correlation imaging at FELs and laser based X-ray sources.

  10. Mesenchymal Tumors of the Breast: Imaging and the Histopathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bo Mi; Kim, Eun Kyung; You, Jae Kyoung; Kim, Yee Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Various benign and malignant mesenchymal tumors can occur in the breast. Most radiologists are unfamiliar with the imaging features of these tumors and the imaging features have not been described in the radiologic literature. It is important that radiologists should be familiar with the broad spectrum of imaging features of rare mesenchymal breast tumors. In this pictorial review, we demonstrate the sonographic findings and the corresponding pathologic findings of various mesenchymal tumors of the breast as defined by the World Health Organization classification system

  11. Radiation damage assessment by digital correlation of images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, J.; Salih, S.M.; Cosslett, V.E.

    1974-01-01

    Structural changes in the electron microscopic specimen due to radiation damage are conveniently studied by electron diffraction. However, two disadvantages of this method are that it does not work for amorphous specimens and that it is not sensitive to structural changes that affect only the phase of the structure factor. It has been proposed that a series of successive images taken under minimum exposure conditions could provide additional information in those cases where the relationship between object function and image intensity can be established. In order to test the proposed method, both lattice images and diffraction patterns of coronene crystals were recorded in separate experiments at controlled levels of exposure. (author)

  12. Image pre-filtering for measurement error reduction in digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yihao; Sun, Chen; Song, Yuntao; Chen, Jubing

    2015-02-01

    In digital image correlation, the sub-pixel intensity interpolation causes a systematic error in the measured displacements. The error increases toward high-frequency component of the speckle pattern. In practice, a captured image is usually corrupted by additive white noise. The noise introduces additional energy in the high frequencies and therefore raises the systematic error. Meanwhile, the noise also elevates the random error which increases with the noise power. In order to reduce the systematic error and the random error of the measurements, we apply a pre-filtering to the images prior to the correlation so that the high-frequency contents are suppressed. Two spatial-domain filters (binomial and Gaussian) and two frequency-domain filters (Butterworth and Wiener) are tested on speckle images undergoing both simulated and real-world translations. By evaluating the errors of the various combinations of speckle patterns, interpolators, noise levels, and filter configurations, we come to the following conclusions. All the four filters are able to reduce the systematic error. Meanwhile, the random error can also be reduced if the signal power is mainly distributed around DC. For high-frequency speckle patterns, the low-pass filters (binomial, Gaussian and Butterworth) slightly increase the random error and Butterworth filter produces the lowest random error among them. By using Wiener filter with over-estimated noise power, the random error can be reduced but the resultant systematic error is higher than that of low-pass filters. In general, Butterworth filter is recommended for error reduction due to its flexibility of passband selection and maximal preservation of the allowed frequencies. Binomial filter enables efficient implementation and thus becomes a good option if computational cost is a critical issue. While used together with pre-filtering, B-spline interpolator produces lower systematic error than bicubic interpolator and similar level of the random

  13. Fourier transform infrared imaging microspectroscopy and tissue-level mechanical testing reveal intraspecies variation in mouse bone mineral and matrix composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtland, Hayden-William; Nasser, Philip; Goldstone, Andrew B; Spevak, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Jepsen, Karl J

    2008-11-01

    Fracture susceptibility is heritable and dependent upon bone morphology and quality. However, studies of bone quality are typically overshadowed by emphasis on bone geometry and bone mineral density. Given that differences in mineral and matrix composition exist in a variety of species, we hypothesized that genetic variation in bone quality and tissue-level mechanical properties would also exist within species. Sixteen-week-old female A/J, C57BL/6J (B6), and C3H/HeJ (C3H) inbred mouse femora were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared imaging and tissue-level mechanical testing for variation in mineral composition, mineral maturity, collagen cross-link ratio, and tissue-level mechanical properties. A/J femora had an increased mineral-to-matrix ratio compared to B6. The C3H mineral-to-matrix ratio was intermediate of A/J and B6. C3H femora had reduced acid phosphate and carbonate levels and an increased collagen cross-link ratio compared to A/J and B6. Modulus values paralleled mineral-to-matrix values, with A/J femora being the most stiff, B6 being the least stiff, and C3H having intermediate stiffness. In addition, work-to-failure varied among the strains, with the highly mineralized and brittle A/J femora performing the least amount of work-to-failure. Inbred mice are therefore able to differentially modulate the composition of their bone mineral and the maturity of their bone matrix in conjunction with tissue-level mechanical properties. These results suggest that specific combinations of bone quality and morphological traits are genetically regulated such that mechanically functional bones can be constructed in different ways.

  14. Pleasant/Unpleasant Filtering for Affective Image Retrieval Based on Cross-Correlation of EEG Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keranmu Xielifuguli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available People often make decisions based on sensitivity rather than rationality. In the field of biological information processing, methods are available for analyzing biological information directly based on electroencephalogram: EEG to determine the pleasant/unpleasant reactions of users. In this study, we propose a sensitivity filtering technique for discriminating preferences (pleasant/unpleasant for images using a sensitivity image filtering system based on EEG. Using a set of images retrieved by similarity retrieval, we perform the sensitivity-based pleasant/unpleasant classification of images based on the affective features extracted from images with the maximum entropy method: MEM. In the present study, the affective features comprised cross-correlation features obtained from EEGs produced when an individual observed an image. However, it is difficult to measure the EEG when a subject visualizes an unknown image. Thus, we propose a solution where a linear regression method based on canonical correlation is used to estimate the cross-correlation features from image features. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the validity of sensitivity filtering compared with image similarity retrieval methods based on image features. We found that sensitivity filtering using color correlograms was suitable for the classification of preferred images, while sensitivity filtering using local binary patterns was suitable for the classification of unpleasant images. Moreover, sensitivity filtering using local binary patterns for unpleasant images had a 90% success rate. Thus, we conclude that the proposed method is efficient for filtering unpleasant images.

  15. NDVI and Panchromatic Image Correlation Using Texture Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    6 Figure 5. Spectral reflectance of vegetation and soil from 0.4 to 1.1 mm (From Perry...should help the classification methods to be able to classify kelp. Figure 5. Spectral reflectance of vegetation and soil from 0.4 to 1.1 mm...1988). Image processing software for imaging spectrometry analysis. Remote Sensing of Enviroment , 24: 201–210. Perry, C., & Lautenschlager, L. F

  16. Fractional finite Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Kedar; George, Nicholas

    2004-07-01

    We show that a fractional version of the finite Fourier transform may be defined by using prolate spheroidal wave functions of order zero. The transform is linear and additive in its index and asymptotically goes over to Namias's definition of the fractional Fourier transform. As a special case of this definition, it is shown that the finite Fourier transform may be inverted by using information over a finite range of frequencies in Fourier space, the inversion being sensitive to noise. Numerical illustrations for both forward (fractional) and inverse finite transforms are provided.

  17. Unusual cystic pancreatic neoplasms -image-pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilendarov, A.; Simova, E.; Petrova, A.; Traikova, N.; Deenichin, G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim is to present the variety of signs and symptoms from the diagnostic imaging methods of atypical neoplasms of the pancreas, presented as a type of cystic lesions. This often leads to unnecessary surgery or inappropriate tracking. In 115 patients (85 men and 30 women) with cystic lesions of the pancreas ultrasonic (US),computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed and verified through histological and macroscopic pathology preparations. The ultrasound machines equipped with linear and convex transducers, MDCT and MRI imaging systems were used. In 14 of 115 patients atypical neoplasms of the pancreas were diagnosed: two cases with macroscopic serous cystic neoplasms, two nonmucinous cystic neoplasms, two hemorrhagic mucinous neoplasms, two ductal adenocarcinomas with cystic changes, one islet cell cystic tumor, two lymphoepithetial cysts, one lymphangioma, one solid papillary epithelial neoplasm and one mucinous adenocarcinoma. The authors take into consideration and overlapping of clinical symptoms and laboratory tests. Although much of the imaging features and morphological characteristics of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are well known, should be known about the atypical unusual images in so-called 'typical' cystic neoplasms, cystic images in solid neoplasms and various atypical tumors with cystic lesions. (authors)

  18. Predicting detection performance with model observers: Fourier domain or spatial domain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baiyu; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James; Favazza, Christopher; Vrieze, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia

    2016-02-27

    The use of Fourier domain model observer is challenged by iterative reconstruction (IR), because IR algorithms are nonlinear and IR images have noise texture different from that of FBP. A modified Fourier domain model observer, which incorporates nonlinear noise and resolution properties, has been proposed for IR and needs to be validated with human detection performance. On the other hand, the spatial domain model observer is theoretically applicable to IR, but more computationally intensive than the Fourier domain method. The purpose of this study is to compare the modified Fourier domain model observer to the spatial domain model observer with both FBP and IR images, using human detection performance as the gold standard. A phantom with inserts of various low contrast levels and sizes was repeatedly scanned 100 times on a third-generation, dual-source CT scanner at 5 dose levels and reconstructed using FBP and IR algorithms. The human detection performance of the inserts was measured via a 2-alternative-forced-choice (2AFC) test. In addition, two model observer performances were calculated, including a Fourier domain non-prewhitening model observer and a spatial domain channelized Hotelling observer. The performance of these two mode observers was compared in terms of how well they correlated with human observer performance. Our results demonstrated that the spatial domain model observer correlated well with human observers across various dose levels, object contrast levels, and object sizes. The Fourier domain observer correlated well with human observers using FBP images, but overestimated the detection performance using IR images.

  19. The fractional Fourier transform and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, David H.; Swarztrauber, Paul N.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the 'fractional Fourier transform', which admits computation by an algorithm that has complexity proportional to the fast Fourier transform algorithm. Whereas the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is based on integral roots of unity e exp -2(pi)i/n, the fractional Fourier transform is based on fractional roots of unity e exp -2(pi)i(alpha), where alpha is arbitrary. The fractional Fourier transform and the corresponding fast algorithm are useful for such applications as computing DFTs of sequences with prime lengths, computing DFTs of sparse sequences, analyzing sequences with noninteger periodicities, performing high-resolution trigonometric interpolation, detecting lines in noisy images, and detecting signals with linearly drifting frequencies. In many cases, the resulting algorithms are faster by arbitrarily large factors than conventional techniques.

  20. Digital Fourier microscopy for soft matter dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giavazzi, Fabio; Cerbino, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Soft matter is studied with a large portfolio of methods. Light scattering and video microscopy are the most employed at optical wavelengths. Light scattering provides ensemble-averaged information on soft matter in the reciprocal space. The wave-vectors probed correspond to length scales ranging from a few nanometers to fractions of millimetre. Microscopy probes the sample directly in the real space, by offering a unique access to the local properties. However, optical resolution issues limit the access to length scales smaller than approximately 200 nm. We describe recent work that bridges the gap between scattering and microscopy. Several apparently unrelated techniques are found to share a simple basic idea: the correlation properties of the sample can be characterized in the reciprocal space via spatial Fourier analysis of images collected in the real space. We describe the main features of such digital Fourier microscopy (DFM), by providing examples of several possible experimental implementations of it, some of which not yet realized in practice. We also provide an overview of experimental results obtained with DFM for the study of the dynamics of soft materials. Finally, we outline possible future developments of DFM that would ease its adoption as a standard laboratory method. (topical review)

  1. Evaluation of digital image correlation techniques using realistic ground truth speckle images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cofaru, C; Philips, W; Van Paepegem, W

    2010-01-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) has been acknowledged and widely used in recent years in the field of experimental mechanics as a contactless method for determining full field displacements and strains. Even though several sub-pixel motion estimation algorithms have been proposed in the literature, little is known about their accuracy and limitations in reproducing complex underlying motion fields occurring in real mechanical tests. This paper presents a new method for evaluating sub-pixel motion estimation algorithms using ground truth speckle images that are realistically warped using artificial motion fields that were obtained following two distinct approaches: in the first, the horizontal and vertical displacement fields are created according to theoretical formulas for the given type of experiment while the second approach constructs the displacements through radial basis function interpolation starting from real DIC results. The method is applied in the evaluation of five DIC algorithms with results indicating that the gradient-based DIC methods generally have a quality advantage when using small sized blocks and are a better choice for calculating very small displacements and strains. The Newton–Raphson is the overall best performing method with a notable quality advantage when large block sizes are employed and in experiments where large strain fields are of interest

  2. Fourier analysis in dynamic non periodic phenomena in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinesco, A.; Lallot, C.

    1984-01-01

    The success of Fourier analysis in assessing cardiac function has led us to investigate other possible uses of this technique. We show that phase analysis applied to dynamic non periodic activity changes gives useful parametric functional images. The phase image is comparable to a transit time image, the amplitude image is comparable to the maximum variations of activity and the mean image corresponds to a normalized sum of images. Exemples of this powerful application of Fourier analysis are discussed [fr

  3. Multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma: imaging and clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yong; Zhang Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma (MCRCC) is a subtype of clear cell renal cell carcinoma and has mild clinical symptoms and a favorable prognosis. Accordingly, nephron-sparing surgery is recommended as a therapeutic strategy. If histologic subtype of MCRCC can be predicted preoperatively with an acceptable level of accuracy, it may be important in predicting prognosis and make clinical management. Most MCRCCs show characteristic cross-sectional imaging findings and permit accurate diagnosis before the treatment. Cross -sectional imaging of MCRCC reveals a well -defined multilocular cystic mass with irregularly enhanced thickened septa and without enhanced intracystic solid nodule. It is often classified as Bosniak classification Ⅲ , which is significantly different from that of other renal cystic masses. The clinical, pathologic, and radiologic features of MCRCC were discussed and illustrated in this article. The role of the imaging preoperative evaluation for MCRCC, and management implications were emphasized. (authors)

  4. Nonlinear image encryption using a fully phase nonzero-order joint transform correlator in the Gyrator domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardy, Juan M.; Millán, María S.; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet

    2017-02-01

    A novel nonlinear image encryption scheme based on a fully phase nonzero-order joint transform correlator architecture (JTC) in the Gyrator domain (GD) is proposed. In this encryption scheme, the two non-overlapping data distributions of the input plane of the JTC are fully encoded in phase and this input plane is transformed using the Gyrator transform (GT); the intensity distribution captured in the GD represents a new definition of the joint Gyrator power distribution (JGPD). The JGPD is modified by two nonlinear operations with the purpose of retrieving the encrypted image, with enhancement of the decrypted signal quality and improvement of the overall security. There are three keys used in the encryption scheme, two random phase masks and the rotation angle of the GT, which are all necessary for a proper decryption. Decryption is highly sensitivity to changes of the rotation angle of the GT as well as to little changes in other parameters or keys. The proposed encryption scheme in the GD still preserves the shift-invariance properties originated in the JTC-based encryption in the Fourier domain. The proposed encryption scheme is more resistant to brute force attacks, chosen-plaintext attacks, known-plaintext attacks, and ciphertext-only attacks, as they have been introduced in the cryptanalysis of the JTC-based encryption system. Numerical results are presented and discussed in order to verify and analyze the feasibility and validity of the novel encryption-decryption scheme.

  5. Verification of Fourier phase and amplitude values from simulated heart motion using a hydrodynamic cardiac model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiannikas, J.; Underwood, D.A.; Takatani, Setsuo; Nose, Yukihiko; MacIntyre, W.J.; Cook, S.A.; Go, R.T.; Golding, L.; Loop, F.D.

    1986-01-01

    Using pusher-plate-type artificial hearts, changes in the degree of synchrony and stroke volume were compared to phase and amplitude calculations from the first Fourier component of individual-pixel time-activity curves generated from gated radionuclide images (RNA) of these hearts. In addition, the ability of Fourier analysis to quantify paradoxical volume shifts was tested using a ventricular aneurysm model by which the Fourier amplitude was correlated to known increments of paradoxical volume. Predetermined phase-angle differences (incremental increases in asynchrony) and the mean phase-angle difference calculated from RNAs showed an agreement of -7 0 +-4.4 0 (mean +-SD). A strong correlation was noted between stroke volume and Fourier amplitude (r=0.98; P<0.0001) as well as between the paradoxical volume accepted by the 'aneurysm' and the Fourier amplitude (r=0.97; P<0.0001). The degree of asynchrony and changes in stroke volume were accurately reflected by the Fourier phase and amplitude values, respectively. In the specific case of ventricular aneurysms, the data demonstrate that using this method, the paradoxically moving areas may be localized, and the expansile volume within these regions can be quantified. (orig.)

  6. Verification of Fourier phase and amplitude values from simulated heart motion using a hydrodynamic cardiac model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yiannikas, J; Underwood, D A; Takatani, Setsuo; Nose, Yukihiko; MacIntyre, W J; Cook, S A; Go, R T; Golding, L; Loop, F D

    1986-02-01

    Using pusher-plate-type artificial hearts, changes in the degree of synchrony and stroke volume were compared to phase and amplitude calculations from the first Fourier component of individual-pixel time-activity curves generated from gated radionuclide images (RNA) of these hearts. In addition, the ability of Fourier analysis to quantify paradoxical volume shifts was tested using a ventricular aneurysm model by which the Fourier amplitude was correlated to known increments of paradoxical volume. Predetermined phase-angle differences (incremental increases in asynchrony) and the mean phase-angle difference calculated from RNAs showed an agreement of -7/sup 0/ +- 4.4/sup 0/ (mean +- SD). A strong correlation was noted between stroke volume and Fourier amplitude as well as between the paradoxical volume accepted by the 'aneurysm' and the Fourier amplitude. The degree of asynchrony and changes in stroke volume were accurately reflected by the Fourier phase and amplitude values, respectively. In the specific case of ventricular aneurysms, the data demonstrate that using this method, the paradoxically moving areas may be localized, and the expansile volume within these regions can be quantified. (orig.).

  7. Improved Fourier-transform profilometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xianfu; Chen Wenjing; Su Xianyu

    2007-01-01

    An improved optical geometry of the projected-fringe profilometry technique, in which the exit pupil of the projecting lens and the entrance pupil of the imaging lens are neither at the same height above the reference plane nor coplanar, is discussed and used in Fourier-transform profilometry. Furthermore, an improved fringe-pattern description and phase-height mapping formula based on the improved geometrical generalization is deduced. Employing the new optical geometry, it is easier for us to obtain the full-field fringe by moving either the projector or the imaging device. Therefore the new method offers a flexible way to obtain reliable height distribution of a measured object

  8. Patient positioning method based on binary image correlation between two edge images for proton-beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Akira; Yoda, Kiyoshi; Numano, Masumi; Futami, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Haruo; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Tsugami, Hironobu

    2005-01-01

    A new technique based on normalized binary image correlation between two edge images has been proposed for positioning proton-beam radiotherapy patients. A Canny edge detector was used to extract two edge images from a reference x-ray image and a test x-ray image of a patient before positioning. While translating and rotating the edged test image, the absolute value of the normalized binary image correlation between the two edge images is iteratively maximized. Each time before rotation, dilation is applied to the edged test image to avoid a steep reduction of the image correlation. To evaluate robustness of the proposed method, a simulation has been carried out using 240 simulated edged head front-view images extracted from a reference image by varying parameters of the Canny algorithm with a given range of rotation angles and translation amounts in x and y directions. It was shown that resulting registration errors have an accuracy of one pixel in x and y directions and zero degrees in rotation, even when the number of edge pixels significantly differs between the edged reference image and the edged simulation image. Subsequently, positioning experiments using several sets of head, lung, and hip data have been performed. We have observed that the differences of translation and rotation between manual positioning and the proposed method were within one pixel in translation and one degree in rotation. From the results of the validation study, it can be concluded that a significant reduction in workload for the physicians and technicians can be achieved with this method

  9. Fourier Series Optimization Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    This note discusses the introduction of Fourier series as an immediate application of optimization of a function of more than one variable. Specifically, it is shown how the study of Fourier series can be motivated to enrich a multivariable calculus class. This is done through discovery learning and use of technology wherein students build the…

  10. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, C.

    2003-03-01

    This paper gives a short account of some key elements in the life of Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768-1830), specifically his relation to Napoleon Bonaparte. The mathematical approach to Fourier series and the original scepticism by French mathematicians are briefly illustrated.

  11. Generalized Fourier transforms classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Svend; Møller, Steen

    2002-01-01

    The Fourier class of integral transforms with kernels $B(\\omega r)$ has by definition inverse transforms with kernel $B(-\\omega r)$. The space of such transforms is explicitly constructed. A slightly more general class of generalized Fourier transforms are introduced. From the general theory...

  12. Correlates of Bio-Psychosocial Factors on Perceived Body Image ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    person's psychosocial adjustment experiences, feelings and attitudes that is ... Brogowicz (1990) reported that 90% of university students in their study said that they ... studies have focused on the issue of body weight as it relates to body image body ... boost feelings of self-mastery, increase social support, bolster feelings of ...

  13. Correlation of simulated TEM images with irradiation induced damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeublin, R.; Almeida, P. de; Almazouzi, A.; Victoria, M.

    2000-01-01

    Crystal damage induced by irradiation is investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled to molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. The displacement cascades are simulated for energies ranging from 10 to 50 keV in Al, Ni and Cu and for times of up to a few tens of picoseconds. Samples are then used to perform simulations of the TEM images that one could observe experimentally. Diffraction contrast is simulated using a method based on the multislice technique. It appears that the cascade induced damage in Al imaged in weak beam exhibits little contrast, which is too low to be experimentally visible, while in Ni and Cu a good contrast is observed. The number of visible clusters is always lower than the actual one. Conversely, high resolution TEM (HRTEM) imaging allows most of the defects contained in the sample to be observed, although experimental difficulties arise due to the low contrast intensity of the smallest defects. Single point defects give rise in HTREM to a contrast that is similar to that of cavities. TEM imaging of the defects is discussed in relation to the actual size of the defects and to the number of clusters deduced from MD simulations

  14. Digital Image Analysis of Ultrasound B-mode images of Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaque: Correlation with Histological Examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Rosendal, Kim; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise Moes

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of how well texture features extracted from B-mode images of atherosclerotic plaque correlates with histological results obtained from the same plaque after carotid endarterectomy. The study reveals that a few second order texture features (diagonal moment, standard...... deviation and autocorrelation) provide good correlation within the training set (p = 0.04); However, the correlation found so far is not so high, that the method can be used in clinical prediction of plaque constituents....

  15. Biopolymer-based material used in optical image correlation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mysliwiec, J.; Kochalska, Anna; Miniewicz, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 11 (2008), s. 1902-1906 ISSN 0003-6935 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : biopolymer * DNA * optical correlation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.763, year: 2008

  16. Mechanical assessment of bovine pericardium using Müeller matrix imaging, enhanced backscattering and digital image correlation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuando-Espitia, Natanael; Sánchez-Arévalo, Francisco; Hernández-Cordero, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical characterization of tissue is an important but complex task. We demonstrate the simultaneous use of Mueller matrix imaging (MMI), enhanced backscattering (EBS) and digital image correlation (DIC) in a bovine pericardium (BP) tensile test. The interest in BP relies on its wide use as valve replacement and biological patch. We show that the mean free path (MFP), obtained through EBS measurements, can be used as an indicator of the anisotropy of the fiber ensemble. Our results further show a good correlation between retardance images and displacement vector fields, which are intrinsically related with the fiber interaction within the tissue.

  17. X-ray interferometric Fourier holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balyan, M.K.

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray interferometric Fourier holography is proposed and theoretically investigated. Fourier The X-ray interferometric Young fringes and object image reconstruction are investigated. It is shown that the interference pattern of two slits formed on the exit surface of the crystal-analyzer (the third plate of the interferometer) is the X-ray interferometric Young fringes. An expression for X-ray interferometric Young fringes period is obtained. The subsequent reconstruction of the slit image as an object is performed by means of Fourier transform of the intensity distribution on the hologram. Three methods of reconstruction of the amplitude transmission complex function of the object are presented: analytical - approximate method, method of iteration and step by step method. As an example the X-ray Fourier interferometric hologram recording and the complex amplitude transmission function reconstruction for a beryllium circular wire are considered

  18. Correlation characteristics of optical coherence tomography images of turbid media with statistically inhomogeneous optical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolin, Lev S.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Turchin, Ilya V.

    2012-01-01

    Noisy structure of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of turbid medium contains information about spatial variations of its optical parameters. We propose analytical model of statistical characteristics of OCT signal fluctuations from turbid medium with spatially inhomogeneous coefficients of absorption and backscattering. Analytically predicted correlation characteristics of OCT signal from spatially inhomogeneous medium are in good agreement with the results of correlation analysis of OCT images of different biological tissues. The proposed model can be efficiently applied for quantitative evaluation of statistical properties of absorption and backscattering fluctuations basing on correlation characteristics of OCT images.

  19. Correlation of early-phase {sup 18}F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET images to FDG images: preliminary studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Lin, Kun-Ju [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Taipei (China); Chang Gung University, Healthy Aging Research Center and Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Huang, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Wen-Chun [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Neurology, Taipei (China); Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Taipei (China); Kung, Mei-Ping [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Taipei (China); Chang Gung University, Healthy Aging Research Center and Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-04-15

    {sup 18}F-Florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) is a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for imaging plaque pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD), while PET images of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for cerebral glucose metabolism can provide complementary information to amyloid plaque images for diagnosis of AD. The goal of this preliminary study was to investigate the perfusion-like property of relative cerebral blood flow estimates (R{sub 1}) and summed early-phase AV-45 images [perfusion AV-45 (pAV-45)] and optimize the early time frame for pAV-45. Dynamic AV-45 PET scans (0-180 min) were performed in seven subjects. pAV-45, late-phase AV-45, and FDG images were spatially normalized to the Montreal Neurological Institute template aided by individual MRI images, and the corresponding standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) was computed. The R{sub 1} images were derived from a simplified reference tissue model. Correlations between regional and voxelwise R{sub 1} and the corresponding FDG images were calculated. An optimization of time frames of pAV-45 was conducted in terms of correlation to FDG images. The optimal early time frame was validated in a separate cohort. The regional distribution in the R{sub 1} images correlated well (R = 0.91) to that of the FDG within subjects. Consistently high correlation was noted across a long range of time frames. The maximal correlation of pAV-45 to FDG SUVR of R = 0.95 was observed at the time frame of 1-6 min, while the peak correlation of R = 0.99 happened at 0-2 min between pAV-45 and R{sub 1}. A similar result was achieved in the validation cohort. Preliminary results showed that the distribution patterns of R{sub 1} and pAV-45 images are highly correlated with normalized FDG images, and the initial 5-min early time frame of 1-6 min is potentially useful in providing complementary FDG-like information to the amyloid plaque density by late-phase AV-45 images. (orig.)

  20. Correlation of early-phase 18F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET images to FDG images: preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Lin, Kun-Ju; Huang, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Wen-Chun; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Kung, Mei-Ping

    2012-01-01

    18 F-Florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) is a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for imaging plaque pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD), while PET images of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for cerebral glucose metabolism can provide complementary information to amyloid plaque images for diagnosis of AD. The goal of this preliminary study was to investigate the perfusion-like property of relative cerebral blood flow estimates (R 1 ) and summed early-phase AV-45 images [perfusion AV-45 (pAV-45)] and optimize the early time frame for pAV-45. Dynamic AV-45 PET scans (0-180 min) were performed in seven subjects. pAV-45, late-phase AV-45, and FDG images were spatially normalized to the Montreal Neurological Institute template aided by individual MRI images, and the corresponding standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) was computed. The R 1 images were derived from a simplified reference tissue model. Correlations between regional and voxelwise R 1 and the corresponding FDG images were calculated. An optimization of time frames of pAV-45 was conducted in terms of correlation to FDG images. The optimal early time frame was validated in a separate cohort. The regional distribution in the R 1 images correlated well (R = 0.91) to that of the FDG within subjects. Consistently high correlation was noted across a long range of time frames. The maximal correlation of pAV-45 to FDG SUVR of R = 0.95 was observed at the time frame of 1-6 min, while the peak correlation of R = 0.99 happened at 0-2 min between pAV-45 and R 1 . A similar result was achieved in the validation cohort. Preliminary results showed that the distribution patterns of R 1 and pAV-45 images are highly correlated with normalized FDG images, and the initial 5-min early time frame of 1-6 min is potentially useful in providing complementary FDG-like information to the amyloid plaque density by late-phase AV-45 images. (orig.)

  1. Fully three-dimensional reconstruction from data collected on concentric cubes in Fourier space: implementation and a sample application to MRI [magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, G.T.; Roberts, D.; Axel, L.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm is proposed for rapid and accurate reconstruction from data collected in Fourier space at points arranged on a grid of concentric cubes. The whole process has computational complexity of the same order as required for the 3D fast Fourier transform and so (for medically relevant sizes of the data set) it is faster than backprojection into the same size rectangular grid. The design of the algorithm ensures that no interpolations are needed, in contrast to methods involving backprojection with their unavoidable interpolations. As an application, a 3D data collection method for MRI has been designed which directly samples the Fourier transform of the object to be reconstructed on concentric cubes as needed for the algorithm. (author)

  2. Imaging-pathologic correlation of multi-step hepatocarcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, O.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Approximately 80% of Japanese HCC cases are derived from HCV-associated liver cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis, and the remaining less than 20% of patients are HBV positive. Because of the introduction of this surveillance system by periodic ultrasound in these high-risk patients, the size of HCCs firstly detected during 2004 to 2005 (n=16809) was less than 2cm in 35% of all cases, 2.1-5.0 cm 48%, respectively. However, various types of hepatocellular nodules such as dysplastic nodule are also detected during screening procedures. Pathologically, human HCC often develops in a multistep fashion from dysplastic nodule to classic hyper vascular HCC. Therefore, for the early diagnosis of HCC, understanding of the sequential changes of imaging findings in accordance with multi-step hepatocarcinogenseis is important. In addition, to understand the imaging features of various types of HCC is also important for the precise characterization of HCCs. (1) Classification of hepatocellular nodules during multistep hepatocarcinogenesis; According to International Consensus Group for Hepatocellular Neoplasia, these nodules are divided into large regenerative nodule, low grade dysplastic nodule (L-DN), high-grade dysplastic nodule (H-DN), and HCC. In addition, small HCC (less than 2 cm) is divided into early HCC and progressed HCC. Early HCC has a vaguely nodular appearance and is highly well differentiated. (2) Imaging of multistep hepatocarcinogenesis; We revealed that the intranodular blood supply changes in accordance with the progression of human hepatocarcinogenesis from dyspalstic nodule to overt HCC. The intranodular portal supply relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma evaluated by CT during arterial portography (CTAP) is decreased, whereas the intranodular arterial supply evaluated by CT during hepatic arteriography (CTHA) revealed is first decreased during the early stage of hepatocarcinogenesis and then increased in parallel with increasing grade of

  3. Acute Severe Aortic Regurgitation: Imaging with Pathological Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Rajesh; Pasha, Ahmed Khurshid

    2016-03-01

    Acute aortic regurgitation (AR) is an important finding associated with a wide variety of disease processes. Its timely diagnosis is of utmost importance. Delay in diagnosis could prove fatal. We describe a case of acute severe AR that was timely diagnosed using real time three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiogram (3D TEE). Not only did it diagnose but also the images obtained by 3D TEE clearly matched with the pathologic specimen. Using this sophisticated imaging modality that is mostly available at the tertiary centers helped in the timely diagnosis, which lead to the optimal management saving his life. Echocardiography and especially 3D TEE can diagnose AR very accurately. Surgical intervention is the definitive treatment but medical therapy is utilized to stabilize the patient initially.

  4. Measurement of the Young's modulus of thin or flexible specimen with digital-image correlation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lianyun; Hou, Zhende; Qin, Yuwen

    2002-05-01

    Because some composite material, thin film material, and biomaterial, are very thin and some of them are flexible, the classical methods for measuring their Young's moduli, by mounting extensometers on specimens, are not available. A bi-image method based on image correlation for measuring Young's moduli is developed in this paper. The measuring precision achieved is one order enhanced with general digital image correlation or called single image method. By this way, the Young's modulus of a SS301 stainless steel thin tape, with thickness 0.067mm, is measured, and the moduli of polyester fiber films, a kind of flexible sheet with thickness 0.25 mm, are also measured.

  5. From Fourier analysis to wavelets

    CERN Document Server

    Gomes, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    This text introduces the basic concepts of function spaces and operators, both from the continuous and discrete viewpoints.  Fourier and Window Fourier Transforms are introduced and used as a guide to arrive at the concept of Wavelet transform.  The fundamental aspects of multiresolution representation, and its importance to function discretization and to the construction of wavelets is also discussed. Emphasis is given on ideas and intuition, avoiding the heavy computations which are usually involved in the study of wavelets.  Readers should have a basic knowledge of linear algebra, calculus, and some familiarity with complex analysis.  Basic knowledge of signal and image processing is desirable. This text originated from a set of notes in Portuguese that the authors wrote for a wavelet course on the Brazilian Mathematical Colloquium in 1997 at IMPA, Rio de Janeiro.

  6. Cystic synovial sarcomas: imaging features with clinical and histopathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Hirofumi; Araki, Nobuhito [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3, Nakamichi, Higashinari-Ku, 537-8511, Osaka (Japan); Sawai, Yuka [Department of Radiology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Kudawara, Ikuo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Mano, Masayuki; Ishiguro, Shingo [Department of Pathology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ueda, Takafumi; Yoshikawa, Hideki [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    To characterize the radiological and clinicopathologic features of cystic synovial sarcoma. Seven patients with primary cystic synovial sarcoma were evaluated. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were undertaken at the first presentation. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was made on the basis of histological examinations followed by molecular analysis. Radiological and clinicopathologic findings were reviewed. CT showed well-defined soft tissue mass without cortical bone erosion and invasion. Calcification was seen at the periphery of the mass in three cases. T2-weighted MR images showed multilocular inhomogeneous intensity mass in all cases, five of which showed fluid-fluid levels. On gross appearance, old and/or fresh hematomas were detected in six cases. In the one remaining case, microscopic hemorrhage in the cystic lumen was proven. Four cases had poorly differentiated areas. In five cases prominent hemangiopericytomatous vasculature was observed. Histologic grade was intermediate in one tumor and high in six. One case had a history of misdiagnosis for tarsal tunnel syndrome, one for lymphadenopathy, two for sciatica and two for hematoma. All cystic synovial sarcomas demonstrated multilocularity with well-circumscribed walls and internal septae. Synovial sarcoma should be taken into consideration in patients with deeply situated multicystic mass with triple signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. (orig.)

  7. Cystic synovial sarcomas: imaging features with clinical and histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Hirofumi; Araki, Nobuhito; Sawai, Yuka; Kudawara, Ikuo; Mano, Masayuki; Ishiguro, Shingo; Ueda, Takafumi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    To characterize the radiological and clinicopathologic features of cystic synovial sarcoma. Seven patients with primary cystic synovial sarcoma were evaluated. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were undertaken at the first presentation. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was made on the basis of histological examinations followed by molecular analysis. Radiological and clinicopathologic findings were reviewed. CT showed well-defined soft tissue mass without cortical bone erosion and invasion. Calcification was seen at the periphery of the mass in three cases. T2-weighted MR images showed multilocular inhomogeneous intensity mass in all cases, five of which showed fluid-fluid levels. On gross appearance, old and/or fresh hematomas were detected in six cases. In the one remaining case, microscopic hemorrhage in the cystic lumen was proven. Four cases had poorly differentiated areas. In five cases prominent hemangiopericytomatous vasculature was observed. Histologic grade was intermediate in one tumor and high in six. One case had a history of misdiagnosis for tarsal tunnel syndrome, one for lymphadenopathy, two for sciatica and two for hematoma. All cystic synovial sarcomas demonstrated multilocularity with well-circumscribed walls and internal septae. Synovial sarcoma should be taken into consideration in patients with deeply situated multicystic mass with triple signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. (orig.)

  8. Considerations on the correlation between real body and body image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice ABALAȘEI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available very individual in the society has a representation of it’s own body in relation to the spatial cues, postural cues, time cues, etc., considered by specialists the body scheme. Throughout its development, the human being goes through different stages of organization of both the image the and body scheme. We start carrying out this study from the idea that there could be, in male individuals, a link between body representation (own image projected outwardly apparent by reference to an image presented through a questionnaire and anthropological parameters, such as body fat and body mass index. The study was conducted on a total of 28 subjects, aged 22.71 ± 2.62 years, height of 177.11 ± 6.76 cm and body weight of 73.56 ± 12.60 kg. For these subjects the body composition has been determined by electromagnetic bioimpendance technique and projection of the self was assesed through a questionnaire. After analyzing statistical data, our hypothesis was refuted by the lack of mathematical connections between the variables analyzed.

  9. Renal cell carcinoma: histological classification and correlation with imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muglia, Valdair F., E-mail: fmuglia@fmrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (CCIFM/FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica. Faculdade de Medicina; Prando, Adilson [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Hospital Vera Cruz, Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Imaginologia

    2015-05-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the seventh most common histological type of cancer in the Western world and has shown a sustained increase in its prevalence. The histological classification of RCCs is of utmost importance, considering the significant prognostic and therapeutic implications of its histological subtypes. Imaging methods play an outstanding role in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of RCC. Clear cell, papillary and chromophobe are the most common histological subtypes of RCC, and their preoperative radiological characterization, either followed or not by confirmatory percutaneous biopsy, may be particularly useful in cases of poor surgical condition, metastatic disease, central mass in a solitary kidney, and in patients eligible for molecular targeted therapy. New strategies recently developed for treating renal cancer, such as cryo and radiofrequency ablation, molecularly targeted therapy and active surveillance also require appropriate preoperative characterization of renal masses. Less common histological types, although sharing nonspecific imaging features, may be suspected on the basis of clinical and epidemiological data. The present study is aimed at reviewing the main clinical and imaging findings of histological RCC subtypes. (author)

  10. Identification of microplastic in effluents of waste water treatment plants using focal plane array-based micro-Fourier-transform infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintenig, S M; Int-Veen, I; Löder, M G J; Primpke, S; Gerdts, G

    2017-01-01

    The global presence of microplastic (MP) in aquatic ecosystems has been shown by various studies. However, neither MP concentrations nor their sources or sinks are completely known. Waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) are considered as significant point sources discharging MP to the environment. This study investigated MP in the effluents of 12 WWTPs in Lower Saxony, Germany. Samples were purified by a plastic-preserving enzymatic-oxidative procedure and subsequent density separation using a zinc chloride solution. For analysis, attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT-IR) and focal plane array (FPA)-based transmission micro-FT-IR imaging were applied. This allowed the identification of polymers of all MP down to a size of 20 μm. In all effluents MP was found with quantities ranging from 0 to 5 × 10 1  m -3  MP > 500 μm and 1 × 10 1 to 9 × 10 3  m -3  MP < 500 μm. By far, polyethylene was the most frequent polymer type in both size classes. Quantities of synthetic fibres ranged from 9 × 10 1 to 1 × 10 3  m -3 and were predominantly made of polyester. Considering the annual effluxes of tested WWTPs, total discharges of 9 × 10 7 to 4 × 10 9  MP particles and fibres per WWTP could be expected. Interestingly, one tertiary WWTP had an additionally installed post-filtration that reduced the total MP discharge by 97%. Furthermore, the sewage sludge of six WWTPs was examined and the existence of MP, predominantly polyethylene, revealed. Our findings suggest that WWTPs could be a sink but also a source of MP and thus can be considered to play an important role for environmental MP pollution. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection and correction of blinking bias in image correlation transport measurements of quantum dot tagged macromolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durisic, Nela; Bachir, Alexia I; Kolin, David L

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are becoming widely used as fluorescent labels for biological applications. Here we demonstrate that fluorescence fluctuation analysis of their diffusional mobility using temporal image correlation spectroscopy is highly susceptible to systematic e...

  12. The derivative-free Fourier shell identity for photoacoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddour, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    In X-ray tomography, the Fourier slice theorem provides a relationship between the Fourier components of the object being imaged and the measured projection data. The Fourier slice theorem is the basis for X-ray Fourier-based tomographic inversion techniques. A similar relationship, referred to as the 'Fourier shell identity' has been previously derived for photoacoustic applications. However, this identity relates the pressure wavefield data function and its normal derivative measured on an arbitrary enclosing aperture to the three-dimensional Fourier transform of the enclosed object evaluated on a sphere. Since the normal derivative of pressure is not normally measured, the applicability of the formulation is limited in this form. In this paper, alternative derivations of the Fourier shell identity in 1D, 2D polar and 3D spherical polar coordinates are presented. The presented formulations do not require the normal derivative of pressure, thereby lending the formulas directly adaptable for Fourier based absorber reconstructions.

  13. Fourier analysis an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Elias M

    2003-01-01

    This first volume, a three-part introduction to the subject, is intended for students with a beginning knowledge of mathematical analysis who are motivated to discover the ideas that shape Fourier analysis. It begins with the simple conviction that Fourier arrived at in the early nineteenth century when studying problems in the physical sciences--that an arbitrary function can be written as an infinite sum of the most basic trigonometric functions.The first part implements this idea in terms of notions of convergence and summability of Fourier series, while highlighting applications such as th

  14. Correlated topographic and spectroscopic imaging by combined atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Dehong; Micic, Miodrag; Klymyshyn, Nicholas; Suh, Y.D.; Lu, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    Near-field scanning microscopy is a powerful approach to obtain topographic and spectroscopic characterization simultaneously for imaging biological and nanoscale systems. To achieve optical imaging at high spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit, aperture-less metallic scanning tips have been utilized to enhance the laser illumination local electromagnetic field at the apex of the scanning tips. In this paper, we discuss and review our work on combined fluorescence imaging with AFM-metallic tip enhancement, finite element method simulation of the tip enhancement, and their applications on AFM-tip enhanced fluorescence lifetime imaging (AFM-FLIM) and correlated AFM and FLIM imaging of the living cells

  15. MR imaging of the hip in avascular necrosis: Radiologic-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H.S.; Lee, S.H.; Lee, Y.S.; Cho, Z.H.; Han, M.C.; Kim, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging is the most sensitive modality for diagnosing avascular necrosis (AVN), but there is no established explanation for the change of signal intensity of the osteonecrotic segment. Ten surgically removed femoral heads with AVN underwent MR imaging at 2.0 T. A combination of high gradient strength (0.1 m T/cm) and small radio frequency coil (8 cm in diameter) was used to obtain images with effective thickness of 2.0 mm and pixel dimensions as small as 200 μm. MR images were correlated with high-resolution CT and histologic findings. This paper illustrates how MR images the histologic findings of AVN

  16. A Short Biography of Joseph Fourier and Historical Development of Fourier Series and Fourier Transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with a brief biographical sketch of Joseph Fourier, his first celebrated work on analytical theory of heat, his first great discovery of Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Included is a historical development of Fourier series and Fourier transforms with their properties, importance and applications. Special emphasis is made…

  17. Meningioangiomatosis: MR imaging and pathological correlation in two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.-Y.; Kim, W.S.; Cheon, J.-E.; Yeon, K.M.; Kim, I.-O.

    2002-01-01

    Meningioangiomatosis is a rare, benign neoplastic disorder involving the cortex and leptomeninges. The pathological findings are characterised by proliferation of meningothelial cells and leptomeningeal vessels and calcifications within the mass. We experienced two cases of pathologically confirmed meningioangiomatosis, one as a solitary cortical mass with calcification and the other as a cortical lesion manifested as extensive intracranial haemorrhage. On MRI, the first case showed an isointense cortical mass in the left frontal lobe and homogeneous enhancement on the contrast-enhanced study. The second case showed a target-like lesion with a peripheral dark signal rim on T2-weighted images accompanied by extensive haemorrhage in the adjacent frontal lobe and lateral ventricles. (orig.)

  18. Diagnosing cysts with correlation coefficient images from 2-dimensional freehand elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booi, Rebecca C; Carson, Paul L; O'Donnell, Matthew; Richards, Michael S; Rubin, Jonathan M

    2007-09-01

    We compared the diagnostic potential of using correlation coefficient images versus elastograms from 2-dimensional (2D) freehand elastography to characterize breast cysts. In this preliminary study, which was approved by the Institutional Review Board and compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, we imaged 4 consecutive human subjects (4 cysts, 1 biopsy-verified benign breast parenchyma) with freehand 2D elastography. Data were processed offline with conventional 2D phase-sensitive speckle-tracking algorithms. The correlation coefficient in the cyst and surrounding tissue was calculated, and appearances of the cysts in the correlation coefficient images and elastograms were compared. The correlation coefficient in the cysts was considerably lower (14%-37%) than in the surrounding tissue because of the lack of sufficient speckle in the cysts, as well as the prominence of random noise, reverberations, and clutter, which decorrelated quickly. Thus, the cysts were visible in all correlation coefficient images. In contrast, the elastograms associated with these cysts each had different elastographic patterns. The solid mass in this study did not have the same high decorrelation rate as the cysts, having a correlation coefficient only 2.1% lower than that of surrounding tissue. Correlation coefficient images may produce a more direct, reliable, and consistent method for characterizing cysts than elastograms.

  19. Using Image Gradients to Improve Robustness of Digital Image Correlation to Non-uniform Illumination: Effects of Weighting and Normalization Choices

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Jiangping; Moussawi, Ali; Gras, Renaud; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the light condition affect the solution of intensity-based digital image correlation algorithms. One natural way to decrease the influence of illumination is to consider the gradients of the image rather than the image itself when

  20. Digital Fourier analysis fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Kido, Ken'iti

    2015-01-01

    This textbook is a thorough, accessible introduction to digital Fourier analysis for undergraduate students in the sciences. Beginning with the principles of sine/cosine decomposition, the reader walks through the principles of discrete Fourier analysis before reaching the cornerstone of signal processing: the Fast Fourier Transform. Saturated with clear, coherent illustrations, "Digital Fourier Analysis - Fundamentals" includes practice problems and thorough Appendices for the advanced reader. As a special feature, the book includes interactive applets (available online) that mirror the illustrations.  These user-friendly applets animate concepts interactively, allowing the user to experiment with the underlying mathematics. For example, a real sine signal can be treated as a sum of clockwise and counter-clockwise rotating vectors. The applet illustration included with the book animates the rotating vectors and the resulting sine signal. By changing parameters such as amplitude and frequency, the reader ca...

  1. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

  2. Radar correlated imaging for extended target by the combination of negative exponential restraint and total variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tingting; Wang, Lianlian; Lu, Guanghua

    2017-07-01

    Radar correlated imaging (RCI) introduces the optical correlated imaging technology to traditional microwave imaging, which has raised widespread concern recently. Conventional RCI methods neglect the structural information of complex extended target, which makes the quality of recovery result not really perfect, thus a novel combination of negative exponential restraint and total variation (NER-TV) algorithm for extended target imaging is proposed in this paper. The sparsity is measured by a sequential order one negative exponential function, then the 2D total variation technique is introduced to design a novel optimization problem for extended target imaging. And the proven alternating direction method of multipliers is applied to solve the new problem. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm could realize high resolution imaging efficiently for extended target.

  3. Early detection of the incidence of malignancy in mammograms using digital image correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espitia, J.; Jacome, J.; Torres, C.

    2016-01-01

    The digital image correlation has proved an effective way for Pattern Recognition, this research to identify the using Findings digitally extracted from a mammographic image, which is the means used by more specialists to determine if a person is a candidate or not, a Suffer Breast Cancer. This shown that early detection of symptom logy 'carcinogenic' is the key . (Author)

  4. Generalized Fourier transforms classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Svend; Møller, Steen

    2002-01-01

    The Fourier class of integral transforms with kernels $B(\\omega r)$ has by definition inverse transforms with kernel $B(-\\omega r)$. The space of such transforms is explicitly constructed. A slightly more general class of generalized Fourier transforms are introduced. From the general theory foll...... follows that integral transform with kernels which are products of a Bessel and a Hankel function or which is of a certain general hypergeometric type have inverse transforms of the same structure....

  5. Generalized fiber Fourier optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotti, Gabriella

    2011-06-15

    A twofold generalization of the optical schemes that perform the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is given: new passive planar architectures are presented where the 2 × 2 3 dB couplers are replaced by M × M hybrids, reducing the number of required connections and phase shifters. Furthermore, the planar implementation of the discrete fractional Fourier transform (DFrFT) is also described, with a waveguide grating router (WGR) configuration and a properly modified slab coupler.

  6. Algorithm for three dimension reconstruction of magnetic resonance tomographs and X-ray images based on Fast Fourier Transform; Algoritmo para reconstrucao tridimensional de imagens de tomografos de ressonancia magnetica e de raio-X baseado no uso de Transformada Rapida de Fourier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, Josiane M.; Traina, Agma Juci M. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Matematicas; Cruvinel, Paulo E. [EMBRAPA, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). CNPDIA

    1995-12-31

    This work presents an algorithm for three-dimensional digital image reconstruction. Such algorithms based on the combination of both a Fast Fourier Transform method with Hamming Window and the use of a tri-linear interpolation function. The algorithm allows not only the generation of three-dimensional spatial spin distribution maps for Magnetic Resonance Tomography data but also X and Y-rays linear attenuation coefficient maps for CT scanners. Results demonstrates the usefulness of the algorithm in three-dimensional image reconstruction by doing first two-dimensional reconstruction and rather after interpolation. The algorithm was developed in C++ language, and there are two available versions: one under the DOS environment, and the other under the UNIX/Sun environment. (author) 10 refs., 5 figs.

  7. The Maximum Cross-Correlation approach to detecting translational motions from sequential remote-sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J.; Lythe, M. B.

    1996-06-01

    This paper presents the principle of the Maximum Cross-Correlation (MCC) approach in detecting translational motions within dynamic fields from time-sequential remotely sensed images. A C program implementing the approach is presented and illustrated in a flowchart. The program is tested with a pair of sea-surface temperature images derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) images near East Cape, New Zealand. Results show that the mean currents in the region have been detected satisfactorily with the approach.

  8. Remote Sensing Image Fusion Based on the Combination Grey Absolute Correlation Degree and IHS Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui LIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An improved fusion algorithm for multi-source remote sensing images with high spatial resolution and multi-spectral capacity is proposed based on traditional IHS fusion and grey correlation analysis. Firstly, grey absolute correlation degree is used to discriminate non-edge pixels and edge pixels in high-spatial resolution images, by which the weight of intensity component is identified in order to combine it with high-spatial resolution image. Therefore, image fusion is achieved using IHS inverse transform. The proposed method is applied to ETM+ multi-spectral images and panchromatic image, and Quickbird’s multi-spectral images and panchromatic image respectively. The experiments prove that the fusion method proposed in the paper can efficiently preserve spectral information of the original multi-spectral images while enhancing spatial resolution greatly. By comparison and analysis, the proposed fusion algorithm is better than traditional IHS fusion and fusion method based on grey correlation analysis and IHS transform.

  9. Motor features in posterior cortical atrophy and their imaging correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Natalie S; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Lehmann, Manja; Keihaninejad, Shiva; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Leung, Kelvin K; Fox, Nick C; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2014-12-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by impaired higher visual processing skills; however, motor features more commonly associated with corticobasal syndrome may also occur. We investigated the frequency and clinical characteristics of motor features in 44 PCA patients and, with 30 controls, conducted voxel-based morphometry, cortical thickness, and subcortical volumetric analyses of their magnetic resonance imaging. Prominent limb rigidity was used to define a PCA-motor subgroup. A total of 30% (13) had PCA-motor; all demonstrating asymmetrical left upper limb rigidity. Limb apraxia was more frequent and asymmetrical in PCA-motor, as was myoclonus. Tremor and alien limb phenomena only occurred in this subgroup. The subgroups did not differ in neuropsychological test performance or apolipoprotein E4 allele frequency. Greater asymmetry of atrophy occurred in PCA-motor, particularly involving right frontoparietal and peri-rolandic cortices, putamen, and thalamus. The 9 patients (including 4 PCA-motor) with pathology or cerebrospinal fluid all showed evidence of Alzheimer's disease. Our data suggest that PCA patients with motor features have greater atrophy of contralateral sensorimotor areas but are still likely to have underlying Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Displacement measurement with nanoscale resolution using a coded micro-mark and digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Ma, Chengfu; Chen, Yuhang

    2014-12-01

    A method for simple and reliable displacement measurement with nanoscale resolution is proposed. The measurement is realized by combining a common optical microscopy imaging of a specially coded nonperiodic microstructure, namely two-dimensional zero-reference mark (2-D ZRM), and subsequent correlation analysis of the obtained image sequence. The autocorrelation peak contrast of the ZRM code is maximized with well-developed artificial intelligence algorithms, which enables robust and accurate displacement determination. To improve the resolution, subpixel image correlation analysis is employed. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate the quasi-static and dynamic displacement characterization ability of a micro 2-D ZRM.

  11. Fourier transformation for engineering and natural science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingen, B.

    2001-01-01

    The following topics are covered: functions, Dirac delta function, Fourier operators, Fourier integrals, Fourier transformation and periodic functions, discrete Fourier transformations and discrete filters, applications. (WL)

  12. Fourier transform in multimode systems in the Bargmann representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, C; Vourdas, A

    2007-01-01

    A Fourier transform in a multimode system is studied, using the Bargmann representation. The growth of a Bargmann function is shown to be related to the second-order correlation of the corresponding state. Both the total growth and the total second-order correlation remain unchanged under the Fourier transform. Examples with coherent states, squeezed states and Mittag-Leffler states are discussed

  13. Preliminary study on the correlation between color measurement of dyed polyester and its image files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y. K.; Park, Y. C.

    2017-10-01

    As the internet becomes more popular, buyers send image files to manufacturers instead of sending swatches. However, this method may cause problems because different from the monitor between the buyer and the manufacturer, and also there is a problem depending on the light source. In order to overcome these problems, we investigated the relationship between color measurement values of dyed fabrics and RGB values of image files. The RGB values of image files tended to decrease with increasing dye concentration in all three colors. Correlation between RGB values and a*, b* values was observed at low concentration, but there was little correlation at high concentration. In the case of yellow color, there is no correlation between the L*a*b* values obtained from the dyed fabric and RGB values obtained from the image file.

  14. A New Measure of Imagination Ability: Anatomical Brain Imaging Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex Eugene Jung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Imagination involves episodic memory retrieval, visualization, mental simulation, spatial navigation, and future thinking, making it a complex cognitive construct. Prior studies of imagination have attempted to study various elements of imagination (e.g., visualization, but none have attempted to capture the entirety of imagination ability in a single instrument. Here we describe the Hunter Imagination Questionnaire (HIQ, an instrument designed to assess imagination over an extended period of time, in a naturalistic manner. We hypothesized that the HIQ would be related to measures of creative achievement and to a network of brain regions previously identified to be important to imagination/creative abilities. Eighty subjects were administered the HIQ in an online format; all subjects were administered a broad battery of tests including measures of intelligence, personality, and aptitude, as well as structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMR. Responses of the HIQ were found to be normally distributed, and exploratory factor analysis yielded four factors. Internal consistency of the HIQ ranged from .76 to .79, and two factors (Implementation and Learning were significantly related to measures of Creative Achievement (Scientifific - r = .26 and Writing - r = .31 respectively, suggesting concurrent validity. We found that the HIQ and its factors were related to a broad network of brain volumes including increased bilateral hippocampi, lingual gyrus, and caudal/rostral middle frontal lobe, and decreased volumes within the nucleus accumbens and regions within the default mode network (e.g., precuneus, posterior cingulate, transverse temporal lobe. The HIQ was found to be a reliable and valid measure of imagination in a cohort of normal human subjects, and was related to brain volumes previously identified as central to imagination including episodic memory retrieval (e.g., hippocampus. We also identified compelling evidence suggesting imagination

  15. Correlative studies of structural and functional imaging in primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panegyres, P K; McCarthy, M; Campbell, A; Lenzo, N; Fallon, M; Thompson, J

    2008-01-01

    To compare and contrast structural and functional imaging in primary progressive aphasia (PPA). A cohort of 8 patients diagnosed with PPA presenting with nonfluency were prospectively evaluated. All patients had structural imaging in the form of MRI and in 1 patient CAT scanning on account of a cardiac pacemaker. All patients had single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. SPECT and PET imaging had 100% correlation. Anatomical imaging was abnormal in only 6 of the 8 patients. Wernicke's area showed greater peak Z score reduction and extent of area affected than Broca's area (McNemar paired test: P = .008 for Z score reduction; P = .0003 for extent). PET scanning revealed significant involvement of the anterior cingulum. Functional imaging in PPA: (a) identified more patients correctly than anatomic imaging highlighting the importance of SPECT and PET in the diagnosis; and (b) demonstrated the heterogeneous involvement of disordered linguistic networks in PPA suggesting its syndromic nature.

  16. Chondroid lipoma: correlation of imaging findings and histopathology of an unusual benign lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.A.R.; Cannon, S.R.; Flanagan, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The imaging findings of soft tissue tumours are often non-specific and generally require biopsy to differentiate between benign and malignant lesions. The finding of curvilinear, annular or amorphous mineralisation in an enlarging mass has sinister connotations. In this case report, we present the imaging findings with histological correlation of a chondroid lipoma, an unusual benign soft tissue tumour, which presented with radiographic evidence of calcification, an imaging finding not previously described. We also describe the ultrasound appearance and certain MR imaging appearances that have not been previously attributed to this tumour in the few reported cases. (orig.)

  17. On Fourier re-expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Liflyand, E.

    2012-01-01

    We study an extension to Fourier transforms of the old problem on absolute convergence of the re-expansion in the sine (cosine) Fourier series of an absolutely convergent cosine (sine) Fourier series. The results are obtained by revealing certain relations between the Fourier transforms and their Hilbert transforms.

  18. Correlation between pennation angle and image quality of skeletal muscle fibre tractography using deterministic diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshikazu; Okamoto, Toru; Yuka, Kujiraoka; Hirano, Yuji; Isobe, Tomonori; Minami, Manabu

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain whether a correlation existed between muscle pennation angle and the ability to successfully perform tractography of the lower leg muscle fibres with deterministic diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in normal volunteers. Fourteen volunteers aged 20-39 (mean 28.2 years old) were recruited. All volunteers were scanned using DTI, and six fibre tractographs were constructed from one lower leg of each volunteer, and the 'fibre density' was calculated in each of the tractographs. The pennation angle is the angle formed by the muscle fibre and the aponeurosis. The average pennation angle (AVPA) and standard deviation of the pennation angle (SDPA) were also measured for each muscle by ultrasonography in the same region as the MRI scan. For all 84 tractography images, the correlation coefficient between the fibre density and AVPA or SDPA was calculated. Fibre density and AVPA showed a moderate negative correlation (R = -0.72), and fibre density and SDPA showed a weak negative correlation (R = -0.47). With respect to comparisons within each muscle, AVPA and fibre density showed a moderate negative correlation in the gastrocnemius lateralis muscle (R = -0.57). Our data suggest that a larger, more variable pennation angle resulted in worse skeletal muscle tractography using deterministic DTI. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  19. Intrasubject correlation between static scan and distribution volume images for [11C]flumazenil PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishina, Masahiro; Senda, Michio; Kimura, Yuichi

    2000-01-01

    Accumulation of [ 11 C]flumazenil (FMZ) reflects central nervous system benzodiazepine receptor (BZR). We searched for the optimal time for a static PET scan with FMZ as semi-quantitative imaging of BZR distribution. In 10 normal subjects, a dynamic series of decay-corrected PET scans was performed for 60 minutes, and the arterial blood was sampled during the scan to measure radioactivity and labeled metabolites. We generated 13 kinds of ''static scan'' images from the dynamic scan in each subject, and analyzed the pixel correlation for these images versus distribution volume (DV) images. We also analyzed the time for the [ 11 C]FMZ in plasma and tissue to reach the equilibrium. The intra-subject pixel correlation demonstrated that the static scan'' images for the period centering around 30 minutes post-injection had the strongest linear correlation with the DV image. The ratio of radioactivity in the cortex to that in the plasma reached a peak at 40 minutes after injection. Considering the physical decay and patient burden, we conclude that the decay corrected static scan for [ 11 C]FMZ PET as semi-quantitative imaging of BZR distribution is to be optimally acquired from 20 to 40 minutes after injection. (author)

  20. Correlation of sequential MR imaging of the injured spinal cord with prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Izunaga, Hiroshi; Sato, Ryuichiro; Shinzato, Jintetsu; Korogi, Yukunori; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Sakae, Terumi

    1993-01-01

    Forty-nine patients with acute spinal cord injuries were studied sequentially with MR imaging by using 0.5 Tesla superconductive units, and sequential MR changes were correlated with the prognosis of the patients. MR images were obtained within one week of the injury and then every two to six months when possible. The Frankel classification of neurologic function was correlated with MR findings. The most frequently observed types of signal intensity patterns on MR imaging were type 0 (isointensity on both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images) and type I (isointensity on T 1 - and hyperintensity on T 2 -weighted images). In subsequent subacute and chronic stages, type II (hypointensity on T 1 and hyperintensity on T 2 ) was most frequently observed. The evolution of type 0 was to types I and II, whereas type I usually turned into type II or remained as type I. Type III (hyperintensity on T 1 and hyper-, iso- or hypointensity on T 2 images) patients were few in number. There was a good correlation between MR imaging patterns and neurologic recovery for initial and subsequent MR patterns, in that type 0 showed good recovery, whereas types I and II revealed good improvement or no recovery. In addition, the extent of the high signal intensity area on initial as well as on subsequent T 2 -weighted images was proportionally correlated to neurologic recovery. The degree of cord compression was also important for predicting recovery of neurologic function. Findings of MR imaging of acutely injured spinal cord suggested the prognosis of spinal cord injury, especially when sequential studies were obtained. (author)

  1. Medulloblastoma: correlation among findings of conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonte, Mariana Vieira de Melo da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lucato, Leandro Tavares; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Leite, Claudia da Costa [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Inst. de Radiologia]. E-mail: mvmfonte@uol.com.br; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues; Amaral, Raquel Portugal Guimaraes [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Reed, Umbertina Conti [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurologia; Rosemberg, Sergio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Patologia

    2008-11-15

    To correlate imaging findings of medulloblastomas at conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, comparing them with data in the literature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging studies of nine pediatric patients with histologically confirmed medulloblastomas (eight desmoplastic medulloblastoma, and one giant cell medulloblastoma) were retrospectively reviewed, considering demographics as well as tumors characteristics such as localization, morphology, signal intensity, contrast-enhancement, dissemination, and diffusion-weighted imaging and spectroscopy findings. In most of cases the tumors were centered in the cerebellar vermis (77.8%), predominantly solid (88.9%), hypointense on T 1-weighted images and intermediate/hyperintense on T 2-FLAIR-weighted images, with heterogeneous enhancement (100%), tumor dissemination/extension (77.8%) and limited water molecule mobility (100%). Proton spectroscopy acquired with STEAM technique (n = 6) demonstrated decreased Na a / Cr ratio (83.3%) and increased Co/Cr (100%) and ml/Cr (66.7%) ratios; and with PRESS technique (n = 7) demonstrated lactate peak (57.1%). Macroscopic magnetic resonance imaging findings in association with biochemical features of medulloblastomas have been useful in the differentiation among the most frequent posterior fossa tumors. (author)

  2. Medulloblastoma: correlation among findings of conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonte, Mariana Vieira de Melo da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lucato, Leandro Tavares; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues; Amaral, Raquel Portugal Guimaraes; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Rosemberg, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    To correlate imaging findings of medulloblastomas at conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, comparing them with data in the literature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging studies of nine pediatric patients with histologically confirmed medulloblastomas (eight desmoplastic medulloblastoma, and one giant cell medulloblastoma) were retrospectively reviewed, considering demographics as well as tumors characteristics such as localization, morphology, signal intensity, contrast-enhancement, dissemination, and diffusion-weighted imaging and spectroscopy findings. In most of cases the tumors were centered in the cerebellar vermis (77.8%), predominantly solid (88.9%), hypointense on T 1-weighted images and intermediate/hyperintense on T 2-FLAIR-weighted images, with heterogeneous enhancement (100%), tumor dissemination/extension (77.8%) and limited water molecule mobility (100%). Proton spectroscopy acquired with STEAM technique (n = 6) demonstrated decreased Na a / Cr ratio (83.3%) and increased Co/Cr (100%) and ml/Cr (66.7%) ratios; and with PRESS technique (n = 7) demonstrated lactate peak (57.1%). Macroscopic magnetic resonance imaging findings in association with biochemical features of medulloblastomas have been useful in the differentiation among the most frequent posterior fossa tumors. (author)

  3. Optical Measurement Techniques for Rocket Engine Testing and Component Applications: Digital Image Correlation and Dynamic Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been advancing dynamic optical measurement systems, primarily Digital Image Correlation, for extreme environment rocket engine test applications. The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technology is used to track local and full field deformations, displacement vectors and local and global strain measurements. This technology has been evaluated at MSFC through lab testing to full scale hotfire engine testing of the J-2X Upper Stage engine at Stennis Space Center. It has been shown to provide reliable measurement data and has replaced many traditional measurement techniques for NASA applications. NASA and AMRDEC have recently signed agreements for NASA to train and transition the technology to applications for missile and helicopter testing. This presentation will provide an overview and progression of the technology, various testing applications at NASA MSFC, overview of Army-NASA test collaborations and application lessons learned about Digital Image Correlation.

  4. Source Determination of Red Gel Pen Inks using Raman Spectroscopy and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy combined with Pearson's Product Moment Correlation Coefficients and Principal Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Asri, Muhammad Naeim; Mat Desa, Wan Nur Syuhaila; Ismail, Dzulkiflee

    2018-01-01

    The potential combination of two nondestructive techniques, that is, Raman spectroscopy (RS) and attenuated total reflectance-fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy with Pearson's product moment correlation (PPMC) coefficient (r) and principal component analysis (PCA) to determine the actual source of red gel pen ink used to write a simulated threatening note, was examined. Eighteen (18) red gel pens purchased from Japan and Malaysia from November to December 2014 where one of the pens was used to write a simulated threatening note were analyzed using RS and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, respectively. The spectra of all the red gel pen inks including the ink deposited on the simulated threatening note gathered from the RS and ATR-FTIR analyses were subjected to PPMC coefficient (r) calculation and principal component analysis (PCA). The coefficients r = 0.9985 and r = 0.9912 for pairwise combination of RS and ATR-FTIR spectra respectively and similarities in terms of PC1 and PC2 scores of one of the inks to the ink deposited on the simulated threatening note substantiated the feasibility of combining RS and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy with PPMC coefficient (r) and PCA for successful source determination of red gel pen inks. The development of pigment spectral library had allowed the ink deposited on the threatening note to be identified as XSL Poppy Red (CI Pigment Red 112). © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours: Correlation of modified NIH risk stratification with diffusion-weighted MR imaging as an imaging biomarker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Seong Hyun; Jang, Kyung Mi; Choi, Dongil; Ha, Sang Yun; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kang, Won Ki; Kim, Min Ji

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Except size and necrosis, conventional MR findings of GISTs were not significantly different according to the modified NIH criteria. • The ADC values of GISTs were negatively correlated with the modified NIH criteria. • The ADC value can be helpful for the determination of intermediate or high-risk GISTs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlation of risk grade of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) based on modified National Institutes of Health (NIH) criteria with conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging. Methods: We included 22 patients with histopathologically proven GISTs in the stomach or small bowel who underwent pre-operative gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging and DW imaging. We retrospectively assessed correlations between morphologic findings, qualitative (signal intensity, consensus from two observers) and quantitative (degree of dynamic enhancement using signal intensity of tumour/muscle ratio and apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC]) values, and the modified NIH criteria for risk stratification. Spearman partial correlation analysis was used to control for tumour size as a confounding factor. The optimal cut-off level of ADC values for intermediate or high risk GISTs was analyzed using a receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Except tumour size and necrosis, conventional MR imaging findings, including the degree of dynamic enhancement, were not significantly different according to the modified NIH criteria (p > 0.05). Tumour ADC values were negatively correlated with the modified NIH criteria, before and after adjustment of tumour size (ρ = −0.754; p < 0.001 and ρ = −0.513; p = 0.017, respectively). The optimal cut-off value for the determination of intermediate or high-risk GISTs was 1.279 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s (100% sensitivity, 69.2% specificity, 81.8% accuracy). Conclusion: Except tumour size and necrosis, conventional MR imaging findings did not correlate with

  6. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours: Correlation of modified NIH risk stratification with diffusion-weighted MR imaging as an imaging biomarker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Wook [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Hyun, E-mail: kshyun@skku.edu [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Kyung Mi; Choi, Dongil [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sang Yun; Kim, Kyoung-Mee [Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Won Ki [Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Ji [Biostatics Unit, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Except size and necrosis, conventional MR findings of GISTs were not significantly different according to the modified NIH criteria. • The ADC values of GISTs were negatively correlated with the modified NIH criteria. • The ADC value can be helpful for the determination of intermediate or high-risk GISTs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlation of risk grade of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) based on modified National Institutes of Health (NIH) criteria with conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging. Methods: We included 22 patients with histopathologically proven GISTs in the stomach or small bowel who underwent pre-operative gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging and DW imaging. We retrospectively assessed correlations between morphologic findings, qualitative (signal intensity, consensus from two observers) and quantitative (degree of dynamic enhancement using signal intensity of tumour/muscle ratio and apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC]) values, and the modified NIH criteria for risk stratification. Spearman partial correlation analysis was used to control for tumour size as a confounding factor. The optimal cut-off level of ADC values for intermediate or high risk GISTs was analyzed using a receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Except tumour size and necrosis, conventional MR imaging findings, including the degree of dynamic enhancement, were not significantly different according to the modified NIH criteria (p > 0.05). Tumour ADC values were negatively correlated with the modified NIH criteria, before and after adjustment of tumour size (ρ = −0.754; p < 0.001 and ρ = −0.513; p = 0.017, respectively). The optimal cut-off value for the determination of intermediate or high-risk GISTs was 1.279 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s (100% sensitivity, 69.2% specificity, 81.8% accuracy). Conclusion: Except tumour size and necrosis, conventional MR imaging findings did not

  7. Partial removal of correlated noise in thermal imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borel, C.C.; Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.

    1996-01-01

    Correlated noise occurs in many imaging systems such as scanners and push-broom imagers. The sources of correlated noise can be from the detectors, pre-amplifiers and sampling circuits. Correlated noise appears as streaking along the scan direction of a scanner or in the along track direction of a push-broom imager. We have developed algorithms to simulate correlated noise and pre-filter to reduce the amount of streaking while not destroying the scene content. The pre- filter in the Fourier domain consists of the product of two filters. One filter models the correlated noise spectrum, the other is a windowing function e.g. Gaussian or Hanning window with variable width to block high frequency noise away from the origin of the Fourier Transform of the image data. We have optimized the filter parameters for various scenes and find improvements of the RMS error of the original minus the pre-filtered noisy image

  8. MR imaging and histopathologic correlations of thermal injuries induced by interstitial laser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Y.; Lufkin, R.B.; Castro, D.J.; Farahani, K.; Chen, H.W.; Hirchowiz, S.

    1991-01-01

    Interstitial laser phototherapy for deep-seated tumors may become an attractive therapeutic modality when a noninvasive, accurate monitoring system is developed. In this paper, to devaluate the ability of MR imaging to differentiate reversible and irreversible thermal injuries induced by laser therapy, the precise correlation of MR and histopathologic findings are investigated in the in vivo model. Nd:YAG lasers were applied to normal musculature of rabbits, and MR examinations were performed immediately after laser exposure and followed up for up to 10 weeks. The sequential MR images were correlated with histopathologic findings. T2-weighted MR imaging clearly showed laser-induced thermal injuries on any postoperative day. MR imaging of acute thermal injuries showed a central cavity, low-signal zone of coagulative necrosis and a peripheral high-signal layer of interstitial edema. The infiltration of neutrophils followed by fibrovascular response was identified on the marginal edema layer after 6 postoperative days

  9. Novel approach to improve molecular imaging research: Correlation between macroscopic and molecular pathological findings in patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Ingrid, E-mail: i.boehm@uni-bonn.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, ZARF Project, Center for Molecular Imaging Research MBMB, Philipps University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35039 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Currently, clinical research approaches are sparse in molecular imaging studies. Moreover, possible links between imaging features and pathological laboratory parameters are unknown, so far. Therefore, the goal was to find a possible relationship between imaging features and peripheral blood cell apoptosis, and thereby to present a novel way to complement molecular imaging research. Materials and methods: The investigation has been done in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype of an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan involvement, autoantibody production, and disturbed apoptosis. Retrospectively, radiological findings have been compared to both autoantibody findings and percentage apoptotic blood cells. Results: Two SLE groups could be identified: patients with normal (annexin V binding < 20%), and with increased apoptosis (annexin V binding > 20%) of peripheral blood cells. The frequency of radiological examinations in SLE patients significantly correlated with an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (p < 0.005). In patients with characteristic imaging findings (e.g. lymph node swelling, pleural effusion) an elevated percentage of apoptotic cells was present. In contrast SLE-patients with normal imaging findings or uncharacteristic results of minimal severity had normal percentages of apoptotic blood cells. Conclusion: This correlation between radiographic findings and percentage of apoptotic blood cells provides (1) further insight into pathological mechanisms of SLE, (2) will offer the possibility to introduce apoptotic biomarkers as molecular probes for clinical molecular imaging approaches in future to early diagnose organ complaints in patients with SLE, and (3) is a plea to complement molecular imaging research by this clinical approach.

  10. Time-of-flight camera via a single-pixel correlation image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Tianyi; Chen, Qian; He, Weiji; Dai, Huidong; Ye, Ling; Gu, Guohua

    2018-04-01

    A time-of-flight imager based on single-pixel correlation image sensors is proposed for noise-free depth map acquisition in presence of ambient light. Digital micro-mirror device and time-modulated IR-laser provide spatial and temporal illumination on the unknown object. Compressed sensing and ‘four bucket principle’ method are combined to reconstruct the depth map from a sequence of measurements at a low sampling rate. Second-order correlation transform is also introduced to reduce the noise from the detector itself and direct ambient light. Computer simulations are presented to validate the computational models and improvement of reconstructions.

  11. The correlation between lacunes and microbleeds on magnetic resonance imaging in consecutive 180 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajitsu, Kenichiro; Yokoyama, Shunichi; Taguci, Yuichiro; Kusumoto, Kazuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Microbleeds on T2 * -weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represent a hemorrhagic type of small vessel disease. Small vessel disease causes both intracerebral hemorrhages and lacunar infarctions. We studied clinical background and MRI findings of the patients to clarify the correlation between microbleeds and lacunes. This study consisted of 180 consecutive patients who underwent brain MRI using 1.5T system in our hospital for a year. We obtained T2 * -weighted gradient-echo imaging as well as T1 and T2-weighted images. We statistically identified the factors related to the presence of microbleeds in all patients. The distribution of lacunes and microbleeds on MRI was compared to clarify the correlation of the lesions in the patients who had both lesions. The overall prevalence of microbleeds was 41.1% (74 of 180 patients). Logistic regression analysis indicated that previous stroke, leukoaraiosis and lacunes were significantly correlated with microbleeds. In the patients who have both microbleeds and lacunes, lesions are tended to locate in thalamus and basal ganglia, especially incidence of lacunes are significantly greater compared with other regions. Thirty-six of 398 lesions (9.05%) diagnosed as lacunes with T1- and T2-weighted imaging were demonstrated as microbleeds with T2 * -weighted gradient-echo imaging. Lacunes, leukoaraiosis as a hypertensive change on MRI had statistically significant correlation with the presence of microbleeds. T2 * -weighted gradient-echo imaging should be included in the imaging protocol for cerebrovascular disease, because T1- and T2-weighted imaging recognizing some of the microbleeds as lacunar infarction. (author)

  12. Fast method of constructing image correlations to build a free network based on image multivocabulary trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Zongqian; Wang, Xin; Wei, Minglu

    2015-05-01

    In image-based three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction, one topic of growing importance is how to quickly obtain a 3-D model from a large number of images. The retrieval of the correct and relevant images for the model poses a considerable technological challenge. The "image vocabulary tree" has been proposed as a method to search for similar images. However, a significant drawback of this approach is identified in its low time efficiency and barely satisfactory classification result. The method proposed is inspired by, and improves upon, some recent methods. Specifically, vocabulary quality is considered and multivocabulary trees are designed to improve the classification result. A marked improvement was, indeed, observed in our evaluation of the proposed method. To improve time efficiency, graphics processing unit (GPU) computer unified device architecture parallel computation is applied in the multivocabulary trees. The results of the experiments showed that the GPU was three to four times more efficient than the enumeration matching and CPU methods when the number of images is large. This paper presents a reliable reference method for the rapid construction of a free network to be used for the computing of 3-D information.

  13. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  14. Correlation of bone quality in radiographic images with clinical bone quality classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Woo; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwan Soo [Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    To investigate the validity of digital image processing on panoramic radiographs in estimating bone quality before endosseous dental implant installation by correlating bone quality in radiographic images with clinical bone quality classification. An experienced surgeon assessed and classified bone quality for implant sites with tactile sensation at the time of implant placement. Including fractal dimension eighteen morphologic features of trabecular pattern were examined in each anatomical sites on panoramic radiographs. Finally bone quality of 67 implant sites were evaluated in 42 patients. Pearson correlation analysis showed that three morphologic parameters had weak linear negative correlation with clinical bone quality classification showing correlation coefficients of -0.276, -0.280, and -0.289, respectively (p<0.05). And other three morphologic parameters had obvious linear negative correlation with clinical bone quality classification showing correlation coefficients of -0.346, -0.488, and -0.343 respectively (p<0.05). Fractal dimension also had a linear correlating with clinical bone quality classification with correlation coefficients -0.506 significantly (P<0.05). This study suggests that fractal and morphometric analysis using digital panoramic radiographs can be used to evaluate bone quality for implant recipient sites.

  15. Hemorrhage in pituitary adenoma: correlation of MR imaging with operative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, N.; Takahashi, S.; Higano, S.; Mugikura, S.; Singh, L.N.; Furuta, S.; Tamura, H.; Ishibashi, T.; Maruoka, S.; Yamada, S. [Department of Radiology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Ikeda, H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate MR imaging and operative findings of hemorrhage in pituitary macroadenomas. We retrospectively reviewed MR images of 113 surgically proven pituitary adenomas. All patients were examined on a 1.5-T MR system. The intensity of intratumoral cystic cavities was correlated with operative findings. In 15 patients with pituitary apoplexy, we determined relationship between interval of MR examination after apoplectic event and MR signal intensity. In 8 patients with repeated preoperative MR examination, we evaluated sequential changes of intratumoral hemorrhage. There were 54 cavities at surgery: 52 were hemorrhagic and 2 were nonhemorrhagic. Twenty-nine of 52 hemorrhagic cysts demonstrated high/low signal (H/L) fluid-fluid levels on T2-weighted image (T2WI). In 19 of them, two components could be separately seen at operation: the supernatant high-intensity area represented xanthochromic fluid, and the dependent low-intensity area represented liquefied hematoma. The H/L fluid-fluid level was observed predominantly in hematomas on MR images obtained after longer intervals. In patients with repeated MR examination, follow-up MR imaging revealed additional hemorrhage or new formation of fluid-fluid levels. It was surprising that 12 of 14 cysts preoperatively judged as nonhemorrhagic in fact contained hemorrhagic components. The preoperative MR images are well correlated to the operative findings in hemorrhagic pituitary macroadenomas. It proved that 52 of 54 cystic cavities had hemorrhagic component. (orig.) With 8 figs., 3 tabs., 17 refs.

  16. Hemorrhage in pituitary adenoma: correlation of MR imaging with operative findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, N.; Takahashi, S.; Higano, S.; Mugikura, S.; Singh, L.N.; Furuta, S.; Tamura, H.; Ishibashi, T.; Maruoka, S.; Yamada, S.; Ikeda, H.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate MR imaging and operative findings of hemorrhage in pituitary macroadenomas. We retrospectively reviewed MR images of 113 surgically proven pituitary adenomas. All patients were examined on a 1.5-T MR system. The intensity of intratumoral cystic cavities was correlated with operative findings. In 15 patients with pituitary apoplexy, we determined relationship between interval of MR examination after apoplectic event and MR signal intensity. In 8 patients with repeated preoperative MR examination, we evaluated sequential changes of intratumoral hemorrhage. There were 54 cavities at surgery: 52 were hemorrhagic and 2 were nonhemorrhagic. Twenty-nine of 52 hemorrhagic cysts demonstrated high/low signal (H/L) fluid-fluid levels on T2-weighted image (T2WI). In 19 of them, two components could be separately seen at operation: the supernatant high-intensity area represented xanthochromic fluid, and the dependent low-intensity area represented liquefied hematoma. The H/L fluid-fluid level was observed predominantly in hematomas on MR images obtained after longer intervals. In patients with repeated MR examination, follow-up MR imaging revealed additional hemorrhage or new formation of fluid-fluid levels. It was surprising that 12 of 14 cysts preoperatively judged as nonhemorrhagic in fact contained hemorrhagic components. The preoperative MR images are well correlated to the operative findings in hemorrhagic pituitary macroadenomas. It proved that 52 of 54 cystic cavities had hemorrhagic component. (orig.)

  17. Intramuscular vascular malformations of an extremity: findings on MR imaging and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.Y.; Ahn, J.M.; Yoon, H.K.; Do, Y.S.; Kim, S.H.; Choo, S.W.; Choo, I.W.; Suh, Y.L.; Kim, S.M.; Kang, H.S.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the findings of intramuscular vascular malformations of an extremity on MR imaging and to correlate these findings with histopathologic examination.Design and patients. The findings on MR imaging and the medical records of 14 patients with an intramuscular vascular malformation of the extremity were retrospectively studied. All patients underwent surgical excision. Diagnoses were based on the results of pathologic examination. Findings on MR imaging were noted and correlated with the histopathologic findings.Results. Intramuscular vascular malformations of an extremity showed multi-septate, honeycomb, or mixed appearance on MR imaging. Multi-septate areas correlated with dilated and communicating vascular spaces with flattened endothelium. Honeycomb areas corresponded to vascular spaces with inconspicuous small lumina and thickened vascular walls. Areas of increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images were found in all intramuscular vascular malformations. Infiltrative margins were more commonly seen in intramuscular lymphaticovenous malformations. Adherence to neurovascular structures and orientation of the lesion along the long axis of the affected muscle were more commonly seen in intramuscular venous malformations.Conclusions. Intramuscular vascular malformations showed either a multi-septate, honeycomb, or mixed appearance, reflecting the size of the vascular spaces and the thickness of the smooth muscles of the vessel walls. Prediction of the subtype of an intramuscular vascular malformation of an extremity on MR imaging seems to be difficult, although there are associated findings that may be helpful in the differential diagnosis of each subtype. (orig.)

  18. Use of Fourier domain filtering and dynamic programming in finding a titanium coil implant in high voltage x-ray images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henning; Hansen, Jesper Carl

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of finding precise position and orientation of a titanium coil implant in humans. Analysis of high voltage X-rays stereo images are used to determine the true 3D position. High voltage images inherently presents with poor contrast. Various image processing techni...

  19. Correlation between image quality of CT scan and amount of intravenous contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Dae Young; Choi, Dae Seob; Kim, Seung Hyup; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Im, Jung Gi; Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Jong Hyo; Han, Man Chung

    1993-01-01

    A blind, comparative clinical study was performed prospectively to examine the correlation between image quality of CT scan in terms of contrast enhancement effect and amount of intravenous contrast media. A total of 357 patients were randomized into two groups. Ionic high-osmolality contrast media (68% meglumine ioglicate) was administered intravenously as 100 ml bolus in one group and as 50 ml bolus in the other group. Statistically significant differences of image quality were found in CT scans of the brain, head and neck, chest and abdomen (p 0.05). We suggest that amount of contrast media may be reduced in pelvis CT without significant degradation of image quality

  20. Image motion compensation by area correlation and centroid tracking of solar surface features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nein, M.E.; Mcintosh, W.R.; Cumings, N.P.

    1983-07-01

    An experimental solar correlation tracker was tested and evaluated on a ground-based solar magnetograph. Using sunspots as fixed targets, tracking error signals were derived by which the telescope image was stabilized against wind induced perturbations. Two methods of stabilization were investigated mechanical stabilization of the image by controlled two-axes motion of an active optical element in the telescope beam, and electronic stabilization by biasing of the electron scan in the recording camera. Both approaches have demonstrated telescope stability of about 0.6 arc sec under random perturbations which can cause the unstabilized image to move up to 120 arc sec at frequencies up to 30 Hz

  1. Image motion compensation by area correlation and centroid tracking of solar surface features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nein, M. E.; Mcintosh, W. R.; Cumings, N. P.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental solar correlation tracker was tested and evaluated on a ground-based solar magnetograph. Using sunspots as fixed targets, tracking error signals were derived by which the telescope image was stabilized against wind induced perturbations. Two methods of stabilization were investigated; mechanical stabilization of the image by controlled two-axes motion of an active optical element in the telescope beam, and electronic stabilization by biasing of the electron scan in the recording camera. Both approaches have demonstrated telescope stability of about 0.6 arc sec under random perturbations which can cause the unstabilized image to move up to 120 arc sec at frequencies up to 30 Hz.

  2. MR imaging of pregnancy luteoma: a case report and correlation with the clinical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Hung Wen; Wu, Ching Jiunn; Chung, Kuo Teng; Wang, Sheng Ru; Chen, Cheng Yu [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2005-03-15

    We report here on a 26-year-old pregnant female who developed hirsutism and virilization during her third trimester along with a significantly elevated serum testosterone level. Abdominal US and MR imaging studies were performed, and they showed unique imaging features that may suggest the diagnosis of pregnancy luteoma in the clinical context. After the delivery, the serum testosterone level continued to decrease, and it returned to normal three weeks postpartum. The follow-up imaging findings were closely correlated with the clinical presentation.

  3. Correlation between Health Perception, Body Image, and Eating Habits in High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ichsan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental disorders, including eating disorders, mostly begin during youth. Moreover, negative body image is found to cause unhealthy eating habits in the context of several cross-cultural settings. This study aimed to examine the correlation between health perception and body image with eating habits among high school students. Methods: A structured, anonymous questionnaire was distributed to students of a private high school in Bandung, Indonesia in June-October 2014. The questionnaire included questions about health perception, body image, eating habits, body weight and height, and also other demographic parameters. The school was selected as the study object through purposive sampling, and 140 high school students (72 male and 68 female were ramdomly selected. Results: Male and female did not show considerable differences in health perceptions. Out of 13 statements, 12 statements of male respondents showed better body image than female. While in eating habits statements, female respondents seemed to maintain healthier eating habits than male respondents. No significant correlation was observed between body image and eating habits (r=-0.015, p=0.858. There was significant correlation between health perception and eating habits (r=0.374, p<0.001. Correlation between sex and eating habits was found (p=0.020, there was not significant relationship between eating habits and Body Mass Index (BMI (p=0.368. Conclusions: The negative relationship between body image and eating habits is not significant. However there was a significant positive relationship between health perception and eating habits. Furthermore, there was correlation between sex and eating habits, while the positive relationship between eating habits and BMI was still not found.

  4. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivka Colen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Cancer Institute (NCI Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research.

  5. Correcting sample drift using Fourier harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena-González, G; Guerrero-Lebrero, M P; Guerrero, E; Reyes, D F; Braza, V; Yañez, A; Nuñez-Moraleda, B; González, D; Galindo, P L

    2018-07-01

    During image acquisition of crystalline materials by high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, the sample drift could lead to distortions and shears that hinder their quantitative analysis and characterization. In order to measure and correct this effect, several authors have proposed different methodologies making use of series of images. In this work, we introduce a methodology to determine the drift angle via Fourier analysis by using a single image based on the measurements between the angles of the second Fourier harmonics in different quadrants. Two different approaches, that are independent of the angle of acquisition of the image, are evaluated. In addition, our results demonstrate that the determination of the drift angle is more accurate by using the measurements of non-consecutive quadrants when the angle of acquisition is an odd multiple of 45°. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Photoacoustic imaging in scattering media by combining a correlation matrix filter with a time reversal operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Wei; Tao, Chao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2017-09-18

    Acoustic scattering medium is a fundamental challenge for photoacoustic imaging. In this study, we reveal the different coherent properties of the scattering photoacoustic waves and the direct photoacoustic waves in a matrix form. Direct waves show a particular coherence on the antidiagonals of the matrix, whereas scattering waves do not. Based on this property, a correlation matrix filter combining with a time reversal operator is proposed to preserve the direct waves and recover the image behind a scattering layer. Both numerical simulations and photoacoustic imaging experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach effectively increases the image contrast and decreases the background speckles in a scattering medium. This study might improve the quality of photoacoustic imaging in an acoustic scattering environment and extend its applications.

  7. Observation of a cavitation cloud in tissue using correlation between ultrafast ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieur, Fabrice; Zorgani, Ali; Catheline, Stefan; Souchon, Rémi; Mestas, Jean-Louis; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril

    2015-07-01

    The local application of ultrasound is known to improve drug intake by tumors. Cavitating bubbles are one of the contributing effects. A setup in which two ultrasound transducers are placed confocally is used to generate cavitation in ex vivo tissue. As the transducers emit a series of short excitation bursts, the evolution of the cavitation activity is monitored using an ultrafast ultrasound imaging system. The frame rate of the system is several thousands of images per second, which provides several tens of images between consecutive excitation bursts. Using the correlation between consecutive images for speckle tracking, a decorrelation of the imaging signal appears due to the creation, fast movement, and dissolution of the bubbles in the cavitation cloud. By analyzing this area of decorrelation, the cavitation cloud can be localized and the spatial extent of the cavitation activity characterized.

  8. Adaptive Microwave Staring Correlated Imaging for Targets Appearing in Discrete Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chao; Jiang, Zheng; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Dongjin

    2017-10-21

    Microwave staring correlated imaging (MSCI) can achieve ultra-high resolution in real aperture staring radar imaging using the correlated imaging process (CIP) under all-weather and all-day circumstances. The CIP must combine the received echo signal with the temporal-spatial stochastic radiation field. However, a precondition of the CIP is that the continuous imaging region must be discretized to a fine grid, and the measurement matrix should be accurately computed, which makes the imaging process highly complex when the MSCI system observes a wide area. This paper proposes an adaptive imaging approach for the targets in discrete clusters to reduce the complexity of the CIP. The approach is divided into two main stages. First, as discrete clustered targets are distributed in different range strips in the imaging region, the transmitters of the MSCI emit narrow-pulse waveforms to separate the echoes of the targets in different strips in the time domain; using spectral entropy, a modified method robust against noise is put forward to detect the echoes of the discrete clustered targets, based on which the strips with targets can be adaptively located. Second, in a strip with targets, the matched filter reconstruction algorithm is used to locate the regions with targets, and only the regions of interest are discretized to a fine grid; sparse recovery is used, and the band exclusion is used to maintain the non-correlation of the dictionary. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate that the proposed approach can accurately and adaptively locate the regions with targets and obtain high-quality reconstructed images.