WorldWideScience

Sample records for formation reactions surface

  1. Fluctuation-Induced Pattern Formation in a Surface Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starke, Jens; Reichert, Christian; Eiswirth, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous nucleation, pulse formation, and propagation failure have been observed experimentally in CO oxidation on Pt(110) at intermediate pressures ($\\approx 10^{-2}$mbar). This phenomenon can be reproduced with a stochastic model which includes temperature effects. Nucleation occurs randomly...

  2. A reaction diffusion model of pattern formation in clustering of adatoms on silicon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trilochan Bagarti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We study a reaction diffusion model which describes the formation of patterns on surfaces having defects. Through this model, the primary goal is to study the growth process of Ge on Si surface. We consider a two species reaction diffusion process where the reacting species are assumed to diffuse on the two dimensional surface with first order interconversion reaction occuring at various defect sites which we call reaction centers. Two models of defects, namely a ring defect and a point defect are considered separately. As reaction centers are assumed to be strongly localized in space, the proposed reaction-diffusion model is found to be exactly solvable. We use Green's function method to study the dynamics of reaction diffusion processes. Further we explore this model through Monte Carlo (MC simulations to study the growth processes in the presence of a large number of defects. The first passage time statistics has been studied numerically.

  3. PCDD/F Formation mechanism: effect of surface composition on chlorination and condensation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, S.; Nath, P.

    2002-07-01

    The post-combustion zone immediately following the incineration (flame) zone is a potential pollutant formation zone as it contains excess O{sub 2} (3-9%), sufficient residence time (from sub seconds to minutes) and catalytically active fly ash particles. This is an ideal reaction environment for the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} compounds exiting the flame zone to undergo condensation and chlorination reactions. Heterogeneous reactions of short-chain aliphatic and chlorinated aliphatic combustion products in both high-temperature and low-temperature post-combustion zones can be important in the formation of larger organic pollutants (e. g. polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorianted dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans, chlorohenols, chlorobenzenes, etc). Fly ash formed in the combustion process provides the active surface for chlorination/condensation reactions in the post-combustion zone. The presence of several metals in flay ashes give rise to the question whether there is one specific metal or a complex of metals that is responsoble for the chlorination. Although fly ash contains many metallic species, most researchers investigations the PCDD/F formation mechanisms have used copper as the catalytic surface in their pollutant formation studies because copper is a known commercial oxychloriantion catalyst. The specific catalytic effects of various copper compounds in the formation of PCDD/F from aliphatica and aromatic compounds have been examined by us and a number of other investigators. In limited studies, iron compounds have also been used as PCDD/F formation catalysts, although these iron studies have produced contradictory results. Review of commercially important polymerization reactions shows that at varying temperatures and pressures, c and C{sub 4} olefinic polymerization reactions may be catalyzed by HCI-activated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} SiO{sub 2} (aromatization also observed), aluminosilicates (1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in SiO{sub 2}), and Fe oxides on aluminosilicates

  4. Clay surface catalysis of formation of humic substances: potential role of maillard reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mechanisms of the formation of humic substances are poorly understood, especially the condensation of amino acids and reducing sugars products (Maillard reaction) in soil environments. Clay minerals behave as Lewis and Brönsted acids and catalyze several reactions and likely to catalyze the Mai...

  5. Ozone consumption and volatile byproduct formation from surface reactions with aircraft cabin materials and clothing fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Beverly K.; Destaillats, Hugo; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Nazaroff, William W.

    We measured ozone consumption and byproduct formation on materials commonly found in aircraft cabins at flight-relevant conditions. Two series of small-chamber experiments were conducted, with most runs at low relative humidity (10%) and high air-exchange rate (˜20 h -1). New and used cabin materials (seat fabric, carpet, and plastic) and laundered and worn clothing fabrics (cotton, polyester, and wool) were studied. We measured ozone deposition to many material samples, and we measured ozone uptake and primary and secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a subset of samples. Deposition velocities ranged from 0.06 to 0.54 cm s -1. Emissions of VOCs were higher with ozone than without ozone in every case. The most commonly detected secondary emissions were C 1 through C 10 saturated aldehydes and the squalene oxidation products 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one and acetone. For the compounds measured, summed VOC emission rates in the presence of 55-128 ppb (residual level) ozone ranged from 1.0 to 8.9 μmol h -1 m -2. Total byproduct yield ranged from 0.07 to 0.24 moles of product volatilized per mole of ozone consumed. Results were used to estimate the relative contribution of different materials to ozone deposition and byproduct emissions in a typical aircraft cabin. The dominant contributor to both was clothing fabrics, followed by seat fabric. Results indicate that ozone reactions with surfaces substantially reduce the ozone concentration in the cabin but also generate volatile byproducts of potential concern for the health and comfort of passengers and crew.

  6. The formation of diethyl ether via the reaction of iodoethane with atomic oxygen on the Ag(110) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. Scott; Barteau, Mark A.; Vohs, John M.

    1999-01-01

    The reactions of iodoethane (ICH 2CH 3) on clean and oxygen-covered Ag(110) surfaces were investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Iodoethane adsorbs dissociatively at 150 K to produce surface ethyl groups on both clean and oxygen-covered Ag(110) surfaces. The ethyl species couple to form butane on both surfaces, with the desorption peak maximum located between 218 and 238 K, depending on the ethyl coverage. In addition to butane, a number of oxidation products including diethyl ether, ethanol, acetaldehyde, surface acetate, ethylene, carbon dioxide and water were formed on the oxygen-dosed Ag(110) surface. Diethyl ether was the major oxygenate produced at all ethyl:oxygen ratios, and the peak temperature for ether evolution varied from 220 to 266 K depending on the relative coverages of these reactants. The total combustion products, CO 2 and H 2O, were primarily formed at low ethyl coverages in the presence of excess oxygen. The formation of ethylene near 240 K probably involves an oxygen-assisted dehydrogenation pathway since ethylene is not formed from ethyl groups on the clean surface. Acetaldehyde and ethanol evolve coincidentally with a peak centered at 270-280 K, and are attributed to the reactions of surface ethoxide species. The surface acetate which decomposes near 620 K is formed from subsequent reactions of acetaldehyde with oxygen atoms. The addition of ethyl to oxygen to form surface ethoxides was verified by HREELS results. The yields of all products exhibited a strong dependence on the relative coverages of ethyl and oxygen.

  7. Reactions at Solid Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ertl, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Expanding on the ideas first presented in Gerhard Ertl's acclaimed Baker Lectures at Cornell University, Reactions at Solid Surfaces comprises an authoritative, self-contained, book-length introduction to surface reactions for both professional chemists and students alike. Outlining our present understanding of the fundamental processes underlying reactions at solid surfaces, the book provides the reader with a complete view of how chemistry works at surfaces, and how to understand and probe the dynamics of surface reactions. Comparing traditional surface probes with more modern ones, and brin

  8. Faraday efficiency and mechanism of electrochemical surface reactions: CO2 reduction and H2 formation on Pt(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Javed; Jónsson, Hannes; Skúlason, Egill

    2016-12-22

    An atomic scale model of the electrical double layer is used to calculate the mechanism and rate of electrochemical reduction of CO2 as well as H2 formation at a Pt(111) electrode. The water layer contains solvated protons and the electrode has excess electrons at the surface. Density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation is used to describe the electronic structure while the mechanism and activation energy of the various elementary reactions is obtained by calculating minimum energy paths using the nudged elastic band method. The applied electrical potential is deduced from the calculated work function. The optimal reaction mechanism for CO2 reduction to either methane or methanol is found and the estimated rate compared with that of the competing reaction, H2 formation. When the free energy of only the intermediates and reactants is taken into account, not the activation energy, Pt(111) would seem to be a good electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction, significantly better than Cu(111). This, however, contradicts experimental findings. Detailed calculations reported here show that the activation energy for CO2 reduction is high for both Heyrovsky and Tafel mechanisms on Pt(111) in the relevant range of applied potential. The rate-limiting step of the Heyrovsky mechanism, *COOH + H(+) + e(-) → *CO + H2O, is estimated to have an activation energy of 0.95 eV at -0.9 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode. Under the same conditions, the activation energy for H2 formation is estimated to be only 0.5 eV. This explains why attempts to reduce CO2 using platinum electrodes have produced only H2. A comparison is made with analogous results for Cu(111) [J. Hussain et al., Procedia Comput. Sci., 2015, 51, 1865] where a reaction mechanism with low activation energy for CO2 electroreduction to methane was identified. The difference between the two electrocatalysts is discussed.

  9. Reaction kinetic model of the surface-mediated formation of PCDD/F from pyrolysis of 2-chlorophenol on a CuP/Silica suface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomnicki, S.; Khachatryan, L.; Dellinger, B. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2004-09-15

    One of the major challenges in developing predictive models of the surface mediated pollutant formation and fuel combustion is the construction of reliable reaction kinetic mechanisms and models. While the homogeneous, gas-phase chemistry of various light fuels such as hydrogen and methane is relatively well-known large uncertainties exist in the reaction paths of surface mediated reaction mechanisms for even these very simple species. To date, no detailed kinetic consideration of the surface mechanisms of formation of complex organics such as PCDD/F have been developed. In addition to the complexity of the mechanism, a major difficulty is the lack of reaction kinetic parameters (pre-exponential factor and activation energy) of surface reactions, Consequently, numerical studies of the surface-mediated formation of PCDD/F have often been incorporated only a few reactions. We report the development of a numerical multiple-step surface model based on experimental data of surface mediated (5% CuO/SiO2) conversion of 2-monochlorphenol (2-MCP) to PCDD/F under pyrolytic or oxidative conditions. A reaction kinetic model of the catalytic conversion of 2-MCP on the copper oxide catalyst under pyrolytic conditions was developed based on a detailed multistep surface reaction mechanism developed in our laboratory. The performance of the chemical model is assessed by comparing the numerical predictions with experimental measurements. SURFACE CHEMKIN (version 3.7.1) software was used for modeling. Our results confirm the validity of previously published mechanism of the reaction and provides new insight concerning the formation of PCDD/F formation in combustion processes. This model successfully explains the high yields of PCDD/F at low temperatures that cannot be explained using a purely gas-phase mode.

  10. Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot: The roles of relative humidity and surface composition of soot in surface sulfate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Jinzhu; Ma, Qingxin; He, Hong

    2017-03-01

    The conversion of SO2 to sulfates on the surface of soot is still poorly understood. Soot samples with different fractions of unsaturated hydrocarbons and oxygen-containing groups were prepared by combusting n-hexane under well-controlled conditions. The heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot was investigated using in situ attenuated total internal reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, ion chromatography (IC) and a flow tube reactor at the ambient pressure and relative humidity (RH). Water promoted SO2 adsorption and sulfate formation at the RH range from 6% to 70%, while exceeded water condensed on soot was unfavorable for sulfate formation due to inhibition of SO2 adsorption when RH was higher than 80%. The surface composition of soot, which was governed by combustion conditions, also played an important role in the heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot. This effect was found to greatly depend on RH. At low RH of 6%, soot with the highest fuel/oxygen ratio of 0.162 exhibited a maximum uptake capacity for SO2 because it contained a large amount of aromatic Csbnd H groups, which acted as active sites for SO2 adsorption. At RH of 54%, soot produced with a fuel/oxygen ratio of 0.134 showed the highest reactivity toward SO2 because it contained appropriate amounts of aromatic Csbnd H groups and oxygen-containing groups, subsequently leading to the optimal surface concentrations of both SO2 and water. These results suggest that variation in the surface composition of soot from different sources and/or resulting from chemical aging in the atmosphere likely affects the conversion of SO2 to sulfates.

  11. Formation and reaction of allylic species on silver surfaces: bond-order conservation Morse-potential analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shustorovich, Evgeny

    1992-12-01

    The reaction energetics, particularly the intrinsic activation barriers for possible reactions involving allylic species C 3H 5X, X = H, OH, O, Cl on clean and oxygen-preadsorbed Ag surfaces, have been calculated by using the bond-order conservation Morse-potential (BOC-MP) method. The calculations were made for low coverages of C 3H 5X with qualitative corrections for higher coverages. On clean Ag surfaces, propylene C 3H 6 and allyl alcohol C 3H 5OH are projected to desorb without dissociation, in contrast to allyl chloride C 3H 5C1, which is projected to desorb only at high coverages but to dissociate at low coverages forming a stable π-allyl (and atomic chlorine). It is found that the intrinsic activation barrier for dimerization of π-allyl into 1,5-hexadiene is very small and the apparent barrier should be mainly of diffusional character. In the presence of preadsorbed hydroxyl OH s, π-allyl is projected to undergo various transformations producing allyl alcohol, allyl alkoxide, acrolein, and propylene, when most recombination and disproportionation reactions have low intrinsic activation barriers. The BOC-MP model projections are in good agreement with experiment, particularly with the recent HREEL and TPD studies of C 3H 5C1.

  12. Theoretical Studies of Reaction Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Similar levels of agreement are being found in studies of water clusters12 , the Menshutkin reaction 13 (ion separation reaction ), a prototypical SN2 ...of both reactants and products. These analyses reveal that Bery pseudorotation occurs repeatedly during the side attack, whereas the SN2 reaction H...31 Aug 97 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS AASERT93 THEORETICAL STUDIES OF REACTION SURFACES F49620-93-1-0556 3484/XS 6. AUTHOR(S) 61103D DR

  13. Quantum tunneling during interstellar surface-catalyzed formation of water: the reaction H + H$_2$O$_2$ $\\rightarrow$ H$_2$O + OH

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberts, Thanja; Köhn, Andreas; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The final step of the water formation network on interstellar grain surfaces starting from the H + O$_2$ route is the reaction between H and H$_2$O$_2$. This reaction is known to have a high activation energy and therefore at low temperatures it can only proceed via tunneling. To date, however, no rate constants are available at temperatures below 200 K. In this work, we use instanton theory to compute rate constants for the title reaction with and without isotopic substitutions down to temperatures of 50 K. The calculations are based on density functional theory, with additional benchmarks for the activation energy using unrestricted single-reference and multireference coupled-cluster single-point energies. Gas-phase bimolecular rate constants are calculated and compared with available experimental data not only for H + H$_2$O$_2$ $\\rightarrow$ H$_2$O + OH, but also for H + H$_2$O$_2$ $\\rightarrow$ H$_2$ + HO$_2$. We find a branching ratio where the title reaction is favored by at least two orders of magnitu...

  14. On the relevance of the H2 + O reaction pathway for the surface formation of interstellar water - A combined experimental and modeling study

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberts, Thanja; Fedoseev, Gleb; Ioppolo, Sergio; Chuang, Ko-Ju; Linnartz, Harold

    2014-01-01

    The formation of interstellar water has been commonly accepted to occur on the surfaces of icy dust grains in dark molecular clouds at low temperatures (10-20 K), involving hydrogenation reactions of oxygen allotropes. As a result of the large abundances of molecular hydrogen and atomic oxygen in these regions, the reaction H2 + O has been proposed to contribute significantly to the formation of water as well. However, gas phase experiments and calculations, as well as solid-phase experimental work contradict this hypothesis. Here, we use precisely executed temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments in an ultra-high vacuum setup combined with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to establish an upper limit of the water production starting from H2 and O. These reactants are brought together in a matrix of CO2 in a series of (control) experiments at different temperatures and with different isotopological compositions. The amount of water detected with the quadrupole mass spectrometer upon TPD is found to o...

  15. Surface science of heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J M

    1982-10-29

    Some of the present and future directions for surface science as a growing and naturally interdisciplinary subject are reviewed. Particular attention is given to surface reaction chemistry as it is related to heterogenous catalysis, a subject area where there are abundant opportunities for detailed measurements of structure and dynamics at the molecular level.

  16. Formation on grain surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cazaux, S; Tielens, AGGM

    2004-01-01

    The most abundant interstellar molecule, H-2, is generally thought to form by recombination of H atoms on grain surfaces. On surfaces, hydrogen atoms can be physisorbed and chemisorbed and their mobility can be governed by quantum mechanical tunneling or thermal hopping. We have developed a model fo

  17. Design of Low Pt Concentration Electrocatalyst Surfaces with High Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity Promoted by Formation of a Heterogeneous Interface between Pt and CeO(x) Nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Shipra; Mori, Toshiyuki; Masuda, Takuya; Ueda, Shigenori; Richards, Gary J; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Isaka, Noriko; Auchterlonie, Graeme; Drennan, John

    2016-04-13

    Pt-CeO(x) nanowire (NW)/C electrocatalysts for the improvement of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity on Pt were prepared by a combined process involving precipitation and coimpregnation. A low, 5 wt % Pt-loaded CeO(x) NW/C electrocatalyst, pretreated by an optimized electrochemical conditioning process, exhibited high ORR activity over a commercially available 20 wt % Pt/C electrocatalyst although the ORR activity observed for a 5 wt % Pt-loaded CeO(x) nanoparticle (NP)/C was similar to that of 20 wt % Pt/C. To investigate the role of a CeO(x) NW promotor on the enhancement of ORR activity on Pt, the Pt-CeO(x) NW interface was characterized by using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HXPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Microanalytical data obtained by these methods were discussed in relation to atomistic simulation performed on the interface structures. The combined techniques of HXPS, TEM-EELS, and atomistic simulation indicate that the Pt-CeO(x) NW interface in the electrocatalyst contains two different defect clusters: Frenkel defect clusters (i.e., 2Pt(i)(••) - 4O(i)″ - 4V(o)(••) - V(Ce)″″) formed in the surface around the Pt-CeO(x) NW interface and Schottky defect clusters (i.e., (Pt(Ce)″ - 2V(O)(••) - 2Ce(Ce)') and (Pt(Ce)″ - V(O)(••))) which appear in the bulk of the Pt-CeO(x) NW interface similarly to Pt-CeO(x) NP/C. It is concluded that the formation of both Frenkel defect clusters and Schottky defect clusters at the Pt-CeO(x) NW heterointerface contributes to the promotion of ORR activity and permits the use of lower Pt-loadings in these electrocatalysts.

  18. Unusual Complex Formation and Chemical Reaction of Haloacetate Anion on the Exterior Surface of Cucurbit[6]uril in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tae Su; Ko, Jae Yoon; Heo, Sung Woo; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kimoon; Kim, Hugh I.

    2012-10-01

    Noncovalent interactions of cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) with haloacetate and halide anions are investigated in the gas phase using electrospray ionization ion mobility mass spectrometry. Strong noncovalent interactions of monoiodoacetate, monobromoacetate, monochloroacetate, dichloroacetate, and trichloroacetate on the exterior surface of CB[6] are observed in the negative mode electrospray ionization mass spectra. The strong binding energy of the complex allows intramolecular SN2 reaction of haloacetate, which yields externally bound CB[6]-halide complex, by collisional activation. Utilizing ion mobility technique, structures of exteriorly bound CB[6] complexes of haloacetate and halide anions are confirmed. Theoretically determined low energy structures using density functional theory (DFT) further support results from ion mobility studies. The DFT calculation reveals that the binding energy and conformation of haloacetate on the CB[6] surface affect the efficiency of the intramolecular SN2 reaction of haloacetate, which correlate well with the experimental observation.

  19. Surface reactions in microelectronics process technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitin, Galit; Hess, Dennis W

    2011-01-01

    Current integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing consists of more than 800 process steps, nearly all of which involve reactions at surfaces that significantly impact device yield and performance. From initial surface preparation through film deposition, patterning, etching, residue removal, and metallization, an understanding of surface reactions and interactions is critical to the successful continuous scaling, yield, and reliability of electronic devices. In this review, some of the most important surface reactions that drive the development of microelectronic device fabrication are described. The reactions discussed do not constitute comprehensive coverage of this topic in IC manufacture but have been selected to demonstrate the importance of surface/interface reactions and interactions in the development of new materials, processing sequences, and process integration challenges. Specifically, the review focuses on surface reactions related to surface cleaning/preparation, semiconductor film growth, dielectric film growth, metallization, and etching (dry and wet).

  20. Reaction Mechanisms for the Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 to CO and Formate on the Cu(100) Surface at 298K from Quantum Mechanics Free Energy Calculations with Explicit Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Xiao, Hai; Goddard, William A

    2016-10-11

    Copper is the only elemental metal that reduces a significant fraction of CO2 to hydrocarbons and alcohols, but the atomistic reaction mechanism that controls the product distributions are not known because it has not been possible to detect the reaction intermediates on the electrode surface experimentally, or carry out Quantum Mechanics (QM) calculations with a realistic description of the electrolyte (water). Here, we carry out Quantum Mechanics (QM) calculations with an explicit description of water on the Cu(100) surface (experimentally shown to be stable under CO2RR conditions) to examine the initial reaction pathways to form CO and formate (HCOO(-)) from CO2 through free energy calculations at 298K and pH 7. We find that CO formation proceeds from physisorbed CO2 to chemisorbed CO2 (*CO2(δ-)), with a free energy barrier of ΔG(‡)=0.43 eV, the rate determining step (RDS). The subsequent barriers of protonating *CO2(δ-) to form COOH* and then dissociating COOH* to form *CO are 0.37 eV and 0.30 eV, respectively. HCOO(-) formation proceeds through a very different pathway in which physisorbed CO2 reacts directly with a surface H* (along with electron transfer), leading to ΔG(‡) = 0.80 eV. Thus, the competition between CO formation and HCOO(-) formation occurs in the first electron transfer step. On Cu(100), the RDS for CO formation is lower, making CO the predominant product. Thus, to alter the product distribution we need to control this first step of CO2 binding, which might involve alloying or changing the structure at the nanoscale.

  1. 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cynthia M. Friend

    2006-03-14

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Ventura Beach Marriott, Ventura California from February 13, 2005 through February 18, 2005. The Conference was well-attended with 124 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  2. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria can attach to any surface in contact with water and proliferate into complex communities enclosed in an adhesive matrix, these communities are called biofilms. The matrix makes the biofilm difficult to remove by physical means, and bacteria in biofilm can survive treatment with many...... antibiotics, disinfectants and cleaning agents. Biofilms are therefore very difficult to eradicate, and an attractive approach to limit biofilm formation is to reduce bacterial adhesion. In this thesis it was shown that lowering the surface roughness had a greater effect on bacterial retention compared....... The ability to form biofilms, the amount of eDNA produced, and the importance of eDNA for biofilm formation or stability did not correlate and varied from strain to strain. Finally, a method was developed for immobilization of living bacteria for analysis by atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM is used...

  3. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  4. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-02-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Holiday Inn, Ventura, California, 2/16-21/03. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  5. Screened Thermonuclear Reaction Rates on Magnetar Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-Lin; LUO Zhi-Quan; LIU Jing-Jing; LAI Xiang-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Improving Salpeter's method, we discuss the effect of superstrong magnetic fields (such as those of magnetars) on thermonuclear reaction rates. These most interesting reactions, including the hydrogen burning by the CNO cycle and the helium burning by the triple alpha reaction, are investigated as examples on the magnetar surfaces. The obtained result shows that the superstrong magnetic fields can increase the thermonuclear reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. The enhancement may have significant influence for further study research of the magnetars, especially for the x-ray luminosity observation and the evolution of magnetars.

  6. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces [Conference summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Michael; Gray, Nancy Ryan

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  7. Formation of Complex Molecules via radiative association reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Kinsuk; Herbst, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The detection of increasing numbers of complex organic molecules in the various phases of star formation plays a key role since they follow the same chemical rules of carbon-based chemistry that are observed in our planet Earth. Many of these molecules are believed to be formed on the surfaces of grains, and can then be released to the gas phase when these grains are heated. This is evident when we observe a rich chemistry in hot core regions. However, recently complex organic molecules have also been observed in cold clouds. Therefore, it is necessary to re-examine various pathways for the formation of these molecules in the gas phase. In this presentation, I will discuss role of radiative association reactions in the formation of complex molecules in the gas phase and at low temperature. We will compare abundance of assorted molecules with and without new radiative association reactions and will show that the abundance of a few complex molecules such as HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3 etc. can go up due to introduction of these reactions, which can help to explain their observed abundances.

  8. Supersonic molecular beam experiments on surface chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Michio

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of a molecule and a surface is important in various fields, and in particular in complex systems like biomaterials and their related chemistry. However, the detailed understanding of the elementary steps in the surface chemistry, for example, stereodynamics, is still insufficient even for simple model systems. In this Personal Account, I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams demonstrate a significant role of the translational energy of the incident molecules. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths specific for the hyperthermal energy region, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. On the other hand, oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility of understanding surface chemical reactions in detail by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for finely monitoring the elementary step of the surface chemical reactions and creating new materials on surfaces.

  9. Diffusion and Surface Reaction in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiker, A.; Richarz, W.

    1978-01-01

    Ethylene hydrogenation on a platinum catalyst, electrolytically applied to a tube wall, is a good system for the study of the interactions between diffusion and surface reaction in heterogeneous catalysis. Theoretical background, apparatus, procedure, and student performance of this experiment are discussed. (BB)

  10. Localized nonequilibrium nanostructures in surface chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, M; Ipsen, M; Mikhailov, A S; Ertl, G [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    Nonequilibrium localized stationary structures of submicrometre and nanometre sizes can spontaneously develop under reaction conditions on a catalytic surface. These self-organized structures emerge because of the coupling between the reaction and a structural phase transition in the substrate. Depending on the reaction conditions they can either correspond to densely covered spots (islands), inside which the reaction predominantly proceeds, or local depletions (holes) in a dense adsorbate layer with a very small reactive output in comparison to the surroundings. The stationary localized solutions are constructed using the singular perturbation approximation. These results are compared with numerical simulations, where special adaptive grid algorithms and numerical continuation of stationary profiles are used. Numerical investigations beyond the singular perturbation limit are also presented.

  11. Basic reactions of osteoblasts on structured material surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B�chter A.

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess how bone substitute materials determine bone formation in vivo it is useful to understand the mechanisms of the material surface/tissue interaction on a cellular level. Artificial materials are used in two applications, as biomaterials alone or as a scaffold for osteoblasts in a tissue engineering approach. Recently, many efforts have been undertaken to improve bone regeneration by the use of structured material surfaces. In vitro studies of bone cell responses to artificial materials are the basic tool to determine these interactions. Surface properties of materials surfaces as well as biophysical constraints at the biomaterial surface are of major importance since these features will direct the cell responses. Studies on osteoblastlike cell reactivity towards materials will have to focus on the different steps of protein and cell reactions towards defined surface properties. The introduction of new techniques allows nowadays the fabrication of materials with ordered surface structures. This paper gives a review of present knowledge on the various stages of osteoblast reactions on material surfaces, focused on basic cell events under in vitro conditions. Special emphasis is given to cellular reactions towards ordered nano-sized topographies.

  12. Lipase-catalyzed reactions at different surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, P; Holmberg, K; Debeche, T; Folmer, B; Fauconnot, L; Watzke, H

    2006-09-12

    Starting from gold chips, we have tailor-made three surfaces by the self-assembly monolayer technique: one entirely hydrophobic, one hydrophobic with dispersed carboxyl groups, and one hydrophilic, containing hydroxyl groups. Rhizomucor miehei lipase has been adsorbed to the hydrophobic and the hydrophilic surfaces and covalently bound to the surface containing carboxyl groups. The adsorption of two substrates-capric acid (decanoic acid) and monocaprin-on the lipase-covered surfaces was monitored by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. Biocatalysis was also performed in the SPR instrument by circulating a solution of the substrate, dissolved in an 85:15 water-glycerol mixture at a(w) = 0.81, through the instrument, thus exposing the capric acid or the monocaprin to the lipase-covered surfaces. The product composition was found to depend on the type of surface used. Lipase adsorbed at the hydrophilic surface favored hydrolysis, and capric acid was the main product formed when monocaprin was used as substrate. Lipase adsorbed at a hydrophobic surface and, in particular, lipase covalently bound to a hydrophobic surface favored condensation. More dicaprin than capric acid was formed in experiments with monocaprin as the substrate. Reactions performed outside the SPR instrument showed that small amounts of triglyceride were also formed under these conditions. We believe that this work constitutes the first example of the SPR instrument being used for in-situ biotransformation.

  13. 45钢表面原位摩擦化学反应膜形成过程及力学性能%Formation and mechanical properties of in situ tribo-chemical reaction film on surface of 45 steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张保森; 许一; 徐滨士; 高飞; 史佩京; 吴毅雄

    2011-01-01

    A kind of tribo-treatment agent, which can be applied to in situ tribo-chemical treatment, was prepared using natural mineral powders. Addition of the as-prepared agent to diesel engine oil was optimized by means of wearing test on a ring-block friction and wear tester. Forming process and mechanical properties of in situ tribo-chernical reaction film on surface of 45 steel were investigated and forming mechanism of the film was discussed. Results show that the addition of 0. 5 wt% agent is most efficient for formation of in situ tribo-chemical reaction film to improve wearing performance of the surface of 45 steel. The friction coefficient and mass wear rate decreases by 19. 7% and 71.8% compared to those of the base oil, respectively. The tribo-treated surface is rather smooth and a tribo-chemical reaction film mainly consisting of iron oxides, iron and/or magnesium silicates and carbon-containing compounds is formed on the steel substrate. Moreover, the porous film tended to become compact and continuous as the wearing time increased, contributing to the improvement in surface strength and wear resistance of 45 steel.%制备了一种用于原位摩擦化学处理技术的天然矿物微粉摩擦处理剂.采用环-块摩擦磨损试验机对其在柴油机油中的添加量进行了优化,研究了其在45钢表面的原位摩擦化学反应膜的形成过程及力学性能,探讨了形成机理.结果表明:处理剂含量为0.5 wt%时对45钢表面具有较好的优化效果,其摩擦因数和质量磨损率分别较基础油降低约19.7%和71.8%.摩擦处理表面较为光滑平整,形成了由铁的氧化物、铁镁硅酸盐及含碳化合物构成的摩擦化学反应膜,且随着时间的增加逐步由疏松多孔趋于致密连续,具有较高的力学性能,显著提高了45钢的表面强度及磨损抗力.

  14. An Overview of the Biology of Reaction Wood Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Du; Fukuju Yamamoto

    2007-01-01

    Reaction wood possesses altered properties and performs the function of regulating a tree's form, but it is a serious defect in wood utility. Trees usually develop reaction wood in response to a gravistimulus. Reaction wood in gymnosperms is referred to as compression wood and develops on the lower side of leaning stems or branches.In arboreal, dicotyledonous angiosperms, however, it is called tension wood and is formed on the upper side of the leaning. Exploring the biology of reaction wood formation is of great value for the understanding of the wood differentiation mechanisms, cambial activity, gravitropism, and the systematics and evolution of plants. After giving an outline of the variety of wood and properties of reaction wood, this review lays emphasis on various stimuli for reaction wood induction and the extensive studies carried out so far on the roles of plant hormones in reaction wood formation. Inconsistent results have been reported for the effects of plant hormones. Both auxin and ethylene regulate the formation of compression wood in gymnosperms. However, the role of ethylene may be indirect as exogenous ethylene cannot induce compression wood formation. Tension wood formation is mainly regulated by auxin and gibberellin. Interactions among hormones and other substances may play important parts in the regulation of reaction wood formation.

  15. Thiazole formation through a modified Gewald reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl J. Mallia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of thiazoles and thiophenes starting from nitriles, via a modified Gewald reaction has been studied for a number of different substrates. 1,4-Dithiane-2,5-diol was used as the aldehyde precursor to give either 2-substituted thiazoles or 2-substituted aminothiophenes depending on the substitution of the α-carbon to the cyano group.

  16. Reactions between monolayer Fe and Si(001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, M.; Kobayashi, N.; Hayashi, N. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Reactions between 1.5 monolayer(ML) Fe deposited on Si(001)-2x1 and -dihydride surfaces were studied in situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction and time-of-flight ion scattering spectrometry with the use of 25 keV H ions. The reactions between Fe and Si which were successively deposited on Si(001)-dihydride surface were also studied. After the room temperature deposition Fe reacted with Si(001)-2x1 substrate resulting in the formation of polycrystalline Fe5Si3. By annealing to 560-650degC composite heteroepitaxial layer of both type A and type B {beta}-FeSi2 was formed. On the dihydride surface polycrystalline Fe was observed after 1.5ML Fe deposition at room temperature, and reaction between Fe and Si(001)-dihydride surface is not likely at room temperature. We observed 3D rough surface when we deposited only Fe layer on the dihydride surface and annealed above 700degC. The hydrogen termination of Si(001) surface prevents the deposited Fe from diffusing into the substrate below 500degC, however the annealing above 710degC leads to the diffusion. We obtained 2D ordered surface, which showed 3x3 RHEED pattern as referenced to the primitive unreconstructed Si(001) surface net, when we deposited 2.5ML Fe and 5.8ML Si successively onto Si(001)-dihydride surface and annealed to 470degC. (author)

  17. A theoretical model of metal surface reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shustorovich, E. (Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, NY); Baetzold, R.C.; Muetterties, E.L.

    1983-03-31

    Metal surface reactions are modeled with a novel theoretical construct in which periodic trends can be scrutinized. The theoretical model is succinctly presented and a conspectus of periodic trends, based on the model, is explored. Periodic trends are discussed in the contexts of chemisorption bond energies, electron transfer between metal surface and adsorbate, stereochemical features of chemisorption states for closed-shell diatomic and linear X-CN or X-NC molecules, and hydrocarbon reactions. Hydrocarbon C-H bond-breaking processes are analyzed in terms of d-level occupancy, electron transfer, and stereochemistry of intermediates. Conceptually and computationally, the metal surface is characterized as a good electron donor: antibonding molecular orbitals of the adsorbate species appear to be significant contributors to the chemisorption bond and also play a decisive role in bond-breaking processes. No aspect of the model projections is inconsistent with the experimental data although the electronic characterization of some chemisorption states are counter to commonly held perceptions.

  18. Oscillatory electrochemical reactions at corroding silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhutik, Vitali; Sasano, Junji; Ogata, Yukio; Matveeva, Eugenia

    2003-05-01

    The paper analyses the nature of chaotic and well-ordered oscillations of the anodic potential and open circuit potential of silicon immersed in aqueous electrolytes. These oscillations are observed when experimental conditions are fine tuned in what corresponds to the current flowing through the system, composition of electrolyte, its viscosity, etc. It is assumed that the oscillations are due to the accumulation of mechanical stress in the thin (50-80 nm) oxide film formed at the surface of silicon as a result of electrochemical anodic reaction. The stress is released by local etching of the oxide and its lifting-on from the Si surface. The process repeats again and again yielding long-lasting oscillations of the anodic potential value (amplitude around 1-15 V, period 20-150 s) or of the open circuit potential (several hundreds milli-volts). Along with temporal ordering of the process (oscillations of potential) there occurs a spatial ordering in the system - the surface of corroding Si sample is covered with hexagonally ordered semi-spherical cells (diameter about 700 nm). The effect is well-fit by the general phenomenology of chaos-order transitions in che4mical systems (bifurcations), strange attractors are the intrinsic features of these oscillations) and its kinetics is very similar to that of the Belousov-Zabotinsky reaction. However, oscillatory processes on the corroding Si surface are caused by quite specific physical and chemical mechanisms, which are not well understood presently. We present the microscopic model for the oscillatory behavior which involves, generation of local mechanical stress at the Si/electrolyte interface, non-linear electrochemical etching of Si, localization of the electric field at the etched surface, etc.

  19. Bifurcation Analysis of Reaction Diffusion Systems on Arbitrary Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Daljit Singh J; Milinkovitch, Michel C; Zwicker, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we present computational techniques to investigate the effect of surface geometry on biological pattern formation. In particular, we study two-component, nonlinear reaction-diffusion (RD) systems on arbitrary surfaces. We build on standard techniques for linear and nonlinear analysis of RD systems and extend them to operate on large-scale meshes for arbitrary surfaces. In particular, we use spectral techniques for a linear stability analysis to characterise and directly compose patterns emerging from homogeneities. We develop an implementation using surface finite element methods and a numerical eigenanalysis of the Laplace-Beltrami operator on surface meshes. In addition, we describe a technique to explore solutions of the nonlinear RD equations using numerical continuation. Here, we present a multiresolution approach that allows us to trace solution branches of the nonlinear equations efficiently even for large-scale meshes. Finally, we demonstrate the working of our framework for two RD systems with applications in biological pattern formation: a Brusselator model that has been used to model pattern development on growing plant tips, and a chemotactic model for the formation of skin pigmentation patterns. While these models have been used previously on simple geometries, our framework allows us to study the impact of arbitrary geometries on emerging patterns.

  20. Salicylic acid electrooxidation. A surface film formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baturova, M.D.; Vedenjapin, A.; Baturova, M.M. [N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Weichgrebe, D.; Danilova, E.; Rosenwinkel, K.H. [Univ. of Hannover, Inst. of Water Quality and Waste Management Hannover (Germany); Skundin, A. [A.N. Frumkin Inst. of Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2003-07-01

    A possibility to use electrochemical treatment for salicylic acid (SA) removal from waste water was studied. It was found that SA can be oxidized at platinum anode with formation of harmless products. Features of anodic process, in particular, formation of solid film on anode surface as well as properties of the film were investigated. (orig.)

  1. Theoretical investigation of water formation on Rh and Pt Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Steffen; Natoli, Vincent; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2000-06-01

    Catalytic water formation from adsorbed H and O adatoms is a fundamental reaction step in a variety of technologically important reactions involving organic molecules. In particular, the water-formation rate determines the selectivity of the catalytic partial oxidation of methane to syngas. In this report we present a theoretical investigation of the potential-energy diagram for water formation from adsorbed O and H species on Rh(111) and Pt(111) surfaces. The study is based on accurate first-principles calculations applying density-functional theory. Our results are compared to the potential-energy diagram for this reaction inferred from experimental data by Hickman and Schmidt [AIChE. J. 39, 1164 (1993)]. The calculations essentially reproduce the scheme of Hickman and Schmidt for water formation on Rh(111) with the important difference that the OH molecule is significantly more stable than assumed by Hickman and Schmidt. On Pt(111) surfaces, however, the calculations predict a barrier to OH formation very similar to that found on Rh(111). In particular, the calculated barrier to OH formation of about 20 kcal/mol seems to contradict the small 2.5 kcal/mol barrier assumed in the Hickman-Schmidt scheme and the observed large rate of water formation on Pt. A possible explanation for the apparent discrepancy between the large calculated barrier for OH formation on Pt and the experimentally observed rapid formation of water even at low temperatures is that the active sites for water formation on Pt are at "defect" sites and not on the ideally flat terraces. A similar conclusion has been reached by Verheij and co-workers [Surf. Sci. 371, 100 (1997); Chem. Phys. Lett. 174, 449 (1990); Surf. Sci. 272, 276 (1991)], who did detailed experimental work on water formation on Pt surfaces. Analyzing our results, we develop an explicit picture of the interaction processes governing the formation of OH groups. This picture rationalizes the calculated weak dependence of OH

  2. Silver-Palladium Surfaces Inhibit Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Schroll, Casper; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2009-01-01

    Undesired biofilm formation is a major concern in many areas. In the present study, we investigated biofilm-inhibiting properties of a silver-palladium surface that kills bacteria by generating microelectric fields and electrochemical redox processes. For evaluation of the biofilm inhibition...... efficacy and study of the biofilm inhibition mechanism, the silver-sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and the silver-resistant E. coli J53[pMG101] strains were used as model organisms, and batch and flow chamber setups were used as model systems. In the case of the silver-sensitive strain, the silver......-palladium surfaces killed the bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low or high bacterial load. In the case of the silver-resistant strain, the silver-palladium surfaces killed surface-associated bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low bacterial load, whereas under...

  3. Formation of Superheavy Nuclei in Massive Fusion Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Zhao-qing; JIN Gen-ming; LI Jun-qing; Scheid Werner

    2009-01-01

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system(DNS),by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process,a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy residue nucleus in massive fusion reactions,in which the capture of two heavy colliding nuclei,the formation of compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated using empirical coupled channel model,solving master equation numerically and statistical theory,respectively.By using the DNS model,the evaporation-residue excitation functions in the ~(48)Ca induced fusion reactions and in the cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data.Optimal evaporation channels and combinations as well as the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.The possible factors that influencing the isotopic dependence of the production cross sections are analyzed.The formation of the superheavy nuclei based on the isotopes U with different projectiles are also investigated.

  4. Molecular hydrogen formation on grain surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cazaux, S; Tielens, A G G M; Le Bourlot, J; Walmsley, M C

    2005-01-01

    We reconsider H2 formation on grain surfaces. We develop a rate equation model which takes into account the presence of both physisorbed and chemisorbed sites on the surface, including quantum mechanical tunnelling and thermal diffusion. In this study, we took into consideration the uncertainties on the characteristics of graphitic surfaces. We calculate the H2 formation efficiency with the Langmuir Hinshelwood and Eley Rideal mechanisms, and discuss the importance of these mechanisms for a wide range of grain and gas temperatures. We also develop a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the H2 formation efficiency and compare the results to our rate equation models. Our results are the following: (1) Depending on the barrier against chemisorption, we predict the efficiency of H2 formation for a wide range of grain and gas temperatures. (2) The Eley-Rideal mechanism has an impact on the H2 formation efficiency at high grain and gas temperatures. (3) The fact that we consider chemisorption in our model makes the ...

  5. Scratching the surface of allergic transfusion reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, William J; Tobian, Aaron A R; Savage, Jessica H; Wood, Robert A; Schroeder, John T; Ness, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    Allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) are a spectrum of hypersensitivity reactions that are the most common adverse reaction to platelets and plasma, occurring in up to 2% of transfusions. Despite the ubiquity of these reactions, little is known about their mechanism. In a small subset of severe reactions, specific antibody has been implicated as causal, although this mechanism does not explain all ATRs. Evidence suggests that donor, product, and recipient factors are involved, and it is possible that many ATRs are multifactorial. Further understanding of the mechanisms of ATRs is necessary so that rationally designed and cost-effective prevention measures can be developed.

  6. EXFOR SYSTEMS MANUAL NUCLEAR REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    EXFOR is an exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. This document has been written for use by the members of the Network and includes matters of procedure and protocol, as well as detailed rules for the compilation of data. Users may prefer to consult EXFOR Basics' for a brief description of the format.

  7. Formation, dissolution and properties of surface nanobubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Che, Zhizhao

    2016-01-01

    Surface nanobubbles are stable gaseous phases in liquids that form onto solid substrates. While their existence has been confirmed, there are many open questions related to their formation and dissolution processes along with their structure and properties, which are difficult to investigate experimentally. To address these issues, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations based on atomistic force-fields for systems comprised of water, air (N2 and O2), and a Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) substrate. Our results provide insights into the formation/dissolution mechanisms of nanobubbles and estimates for their density, contact angle and surface tension. We found that the formation of nanobubbles is driven by an initial nucleation process of air molecules and the subsequent coalescence of the formed air clusters. The clusters form favorably on the substrate, which provides an enhanced stability to the clusters. In contrast, nanobubbles formed in the bulk move either randomly to the substrate and sp...

  8. Surface Reaction Kinetics of Steam- and CO2-Reforming as Well as Oxidation of Methane over Nickel-Based Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Karla Herrera Delgado; Lubow Maier; Steffen Tischer; Alexander Zellner; Henning Stotz; Olaf Deutschmann

    2015-01-01

    An experimental and kinetic modeling study on the Ni-catalyzed conversion of methane under oxidative and reforming conditions is presented. The numerical model is based on a surface reaction mechanism consisting of 52 elementary-step like reactions with 14 surface and six gas-phase species. Reactions for the conversion of methane with oxygen, steam, and CO2 as well as methanation, water-gas shift reaction and carbon formation via Boudouard reaction are included. The mechanism is implemented i...

  9. Substrate decomposition in galvanic displacement reaction: Contrast between gold and silver nanoparticle formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Tapas; Satpati, Biswarup, E-mail: biswarup.satpati@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700 064 (India); Kabiraj, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We have investigated substrate decomposition during formation of silver and gold nanoparticles in galvanic displacement reaction on germanium surfaces. Silver and gold nanoparticles were synthesized by electroless deposition on sputter coated germanium thin film (∼ 200 nm) grown initially on silicon substrate. The nanoparticles formation and the substrate corrosion were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy.

  10. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing; Scheid, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  11. Platelet reactions to modified surfaces under dynamic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, N P; Shortland, A P; Rattray, A; Williams, D F

    1998-12-01

    The influence of surfaces on the reactions of platelets in whole blood under laminar flow was investigated in a cone and plate viscometer. Citrated whole blood was exposed to steel, PMMA and PMMA modified with PEO at low (500 s(-1)) and high (4000 s(-1)) wall shear rates at room temperature for a period of 100 s. Treated blood samples were fixed with paraformaldehyde, stained with a monoclonal antibody for CD41 (platelet GPIIb/IIIa) conjugated with phycoerythrin and analyzed by flow cytometry. The reactions of platelets (microparticle generation and formation of platelet-platelet, platelet-red blood cell and red blood cell-microparticle aggregates) to these environments were quantified. Additionally, the size of platelet-platelet aggregates was assessed. The percentage platelet aggregation and numbers of microparticles generated were independent of surface type at any shear rate. The composition of the aggregates formed was influenced by the surface: at low and high shear rates PMMA caused the generation of platelet-platelet aggregates of the greatest size. The numbers of red blood cell-platelet and red blood cell-microparticle aggregates also varied depending on the surface. Fewer red blood cell-platelet aggregates were formed at higher shear rates, whereas the reverse was true for red blood cell-microparticle aggregates. It is concluded that these variations may help to explain the differential effects of surfaces to the induction of distant thrombotic events: microparticles may be protected from loss from the blood stream by their association with red blood cells at high shear rates.

  12. Formation of hollow atoms above a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Jean Pierre; Phaneuf, Ronald; Terracol, Stephane; Xie, Zuqi

    2012-06-01

    Slow highly stripped ions approaching or penetrating surfaces are known to capture electrons into outer shells of the ions, leaving the innermost shells empty, and forming hollow atoms. Electron capture occurs above and below the surfaces. The existence of hollow atoms below surfaces e.g. Ar atoms whose K and L shells are empty, with all electrons lying in the M and N shells, was demonstrated in 1990 [1]. At nm above surfaces, the excited ions may not have enough time to decay before hitting the surfaces, and the formation of hollow atoms above surfaces has even been questioned [2]. To observe it, one must increase the time above the surface by decelerating the ions. We have for the first time decelerated O^7+ ions to energies as low as 1 eV/q, below the minimum energy gained by the ions due to the acceleration by their image charge. As expected, no ion backscattering (trampoline effect) above dielectric (Ge) was observed and at the lowest ion kinetic energies, most of the observed x-rays were found to be emitted by the ions after surface contact. [4pt] [1] J. P. Briand et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 65(1990)159.[0pt] [2] J.P. Briand, AIP Conference Proceedings 215 (1990) 513.

  13. Formation of graphene on Ru(0001) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Yi; Shi Dong-Xia; Gao Hong-Jun

    2007-01-01

    We report on the formation of a graphene monolayer on a Ru(0001) surface by annealing the Ru(0001) crystal.The samples are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). STM images show that the Moiré pattern is caused by the graphene layer mismatched with the underlying Ru(0001) surface and has an N × N superlattice. It is further found that the graphene monolayer on a Ru(0001) surface is very stable at high temperatures. Our results provide a simple and convenient method to produce a graphene monolayer on the Ru(0001) surface, which is used as a template for fabricating functional nanostructures needed in future nano devices and catalysis.

  14. Polyspecies biofilm formation on implant surfaces with different surface characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick R. SCHMIDLIN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the microbial adherence and colonization of a polyspecies biofilm on 7 differently processed titanium surfaces. Material and Methods Six-species biofilms were formed anaerobically on 5-mm-diameter sterilized, saliva-preconditioned titanium discs. Material surfaces used were either machined, stained, acid-etched or sandblasted/acid-etched (SLA. Samples of the latter two materials were also provided in a chemically modified form, with increased wettability characteristics. Surface roughness and contact angles of all materials were determined. The discs were then incubated anaerobically for up to 16.5 h. Initial microbial adherence was evaluated after 20 min incubation and further colonization after 2, 4, 8, and 16.5 h using non-selective and selective culture techniques. Results at different time points were compared using ANOVA and Scheffé post hoc analysis. Results The mean differences in microorganisms colonizing after the first 20 min were in a very narrow range (4.5 to 4.8 log CFU. At up to 16.5 h, the modified SLA surface exhibited the highest values for colonization (6.9±0.2 log CFU, p<0.05 but increasing growth was observed on all test surfaces over time. Discrepancies among bacterial strains on the differently crafted titanium surfaces were very similar to those described for total log CFU. F. nucleatum was below the detection limit on all surfaces after 4 h. Conclusion Within the limitations of this in vitro study, surface roughness had a moderate influence on biofilm formation, while wettability did not seem to influence biofilm formation under the experimental conditions described. The modified SLA surface showed the highest trend for bacterial colonization.

  15. Steric Effects in the Reaction of Aryl Radicals on Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combellas, Catherine [CNRS-ESPCI; Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Kanoufi, Frederic [CNRS-ESPCI; Pinson, Jean [Alchimer; Podvorica, Fetah [University of Prishtina, Kosovo

    2009-01-01

    Steric effects are investigated in the reaction of aryl radicals with surfaces. The electrochemical reduction of 2-, 3-, 4-methyl, 2-methoxy, 2-ethyl, 2,6-, 2,4-, and 3,5-dimethyl, 4-tert-butyl, 3,5-bis-tert-butyl benzenediazonium, 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl), and pentafluoro benzenediazonium tetrafluoroborates is examined in acetonitrile solutions. It leads to the formation of grafted layers only if the steric hindrance at the 2- or 2,6-position(s) is small. When the 3,5-positions are crowded with tert-butyl groups, the growth of the organic layer is limited by steric effects and a monolayer is formed. The efficiency of the grafting process is assessed by cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared, and ellipsometry. These experiments, together with density functional computations of bonding energies of substituted phenyl groups on a copper surface, are discussed in terms of the reactivity of aryl radicals in the electrografting reaction and in the growth of the polyaryl layer.

  16. Coupling and Reactions of 5-Hydroxyconiferyl Alcohol in Lignin Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, Thomas; Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2016-06-15

    The catechol alcohols, caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, may be incorporated into lignin either naturally or through genetic manipulation. Due to the presence of o-OH groups, these compounds form benzodioxanes, a departure from the interunit connections found in lignins derived from the cinnamyl alcohols. In nature, lignins composed of caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol are linear homopolymers and, as such, may have properties that make them amenable for use in value-added products, such as lignin-based carbon fibers. In the current work, results from density functional theory calculations for the reactions of 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, taking stereochemistry into account, are reported. Dehydrogenation and quinone methide formation are found to be thermodynamically favored for 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, over coniferyl alcohol. The comparative energetics of the rearomatization reactions suggest that the formation of the benzodioxane linkage is under kinetic control. Ring-opening reactions of the benzodioxane groups show that the bond dissociation enthalpy of the ..alpha..-O cleavage reaction is lower than that of the ..beta..-O reaction. The catechol lignins represent a novel form of the polymer that may offer new opportunities for bioproducts and genetic targets.

  17. Secondary aerosol formation from atmospheric reactions of aliphatic amines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Murphy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although aliphatic amines have been detected in both urban and rural atmospheric aerosols, little is known about the chemistry leading to particle formation or the potential aerosol yields from reactions of gas-phase amines. We present here the first systematic study of aerosol formation from the atmospheric reactions of amines. Based on laboratory chamber experiments and theoretical calculations, we evaluate aerosol formation from reaction of OH, ozone, and nitric acid with trimethylamine, methylamine, triethylamine, diethylamine, ethylamine, and ethanolamine. Entropies of formation for alkylammonium nitrate salts are estimated by molecular dynamics calculations enabling us to estimate equilibrium constants for the reactions of amines with nitric acid. Though subject to significant uncertainty, the calculated dissociation equilibrium constant for diethylammonium nitrate is found to be sufficiently small to allow for its atmospheric formation, even in the presence of ammonia which competes for available nitric acid. Experimental chamber studies indicate that the dissociation equilibrium constant for triethylammonium nitrate is of the same order of magnitude as that for ammonium nitrate. All amines studied form aerosol when photooxidized in the presence of NOx with the majority of the aerosol mass present at the peak of aerosol growth consisting of aminium (R3NH+ nitrate salts, which repartition back to the gas phase as the parent amine is consumed. Only the two tertiary amines studied, trimethylamine and triethylamine, are found to form significant non-salt organic aerosol when oxidized by OH or ozone; calculated organic mass yields for the experiments conducted are similar for ozonolysis (15% and 5% respectively and photooxidation (23% and 8% respectively. The non-salt organic aerosol formed appears to be more stable than the nitrate salts and does not quickly repartition back to the gas phase.

  18. Secondary aerosol formation from atmospheric reactions of aliphatic amines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Murphy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although aliphatic amines have been detected in both urban and rural atmospheric aerosols, little is known about the chemistry leading to particle formation or the potential aerosol yields from reactions of gas-phase amines. We present here the first systematic study of aerosol formation from the atmospheric reactions of amines. Based on laboratory chamber experiments and theoretical calculations, we evaluate aerosol formation from reaction of OH, ozone, and nitric acid with trimethylamine, methylamine, triethylamine, diethylamine, ethylamine, and ethanolamine. Entropies of formation for alkylammonium nitrate salts are estimated by molecular dynamics calculations enabling us to estimate equilibrium constants for the reactions of amines with nitric acid. Though subject to significant uncertainty, the calculated dissociation equilibrium constant for diethylammonium nitrate is found to be sufficiently small to allow for its atmospheric formation, even in the presence of ammonia which competes for available nitric acid. Experimental chamber studies indicate that the dissociation equilibrium constant for triethylammonium nitrate is of the same order of magnitude as that for ammonium nitrate. All amines studied form aerosol when photooxidized in the presence of NOx with the majority of the aerosol mass present at the peak of aerosol growth consisting of aminium (R3NH+ nitrate salts, which repartition back to the gas phase as the parent amine is consumed. Only the two tertiary amines studied, trimethylamine and triethylamine, are found to form significant non-salt organic aerosol when oxidized by OH or ozone; calculated organic mass yields for the experiments conducted are similar for ozonolysis (15% and 5% respectively and photooxidation (23% and 8% respectively. The non-salt organic aerosol formed appears to be more stable than the nitrate salts and does not quickly repartition back to the gas phase.

  19. Electronic dissipation processes during chemical reactions on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Stella, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Every day in our life is larded with a huge number of chemical reactions on surfaces. Some reactions occur immediately, for others an activation energy has to be supplied. Thus it happens that though a reaction should thermodynamically run off, it is kinetically hindered. Meaning the partners react only to the thermodynamically more stable product state within a mentionable time if the activation energy of the reaction is supplied. With the help of catalysts the activation energy of a reaction can be lowered. Such catalytic processes on surfaces are widely used in industry. A

  20. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLane, V. [ed.

    1996-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. In addition to storing the data and its bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  1. Reaction kinetics of fluorite in flow systems and surface chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张荣华; 胡书敏

    1996-01-01

    The kinetic experiments of fluorite in water-HCl solution in an open-flow system at the temperatures ≤100℃ reveal that the variation of flow rate (U) can change the reaction rate orders from 0 to 2 or higher. In the far from equilibrium systems, the dissolution rates of fluorite in aqueous solutions have a zero order.The reaction rates are controlled by pH values of input solutions. In fact, the reaction rates are related to the concentrations of the active sites occupied by H+ on fluorite surface [SOH]. X-ray photospectroscopy observations on fluorite surface before and after reaction indicate that surface chemical processes control the reaction rates: Cl- cations attach on and enter into surface of fluorite besides H+ when fluorites react with HCl solutions, which affect the reaction rates.

  2. Holographic Grating Formation in Cationic Photopolymers with Dark Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Hao-Yun; CAO Liang-Cai; GU Claire; XU Zhen-Feng; HE Ming-Zhao; HE Qing-Sheng; HE Shu-Rong; JIN Guo-Fan

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a new formula to describe the dynamics of holographic grating formation under low intensity pulse exposures in cationic photopolymers, in which the dark reaction contributes dominantly to the grating strength.The formula is based on the living polymerization mechanism and the diffusion-free approximation. The analytical solution indicates that the grating formation time depends on the termination rate constant, while the final grating strength depends linearly on the total exposure energy. These theoretical predictions are verified experimentally using the Aprilis HMC-400μm photopolymer. The results can provide guidelines for the control and optimization of the holographic recording conditions in practical applications.

  3. Heterogeneous reaction of formaldehyde on the surface of TiO2 particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of formaldehyde (HCHO) on the surface of titanium dioxide (TiO2) was investigated in situ using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) combined with ion chromatography (IC),X-ray diffraction (XRD),and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Formate,dioxymethylene,methoxy,and polyoxymethylene were observed in the infrared spectra of TiO2 particles during the reaction.On the surface of TiO2,the adsorbed HCHO was first oxidized to dioxymethylene and further oxidized to formate.The effects of temperature and ultraviolet radiation (UV) on the reaction products and reactive uptake coefficients were studied,and the results indicate that the reaction rate can be accelerated at increasing temperatures as well as under UV.The heterogeneous reaction mechanisms of HCHO on the surface of TiO2 in the dark and under UV irradiation are proposed.Kinetic measurements show that formate formation on TiO2 is second order in HCHO concentration and the initial reactive uptake coefficients at room temperature calculated with the Brunauer-EmmettTeller specific surface area are (0.5-5) × 10-8 ([HCHO]:1 × 1013-2 × 10 14 molecules/cm3).A linear function relationship exists between the uptake coefficient and the concentration.The apparent activation energy of the reaction was also determined.

  4. Peptide bond formation through gas-phase reactions in the interstellar medium: formamide and acetamide as prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio, E-mail: predondo@qf.uva.es [Computational Chemistry Group, Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-09-20

    A theoretical study of the reactions of NH{sub 4}{sup +} with formaldehyde and CH{sub 5}{sup +} with formamide is carried out. The viability of these gas-phase ion-molecule reactions as possible sources of formamide and acetamide under the conditions of interstellar medium is evaluated. We report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies and an analysis of their potential energy surfaces. Formation of protonated formamide from the reaction between ammonium cation and formaldehyde is an exothermic process, but all the channels located on the potential energy surface leading to this product present net activation energies. For the reaction between methanium and formamide, different products are possible from a thermodynamic point of view. An analysis of its potential energy surface showed that formation of protonated acetamide and amino acetaldehyde takes place through barrier-free paths. Therefore, this reaction could be a feasible source of acetamide and amino acetaldehyde in space.

  5. Strangeness production and hypernucleus formation in antiproton induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Formation mechanism of fragments with strangeness in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport approach combined with a statistical model (GEMINI) for describing the decays of excited fragments. Production of strange particles in the antiproton induced nuclear reactions is modeled within the LQMD model, in which all possible reaction channels such as elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic scattering in antibaryon-baryon, baryon-baryon and meson-baryon collisions have been included. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing hyperfragments in phase space after de-excitation of nucleonic fragments. The combined approach could describe the production of fragments in low-energy antiproton induced reactions. Hyperfragments are formed within the narrower rapidities and lower kinetic energies. It has advantage to produce heavier hyperfragments and hypernuclides with strangeness s=-2 (double-$\\Lambda$ fra...

  6. Catalysis of Dialanine Formation by Glycine in the Salt-Induced Peptide Formation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannachot, Yuttana; Rode, Bernd M.

    1998-02-01

    Mutual catalysis of amino acids in the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction is demonstrated for the case of glycine/alanine. The presence of glycine enhances dialanine formation by a factor up to 50 and enables dialanine formation at much lower alanine concentrations. The actual amounts of glycine play an important role for this catalytic effect, the optimal glycine concentration is 1/8 of the alanine concentration. The mechanism appears to be based on the formation of the intermediate Gly-Ala-Ala tripeptide, connected to one coordination site of copper(II) ion, and subsequent hydrolysis to dialanine and glycine.

  7. Confinement of reaction components at electrode surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, Oana R.; Weitekamp, Raymond; Grubbs, Robert H.; Atwater, Harry A.; Mitrovic, Slobodan

    2017-03-14

    A CO.sub.2 reduction electrode includes an active layer on an electrode base. The active layer includes a polymer that includes one or more reaction components selected from a group consisting of a CO.sub.2 reduction catalyst and an activator that bonds CO.sub.2 so as to form a CO.sub.2 reduction intermediate.

  8. Shock-induced hotspot formation and chemical reaction initiation in PETN containing a spherical void

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2014-05-01

    We present results of reactive molecular dynamics simulations of hotspot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shock-induced compression of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) with the ReaxFF reactive force field. A supported shockwave is driven through a PETN crystal containing a 20 nm spherical void at a sub-threshold impact velocity of 2 km/s. Formation of a hotspot due to shock-induced void collapse is observed. During void collapse, NO2 is the dominant species ejected from the upstream void surface. Once the ejecta collide with the downstream void surface and the hotspot develops, formation of final products such as N2 and H2O is observed. The simulation provides a detailed picture of how void collapse and hotspot formation leads to initiation at sub-threshold impact velocities.

  9. Surface Nano-Structuring by Adsorption and Chemical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ken-ichi Tanaka

    2010-01-01

    Nano-structuring of the surface caused by adsorption of molecules or atoms and by the reaction of surface atoms with adsorbed species are reviewed from a chemistry viewpoint. Self-assembly of adsorbed species is markedly influenced by weak mutual interactions and the local strain of the surface induced by the adsorption. Nano-structuring taking place on the surface is well explained by the notion of a quasi-molecule provided by the reaction of surface atoms with adsorbed species. Self-assembl...

  10. Interpolated lattice Boltzmann boundary conditions for surface reaction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, S D C; Saar, M O

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes a method for implementing surface reaction kinetics in lattice Boltzmann simulations. The interpolated boundary conditions are capable of simulating surface reactions and dissolution at both stationary and moving solid-fluid and fluid-fluid interfaces. Results obtained with the boundary conditions are compared to analytical solutions for first-order and constant-flux kinetic surface reactions in a one-dimensional half space, as well as to the analytical solution for evaporation from the surface of a cylinder. Excellent agreement between analytical and simulated results is obtained for a wide range of diffusivities, lattice velocities, and surface reaction rates. The boundary model's ability to represent dissolution in binary fluid mixtures is demonstrated by modeling diffusion from a rising bubble and dissolution of a droplet near a flat plate.

  11. Reaction mechanisms for on-surface synthesis of covalent nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, J

    2016-03-02

    In recent years, on-surface synthesis has become an increasingly popular strategy to form covalent nanostructures. The approach has great prospects for facilitating the manufacture of a range of fascinating materials with atomic precision. However, the on-surface reactions are enigmatic to control, currently restricting its bright perspectives and there is a great need to explore how the reactions are governed. The objective of this topical review is to summarize theoretical work that has focused on comprehending on-surface synthesis protocols through studies of reaction mechanisms.

  12. Chemical reactions on solid surfaces using molecular beam techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R. L.

    1980-07-01

    Thermal energy molecular beams have been used to study chemical interactions with metal surfaces. Chemisorption of simple molecules such as H2, O2, CH4, C2Hx and CO was investigated on single and polycrystalline surfaces of Pt, Ni, Co, and Ag. Kinetic parameters and reaction mechanisms were determined for model catalytic reactions including CO and C2Hx oxidation and methanation from H2/CO mixtures. Chemical reactions of NOx with CO and D2 on Pt(111) and other surfaces have been surveyed and the kinetics of NO and O2 chemisorption have been measured. The theory of adsorption/desorption kinetics is reviewed and certain deficiencies identified.

  13. One-pot reaction for the preparation of biofunctionalized self-assembled monolayers on gold surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raigoza, Annette F.; Fies, Whitney; Lim, Amber; Onyirioha, Kristeen; Webb, Lauren J.

    2017-02-01

    The Huisgen cycloaddition reaction (;click; chemistry) has been used extensively to functionalize surfaces with macromolecules in a straightforward manner. We have previously developed a procedure using the copper(I)-catalyzed click reaction to tether synthetic α-helical peptides carrying two alkyne groups to a well-ordered azide-terminated alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a Au(111) surface. While convenient, click-based strategies potentially pose significant problems from reagents, solvents, and reaction temperatures that may irreversibly damage some molecules or substrates. Tuning click chemistry conditions would allow individual optimization of reaction conditions for a wide variety of biomolecules and substrate materials. Here, we explore the utility of simultaneous SAM formation and peptide-attachment chemistry in a one-pot reaction. We demonstrate that a formerly multistep reaction can be successfully carried out concurrently by mixing azide-terminated alkanethiols, CuCl, and a propargylglycine-containing peptide over a bare gold surface in ethanol and reacting at 70 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface infrared spectroscopy, surface circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) were used to determine that this one-pot reaction strategy resulted in a high density of surface-bound α-helices without aggregation. This work demonstrates the simplicity and versatility of a SAM-plus-click chemistry strategy for functionalizing Au surfaces with structured biomolecules.

  14. Geodesic curvature driven surface microdomain formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Melissa R; Zhou, Y C

    2017-09-15

    Lipid bilayer membranes are not uniform and clusters of lipids in a more ordered state exist within the generally disorder lipid milieu of the membrane. These clusters of ordered lipids microdomains are now referred to as lipid rafts. Recent reports attribute the formation of these microdomains to the geometrical and molecular mechanical mismatch of lipids of different species on the boundary. Here we introduce the geodesic curvature to characterize the geometry of the domain boundary, and develop a geodesic curvature energy model to describe the formation of these microdomains as a result of energy minimization. Our model accepts the intrinsic geodesic curvature of any binary lipid mixture as an input, and will produce microdomains of the given geodesic curvature as demonstrated by three sets of numerical simulations. Our results are in contrast to the surface phase separation predicted by the classical surface Cahn-Hilliard equation, which tends to generate large domains as a result of the minimizing line tension. Our model provides a direct and quantified description of the structure inhomogeneity of lipid bilayer membrane, and can be coupled to the investigations of biological processes on membranes for which such inhomogeneity plays essential roles.

  15. Geodesic curvature driven surface microdomain formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Melissa R.; Zhou, Y. C.

    2017-09-01

    Lipid bilayer membranes are not uniform and clusters of lipids in a more ordered state exist within the generally disorder lipid milieu of the membrane. These clusters of ordered lipids microdomains are now referred to as lipid rafts. Recent reports attribute the formation of these microdomains to the geometrical and molecular mechanical mismatch of lipids of different species on the boundary. Here we introduce the geodesic curvature to characterize the geometry of the domain boundary, and develop a geodesic curvature energy model to describe the formation of these microdomains as a result of energy minimization. Our model accepts the intrinsic geodesic curvature of any binary lipid mixture as an input, and will produce microdomains of the given geodesic curvature as demonstrated by three sets of numerical simulations. Our results are in contrast to the surface phase separation predicted by the classical surface Cahn-Hilliard equation, which tends to generate large domains as a result of the minimizing line tension. Our model provides a direct and quantified description of the structure inhomogeneity of lipid bilayer membrane, and can be coupled to the investigations of biological processes on membranes for which such inhomogeneity plays essential roles.

  16. Effects of a Single Water Molecule on the Reaction Barrier of Interstellar CO2 Formation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-08-25

    The mechanism by which CO2 is formed in the interstellar space remains a mystery. The most likely reaction is collision between CO and OH; however, previous theoretical works have shown that the activation barrier for CO2 formation is high enough to prevent the reaction at the low thermal conditions of space (∼10 K). The effects of single water molecule on the reaction barrier of CO2 formation from reaction between CO and OH have been investigated here by means of ab initio calculation. The barrier height along the lowest-energy pathway in the reaction between CO and OH in the absence of the H2O molecule was calculated to be 2.3 kcal/mol when CCSD(T) energy corrections are combined with the MP2 basis set limit. In the case of the hydrated (H2O-CO-OH) system, the inclusion of a single H2O molecule into the system significantly decreased the barrier height to 0.2 kcal/mol. This suggests that CO2 can be formed when CO and OH react in the presence of H2O, even under thermal conditions as low as 10 K.

  17. Numerical Study on the Impacts of Heterogeneous Reactions on Ozone Formation in the Beijing Urban Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The air quality model CMAQ-MADRID (Community Multiscale Air Quality-Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization and Dissolution) was employed to simulate summer O3 formation in Beijing China, in order to explore the impacts of four heterogeneous reactions on O3 formation in an urban area.The results showed that the impacts were obvious and exhibited the characteristics of a typical response of a VOC-limited regime in the urban area. For the four heterogeneous reactions considered, the NO2 and HO2 heterogeneous reactions have the most severe impacts on O3 formation. During the O3 formation period, the NO2 heterogeneous reaction increased new radical creation by 30%, raising the atmospheric activity as more NO→NO2 conversion occurred, thus causing the O3 to rise. The increase of O3 peak concentration reached a maximum value of 67 ppb in the urban area. In the morning hours, high NO titration reduced the effect of the photolysis of HONO, which was produced heterogeneously at night in the surface layer. The NO2 heterogeneous reaction in the daytime is likely one of the major reasons causing the O3 increase in the Beijing urban area. The HO2 heterogeneous reaction accelerated radical termination,resulting in a decrease of the radical concentration by 44% at the most. O3 peak concentration decreased by a maximum amount of 24 ppb in the urban area. The simulation results were improved when the heterogeneous reactions were included, with the O3 and HONO model results close to the observations.

  18. Chemical reaction and dust formation studies in laboratory hydrocarbon plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, Rainer; Majumdar, Abhijit; Thejaswini, H. C.

    Plasma chemical reaction studies with relevance to, e.g., Titan's atmosphere have been per-formed in various laboratory plasmas [1,2]. Chemical reactions in a dielectric barrier discharge at medium pressure of 250-300 mbar have been studied in CH4 /N2 and CH4 /Ar gas mixtures by means of mass spectrometry. The main reaction scheme is production of H2 by fragmenta-tion of CH4 , but also production of larger hydrocarbons like Cn Hm with n up to 10 including formation of different functional CN groups is observed. [1] A. Majumdar and R. Hippler, Development of dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing apparatus for mass spectrometry and thin film deposition, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 075103 (2007) [2] H.T. Do, G. Thieme, M. Frühlich, H. Kersten, and R. Hippler, Ion Molecule and Dust Particle Formation in Ar/CH4 , Ar/C2 H2 and Ar/C3 H6 Radio-frequency Plasmas, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 45, No. 5-6, 378-384 (2005)

  19. DFT study of the formate formation on Ni(111) surface doped by transition metals [Ni(111)-M; M=Cu, Pd, Pt, Rh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha; Saputro, A. G.; Agusta, M. K.; Rusydi, F.; Maezono, R.; Dipojono, H. K.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the formation of formate (HCOO) from the reaction of CO2 gas and a pre- adsorbed H atom (CO2 (g) + *H → *HCOO) on Ni(111) surface doped by transition-metals [Ni(111)-M; M= Cu, Pd, Pt, Rh] by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. This *HCOO formation reaction is one of the most important rate- limiting steps in the methanol synthesis process. We find that the presence of transition metal doping on the first-layer of Ni(111) surface could reduce the activation barrier of this reaction [up to ~38.4%, compared to clean Ni(111) surface].

  20. Metal-Free Click Chemistry Reactions on Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escorihuela, J.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Zuilhof, H.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, interest in the functionalization of surfaces and materials has increased dramatically. In this regard, click chemistry deserves a central focus because of its mild reaction conditions, high efficiency, and easy post-treatment. Among such novel click reactions, those that do not

  1. Metal-Free Click Chemistry Reactions on Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escorihuela, J.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Zuilhof, H.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, interest in the functionalization of surfaces and materials has increased dramatically. In this regard, click chemistry deserves a central focus because of its mild reaction conditions, high efficiency, and easy post-treatment. Among such novel click reactions, those that do not

  2. Reaction path and crystallograpy of cobalt silicide formation on silicon(001) by reaction deposition epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chong Wee

    CaF2-structure CoSi2 layers were formed on Si(001) by reactive deposition epitaxy (RDE) and compared with CoSi2 layers obtained by conventional solid phase growth (SPG). In the case of RDE, CoSi 2 formation occurred during Co deposition at elevated temperature while for SPG, Co was deposited at 25°C and silicidation took place during subsequent annealing. My results demonstrate that RDE CoSi2 layers are epitaxial with a cube-on-cube relationship, 001CoSi2 ‖001Si and 100CoSi2 ‖100 Si . In contrast, SPG films are polycrystalline with a mixed 111/002/022/112 orientation. I attribute the striking difference to rapid Co diffusion during RDE for which the high Co/Si reactivity gives rise to a flux-limited reaction resulting in the direct formation of the disilicide phase. Initial formation of CoSi2(001) follows the Volmer-Weber mode with two families of island shapes: inverse pyramids and platelets. The rectangular-based pyramidal islands extend along orthogonal directions, bounded by four {111} CoSi2/Si interfaces, and grow with a cube-on-cube orientation with respect to Si(001). Platelet-shaped islands are bounded across their long directions by {111} twin planes and their narrow directions by 511CoSi2 ‖111Si interfaces. The top and bottom surfaces are {22¯1}, with 22¯1 CoSi2‖001 Si , and {1¯1¯1}, with 1¯1¯ 1CoSi2‖ 11¯1Si , respectively. The early stages of film growth (tCo ≤ 13 A) are dominated by the twinned platelets due to a combination of higher nucleation rates and rapid elongation along preferred directions. However, at tCo ≥ 13 A, island coalescence becomes significant as orthogonal platelets intersect and block elongation along fast growth directions. Further island growth becomes dominated by the untwinned islands. I show that high-flux low-energy Ar+ ion irradiation during RDE growth dramatically increases the area fraction of untwinned regions from 0.17 in films grown under standard magnetically balanced conditions in which the ratio

  3. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-01

    Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH2) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such zwitterion modified PP surface.

  4. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  5. Blood coagulation reactions on nanoscale membrane surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pureza, Vincent S.

    Blood coagulation requires the assembly of several membrane-bound protein complexes composed of regulatory and catalytic subunits. The biomembranes involved in these reactions not only provide a platform for these procoagulant proteins, but can also affect their function. Increased exposure of acidic phospholipids on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane can dramatically modulate the catalytic efficiencies of such membrane-bound enzymes. Under physiologic conditions, however, these phospholipids spontaneously cluster into a patchwork of membrane microdomains upon which membrane binding proteins may preferentially assemble. As a result, the membrane composition surrounding these proteins is largely unknown. Through the development and use of a nanometer-scale bilayer system that provides rigorous control of the phospholipid membrane environment, I investigated the role of phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid, in the direct vicinity (within nanometers) of two critical membrane-bound procoagulant protein complexes and their respective natural substrates. Here, I present how the assembly and function of the tissue factor˙factor VIIa and factor Va˙factor Xa complexes, the first and final cofactor˙enzyme complexes of the blood clotting cascade, respectively, are mediated by changes in their immediate phospholipid environments.

  6. Acid-base bifunctional catalytic surfaces for nucleophilic addition reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motokura, Ken; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-09-01

    This article illustrates the modification of oxide surfaces with organic amine functional groups to create acid-base bifunctional catalysts, summarizing our previous reports and also presenting new data. Immobilization of organic amines as bases on inorganic solid-acid surfaces afforded highly active acid-base bifunctional catalysts, which enabled various organic transformations including C--C coupling reactions, though these reactions did not proceed with either the homogeneous amine precursors or the acidic supports alone. Spectroscopic characterization, such as by solid-state MAS NMR and FTIR, revealed not only the interactions between acidic and basic sites but also bifunctional catalytic reaction mechanisms.

  7. Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Elnaggar, Mariam S

    2013-07-16

    A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

  8. Interfacial reaction of eutectic AuSi solder with Si (100) and Si (111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jin-Wook; Hayes, Scott; Lin, Jong-Kai; Frear, Darrel R.

    2004-06-01

    The dissolution behavior of Si (100) and (111) dies by eutectic AuSi solder was investigated. On the Si (100) surface, the dissolution primarily occurred by the formation of craters resulting in a rough surface. The dissolution of the Si (111) resulted in a relatively smooth surface. The morphology of the Si (100) surface during a AuSi soldering reaction exhibited more time-dependent behavior and the etching craters on a Si (100) surface grew larger with time whereas Si (111) did not significantly change. This difference was ascribed to the surface energy differences between Si (111) and (100) surfaces that resulted in the two- and three-dimensional dissolution behaviors, respectively. This difference plays an important role in the formation of voids during the AuSi die bonding. The etching craters on Si (100) act as a AuSi solder sink and the regions surrounded by etch pits tend to become voids. For Si (111), flat surfaces were observed in the voided regions. Cross section analysis showed that no solder reaction occurred in the voided region of the Si (111) surface. This suggests the possibility of the formation of a thin inert layer in a potentially voided region prior to assembly. To achieve void-free die bonding, different parameters must be adjusted to the Si (100) and Si (111) surfaces with the AuSi alloy.

  9. Formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold O + OH reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendrick, Brian Kent [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quemener, Goulven [UNLV; Balakrishman, Naduvalath [UNLV

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold collisions between hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. A time-independent quantum formalism based on hyperspherical coordinates is employed for the calculations. Elastic, inelastic and reactive cross sections as well as the vibrational and rotational populations of the product O{sub 2} molecules are reported. A J-shifting approximation is used to compute the rate coefficients. At temperatures T = 10--100 mK for which the OH molecules have been cooled and trapped experimentally, the elastic and reactive rate coefficients are of comparable magnitude, while at colder temperatures, T < 1 mK, the formation of molecular oxygen becomes the dominant pathway. The validity of a classical capture model to describe cold collisions of OH and O is also discussed. While very good agreement is found between classical and quantum results at T = 0.3 K, at higher temperatures, the quantum calculations predict a higher rate coefficient than the classical model, in agreement with experimental data for the O + OH reaction. The zero-temperature limiting value of the rate coefficient is predicted to be about 6 x 10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} s{sup 01}, a value comparable to that of barrierless alkali metal atom-dimer systems and about a factor of five larger than that of the tunneling dominated F + H{sub 2} reaction.

  10. Influence of supported gold particles on the surface reactions of diethylamine on TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento-Lopez, Adan G.; Berumen-España, Gerardo; Lopez-Serrano, Cesar; Fierro-Gonzalez, Juan C.

    2016-11-01

    The adsorption and reactions of diethylamine on the surfaces of TiO2 and TiO2-supported gold samples were investigated by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. IR spectra measured as the samples were treated in flowing diethylamine at room temperature indicate that the amine was preferentially adsorbed molecularly on surface Ti4 + sites. Thermal treatment of the samples with flowing diethylamine led to the formation of ethylene and acetonitrile as dehydrogenation products. The data show that the reactions occurred at lower temperatures in the presence of supported gold samples than on TiO2, and IR spectra recorded under reaction conditions show evidence of amine-derived surface species bonded to gold nanoparticles that could be regarded as reaction intermediates. The results indicate that the gold nanoparticles provide sites for subtraction and recombination of hydrogen atoms from the amine, ensuing its dehydrogenation.

  11. Controlling surface reactions with nanopatterned surface elastic strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhisheng; Potapenko, Denis V; Osgood, Richard M

    2015-01-27

    The application of elastic lattice strain is a promising approach for tuning material properties, but the attainment of a systematic approach for introducing a high level of strain in materials so as to study its effects has been a major challenge. Here we create an array of intense locally varying strain fields on a TiO2 (110) surface by introducing highly pressurized argon nanoclusters at 6-20 monolayers under the surface. By combining scanning tunneling microscopy imaging and the continuum mechanics model, we show that strain causes the surface bridge-bonded oxygen vacancies (BBOv), which are typically present on this surface, to be absent from the strained area and generates defect-free regions. In addition, we find that the adsorption energy of hydrogen binding to oxygen (BBO) is significantly altered by local lattice strain. In particular, the adsorption energy of hydrogen on BBO rows is reduced by ∼ 35 meV when the local crystal lattice is compressed by ∼ 1.3%. Our results provide direct evidence of the influence of strain on atomic-scale surface chemical properties, and such effects may help guide future research in catalysis materials design.

  12. Mechanism of chimera formation during the Multiple Displacement Amplification reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stockwell Timothy B

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Displacement Amplification (MDA is a method used for amplifying limiting DNA sources. The high molecular weight amplified DNA is ideal for DNA library construction. While this has enabled genomic sequencing from one or a few cells of unculturable microorganisms, the process is complicated by the tendency of MDA to generate chimeric DNA rearrangements in the amplified DNA. Determining the source of the DNA rearrangements would be an important step towards reducing or eliminating them. Results Here, we characterize the major types of chimeras formed by carrying out an MDA whole genome amplification from a single E. coli cell and sequencing by the 454 Life Sciences method. Analysis of 475 chimeras revealed the predominant reaction mechanisms that create the DNA rearrangements. The highly branched DNA synthesized in MDA can assume many alternative secondary structures. DNA strands extended on an initial template can be displaced becoming available to prime on a second template creating the chimeras. Evidence supports a model in which branch migration can displace 3'-ends freeing them to prime on the new templates. More than 85% of the resulting DNA rearrangements were inverted sequences with intervening deletions that the model predicts. Intramolecular rearrangements were favored, with displaced 3'-ends reannealing to single stranded 5'-strands contained within the same branched DNA molecule. In over 70% of the chimeric junctions, the 3' termini had initiated priming at complimentary sequences of 2–21 nucleotides (nts in the new templates. Conclusion Formation of chimeras is an important limitation to the MDA method, particularly for whole genome sequencing. Identification of the mechanism for chimera formation provides new insight into the MDA reaction and suggests methods to reduce chimeras. The 454 sequencing approach used here will provide a rapid method to assess the utility of reaction modifications.

  13. Surface Reactions Studied by Synchrotron Based Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrbek, J.

    1998-11-03

    The goal of this article is to illustrate the use of synchrotron radiation for investigating surface chemical reactions by photoelectron spectroscopy. A brief introduction and background information is followed by examples of layer resolved spectroscopy, oxidation and sulfidation of metallic, semiconducting and oxide surfaces.

  14. Radionuclide reactions with groundwater and basalts from Columbia River basalt formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barney, G.S.

    1981-06-01

    Chemical reactions of radionuclides with geologic materials found in Columbia River basalt formations were studied. The objective was to determine the ability of these formations to retard radionuclide migration from a radioactive waste repository located in deep basalt. Reactions that can influence migration are precipitation, ion-exchange, complexation, and oxidation-reduction. These reactions were studied by measuring the effects of groundwater composition and redox potential (Eh) on radionuclide sorption on fresh basalt surfaces, a naturally altered basalt, and a sample of secondary minerals associated with a Columbia River basalt flow. In addition, radionuclide sorption isotherms were measured for these materials and reaction kinetics were determined. The radionuclides studied were /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, /sup 75/Se, /sup 95m/Tc, /sup 237/Np, /sup 241/Am, /sup 226/Ra and /sup 237/Pu. The Freundlich equation accurately describes the isotherms when precipitation of radionuclides does not occur. In general, sorption increased in the order: basalt < altered basalt < secondary minerals. This increase in sorption corresponds to increasing surface area and cation exchange capacity. The Eh of the system had a large effect on technetium, plutonium, and neptunium sorption. Technetium(VII), Pu(VI), and Np(V) are reduced to Tc(IV), Pu(IV), and Np(IV), respectively, under Eh conditions expected in deep basalt formations. The kinetics of radionuclide sorption and basalt-groundwater reactions were observed over a period of 18 weeks. Most sorption reactions stabilized after about four weeks. Groundwater composition changed the least in contact with altered basalt. Contact with secondary minerals greatly increased Ca, K, and Mg concentrations in the groundwater.

  15. Adsorbate induced surface alloy formation investigated by near ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierhoff, Anders Ulrik Fregerslev; Conradsen, Christian Nagstrup; McCarthy, David Norman

    2014-01-01

    Formation of meta-stable surface-alloys can be used as a way to tune the binding strength of reaction intermediates and could therefore be used as improved catalyst materials for heterogeneous catalysis. Understanding the role of adsorbates on such alloy surfaces can provide new insights for engi...

  16. Potential energy surfaces and reaction dynamics of polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yan-Tyng.

    1991-11-01

    A simple empirical valence bond (EVB) model approach is suggested for constructing global potential energy surfaces for reactions of polyatomic molecular systems. This approach produces smooth and continuous potential surfaces which can be directly utilized in a dynamical study. Two types of reactions are of special interest, the unimolecular dissociation and the unimolecular isomerization. For the first type, the molecular dissociation dynamics of formaldehyde on the ground electronic surface is investigated through classical trajectory calculations on EVB surfaces. The product state distributions and vector correlations obtained from this study suggest very similar behaviors seen in the experiments. The intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer in the formic acid dimer is an example of the isomerization reaction. High level ab initio quantum chemistry calculations are performed to obtain optimized equilibrium and transition state dimer geometries and also the harmonic frequencies.

  17. Aerosol formation yields from the reaction of catechol with ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Tomas, Alexandre; Guilloteau, Angélique; Henry, Françoise; Ledoux, Frédéric; Visez, Nicolas; Riffault, Véronique; Wenger, John C.; Bedjanian, Yuri

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol from the gas-phase reaction of catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) with ozone has been studied in two smog chambers. Aerosol production was monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer and loss of the precursor was determined by gas chromatography and infrared spectroscopy, whilst ozone concentrations were measured using a UV photometric analyzer. The overall organic aerosol yield ( Y) was determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses ( Mo) to the total reacted catechol concentrations, assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm -3. Analysis of the data clearly shows that Y is a strong function of Mo and that secondary organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas-particle partitioning absorption model. The aerosol formation is affected by the initial catechol concentration, which leads to aerosol yields ranging from 17% to 86%. The results of this work are compared to similar studies reported in the literature.

  18. Ultrafast Coherent Control and Characterization of Surface Reactions using FELs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nordlund, Dennis a Nilsson, Anders; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-30

    The microscopic understanding of reactions at surfaces requires an in-depth knowledge of the dynamics of elementary processes on an ultrafast timescale. This can be accomplished using an ultrafast excitation to initiate a chemical reaction and then probe the progression of the reaction with an ultrashort x-ray pulse from the FEL. There is a great potential to use atom-specific spectroscopy involving core levels to probe the chemical nature, structure and bonding of species on surfaces. The ultrashort electron pulse obtained in the linear accelerator to feed the X-ray FEL can also be used for generation of coherent synchrotron radiation in the low energy THz regime to be used as a pump. This radiation has an energy close to the thermal excitations of low-energy vibrational modes of molecules on surfaces and phonons in substrates. The coherent THz radiation will be an electric field pulse with a certain direction that can collectively manipulate atoms or molecules on surfaces. In this respect a chemical reaction can be initiated by collective atomic motion along a specific reaction coordinate. If the coherent THz radiation is generated from the same source as the X-ray FEL radiation, full-time synchronization for pump-probe experiments will be possible. The combination of THz and X-ray spectroscopy could be a unique opportunity for FEL facilities to conduct ultrafast chemistry studies at surfaces.

  19. Grain Surface Reactions in Molecular Clouds: The Effect of Cosmic Rays and Quantum Tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Reboussin, Laura; Guilloteau, Stéphane; Hersant, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Grain-surface reactions play an essential role in interstellar chemistry, since dust grain catalyses reactions at its surface allowing for the formation of molecules. We used a chemical model in which both gas-phase and grain-surface reactions occur and studied particularly the diffusion mechanisms on the surface of the grains. Surface reactions can occur via thermal hopping when species cross over a potential barrier or via quantum tunneling when species cross through this barrier. We show that the thermal diffusion (hopping) can be much more efficient after a cosmic ray particle collides with a dust grain, heating it to a peak temperature of 70K. We present here the results of numerical simulations after including the quantum tunneling mechanism for species H, H2 and O and considering the effect of cosmic ray particle collision on the surface reactions. As a consequence, the gas-phase and grain-surface abundances are affected and we show that more complex molecules can be formed in molecular clouds.

  20. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  1. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  2. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Theoretical Study of Sodium-Water Surface Reaction Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR).

  4. Detailed surface reaction mechanism in a three-way catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, D; Deutschmann, O; Warnatz, J

    2001-01-01

    Monolithic three-way catalysts are applied to reduce the emission of combustion engines. The design of such a catalytic converter is a complex process involving the optimization of different physical and chemical parameters (in the simplest case, e.g., length, cell densities or metal coverage of the catalyst). Numerical simulation can be used as an effective tool for the investigation of the catalytic properties of a catalytic converter and for the prediction of the performance of the catalyst. To attain this goal, a two-dimensional flow-field description is coupled with a detailed surface reaction model (gas-phase reactions can be neglected in three-way catalysts). This surface reaction mechanism (with C3H6 taken as representative of unburnt hydrocarbons) was developed using sub-mechanisms recently developed for hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane oxidation, literature values for C3H6 oxidation, and estimates for the remaining unknown reactions. Results of the simulation of a monolithic single channel are used to validate the surface reaction mechanism. The performance of the catalyst was simulated under lean, nearly stoichiometric and rich conditions. For these characteristic conditions, the oxidation of propene and carbon monoxide and the reduction of NO on a typical Pt/Rh coated three-way catalyst were simulated as a function of temperature. The numerically predicted conversion data are compared with experimentally measured data. The simulation further reveals the coupling between chemical reactions and transport processes within the monolithic channel.

  5. Bayesian inversion analysis of nonlinear dynamics in surface heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Toshiaki; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Okamoto, Atsushi; Hukushima, Koji

    2016-09-01

    It is essential to extract nonlinear dynamics from time-series data as an inverse problem in natural sciences. We propose a Bayesian statistical framework for extracting nonlinear dynamics of surface heterogeneous reactions from sparse and noisy observable data. Surface heterogeneous reactions are chemical reactions with conjugation of multiple phases, and they have the intrinsic nonlinearity of their dynamics caused by the effect of surface-area between different phases. We adapt a belief propagation method and an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to partial observation problem, in order to simultaneously estimate the time course of hidden variables and the kinetic parameters underlying dynamics. The proposed belief propagation method is performed by using sequential Monte Carlo algorithm in order to estimate nonlinear dynamical system. Using our proposed method, we show that the rate constants of dissolution and precipitation reactions, which are typical examples of surface heterogeneous reactions, as well as the temporal changes of solid reactants and products, were successfully estimated only from the observable temporal changes in the concentration of the dissolved intermediate product.

  6. Inhibition of Biofilm Formation Using Novel Nanostructured Surfaces Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environment. Few surfaces resist biofilm formation, most promote it. Biofilm formation poses problems in water systems as they can...

  7. Detection of submonolayer oxygen-18 on a gold surface by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S.; Kenny, M.J.; Wieczorek, L. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1993-12-31

    A gold substrate is the preferred solid surface for formation of an organic self-assembled monolayer ( SAM ). Device fabrication process may require the gold film to be exposed to photolithographic processing and plasma treatment prior to molecular assembly. It has been observed that oxygen plasma treatment prevents the formation of SAMs; however, subsequent treatment with an argon plasma allows assembly of the organic monolayers. To understand the mechanisms involved, a plasma containing 98% {sup 18}O was used and the film surface was analysed using the {sup 18}O (p,{alpha}){sup 15}N nuclear reaction. 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  8. Ultrafast Coherent Control and Characterization of Surface Reactions using FELs

    CERN Document Server

    Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nordlund, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    The microscopic understanding of surface chemistry requires a detailed understanding of the dynamics of elementary processes at surfaces. The ultrashort electron pulse obtained in the linear accelerator to feed the FEL can be used for generation of coherent synchrotron radiation in the low energy THz regime. With the current parameters for LCLS this corresponds to radiation with energy corresponding to excitations of low-energy vibrational modes of molecules on surfaces or phonons in substrates. The coherent radiation can coherently manipulate atoms or molecules on surfaces. In this respect a chemical reaction can be initiated by coherent atomic motion along a specific reaction coordinate. Since the THz radiation is generated from the same source as the FEL radiation full-time synchronization for pump-probe experiments will be possible. The possibility to perform time-resolved X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements as a probe of chemical dynamics is an exciti...

  9. Metallic nanostructure formation limited by the surface hydrogen on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Kathryn A; Teplyakov, Andrew V

    2010-08-03

    Constant miniaturization of electronic devices and interfaces needed to make them functional requires an understanding of the initial stages of metal growth at the molecular level. The use of metal-organic precursors for metal deposition allows for some control of the deposition process, but the ligands of these precursor molecules often pose substantial contamination problems. One of the ways to alleviate the contamination problem with common copper deposition precursors, such as copper(I) (hexafluoroacetylacetonato) vinyltrimethylsilane, Cu(hfac)VTMS, is a gas-phase reduction with molecular hydrogen. Here we present an alternative method to copper film and nanostructure growth using the well-defined silicon surface. Nearly ideal hydrogen termination of silicon single-crystalline substrates achievable by modern surface modification methods provides a limited supply of a reducing agent at the surface during the initial stages of metal deposition. Spectroscopic evidence shows that the Cu(hfac) fragment is present upon room-temperature adsorption and reacts with H-terminated Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces to deposit metallic copper. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to follow the initial stages of copper nucleation and the formation of copper nanoparticles, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) confirms the presence of hfac fragments on the surfaces of nanoparticles. As the surface hydrogen is consumed, copper nanoparticles are formed; however, this growth stops as the accessible hydrogen is reacted away at room temperature. This reaction sets a reference for using other solid substrates that can act as reducing agents in nanoparticle growth and metal deposition.

  10. Multifunctional silicon surfaces: reaction of dichlorocarbene generated from Seyferth reagent with hydrogen-terminated silicon (111) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjun; Sharp, Ian D; Tilley, T Don

    2014-01-14

    Insertion of dichlorocarbene (:CCl2), generated by decomposition of the Seyferth reagent PhHgCCl2Br, into the Si-H bond of a tertiary silane to form a Si-CCl2H group is an efficient homogeneous, molecular transformation. A heterogeneous version of this reaction, between PhHgCCl2Br and a silicon (111) surface terminated by tertiary Si-H bonds, was studied using a combination of surface-sensitive infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. The insertion of dichlorocarbene into surface Si-H bonds parallels the corresponding reaction of silanes in solution, to produce surface-bound dichloromethyl groups (Si-CCl2H) covering ∼25% of the silicon surface sites. A significant fraction of the remaining Si-H bonds on the surface was converted to Si-Cl/Br groups during the same reaction, with PhHgCCl2Br serving as a halogen atom source. The presence of two distinct environments for the chlorine atoms (Si-CCl2H and Si-Cl) and one type of bromine atom (Si-Br) was confirmed by Cl 2p, Br 3d, and C 1s X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The formation of reactive, halogen-terminated atop silicon sites was also verified by reaction with sodium azide or the Grignard reagent (CH3MgBr), to produce Si-N3 or Si-Me functionalities, respectively. Thus, reaction of a hydrogen-terminated silicon (111) surface with PhHgCCl2Br provides a facile route to multifunctional surfaces possessing both stable silicon-carbon and labile silicon-halogen sites, in a single pot synthesis. The reactive silicon-halogen groups can be utilized for subsequent transformations and, potentially, the construction of more complex organic-silicon hybrid systems.

  11. Effect of reaction time on formation of silica core/shell particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan P. Nikolić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The silica core/shell nanostructures were prepared by a wet-chemical process. Silica core particles were prepared by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate. The obtained particles (average size ∼0.4 µm were used as templates for assembling of silica nanoparticles generated from highly basic sodium silicate solution. The silica core particles were functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES to allow electrostatic assembling of silica nanoparticles on the surface of silica core particles. In order to find the optimal conditions for synthesis of silica core/shell particles with mesoporous shells, the effect of reaction time on formation of silica nanoparticles was investigated. The effect of process parameters on generation and aggregation of silica nanoparticles prepared from highly basic sodium silicate solution was also investigated. It was shown that the size of silica nanoparticles and tendency towards aggregation increase with increasing the reaction time and temperature. These behaviours were reflected on the formation of mesoporous silica shell around silica core particles. Thin and uniform mesoporous silica layers were obtained if reaction times were kept short. When the reaction time was prolonged, the thicker and non-uniform shells were obtained.

  12. Size Dependence of Doping by a Vacancy Formation Reaction in Copper Sulfide Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elimelech, Orian [The Institute of Chemistry and The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 Israel; Liu, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook NY 11794 USA; Plonka, Anna M. [Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook NY 11794 USA; Frenkel, Anatoly I. [Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook NY 11794 USA; Banin, Uri [The Institute of Chemistry and The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 Israel

    2017-07-19

    Doping of nanocrystals (NCs) is a key, yet underexplored, approach for tuning of the electronic properties of semiconductors. An important route for doping of NCs is by vacancy formation. The size and concentration dependence of doping was studied in copper(I) sulfide (Cu2S) NCs through a redox reaction with iodine molecules (I2), which formed vacancies accompanied by a localized surface plasmon response. X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction reveal transformation from Cu2S to Cu-depleted phases, along with CuI formation. Greater reaction efficiency was observed for larger NCs. This behavior is attributed to interplay of the vacancy formation energy, which decreases for smaller sized NCs, and the growth of CuI on the NC surface, which is favored on well-defined facets of larger NCs. This doping process allows tuning of the plasmonic properties of a semiconductor across a wide range of plasmonic frequencies by varying the size of NCs and the concentration of iodine. Controlled vacancy doping of NCs may be used to tune and tailor semiconductors for use in optoelectronic applications.

  13. Toward understanding the rates of reactions at mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, W.H. [Univ. of California Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Land, Air and Water Resources and Dept. of Geology; Ludwig, C. [EAWAG, Swiss Federal Institute for Environmental Science and Technolgy, Dubendorf (Switzerland). Dept. of Resources and Waste management; Holmen, B. [Univ. of California Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Land, Air and Water Resources

    1998-12-31

    Environmental geo chemists are commonly called upon to make predictions over long scales of time and distance. In many cases, these predictions involve disequilibrium reactions, such as the decomposition of ozone-depleting gases or the migration rates of groundwater contaminants. These groundwater contaminants interact with mineral surfaces in a complicated fashion that is not understood quantitatively. However, in a real sense, mineral dissolution studies are to the aqueous geo chemists what Escherichia coli are to microbiologists: an inexpensive model system to map out important kinetic relations that can then be extended qualitatively to other settings. This chapter explains that is enormously useful to draw analogies between reactions at mineral surfaces and at dissolved metal-ligand complexes. In this approach, the reactivities of bond between a metal and a water molecule or ligand in the inner-coordination-sphere of the dissolved complex are proxies for bonds between a metal and oxygen at the mineral surface, which cannot be studied directly.

  14. General aspects of surface alloy formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergbreiter, Andreas; Engstfeld, Albert K.; Roetter, Ralf T.; Hoster, Harry E.; Behm, R. Juergen [Institute of Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, Ulm University, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Berko, Andras

    2010-07-01

    Surface confined alloys are excellent model systems for studies of structure-property relationships of bimetallic surfaces. They are formed by deposition of a guest metal B onto a substrate A, followed by annealing to a temperature, where place exchange between adatoms and atoms from the underlying surface layer becomes possible and diffusion into the bulk is sufficiently slow. We exemplarily confirmed by scanning tunneling microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy for PtRu/Ru(0001), PdRu/Ru(0001), AuPt/Pt(111), AgPt/Pt(111), and AgPd/Pd(111), surface alloys are obtained for systems where metal B has a negative surface segregation energy within metal A. By exchanging A and B, however, AB surface alloys are most likely overgrown by metal B, which we demonstrate for RuPt/Pt(111) in comparison to PtRu/Ru(0001).

  15. STM observation of the chemical reaction of atomic hydrogen on the N-adsorbed Cu(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takuma; Yamada, Masamichi; Komori, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Chemical reaction of atomic hydrogen with the N-adsorbed Cu(001) surfaces was investigated at room temperature by scanning tunnel microscopy. At the low exposure of atomic hydrogen, it reacted with the N atoms and turned to be the NH species on the surface. The reaction rate is proportional to the amount of the unreacted N atoms. By increasing the exposure of atomic hydrogen from this condition, the amount of nitrogen species on the surface decreased. This is attributed to the formation of ammonia and its desorption from the surface. The NH species on the surface turn to NH3 through the surface NH2 species by atomic hydrogen. Coexistence of the clean Cu surface enhances the rate of ammonia formation owing to atomic hydrogen migrating on the clean surface.

  16. Prebiotic molecules formation through the gas-phase reaction between HNO and CH2CHOH2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Pilar; Martínez, Henar; Largo, Antonio; Barrientos, Carmen

    2017-07-01

    Context. Knowing how the molecules that are present in the ISM can evolve to more complex ones is an interesting topic in interstellar chemistry. The study of possible reactions between detected species can help to understand the evolution in complexity of the interstellar matter and also allows knowing the formation of new molecules which could be candidates to be detected. We focus our attention on two molecules detected in space, vinyl alcohol (CH2CHOH) and azanone (HNO). Aims: We aim to carry out a theoretical study of the ion-molecule reaction between protonated vinyl alcohol and azanone. The viability of formation of complex organic molecules (COMs) from these reactants is expected to provide some insight into the formation of prebiotic species through gas phase reactions. Methods: The reaction of protonated vinyl alcohol with azanone has been theoretically studied by using ab initio methods. Stationary points on the potential energy surface (PES) were characterized at the second-order Moller-Plesset level in conjunction with the aug-cc-pVTZ (correlation-consistent polarized valence triple-zeta) basis set. In addition, the electronic energies were refined by means of single-point calculations at the CCSD(T) level (coupled cluster single and double excitation model augmented with a non-iterative treatment of triple excitations) with the same basis set. Results: From a thermodynamic point of view, twelve products, composed of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen which could be precursors in the formation of more complex biological molecules, can be obtained from this reaction. Among these, we focus especially on ionized glycine and two of its isomers. The analysis of the PES shows that only formation of cis- and trans-O-protonated imine acetaldehyde, CH2NHCOH+ and, CHNHCHOH+, are viable under interstellar conditions. Conclusions: The reaction of protonated vinyl alcohol with azanone can evolve in the interstellar medium to more complex organic molecules of

  17. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elçin Külah; Laurent Marot; Roland Steiner; Andriy Romanyuk; Thomas A Jung; Aneliia Wäckerlin; Ernst Meyer

    2017-01-01

    .... Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide...

  18. Ionic liquid effects on Mizoroki-Heck reactions: more than just carbene complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyton, Matthew R; Cole, Marcus L; Harper, Jason B

    2011-08-28

    Reaction profiles for a Mizoroki-Heck reaction in either an ionic liquid or a molecular solvent with different palladium sources demonstrate that the rate enhancements observed in ionic liquids cannot be solely attributed to Pd-carbene complex formation.

  19. Ozone - plant surface reactions an important ozone loss term?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Canaval, Eva; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billions dollar per year. Plant injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. But a striking question remains: How much ozone enters the plant through open stomata and how much ozone is lost by chemical reactions at the plant surface? Until now surface losses are estimated from measured total ozone deposition fluxes and calculated stomatal conductance values. While stomatal conductance of CO2 and H2O is well understood and extensively used in describing plant atmosphere gas exchange, stomatal conductance of ozone is not well known. Here we use different Nicotiana tabacum varieties and find that surface reactions of ozone with diterpenoids synthesized by glandular trichomes reduce ozone flux through open stomata. Our measurements reveal that fast ozone loss at the plant surface is accompanied with prompt release of oxygenated volatile compounds. In the ozone fumigation experiments of different Nicotiana tabacum varieties the release of specific volatile oxy-VOCs allowed to identify the semi volatile precursor compounds at the plant surface. Ozone fumigation experiments with Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), two common species in the Northern Hemisphere, show also a significant ozone loss at the plant surface for Picea abies. Fluid dynamic calculations of ozone transport in the diffusive leaf boundary layer reveal a vertical but no horizontal ozone gradient thus reducing ozone fluxes through the pores in case of efficient ozone scavenging plant surfaces. We explain this efficient ozone protection mechanism by the porous surface architecture of plants in combination with unsaturated semi-volatile compounds deposited at the plant surface. These results show that unsaturated semi-volatile compounds at

  20. Laboratory simulation of SO2 heterogeneous reactions on hematite surface under different SO2 concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Huxiong; CHENG Tiantao; YU Xingna; CHEN Jianmin; XU Yongfu; FANG Wen

    2009-01-01

    The variations of sulfate formation and optical coefficients during SO2 heterogeneous reactions on hematite surface under different SO2 concentrations were examined using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and ion chromatograph (IC). Laboratory experiments revealed that within ambient SO2 of 0.51--18.6 ppmv, sulfate product, producing velocity, absorption and backward scattering coefficients showed an increasing trend with SO2 concentration. Under given SO2 concentration, the velocity of sulfate producing performed an evolution of initial increasing, midterm decreasing and final stabilizing. The reactive uptake and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) uptake coefficients of heterogeneous reactions rose with SO2 and exhibited high reactivities. Considering global warming, this result is important for the knowledge of heterogeneous reactions of SO2 on mineral particle surface in the atmosphere and the assessment of their impacts on radiative forcing.

  1. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathway for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such observables as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method with the Dunning correlation consistent basis sets to obtain accurate energetics, gives useful results for a number of chemically important systems. Applications to complex reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion are discussed.

  2. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külah, Elçin; Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Romanyuk, Andriy; Jung, Thomas A.; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-01-01

    Rare-earth (RE) oxide surfaces are of significant importance for catalysis and were recently reported to possess intrinsic hydrophobicity. The surface chemistry of these oxides in the low temperature regime, however, remains to a large extent unexplored. The reactions occurring at RE surfaces at room temperature (RT) in real air environment, in particular, in presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were not addressed until now. Discovering these reactions would shed light onto intermediate steps occurring in automotive exhaust catalysts before reaching the final high operational temperature and full conversion of organics. Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide surfaces, exemplified by tetracene (C18H12) on a Gd2O3. Our study evidences a novel effect – oxidation of higher hydrocarbons at significantly lower temperatures (~300 K) than previously reported (>500 K). The evolution of the surface chemical composition of RE compounds in ambient air is investigated and correlated with the surface wetting. Our surprising results reveal the complex behavior of RE surfaces and motivate follow-up studies of reactions between PAH and catalytic surfaces at the single molecule level. PMID:28327642

  3. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  4. Recyclable surfaces for amine conjugation chemistry via redox reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Inseong; Yeo, Woon Seok [Dept. of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio/Molecular Informatics Center, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Se Won [Green Materials and Process Group, Research Institute of Sustainable Manufacturing System, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In this study, we extended this strategy to present a switchable surface that allows surface functionalization and removal of functional groups repeatedly. The substrate presenting a benzoquinone acid group is first used to immobilize with an amine-containing (bio)molecule using well-known conjugation chemistry. The benzoquinone group is then converted to the corresponding hydroquinone by treating with a reducing agent. We have described a strategy for the dynamic control of surface properties with recyclability via a simple reduction/ oxidation reaction. A stimuli-responsive quinone derivative was harnessed for the repeated immobilization and release of (bio)molecules, and thus, for the repeated dynamic change of the surface properties according to the characteristics of the immobilized (bio)molecules.

  5. Thermodynamic aspects of dehydrogenation reactions on noble metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svane, K L; Hammer, B

    2014-11-01

    The reaction free energy for dehydrogenation of phenol, aniline, thiophenol, benzoic acid, and 1,4-benzenediol on the close packed copper, silver, and gold surfaces has been studied by density functional theory calculations. Dehydrogenation of thiophenol is found to be favourable on all three surfaces while aniline does not dehydrogenate on any of them. For phenol, benzenediol and benzoic acid dehydrogenation is favourable on copper and silver only, following the general trend of an increasing reaction free energy when going form gold to silver to copper. This trend can be correlated with the changes in bond lengths within the molecule upon dehydrogenation. While copper is able to replace hydrogen, leaving small changes in the bond lengths of the aromatic ring, the metal-molecule bond is weaker for silver and gold, resulting in a partial loss of aromaticity. This difference in bond strength leads to pronounced differences in adsorption geometries upon multiple dehydrogenations.

  6. Self-activated, self-limiting reactions on Si surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Per; Hvam, Jeanette; Bahari, Ali

    mechanism for the direct growth of ultrathin films (0-3 nm) of oxides and nitrides under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Neutral oxygen and a microwave excited nitrogen plasma interact directly with Si surfaces kept at different temperatures during the reaction. The gas pressures are around 10-6 Torr......The direct thermally activated reactions of oxygen and ammonia with Si surfaces in furnaces have been used for a very long time in the semiconductor industry for the growth of thick oxides and nitride layers respectively. The oxidation mechanism was described in the Deal-Grove model as a diffusion......, and the temperatures vary from room temperature to 10000C.The growth is in these cases self-limiting, with the optimal oxide thickness around 0.7-0.8 nm, at 5000C, and up to a few nm for nitride. The self-limiting oxide case was recently predicted by Alex Demkov in a structural optimization to minimise the total...

  7. Control of Reactivity and Regioselectivity for On-Surface Dehydrogenative Aryl-Aryl Bond Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocić, Nemanja; Liu, Xunshan; Chen, Songjie; Decurtins, Silvio; Krejčí, Ondřej; Jelínek, Pavel; Repp, Jascha; Liu, Shi-Xia

    2016-05-04

    Regioselectivity is of fundamental importance in chemical synthesis. Although many concepts for site-selective reactions are well established for solution chemistry, it is not a priori clear whether they can easily be transferred to reactions taking place on a metal surface. A metal will fix the chemical potential of the electrons and perturb the electronic states of the reactants because of hybridization. Additionally, techniques to characterize chemical reactions in solution are generally not applicable to on-surface reactions. Only recent developments in resolving chemical structures by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) paved the way for identifying individual reaction products on surfaces. Here we exploit a combined STM/AFM technique to demonstrate the on-surface formation of complex molecular architectures built up from a heteroaromatic precursor, the tetracyclic pyrazino[2,3-f][4,7]phenanthroline (pap) molecule. Selective intermolecular aryl-aryl coupling via dehydrogenative C-H activation occurs on Au(111) upon thermal annealing under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. A full atomistic description of the different reaction products based on an unambiguous discrimination between pyrazine and pyridine moieties is presented. Our work not only elucidates that ortho-hydrogen atoms of the pyrazine rings are preferentially activated over their pyridine equivalents, but also sheds new light onto the participation of substrate atoms in metal-organic coordination bonding during covalent C-C bond formation.

  8. The Role of Grain Surface Reactions in the Chemistry of Star Forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Roberge, W. G.

    1998-01-01

    The importance of reactions at the surfaces of dust grains has long been recognized to be one of the two main chemical processes that form molecules in cold, dark interstellar clouds where simple, saturated (fully-hydrogenated) molecules such as H2 water, methanol, H2CO, H2S, ammonia and CH4 are present in quantities far too high to be consistent with their extremely low gas phase formation rates. In cold dark regions of interstellar space, dust grains provide a substrate onto which gas-phase species can accrete and react. Grains provide a "third body" or a sink for the energy released in the exothermic reactions that form chemical bonds. In essence, the surfaces of dust grains open up alternative reaction pathways to form observed molecules whose abundances cannot be explained with gas-phase chemistry alone. This concept is taken one step further in this work: instead of merely acting as a substrate onto which radicals and molecules may physically adsorb, some grains may actively participate in the reaction itself, forming chemical bonds with the accreting species. Until recently, surface chemical reactions had not been thought to be important in warm circumstellar media because adspecies rapidly desorb from grains at very low temperatures; thus, the residence times of molecules and radicals on the surface of grains at all but the lowest temperatures are far too short to allow these reactions to occur. However, if the adspecies could adsorb more strongly, via a true chemical bond with surfaces of some dust grains, then grain surface reactions will play an important role in warm circumstellar regions as well. In this work, the surface-catalyzed reaction CO + 3 H2 yields CH4 + H2O is studied in the context that it may be very effective at converting the inorganic molecule CO into the simplest organic compound, methane. H2 and CO are the most abundant molecules in space, and the reaction converting them to methane, while kinetically inhibited in the gas phase under

  9. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas phase reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Balucani, Nadia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-01-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm (>30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain surface and gas phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthetized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairy well the observations towards L1544. It also...

  10. Thermokinetics of the Formation Reaction of Zinc Histidine Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO,Sheng-Li(高胜利); CHEN,San-Ping(陈三平); HU,Rong-Zu(胡荣祖); SHI,Qi-Zhen(史启祯)

    2002-01-01

    The enthalpy change of reaction of zinc chloride with L-α-histidine in the temperature range of 25-50 ℃ has been determined by a microcalorimeter. On the basis of experimental and calculated results, three thermodynamics parameters (the activation enthalpy, the activation entropy, the activation free energy), the rate constant and three kinetic parameters (the activation energy, the pre-exponential constant and the reaction order) of the reaction, and the standard enthalpy of formarion of Zn(His)2+ (aq.) are obtained. The results showed that the title reaction easily took place at the studied temperature.

  11. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathways for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such parameters as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. For some dynamics methods, global potential energy surfaces are required. In this case, it is necessary to obtain the energy at a complete sampling of all the possible arrangements of the nuclei, which are energetically accessible, and then a fitting function must be obtained to interpolate between the computed points. In other cases, characterization of the stationary points and the reaction pathway connecting them is sufficient. These properties may be readily obtained using analytical derivative methods. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method to obtain accurate energetics, gives usefull results for a number of chemically important systems. The talk will focus on a number of applications including global potential energy surfaces, H + O2, H + N2, O(3p) + H2, and reaction pathways for complex reactions, including reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion.

  12. Metal surfaces: Surface, step and kink formation energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollár, J.; Vitos, Levente; Johansson, B.;

    2000-01-01

    We review the surface, step, and kink energies in monoatomic metallic systems. A systematic comparison is given between the theoretical results based on density functional theory and available experimental data. Our calculated values are used to predict the equilibrium shapes of small metal...

  13. Polygon formation and surface flow on a rotating fluid surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Raymond; Tophøj, Laust Emil Hjerrild; Homan, T. A. M.;

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of polygons forming on the free surface of a water flow confined to a stationary cylinder and driven by a rotating bottom plate as described by Jansson et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 96, 2006, 174502). In particular, we study the case of a triangular structure, either completel...

  14. Complex Organic Molecules Formation in Space Through Gas Phase Reactions: A Theoretical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Chemistry in the interstellar medium (ISM) is capable of producing complex organic molecules (COMs) of great importance to astrobiology. Gas phase and grain surface chemistry almost certainly both contribute to COM formation. Amino acids as building blocks of proteins are some of the most interesting COMs. The simplest one, glycine, has been characterized in meteorites and comets and, its conclusive detection in the ISM seems to be highly plausible. In this work, we analyze the gas phase reaction of glycine and {{{CH}}5}+ to establish the role of this process in the formation of alanine or other COMs in the ISM. Formation of protonated α- and β-alanine in spite of being exothermic processes is not viable under interstellar conditions because the different paths leading to these isomers present net activation energies. Nevertheless, glycine can evolve to protonated 1-imide-2, 2-propanediol, protonated amino acetone, protonated hydroxyacetone, and protonated propionic acid. However, formation of acetic acid and protonated methylamine is also a favorable process and therefore will be a competitive channel with the evolution of glycine to COMs.

  15. Determinants of biofilm formation and cleanability of titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Lucia K; Astasov-Frauenhoffer, Monika; Braissant, Olivier; Hauser-Gerspach, Irmgard; Waltimo, Tuomas; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze biofilm formation on four different titanium-based surfaces (machined titanium zirconium (TiZr) alloy, M; machined, acid-etched TiZr alloy, modMA; machined, sandblasted, acid-etched TiZr alloy, modSLA; and micro-grooved titanium aluminum vanadium alloy, TAV MG) in an experimental human model. Custom-made discs were mounted in individual intraoral splint housings and worn by 16 volunteers for 24 h. The safranin staining assay, isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC), and SEM were applied before and after surface cleaning. The hydrophilic surfaces modMA and modSLA with greater surface micro-roughness exhibited significantly more biofilm than the hydrophobic surfaces TAV MG and M. The standardized cleaning procedure substantially reduced the biofilm mass on all surfaces. After cleaning, the IMC analyses demonstrated a longer lag time of the growth curve on TAV MG compared to modSLA. Inter- and intraindividual variations in biofilm formation on the titanium discs were evident throughout the study. Surface hydrophilicity and roughness enhanced biofilm formation in vivo, whereas surface topography was the most influential factor that determined surface cleanability. While the grooved surface retained larger amounts of initial biofilm, the machined surface was easier to clean, but proliferation indicated by increased metabolic activity (growth rate) in IMC occurred despite mechanical biofilm removal. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Electrochemical interfacial influences on deoxygenation and hydrogenation reactions in CO reduction on a Cu(100) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Tian; Lin, Wen-Feng; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2016-06-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons on a copper surface has attracted much attention in the last few decades for providing a sustainable way for energy storage. During the CO2 and further CO electroreduction processes, deoxygenation that is C-O bond dissociation, and hydrogenation that is C-H bond formation, are two main types of surface reactions catalyzed by the copper electrode. In this work, by performing the state-of-the-art constrained ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we have systematically investigated deoxygenation and hydrogenation reactions involving two important intermediates, COHads and CHOads, under various conditions of (i) on a Cu(100) surface without water molecules, (ii) at the water/Cu(100) interface and (iii) at the charged water/Cu(100) interface, in order to elucidate the electrochemical interfacial influences. It has been found that the electrochemical interface can facilitate considerably the C-O bond dissociation via changing the reaction mechanisms. However, C-H bond formation has not been affected by the presence of water or electrical charge. Furthermore, the promotional roles of an aqueous environment and negative electrode potential in deoxygenation have been clarified, respectively. This fundamental study provides an atomic level insight into the significance of the electrochemical interface towards electrocatalysis, which is of general importance for understanding electrochemistry.

  17. Surface reactions of dimethyl ether on γ-Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, G. N.; Volnina, E. A.; Kipnis, M. A.; Rodionov, A. S.; Samokhin, P. V.; Lin, G. I.

    2016-02-01

    The surface reactions of dimethyl ether (DME) on industrial alumina (γ-Al2O3) were studied by chromatographic analysis of the products at the outlet of the flow reactor and (independently) by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy. The major products of the reactions at 250°C were found to be methanol formed in the reaction of DME with hydroxyl groups (the 3720 and 3674 cm-1 bands in the diffuse reflectance spectrum) and various methoxy groups (the 1121, 1070, 695, and 670 cm-1 bands in the differential spectra). The presence of molecularly adsorbed methanol was confirmed by experiments with methanol fed in a high-temperature IR cell. The interaction of the resulting methanol molecule with the hydroxyl group led to the formation of a water molecule in the gas phase and a methoxy group on the oxide surface. Strong adsorption of molecular DME was revealed, which was favored by an increase in the temperature of the preliminary calcination of oxide from 250 to 450-500°C; treatment of alumina with water vapor after its preliminary contact with DME led to a recovery of the hydroxyl coating and a replacement of molecularly adsorbed DME with hydroxyl. The thermal effect recorded in a flow reactor was positive during the adsorption of DME and negative during the desorption of weakly bonded DME. Schemes of formation of methoxy groups in the interaction of DME and methanol with surface hydroxyls were suggested.

  18. Production of Organic Grain Coatings by Surface-Mediated Reactions and the Consequences of This Process for Meteoritic Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2011-01-01

    When hydrogen, nitrogen and CO are exposed to amorphous iron silicate surfaces at temperatures between 500 - 900K, a carbonaceous coating forms via Fischer-Tropsch type reactions. Under normal circumstances such a catalytic coating would impede or stop further reaction. However, we find that this coating is a better catalyst than the amorphous iron silicates that initiate these reactions. The formation of a self-perpetuating catalytic coating on grain surfaces could explain the rich deposits of macromolecular carbon found in primitive meteorites and would imply that protostellar nebulae should be rich in organic material. Many more experiments are needed to understand this chemical system and its application to protostellar nebulae.

  19. Covalent-Bond Formation via On-Surface Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Philipp Alexander; Fuchs, Harald; Studer, Armido

    2017-05-02

    In this Review article pioneering work and recent achievements in the emerging research area of on-surface chemistry is discussed. On-surface chemistry, sometimes also called two-dimensional chemistry, shows great potential for bottom-up preparation of defined nanostructures. In contrast to traditional organic synthesis, where reactions are generally conducted in well-defined reaction flasks in solution, on-surface chemistry is performed in the cavity of a scanning probe microscope on a metal crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The metal first acts as a platform for self-assembly of the organic building blocks and in many cases it also acts as a catalyst for the given chemical transformation. Products and hence success of the reaction are directly analyzed by scanning probe microscopy. This Review provides a general overview of this chemistry highlighting advantages and disadvantages as compared to traditional reaction setups. The second part of the Review then focuses on reactions that have been successfully conducted as on-surface processes. On-surface Ullmann and Glaser couplings are addressed. In addition, cyclodehydrogenation reactions and cycloadditions are discussed and reactions involving the carbonyl functionality are highlighted. Finally, the first examples of sequential on-surface chemistry are considered in which two different functionalities are chemoselectively addressed. The Review gives an overview for experts working in the area but also offers a starting point to non-experts to enter into this exciting new interdisciplinary research field. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Self-activated, self-limiting reactions on Si surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Per; Hvam, Jeanette; Bahari, Ali

    The direct thermally activated reactions of oxygen and ammonia with Si surfaces in furnaces have been used for a very long time in the semiconductor industry for the growth of thick oxides and nitride layers respectively. The oxidation mechanism was described in the Deal-Grove model as a diffusion...... limited transport of oxygen to the oxide/silicon interface. For thin oxides the deal-Grove growth rate is initially constant, but for ultrathin oxides (a couple of nm thick) this is not true and the Deal-Grove model does not explain the mechanism. In a series of recent reports we have found a new...

  1. Ring formation on an inclined surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Robert; Du, Xiyu

    2015-11-01

    A drop dried on a solid surface will typically leave a narrow band of solute deposited along the contact line. We examined variations of this deposit due to the inclination of the substrate using numerical simulations of a two-dimensional drop, equivalent to a strip-like drop. An asymptotic analysis of the contact line region predicts that the upslope deposit will grow faster at early times, but the growth of this deposit ends sooner because the upper contact line depins first. From our simulations we find that the deposit can be larger at either the upper or lower contact line depending on the initial drop volume and substrate inclination. For larger drops and steeper inclinations, the early lead in deposited mass at the upper contact line is wiped out by the earlier depinning of the upper contact line and subsequent continued growth at the lower contact line. Conversely, for smaller drops and shallower inclinations, the early lead of the upper contact line is insurmountable despite its earlier termination in growth. Our results show that it is difficult to reconstruct a postiorithe inclination of the substrate based solely on the shape of the deposit. The authors thank the James S. McDonnell Foundation for support through a 21st Century Science Initiative in Studying Complex Systems Research Award, and the National Science Foundation for support under Grant No. 0932600.

  2. Surface Hydrogen and Subsurface Hydrogen: Their Roles in Bulk Absorption and Surface Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    Hydrogen adsorbed on metal surfaces possibly penetrates into “subsurface” sites, which might further diffuse into bulk. When temperature is raised, on the other hand, such absorbed hydrogen diffuses back to the surface via the subsurface site eventually desorbing from the surface. The kinetics of these absorption and desorption are ideally expressed by the potential energy surfaces of hydrogen near the surfaces. This article describes how the potential of hydrogen is described, and how the surface and subsurface sites influence the kinetics of absorption and desorption for Pd and Ni as examples. As well as these phenomena, the subsurface sites could serve to promote particular hydrogenation reactions occurring at surfaces. The mechanism of subsurface chemistry is discussed.

  3. Formation of palladium(0) nanoparticles at microbial surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunge, Michael; Søbjerg, Lina S; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena

    2010-01-01

    ) nanoparticles were still deposited on autoclaved cells of C. necator that had no hydrogenase activity, suggesting a hydrogenase-independent formation mechanism. The catalytic properties of Pd(0) and bioPd(0) were determined by the amount of hydrogen released in a reaction with hypophosphite. Generally, bioPd(0...

  4. Mean-field instabilities and cluster formation in nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Colonna, M; Baran, V

    2016-01-01

    We review recent results on intermediate mass cluster production in heavy ion collisions at Fermi energy and in spallation reactions. Our studies are based on modern transport theories, employing effective interactions for the nuclear mean-field and incorporating two-body correlations and fluctuations. Namely we will consider the Stochastic Mean Field (SMF) approach and the recently developed Boltzmann-Langevin One Body (BLOB) model. We focus on cluster production emerging from the possible occurrence of low-density mean-field instabilities in heavy ion reactions. Within such a framework, the respective role of one and two-body effects, in the two models considered, will be carefully analysed. We will discuss, in particular, fragment production in central and semi-peripheral heavy ion collisions, which is the object of many recent experimental investigations. Moreover, in the context of spallation reactions, we will show how thermal expansion may trigger the development of mean-field instabilities, leading to...

  5. The Star Formation Law at Low Surface Density

    CERN Document Server

    Wyder, Ted K; Barlow, Tom A; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Neill, James D; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Timothy M; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barrry F; Milliard, Bruno; Rich, R Michael; Szalay, A S; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the nature of the star formation law at low gas surface densities using a sample of 19 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies with existing HI maps in the literature, UV imaging from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, and optical images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. All of the LSB galaxies have (NUV-r) colors similar to those for higher surface brightness star-forming galaxies of similar luminosity indicating that their average star formation histories are not very different. Based upon four LSB galaxies with both UV and FIR data, we find FIR/UV ratios significantly less than one, implying low amounts of internal UV extinction in LSB galaxies. We use the UV images and HI maps to measure the star formation rate and hydrogen gas surface densities within the same region for all of the galaxies. The LSB galaxy star formation rate surface densities lie below the extrapolation of the power law fit to the star formation rate surface density as a function of the total gas density for higher s...

  6. Evidências da formação de monocamada de óxido de alumínio sobre sílica, através de reações de enxerto Evidence of aluminum oxide monolayer formation on a silica gel surface using grafting reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. D. Cónsul

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum oxide was dispersed on a commercial silica gel surface, using successive grafting reactions. The reaction products were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The progressive incorporation of aluminum, up to 5.5% (w/w, does not produce agglomeration of alumina, since changes in the original pore size distribution of the silica matrix were not observed. The aluminum oxide covers homogeneously the silica surface.

  7. Controlled silanization-amination reactions on the Ti6Al4V surface for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cano, Abraham; Cintas, Pedro; Fernández-Calderón, María-Coronada; Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel-Ángel; Crespo, Lara; Saldaña, Laura; Vilaboa, Nuria; González-Martín, María-Luisa; Babiano, Reyes

    2013-06-01

    Formation of thin films on titanium alloys incorporating bioactive small molecules or macromolecules is a route to improve their biocompatibility. Aminoalkylsilanes are commonly employed as interface reagents that combine good adhesion properties with an amino tail group susceptible of further functionalization. This article introduces a reproducible methodology to obtain a cross-linked polymer-type brush structure of covalently-bonded aminoalkylsiloxane chains on Ti6Al4V. The experimental protocol can be fine-tuned to provide a high density of surface-coated amino groups (threshold value: 2.1±0.1×10(-8) mol cm(-2)) as proven by chemical and spectrophotometric analyses. Using a model reaction involving the condensation of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) on Ti6Al4V alloy, we herein show the effects of reaction temperature, reaction time and solvent humidity on the composition and structure of the film. The stability of the resulting coating under physiological-like conditions as well as the possibility of surface re-silanization has also been evaluated. To verify if detrimental effects on the biological performance of the Ti6Al4V alloy were induced by this coverage, human primary osteoblasts behavior, Staphylococci adhesion and biofilm formation have been tested and compared to the Ti6Al4V oxidized surface. Reaction with trans-cinnamaldehyde has used in order to determine useful amino groups at aminosilanized surface, XPS and UV analyses of imino derivatives generated reveal that almost a 50% of these groups are actually available at the siloxane chains.

  8. Alcali-silica reactions: Mechanisms for crack formations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2006-01-01

    Alkali-silica reactions (ASR) are found all over the world and cause a large number of damage, which have lead to different sets of requirements in the different countries for the aggregates, the cements and the admixtures. One of the reasons for the damage and the different requirements is that ...

  9. An Investigation of Model Catalyzed Hydrocarbon Formation Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tysoe, W. T.

    2001-05-02

    Work was focused on two areas aimed at understanding the chemistry of realistic catalytic systems: (1) The synthesis and characterization of model supported olefin metathesis catalysts. (2) Understanding the role of the carbonaceous layer present on Pd(111) single crystal model catalysts during reaction.

  10. Effect of surface nanostructure on temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Michael; Rogal, Jutta; Reuter, Karsten

    2008-03-01

    Using the catalytic CO oxidation at RuO2(110) as a showcase, we employ first-principles kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to illustrate the intricate effects on temperature programmed reaction (TPR) spectroscopy data brought about by the mere correlations between the locations of the active sites at a nanostructured surface. Even in the absence of lateral interactions, this nanostructure alone can cause inhomogeneities that cannot be grasped by prevalent mean-field data analysis procedures, which thus lead to wrong conclusions on the reactivity of the different surface species. The RuO2(110) surface studied here exhibits only two prominent active sites, arranged in simple alternating rows. Yet, the mere neglection of this still quite trivial nanostructure leads mean-field TPR data analysis [1] to extract kinetic parameters that are in error by several orders of magnitude and that do not even reflect the relative reactivity of the different surface species correctly [2].[1] S. Wendt, M. Knapp, and H. Over, JACS 126, 1537 (2004).[2] M. Rieger, J. Rogal, and K. Reuter, Phys. Rev. Lett (in press).

  11. Reactions of metal ions at surfaces of hydrous iron oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Cu, Ag and Cr concentrations in natural water may be lowered by mild chemical reduction involving ferric hydroxide-ferrous ion redox processes. V and Mo solubilities may be controlled by precipitation of ferrous vanadate or molybdate. Concentrations as low as 10-8.00 or 10-9.00 M are readily attainable for all these metals in oxygen-depleted systems that are relatively rich in Fe. Deposition of manganese oxides such as Mn3O4 can be catalyzed in oxygenated water by coupling to ferrous-ferric redox reactions. Once formed, these oxides may disproportionate, giving Mn4+ oxides. This reaction produces strongly oxidizing conditions at manganese oxide surfaces. The solubility of As is significantly influenced by ferric iron only at low pH. Spinel structures such as chromite or ferrites of Cu, Ni, and Zn, are very stable and if locally developed on ferric hydroxide surfaces could bring about solubilities much below 10-9.00 M for divalent metals near neutral pH. Solubilities calculated from thermodynamic data are shown graphically and compared with observed concentrations in some natural systems. ?? 1977.

  12. Oral Streptococci Biofilm Formation on Different Implant Surface Topographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Cardoso Pita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of the subgingival microbiota is dependent on successive colonization of the implant surface by bacterial species. Different implant surface topographies could influence the bacterial adsorption and therefore jeopardize the implant survival. This study evaluated the biofilm formation capacity of five oral streptococci species on two titanium surface topographies. In vitro biofilm formation was induced on 30 titanium discs divided in two groups: sandblasted acid-etched (SAE- n=15 and as-machined (M- n=15 surface. The specimens were immersed in sterilized whole human unstimulated saliva and then in fresh bacterial culture with five oral streptococci species: Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, and Streptococcus cricetus. The specimens were fixed and stained and the adsorbed dye was measured. Surface characterization was performed by atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. Surface and microbiologic data were analyzed by Student’s t-test and two-way ANOVA, respectively (P0.05. S. sanguinis exhibited similar behavior to form biofilm on both implant surface topographies, while S. salivarius showed the lowest ability to form biofilm. It was concluded that biofilm formation on titanium surfaces depends on surface topography and species involved.

  13. Chemical reactions between Venus' surface and atmosphere - An update. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    The surface of Venus, at ~740K, is hot enough to allow relatively rapid chemical reactions between it and the atmosphere, i.e. weathering. Venus chemical weathering has been explored in detail [1], to the limits of available data. New data from Venus Express (VEx) and new ideas from exoplanets have sparked a modest renewal of interest in Venus weathering. Venus' surface cannot be observed in visible light, but there are several NIR ';windows' through its atmosphere that allow surface imaging. The VIRTIS spectrometer on VEx viewed the surface through one window [2]; emissivity variations among lava flows on Imdr and Themis Regios have been explained as varying degrees of weathering, and thus age [3]. The VMC camera on VEx also provides images through a NIR window, which suggest variable degrees of weathering on some basaltic plains [4]. Indirect evidence for weathering may come from varying SO2 abundance at Venus' cloud tops; repeated rapid increases and gradual declines may represent volcanic eruptions followed by weathering to form sulfate minerals [5]. Continued geochemical modeling relevant to Venus weathering is motivated by expolanet studies [6]. Models have been extended to hypothetical exo-Venuses of different temperatures and surface compositions [7]. The idea that Venus' atmosphere composition can be buffered by reaction with its surface was explored in detail, and the derived constraint extended to other types of planets [8]. Several laboratories are investigating Venus weathering, motivated in part by the hope that they can provide real constraints on timescales of Venus volcanism [3]. Aveline et al. [9] are extending early studies [10] by reacting rocks and minerals with concentrated SO2 (to accelerate reaction rates to allow detectability of products). Kohler et al. [11] are investigating the stability of metals and chalcogenides as possible causes of the low-emissivity surfaces at high elevations. Berger and Aigouy [12] studied rock alteration on a

  14. Influence of iron and copper oxides on polychlorinated diphenyl ether formation in heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenxia; Shen, Lianfeng; Zhang, Fawen; Liu, Wenbin; Zheng, Minghui; Yang, Xitian

    2013-08-01

    Polychlorinated diphenyl ether (PCDE) has attracted great attention recently as an important type of environmental pollutant. The influence of iron and copper oxides on formation of PCDEs was investigated using laboratory-scale flow reactors under air and under nitrogen at 350 °C, a temperature corresponding to the post-combustion zone of a municipal solid waste incinerator. The results show that the 2,2',3,4,4',5,5',6-otachlorodiphenyl ether (OCDE) formed from the condensation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene (Cl4Bz) is the predominant congener formed on the SiO2/Fe2O3 surface with and without oxygen. This indicated that HCl elimination between PCP and 1,2,4,5-Cl4Bz molecules formed 2,2',3,4,4',5,5',6-OCDE in the presence of Fe2O3. On the other hand, decachlorodiphenyl ether, nonachlorodiphenyl ether, and OCDE were the dominant products on the SiO2/CuO surface without oxygen, although the 2,2',3,4,4',5,5',6-OCDE was the dominant product on the SiO2/CuO surface with oxygen. Therefore, the presence of Fe2O3 and CuO influences the formation and homologue distribution of PCDEs, which shifted towards the lower chlorinated species. Fe2O3 can promote both the condensation and dechlorination reaction without oxygen. On the contrary, with oxygen, Fe2O3 suppresses the condensation of chlorobenzene and chlorophenol to form PCDEs and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). CuO can increase the formation of lower chlorinated PCDEs and PCDDs without oxygen. In conclusion, the different fly ash components have a major influence on PCDE emissions.

  15. Effect of atmospheric oxidative plasma treatments on polypropylenic fibers surface: Characterization and reaction mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisticò, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.nistico@unito.it [University of Torino, Department of Chemistry and NIS Centre of Excellence, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Magnacca, Giuliana [University of Torino, Department of Chemistry and NIS Centre of Excellence, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Faga, Maria Giulia; Gautier, Giovanna [CNR-IMAMOTER, Strada delle Cacce 73, 10135 Torino (Italy); D’Angelo, Domenico; Ciancio, Emanuele [Clean-NT Lab, Environment Park S.p.A., Via Livorno 60, 10144 Torino (Italy); Lamberti, Roberta; Martorana, Selanna [Herniamesh S.r.l., Via F.lli Meliga 1/C, 10034 Chivasso (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Atmospheric pressure plasma-dielectric barrier discharge (APP-DBD, open chamber configuration) was used to functionalize polypropylene (PP) fibers surface in order to generate oxidized-reactive groups such as hydroperoxides, alcohols and carbonyl species (i.e. ketones and others). Such a species increased the surface polarity, without causing material degradation. Three different types of plasma mixture (He, He/O{sub 2}, He/O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O) under three different values of applied power (750, 1050, 1400 W) were investigated. The formed plasma species (O{sub 2}{sup +}, O single atom and OH radical) and their distribution were monitored via optical emission spectrometry (OES) measurements, and the plasma effects on PP surface species formation were followed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Results allowed to better understand the reaction pathways between plasma phase and PP fibers. In fact, two reaction mechanisms were proposed, the first one concerning the plasma phase reactions and the second one involving material surface modifications.

  16. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969. As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  17. Variation of Surface Adhesion Force During the Formation of OTS Self-assembled Monolayer Investigated by AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国华; HigashitaniKo

    1999-01-01

    Variation of the surface adhesion force during the formation of octadecyl trichlororilane (OTS) .self-assembled monolayer on a glass substrate surface was investigated hy atomic force microscope (AFM). The research shows that the hydrophobicity and the adbeslon force of the sample surface increases gradualy while the substrate surface is covered by OTS molecules as the reaction proceeds. After 15 min reaction, a cloee-pac.ked and smooth OTS self-assembled monolayer could from on the glass subetrate surface with an advancing contact angle of 105° and an interfaeial energy of 55.79 mJ.m-2.

  18. Turing pattern formation on the sphere for a morphochemical reaction-diffusion model for electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacitignola, Deborah; Bozzini, Benedetto; Frittelli, Massimo; Sgura, Ivonne

    2017-07-01

    The present paper deals with the pattern formation properties of a specific morpho-electrochemical reaction-diffusion model on a sphere. The physico-chemical background to this study is the morphological control of material electrodeposited onto spherical particles. The particular experimental case of interest refers to the optimization of novel metal-air flow batteries and addresses the electrodeposition of zinc onto inert spherical supports. Morphological control in this step of the high-energy battery operation is crucial to the energetic efficiency of the recharge process and to the durability of the whole energy-storage device. To rationalise this technological challenge within a mathematical modeling perspective, we consider the reaction-diffusion system for metal electrodeposition introduced in [Bozzini et al., J. Solid State Electr.17, 467-479 (2013)] and extend its study to spherical domains. Conditions are derived for the occurrence of the Turing instability phenomenon and the steady patterns emerging at the onset of Turing instability are investigated. The reaction-diffusion system on spherical domains is solved numerically by means of the Lumped Surface Finite Element Method (LSFEM) in space combined with the IMEX Euler method in time. The effect on pattern formation of variations in the domain size is investigated both qualitatively, by means of systematic numerical simulations, and quantitatively by introducing suitable indicators that allow to assign each pattern to a given morphological class. An experimental validation of the obtained results is finally presented for the case of zinc electrodeposition from alkaline zincate solutions onto copper spheres.

  19. Heterogeneous and Photochemical Reactions Involving Surface Adsorbed Organics: Common Lignin Pyrolysis Products With Nitrogen Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.; Nichols, B. R.; Rapa, C.; Costa, V.

    2009-05-01

    Solid-air interfaces, such as airborne particulate matter and ground level surfaces, provide unique supports for tropospheric heterogeneous chemistry. These interfaces commonly contain surface adsorbed organics, such as lignin pyrolysis products, that can significantly alter their physical and chemical properties. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) provides an ideal tool for monitoring chemical changes in thin organic films during heterogeneous and photochemical reactions. Phenolic compounds, with and without co- adsorbed photosensitizers, were exposed to NO2 concentrations in the parts-per-billion range at 300 K and 20% relative humidity. Catechol, when mixed with benzophenone or dicyclohexylketone, formed 4- nitrocatechol as the dominant product under dark conditions. Deuterating the catechol alcohol groups caused the initial rate of reaction to decrease by a factor of 3.3±0.5, consistent with formation of the ortho- semiquinone radical as the rate determining step. The rate of 4-nitrocatechol formation did not increase under illuminated conditions, even with the presence of benzophenone a well known photosensitizer. UV-A/visible radiation did, however, initiate a photochemical reaction between benzophenone and 4-nitrocatechol, likely forming high molecular weight polymerization products. In contrast, 2-ethoxyphenol displayed no reactivity with NO2, even under illuminated conditions with a photosensitizer. Implications for the fate of lignin pyrolysis products, which are prevalent in biomass combustion smoke, will be discussed.

  20. Statistical characterisation and stochastic parameterisation of sedimentary geological formations on their reaction capacity for sustainable groundwater quality management

    OpenAIRE

    Griffioen, J.; Vermooten, S.; Keijzer, T.; Bakr, M; Valstar, J.

    2012-01-01

    The fate of contaminants in groundwater aquifers is determined by the buffering capacity of those aquifers together with the composition of inflowing groundwater. A nationwide characterisation of the environmental geochemistry of the shallow subsurface (down to 30 m below surface) has been started in the Netherlands. This covers: 1. the reaction capacity of sediments as buffer for contamination, and 2. typical elemental composition of geological formations and the association between trace el...

  1. Productions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Surface Waters from Reactions with Atmospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Frances; Bell, Thomas; Yang, Mingxi

    2017-04-01

    Ozone (O3) is a key atmospheric oxidant, greenhouse gas and air pollutant. In marine environments, some atmospheric ozone is lost by reactions with aqueous compounds (e.g. dissolved organic material, DOM, dimethyl sulfide, DMS, and iodide) near the sea surface. These reactions also lead to formations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Removal of O3 by the ocean remains a large uncertainty in global and regional chemical transport models, hampering coastal air quality forecasts. To better understand the role of the ocean in controlling O3 concentrations in the coastal marine atmosphere, we designed and implemented a series of laboratory experiments whereby ambient surface seawater was bubbled with O3-enriched, VOC-free air in a custom-made glass bubble equilibration system. Gas phase concentrations of a range of VOCs were monitored continuously over the mass range m/z 33 - 137 at the outflow of the bubble equilibrator by a proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Gas phase O3 was also measured at the input and output of the equilibrator to monitor the uptake due to reactions with dissolved compounds in seawater. We observed consistent productions of a variety of VOCs upon reaction with O3, notably isoprene, aldehydes, and ketones. Aqueous DMS is rapidly removed from the reactions with O3. To test the importance of dissolved organic matter precursors, we added increasing (milliliter) volumes of Emiliania huxleyi culture to the equilibrator filled with aged seawater, and observed significant linear increases in gas phase concentrations of a number of VOCs. Reactions between DOM and O3 at the sea-air interface represent a potentially significant source of VOCs in marine air and a sink of atmospheric O3.

  2. Surface Reaction Kinetics of Steam- and CO2-Reforming as Well as Oxidation of Methane over Nickel-Based Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Herrera Delgado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and kinetic modeling study on the Ni-catalyzed conversion of methane under oxidative and reforming conditions is presented. The numerical model is based on a surface reaction mechanism consisting of 52 elementary-step like reactions with 14 surface and six gas-phase species. Reactions for the conversion of methane with oxygen, steam, and CO2 as well as methanation, water-gas shift reaction and carbon formation via Boudouard reaction are included. The mechanism is implemented in a one-dimensional flow field description of a fixed bed reactor. The model is evaluated by comparison of numerical simulations with data derived from isothermal experiments in a flow reactor over a powdered nickel-based catalyst using varying inlet gas compositions and operating temperatures. Furthermore, the influence of hydrogen and water as co-feed on methane dry reforming with CO2 is also investigated.

  3. Numerical investigation of the effects of iron oxidation reactions on the fume formation mechanism in arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanibondi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Fume formation during arc welding has been modelled using a stochastic approach taking into account iron oxidation reactions. The model includes the nucleation and condensation of Fe and FeO vapours, the reaction of gaseous O2 and O on the nanoparticle surface, the coagulation of the nanoparticles including a sintering time as a function of temperature and composition, assuming chemical equilibrium for species in the gaseous phase. Results suggest that fumes generated in gas metal arc welding with oxidizing shielding mixtures are composed of aggregates of primary particles that are nucleated from gas-phase FeO and further oxidized to Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 in the liquid and solid phase, respectively. The composition of the fumes at the end of the formation process depends on the relative initial concentration of Fe and O2 species in the gas mixture and on the diameter of the primary particles that compose the aggregates: as the oxidation reactions are driven by deposition of oxygen on nanoparticle surface, the oxidation of larger particles is slower than that of smaller particles because of their lower surface to volume ratio. Solid-state diffusion is limiting the oxidation process at temperatures lower than 1500 K, inducing the formation of not fully oxidized particles composed of Fe3O4.

  4. STUDY OF REACTION SEQUENCES FOR FORMATION OF SOLID ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    31 déc. 2012 ... phase intermédiaire PbTiO3 et la formation de PZT à 800 °C. ... matériau céramique de type PZT de formule chimique: 0,48PbZrO3-0 .... (ATG) relative au mélange par un changement de perte visible équivalente à 3%.

  5. Modelling of frost formation and growth on microstuctured surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntaha, Md. Ali; Haider, Md. Mushfique; Rahman, Md. Ashiqur

    2016-07-01

    Frost formation on heat exchangers is an undesirable phenomenon often encountered in different applications where the cold surface with a temperature below freezing point of water is exposed to humid air. The formation of frost on the heat transfer surface results in an increase in pressure drop and reduction in heat transfer, resulting in a reduction of the system efficiency. Many factors, including the temperature and moisture content of air, cold plate temperature, surface wettability etc., are known to affect frost formation and growth. In our present study, a model for frost growth on rectangular, periodic microgroove surfaces for a range of microgroove dimension (ten to hundreds of micron) is presented. The mathematical model is developed analytically by solving the governing heat and mass transfer equations with appropriate boundary conditions using the EES (Engineering Equation Solver) software. For temperature, a convective boundary condition at frost-air interface and a fixed cold plate surface temperature is used. Instead of considering the saturation or super-saturation models, density gradient at the surface is obtained by considering experimentally-found specified heat flux. The effect of surface wettability is incorporated by considering the distribution of condensed water droplets at the early stage of frost formation. Thickness, density and thermal conductivity of frost layer on the micro-grooved surfaces are found to vary with the dimension of the grooves. The variation of density and thickness of the frost layer on these micro-grooved surfaces under natural convection is numerally determined for a range of plate temperature and air temperature conditions and is compared with experimental results found in the open literature.

  6. Surface modification of materials to encourage beneficial biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amreeta Sarjit

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are communities of sessile microorganisms that grow and produce extrapolymeric substances on an abiotic or biotic surface. Although biofilms are often associated with negative impacts, the role of beneficial biofilms is wide and include applications in bioremediation, wastewater treatment and microbial fuel cells. Microbial adhesion to a surface, which is highly dependent on the physicochemical properties of the cells and surfaces, is an essential step in biofilm formation. Surface modification therefore represents an important way to modulate microbial attachment and ultimately biofilm formation by microorganisms. In this review different surface modification processes such as organosilane surface modification, plasma treatment, and chemical modification of carbon nanotubes, electro-oxidation and covalent-immobilization with neutral red and methylene blue molecules are outlined. The effectiveness of these modifications and their industrial applications are also discussed. There is inadequate literature on surface modification as a process to enhance beneficial biofilm formation. These methods need to be safe, economically viable, scalable and environmental friendly and their potential to fulfil these criteria for many applications has yet to be determined.

  7. What happens when iron becomes wet? Observation of reactions at interfaces between liquid and metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, M

    2003-01-01

    Synchrotron-radiation has been applied to investigation of interfaces between liquid and metal surfaces, with a special attention to corrosion. Three topics are shown: (1) nano structures of rusts formed on steel after atmospheric corrosion. Evolution of 'Fe(O, OH) sub 6 network' is the key to understand how the durable rusts prevent from formation of more rusts. (2) In situ observation of reactions at the interface has been carried out for localized corrosion of stainless steel. It is shown that change in states of Cr sup 3 sup + and Br sup - ions near the interface is deeply related with a breakout of the passivation film. (3) A structural phase transformation on a Cu sub 3 Au(001) surface was investigated. Ordering remains even at a temperature higher than the bulk-critical temperature, showing surface-induced ordering. These approaches gives us crucial information for a new steel-product. (author)

  8. Ultrafast exciton formation at the ZnO(1010) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinert, J-C; Wegkamp, D; Meyer, M; Richter, C; Wolf, M; Stähler, J

    2014-08-01

    We study the ultrafast quasiparticle dynamics in and below the ZnO conduction band using femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy. Above band gap excitation causes hot electron relaxation by electron-phonon scattering down to the Fermi level E_{F} followed by ultrafast (200 fs) formation of a surface exciton (SX). Transient screening of the Coulomb interaction reduces the SX formation probability at high excitation densities near the Mott limit. Located just below the surface, the SX are stable with regard to hydrogen-induced work function modifications and thus the ideal prerequisite for resonant energy transfer applications.

  9. Electrochemical detection of protein based on hybridization chain reaction-assisted formation of copper nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Hu, Suisui; Cao, Ya; Zhang, Bin; Li, Genxi

    2015-04-15

    In this paper, we report an electrochemical method for highly sensitive and specific detection of protein based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR)-assisted formation of copper nanoparticles by using small molecule such as folate-linked DNA as probe. In the presence of target protein, taking folate receptor (FR) as the model protein in this study, its binding with folate can protect the probe DNA from exonuclease I-catalyzed degradation, thus the probe DNA can be immobilized onto the electrode surface through the hybridization with capture DNA, triggering HCR on the electrode surface. Subsequently, copper nanoparticles can be formed on the electrode surface by using long duplex DNA oligomers from HCR as templates. Furthermore, copper ions released from acid-dissolution of copper nanoparticles can catalyze the oxidation of ο-phenylenediamine by dissolved oxygen, leading to significant electrochemical responses. As a result, our method can sensitively detect FR in the linear range from 0.01ng/mL to 100ng/mL with a detection limit of 3pg/mL. It can also specifically distinguish the target protein in both buffer and complex serum samples. Since many other proteins can be assayed by changing the corresponding small molecule, this method may be promising for the development of the technique for protein detections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. FORMATION OF MANGANESE SILICIDE THIN FILMS BY SOLID PHASE REACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.Q. Xie; W.W. Wang; N. Jiang; D.Y. He

    2002-01-01

    Manganese silicide MnSi2-x thin films have been prepared on n-type silicon substratesthrough solid phase reaction. The heterostructures were analyzed by X-ray diffraction,Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared transmittance spec-troscopy and the four-point probe technique. The results show that two manganese sili-cides have been formed sequentially via the reaction of thin layer Mn with Si substrateat different irradiation annealing stages, i.e., MnSi at 450℃ and MnSi1.73 at 550℃.MnSi1.73 phase exhibits preferred growth after irradiation with infrared. In situ four-point probe measurements of sheet resistance during infrared irradiation annealingshow that nucleation of MnSi and phase transformation of MnSi to MnSi1. 73 occur at410℃ and 530℃, respectively; the MnSi phase shows metallic behavior, while MnSi1.73exhibits semiconducting behavior. Characteristic phonon bands of MnSi2-x silicides,which can be used for phase identification along with conventional XRD techniques,have been observed by FTIR spectroscopy.

  11. Analysis of reaction rates of single molecules on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueba, H.

    2017-10-01

    The experimental results of the action spectra i.e., reaction rate R(V) as a function of a bias voltage V are analyzed for rotation of a single CCH (D) molecule on a Cu (100) surface [5] and hopping of a single H(D)2O molecule on Pd(111) surface [6]. In the former system it is identified that rotation occurs if enough energy stored in the C-H (D) in-plane bending (IPB) mode excited by tunneling electron is transferred to the C-H (D) out of plane bending (OPB) mode (reaction coordinate mode) via the anharmonic mode coupling in a single electron process. The calculated R(V) shows an excellent agreement with the experimental results except at the low bias voltages below V ≃ 60 mV where no experimental data is available for the nonlinear current I dependence of R(I). A reproduction of the experimental R(V) at the higher voltage region allows us to determine the vibrational density of states of the C-H IPB mode and its coupling rate to the C-H (D) OPB mode as well as the inelastic tunneling current to excite IPB mode. A change of a conductance upon excitation of the C-H IPB mode enables us to evaluate the electron-vibration coupling strength inducing the rotation motion of CCH molecule. In the latter system investigated at a high temperature of about 40 K, the constant R(V) due to thermal hopping followed by the rapid increase is satisfactory explained by anharmonic inter-mode coupling between the scissor mode excited by tunneling electrons and the frustrated translation mode for H(D)2O molecule on Pd(111).

  12. Robust formation control of marine surface craft using Lagrange multipliers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihle, Ivar-Andre F.; Jouffroy, Jerome; Fossen, Thor I.

    2006-01-01

    framework we develop robust control laws for marine surface vessels to counteract unknown, slowly varying, environmental disturbances and measurement noise. Robustness with respect to time-delays in the communication channels are addressed by linearizing the system. Simulations of tugboats subject......This paper presents a formation modelling scheme based on a set of inter-body constraint functions and Lagrangian multipliers. Formation control for a °eet of marine craft is achieved by stabilizing the auxiliary constraints such that the desired formation con¯guration appears. In the proposed...

  13. Dynamics of altered surface layer formation on dissolving silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daval, Damien; Bernard, Sylvain; Rémusat, Laurent; Wild, Bastien; Guyot, François; Micha, Jean Sébastien; Rieutord, François; Magnin, Valérie; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro

    2017-07-01

    .g., the (0 1 0) face), the dissolution of other faces is hampered by passivating ASSLs within a few hours. The observed passivation is suggested to originate from the progressive densification of the ASSL, which limits the transport of reactive species from and to the dissolving wollastonite surface, as evidenced by the estimated diffusivity of the ASSLs. Because the apparent face-specific diffusivity of the ASSLs is correlated with the face-specific initial (i.e., ASSL-free) dissolution rate of wollastonite, we propose that the extent of ASSL densification (and the resulting impact on ion transport) is (at least partly) controlled by the absolute mineral dissolution rate. Overall, this study argues that the formation and microstructural evolution of ASSLs are likely candidates for mineral ageing, highlighting the need for determining the parameters controlling the spontaneous changes of ASSL diffusivity as a function of the reaction progress.

  14. The role of surface reactions on the active and selective catalyst design for bioethanol steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, M.; Padilla, R.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Rodríguez, L.; Brey, J. J.; Daza, L.

    In order to study the role of surface reactions involved in bioethanol steam reforming mechanism, a very active and selective catalyst for hydrogen production was analysed. The highest activity was obtained at 700 °C, temperature at which the catalyst achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. It also exhibited a very high hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H 2 per mol of EtOH fed. The catalyst was operated at a steam to carbon ratio (S/C) of 4.8, at 700 °C and atmospheric pressure. No by-products, such as ethylene or acetaldehyde were observed. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term stability test was performed under the conditions previously reported. After 750 h, the catalyst still exhibited a high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production. Based on the intermediate products detected by temperature programmed desorption and reaction (TPD and TPR) experiments, a reaction pathway was proposed. Firstly, the adsorbed ethanol is dehydrogenated to acetaldehyde producing hydrogen. Secondly, the adsorbed acetaldehyde is transformed into acetone via acetic acid formation. Finally, acetone is reformed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which were the final reaction products. The promotion of such reaction sequence is the key to develop an active, selective and stable catalyst, which is the technical barrier for hydrogen production by ethanol reforming.

  15. The role of surface reactions on the active and selective catalyst design for bioethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito, M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ciemat, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Padilla, R.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Rodriguez, L.; Daza, L. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Brey, J.J. [Hynergreen Technologies, Av. Buhaira 2, 41018 Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    In order to study the role of surface reactions involved in bioethanol steam reforming mechanism, a very active and selective catalyst for hydrogen production was analysed. The highest activity was obtained at 700 C, temperature at which the catalyst achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. It also exhibited a very high hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H{sub 2} per mol of EtOH fed. The catalyst was operated at a steam to carbon ratio (S/C) of 4.8, at 700 C and atmospheric pressure. No by-products, such as ethylene or acetaldehyde were observed. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term stability test was performed under the conditions previously reported. After 750 h, the catalyst still exhibited a high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production. Based on the intermediate products detected by temperature programmed desorption and reaction (TPD and TPR) experiments, a reaction pathway was proposed. Firstly, the adsorbed ethanol is dehydrogenated to acetaldehyde producing hydrogen. Secondly, the adsorbed acetaldehyde is transformed into acetone via acetic acid formation. Finally, acetone is reformed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which were the final reaction products. The promotion of such reaction sequence is the key to develop an active, selective and stable catalyst, which is the technical barrier for hydrogen production by ethanol reforming. (author)

  16. Coke formation on HFAU and HEMT zeolites. Influence of the reaction temperature and propene pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doka Nassionou, G. A.; Magnoux, P.; Guisnet, M.

    1999-02-01

    The formation of coke from propene (Pp = 1.3 kPa and 13 kPa) was investigated on HFAU and HEMT zeolites in a microbalance for temperatures ranging from 120 °C to 450 °C. For both zeolites, the greater the propene pressure and the lower the temperature the faster the initial coke formation. However for high propene pressure, initial coke formation is faster with HEMT zeolite. This can be related to the stronger acidity of the HEMT sample. For low propene pressure and after 420 minutes of coking, a minimum in coke is observed for T = 350 ^circC, which can be related to the difference between the rate of formation and the rate of retention of coke molecules. At low temperature, due to their low volatility, oligomers are easily formed and retained in the zeolite pores. These molecules can be totally eliminated by an adequate thermal treatment in vacuum. At higher temperature, only aromatic or polyaromatic compounds which present a size larger than the pore apertures can be retained in the cavities of the zeolites. The greater the reaction time, the faster the retention. Whatever the reaction temperature, coke molecules are more homogeneously distributed in the HEMT crystallites than in those of HFAU samples. For this latter zeolite coke molecules are preferentially formed in the cavities located near the outer surface of the crystallites (shell coking). La formation de coke à partir du propène (Pp = 1,3 et 13 kPa) a été étudiée en microbalance sur zéolithes HFAU et HEMT dans une gamme de température variant de 120 à 450°C. La vitesse initiale de formation de coke dépend de la pression du propène, de la température et également de la zéolithe. Ainsi, pour une forte pression en propène, la vitesse initiale de formation de coke est toujours plus importante sur HEMT que sur HFAU. Ceci est à relier à la plus grande acidité et à la présence de sites acides plus forts sur HEMT. Après 420 minutes de réaction, et pour une faible pression en propène le

  17. Nanoparticles dynamics on a surface: fractal pattern formation and fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Veronika V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review our recent results on the formation and the post-growth relaxation processes of nanofractals on surface. For this study we developed a method which describes the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal and accounts for their diffusion and detachment. We demonstrate...... that these kinetic processes determine the final shape of the islands on surface after post-growth relaxation. We consider different scenarios of fractal relaxation and analyze the time evolution of the island's morphology....

  18. Spontaneous formation of optically induced surface relief gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Leblond, H; Ahamadi-kandjani, S; Nunzi, J -M; Ortyl, E; Kucharski, S

    2009-01-01

    A model based on Fick's law of diffusion as a phenomenological description of the molecular motion, and on the coupled mode theory, is developped to describe single-beam surface relief grating formation in azopolymers thin films. It allows to explain the mechanism of spontaneous patterning, and self-organization. It allows also to compute the surface relief profile and its evolution in time with good agreement with experiments.

  19. Nanoparticles dynamics on a surface: fractal pattern formation and fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Veronika V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review our recent results on the formation and the post-growth relaxation processes of nanofractals on surface. For this study we developed a method which describes the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal and accounts for their diffusion and detachment. We demonstrate...... that these kinetic processes determine the final shape of the islands on surface after post-growth relaxation. We consider different scenarios of fractal relaxation and analyze the time evolution of the island's morphology....

  20. Membrane Tether Formation on a Cell Surface with Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yu-Qiang; GUO Hong-Lian; LIU Chun-Xiang; LI Zhao-Lin; CHENG Bing-Ying; ZHANG Dao-Zhong; JIA Suo-Tang

    2004-01-01

    @@ We propose a mathematical model to analyse the membrane tether formation process on a cell surface with reservoir. Based on the experimental results, the membrane reservoir density of breast cancer cell was obtained,p = 8.02. The membrane surface viscosity between membrane and environment η is 0.021(pN.s/μm3), and the static force F0 = 5.71 pN.

  1. Quasifission in heavy and superheavy element formation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, D. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Jeung, D. Y.; Mohanto, G.; Prasad, E.; Simenel, C.; Walshe, J.; Wahkle, A.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Kalkal, Sunil; Rafferty, D. C.; Rietz, R. du; Simpson, E. C.; David, H. M.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Khuyagbaatar, J.

    2016-12-01

    Superheavy elements are created in the laboratory by the fusion of two heavy nuclei. The large Coulomb repulsion that makes superheavy elements decay also makes the fusion process that forms them very unlikely. Instead, after sticking together for a short time, the two nuclei usually come apart, in a process called quasifission. Mass-angle distributions give the most direct information on the characteristics and time scales of quasifission. A systematic study of carefully chosen mass-angle distributions has provided information on the global trends of quasifission. Large deviations from these systematics reveal the major role played by the nuclear structure of the two colliding nuclei in determining the reaction outcome, and thus implicitly in hindering or favouring superheavy element production.

  2. Influence of Surface and Bulk Water Ice on the Reactivity of a Water-forming Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, Thanja; Kästner, Johannes

    2017-09-01

    On the surface of icy dust grains in the dense regions of the interstellar medium, a rich chemistry can take place. Due to the low temperature, reactions that proceed via a barrier can only take place through tunneling. The reaction {{H}}+{{{H}}}2{{{O}}}2\\longrightarrow {{{H}}}2{{O}}+{OH} is such a case with a gas-phase barrier of ∼26.5 kJ mol‑1. Still, the reaction is known to be involved in water formation on interstellar grains. Here, we investigate the influence of a water ice surface and of bulk ice on the reaction rate constant. Rate constants are calculated using instanton theory down to 74 K. The ice is taken into account via multiscale modeling, describing the reactants and the direct surrounding at the quantum mechanical level with density functional theory (DFT), while the rest of the ice is modeled on the molecular mechanical level with a force field. We find that H2O2 binding energies cannot be captured by a single value, but rather they depend on the number of hydrogen bonds with surface molecules. In highly amorphous surroundings, the binding site can block the routes of attack and impede the reaction. Furthermore, the activation energies do not correlate with the binding energies of the same sites. The unimolecular rate constants related to the Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism increase as the activation energy decreases. Thus, we provide a lower limit for the rate constant and argue that rate constants can have values up to two order of magnitude larger than this limit.

  3. Reaction of water-saturated supercritical CO2 with forsterite: Evidence for magnesite formation at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary; Todd Schaef, H.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Hess, Nancy J.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Feng, Ju; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2012-08-01

    The nature of the reaction products that form on the surfaces of nanometer-sized forsterite particles during reaction with H2O-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 35 °C and 50 °C were examined under in situ conditions and ex situ following reaction. The in situ analysis was conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ex situ analysis consisted of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the surface phases and chemical characterization of precipitates using a combination of confocal Raman spectroscopy, 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that the forsterite surface is highly reactive with the primary reaction products being a mixture of nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3) at short reaction times (˜3-4 days) and then magnesite (MgCO3) and a highly porous amorphous silica phase at longer reaction times (14 days). After 14 days of reaction most of the original forsterite transformed to reaction products. Importantly, the formation of magnesite was observed at temperatures much lower (35 °C) than previously thought needed to overcome its well-known sluggish precipitation kinetics. The conversion of nesquehonite to magnesite liberates H2O which can potentially facilitate further metal carbonation, as postulated by previous investigators, based upon studies at higher temperature (80 °C). The observation that magnesite can form at lower temperatures implies that water recycling may also be important in determining the rate and extent of mineral carbonation in a wide range of potential CO2 storage reservoirs.

  4. Reaction of Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2 with Forsterite: Evidence for Magnesite Formation at Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Hess, Nancy J.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Feng, Ju; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2012-08-01

    The nature of the reaction products that form on the surfaces of nanometer-sized forsterite particles during reaction with H2O saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 35 C and 50 C were examined under in situ conditions and ex situ following reaction. The in situ analysis was conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ex situ analysis consisted of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the surface phases and chemical characterization of precipitates using a combination of confocal Raman spectroscopy, 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that the forsterite surface is highly reactive with the primary reaction products being a mixture of nesquehonite (MgCO3.3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3) at short reaction times ({approx}3-4 days) and then magnesite (MgCO3) and a highly porous amorphous silica phase at longer reaction times (14 days). After 14 days of reaction most of the original forsterite transformed to reaction products. Importantly, the formation of magnesite was observed at temperatures much lower (35 C) than previously thought needed to overcome its well known sluggish precipitation kinetics. The conversion of nesquehonite to magnesite liberates H2O which can potentially facilitate further metal carbonation, as postulated by previous investigators, based upon studies at higher temperature (80 C). The observation that magnesite can form at lower temperatures implies that water recycling may also be important in determining the rate and extent of mineral carbonation in a wide range of potential CO2 storage reservoirs.

  5. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  6. Nickel-Catalyzed Reactions Directed toward the Formation of Heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2015-06-16

    Heterocycles have garnered significant attention because they are important functional building blocks in various useful molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agricultural chemicals, pesticides, and materials. Several studies have been conducted regarding the preparation of heterocyclic skeletons with an emphasis on selectivity and efficiency. Three strategies are typically employed to construct cyclic molecules, namely, cyclization, cycloaddition, and ring-size alterations. Although each method has certain advantages, cycloaddition may be superior from the viewpoint of divergence. Specifically, cycloadditions enable the construction of rings from several pieces. However, the construction of heterocycles via cycloadditions is more challenging than the construction of carbocycles. For heterocycle construction, simple pericyclic reactions rarely work smoothly because of the large HOMO-LUMO gap unless well-designed combinations, such as electron-rich dienes and aldehydes, are utilized. Thus, a different approach should be employed to prepare heterocycles via cycloadditions. To this end, the use of metallacycles containing heteroatoms is expected to serve as a promising solution. In this study, we focused on the preparation of heteroatom-containing nickelacycles. Because nickel possesses a relatively high redox potential and an affinity for heteroatoms, several methods were developed to synthesize heteronickelacycles from various starting materials. The prepared nickelacycles were demonstrated to be reasonable intermediates in cycloaddition reactions, which were used to prepare various heterocycles. In this Account, we introduce the following four methods to prepare heterocycles via heteronickelacycles. (1) Direct oxidative insertion of Ni(0) to α,β-unsaturated enone derivatives: treatment of 3-ethoxycarbonyl-4-phenyl-3-buten-2-one with Ni(0) afforded an oxa-nickelacycle, which reacted with alkynes to give pyrans. (2) Substitution of a part of a cyclic compound with

  7. STAR-FORMATION THRESHOLDS IN LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHULST, JM; SKILLMAN, ED; SMITH, TR; BOTHUN, GD; MCGAUGH, SS; DEBLOK, WJG

    1993-01-01

    Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies appear to have low star formation rates despite their often quite normal H I contents as judged from global H I properties such as M(H I)/L and M(H I)/M(T) ratios. H I imaging with the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (the NRAO is ope

  8. Self-organized surface ripple pattern formation by ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsäss, Hans; Zhang, Kun; Bobes, Omar

    2016-10-01

    Ion induced ripple pattern formation on solid surfaces has been extensively studied in the past and the theories describing curvature dependent ion erosion as well as redistribution of recoil atoms have been very successful in explaining many features of the pattern formation. Since most experimental studies use noble gas ion irradiation, the incorporation of the ions into the films is usually neglected. In this work we show that the incorporation or implantation of non-volatile ions also leads to a curvature dependent term in the equation of motion of a surface height profile. The implantation of ions can be interpreted as a negative sputter yield; and therefore, the effect of ion implantation is opposite to the one of ion erosion. For angles up to about 50°, implantation of ions stabilizes the surface, whereas above 50°, ion implantation contributes to the destabilization of the surface. We present simulations of the curvature coefficients using the crater function formalism and we compare the simulation results to the experimental data on the ion induced pattern formation using non-volatile ions. We present several model cases, where the incorporation of ions is a crucial requirement for the pattern formation.

  9. From surface science to catalysis: The importance of methoxy and formate species on Cu single crystals and industrial catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, M.; Waugh, K. C.

    2016-08-01

    Early work from the Madix group identified a number of simple surface intermediate species which have proved to be of significance for industrial catalytic processes. Two of these intermediates are the methoxy and formate surface species. We discuss the formation and behavior of these on copper surfaces, and go on to highlight their role in two important industrial reactions, namely methanol synthesis and the selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. The formate is the pivotal intermediate for methanol synthesis and is formed from the reaction of CO2 and H2, whereas it is important to avoid the formation of that intermediate for selective methanol oxidation, which proceeds through dehydrogenation of the methoxy species.

  10. Surface formation and depth in monocular scene perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, M K

    1999-01-01

    The visual perception of monocular stimuli perceived as 3-D objects has received considerable attention from researchers in human and machine vision. However, most previous research has focused on how individual 3-D objects are perceived. Here this is extended to a study of how the structure of 3-D scenes containing multiple, possibly disconnected objects and features is perceived. Da Vinci stereopsis, stereo capture, and other surface formation and interpolation phenomena in stereopsis and structure-from-motion suggest that small features having ambiguous depth may be assigned depth by interpolation with features having unambiguous depth. I investigated whether vision may use similar mechanisms to assign relative depth to multiple objects and features in sparse monocular images, such as line drawings, especially when other depth cues are absent. I propose that vision tends to organize disconnected objects and features into common surfaces to construct 3-D-scene interpretations. Interpolations that are too weak to generate a visible surface percept may still be strong enough to assign relative depth to objects within a scene. When there exists more than one possible surface interpolation in a scene, the visual system's preference for one interpolation over another seems to be influenced by a number of factors, including: (i) proximity, (ii) smoothness, (iii) a preference for roughly frontoparallel surfaces and 'ground' surfaces, (iv) attention and fixation, and (v) higher-level factors. I present a variety of demonstrations and an experiment to support this surface-formation hypothesis.

  11. The formation of illite from nontronite by mesophilic and thermophilic bacterial reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisi, D.P.; Eberl, D.D.; Dong, H.; Kim, J.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of illite through the smectite-to-illite (S-I) reaction is considered to be one of the most important mineral reactions occurring during diagenesis. In biologically catalyzed systems, however, this transformation has been suggested to be rapid and to bypass the high temperature and long time requirements. To understand the factors that promote the S-I reaction, the present study focused on the effects of pH, temperature, solution chemistry, and aging on the S-I reaction in microbially mediated systems. Fe(III)-reduction experiments were performed in both growth and non-growth media with two types of bacteria: mesophilic (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32) and thermophilic (Thermus scotoductus SA-01). Reductive dissolution of NAu-2 was observed and the formation of illite in treatment with thermophilic SA-01 was indicated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A basic pH (8.4) and high temperature (65??C) were the most favorable conditions forthe formation of illite. A long incubation time was also found to enhance the formation of illite. K-nontronite (non-permanent fixation of K) was also detected and differentiated from the discrete illite in the XRD profiles. These results collectively suggested that the formation of illite associated with the biologically catalyzed smectite-to-illite reaction pathway may bypass the prolonged time and high temperature required for the S-I reaction in the absence of microbial activity.

  12. Formation of eta'(958) Meson Bound States by the 6Li(gamma,d) reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Miyatani, M; Nagahiro, H; Hirenzaki, S

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the 6Li(gamma,d) reaction theoretically for the formation of the eta'(958) mesic nucleus close to the recoilless kinematics. We have developed the theoretical formula and reported the quantitative results of the formation spectra for various cases in this article. We have found that the formation cross sections are reduced by the effects of the fragile deuteron form factor.

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation from benzyl radicals: a reaction kinetics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet

    2016-03-21

    The role of resonantly stabilized radicals such as propargyl, cyclopentadienyl and benzyl in the formation of aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene and naphthalene in the high temperature environments has been long known. In this work, the possibility of benzyl recombination to form three-ring aromatics, phenanthrene and anthracene, is explored. A reaction mechanism for it is developed, where reaction energetics are calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set) and CBS-QB3, while temperature-dependent reaction kinetics are evaluated using transition state theory. The mechanism begins with barrierless formation of bibenzyl from two benzyl radicals with the release of 283.2 kJ mol(-1) of reaction energy. The further reactions involve H-abstraction by a H atom, H-desorption, H-migration, and ring closure to gain aromaticity. Through mechanism and rate of production analyses, the important reactions leading to phenanthrene and anthracene formation are determined. Phenanthrene is found to be the major product at high temperatures. Premixed laminar flame simulations are carried out by including the proposed reactions for phenanthrene formation from benzyl radicals and compared to experimentally observed species profiles to understand their effects on species concentrations.

  14. Novel multiparametric approach to elucidate the surface amine-silanization reaction profile on fluorescent silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shibsekhar; Dixit, Chandra K; Woolley, Robert; MacCraith, Brian D; O'Kennedy, Richard; McDonagh, Colette

    2010-12-07

    This Article addresses the important issue of the characterization of surface functional groups for optical bioassay applications. We use a model system consisting of spherical dye-doped silica nanoparticles (NPs) that have been functionalized with amine groups whereby the encapsulated cyanine-based near-infrared dye fluorescence acts as a probe of the NP surface environment. This facilitates the identification of the optimum deposition parameters for the formation of a stable ordered amine monolayer and also elucidates the functionalization profile of the amine-silanization process. Specifically, we use a novel approach where the techniques of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and fluorescence lifetime measurement (FL) are used in conjunction with the more conventional analytical techniques of zeta potential measurement and Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The dynamics of the ordering of the amine layer in different stages of the reaction have been characterized by FTIR, FL, and FCS. The results indicate an optimum reaction time for the formation of a stable amine layer, which is optimized for further biomolecular conjugation, whereas extended reaction times lead to a disordered cross-linked layer. The results have been validated using an immunoglobulin (IgG) plate-based direct binding assay where the maximum number of IgG-conjugated aminated NPs were captured by immobilized anti-IgG antibodies for the NP sample corresponding to the optimized amine-silanization condition. Importantly, these results point to the potential of FCS and FL as useful analytical tools in diverse fields such as characterization of surface functionalization.

  15. Study on the Formation Mechanism of Oxygen-containing Groups on the Surfaces of Hypercrosslinked Polystyrenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan Hua MENG; Ai Min LI; Lin WU; Fu Qiang LIU; Quan Xing ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    The synthetic parameters were changed to explore the formation mechanism of the oxygen-containing groups on the surfaces of the hypercrosslinked polymers. The FT-IR spectra and the Boehm titration were used to characterize the surface chemistry of the synthesized polymers. The GC-MS was applied to analyze nitrobenzene which was the solvent in the reaction.The functionalities such as carbonyls and phenols were formed through the oxidation of residual chloromethyl groups by nitrobenzene and the carboxylic groups were formed through further oxidation by oxygen. The nitrobenzene was deoxidized to nitrosobenzene and further to aniline.

  16. The synthesis of PdPt/carbon paper via surface limited redox replacement reactions for oxygen reduction reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motsoeneng, RG

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface-limited redox replacement reactions using the electrochemical atomic layer deposition (EC-ALD) technique were used to synthesize PdPt bimetallic electrocatalysts on carbon paper substrate. Electrocatalysts having different Pd:Pt ratio were...

  17. EXFOR basics: A short guide to the nuclear reaction data exchange format

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear data compilation centers. This format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  18. Simulations of Pore Formation in Lipid Membranes: Reaction Coordinates, Convergence, Hysteresis, and Finite-Size Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Neha; Hub, Jochen S

    2016-07-12

    Transmembrane pores play an important role in various biophysical processes such as membrane permeation, membrane fusion, and antimicrobial peptide activity. In principal, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide an accurate model of pore formation in lipid membranes. However, the free energy landscape of transmembrane pore formation remains poorly understood, partly because potential of mean force (PMF) calculations of pore formation strongly depend on the choice of the reaction coordinate. In this study, we used umbrella sampling to compute PMFs for pore formation using three different reaction coordinates, namely, (i) a coordinate that steers the lipids in the lateral direction away from the pore center, (ii) the distance of a single lipid phosphate group from the membrane center, and (iii) the average water density inside a membrane-spanning cylinder. Our results show that while the three reaction coordinates efficiently form pores in membranes, they suffer from strong hysteresis between pore-opening and pore-closing simulations, suggesting that they do not restrain the systems close to the transition state for pore formation. The two reaction coordinates that act via restraining the lipids lead to more pronounced hysteresis compared with the coordinate acting on the water molecules. By comparing PMFs computed from membranes with different numbers of lipids, we observed significant artifacts from the periodic boundary conditions in small simulation systems. Further analysis suggests that the formation and disruption of a continuous hydrogen-bonding network across the membrane corresponds to the transition state for pore formation. Our study provides molecular insights into the critical steps of transmembrane pore formation, and it may guide the development of efficient reaction coordinates for pore formation.

  19. Sequence-Fenton Reaction for Decreasing Phenol Formation during Benzene Chemical Conversion in Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SB Mortazavi, A Sabzali, A Rezaee

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Advanced oxidation processes such as Fenton reagent generates highly reactive hydroxyl free radicals to oxidize various compounds in the water and wastewater. The efficiency of different Fenton-related oxidative processes such as Fenton, solar-Fenton, UV-Fenton and Fenton reactions in different batch reactors was examined using benzene as pollutant in aqueous solutions. A batch study was conducted to optimize parameters like pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature, reaction time and ferrous ion concentration governing the Fenton process. The concentrations of produced phenol were measured at the end of the reactions. The role of sequence reaction was tested for decreasing phenol formation during benzene conversion. At optimum conditions, different Fenton-related processes were compared for the degradation of benzene. Increased degradation efficiency was observed in photo-Fenton processes as compared to conventional Fenton process. The formation of phenol in Fenton reaction depended on reaction time, sequence in reaction, purity of hydrogen peroxide and other compounds such as alcohols that contributed into the reaction. In the Fenton process, carboxylic acids like acetic acid and oxalic acid were formed as the end products during the complete degradation of benzene. With the increase in mono-valence, two-valence ions and hardness, Fenton's efficiency decreased, respectively. Sequence Fenton reaction produced less phenol and its end products had smaller COD as compared to conventional Fenton process.

  20. Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, M.; Johansen, C.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended...... (modified Robbins device) (reaching 10(2) CFU/cm(2)) than in a batch system (reaching 10(7) CFU/cm(2)), and maximum numbers were reached after 24 h. When nutrients were supplied, S. putrefaciens grew in biofilms with layers of bacteria. The rate of biofilm formation and the thickness of the film were...

  1. Isolation and characterization of unusual multinuclear Schiff base complexes: rearrangements reactions and octanuclear cluster formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Belmonte, Marta; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo C; Martin, Eddy; Kleij, Arjan W

    2012-05-07

    The isolation and full characterization of multinuclear Schiff base complexes is reported, and their relevance as precursors for octanuclear Zn(8) salen cluster complex formation is discussed. Starting from simple precursors, three tetranuclear Zn(4) complexes were accessed that incorporate typical half-salen units and comprise of bridging acetates. The use of alternative reaction conditions or a step-wise approach smoothly leads to Zn(8) cluster formation. In addition, the tetranuclear Zn(4) complexes themselves may also serve as precursors toward Zn(8) cluster formation when treated under appropriate reaction conditions. The influence of the solvent medium in the latter Zn(4) → Zn(8) conversion was separately studied and revealed the formation of unusual pyridine-ligated multinuclear structures with fully condensed salen coordination pockets, providing a possible prelude to octanuclear cluster formation.

  2. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969.3 As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: l that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); l that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  3. Nicotiana tabacum as model for ozone - plant surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain; Canaval, Eva; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. The ensuing injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through the stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. A striking question of current research is the environment and plant specific partitioning of ozone loss between gas phase, stomatal or plant surface sink terms. Here we show results from ozone fumigation experiments using various Nicotiana Tabacum varieties, whose surfaces are covered with different amounts of unsaturated diterpenoids exuded by their glandular trichomes. Exposure to elevated ozone levels (50 to 150 ppbv) for 5 to 15 hours in an exceptionally clean cuvette system did neither result in a reduction of photosynthesis nor caused any visible leaf damage. Both these ozone induced stress effects have been observed previously in ozone fumigation experiments with the ozone sensitive tobacco line Bel-W3. In our case ozone fumigation was accompanied by a continuous release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be clearly associated to their condensed phase precursors for the first time. Gas phase reactions of ozone were avoided by choosing a high enough gas exchange rate of the plant cuvette system. In the case of the Ambalema variety, that is known to exude only the diterpenoid cis-abienol, ozone fumigation experiments yield the volatiles formaldehyde and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK). The latter could be unequivocally separated from isomeric methacrolein (MACR) by the aid of a Selective Reagent Ion Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SRI-ToF-MS), which was switched every six minutes from H3O+ to NO+ primary ion mode and vice versa. Consistent with the picture of an ozone protection mechanism caused by reactive diterpenoids at the leaf surface are the results from dark-light experiments. The ozone loss obtained from the

  4. Profiling transition-state configurations on the Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase free-energy reaction surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Ian L; Naidoo, Kevin J

    2015-01-22

    Enzymatically catalyzed reactions pass from reactants to products via transition states that are short-lived and potentially characterized from free-energy reaction surfaces. We compute the reaction surface for Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase using the Free Energy from Adaptive Reaction Coordinate Forces method. The reaction coordinates are the bonds between the sialic acid and the leaving group (TYR342) and the sialic acid and the nucpleophile (ASP59). We are able to track progress of the reaction trajectories up to (incomplete), about (recrossed), and across (crossed) the col that divides the reactant (covalent intermediate) and product (Michaelis complex) surfaces. More than 40 transition state configurations were isolated from these trajectories, and the sialic acid substrate conformations were analyzed as well as the substrate interactions with the nucleophile and catalytic acid/base. A successful barrier crossing requires that the substrate passes through a family of E5, (4)H5, and (6)H5 pucker conformations. These puckers interact slightly differently with the enzyme. The E5 and (4)H5 conformations have a high-frequency hydrogen bonding with Asp96, while (6)H5 puckers show increased hydrogen bonding between sialic acid O-8-Glu230. Our analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase configurations that populate the col separating the reactant from product surfaces brings new evidence to the prevailing premise that there are several pathways from reactant to product passing through the saddle and successful product formation is not restricted to the minimum energy path and transition state.

  5. Shewanella putrefaciens Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Food Processing Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, Mette; Johansen, Charlotte; Huber, Ingrid; Gram, Lone

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended in buffer adhered readily to stainless steel surfaces. Maximum numbers of adherent bacteria per square centimeter were reached in 8 h at 25°C and reflected the cell density in suspension. Numbers of adhering bacteria from a suspension containing 108 CFU/ml were much lower in a laminar flow system (modified Robbins device) (reaching 102 CFU/cm2) than in a batch system (reaching 107 CFU/cm2), and maximum numbers were reached after 24 h. When nutrients were supplied, S. putrefaciens grew in biofilms with layers of bacteria. The rate of biofilm formation and the thickness of the film were not dependent on the availability of carbohydrate (lactate or glucose) or on iron starvation. The number of S. putrefaciens bacteria on the surface was partly influenced by the presence of other bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) which reduced the numbers of S. putrefaciens bacteria in the biofilm. Numbers of bacteria on the surface must be quantified to evaluate the influence of environmental factors on adhesion and biofilm formation. We used a combination of fluorescence microscopy (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and in situ hybridization, for mixed-culture studies), ultrasonic removal of bacteria from surfaces, and indirect conductometry and found this combination sufficient to quantify bacteria on surfaces. PMID:11319118

  6. SurfKin: an ab initio kinetic code for modeling surface reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thong Nguyen-Minh; Liu, Bin; Huynh, Lam K

    2014-10-05

    In this article, we describe a C/C++ program called SurfKin (Surface Kinetics) to construct microkinetic mechanisms for modeling gas-surface reactions. Thermodynamic properties of reaction species are estimated based on density functional theory calculations and statistical mechanics. Rate constants for elementary steps (including adsorption, desorption, and chemical reactions on surfaces) are calculated using the classical collision theory and transition state theory. Methane decomposition and water-gas shift reaction on Ni(111) surface were chosen as test cases to validate the code implementations. The good agreement with literature data suggests this is a powerful tool to facilitate the analysis of complex reactions on surfaces, and thus it helps to effectively construct detailed microkinetic mechanisms for such surface reactions. SurfKin also opens a possibility for designing nanoscale model catalysts.

  7. Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, M.; Johansen, C.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended...... in buffer adhered readily to stainless steel surfaces. Maximum numbers of adherent bacteria per square centimeter were reached in 8 h at 25 degreesC and reflected the cell density in suspension. Numbers of adhering bacteria from a suspension containing 10(8) CFU/ml were much lower in a laminar flow system...... (modified Robbins device) (reaching 10(2) CFU/cm(2)) than in a batch system (reaching 10(7) CFU/cm(2)), and maximum numbers were reached after 24 h. When nutrients were supplied, S. putrefaciens grew in biofilms with layers of bacteria. The rate of biofilm formation and the thickness of the film were...

  8. Evaluation of scale formation in waterwall heated surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylasheva Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the possibility of forecasting assessments of the speed and the time of formation of depositions in the evaporator-tube elements of double-drum boilers. The values of thermal flow in the wall region of tank screens of boiler furnace are obtained, besides the velocity values of scaling metal corrosion products are obtained. Conclusions about the ability of forecasting unnominal situations and emergency risks dependent with damage to the screen surface heating pipes are made.

  9. Formation of Organometallic Intermediate States in On-Surface Ullmann Couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Dennis; Gao, Hong-Ying; Held, Philipp Alexander; Studer, Armido; Fuchs, Harald; Doltsinis, Nikos L; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2017-02-17

    Possible origins of the formation of organometallic intermediates in on-surface Ullmann couplings have been investigated by surface tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We consider the case of iodobenzenes on the coinage metals Au, Ag and Cu. We found experimental evidence for the formation of surface vacancies and the presence of metal adatoms in these coupling reactions, which are taken as a hint for the reactive extraction of surface atoms by adsorbates. In a second step, we demonstrate by ab initio molecular dynamics calculations for aryl-iodides on copper that metal atoms can be pulled out of the surface to form metalorganic species. By contrast, a thermally activated provision of a metal atom from the surface to form an adatom is energetically unfavourable. Finally, we investigate the mechanism and energetics of the reactive extraction of surface metal atoms by means of (climbing-image) nudged-elastic-band density-functional theory calculations for iodobenzene on copper, silver and gold, and analyze our results in the light of the experimental findings.

  10. Deduction of compound nucleus formation probability from the fragment angular distributions in heavy-ion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, C.; Thomas, R. G.; Mohanty, A. K.; Kapoor, S. S.

    2015-07-01

    The presence of various fissionlike reactions in heavy-ion induced reactions is a major hurdle in the path to laboratory synthesis of heavy and super-heavy nuclei. It is known that the cross section of forming a heavy evaporation residue in fusion reactions depends on the three factors—the capture cross section, probability of compound nucleus formation PCN, and the survival probability of the compound nucleus against fission. As the probability of compound nucleus formation, PCN is difficult to theoretically estimate because of its complex dependence on several parameters; attempts have been made in the past to deduce it from the fission fragment anisotropy data. In the present work, the fragment anisotropy data for a number of heavy-ion reactions are analyzed and it is found that deduction of PCN from the anisotropy data also requires the knowledge of the ratio of relaxation time of the K degree of freedom to pre-equilibrium fission time.

  11. Optimized Reaction Conditions for Amide Bond Formation in DNA-Encoded Combinatorial Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yizhou; Gabriele, Elena; Samain, Florent; Favalli, Nicholas; Sladojevich, Filippo; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2016-08-08

    DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries are increasingly being used as tools for the discovery of small organic binding molecules to proteins of biological or pharmaceutical interest. In the majority of cases, synthetic procedures for the formation of DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries incorporate at least one step of amide bond formation between amino-modified DNA and a carboxylic acid. We investigated reaction conditions and established a methodology by using 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide, 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole and N,N'-diisopropylethylamine (EDC/HOAt/DIPEA) in combination, which provided conversions greater than 75% for 423/543 (78%) of the carboxylic acids tested. These reaction conditions were efficient with a variety of primary and secondary amines, as well as with various types of amino-modified oligonucleotides. The reaction conditions, which also worked efficiently over a broad range of DNA concentrations and reaction scales, should facilitate the synthesis of novel DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries.

  12. Membrane Formation on the Surface of implanted Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lenses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FangyaoYang; GuijunWu

    1995-01-01

    Purpose:To study the prevention and treatment of the membrane formation on the lens surface after extracapsular cataract extraction(ECCE)with posterior chamber intraocular lens(PCIOL)implantation.Methods:We reviewed the records of 312 cataractous patients that had undergone ECCEwith PCIOLimplantation between1989and1993,Postoperatively all pa-tients were examined under slit-lamp microscopy.The membrane formation on the surface of PCIOLin pupilar area was divided into four grades.Two mem-branes of surgical removal were observed under a transmission electrom mi-croscopy.One PCIOLof surgical removal was observed under a scanning electron microscopy.Results;Of312 patients,21 had the membrane formation on the surface of the PCIOL postoperatively.The incidence of the membrane formation was6.7%.Comparisone with cases of senile cataract showed the incidence to be significantly the highest among;1.patients who had traumatic cataract(P<0.05);2.pa-tients with complicated cataract(P<0.05).Interoperatively residual lens corten and rupture of posterior capsule,interval time betwwen the first and second eye operations less than 1month are the main factors of menbrane formation.The ultrastructure in membrane and cytology on the lens surface showed that the membrane on the surface of PCIOLs is usually composed of acellular protein film and cellular elements,including macrophages.fibroblast-like cells,epithelioid cells,giant cells,fibroblasts and collagen fibrils,etc.Conclusions:The cellular response on the surface of an implanted PCIOLis a chonic foreign-body inflammatory reaction and the membrane of the surfaceof implanted PCIOL is a reactive membrane of the foreign-body.Eye Science1995;11:131-135.

  13. Hydrodynamic approach to surface pattern formation by ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Mario, E-mail: marioc@upcomillas.es [Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC) and Grupo de Dinamica No Lineal (DNL), Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieri a - ICAI, Universidad Pontificia Comillas, E-28015 Madrid (Spain); Cuerno, Rodolfo [Departamento de Matematicas and GISC, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganes (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    On the proper timescale, amorphous solids can flow. Solid flow can be observed macroscopically in glaciers or lead pipes, but it can also be artificially enhanced by creating defects. Ion Beam Sputtering (IBS) is a technique in which ions with energies in the 0.110 keV range impact against a solid target inducing defect creation and dynamics, and eroding its surface leading to formation of ordered nanostructures. Despite its technological interest, a basic understanding of nanopattern formation processes occurring under IBS of amorphizable targets has not been clearly established, recent experiments on Si having largely questioned knowledge accumulated during the last two decades. A number of interfacial equations have been proposed in the past to describe these phenomena, typically by adding together different contributions coming from surface diffusion, ion sputtering or mass redistribution, etc. in a non-systematic way. Here, we exploit the general idea of solids flowing due to ion impacts in order to establish a general framework into which different mechanisms (such as viscous flow, stress, diffusion, or sputtering) can be incorporated, under generic physical conservation laws. As opposed to formulating phenomenological interfacial equations, this approach allows to assess systematically the relevance and interplay of different physical mechanisms influencing surface pattern formation by IBS.

  14. Surface Properties of Titanium dioxide and its Structural Modifications by Reactions with Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpegamage, Sandamali

    Surfaces of metal oxides play a vital role in many technologically important applications. The surfaces of titanium dioxide, in particular, show quite promising properties that can be utilized in solid-state gas sensing and photocatalysis applications. In the first part of this dissertation we investigate these properties of TiO2 surfaces through a vigorous surface scientific approach. In the second part, we investigate the possibilities of modifying the TiO2 surfaces by depositing multi-component transition metal oxide monolayers so that the properties of bare TiO2 surface can be influenced in a beneficial way. For instance, via formation of new surface sites or cations that have different valance states, the chemisorption and catalytic properties can be modified. We use sophisticated experimental surface science techniques that are compatible with ultra-high vacuum technology for surface characterization. All the experimental results, except for the photocatalysis experiments, were compared to and verified by supporting DFT-based theoretical results produced by our theory collaborators. TiO2 based solid-state gas sensors have been used before for detecting trace amounts of explosives such as 2,4-dinitrololuene (DNT), a toxic decomposition product of the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) that have very low vapor pressure. However, the adsorption, desorption and reaction mechanism were not well- understood. Here, we investigate 2,4-DNT adsorption on rutile-TiO2(110) surface in order to gain insight about these mechanisms in an atomistic level and we propose an efficient way of desorbing DNT from the surface through UV-light induced photoreactions. TiO2 exists in different polymorphs and the photocatalytic activity differs from one polymorph to another. Rutile and anatase are the most famous forms of TiO2 in photocatalysis and anatase is known to show higher activity than rutile. The photoactivity also varies depending on the surface orientation for the same

  15. A New Source of CO2 in the Universe: A Photoactivated Eley-Rideal Surface Reaction on Water Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chunqing; Cooke, Ilsa R.; Yates, John T., Jr.

    2014-08-01

    CO2 is one of the most abundant components of ices in the interstellar medium; however, its formation mechanism has not been clearly identified. Here we report an experimental observation of an Eley-Rideal-type reaction on a water ice surface, where CO gas molecules react by direct collisions with surface OH radicals, made by photodissociation of H2O molecules, to produce CO2 ice on the surface. The discovery of this source of CO2 provides a new mechanism to explain the high relative abundance of CO2 ice in space.

  16. Open problems in formation and decay of composite systems in heavy ion reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Viesti; V Rizzi; M Barbui; D Fabris; M Lunardon; G Nebbia; S Moretto; S Pesente; M Cinausero; E Fioretto; G Prete; D Shetty

    2001-08-01

    New highly exclusive experiments in the field of formation and decay of composite systems in heavy ion reactions are presented. Dynamical effects are reviewed in the light of recent works on the role of the / asymmetry between projectile and target. The possibility of extracting directly from the experimental data the emission barrier of alpha particles emitted from highly excited nuclei is discussed. Finally, the first experimental evidence of double giant resonance excitation in fusion-evaporation reaction is presented.

  17. Formation of degradation compounds from lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery: sugar reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Helena; Sørensen, Hanne R; Meyer, Anne S

    2014-02-19

    The degradation compounds formed during pretreatment when lignocellulosic biomass is processed to ethanol or other biorefinery products include furans, phenolics, organic acids, as well as mono- and oligomeric pentoses and hexoses. Depending on the reaction conditions glucose can be converted to 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde (HMF) and/or levulinic acid, formic acid and different phenolics at elevated temperatures. Correspondingly, xylose can follow different reaction mechanisms resulting in the formation of furan-2-carbaldehyde (furfural) and/or various C-1 and C-4 compounds. At least four routes for the formation of HMF from glucose and three routes for furfural formation from xylose are possible. In addition, new findings show that biomass monosaccharides themselves can react further to form pseudo-lignin and humins as well as a wide array of other compounds when exposed to high temperatures. Hence, several aldehydes and ketones and many different organic acids and aromatic compounds may be generated during hydrothermal treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. The reaction mechanisms are of interest because the very same compounds that are possible inhibitors for biomass processing enzymes and microorganisms may be valuable biobased chemicals. Hence a new potential for industrial scale synthesis of chemicals has emerged. A better understanding of the reaction mechanisms and the impact of the reaction conditions on the product formation is thus a prerequisite for designing better biomass processing strategies and forms an important basis for the development of new biorefinery products from lignocellulosic biomass as well.

  18. Swarm formation control utilizing elliptical surfaces and limiting functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Laura E; Fields, Mary Anne; Valavanis, Kimon P

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present a strategy for organizing swarms of unmanned vehicles into a formation by utilizing artificial potential fields that were generated from normal and sigmoid functions. These functions construct the surface on which swarm members travel, controlling the overall swarm geometry and the individual member spacing. Nonlinear limiting functions are defined to provide tighter swarm control by modifying and adjusting a set of control variables that force the swarm to behave according to set constraints, formation, and member spacing. The artificial potential functions and limiting functions are combined to control swarm formation, orientation, and swarm movement as a whole. Parameters are chosen based on desired formation and user-defined constraints. This approach is computationally efficient and scales well to different swarm sizes, to heterogeneous systems, and to both centralized and decentralized swarm models. Simulation results are presented for a swarm of 10 and 40 robots that follow circle, ellipse, and wedge formations. Experimental results are included to demonstrate the applicability of the approach on a swarm of four custom-built unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs).

  19. The role of advanced reactive surface area characterization in improving predictions of mineral reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckingham, L. E.; Zhang, S.; Mitnick, E.; Cole, D. R.; Yang, L.; Anovitz, L. M.; Sheets, J.; Swift, A.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Landrot, G.; Mito, S.; Xue, Z.; Steefel, C. I.; DePaolo, D. J.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 in deep sedimentary formations is a promising means of mitigating carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants but the long-term fate of injected CO2 is challenging to predict. Reactive transport models are used to gain insight over long times but rely on laboratory determined mineral reaction rates that have been difficult to extrapolate to field systems. This, in part, is due to a lack of understanding of mineral reactive surface area. Many models use an arbitrary approximation of reactive surface area, applying orders of magnitude scaling factors to measured BET or geometric surface areas. Recently, a few more sophisticated approaches have used 2D and 3D image analyses to determine mineral-specific reactive surface areas that account for the accessibility of minerals. However, the ability of these advanced surface area estimates to improve predictions of mineral reaction rates has yet to be determined. In this study, we fuse X-ray microCT, SEM QEMSCAN, XRD, SANS, and SEM-FIB analysis to determine mineral-specific accessible reactive surface areas for a core sample from the Nagaoka pilot CO2 injection site (Japan). This sample is primarily quartz, plagioclase, smectite, K-feldspar, and pyroxene. SEM imaging shows abundant smectite cement and grain coatings that decrease the fluid accessibility of other minerals. However, analysis of FIB-SEM images reveals that smectite nano-pores are well connected such that access to underlying minerals is not occluded by smectite coatings. Mineral-specific accessible surfaces are determined, accounting for the connectivity of the pore space with and without connected smectite nano-pores. The large-scale impact of variations in accessibility and dissolution rates are then determined through continuum scale modeling using grid-cell specific information on accessible surface areas. This approach will be compared with a traditional continuum scale model using mineral abundances and common surface area

  20. Formation and characterization of infrared absorbing copper oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Burcu; Demirci, Gökhan; Erdoğan, Metehan; Karakaya, İshak

    2017-04-01

    Copper oxide formation has been investigated to combine the advantages of producing different size and shapes of coatings that possess good light absorbing properties. An aqueous blackening solution was investigated and optimum composition was found as 2.5 M NaOH and 0.225 M NaClO to form velvet copper oxide films. A two-step oxidation mechanism was proposed for the blackening process by carefully examining the experimental results. Formation of Cu2O was observed until the entire copper surface was covered at first. In the second step, Cu2O surface was further oxidized to CuO until the whole Cu2O surface was covered by CuO. Therefore, blackened copper surfaces consisted of Cu2O/CuO duplex oxides. Characterization of the coatings were performed in terms of microstructure, phase analysis, chemical state, infrared specular and total reflectivity by SEM, XRD, XPS, FTIR and UV-vis spectrophotometry, respectively.

  1. Formation of Gold Microparticles by Ablation with Surface Plasmons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Molian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The formation of gold microparticles on a silicon substrate through the use of energetic surface plasmons is reported. A laser-assisted plasmonics system was assembled and tested to synthesize gold particles from gold thin film by electrical field enhancement mechanism. A mask containing an array of 200 nm diameter holes with a periodicity of 400 nm was prepared and placed on a silicon substrate. The mask was composed of 60 µm thick porous alumina membrane sputter-coated with 100 nm thin gold film. A Nd:YAG laser with 1064 nm wavelength and 230 µs pulse width (free-running mode was then passed through the mask at an energy fluence of 0.35 J/cm2. The extraordinary transmission of laser light through alumina/gold micro-hole optical antenna created both extended and localized surface plasmons that caused the gold film at the bottom of the mask to fragment into microparticles and deposit on the silicon substrate that is in direct contact with the mask. The surface plasmon method is simpler, quicker, more energy efficient, and environmentally safer than existing physical and chemical methods, as well as being contamination-free, and can be extended to all types of materials that will in turn allow for new possibilities in the formation of structured surfaces.

  2. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Hohmann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application.

  3. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Siegfried; Kögel, Svea; Brunner, Yvonne; Schmieg, Barbara; Ewald, Christina; Kirschhöfer, Frank; Brenner-Weiß, Gerald; Länge, Kerstin

    2015-05-21

    We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application.

  4. Unraveling the surface formation of regular and deuterated water in space : a combined laboratory and computational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, Agneta Luciana Matthanja (Thanja)

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of regular and deuterated water in ices and on surfaces against an interstellar background. A large network for the formation of regular water has been studied with the use of a Kinetic Monte Carlo model. A specific reaction has been investigated as well: H2 + O -

  5. An alternative approach to aldol reactions: gold-catalyzed formation of boron enolates from alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Cindy; Starkov, Pavel; Sheppard, Tom D

    2010-05-05

    A new method for enolate generation via the gold-catalyzed addition of boronic acids to alkynes is reported. The formation of boron enolates from readily accessible ortho-alkynylbenzeneboronic acids proceeds rapidly with 2 mol % PPh(3)AuNTf(2) at ambient temperature. The enolates undergo aldol reaction with an aldehyde present in the reaction mixture to give cyclic boronate esters, which can be subsequently transformed into phenols, biaryls, or dihydrobenzofurans via oxidation, Suzuki-Miyaura, or intramolecular Chan-Lam coupling, respectively. A combined gold/boronic acid catalyzed aldol condensation reaction of an alkynyl aldehyde was also successfully achieved.

  6. The role of surface elasticity in liquid film formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champougny, Lorene; Scheid, Benoit; Restagno, Frederic; Rio, Emmanuelle; Laboratoire de Physique des Solides Team; TIPS-Fluid Physics Unit Team

    2014-11-01

    The formation of thin liquid films, either free standing (soap films) or deposited on a solid substrate (coated films), is of utmost importance for many applications, ranging from the control of foam stability to surface functionalization. In this work, the behavior of thin liquid films during their generation from a surfactant solution is investigated through comparison between a hydrodynamic model including surface elasticity and experiments. ``Twin'' models are proposed to describe the coating of films onto a solid plate (Landau-Levich-Derjaguin configuration) as well as soap film pulling (Frankel configuration) in a single framework. Experimental data are successfully fitted using the models, surface elasticity being the only adjustable parameter. For a given surfactant solution, the analyses of soap and coated films both yield the same value for the effective surface elasticity, showing that it is an intrinsic parameter of a surfactant solution. Conversely, we demonstrate that Frankel- or Landau-Levich-like experiments can be used in practice as surface rheometers to determine the numerical value of the (effective) surface elasticity of a solution, especially for values lower than those measurable by classical devices. L.C. was supported by ANR F2F. B.S. thanks the F.R.S.-FNRS for funding as well as the IAP-MicroMAST project.

  7. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format. Revision 97/1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLane, V. [ed.] [comp.

    1997-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Center Network. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility rather than optimization of data processing in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  8. Library of Antifouling Surfaces Derived From Natural Amino Acids by Click Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Hu, Xin; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Ye-Min; Liu, Xiao-Jiu; Xie, Bin-Bin; Yao, Chen; Li, Yi; Li, Xin-Song

    2015-08-12

    Biofouling is of great concern in numerous applications ranging from ophthalmological implants to catheters, and from bioseparation to biosensors. In this report, a general and facile strategy to combat surface fouling is developed by grafting of amino acids onto polymer substrates to form zwitterionic structure through amino groups induced epoxy ring opening click reaction. First of all, a library of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) hydrogels with zwitterionic surfaces were prepared, resulting in the formation of pairs of carboxyl anions and protonated secondary amino cations. The analysis of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the successful immobilization of amino acids on the hydrogel surfaces. After that, the contact angle and equilibrium water content of the modified hydrogels showed that the hydrogels exhibited improved hydrophilicity compared with the parent hydrogel. Furthermore, the protein deposition was evaluated by bicinchoninic acid assay using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme as models. The results indicated that the performance of the hydrogels was determined by the nature of incorporated amino acid: the hydrogels incorporated with neutral amino acids had nonspecific antiadsorption capability to both BSA and lysozyme; the hydrogels incorporated with charged amino acids showed antiadsorption behaviors against protein with same charge and enhanced adsorption to the protein with opposite charge; the optimal antiadsorption performance was observed on the hydrogels incorporated with polar amino acids with a hydroxyl residual. The improvement of antiprotein fouling of the neutral amino acids grafted hydrogels can be ascribed to the formation of zwitterionic surfaces. Finally, a couple of soft contact lenses grafted with amino acids were fabricated having improved antifouling property and hydrophilicity. The result demonstrated the success of

  9. Formation of palladium(0) nanoparticles at microbial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunge, Michael; Søbjerg, Lina S; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Gauthier, Delphine; Lindhardt, Anders T; Hause, Gerd; Finster, Kai; Kingshott, Peter; Skrydstrup, Troels; Meyer, Rikke L

    2010-10-01

    The increasing demand and limited natural resources for industrially important platinum-group metal (PGM) catalysts render the recovery from secondary sources such as industrial waste economically interesting. In the process of palladium (Pd) recovery, microorganisms have revealed a strong potential. Hitherto, bacteria with the property of dissimilatory metal reduction have been in focus, although the biochemical reactions linking enzymatic Pd(II) reduction and Pd(0) deposition have not yet been identified. In this study we investigated Pd(II) reduction with formate as the electron donor in the presence of Gram-negative bacteria with no documented capacity for reducing metals for energy production: Cupriavidus necator, Pseudomonas putida, and Paracoccus denitrificans. Only large and close-packed Pd(0) aggregates were formed in cell-free buffer solutions. Pd(II) reduction in the presence of bacteria resulted in smaller, well-suspended Pd(0) particles that were associated with the cells (called "bioPd(0)" in the following). Nanosize Pd(0) particles (3-30 nm) were only observed in the presence of bacteria, and particles in this size range were located in the periplasmic space. Pd(0) nanoparticles were still deposited on autoclaved cells of C. necator that had no hydrogenase activity, suggesting a hydrogenase-independent formation mechanism. The catalytic properties of Pd(0) and bioPd(0) were determined by the amount of hydrogen released in a reaction with hypophosphite. Generally, bioPd(0) demonstrated a lower level of activity than the Pd(0) control, possibly due to the inaccessibility of the Pd(0) fraction embedded in the cell envelope. Our results demonstrate the suitability of bacterial cells for the recovery of Pd(0), and formation and immobilization of Pd(0) nanoparticles inside the cell envelope. However, procedures to make periplasmic Pd(0) catalytically accessible need to be developed for future nanobiotechnological applications.

  10. Surface effects on PCR reactions in multichip microfluidic platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaro, Nicholas J; Lou, Xing Jian; Fortina, Paolo; Kricka, Larry J; Wilding, Peter

    2004-03-01

    We evaluated the compatibility of several common plastics, commercially available plastic tubing and disposable syringes which might be useful in the construction of microfluidic platforms with respect to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A simple and inexpensive plastic test module was constructed in order to evaluate some of the construction plastics. We also investigated the effect of addition of PEG 8000 to PCR reaction mixtures on the compatibility of materials. These studies identified several common plastics, plastic tubing, and disposable syringes which were compatible with the PCR reaction.

  11. Towards reducing DBP formation potential of drinking water by favouring direct ozone over hydroxyl radical reactions during ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vera, Glen Andrew; Stalter, Daniel; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Weinberg, Howard S; Keller, Jurg; Farré, Maria José

    2015-12-15

    When ozonation is employed in advanced water treatment plants to produce drinking water, dissolved organic matter reacts with ozone (O3) and/or hydroxyl radicals (OH) affecting disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation with subsequently used chlorine-based disinfectants. This study presents the effects of varying exposures of O3 and •OH on DBP concentrations and their associated toxicity generated after subsequent chlorination. DBP formation potential tests and in vitro bioassays were conducted after batch ozonation experiments of coagulated surface water with and without addition of tertiary butanol (t-BuOH, 10 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mg/mg O3), and at different pH (6-8) and transferred ozone doses (0-1 mg/mg TOC). Although ozonation led to a 24-37% decrease in formation of total trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and trihaloacetamides, an increase in formation of total trihalonitromethanes, chloral hydrate, and haloketones was observed. This effect however was less pronounced for samples ozonated at conditions favoring molecular ozone (e.g., pH 6 and in the presence of t-BuOH) over •OH reactions (e.g., pH 8 and in the presence of H2O2). Compared to ozonation only, addition of H2O2 consistently enhanced formation of all DBP groups (20-61%) except trihalonitromethanes. This proves that •OH-transformed organic matter is more susceptible to halogen incorporation. Analogously, adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) concentrations increased under conditions that favor •OH reactions. The ratio of unknown to known AOX, however, was greater at conditions that promote direct O3 reactions. Although significant correlation was found between AOX and genotoxicity with the p53 bioassay, toxicity tests using 4 in vitro bioassays showed relatively low absolute differences between various ozonation conditions.

  12. Argon ion beam induced surface pattern formation on Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofsäss, H.; Bobes, O.; Zhang, K. [2nd Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, University Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-01-21

    The development of self-organized surface patterns on Si due to noble gas ion irradiation has been studied extensively in the past. In particular, Ar ions are commonly used and the pattern formation was analyzed as function of ion incidence angle, ion fluence, and ion energies between 250 eV and 140 keV. Very few results exist for the energy regime between 1.5 keV and 10 keV and it appears that pattern formation is completely absent for these ion energies. In this work, we present experimental data on pattern formation for Ar ion irradiation between 1 keV and 10 keV and ion incidence angles between 50° and 75°. We confirm the absence of patterns at least for ion fluences up to 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. Using the crater function formalism and Monte Carlo simulations, we calculate curvature coefficients of linear continuum models of pattern formation, taking into account contribution due to ion erosion and recoil redistribution. The calculations consider the recently introduced curvature dependence of the erosion crater function as well as the dynamic behavior of the thickness of the ion irradiated layer. Only when taking into account these additional contributions to the linear theory, our simulations clearly show that that pattern formation is strongly suppressed between about 1.5 keV and 10 keV, most pronounced at 3 keV. Furthermore, our simulations are now able to predict whether or not parallel oriented ripple patterns are formed, and in case of ripple formation the corresponding critical angles for the whole experimentally studied energies range between 250 eV and 140 keV.

  13. Interface formation between hydrocarbon ring molecules and III-V semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passmann, Regina

    2008-08-15

    In this work a systematical study to investigate the adsorption structures of small hydrocarbon ring shaped molecules on III-V semiconductor surfaces with Photo-Emission Spectroscopy (PES), Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) as well as Low Electron Energy Diffraction (LEED) was performed. To investigate the influence of the surface structure in detail the surface dimer configuration to the adsorption process of organic molecules GaAs(001) surfaces, the c(4 x 4), the (2 x 4) and the (4 x 2) have been investigated as well as the adsorption of cyclopentene on the InP(001)(2 x 4) reconstructed surface. In the direct comparison it is shown that cyclopentene bonds to the InP(001)(2 x 4) surface via a cycloaddition like reaction. During this adsorption the double bond splits which is in contrast to the adsorption of cyclopentene on the GaAs(001) surfaces. Therefrom it is concluded that the surface geometry has an influence on the resulting adsorption structure. In order to investigate the influence of the intra-molecular double bonds, cyclopentene (one double bond), 1,4-cyclohexadiene (two double bonds) and benzene (three double bonds) were used for the characterization of the interface formation. With the investigations on the GaAs(001) reconstructed surfaces it was shown that a dependency of the bonding configuration on the intra-molecular double bonds exists. During the adsorption of cyclopentene no evidence was found that the double bond has to be involved in the interface formation while during the adsorption of 1,4-cyclohexadiene and benzene the double bonds are involved. Furthermore it was found that a bonding to As atoms of the surface is more likely than a bonding to Ga atoms. (orig.)

  14. Antiseptics and microcosm biofilm formation on titanium surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia VERARDI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oral rehabilitation with osseointegrated implants is a way to restore esthetics and masticatory function in edentulous patients, but bacterial colonization around the implants may lead to mucositis or peri-implantitis and consequent implant loss. Peri-implantitis is the main complication of oral rehabilitation with dental implants and, therefore, it is necessary to take into account the potential effects of antiseptics such as chlorhexidine (CHX, chloramine T (CHT, triclosan (TRI, and essential oils (EO on bacterial adhesion and on biofilm formation. To assess the action of these substances, we used the microcosm technique, in which the oral environment and periodontal conditions are simulated in vitro on titanium discs with different surface treatments (smooth surface - SS, acid-etched smooth surface - AESS, sand-blasted surface - SBS, and sand-blasted and acid-etched surface - SBAES. Roughness measurements yielded the following results: SS: 0.47 µm, AESS: 0.43 µm, SB: 0.79 µm, and SBAES: 0.72 µm. There was statistical difference only between SBS and AESS. There was no statistical difference among antiseptic treatments. However, EO and CHT showed lower bacterial counts compared with the saline solution treatment (control group. Thus, the current gold standard (CHX did not outperform CHT and EO, which were efficient in reducing the biofilm biomass compared with saline solution.

  15. Formation of Secondary Particulate Matter by Reactions of Gas Phase Hexanal with Sulfate Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.

    2003-12-01

    The formation of secondary particulate matter from the atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds can significantly contribute to the particulate burden, but the formation of organic secondary particulate matter is poorly understood. One way of producing organic secondary particulate matter is the oxidation of hydrocarbons with seven or more carbon atoms to get products with low vapor pressure. However, several recent reports suggest that relatively low molecular weight carbonyls can enter the particle phase by undergoing heterogeneous reactions. This may be a very important mechanism for the formation of organic secondary particulate matter. Atmospheric aldehydes are important carbonyls in the gas phase, which form via the oxidation of hydrocarbons emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In this poster, we report the results on particle growth by the heterogeneous reactions of hexanal. A 5 L Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is set up to conduct the reactions in the presence of seed aerosol particles of deliquesced ammonia bisulfate. Hexanal is added into CSTR by syringe pump, meanwhile the concentrations of hexanal are monitored with High Pressure Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC 1050). A differential Mobility Analyzer (TSI 3071) set to an appropriate voltage is employed to obtain monodisperse aerosols, and another DMA associated with a Condensation Nuclear Counter (TSI 7610) is used to measure the secondary particle size distribution by the reaction in CSTR. This permits the sensitive determination of particle growth due to the heterogeneous reaction, very little growth occurs when hexanal added alone. Results for the simultaneous addition of hexanal and alcohols will also be presented.

  16. The effects of phytic acid on the Maillard reaction and the formation of acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Zhou, Yamin; Ma, Jimei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Hong

    2013-11-01

    Phytic acid, myo-inositol hexaphosphoric acid, exists in substantial (1-5%) amounts in edible plant seeds. In this study the effects of phytic acid on the Maillard reaction and the formation of acrylamide were investigated. Both phytic acid and phosphate enhanced browning in glucose/β-alanine system, but phytic acid was less effective than phosphate. Higher pH favoured the catalytic activities for both of them. The influence of the types of sugar and amino acid on the reaction was also examined. Browning was suppressed by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions, but an additive effect was observed for ferrous ions and phytic acid in glucose/β-alanine solution at pH 8.0. Both phytic acid and phosphate promoted the polymerisation of the reaction intermediates. The kinetics of Maillard reaction was first-ordered reaction in the presence of phytic acid. Phytic acid was less effective than phosphate in the formation of acrylamide. When potato slices were treated with sodium phytate and calcium chloride successively, the formation of acrylamide was greatly suppressed.

  17. Reactions and SEI Formation during Charging of Li-O2 Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Jonathan; Knudsen, Kristian Bastholm; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-01-01

    chemical formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer as the first monolayer of Li2O2 is oxidized, leading to a voltage increase. The first electrochemical degradation reaction is identified between 3.3 V and 3.5 V, and the chemical degradation is limited above 3.5 V, suggesting that a chemically...

  18. Effects of online advertising format and persuasion knowledge on audience reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tutaj, K.; van Reijmersdal, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    In an experiment (N = 99), effects of subtle and prominent online advertising formats, respectively sponsored content and banner ads, on audience reactions toward the advertisement are tested. In addition, the role of several persuasion knowledge elements such as understanding of persuasive intent a

  19. Effects of online advertising format and persuasion knowledge on audience reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tutaj, K.; van Reijmersdal, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    In an experiment (N = 99), effects of subtle and prominent online advertising formats, respectively sponsored content and banner ads, on audience reactions toward the advertisement are tested. In addition, the role of several persuasion knowledge elements such as understanding of persuasive intent a

  20. Silver(Ⅰ)-mediated reaction of trimethylsilylated arylacetylenes with sulfonyl chlorides: Unexpected formation of vinyl sulfones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui Sheng Deng; Teng Fei Sun

    2012-01-01

    A novel reaction of trimethylsilylated arylacetylenes with sulfonyl chlorides was performed in the presence of silver nitrate or triflate.Conjugated vinyl sulfones as dramatic products were obtained in moderate yields and with Z-selectivity.A free radical mechanism has been proposed to account for the formation of the products.

  1. Toward a Kinetic Model for Acrylamide Formation in a Glucose-Asparagine Reaction System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, J.J.; Loon, W.A.M.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Ruck, A.L.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A kinetic model for the formation of acrylamide in a glucose-asparagine reaction system is pro-posed. Equimolar solutions (0.2 M) of glucose and asparagine were heated at different tempera-tures (120-200 C) at pH 6.8. Besides the reactants, acrylamide, fructose, and melanoidins were quantified after

  2. On adduct formation and reactivity in the OCS plus OH reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johan Albrecht; Kyte, Mildrid; Østerstrøm, Freja From

    2017-01-01

    The OCS + OH reaction occurs either via adduct formation or direct S-abstraction. We investigate OH-oxidation of OCS using quantum chemical methods and find that the OC(OH)S adduct reacts rapidly with O2forming SOOH + CO2. SOOH rapidly dissociates under atmospheric conditions regenerating OH. We...

  3. A density functional theory study on the carbon chain growth of ethanol formation on Cu-Co (111) and (211) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Bohua; Dong, Xiuqin; Yu, Yingzhe; Wen, Guobin; Zhang, Minhua

    2017-08-01

    Calculations based on the first-principle density functional theory were carried out to study the most controversial reactions in ethanol formation from syngas on Cu-Co surfaces: CO dissociation mechanism and the key reactions of carbon chain growth of ethanol formation (HCO insertion reactions) on four model surfaces (Cu-Co (111) and (211) with Cu-rich or Co-rich surfaces) to investigate the synergy of the Cu and Co components since the complete reaction network of ethanol formation from syngas is a huge computational burden to calculate on four Cu-Co surface models. We investigated adsorption of important species involved in these reactions, activation barrier and reaction energy of H-assisted dissociation mechanism, directly dissociation of CO, and HCO insertion reactions (CHx + HCO → CHxCHO (x = 1-3)) on four Cu-Co surface models. It was found that reactions on Cu-rich (111) and (211) surfaces all have lower activation barrier in H-assisted dissociation and HCO insertion reactions, especially CH + HCO → CHCHO reaction. The PDOS of 4d orbitals of surface Cu and Co atoms of all surfaces were studied. Analysis of d-band center of Cu and Co atoms and the activation barrier data suggested the correlation between electronic property and catalytic performance. Cu-Co bimetallic with Cu-rich surface allows Co to have higher catalytic activity through the interaction of Cu and Co atom. Then it will improve the adsorption of CO and catalytic activity of Co. Thus it is more favorable to the carbon chain growth in ethanol formation. Our study revealed the factors influencing the carbon chain growth in ethanol production and explained the internal mechanism from electronic property aspect.

  4. Catalytic Systems Containing p-Toluenesulfonic Acid for the Coupling Reaction of Formaldehyde and Methyl Formate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kebing Wang; Jie Yao; Yue Wang; Gongying Wang

    2007-01-01

    The coupling reaction of formaldehyde (FA) and methyl formate (MF) to form methyl glycolate (MG) and methyl methoxy acetate(MMAc),catalyzed by p-toluenesulfonic acid(p-TsOH) as well as assisted by different kinds of solvents or Ni-containing compounds.had been investigated.The results showed that when the reaction was carried out at 140℃ with a molar ratio of FA to MF of 0.65:1,molar fraction of p-TsOH to total feedstock of 11.0%,and reaction time of 3 h,the yield of MG and MMAc Was 31.1% and 17.1%.respectively.p-TsOH catalyzed the coupling reaction by means of the synergistic catalysis of protonic acidity and soft basicity.Adding extra solvents to the reaction system Was unfavorable for the reaction.The composite catalytic system consisting of p-TsOH and NiX2(X=Cl,Br,I)exhibited a high catalytic performance for the coupling reaction,and NiX2 acted as a promoter in the reaction,whose promotion for the catalysis increased in the following order:NiCl2<NiBr2<NiI2.The present system is less corrosive when compared with the previous system,in which strong inorganic liquid acids were used as catalysts.

  5. Capability of LEP-type surfaces to describe noncollinear reactions 2 - Polyatomic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa-Garcia, Joaquin

    2001-01-01

    In this second article of the series, the popular LEP-type surface for collinear reaction paths and a "bent" surface, which involves a saddle point geometry with a nonlinear central angle, were used to examine the capacity of LEP-type surfaces to describe the kinetics and dynamics of noncollinear reaction paths in polyatomic systems. Analyzing the geometries, vibrational frequencies, curvature along the reaction path (to estimate the tunneling effect and the reaction coordinate-bound modes coupling), and the variational transition- state theory thermal rate constants for the NH//3 + O(**3P) reaction, we found that the "collinear" LEP-type and the "bent" surfaces for this polyatomic system show similar behavior, thus allowing a considerable saving in time and computational effort. This agreement is especially encouraging for this polyatomic system because in the Cs symmetry the reaction proceeds via two electronic states of symmetries **3A prime and **3A double prime , which had to be independently calibrated....

  6. Diagnostics for the Analysis of Surface Chemistry Effects on Composite Energetic Material Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Diagnostics for the Analysis of Surface Chemistry Effects on Composite Energetic Material Reactions The views...peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Diagnostics for the Analysis of Surface Chemistry Effects on Composite Energetic Material Reactions Report...2.00 4.00 Evan Vargas, Michelle L. Pantoya, Mohammed A Saed, Brandon L Weeks. Advanced Susceptors for Microwave Heating of Energetic Materials

  7. Dynamics of Surface Exchange Reactions Between Au and Pt for HER and HOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, Billie; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; Bonde, Jacob Lindner;

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric analysis of the Pt-on-Au system for hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER/HOR) indicates that dynamic surface exchange reactions occur between Pt and Au. HER/HOR activities depend on the dominant surface species present, which is controllable by the potential applied...

  8. Organosulfate Formation through the Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide with Unsaturated Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, C.; Passananti, M.; Kong, L.; Shang, J.; Perrier, S.; Jianmin, C.; Donaldson, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric formation of organosulfur derivatives through reaction with SO2 is generally mediated by oxidants such as O3, OH; recently we have proposed a direct reaction between SO2 and unsaturated compounds as another possible pathway for organosulfate formation in the troposphere. For the first time it was shown recently that a heterogeneous reaction between SO2 and oleic acid (OA; an unsaturated fatty acid) takes place and leads efficiently to the formation of organosulfur products. Here, we demonstrate that this reaction proceeds on various unsaturated compounds, and may therefore have a general environmental impact. We used different experimental strategies i.e., a coated flow tube (CFT), an aerosol flow tube (AFT) and a DRIFT (diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform) cell. The reaction products were analyzed by means of liquid chromatography coupled to a high resolution mass spectrometer (LC-HR-MS). We report indeed that SO2 reacts with large variety of C=C unsaturations and that even in the presence of ozone, SO2 reacts with OA leading to organosulfur products. A strong enhancement in product formation is observed under actinic illumination, increases the atmospheric significance of this chemical pathway. This is probably due to the chromophoric nature of the SO2 adduct with C=C bonds, and means that the contribution of this direct addition of SO2 could be in excess of 5%. The detection in atmospheric aerosols of organosulfur compounds with the same chemical formulae as the products identified here seems to confirm the importance of this reaction in the atmosphere.

  9. [Formation of microbial populations on the surface of protective coatings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopteva, Zh P; Zanina, V V; Piliashenko-Novokhatnyĭ, A I; Kopteva, A E; Kozlova, I A

    2001-01-01

    Formation of microbial cenosis on the surface of polyethylene-, polyurethane- and oil-bitumen-based protective coatings was studied in dynamics during 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days. It has been shown that the biofilm was formed on the protective materials during 14 days and consisted of ammonifying, denitrifying, hydrocarbon-oxidizing and sulphate-reducing bacteria referred to Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Kesulfovibrio genera. The bacteria which form the biofilm on coatings possess high denitrifying and sulphate-reducing activities. Corrosion inhibitors-biocydes, introduced in composition of oil-bitumen coatings suppressed growth and metabolic activity of corrosion-active bacteria.

  10. Drop formation by thermal fluctuations at an ultralow surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, Y; Aarts, D G A L; van der Wiel, J H; Wegdam, G; Eggers, J; Lekkerkerker, H N W; Bonn, Daniel

    2006-12-15

    We present experimental evidence that drop breakup is caused by thermal noise in a system with a surface tension that is more than 10(6) times smaller than that of water. We observe that at very small scales classical hydrodynamics breaks down and the characteristic signatures of pinch-off due to thermal noise are observed. Surprisingly, the noise makes the drop size distribution more uniform, by suppressing the formation of satellite droplets of the smallest sizes. The crossover between deterministic hydrodynamic motion and stochastic thermally driven motion has repercussions for our understanding of small-scale hydrodynamics, important in many problems such as micro- or nanofluidics and interfacial singularities.

  11. Dynamics of formation of the Exclusion Zone near hydrophilic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ninno, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    EZ water is unable to host solutes, what provides the root of the name Exclusion Zone, and its formation law points towards a diffusive process. These peculiarities have attracted the interest of scientists because it challenges all the theories which have tried to describe the structure of liquid water. The mixture of H-bond stable and H-bond distorted structures envisaged by very recent experimental findings, cannot account for the long-lived hexagonal configuration observed near the Nafion surface. A theoretical account for the phenomenology of H-bond is provided which looks able to explain many among the most striking feature of this water.

  12. Some insights into formamide formation through gas-phase reactions in the interstellar medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio, E-mail: predondo@qf.uva.es [Computational Chemistry Group, Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-01-10

    We study the viability of different gas-phase ion-molecule reactions that could produce precursors of formamide in the interstellar medium. We analyze different reactions between cations containing a nitrogen atom (NH{sub 3}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, NH{sub 3}OH{sup +}, and NH{sub 2}OH{sup +}) and neutral molecules having one carbonyl group (H{sub 2}CO and HCOOH). First, we report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies for the proposed processes. Second, for more favorable reactions, from a thermodynamic point of view, we perform a theoretical study of the potential energy surface. In particular, the more exothermic processes correspond to the reactions of ionized and protonated hydroxylamine with formaldehyde. In addition, a neutral-neutral reaction has also been considered. The analysis of the potential energy surfaces corresponding to these reactions shows that these processes present a net activation barrier and that they cannot be considered as a source of formamide in space.

  13. Theoretical study on the formation of tetraoxygen conformational isomerism in the CO 2 with O 3 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Moein; Piri, Farideh; Hajari, Nasim; Karimi, Leila

    2010-10-01

    The reaction mechanism of CO 2 with O 3 on the singlet potential energy surface has been investigated at the CBS-QB3//B3LYP/6-311++G(3df, 3pd) level of theory. The reactants are initially associated with adducts IN1 (OOO-OCO) and IN2 (OC-cyclic O 4) in a barrier-less process. Then, adducts undergo isomerization and dissociation processes to produce P 1 (CO + 2 3O 2) and P 2 (CO 3 + 3O 2) with two different mechanisms. The calculated results show that there is no favorable pathway for the formation of these two products in the atmospheric reaction of CO 2 with O 3.

  14. Bap: a family of surface proteins involved in biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2006-03-01

    A group of surface proteins sharing several structural and functional features is emerging as an important element in the biofilm formation process of diverse bacterial species. The first member of this group of proteins was identified in a Staphylococcus aureus mastitis isolate and was named Bap (biofilm-associated protein). As common structural features, Bap-related proteins: (i) are present on the bacterial surface; (ii) show a high molecular weight; (iii) contain a core domain of tandem repeats; (iv) confer upon bacteria the capacity to form a biofilm; (v) play a relevant role in bacterial infectious processes; and (vi) can occasionally be contained in mobile elements. This review summarizes recent studies that have identified and assigned roles to Bap-related proteins in biofilm biology and virulence.

  15. Integrated in situ characterization of molten salt catalyst surface: Evidence of sodium peroxide and OH radical formation

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2017-06-26

    Na-based catalysts (i.e., Na2WO4) were proposed to selectively catalyze OH radical formation from H2O and O2 at high temperatures. This reaction may proceed on molten salt state surfaces due to the lower melting point of the used Na salts compared to the reaction temperature. This study provides direct evidence of the molten salt state of Na2WO4, which can form OH radicals, using in situ techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometer, and ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS). As a result, Na2O2 species, which were hypothesized to be responsible for the formation of OH radicals, has been identified on the outer surfaces at temperatures ≥800°C, and these species are useful for various gas-phase hydrocarbon reactions including the selective transformation of methane to ethane.

  16. Formation of degradation compounds from lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery: sugar reaction mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helena; Sørensen, Hanne R.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    , several aldehydes and ketones and many different organic acids and aromatic compounds may be generated during hydrothermal treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. The reaction mechanisms are of interest because the very same compounds that are possible inhibitors for biomass processing enzymes......The degradation compounds formed during pretreatment when lignocellulosic biomass is processed to ethanol or other biorefinery products include furans, phenolics, organic acids, as well as mono- and oligomeric pentoses and hexoses. Depending on the reaction conditions glucose can be converted to 5...... and microorganisms may be valuable biobased chemicals. Hence a new potential for industrial scale synthesis of chemicals has emerged. A better understanding of the reaction mechanisms and the impact of the reaction conditions on the product formation is thus a prerequisite for designing better biomass processing...

  17. Formation and photocatalytic decomposition of a pellicle on anatase surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, F; Haupt, M; Eichler, M; Doering, C; Klostermann, H; Scheideler, L; Lachmann, S; Oehr, C; Wendel, H P; Decker, E; Geis-Gerstorfer, J; von Ohle, C

    2012-01-01

    The acquired dental pellicle plays a critical role in the adhesion and detachment of dental plaque bacteria. It has been reported that titanium dioxide biomaterials decompose single-protein films by photocatalysis. However, it is not known whether this can also be achieved with complex structured pellicle films. This in vitro study investigated in real-time the formation and photocatalytic decomposition of human pellicle at anatase-saliva interfaces. Nanostructured polycrystalline anatase layers were deposited on titanium-coated quartz crystals by magnetron-sputtering, serving as a model for titanium implant surfaces. The quartz crystals were used as acoustic sensors in a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) system with dissipation. In situ UV irradiation of pellicle-covered anatase caused a statistically significant decrease of the adsorbed salivary mass. In contrast, photocatalytic decomposition of pellicle could not be observed on reference titanium surfaces. Wettability characterization revealed superhydrophilicity of anatase upon UV irradiation, whereas titanium was unaffected. XPS measurements provide further information concerning the decomposition of the salivary films. The results suggest that the photocatalytic activity of polycrystalline anatase-modified biomaterial surfaces is able to decompose complex structured macromolecular pellicle films. Therefore, this study opens the way to surface modifications supporting therapeutic approaches of biofilm removal.

  18. Star Formation Isochrone Surfaces: Clues on Star Formation Quenching in Dense Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Aragon-Calvo, M A; Silk, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The star formation history of galaxies is a complex process usually considered to be stochastic in nature, for which we can only give average descriptions such as the color-density relation. In this work we follow star-forming gas particles in a hydrodynamical N-body simulation back in time in order to study their initial spatial configuration. By keeping record of the time when a gas particle started forming stars we can produce gas-star isochrone surfaces delineating the surfaces of accreting gas that begin producing stars at different times. These accretion surfaces are closely packed inside dense regions, intersecting each other, and as a result galaxies inside proto-clusters stop accreting gas early, naturally explaining the color dependence on density. The process described here has a purely gravitational / geometrical origin, arguably operating at a more fundamental level than complex processes such as AGN and supernovae, and providing a conceptual origin for the color-density relation.

  19. DFT study of the formation mechanism of anthraquinone from the reaction of NO2 and anthracene on NaCl clusters: the role of NaNO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao; Yu, Qiming; Wang, Hongming

    2016-12-08

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and oxygenated-PAHs are globally worrisome air pollutants because of their highly direct-acting mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. The formation of oxygenated-PAHs is of crucial importance for the prevention of their atmospheric pollution successfully. In this paper, the formation mechanism of oxygenated-PAHs from the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with anthracene on the surface of NaCl was studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. At first, the various adsorption configurations of NO2 and N2O4 on NaCl were investigated. The chemical conversion mechanisms among these configurations were also investigated. It is found that these structures can easily interconvert due to their low energy barriers. NaNO3 was found to be the main product of the reaction of NO2/N2O4 on NaCl. Then the oxidation mechanism of anthracene by NO2 on the NaCl surface showed that NaNO3 is able to oxidize anthracene and plays a catalytic role in the reaction process. This means that the formation of NaNO3 is very important to promote the formation of 9,10-anthraquinone from the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with anthracene. Our calculations also showed that the introduction of water can greatly accelerate this reaction process.

  20. Computational Study of Field Initiated Surface Reactions for Synthesis of Diamond and Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, Charles Bruce

    1999-01-01

    This project involves using quantum chemistry to simulate surface chemical reactions in the presence of an electric field for nanofabrication of diamond and silicon. A field delivered by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to a nanometer scale region of a surface affects chemical reaction potential energy surfaces (PES) to direct atomic scale surface modification to fabricate sub-nanometer structures. Our original hypothesis is that the applied voltage polarizes the charge distribution of the valence electrons and that these distorted molecular orbitals can be manipulated with the STM so as to change the relative stabilities of the electronic configurations over the reaction coordinates and thus the topology of the PES and reaction kinetics. Our objective is to investigate the effect of applied bias on surface reactions and the extent to which STM delivered fields can be used to direct surface chemical reactions on an atomic scale on diamond and silicon. To analyze the fundamentals of field induced chemistry and to investigate the application of this technique for the fabrication of nanostructures, we have employed methods capable of accurately describing molecular electronic structure. The methods we employ are density functional theory (DFT) quantum chemical (QC) methods. To determine the effect of applied bias on surface reactions we have calculated the QC PESs in various applied external fields for various reaction steps for depositing or etching diamond and silicon. We have chosen reactions which are thought to play a role in etching and the chemical vapor deposition growth of Si and diamond. The PESs of the elementary reaction steps involved are then calculated under the applied fields, which we vary in magnitude and configuration. We pay special attention to the change in the reaction barriers, and transition state locations, and search for low energy reaction channels which were inaccessible without the applied bias.

  1. Cellulose Microfibril Formation by Surface-Tethered Cellulose Synthase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Snehasish; Omadjela, Okako; Gaddes, David; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Zimmer, Jochen; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2016-02-23

    Cellulose microfibrils are pseudocrystalline arrays of cellulose chains that are synthesized by cellulose synthases. The enzymes are organized into large membrane-embedded complexes in which each enzyme likely synthesizes and secretes a β-(1→4) glucan. The relationship between the organization of the enzymes in these complexes and cellulose crystallization has not been explored. To better understand this relationship, we used atomic force microscopy to visualize cellulose microfibril formation from nickel-film-immobilized bacterial cellulose synthase enzymes (BcsA-Bs), which in standard solution only form amorphous cellulose from monomeric BcsA-B complexes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques show that surface-tethered BcsA-Bs synthesize highly crystalline cellulose II in the presence of UDP-Glc, the allosteric activator cyclic-di-GMP, as well as magnesium. The cellulose II cross section/diameter and the crystal size and crystallinity depend on the surface density of tethered enzymes as well as the overall concentration of substrates. Our results provide the correlation between cellulose microfibril formation and the spatial organization of cellulose synthases.

  2. Interactions Between Surface Reactions and Gas-phase Reactions in Catalytic Combustion and Their Influence on Ignition of HCCI Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of methane in a microchannel whose surface was coated with platinum(Pt)catalyst was studied by numerical-simulation. The effects of gas-phase reactions on the whole catalytic combustion process were analyzed at a high inlet pressure. A sensitivity analysis of the detailed mechanisms of the surface reaction of methane on Pt revealed that the most sensitive reactions affecting the heterogeneous ignition are oxygen adsorption/desorption and methane adsorption, and the most sensitive reactions affecting the homogeneous ignition are OH and H2O adsorption/desorption. The combustion process of the homogeneous charge compression ignition(HCCI) engine whose piston face was coated with Pt catalyst was simulated. The effects of catalysis and the most sensitive reactions on the ignition timing and the concentration of the main intermediate species during the HCCI engine combustion are discussed. The results show that the ignition timing of the HCCI engine can be increased by catalysis, and the most sensitive reactions affecting the ignition timing of the HCCI engine are OH and H2O adsorption/desorption.

  3. The formation of light absorbing insoluble organic compounds from the reaction of biomass burning precursors and Fe(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Avi; Lin, Peng; Bhaduri, Bhaskar; Laskin, Alexander; Rudich, Yinon

    2017-04-01

    Dust particles and volatile organic compounds from fuel or biomass burning are two major components that affect air quality in urban polluted areas. We characterized the products from the reaction of soluble Fe(III), a reactive transition metal originating from dust particles dissolution processes, with phenolic compounds , namely, guaiacol, syringol, catechol, o- and p- cresol that are known products of incomplete fuel and biomass combustion but also from other natural sources such as humic compounds degradation. We found that under acidic conditions comparable to those expected on a dust particle surface, phenolic compounds readily react with dissolved Fe(III), leading to the formation of insoluble polymeric compounds. We characterized the insoluble products by x-ray photoelectron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, elemental analysis and thermo-gravimetric analysis. We found that the major chromophores formed are oligomers (from dimers to pentamers) of the reaction precursors that efficiently absorb light between 300nm and 500nm. High variability of the mass absorption coefficient of the reaction products was observed with catechol and guaiacol showing high absorption at the 300-500nm range that is comparable to that of brown carbon (BrC) from biomass burning studies. The studied reaction is a potential source for the in-situ production of secondary BrC material under dark conditions. Our results suggest a reaction path for the formation of bio-available iron in coastal polluted areas where dust particles mix with biomass burning pollution plumes. Such mixing can occur, for instance in the coast of West Africa or North Africa during dust and biomass burning seasons

  4. Heterogeneous Reactions of Acetic Acid with Oxide Surfaces: Effects of Mineralogy and Relative Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingjin; Larish, Whitney A; Fang, Yuan; Gankanda, Aruni; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the heterogeneous uptake of gaseous acetic acid on different oxides including γ-Al2O3, SiO2, and CaO under a range of relative humidity conditions. Under dry conditions, the uptake of acetic acid leads to the formation of both acetate and molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on γ-Al2O3 and CaO and only molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on SiO2. More importantly, under the conditions of this study, dimers are the major form for molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on all three particle surfaces investigated, even at low acetic acid pressures under which monomers are the dominant species in the gas phase. We have also determined saturation surface coverages for acetic acid adsorption on these three oxides under dry conditions as well as Langmuir adsorption constants in some cases. Kinetic analysis shows that the reaction rate of acetic acid increases by a factor of 3-5 for γ-Al2O3 when relative humidity increases from 0% to 15%, whereas for SiO2 particles, acetic acid and water are found to compete for surface adsorption sites.

  5. Spatial Heterogeneity and Imperfect Mixing in Chemical Reactions: Visualization of Density-Driven Pattern Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina G. Sobel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Imperfect mixing is a concern in industrial processes, everyday processes (mixing paint, bread machines, and in understanding salt water-fresh water mixing in ecosystems. The effects of imperfect mixing become evident in the unstirred ferroin-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, the prototype for chemical pattern formation. Over time, waves of oxidation (high ferriin concentration, blue propagate into a background of low ferriin concentration (red; their structure reflects in part the history of mixing in the reaction vessel. However, it may be difficult to separate mixing effects from reaction effects. We describe a simpler model system for visualizing density-driven pattern formation in an essentially unmixed chemical system: the reaction of pale yellow Fe3+ with colorless SCN− to form the blood-red Fe(SCN2+ complex ion in aqueous solution. Careful addition of one drop of Fe(NO33 to KSCN yields striped patterns after several minutes. The patterns appear reminiscent of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and convection rolls, arguing that pattern formation is caused by density-driven mixing.

  6. Magnetization of individual yeast cells by in situ formation of iron oxide on cell surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinsu; Lee, Hojae; Choi, Insung S.; Yang, Sung Ho

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic functionalization of living cells has intensively been investigated with the aim of various bioapplications such as selective separation, targeting, and localization of the cells by using an external magnetic field. However, the magnetism has not been introduced to individual living cells through the in situ chemical reactions because of harsh conditions required for synthesis of magnetic materials. In this work, magnetic iron oxide was formed on the surface of living cells by optimizing reactions conditions to be mild sufficiently enough to sustain cell viability. Specifically, the reactive LbL strategy led to formation of magnetically responsive yeast cells with iron oxide shells. This facile and direct post-magnetization method would be a useful tool for remote manipulation of living cells with magnetic interactions, which is an important technique for the integration of cell-based circuits and the isolation of cell in microfluidic devices.

  7. Development of an FTIR in situ reactor for real time study of surface reactions in photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauchecorne, Birger

    For many years, photocatalysis has been proposed as one of the promising techniques to abate environmental pollutants. To improve the catalytic efficiency, it is vital to know the reaction mechanisms of the photocatalytic degradation. Different methods are therefore described in literature to study these mechanisms at the gaseous phase/photocatalyst interface with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a commonly used method. The reactors described in literature and/or available on the market experience some technical and scientific difficulties. Generally, the catalyst can only be investigated after the reactions have occurred, or it is only possible to look at the changes in the gas phase concentrations while the reactions are taking place. It is thus a major challenge to develop a reactor which makes it possible to detect changes on the catalyst surface at the moment the reactions are happening. In this work, a new reactor is developed that makes it possible to study the catalytic surface at the moment the reactions occur, by means of transmission-absorption FTIR spectroscopy. Moreover, by using UV LEDs, it was possible to install the UV light inside the reactor area, so that no harmful UV light can leave the reactor, inherently making it a safer method. It was also opted to construct the reactor in a modular way, so that every part was interchangeable and could easily be replaced according to the needs of the researcher. A special screw cap is designed to hold the UV LEDs on a printed circuit board and to fit in every standard FTIR spectrometer. This study provides exciting new insights in the photocatalytic degradation mechanism of ethylene and acetaldehyde. It is for instance found that OH radicals are used as the oxidising agents to abate these pollutants. For ethylene it was proven that the molecular orbitals play an important role, resulting in the formation of both formaldehyde and formic acid as intermediates before complete mineralisation

  8. Impact of high-intensity ultrasound on the formation of lactulose and Maillard reaction glycoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzo-Martínez, Marta; Montilla, Antonia; Megías-Pérez, Roberto; Olano, Agustín; Moreno, F Javier; Villamiel, Mar

    2014-08-15

    The impact of high-intensity ultrasound (US) on the formation of lactulose during lactose isomerization and on the obtention of lysine-glucose glycoconjugates during Maillard reaction (MR) has been studied, respectively, in basic and neutral media. As compared to equivalent conventional heat treatments, a higher formation of furosine, as indicator of initial steps of MR, was observed together with more advance of the reaction in US treated samples, this effect being more pronounced with the increase of US amplitude (50-70%) and temperature (25-40 °C). Regarding the influence of US on lactulose formation, in general, in a buffered system (pH 10.0), US at 70% of amplitude and 60 °C increased the rate of lactose isomerization, higher values of lactulose, epilactose and galactose being observed in comparison to conventional heating. The results of this work showed an acceleration of both reactions by US, indicating its usefulness to promote the formation of functional ingredients.

  9. Chemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formation from phenyl radical pyrolysis and reaction of phenyl and acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandini, A; Malewicki, T; Brezinsky, K

    2012-03-15

    An experimental investigation of phenyl radical pyrolysis and the phenyl radical + acetylene reaction has been performed to clarify the role of different reaction mechanisms involved in the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) serving as precursors for soot formation. Experiments were conducted using GC/GC-MS diagnostics coupled to the high-pressure single-pulse shock tube present at the University of Illinois at Chicago. For the first time, comprehensive speciation of the major stable products, including small hydrocarbons and large PAH intermediates, was obtained over a wide range of pressures (25-60 atm) and temperatures (900-1800 K) which encompass the typical conditions in modern combustion devices. The experimental results were used to validate a comprehensive chemical kinetic model which provides relevant information on the chemistry associated with the formation of PAH compounds. In particular, the modeling results indicate that the o-benzyne chemistry is a key factor in the formation of multi-ring intermediates in phenyl radical pyrolysis. On the other hand, the PAHs from the phenyl + acetylene reaction are formed mainly through recombination between single-ring aromatics and through the hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition mechanism. Polymerization is the common dominant process at high temperature conditions.

  10. Contrasting reactions of hydrated electron and formate radical with 2-thio analogues of cytosine and uracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanthkumar, Kavanal P; Alvarez-Idaboy, Juan R; Kumar, Pavitra V; Singh, Beena G; Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2016-10-19

    2-Thiocytosine (TC) and 2-thiouracil (TU) were subjected to hydrated electron (eaq(-)), formate radical (CO2˙(-)) and 2-hydroxypropan-2-yl radical ((CH3)2˙COH) reactions in aqueous medium. Transients were characterized by absorption spectroscopy and the experimental findings were rationalized by DFT calculations at LC-ωPBE and M06-2X levels using a 6-311+G(d,p) basis set and SMD solvation. In eaq(-) reactions, a ring N-atom protonated radical of TC and an exocyclic O-atom protonated radical of TU were observed via addition of eaq(-) and subsequent protonation by solvent molecules. However, two competing but simultaneous mechanisms are operative in CO2˙(-) reactions with TC and TU. The first one corresponds to formations of N(O)-atom protonated radicals (similar to eaq(-) reactions); the second mechanism led to 2 center-3 electron, sulfur-sulfur bonded neutral dimer radicals, TCdim˙ and TUdim˙. DFT calculations demonstrated that H-abstraction by CO2˙(-) from TC(TU) results in S-centered radical which upon combination with TC(TU) provide the dimer radical. In some cases, DFT energy profiles were further validated by CBS-QB3//M06-2X calculations. This is the first time report for a contradictory behavior in the mechanisms of eaq(-) and CO2˙(-) reactions with any pyrimidines or their thio analogues.

  11. Early stages of particle formation in precipitation reactions-quinacridone and boehmite as generic examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberkorn, H; Franke, D; Frechen, Th; Goesele, W; Rieger, J

    2003-03-01

    For many products, such as nanoparticulate systems, particle formation by precipitation is an essential procedural step. To learn more about the processes involved in precipitation, we investigated particle formation during precipitation reactions by means of online and offline methods. As model systems we chose the catalyst boehmite and the organic pigment quinacridone. The reactants were mixed in a mixing device and led into a reaction tube. At the end of the tube, a free jet of the suspension was produced. By varying the length of the reaction tube the time between mixing the reactants and the moment of observation was varied. Thus a time resolution down to 10 ms from the beginning of the reaction was obtained. Small-angle X-ray scattering on the free jet yielded online information about the structural inhomogeneities within the reacting systems. Transmission electron microscopy patterns obtained from quenched samples, which were taken by shooting copper grids through the free jet into liquid nitrogen, provided complementary information about structural features. Immediately after mixture an emulsion-like structure develops indicating that classical nucleation theory does not apply in the present systems. This finding can be explained by assuming instantaneous reaction at the interfaces of the two reactants that meet in the mixing device. From this preliminary state primary particles form with a size in the nanometer range. The observations can be rationalized by considering the underlying hydrodynamics of turbulent mixing of the reactants.

  12. Quantifying the ionic reaction channels in the Secondary Organic Aerosol formation from glyoxal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxut, Aurelia; Nozière, Barbara; Rossignol, Stéphanie; George, Christian; Waxman, Eleanor Marie; Laskin, Alexander; Slowik, Jay; Dommen, Josef; Prévôt, André; Baltensperger, Urs; Volkamer, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Glyoxal, a common organic gas in the atmosphere, has been identified in recent years as an important Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) precursor (Volkamer et al., 2007). But, unlike with other precursors, the SOA is largely produced by particle-phase reactions (Volkamer et al., 2009) and equilibria (Kampf et al. 2013) that are still not entirely characterized. Since 2009 series of smog chamber experiments have been performed within the Eurochamp program at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, to investigate SOA formation from glyoxal. In these experiments, glyoxal was produced by the gas-phase oxidation of acetylene in the presence of seeds, the seed composition and other conditions being varied. The 2011 campaign resulted in the identification of salting processes controlling the glyoxal partitioning in the seeds (Kampf et al. 2013). This presentation will report results of the 2013 campaign focusing on the identification of the various reactions (ionic or photo-induced) contributing to the SOA mass. In particular, the contribution of the ionic reactions, i.e. mediated by NH4+, were investigated by quantifying the formation of imidazoles (imidazole, imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde, 2,2'-biimidazole) from the small condensation channel of glyoxal with ammonia. For this, the SOA produced were collected on quartz filters and analyzed by Orbitrap LC/MS (Q-Exactive Thermo Fisher). The formation of other products such as organic acids was also investigated to determine potential competing reactions. Time-resolved MOUDI sampling coupled with nano-DESY/ESI-MS/MS analysis was also used to identify nitrogen- and sulphur-containing products from all the reactions. The results obtained for a range of conditions will be presented and compared with recent mechanistic information on the ionic reaction channels (Nozière et al., in preparation, 2013). The implementation of all this new information into a glyoxal-SOA model will be discussed.

  13. Secondary organic aerosol formation from ozone reactions with single terpenoids and terpenoid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Michael S.; Wells, J. Raymond; Siegel, Jeffrey A.

    2011-08-01

    Ozone reacts with indoor-emitted terpenoids to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Most SOA research has focused on ozone reactions with single terpenoids or with consumer products, and this paper reports the results from an investigation of SOA formation from ozone reactions with both single terpenoids and mixtures of D-limonene, α-pinene, and α-terpineol. Transient experiments were conducted at low (25 ppb) and high (100 ppb) initial concentrations of ozone. The three terpenoids were tested singly and in combinations in a manner that controlled for their different reaction rates with ozone. The SOA formation was assessed by examining the evolution in time of the resulting number size-distributions and estimates of the mass concentrations. The results suggest that at higher ozone and terpenoid concentrations, SOA number formation follows a linear trend as a function of the initial rate of reaction. This finding was valid for both single terpenoids and mixtures. Generally speaking, higher ozone and terpenoid concentrations also led to larger geometric mean diameters and smaller geometric standard deviations of fitted lognormal distributions of the formed SOA. By assuming a density, mass concentrations were also assessed and did not follow as consistent of a trend. At low ozone concentration conditions, reactions with only D-limonene yielded the largest number concentrations of any experiment, even more than experiments with mixtures containing D-limonene and much higher overall terpenoid concentrations. This finding was not seen for high ozone concentrations. These experiments demonstrate quantifiable trends for SOA forming reactions of ozone and mixtures, and this work provides a framework for expanding these results to more complex mixtures and consumer products.

  14. Instability and pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems: a higher order analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Syed Shahed; Sharma, Rahul; Bhattacharyya, S P; Ray, D S

    2007-08-14

    We analyze the condition for instability and pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems beyond the usual linear regime. The approach is based on taking into account perturbations of higher orders. Our analysis reveals that nonlinearity present in the system can be instrumental in determining the stability of a system, even to the extent of destabilizing one in a linearly stable parameter regime. The analysis is also successful to account for the observed effect of additive noise in modifying the instability threshold of a system. The analytical study is corroborated by numerical simulation in a standard reaction-diffusion system.

  15. Condensation reaction of formaldehyde and methyl formate catalyzed by a composite catalyst system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The condensation reaction of formaldehyde and methyl formate to form methyl glycolate and methyl methoxy acetate catalyzed by p-toluenesulfonic acid and different Lewis acid compounds has been investigated. The composite catalytic system consisting of p-toluenesulfonic acid and NiX2 (X = Cl, Br, I), especially NiI2, exhibited a high catalytic performance for the condensation reaction, the total yield of MG and MMAc was up to 72.37%.(C) 2007 Gong Ying Wang. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanistic Aspects in the Formation, Growth and Surface Functionalization of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Organic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederberger, Markus; Deshmukh, Rupali

    2017-04-04

    The synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles in organic solvents, so-called nonaqueous (or nonhydrolytic) processes represent powerful alternatives to aqueous approaches and have become an independent research field. 10 years ago, when we published our first review on organic reaction pathways in nonaqueous sol-gel approaches,[1] the number of examples was relatively limited. Nowadays, it is almost impossible to provide an exhaustive overview. Here we review the development of the last few years, without neglecting pioneering examples, which help to follow the historical development. The importance of a profound understanding of mechanistic aspects of nanoparticle crystallization and formation mechanisms can't be overestimated, when it comes to the design of rational synthesis concepts under minimization of trial-and-error experiments. The main reason for the progress in mechanistic understanding lies in the availability of characterization tools that make it possible to monitor chemical reactions from the dissolution of the precursor to the nucleation and growth of the nanoparticles, by ex-situ methods involving sampling after different reaction times, but more and more also by in-situ studies. After a short introduction to experimental aspects of nonaqueous sol-gel routes to metal oxide nanoparticles, we provide an overview of the main and basic organic reaction pathways in these approaches. Afterwards, we summarize the main characterization methods to study formation mechanisms, and then we discuss in great depth the chemical formation mechanisms of many different types of metal oxide nanoparticles. The review concludes with a paragraph on selected crystallization mechanisms reported for nonaqueous systems and a few illustrative examples of nonaqueous sol-gel concepts applied to surface chemistry.

  17. Surface grafted chitosan gels. Part II. Gel formation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per M; Tyrode, Eric

    2014-07-29

    Responsive biomaterial hydrogels attract significant attention due to their biocompatibility and degradability. In order to make chitosan based gels, we first graft one layer of chitosan to silica, and then build a chitosan/poly(acrylic acid) multilayer using the layer-by-layer approach. After cross-linking the chitosan present in the polyelectrolyte multilayer, poly(acrylic acid) is partly removed by exposing the multilayer structure to a concentrated carbonate buffer solution at a high pH, leaving a surface-grafted cross-linked gel. Chemical cross-linking enhances the gel stability against detachment and decomposition. The chemical reaction between gluteraldehyde, the cross-linking agent, and chitosan was followed in situ using total internal reflection Raman (TIRR) spectroscopy, which provided a molecular insight into the complex reaction mechanism, as well as the means to quantify the cross-linking density. The amount of poly(acrylic acid) trapped inside the surface grafted films was found to decrease with decreasing cross-linking density, as confirmed in situ using TIRR, and ex situ by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements on dried films. The responsiveness of the chitosan-based gels with respect to pH changes was probed by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and TIRR. Highly cross-linked gels show a small and fully reversible behavior when the solution pH is switched between pH 2.7 and 5.7. In contrast, low cross-linked gels are more responsive to pH changes, but the response is fully reversible only after the first exposure to the acidic solution, once an internal restructuring of the gel has taken place. Two distinct pKa's for both chitosan and poly(acrylic acid), were determined for the cross-linked structure using TIRR. They are associated with populations of chargeable groups displaying either a bulk like dissociation behavior or forming ionic complexes inside the hydrogel film.

  18. Nanograin formation and reaction-induced fracturing due to decarbonation: Implications for the microstructures of fault mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluymakers, A.; Røyne, A.

    2017-10-01

    Principal slip zones often contain highly reflective surfaces referred to as fault mirrors, shown to consist of a nanogranular coating. There is currently no consensus on how the nanograins form, or why they survive weathering on a geological time-scale. To simplify the complex system of a natural fault zone, where slip and heat generation are inherently coupled, we investigated the effect of elevated temperatures on carbonate rock surfaces, as well as their resistance to water exposure. This allows us to isolate the role of the decarbonation process in the formation of nanograins. We used cleaved crystals of Iceland spar calcite, manually polished dolomite protolith, as well as natural dolomite fault mirror surfaces. The samples were heated to 200-800 °C in a ∼5 h heating cycle, followed by slow cooling (∼12 h) to room temperature. Subsequently, we imaged the samples using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Nanograin formation on all sample surfaces was pervasive at and above 600 °C. The Foiana fault mirror samples were initially coated with aligned naturally-formed nanograins, but display a non-directional nanogranular coating after heating. The nanograins that were formed by heating rapidly recrystallized to bladed hydroxides upon exposure to deionized water, whereas the nanograins on unheated fault mirror samples remained unchanged in water. This shows that the nanograins formed by heating alone are different from those formed in fault zones, and calls for a better characterization of nanograins and their formation mechanisms. Furthermore, we find a characteristic star-shaped crack pattern associated with reacted regions of the carbonate surfaces. The existence of this pattern implies that the mechanical stresses set up by the decarbonation reaction can be sufficiently large to drive fracturing in these systems. We propose that this mechanism may contribute to grain size reduction in fault zones.

  19. Apparatus for testing gas-surface reactions for epicatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, D. P.; Zawlacki, T. A.; Helmer, W. H.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a new mode of gas-surface heterogeneous catalysis (epicatalysis) has been identified, having potential applications ranging from industrial and green chemistry to novel forms of power generation. This article describes an inexpensive, easily constructed, vacuum-compatible apparatus by which multiple candidate gas-surface combinations can be rapidly screened for epicatalytic activity. In exploratory experiments, candidate surfaces (teflon, kapton, glass, and gold) and gases (helium, argon, cyclohexane, water, methanol, formic acid, and acetic acid) were tested for epicatalytic activity. Kapton and teflon displayed small but reproducible differences in formic acid and methanol dimer desorption, thereby demonstrating the first examples of room-temperature epicatalysis. Other gas-surface combinations showed smaller or inconclusive evidence for epicatalysis.

  20. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas phase reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-01-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm (>30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) ...

  1. NO oxidation on Zeolite Supported Cu Catalysts: Formation and Reactivity of Surface Nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hai-Ying; Wei, Zhehao; Kollar, Marton; Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2016-04-18

    The comparative activities of a small-pore Cu-CHA and a large-pore Cu-BEA catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3, and for the oxidation of NO to NO2 and the subsequent formation of surface nitrates were investigated. Although both catalysts are highly active in SCR reactions, they exhibit very low NO oxidation activity. Furthermore, Cu-CHA is even less active than Cu-BEA in catalyzing NO oxidation but is clearly more active for SCR reactions. Temperature-programed desorption (TPD) experiments following the adsorption of (NO2 + NO + O2) with different NO2:NO ratios reveal that the poor NO oxidation activity of the two catalysts is not due to the formation of stable surface nitrates. On the contrary, NO is found to reduce and decompose the surface nitrates on both catalysts. To monitor the reaction pathways, isotope exchange experiments were conducted by using 15NO to react with 14N-nitrate covered catalyst surfaces. The evolution of FTIR spectra during the isotope exchange process demonstrates that 14N-nitrates are simply displaced with no formation of 15N-nitrates on the Cu-CHA sample, which is clearly different from that observed on the Cu-BEA sample where formation of 15N-nitrates is apparent. The results suggest that the formal oxidation state of N during the NO oxidation on Cu-CHA mainly proceeds from its original +2 to a +3 oxidation state, whereas reaching a higher oxidation state for N, such as +4 or +5, is possible on Cu-BEA. The authors at PNNL gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  2. Controlled reactions between chromia and coating on alloy surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren

    1996-01-01

    An electrically conducting Sr-doped lanthanum chromite (LSC) coating has been produced by reacting a coating of fine particles of La oxide and Sr oxide with chromia formed as an external scale on a metallic alloy. In addition to the formation of LSC the coating also resulted in much reduced...... buckling of the underlying chromia layer compared with a non-coated alloy....

  3. Heterogeneous Reactions of Surface-Adsorbed Catechol: A Comparison of Tropospheric Aerosol Surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.; Woodill, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Surface-adsorbed organics can alter the chemistry of tropospheric solid-air interfaces, such as aerosol and ground level surfaces, thereby impacting photochemical cycles and altering aerosol properties. The nature of the surface can also influence the chemistry of the surface-adsorbed organic. We employed diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to monitor the adsorption of gaseous catechol on several tropospheric aerosol surrogates and to investigate the subsequent reactivity of adsorbed-catechol with nitrogen dioxide and, in separate preliminary experiments, ozone. Graphite, kaolinite, and sodium halide (NaF, NaCl, NaBr) powders served as carbonaceous, mineral and sea salt aerosol surrogates, respectively. Broad OH stretching bands for adsorbed catechol shifted to lower wavenumber with peak frequencies following the trend NaBr > NaCl > NaF ≈ kaolinite, consistent with the increasing basicity of the halide anions and basic Brønsted sites on kaolinite. The dark heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with NaCl-adsorbed catechol at relative humidity (RH) 4-nitrocatechol and oxidation forming 1,2-benzoquinone and the ring cleavage product muconic acid, with product yields of 88%, 8%, and 4%, respectively. 4-Nitrocatechol was the dominant product for catechol adsorbed on NaF and kaolinite, while NaBr-adsorbed catechol produced less 4-nitrocatechol and more 1,2-benzoquinone and muconic acid. For all three sodium halides, the reactions of NO2 with adsorbed catechol were orders of magnitude faster than between NO2 and each NaX substrate. 4-Nitrocatechol rates and product yields were consistent with the relative ability of each substrate to enhance the deprotonated nature of adsorbed-catechol. Increasing the relative humidity caused the rate of each product channel to decrease and also altered the product branching ratios. Most notably, 1,2-benzoquinone formation decreased significantly even at 13% RH. The dramatic reactivity of surface

  4. Hot spot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shocked HMX crystals with nanovoids: a large-scale reactive molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tingting; Lou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yangeng; Song, Huajie; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-07-14

    We report million-atom reactive molecular dynamic simulations of shock initiation of β-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (β-HMX) single crystals containing nanometer-scale spherical voids. Shock induced void collapse and subsequent hot spot formation as well as chemical reaction initiation are observed which depend on the void size and impact strength. For an impact velocity of 1 km s(-1) and a void radius of 4 nm, the void collapse process includes three stages; the dominant mechanism is the convergence of upstream molecules toward the centerline and the downstream surface of the void forming flowing molecules. Hot spot formation also undergoes three stages, and the principal mechanism is kinetic energy transforming to thermal energy due to the collision of flowing molecules on the downstream surface. The high temperature of the hot spot initiates a local chemical reaction, and the breakage of the N-NO2 bond plays the key role in the initial reaction mechanism. The impact strength and void size have noticeable effects on the shock dynamical process, resulting in a variation of the predominant mechanisms leading to void collapse and hot spot formation. Larger voids or stronger shocks result in more intense hot spots and, thus, more violent chemical reactions, promoting more reaction channels and generating more reaction products in a shorter duration. The reaction products are mainly concentrated in the developed hot spot, indicating that the chemical reactivity of the hmx crystal is greatly enhanced by void collapse. The detailed information derived from this study can aid a thorough understanding of the role of void collapse in hot spot formation and the chemical reaction initiation of explosives.

  5. Thermal Condensation of Glycine and Alanine on Metal Ferrite Surface: Primitive Peptide Bond Formation Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqubal, Md. Asif; Sharma, Rachana; Jheeta, Sohan; Kamaluddin

    2017-01-01

    The amino acid condensation reaction on a heterogeneous mineral surface has been regarded as one of the important pathways for peptide bond formation. Keeping this in view, we have studied the oligomerization of the simple amino acids, glycine and alanine, on nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4), cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4), copper ferrite (CuFe2O4), zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4), and manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanoparticles surfaces, in the temperature range from 50–120 °C for 1–35 days, without applying any wetting/drying cycles. Among the metal ferrites tested for their catalytic activity, NiFe2O4 produced the highest yield of products by oligomerizing glycine to the trimer level and alanine to the dimer level, whereas MnFe2O4 was the least efficient catalyst, producing the lowest yield of products, as well as shorter oligomers of amino acids under the same set of experimental conditions. It produced primarily diketopiperazine (Ala) with a trace amount of alanine dimer from alanine condensation, while glycine was oligomerized to the dimer level. The trend in product formation is in accordance with the surface area of the minerals used. A temperature as low as 50 °C can even favor peptide bond formation in the present study, which is important in the sense that the condensation process is highly feasible without any sort of localized heat that may originate from volcanoes or hydrothermal vents. However, at a high temperature of 120 °C, anhydrides of glycine and alanine formation are favored, while the optimum temperature for the highest yield of product formation was found to be 90 °C. PMID:28346388

  6. The (impossible?) formation of acetaldehyde on the grain surfaces: insights from quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrique-Romero, J.; Rimola, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Balucani, N.

    2016-06-01

    Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, it is not clear whether their synthesis occurs on the icy surfaces of interstellar grains or via a series of gas-phase reactions. As a test case of the COMs synthesis in the ISM, we present new quantum chemical calculations on the formation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) from the coupling of the HCO and CH3 radicals, both in gas phase and on water ice surfaces. The binding energies of HCO and CH3 on the amorphous water ice were also computed (2333 and 734 K, respectively). Results indicate that, in gas phase, the products could be either CH3CHO, CH4 + CO, or CH3OCH, depending on the relative orientation of the two radicals. However, on the amorphous water ice, only the CH4 + CO product is possible due to the geometrical constraints imposed by the water ice surface. Therefore, acetaldehyde cannot be synthesized by the CH3 + HCO coupling on the icy grains. We discuss the implications of these results and other cases, such as ethylene glycol and dimethyl ether, in which similar situations can occur, suggesting that formation of these molecules on the grain surfaces might be unlikely.

  7. Surface-mediated formation of Pu(IV) nanoparticles at the muscovite-electrolyte interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Moritz; Lee, Sang Soo; Wilson, Richard E; Knope, Karah E; Bellucci, Francesco; Eng, Peter J; Stubbs, Joanne E; Soderholm, L; Fenter, P

    2013-12-17

    The formation of Pu(IV)-oxo-nanoparticles from Pu(III) solutions by a surface-enhanced redox/polymerization reaction at the muscovite (001) basal plane is reported, with a continuous increase in plutonium coverage observed in situ over several hours. The sorbed Pu extends >70 Å from the surface with a maximum concentration at 10.5 Å and a total coverage of >9 Pu atoms per unit cell area of muscovite (0.77 μg Pu/cm(2)) (determined independently by in situ resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity and by ex-situ alpha-spectrometry). The presence of discrete nanoparticles is confirmed by high resolution atomic force microscopy. We propose that the formation of these Pu(IV) nanoparticles from an otherwise stable Pu(III) solution can be explained by the combination of a highly concentrated interfacial Pu-ion species, the Pu(III)-Pu(IV) redox equilibrium, and the strong proclivity of tetravalent Pu to hydrolyze and form polymeric species. These results are the first direct observation of such behavior of plutonium on a naturally occurring mineral, providing insights into understanding the environmental transport of plutonium and other contaminants capable of similar redox/polymerization reactions.

  8. Quantifying Fenton reaction pathways driven by self-generated H2O2 on pyrite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Lozano, C.; Davila, A. F.; Losa-Adams, E.; Fairén, A. G.; Gago-Duport, L.

    2017-03-01

    Oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) plays a significant role in the redox cycling of iron and sulfur on Earth and is the primary cause of acid mine drainage (AMD). It has been established that this process involves multi-step electron-transfer reactions between surface defects and adsorbed O2 and H2O, releasing sulfoxy species (e.g., S2O32-, SO42-) and ferrous iron (Fe2+) to the solution and also producing intermediate by-products, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), however, our understanding of the kinetics of these transient species is still limited. We investigated the kinetics of H2O2 formation in aqueous suspensions of FeS2 microparticles by monitoring, in real time, the H2O2 and dissolved O2 concentration under oxic and anoxic conditions using amperometric microsensors. Additional spectroscopic and structural analyses were done to track the dependencies between the process of FeS2 dissolution and the degradation of H2O2 through the Fenton reaction. Based on our experimental results, we built a kinetic model which explains the observed trend of H2O2, showing that FeS2 dissolution can act as a natural Fenton reagent, influencing the oxidation of third-party species during the long term evolution of geochemical systems, even in oxygen-limited environments.

  9. Kinetics of contrail particles formation and heterogeneous reactions on such particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogan, M.N.; Butkovsky, A.V.; Erofeev, A.I.; Freedlender, O.G.; Makashev, N.K. [Central Aerohydrodynamic Inst., Zhukovsky (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The research of impact of aircraft emissions upon the atmosphere is very complex and difficult problem. More than two decades of intensive investigations of the problem of ozone decay do not permit to make definite conclusions. Many important problems still remain unsolved in the aircraft/atmosphere interaction: engine, nozzle, jet, jet/vortex system interaction, vortex breakdown, contrail formation, meso-scale and global processes, their effects on climate. The particles formation and heterogeneous reactions play an important role in some of these processes. These problems are discussed. (author) 11 refs.

  10. Direct detection of pyridine formation by the reaction of CH (CD) with pyrrole: a ring expansion reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soorkia, Satchin; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2010-03-16

    The reaction of the ground state methylidyne radical CH (X2Pi) with pyrrole (C4H5N) has been studied in a slow flow tube reactor using Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometry coupled to quasi-continuous tunable VUV synchrotron radiation at room temperature (295 K) and 90 oC (363 K), at 4 Torr (533 Pa). Laser photolysis of bromoform (CHBr3) at 248 nm (KrF excimer laser) is used to produce CH radicals that are free to react with pyrrole molecules in the gaseous mixture. A signal at m/z = 79 (C5H5N) is identified as the product of the reaction and resolved from 79Br atoms, and the result is consistent with CH addition to pyrrole followed by Helimination. The Photoionization Efficiency curve unambiguously identifies m/z = 79 as pyridine. With deuterated methylidyne radicals (CD), the product mass peak is shifted by +1 mass unit, consistent with the formation of C5H4DN and identified as deuterated pyridine (dpyridine). Within detection limits, there is no evidence that the addition intermediate complex undergoes hydrogen scrambling. The results are consistent with a reaction mechanism that proceeds via the direct CH (CD) cycloaddition or insertion into the five-member pyrrole ring, giving rise to ring expansion, followed by H atom elimination from the nitrogen atom in the intermediate to form the resonance stabilized pyridine (d-pyridine) molecule. Implications to interstellar chemistry and planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as well as in gas-phase combustion processes, are discussed.

  11. Surface reactions of iron - enriched smectites: adsorption and transformation of hydroxy fatty acids and phenolic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polubesova, Tamara; Olshansky, Yaniv; Eldad, Shay; Chefetz, Benny

    2014-05-01

    Iron-enriched smectites play an important role in adsorption and transformation of soil organic components. Soil organo-clay complexes, and in particular humin contain hydroxy fatty acids, which are derived from plant biopolymer cutin. Phenolic acids belong to another major group of organic acids detected in soil. They participate in various soil processes, and are of concern due to their allelopathic activity. We studied the reactivity of iron-enriched smectites (Fe(III)-montmorillonite and nontronite) toward both groups of acids. We used fatty acids- 9(10),16-dihydroxypalmitic acid (diHPA), isolated from curtin, and 9,10,16-trihydroxypalmitic acid (triHPA); the following phenolic acids were used: ferulic, p-coumaric, syringic, and vanillic. Adsorption of both groups of acids was measured. The FTIR spectra of fatty acid-mineral complexes indicated inner-sphere complexation of fatty acids with iron-enriched smectites (versus outer-sphere complexation with Ca(II)-montmorillonite). The LC-MS results demonstrated enhanced esterification of fatty acids on the iron-enriched smectite surfaces (as compared to Ca(II)-montmorillonite). This study suggests that fatty acids can be esterified on the iron-enriched smectite surfaces, which results in the formation of stable organo-mineral complexes. These complexes may serve as a model for the study of natural soil organo-clay complexes and humin. The reaction of phenolic acids with Fe(III)-montmorillonite demonstrated their oxidative transformation by the mineral surfaces, which was affected by molecular structure of acids. The following order of their transformation was obtained: ferulic >syringic >p-coumaric >vanillic. The LC-MS analysis demonstrated the presence of dimers, trimers, and tetramers of ferulic acid on the surface of Fe(III)-montmorillonite. Oxidation and transformation of ferulic acid were more intense on the surface of Fe(III)-montmorillonite as compared to Fe(III) in solution due to stronger complexation on

  12. Background defining during the imine formation reaction in FT-IR liquid cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namli, Hilmi; Turhan, Onur

    2006-05-01

    Imine formation is a very important chemical reaction because of its relevance to biological process. Therefore, it is crucial to follow whole reaction process in detail. The current work performed to monitor the whole imination reaction in real time in liquid cell by FT-IR spectroscopy. The complex spectral futures due to solvent, unreacted reagents, acid catalysis and other additives are eliminated by defining a background at the beginning or at any time during the reaction. This procedure also makes it possible to monitor the changes in the concentration of each component in the liquid cell. The consumption of the functional groups of the reagents results in absorbance due to the direct difference spectra while the appearance of functional groups is monitored as percentage transmittance. The concentration changes in the cell arising from the reaction gives the product spectra without having to isolate it from the mixture. It is also possible to see the intermediates appearing and disappearing during the reaction. This report also illustrates a brief application of the technique by time dependence of the peak highs in absorption (ABS) mode.

  13. Olefin metathesis reaction on GaN (0 0 0 1) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Matthew S.; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2011-03-01

    Proof-of-concept reactions were performed on GaN (0 0 0 1) surfaces to demonstrate surface termination with desired chemical groups using an olefin cross-metathesis reaction. To prepare the GaN surfaces for olefin metathesis, the surfaces were hydrogen terminated with hydrogen plasma, chlorine terminated with phosphorous pentachloride, and then terminated with an alkene group via a Grignard reaction. The olefin metathesis reaction then bound 7-bromo-1-heptene. The modified surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, and water contact angle measurements following each step in the reaction scheme. The XPS data was used to qualitatively identify surface chemical species and to quantitatively determine molecular surface coverage. The bromine atom in 7-bromo-1-heptene served as a heteroatom for identification with XPS. The reaction scheme resulted in GaN substrates with a surface coverage of 0.10 monolayers and excellent stability towards oxidation when exposed to oxygen plasma.

  14. Positronium in a Liquid Phase: Formation, Bubble State and Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Stepanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present approach describes the e+ fate since its injection into a liquid until its annihilation. Several stages of the e+ evolution are discussed: (1 energy deposition and track structure of fast positrons: ionization slowing down, number of ion-electron pairs, typical sizes, thermalization, electrostatic interaction between e+ and the constituents of its blob, and effect of local heating; (2 positronium formation in condensed media: the Ore model, quasifree Ps state, intratrack mechanism of Ps formation; (3 fast intratrack diffusion-controlled reactions: Ps oxidation and ortho-paraconversion by radiolytic products, reaction rate constants, and interpretation of the PAL spectra in water at different temperatures; (4 Ps bubble models. Inner structure of positronium (wave function, energy contributions, relationship between the pick-off annihilation rate and the bubble radius.

  15. Turing Bifurcation and Pattern Formation of Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianiqian Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is ubiquitous in a system and can induce some spontaneous pattern formations on a spatially homogeneous domain. In comparison to the Reaction-Diffusion System (RDS, Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion System (SRDS is more complex and it is very difficult to deal with the noise function. In this paper, we have presented a method to solve it and obtained the conditions of how the Turing bifurcation and Hopf bifurcation arise through linear stability analysis of local equilibrium. In addition, we have developed the amplitude equation with a pair of wave vector by using Taylor series expansion, multiscaling, and further expansion in powers of small parameter. Our analysis facilitates finding regions of bifurcations and understanding the pattern formation mechanism of SRDS. Finally, the simulation shows that the analytical results agree with numerical simulation.

  16. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  17. Thermochemistry and Reaction Barriers for the Formation of Levoglucosenone from Cellobiose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2012-02-06

    Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

  18. Thermochemistry and reaction barriers for the formation of levoglucosenone from cellobiose.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Northwestern Univ.)

    2012-02-06

    Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

  19. Quantum state-resolved gas/surface reaction dynamics probed by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Ueta, Hirokazu; Bisson, Régis; Beck, Rainer D

    2013-05-01

    We report the design and characterization of a new molecular-beam/surface-science apparatus for quantum state-resolved studies of gas/surface reaction dynamics combining optical state-specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage with detection of surface-bound reaction products by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). RAIRS is a non-invasive infrared spectroscopic detection technique that enables online monitoring of the buildup of reaction products on the target surface during reactant deposition by a molecular beam. The product uptake rate obtained by calibrated RAIRS detection yields the coverage dependent state-resolved reaction probability S(θ). Furthermore, the infrared absorption spectra of the adsorbed products obtained by the RAIRS technique provide structural information, which help to identify nascent reaction products, investigate reaction pathways, and determine branching ratios for different pathways of a chemisorption reaction. Measurements of the dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111) with this new apparatus are presented to illustrate the utility of RAIRS detection for highly detailed studies of chemical reactions at the gas/surface interface.

  20. Reactions on the surface and inside of neutron stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehm K. E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements from orbiting X-ray satellites during the last decades have provided us with a wealth of information about nuclear reactions thought to occur in the extreme, highdensity environment of neutron stars. With radioactive ion beams from first-generation facilities we have begun to study some of these processes in the laboratory. In this contribution I report on experiments performed with radioactive beams from the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne. I will discuss the nuclear physics of X-ray bursts and super-bursts, the production of in-flight radioactive beams, as well as novel detectors which are used in these experiments.

  1. Proton Mobility in b2 Ion Formation and Fragmentation Reactions of Histidine-Containing Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Carissa R.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Harrison, Alex G.; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    A detailed energy-resolved study of the fragmentation reactions of protonated histidine-containing peptides and their b2 ions has been undertaken. Density functional theory calculations were utilized to predict how the fragmentation reactions occur so that we might discern why the mass spectra demonstrated particular energy dependencies. We compare our results to the current literature and to synthetic b2 ion standards. We show that the position of the His residue does affect the identity of the subsequent b2 ion (diketopiperazine versus oxazolone versus lactam) and that energy-resolved CID can distinguish these isomeric products based on their fragmentation energetics. The histidine side chain facilitates every major transformation except trans-cis isomerization of the first amide bond, a necessary prerequisite to diketopiperazine b2 ion formation. Despite this lack of catalyzation, trans-cis isomerization is predicted to be facile. Concomitantly, the subsequent amide bond cleavage reaction is rate-limiting.

  2. Formation process of liquid in interface of Ti/Cu contact reaction couple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ming-fang; YU Chun; YU Zhi-shi; LI Rui-feng

    2005-01-01

    By using the Ti/Cu contact reaction couples,the dissolution behavior of Ti and Cu in the eutectic reaction process was investigated under different conditions.The results show that the formation of eutectic liquid phase has a directional property,I.e.the eutectic liquid phase forms first at the Cu side and then spreads along the depth direction of Cu.The width of the eutectic liquid zone when Ti is placed on Cu is wider than that when Ti is placed under Cu.The shape of the upside liquid zone is wave-like.This phenomenon indicates that the formation process and spreading behavior in the upside are different from those in the underside,and there exists void effect in the Cu side of underside liquid zone,this will result in the delaying phenomenon of the contact reaction between Ti and Cu,and distinctly different shapes of the both liquid zones.The formation process of Ti/Cu eutectic liquid zone is similar to that of the traditional solid-state diffusion layer,and the relationship between the width of liquid zone and holding time obeys a square root law.

  3. Biofilm formation on the surface of ceramic tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, R; Di Pietro, M; Zamparelli, M; Schiavoni, G; Del Piano, M

    2000-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the formation of biofilm on the surface of ceramic tiles, widely present in public and private buildings, using six parallel flow chambers. Our flow system was conceived and made to compare biofilm results by parallel distributed rectangular tiles. The tiles, divided into two identical A and B sections, were placed within the flow chambers. Biofilm formation was performed after 72 h and was quantified by viable counts of bacteria. Average viable counts ranged from 1.1x10(7) to 7.3x10(7) cfu cm(-2) and from 1.1x10(7) to 5.8x10(7) cfu cm(-2) respectively for biofilm A and B sections. As statistical analysis does not show significant differences, we can conclude that biofilms obtained were so similar to each other that they confirmed the system reproducibility. Our next step will be to use our system to study Legionella pneumophila and to evaluate the efficacy of antibacterial agents.

  4. Reaction dynamics of small molecules at metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Samson, P A

    1999-01-01

    directed angular distributions suggest the influence of a trapping mechanism, recombining molecules scattering through a molecularly adsorbed state, with a transition state of large d sub N sub N responsible for the product vibrational excitation. Although N sub 2 dissociation on Fe(100) forms a simple overlayer structure, on Fe(110), molecular chemisorption does not occur at or above room temperature and the sticking is extremely small (approx 10 sup - sup 6 to 10 sup - sup 7). Activated nitrogen bombardment can be used to prepare a 'surface nitride' with a structure related to the geometry of bulk Fe sub 4 N. Scanning tunnelling microscopy yields atomic scale features that cannot be explained by simple overlayers. It is proposed that the uppermost iron layer reconstructs to generate quasi-octahedral sites between the top two layers, with sub-surface nitrogen in these sites forming a model for the 'surface nitride' structure. The dissociation-desorption dynamics of D sub 2 upon the Sn/Pt(111) surface alloy a...

  5. Formation and Migration of Oxygen Vacancies in SrCoO3 and their effect on Oxygen Evolution Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, Hassan A.

    2016-07-18

    Perovskite SrCoO3 is a potentially useful material for promoting the electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction, with high activities predicted theoretically and observed experimentally for closely related doped perovskite materials. However, complete stoichiometric oxidation is very difficult to realize experimentally – in almost all cases there are significant fractions of oxygen vacancies present. Here, using first principles calculations we study oxygen vacancies in perovskite SrCoO3 from thermodynamic, electronic and kinetic points of view. We find that an oxygen vacancy donates two electrons to neighboring Co sites in the form of localized charge. The formation energy of a single vacancy is very low and estimated to be 1.26 eV in the dilute limit. We find that a vacancy is quite mobile with a migration energy of ~0.5 eV. Moreover, we predict that oxygen vacancies exhibit a tendency towards clustering which is in accordance with the material’s ability to form a variety of oxygen-deficient structures. These vacancies have a profound effect on the material’s ability to facilitate OER, increasing the overpotential from ~0.3 V for the perfect material to ~0.7 for defective surfaces. A moderate compressive biaxial strain (2%) is predicted here to increase the surface oxygen vacancy formation energy by ca. 30%, thus reducing the concentration of surface vacancies and thereby preserving the OER activity of the material.

  6. Reaction Kinetic Parameters and Surface Thermodynamic Properties of Cu2O Nanocubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cuprous oxide (Cu2O nanocubes were synthesized by reducing Cu(OH2 in the presence of sodium citrate at room temperature. The samples were characterized in detail by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and N2 absorption (BET specific surface area. The equations for acquiring reaction kinetic parameters and surface thermodynamic properties of Cu2O nanocubes were deduced by establishment of the relations between thermodynamic functions of Cu2O nanocubes and these of the bulk Cu2O. Combined with thermochemical cycle, transition state theory, basic theory of chemical thermodynamics, and in situ microcalorimetry, reaction kinetic parameters, specific surface enthalpy, specific surface Gibbs free energy, and specific surface entropy of Cu2O nanocubes were successfully determined. We also introduced a universal route for gaining reaction kinetic parameters and surface thermodynamic properties of nanomaterials.

  7. Statistical characterisation and stochastic parameterisation of sedimentary geological formations on their reaction capacity for sustainable groundwater quality management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffioen, J.; Vermooten, S.; Keijzer, T.; Bakr, M.; Valstar, J.

    2012-04-01

    The fate of contaminants in groundwater aquifers is determined by the buffering capacity of those aquifers together with the composition of inflowing groundwater. A nationwide characterisation of the environmental geochemistry of the shallow subsurface (down to 30 m below surface) has been started in the Netherlands. This covers: 1. the reaction capacity of sediments as buffer for contamination, and 2. typical elemental composition of geological formations and the association between trace elements and major minerals. For this purpose, the Netherlands is subdivided into 27 so-called geotop regions each having a unique geological build-up of the shallow subsurface. Here, four types are recognised based on vertical hydrogeological build-up. The regions are statistically characterised on their geochemical composition using combinations of lithological class and geological formation as strata. The statistical data are subsequently coupled with a geological voxel model of the subsurface to stochastically parameterise the geological units on reaction capacity. This combined approach will be illustrated for the Dutch province Zeeland. Reaction capacity is considered as a series of geochemical characteristics that control acid/base condition, redox condition and sorption capacity. Five primary reaction capacity variables are characterised: 1. pyrite, 2. non-pyrite, reactive iron (oxides, siderite and glauconite), 3. clay fraction, 4. organic matter and 5. Ca-carbonate. Important reaction capacity variables that are determined by more than one solid compound are also deduced: 1. potential reduction capacity (PRC) by pyrite and organic matter, 2. cation-exchange capacity (CEC) by organic matter and clay content, 3. carbonate buffering upon pyrite oxidation (CPBO) by carbonate and pyrite. A statistical investigation of several hunderds of sediment analyses is performed that provides the geochemical properties of the sediments. Here, classification based on sedimentary facies

  8. Enhanced Colloidal Stability of CeO2 Nanoparticles by Ferrous Ions: Adsorption, Redox Reaction, and Surface Precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuyang; Ray, Jessica R; Neil, Chelsea W; Li, Qingyun; Jun, Young-Shin

    2015-05-05

    Due to the toxicity of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (NPs), a better understanding of the redox reaction-induced surface property changes of CeO2 NPs and their transport in natural and engineered aqueous systems is needed. This study investigates the impact of redox reactions with ferrous ions (Fe2+) on the colloidal stability of CeO2 NPs. We demonstrated that under anaerobic conditions, suspended CeO2 NPs in a 3 mM FeCl2 solution at pH 4.8 were much more stable against sedimentation than those in the absence of Fe2+. Redox reactions between CeO2 NPs and Fe2+ lead to the formation of 6-line ferrihydrite on the CeO2 surfaces, which enhanced the colloidal stability by increasing the zeta potential and hydrophilicity of CeO2 NPs. These redox reactions can affect the toxicity of CeO2 NPs by increasing cerium dissolution, and by creating new Fe(III) (hydr)oxide reactive surface layers. Thus, these findings have significant implications for elucidating the phase transformation and transport of redox reactive NPs in the environment.

  9. Formation of Reversible Solid Electrolyte Interface on Graphite Surface from Concentrated Electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Dongping; Tao, Jinhui; Yan, Pengfei; Henderson, Wesley A.; Li, Qiuyan; Shao, Yuyan; Helm, Monte L.; Borodin, Oleg; Graff, Gordon L.; Polzin, Bryant; Wang, Chong-Min; Engelhard, Mark; Zhang, Ji-Guang; De Yoreo, James J.; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2017-02-10

    Interfacial phenomena have always been key determinants for the performance of energy storage technologies. The solid electrolyte interfacial (SEI) layer, pervasive on the surfaces of battery electrodes for numerous chemical couples, directly affects the ion transport, charge transfer and lifespan of the entire energy system. Almost all SEI layers, however, are unstable resulting in the continuous consumption of the electrolyte. Typically, this leads to the accumulation of degradation products on/restructuring of the electrode surface and thus increased cell impedance, which largely limits the long-term operation of the electrochemical reactions. Herein, a completely new SEI formation mechanism has been discovered, in which the electrolyte components reversibly self-assemble into a protective surface coating on a graphite electrode upon changing the potential. In contrast to the established wisdom regarding the necessity of employing the solvent ethylene carbonate (EC) to form a protective SEI layer on graphite, a wide range of EC-free electrolytes are demonstrated for the reversible intercalation/deintercalation of Li+ cations within a graphite lattice, thereby providing tremendous flexibility in electrolyte tailoring for battery couples. This novel finding is broadly applicable and provides guidance for how to control interfacial reactions through the relationship between ion aggregation and solvent decomposition at polarized interfaces.

  10. 3D surface topography formation in ultra-precision turning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽伟; 董申; 程凯

    2004-01-01

    The generation process of 3 D surface topography in ultra-precision turning is analyzed, as the result of superimposing between actual roughness surface, waviness surface and geometrical form texture surface. From the viewpoints of machine technical system and manufacturing process, factors influencing on roughness surface,waviness surface and geometrical form texture surface in ultra-precision turning are discussed further. The 3D topography of ideal roughness surface and actual surface affected by cutting vibration are simulated respectively.

  11. Reaction dynamics of molecular hydrogen on silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratu, P.; Brenig, W.; Gross, A.

    1996-01-01

    between the two surfaces. These results indicate that tunneling, molecular vibrations, and the structural details of the surface play only a minor role for the adsorption dynamics. Instead, they appear to be governed by the localized H-Si bonding and Si-Si lattice vibrations. Theoretically, an effective...... of the preexponential factor by about one order of magnitude per lateral degree of freedom. Molecular vibrations have practically no effect on the adsorption/desorption dynamics itself, but lead to vibrational heating in desorption with a strong isotope effect. Ab initio calculations for the H-2 interaction......Experimental and theoretical results on the dynamics of dissociative adsorption and recombinative desorption of hydrogen on silicon are presented. Using optical second-harmonic generation, extremely small sticking probabilities in the range 10(-9)-10(-5) could be measured for H-2 and D-2 on Si(111...

  12. On the formation and bonding of a surface carbonate on Ni(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, R. J.; Brundle, C. R.

    1991-09-01

    The formation, stability, adsorption geometry and electronic structure of a surface carbonate on Ni(100) have been investigated by photoemission (XPS, UPS) and temperature-programmed reaction (TPR). The core level binding energies of 531.2 eV for 0(1s) and 289.0 eV for C(1s) are comparable to those of bulk carbonates. The He(II) spectrum of the carbonate valence levels is not well defined because of the coexisting adsorbed and oxidic oxygen. The angular dependence of the carbonate core level intensities is characteristic of the carbonate being present as an overlayer species rather than a thicker surface phase. The XPS data and isotope labelled TPR experiments indicate the oxygen atoms of the carbonate to be electronically and chemically equivalent, and on this basis we favor a structure in which the carbonate is attached to the metal via all three oxygen atoms. This is supported by comparision with the core level binding energies of HCOO ab and chemisorbed CO 2,ad, which are similarly attached to the surface. From the core level angular behavior, the close similarity of core level binding energies and available vibrational spectroscopic data, a (nearly) planar geometry of the CO 3,ad on Ni(100) is concluded, which is comparable to the planar bulk carbonate anion and the planar carbonate species on Ag(110). The activation barrier for decomposition is estimated from the observed maximum in TPR at 420 K to be 25 ± 2 kcal/mol. CO 2 does not accumulate on the clean or O ad-precovered Ni(100) surface at 130 K. The stabilized, chemisorbed CO 2,ad species often observed on other metal surfaces therefore does not play a critical role for carbonate formation on Ni(100). Also a mechanism involving the disproportionation of a CO 2… CO 2,ad- dimer anion can be ruled out from TPR data. The evidence of the experiments discussed in this paper suggests that the carbonate is predominantly formed by reaction of CO 2,ad with a less stable, defect (disordered) O ad species rather

  13. Fundamental Studies of Diamond Growth and Surface Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    the material. In the diamond gem industry, mechanical polishing procedures have been developed to obtain an optical quality finish on small-scale...with unpolished samples. The methodology for the technique is described in two journal articlesl6. 17. I 6.0 Characterization of Spectroscopic...sample. Thedegree of improvement in surface roughness in the diamond films can be seen in the Dektak profiles in Fig. 6. The unpolished film had a

  14. Size dependence of surface thermodynamic properties of nanoparticles and its determination method by reaction rate constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenjiao; Xue, Yongqiang, E-mail: xyqlw@126.com; Cui, Zixiang

    2016-08-15

    Surface thermodynamic properties are the fundamental properties of nanomaterials, and these properties depend on the size of nanoparticles. In this paper, relations of molar surface thermodynamic properties and surface heat capacity at constant pressure of nanoparticles with particle size were derived theoretically, and the method of obtaining the surface thermodynamic properties by reaction rate constant was put forward. The reaction of nano-MgO with sodium bisulfate solution was taken as a research system. The influence regularities of the particle size on the surface thermodynamic properties were discussed theoretically and experimentally, which show that the experimental regularities are in accordance with the corresponding theoretical relations. With the decreasing of nanoparticle size, the molar surface thermodynamic properties increase, while the surface heat capacity decreases (the absolute value increases). In addition, the surface thermodynamic properties are linearly related to the reciprocal of nanoparticle diameter, respectively.

  15. Imaging physicochemical reactions occurring at the pore surface in binary bioactive glass foams by micro ion beam analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallot, E; Lao, J; John, L; Soulié, J; Moretto, Ph; Nedelec, J M

    2010-06-01

    In this work, the physicochemical reactions occurring at the surface of bioactive sol-gel derived 3D glass scaffolds via a complete PIXE characterization were studied. 3D glass foams in the SiO(2)-CaO system were prepared by sol-gel route. Samples of glass scaffolds were soaked in biological fluids for periods up to 2 days. The surface changes were characterized using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) associated to Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), which are efficient methods to perform quantitative chemical maps. Elemental maps of major and trace elements at the glass/biological fluids interface were obtained at the micrometer scale for every interaction time. Results revealed interconnected macropores and physicochemical reactions occurring at the surface of pores. The micro-PIXE-RBS characterization of the pores/biological fluids interface shows the glass dissolution and the rapid formation of a Ca rich layer with the presence of phosphorus that came from biological fluids. After 2 days, a calcium phosphate-rich layer containing magnesium is formed at the surface of the glass scaffolds. We demonstrate that quantities of phosphorus provided only by the biological medium have a significant impact on the development and the formation of the phosphocalcic layer.

  16. Arsenic Sulfide Nanowire Formation on Fused Quartz Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmstead, J.; Riley, B.J.; Johnson, B.R.; Sundaram, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic sulfide (AsxSy) nanowires were synthesized by an evaporation-condensation process in evacuated fused quartz ampoules. During the deposition process, a thin, colored film of AsxSy was deposited along the upper, cooler portion of the ampoule. The ampoule was sectioned and the deposited film analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to characterize and semi-quantitatively evaluate the microstructural features of the deposited film. A variety of microstructures were observed that ranged from a continuous thin film (warmer portion of the ampoule), to isolated micron- and nano-scale droplets (in the intermediate portion), as well as nanowires (colder portion of the ampoule). Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of ampoule cleaning methods (e.g. modify surface chemistry) and quantity of source material on nanowire formation. The evolution of these microstructures in the thin film was determined to be a function of initial pressure, substrate temperature, substrate surface treatment, and initial volume of As2S3 glass. In a set of two experiments where the initial pressure, substrate thermal gradient, and surface treatment were the same, the initial quantity of As2S3 glass per internal ampoule volume was doubled from one test to the other. The results showed that AsxSy nanowires were only formed in the test with the greater initial quantity of As2S3 per internal ampoule volume. The growth data for variation in diameter (e.g. nanowire or droplet) as a function of substrate temperature was fit to an exponential trendline with the form y = Aekx, where y is the structure diameter, A = 1.25×10-3, k = 3.96×10-2, and x is the temperature with correlation coefficient, R2 = 0.979, indicating a thermally-activated process.

  17. Formation, Removal, and Reformation of Surface Coatings on Various Metal Oxide Surfaces Inspired by Mussel Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Taegon; Oh, Dongyeop X; Heo, Jinhwa; Lee, Han-Koo; Choy, Seunghwan; Hawker, Craig J; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-11-11

    Mussels survive by strongly attaching to a variety of different surfaces, primarily subsurface rocks composed of metal oxides, through the formation of coordinative interactions driven by protein-based catechol repeating units contained within their adhesive secretions. From a chemistry perspective, catechols are known to form strong and reversible complexes with metal ions or metal oxides, with the binding affinity being dependent on the nature of the metal ion. As a result, catechol binding with metal oxides is reversible and can be broken in the presence of a free metal ion with a higher stability constant. It is proposed to exploit this competitive exchange in the design of a new strategy for the formation, removal, and reformation of surface coatings and self-assembled monolayers (SAM) based on catechols as the adhesive unit. In this study, catechol-functionalized tri(ethylene oxide) (TEO) was synthesized as a removable and recoverable self-assembled monolayer (SAM) for use on oxides surfaces. Attachment and detachment of these catechol derivatives on a variety of surfaces was shown to be reversible and controllable by exploiting the high stability constant of catechol to soluble metal ions, such as Fe(III). This tunable assembly based on catechol binding to metal oxides represents a new concept for reformable coatings with applications in fields ranging from friction/wettability control to biomolecular sensing and antifouling.

  18. Equilibrium Geometries, Reaction Pathways, and Electronic Structures of Ethanol Adsorbed on the Si (111) Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilenko, A V; Gavrilenko, V I

    2008-01-01

    Equilibrium atomic configurations and electron energy structure of ethanol adsorbed on the Si (111) surface are studied by the first-principles density functional theory. Geometry optimization is performed by the total energy minimization method. Several equilibrium atomic configurations of ethanol, both undissociated and dissociated, on the Si (111) surface are found. Reaction pathways and predicted transition states are discussed in comparison with available experimental data in terms of the feasibility of the reactions occurring. Analysis of atom and orbital resolved projected density of states indicate substantial modifications of the Si surface valence and conduction bands due to the adsorption of ethanol affecting the electrical properties of the surface.

  19. Probing anharmonic properties of nuclear surface vibration by heavy-ion fusion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Takigawa, N; Kuyucak, S

    1997-01-01

    Describing fusion reactions between ^{16}O and ^{154}Dy and, between ^{16}O and ^{144}Sm by the $sd-$ and $sdf-$ interacting boson model, we show that heavy-ion fusion reactions are strongly affected by anharmonic properties of nuclear surface vibrations and nuclear shape, and thus provide a powerful method to study details of nuclear structure and dynamics.

  20. Toward 4D Nanoprinting with Tip-Induced Organic Surface Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Carlos; Braunschweig, Adam B

    2017-02-21

    Future nanomanufacturing tools will prepare organic materials with complex four-dimensional (4D) structure, where the position (x, y, z) and chemical composition within a volume is controlled with sub-1 μm spatial resolution. Such tools could produce substrates that mimic biological interfaces, like the cell surface or the extracellular matrix, whose topology and chemical complexity combine to direct some of the most sophisticated biological events. The control of organic materials at the nanoscale-level of spatial resolution could revolutionize the assembly of next generation optical and electronic devices or substrates for tissue engineering or enable fundamental biological or material science investigations. Organic chemistry provides the requisite control over the orientation and position of matter within a nanoscale reference frame through the formation of new covalent bonds. Several challenges however preclude the integration of organic chemistry with conventional nanomanufacturing approaches, namely most nanolithography platforms would denature or destroy delicate organic and biologically active matter, confirming covalent bond formation at interfaces remains difficult, and finally, only a small handful of the reactions used to transform molecules in solution have been validated on surfaces. Thus, entirely new approaches, where organic transformations and spatial control are considered equally important contributors, are needed to create 4D organic nanoprinting platforms. This Account describes efforts from our group to reconcile nanolithography, and specifically massively parallel scanning probe lithography (SPL), with organic chemistry to further the goal of 4D organic nanoprinting. Massively parallel SPL involves arrays of elastomeric pyramids mounted onto piezoelectric actuators, and creates patterns with feature diameters below 50 nm by using the pyramidal tips for either the direct deposition of ink or the localized delivery of energy to a surface

  1. Potential Energy Surfaces and Quantum Yields for Photochromic Diarylethene Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Hatakeyama

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Photochromic diarylethenes (DAEs are among the most promising molecular switching systems for future molecular electronics. Numerous derivatives have been synthesized recently, and experimental quantum yields (QYs have been reported for two categories of them. Although the QY is one of the most important properties in various applications, it is also the most difficult property to predict before a molecule is actually synthesized. We have previously reported preliminary theoretical studies on what determines the QYs in both categories of DAE derivatives. Here, reflecting theoretical analyses of potential energy surfaces and recent experimental results, a rational explanation of the general guiding principle for QY design is presented for future molecular design.

  2. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  3. Surface site diffusion and reaction on molecular organizates and colloidal catalysts: a geometrical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Politowicz, P.A.; Kozak, J.J.

    1987-12-01

    The authors study surface-mediated, diffusion-controlled reactive processes on particles whose overall geometry is homeomorphic to a sphere. Rather than assuming that a coreactant can diffuse freely over the surface of the particle to a target site (reaction center), they consider the case where the coreactant can migrate only among N-1 satellite sites that are networked to the reaction site by means of a number of pathways or reaction channels. Five distinct lattice topologies are considered and they study the reaction efficiency both for the case where the satellite sites are passive and for the case where reaction may occur with finite probability at these sites. The results obtained for this class of surface problems are compared with those obtained by assuming that the reaction-diffusion process takes place on a planar, two-dimensional surface (lattice). The applicability of their results to surface-mediated processes on organizates (cells, vesicles, micelles) and on colloidally dispersed catalyst particles is brought out in the Introduction, and the correspondence between the lattice-based, Markovian approach developed here and Fickian models of surface diffusion, particularly with regard to the exponentiality of the decay, is discussed in the concluding section.

  4. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang; Liu, Yangang

    2015-12-01

    The effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols, and led to rapid increase of the PM2.5 concentration.

  5. Constrained Broyden Dimer Method with Bias Potential for Exploring Potential Energy Surface of Multistep Reaction Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Cheng; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2012-07-10

    To predict the chemical activity of new matter is an ultimate goal in chemistry. The identification of reaction pathways using modern quantum mechanics calculations, however, often requires a high demand in computational power and good chemical intuition on the reaction. Here, a new reaction path searching method is developed by combining our recently developed transition state (TS) location method, namely, the constrained Broyden dimer method, with a basin-filling method via bias potentials, which allows the system to walk out from the energy traps at a given reaction direction. In the new method, the reaction path searching starts from an initial state without the need for preguessing the TS-like or final state structure and can proceed iteratively to the final state by locating all related TSs and intermediates. In each elementary reaction step, a reaction direction, such as a bond breaking, needs to be specified, the information of which is refined and preserved as a normal mode through biased dimer rotation. The method is tested successfully on the Baker reaction system (50 elementary reactions) with good efficiency and stability and is also applied to the potential energy surface exploration of multistep reaction processes in the gas phase and on the surface. The new method can be applied for the computational screening of new catalytic materials with a minimum requirement of chemical intuition.

  6. Water entry without surface seal: Extended cavity formation

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad M.

    2014-03-01

    We report results from an experimental study of cavity formation during the impact of superhydrophobic spheres onto water. Using a simple splash-guard mechanism, we block the spray emerging during initial contact from closing thus eliminating the phenomenon known as \\'surface seal\\', which typically occurs at Froude numbers Fr= V0 2/(gR0) = O(100). As such, we are able to observe the evolution of a smooth cavity in a more extended parameter space than has been achieved in previous studies. Furthermore, by systematically varying the tank size and sphere diameter, we examine the influence of increasing wall effects on these guarded impact cavities and note the formation of surface undulations with wavelength λ =O(10)cm and acoustic waves λa=O(D0) along the cavity interface, which produce multiple pinch-off points. Acoustic waves are initiated by pressure perturbations, which themselves are generated by the primary cavity pinch-off. Using high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques we study the bulk fluid flow for the most constrained geometry and show the larger undulations ( λ =O (10cm)) have a fixed nature with respect to the lab frame. We show that previously deduced scalings for the normalized (primary) pinch-off location (ratio of pinch-off depth to sphere depth at pinch-off time), Hp/H = 1/2, and pinch-off time, τ α (R0/g) 1/2, do not hold for these extended cavities in the presence of strong wall effects (sphere-to-tank diameter ratio), ε = D 0/Dtank 1/16. Instead, we find multiple distinct regimes for values of Hp/H as the observed undulations are induced above the first pinch-off point as the impact speed increases. We also report observations of \\'kinked\\' pinch-off points and the suppression of downward facing jets in the presence of wall effects. Surprisingly, upward facing jets emanating from first cavity pinch-off points evolve into a \\'flat\\' structure at high impact speeds, both in the presence and absence of wall effects.

  7. Cyclic Square Wave Voltammetry of Surface-Confined Quasireversible Electron Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Megan A; Bottomley, Lawrence A

    2015-09-01

    The theory for cyclic square wave voltammetry of surface-confined quasireversible electrode reactions is presented and experimentally verified. Theoretical voltammograms were calculated following systematic variation of empirical parameters to assess their impact on the shape of the voltammogram. From the trends obtained, diagnostic criteria for this mechanism were deduced. These criteria were experimentally confirmed using two well-established surface-confined analytes. When properly applied, these criteria will enable non-experts in voltammetry to assign the electrode reaction mechanism and accurately measure electrode reaction kinetics.

  8. Heterogeneous reactions on the surface of fine particles in the atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Jie; ZHU Tong

    2003-01-01

    Fine particles play an important role in the atmosphere. Research on heterogeneous reactions on the surface of fine particles is one of the frontier areas of atmospheric science. In this paper, physical and chemical characteristics of fine particles in the atmosphere and the interactions between trace gases and fine particles are described, methods used in heterogeneous reactions research are discussed in detail, progress in the study of heterogeneous reactions on the surface of fine particles in the atmosphere is summarized, existing importantquestions are pointed out and future research directions are suggested.

  9. Pattern formation and self-organization in plasmas interacting with surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelles, Juan Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Pattern formation and self-organization are fascinating phenomena commonly observed in diverse types of biological, chemical and physical systems, including plasmas. These phenomena are often responsible for the occurrence of coherent structures found in nature, such as recirculation cells and spot arrangements; and their understanding and control can have important implications in technology, e.g. from determining the uniformity of plasma surface treatments to electrode erosion rates. This review comprises theoretical, computational and experimental investigations of the formation of spatiotemporal patterns that result from self-organization events due to the interaction of low-temperature plasmas in contact with confining or intervening surfaces, particularly electrodes. The basic definitions associated to pattern formation and self-organization are provided, as well as some of the characteristics of these phenomena within natural and technological contexts, especially those specific to plasmas. Phenomenological aspects of pattern formation include the competition between production/forcing and dissipation/transport processes, as well as nonequilibrium, stability, bifurcation and nonlinear interactions. The mathematical modeling of pattern formation in plasmas has encompassed from theoretical approaches and canonical models, such as reaction-diffusion systems, to drift-diffusion and nonequilibrium fluid flow models. The computational simulation of pattern formation phenomena imposes distinct challenges to numerical methods, such as high sensitivity to numerical approximations and the occurrence of multiple solutions. Representative experimental and numerical investigations of pattern formation and self-organization in diverse types of low-temperature electrical discharges (low and high pressure glow, dielectric barrier and arc discharges, etc) in contact with solid and liquid electrodes are reviewed. Notably, plasmas in contact with liquids, found in diverse

  10. Prediction of Tetraoxygen Reaction Mechanism with Sulfur Atom on the Singlet Potential Energy Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Khademzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of S+O4 (D2h reaction has been investigated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df and CCSD levels on the singlet potential energy surface. One stable complex has been found for the S+O4 (D2h reaction, IN1, on the singlet potential energy surface. For the title reaction, we obtained four kinds of products at the B3LYP level, which have enough thermodynamic stability. The results reveal that the product P3 is spontaneous and exothermic with −188.042 and −179.147 kcal/mol in Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of reaction, respectively. Because P1 adduct is produced after passing two low energy level transition states, kinetically, it is the most favorable adduct in the 1S+1O4 (D2h atmospheric reactions.

  11. Radiative capture reaction for 17Ne formation within a full three-body model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, J.; Garrido, E.; de Diego, R.; Arias, J. M.; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M.

    2016-11-01

    Background: The breakout from the hot Carbon-Nitrogen-Oxigen (CNO) cycles can trigger the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts. In this environment, a competition between 15O(α ,γ )19Ne and the two-proton capture reaction 15O(2 p ,γ )17Ne is expected. Purpose: Determine the three-body radiative capture reaction rate for 17Ne formation including sequential and direct, resonant and nonresonant contributions on an equal footing. Method: Two different discretization methods have been applied to generate 17Ne states in a full three-body model: the analytical transformed harmonic oscillator method and the hyperspherical adiabatic expansion method. The binary p -15O interaction has been adjusted to reproduce the known spectrum of the unbound 16F nucleus. The dominant E 1 contributions to the 15O(2 p ,γ )17Ne reaction rate have been calculated from the inverse photodissociation process. Results: Three-body calculations provide a reliable description of 17Ne states. The agreement with the available experimental data on 17Ne is discussed. It is shown that the 15O(2 p ,γ )17Ne reaction rates computed within the two methods agree in a broad range of temperatures. The present calculations are compared with a previous theoretical estimation of the reaction rate. Conclusions: It is found that the full three-body model provides a reaction rate several orders of magnitude larger than the only previous estimation. The implications for the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts should be investigated.

  12. Computational studies of atmospherically-relevant chemical reactions in water clusters and on liquid water and ice surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, R Benny; Varner, Mychel E; Hammerich, Audrey D; Riikonen, Sampsa; Murdachaew, Garold; Shemesh, Dorit; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Reactions on water and ice surfaces and in other aqueous media are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, but the microscopic mechanisms of most of these processes are as yet unknown. This Account examines recent progress in atomistic simulations of such reactions and the insights provided into mechanisms and interpretation of experiments. Illustrative examples are discussed. The main computational approaches employed are classical trajectory simulations using interaction potentials derived from quantum chemical methods. This comprises both ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and semiempirical molecular dynamics (SEMD), the latter referring to semiempirical quantum chemical methods. Presented examples are as follows: (i) Reaction of the (NO(+))(NO3(-)) ion pair with a water cluster to produce the atmospherically important HONO and HNO3. The simulations show that a cluster with four water molecules describes the reaction. This provides a hydrogen-bonding network supporting the transition state. The reaction is triggered by thermal structural fluctuations, and ultrafast changes in atomic partial charges play a key role. This is an example where a reaction in a small cluster can provide a model for a corresponding bulk process. The results support the proposed mechanism for production of HONO by hydrolysis of NO2 (N2O4). (ii) The reactions of gaseous HCl with N2O4 and N2O5 on liquid water surfaces. Ionization of HCl at the water/air interface is followed by nucleophilic attack of Cl(-) on N2O4 or N2O5. Both reactions proceed by an SN2 mechanism. The products are ClNO and ClNO2, precursors of atmospheric atomic chlorine. Because this mechanism cannot result from a cluster too small for HCl ionization, an extended water film model was simulated. The results explain ClNO formation experiments. Predicted ClNO2 formation is less efficient. (iii) Ionization of acids at ice surfaces. No ionization is found on ideal crystalline surfaces, but the process is efficient on

  13. Using electrochemical surface plasmon resonance for in-situ kinetic investigations of solid electrolyte interphase formation in lithium ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradanawati, Sylvia Ayu; Wang, Fu-Ming; Su, Chia-Hung

    2016-10-01

    The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) significantly affects the energy density and safety performance of lithium ion batteries. Previous studies have shown that conventional analyses cannot characterize the real-time molecule interactions of SEI formation on the surface of an electrode. In this study, a novel in situ electrochemical-surface plasmon resonance (EC-SPR) was developed for evaluating the kinetic changes of ionic dissociation, SEI formation, and Li-Au alloying reaction. The novel EC-SPR not only indicates the rates of each reaction stage but also reveals the characteristics of the passivated layers. This research demonstrates that the dissociation rates of ionic clusters are affected by several reactions on the surface of an electrode. The rate and mass of the SEI formation from the reduction of ethylene carbonate (EC) are calculated at 0.004 ngs-1 and 5.858 ng, respectively. The EC-SPR is a powerful tool for further in situ kinetic investigations of different electrolyte and electrode systems.

  14. Formation of hydrogen peroxide and water from the reaction of cold hydrogen atoms with solid oxygen at 10K

    CERN Document Server

    Miyauchi, N; Chigai, T; Nagaoka, A; Watanabe, N; Kouchi, A

    2008-01-01

    The reactions of cold H atoms with solid O2 molecules were investigated at 10 K. The formation of H2O2 and H2O has been confirmed by in-situ infrared spectroscopy. We found that the reaction proceeds very efficiently and obtained the effective reaction rates. This is the first clear experimental evidence of the formation of water molecules under conditions mimicking those found in cold interstellar molecular clouds. Based on the experimental results, we discuss the reaction mechanism and astrophysical implications.

  15. Formation of flavor components by the reaction of amino acid and carbonyl compounds in mild conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pripis-Nicolau, L; de Revel, G; Bertrand, A; Maujean, A

    2000-09-01

    This work describe products of reactions between four alpha-dicarbonyl compounds (diacetyl, pentan-2,3-dione, glyoxal, and methylglyoxal) or two alpha-hydroxy ketones, (acetoine and acetol) and amino acids present in wines. The results shows the formation of odorous products or strong-smelling additives resulting from the Maillard and Strecker reaction in a primarily aqueous medium, at low temperature and low pH ( approximately pH 3.5) of the wine. GC/FID, GC/FPD, GC/NPD and GC/MS techniques were used. The olfactive characteristics of the products are described. In the presence of sulfur amino acids and in particular cysteine, many products were formed with a heterocycle production such as pyrazines and methylpyrazines, methylthiazoles, acetylthiazoles, acetylthiazolines, acetylthiazolidines, trimethyloxazole, and dimethylethyloxazoles. These various compounds present odors of sulfur, cornlike, pungent, nut, popcorn, roasted hazelnut, toasted, roasted, and ripe fruits. The chemical conditions of the model reactions are specified. The influence of temperature and pH on the reactions in the presence of cysteine were also studied.

  16. Pressure Dependent Product Formation in the Photochemically Initiated Allyl + Allyl Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Zeuch

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Photochemically driven reactions involving unsaturated radicals produce a thick global layer of organic haze on Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. The allyl radical self-reaction is an example for this type of chemistry and was examined at room temperature from an experimental and kinetic modelling perspective. The experiments were performed in a static reactor with a volume of 5 L under wall free conditions. The allyl radicals were produced from laser flash photolysis of three different precursors allyl bromide (C3H5Br, allyl chloride (C3H5Cl, and 1,5-hexadiene (CH2CH(CH22CHCH2 at 193 nm. Stable products were identified by their characteristic vibrational modes and quantified using FTIR spectroscopy. In addition to the (re- combination pathway C3H5+C3H5 → C6H10 we found at low pressures around 1 mbar the highest final product yields for allene and propene for the precursor C3H5Br. A kinetic analysis indicates that the end product formation is influenced by specific reaction kinetics of photochemically activated allyl radicals. Above 10 mbar the (re- combination pathway becomes dominant. These findings exemplify the specificities of reaction kinetics involving chemically activated species, which for certain conditions cannot be simply deduced from combustion kinetics or atmospheric chemistry on Earth.

  17. Monitorizing nitinol alloy surface reactions for biofouling studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinu, C.Z. [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Photenhauerstrasse 108, Dresden (Germany); Dinca, V.C. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-16, RO 77125 Bucharest (Romania)]. E-mail: valentina.dinca@inflpr.ro; Soare, S. [UNIBUC-MICROGEN, University of Bucharest, Centre for Research, Education and Consulting in Microbiology, Genetics and Biotechnology (MICROGEN), Splaiul Independentei, 91-95, RO 76201 Bucharest (Romania); Moldovan, A. [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Photenhauerstrasse 108, Dresden (Germany); Smarandache, D. [UNIBUC-MICROGEN, University of Bucharest, Centre for Research, Education and Consulting in Microbiology, Genetics and Biotechnology (MICROGEN), Splaiul Independentei, 91-95, RO 76201 Bucharest (Romania); Scarisoareanu, N. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-16, RO 77125 Bucharest (Romania); Barbalat, A. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-16, RO 77125 Bucharest (Romania); Birjega, R. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-16, RO 77125 Bucharest (Romania); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-16, RO 77125 Bucharest (Romania); DiStefano, V. Ferrari [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Electronics, Rome (Italy)

    2007-07-31

    Growth and deposition of unwanted bacteria on implant metal alloys affect their use as biomedical samples. Monitoring any bacterial biofilm accumulation will provide early countermeasures. For a reliable antifouling strategy we prepared nitinol (NiTi) thin films on Ti-derived substrates by using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. As the microstructure of Ti-alloy is dictated by the tensile strength, fatigue and the fracture toughness we tested the use of hydrogen as an alloying element. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigated the crystalline structure, chemical composition and respectively the surface morphology of the nitinol hydrogen and hydrogen-free samples. Moreover, the alloys were integrated and tested using a cellular metric and their responses were systematic evaluated and quantified. Our attractive approach is meant to select the suitable components for an effective and trustworthy anti-fouling strategy. A greater understanding of such processes should lead to novel and effective control methods that would improve in the future implant stability and capabilities.

  18. Monitorizing nitinol alloy surface reactions for biofouling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinu, C. Z.; Dinca, V. C.; Soare, S.; Moldovan, A.; Smarandache, D.; Scarisoareanu, N.; Barbalat, A.; Birjega, R.; Dinescu, M.; DiStefano, V. Ferrari

    2007-07-01

    Growth and deposition of unwanted bacteria on implant metal alloys affect their use as biomedical samples. Monitoring any bacterial biofilm accumulation will provide early countermeasures. For a reliable antifouling strategy we prepared nitinol (NiTi) thin films on Ti-derived substrates by using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. As the microstructure of Ti-alloy is dictated by the tensile strength, fatigue and the fracture toughness we tested the use of hydrogen as an alloying element. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigated the crystalline structure, chemical composition and respectively the surface morphology of the nitinol hydrogen and hydrogen-free samples. Moreover, the alloys were integrated and tested using a cellular metric and their responses were systematic evaluated and quantified. Our attractive approach is meant to select the suitable components for an effective and trustworthy anti-fouling strategy. A greater understanding of such processes should lead to novel and effective control methods that would improve in the future implant stability and capabilities.

  19. Reaction sampling and reactivity prediction using the stochastic surface walking method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2015-01-28

    The prediction of chemical reactivity and thus the design of new reaction systems are the key challenges in chemistry. Here, we develop an unbiased general-purpose reaction sampling method, the stochastic surface walking based reaction sampling (SSW-RS) method, and show that the new method is a promising solution for reactivity prediction of complex reaction systems. The SSW-RS method is capable of sampling both the configuration space of the reactant and the reaction space of pathways, owing to the combination of two recently developed theoretical methods, namely, the stochastic surface walking (SSW) method for potential energy surface (PES) exploration and the double-ended surface walking (DESW) method for building pathways. By integrating with first principles calculations, we show that the SSW-RS method can be applied to investigate the kinetics of complex organic reactions featuring many possible reaction channels and complex hydrogen-bonding networks, as demonstrated here using two examples, epoxypropane hydrolysis in aqueous solution and β-d-glucopyranose decomposition. Our results show that simultaneous sampling of the soft hydrogen-bonding conformations and the chemical reactions involving hard bond making/breaking can be achieved in the SSW-RS simulation, and the mechanism and kinetics can be predicted without a priori information on the system. Unexpected new chemistry for these reactions is revealed and discussed. In particular, despite many possible pathways for β-d-glucopyranose decomposition, the SSW-RS shows that only β-d-glucose and levoglucosan are kinetically preferred direct products and the 5- or 7-member ring products should be secondary products derived from β-d-glucose or levoglucosan. As a general tool for reactivity prediction, the SSW-RS opens a new route for the design of rational reactions.

  20. DME Dissociation Reaction on Platinum Electrode Surface : A Quantitative Kinetic Analysis by In Situ IR Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yi; Tong, Yujin; Lu, Leilei; Osawa, Masatoshi; Ye, Shen

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of electrocatalytic dissociation reaction of dimethyl ether (DME) on a platinum (Pt) polycrystalline electrode in an acidic solution yielding carbon monoxide (CO) has been quantitatively analyzed by in situ IR spectroscopy in the potential region between 100 and 500 mV (vs reversible hydrogen electrode). A two-step consecutive reaction model, an initial dehydrogenation step followed by a CO formation step, is proposed for the dissociation process of the DME molecule. The mechanis...

  1. Dichotomous-noise-induced pattern formation in a reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debojyoti; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2013-06-01

    We consider a generic reaction-diffusion system in which one of the parameters is subjected to dichotomous noise by controlling the flow of one of the reacting species in a continuous-flow-stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) -membrane reactor. The linear stability analysis in an extended phase space is carried out by invoking Furutzu-Novikov procedure for exponentially correlated multiplicative noise to derive the instability condition in the plane of the noise parameters (correlation time and strength of the noise). We demonstrate that depending on the correlation time an optimal strength of noise governs the self-organization. Our theoretical analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on pattern formation in a chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system.

  2. Redirection of the Reaction Specificity of a Thermophilic Acetolactate Synthase toward Acetaldehyde Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cheng

    Full Text Available Acetolactate synthase and pyruvate decarboxylase are thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes that convert pyruvate into acetolactate and acetaldehyde, respectively. Although the former are encoded in the genomes of many thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, the latter has been found only in mesophilic organisms. In this study, the reaction specificity of acetolactate synthase from Thermus thermophilus was redirected to catalyze acetaldehyde formation to develop a thermophilic pyruvate decarboxylase. Error-prone PCR and mutant library screening led to the identification of a quadruple mutant with 3.1-fold higher acetaldehyde-forming activity than the wild-type. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the increased activity of the mutant was due to H474R amino acid substitution, which likely generated two new hydrogen bonds near the thiamine pyrophosphate-binding site. These hydrogen bonds might result in the better accessibility of H+ to the substrate-cofactor-enzyme intermediate and a shift in the reaction specificity of the enzyme.

  3. Reversible Formation and Transmetalation of Schiff-Base Complexes in Subcomponent Self-Assembly Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewing, Dennis; Koppetz, Hannah; Hahn, F Ekkehardt

    2015-08-03

    Dinuclear complexes [Zn2(NS,NS)2] 3 and [Ni2(NS,NS)2] 6 bearing Schiff-base ligands featuring two NS donor groups were obtained in subcomponent self-assembly reactions using nickel or zinc as template metals. Several transmetalation reactions starting from 3 or 6 yielded the complexes [Pd2(NS,NS)2] 4 and [Co2(NS,NS)2] 5, and their molecular structures were determined by X-ray diffraction. Starting from the mononuclear complex [Ni(NS/NOH)2] 9 featuring a coordinated NS Schiff base and a free NOH Schiff base, completely reversible thermodynamically controlled imine bond formation was observed leading to complex [Ni2(NS,NS)2] 6 and the free Schiff -base ligand NOH,NOH 10.

  4. Chemo-Marangoni convection driven by an interfacial reaction: pattern formation and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, K; Acker, M; Tadmouri, R; Pimienta, V

    2012-09-01

    A combined study devoted to chemo-Marangoni convection and the underlying kinetics is presented for a biphasic system in which surfactants are produced in situ by an interfacial reaction. The pattern formation studied in a Hele-Shaw cell in both microgravity and terrestrial environments initially shows an ensemble of chemo-Marangoni cells along a nearly planar interface. Soon, a crossover occurs to periodic large-scale interfacial deformations which coexist with the Marangoni cells. This crossover can be correlated with the autocatalytic nature of the interfacial reaction identified in the kinetic studies. The drastic increase in the product concentration is associated with an enhanced aggregate-assisted transfer after the critical micellar concentration is approached. In this context, it was possible to conclusively explain the changes in the periodicity of the interfacial deformations depending on the reactant concentration ratio.

  5. On adduct formation and reactivity in the OCS + OH reaction: A combined theoretical and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Johan A.; Kyte, Mildrid; Østerstrøm, Freja F.; Joelsson, Lars M. T.; Knap, Hasse C.; Jørgensen, Solvejg; Nielsen, Ole John; Murakami, Tatsuhiro; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2017-05-01

    The OCS + OH reaction occurs either via adduct formation or direct S-abstraction. We investigate OH-oxidation of OCS using quantum chemical methods and find that the OC(OH)S adduct reacts rapidly with O2 forming SOOH + CO2. SOOH rapidly dissociates under atmospheric conditions regenerating OH. We interpret earlier experimental results based on monitoring OH-loss, and find that OH-regeneration in presence of O2 may explain the insensitivity of the reaction rate to pressure and O2. We calculate a rate constant of 3.52 ×10-16 cm3 s-1 at 10 Torr increasing to 7.20 ×10-16 cm3 s-1 at 700 Torr. In addition we present a new experimental determination of the OCS + OH rate constant of (5.3 ± 3.6) ×10-15 cm3 s-1 at 296 K and 700 Torr using relative-rate technique.

  6. Iterative reactions of transient boronic acids enable sequential C-C bond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battilocchio, Claudio; Feist, Florian; Hafner, Andreas; Simon, Meike; Tran, Duc N.; Allwood, Daniel M.; Blakemore, David C.; Ley, Steven V.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to form multiple carbon-carbon bonds in a controlled sequence and thus rapidly build molecular complexity in an iterative fashion is an important goal in modern chemical synthesis. In recent times, transition-metal-catalysed coupling reactions have dominated in the development of C-C bond forming processes. A desire to reduce the reliance on precious metals and a need to obtain products with very low levels of metal impurities has brought a renewed focus on metal-free coupling processes. Here, we report the in situ preparation of reactive allylic and benzylic boronic acids, obtained by reacting flow-generated diazo compounds with boronic acids, and their application in controlled iterative C-C bond forming reactions is described. Thus far we have shown the formation of up to three C-C bonds in a sequence including the final trapping of a reactive boronic acid species with an aldehyde to generate a range of new chemical structures.

  7. Removal of boron from wastewater by the hydroxyapatite formation reaction using acceleration effect of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Eishi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Jhonan, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan); Sasaki, Atsushi [Technical Division of Instrumental Analysis, Faculty of Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Jhonan, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan); Endo, Masatoshi, E-mail: endomasa@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Jhonan, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The removal rate of boron was controlled by the HAp precipitate formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method could reduce reaction time to 1/10 that of the conventional one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of ammonia could accelerate boron removal in this proposed method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium alpha-olefin sulfonate was the most effective coagulant in proposed method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed method had applicability to the real waste water sample. - Abstract: The mechanism was discussed for the removal of boron by the hydroxyapatite (HAp) formation reaction using Ca(OH){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} in room temperature. Time required to remove boron was 20 min by adding Ca(OH){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} for the remaining boron to below 1 mg/L. The removal rate of boron was controlled by the HAp precipitate formation and the presence of ammonia. From the XRD patterns and SEM images, HAp could be confirmed in the precipitate product. The reaction between borate ions and calcium hydroxide was accelerated by dehydration with ammonia; the borate-calcium hydroxide compound coprecipitated with resulting HAp. Although the removal of boron decreased in the presence of sulfate, phosphate, and aluminum, these effects could be prevented by adding excess Ca(OH){sub 2}. Interference of fluoride ions was eliminated by adding Al{sup 3+}. Sodium alpha-olefin sulfonate was the most effective coagulant for HAp precipitation. The proposed boron removal method has several advantages about treating time and ability of boron removal. The method was successfully applied to the real hot spring wastewater.

  8. Evaluation of the atmospheric significance of multiphase reactions in atmospheric secondary organic aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelencsér

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In a simple conceptual cloud-aerosol model the mass of secondary organic aerosol (SOA that may be formed in multiphase reaction in an idealized scenario involving two cloud cycles separated with a cloud-free period is evaluated. The conditions are set to those typical of continental clouds, and each parameter used in the model calculations is selected as a mean of available observational data of individual species for which the multiphase SOA formation route has been established. In the idealized setting gas and aqueous-phase reactions are both considered, but only the latter is expected to yield products of sufficiently low volatility to be retained by aerosol particles after the cloud dissipates. The key variable of the model is the Henry-constant which primarily determines how important multiphase reactions are relative to gas-phase photooxidation processes. The precursor considered in the model is assumed to already have some affinity to water, i.e. it is a compound having oxygen-containing functional group(s. As a principal model output an aerosol yield parameter is calculated for the multiphase SOA formation route as a function of the Henry-constant, and has been found to be significant already above H~103 M atm-1. Among the potential precursors that may be eligible for this mechanism based on their Henry constants, there are a suite of oxygenated compounds such as primary oxidation products of biogenic and anthropogenic hydrocarbons, including, for example, pinonaldehyde. Finally, the analogy of multiphase SOA formation to in-cloud sulfate production is exploited.

  9. Assessment of the potential for ammonium nitrate formation and reaction in Tank 241-SY-101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    Two principal scenarios by which ammonium nitrate may be formed were considered: (a) precipitation of ammonium nitrate in the waste, and (b) ammonium nitrate formation via the gas phase reaction of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The first of these can be dismissed because ammonium ions, which are necessary for ammonium nitrate precipitation, can exist only in negligibly small concentrations in strongly alkaline solutions. Gas phase reactions between ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor in the gas phase represent the most likely means by which ammonium nitrate aerosols could be formed in Tank 241-SY-101. Predicted ammonium nitrate formation rates are largely controlled by the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. This gas has not been detected among those gases vented from the wastes using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. While detection limits for nitrogen dioxide have not been established experimentally, the maximum concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase in Tank 241-SY-101 was estimated at 0.1 ppm based on calculations using the HITRAN data base and on FTIR spectra of gases vented from the wastes. At 50 C and with 100 ppm ammonia also present, less than one gram of ammonium nitrate per year is estimated to be formed in the tank. To date, ammonium nitrate has not been detected on HEPA filters in the ventilation system, so any quantity that has been formed in the tank must be quite small, in good agreement with rate calculations. The potential for runaway exothermic reactions involving ammonium nitrate in Tank 241-SY-101 is minimal. Dilution by non-reacting waste components, particularly water, would prevent hazardous exothermic reactions from occurring within the waste slurry, even if ammonium nitrate were present. 41 refs.

  10. To address surface reaction network complexity using scaling relations machine learning and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulissi, Zachary W.; Medford, Andrew J.; Bligaard, Thomas; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2017-01-01

    Surface reaction networks involving hydrocarbons exhibit enormous complexity with thousands of species and reactions for all but the very simplest of chemistries. We present a framework for optimization under uncertainty for heterogeneous catalysis reaction networks using surrogate models that are trained on the fly. The surrogate model is constructed by teaching a Gaussian process adsorption energies based on group additivity fingerprints, combined with transition-state scaling relations and a simple classifier for determining the rate-limiting step. The surrogate model is iteratively used to predict the most important reaction step to be calculated explicitly with computationally demanding electronic structure theory. Applying these methods to the reaction of syngas on rhodium(111), we identify the most likely reaction mechanism. Propagating uncertainty throughout this process yields the likelihood that the final mechanism is complete given measurements on only a subset of the entire network and uncertainty in the underlying density functional theory calculations. PMID:28262694

  11. To address surface reaction network complexity using scaling relations machine learning and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulissi, Zachary W.; Medford, Andrew J.; Bligaard, Thomas; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2017-03-01

    Surface reaction networks involving hydrocarbons exhibit enormous complexity with thousands of species and reactions for all but the very simplest of chemistries. We present a framework for optimization under uncertainty for heterogeneous catalysis reaction networks using surrogate models that are trained on the fly. The surrogate model is constructed by teaching a Gaussian process adsorption energies based on group additivity fingerprints, combined with transition-state scaling relations and a simple classifier for determining the rate-limiting step. The surrogate model is iteratively used to predict the most important reaction step to be calculated explicitly with computationally demanding electronic structure theory. Applying these methods to the reaction of syngas on rhodium(111), we identify the most likely reaction mechanism. Propagating uncertainty throughout this process yields the likelihood that the final mechanism is complete given measurements on only a subset of the entire network and uncertainty in the underlying density functional theory calculations.

  12. Kinetics and activation thermodynamics of methane monooxygenase compound Q formation and reaction with substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazeau, B J; Lipscomb, J D

    2000-11-07

    The transient kinetics of formation and decay of the reaction cycle intermediates of the Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b methane monooxygenase (MMO) catalytic cycle are studied as a function of temperature and substrate type and deuteration. Kinetic evidence is presented for the existence of three intermediates termed compounds O, P, and P forming after the addition of O(2) to diferrous MMO hydroxylase (H(r)) and before the formation of the reactive intermediate compound Q. The Arrhenius plots for these reactions are linear and independent of substrate concentration and type, showing that substrate does not participate directly in the oxygen activation phase of the catalytic cycle. Analysis of the transient kinetic data revealed only small changes relative to the weak optical spectrum of H(r) for any of these intermediates. In contrast, large changes in the 430 nm spectral region are associated with the formation of Q. The decay reaction of Q exhibits an apparent first-order concentration dependence for all substrates tested, and the observed rate constant depends on the substrate type. The kinetics of the decay reaction of Q yield a nonlinear Arrhenius plot when methane is the substrate, and the rates in both segments of the plot increase linearly with methane concentration. Together these observations suggest that at least two reactions with a methane concentration dependence, and perhaps two methane molecules, are involved in the decay process. When CD(4) is used as the substrate, a large isotope effect and a linear Arrhenius plot are observed. Analogous plots for all other MMO substrates tested (e.g., ethane) are linear, and no isotope effect for deuterated analogues is observed. This demonstrates that a step other than C-H bond breaking is rate limiting for alternative MMO substrates. A two step Q decay mechanism is proposed that provides an explanation for the lack of an isotope effect for alternative MMO substrates and the fact that rate of oxidation of

  13. Formation control of surface marine craft using Lagrange multipliers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihle, Ivar-Andre F.; Jouffroy, Jerome; Fossen, Thor I.

    on the total system. In this way, a formation can be assembled and stay together when exposed to external forces. A brief comparison with other control designs for a group of marine craft is done. Further, control laws for formation assembling (with dynamic positioning), and formation keeping during...

  14. Study of Reaction of Curium Oxy-Compound Formation in Molten Chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipenko, A.G.; Mayorshin, A.A.; Bychkov, A.V. [Dimitrovgrad-10, Ulyanovsk region, 433510 (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    The method of potentiometric titration using oxygen sensors with solid electrolyte membrane was applied for the study of the interaction of curium cations with oxygen anions in the molten alkali metal chlorides in the temperature range of 450-850 C degrees depending on oxy-acidity of the environment. Assumptions were made concerning ion and phase composition of the obtained high-temperature compounds and chemical reactions taking place in the melts. This scheme assumes that as the basicity of the melt increases, initially the formation of soluble curium oxychlorides takes place in the melt (presumably CmO{sup -}) that is followed by formation of solid CmOCl and finally sesquioxide Cm{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Basic thermodynamic values were calculated for the resultant curium oxy-compounds.

  15. Role of glyoxal in SOA formation from aromatic hydrocarbons: gas-phase reaction trumps reactive uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nakao

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the significance of glyoxal acting as an intermediate species leading to SOA formation from aromatic hydrocarbon photooxidation under humid conditions. Rapid SOA formation from glyoxal uptake onto aqueous (NH42SO4 seed particles is observed; however, glyoxal did not partition to SOA or SOA coated aqueous seed during all aromatic hydrocarbon experiments (RH up to 80%. Glyoxal is found to only influence SOA formation by raising hydroxyl (OH radical concentrations. Four experimental approaches supporting this conclusion are presented in this paper: (1 increased SOA formation and decreased SOA volatility in the toluene + NOx photooxidation system with additional glyoxal was reproduced by matching OH radical concentrations through H2O2 addition; (2 glyoxal addition to SOA seed formed from toluene + NOx photooxidation did not increase observed SOA volume; (3 SOA formation from toluene + NOx photooxidation with and without deliquesced (NH42SO4 seed resulted in similar SOA growth, consistent with a coating of SOA preventing glyoxal uptake onto deliquesced (NH42SO4 seed; and (4 the fraction of a C4H9+ fragment (observed by Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, HR-ToF-AMS from SOA formed by 2-tert-butylphenol (BP oxidation was unchanged in the presence of additional glyoxal despite enhanced SOA formation. This study suggests that glyoxal uptake onto aerosol is minor when the surface (and near-surface of aerosols are primarily composed of secondary organic compounds.

  16. Formation of meso, N-diphenylprotoporphyrin IX by an aerobic reaction of phenylhydrazine with oxyhemoglobins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakanishi A

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Administration of phenylhydrazine to rabbits resulted in the denaturation of hemoglobins in erythrocytes, causing the formation of intracellular precipitates known as Heinz bodies, severe hemolytic anemia, and reticulocytosis. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of the destabilization, we allowed human oxyhemoglobins to react aerobically with phenylhydrazine. After treatment with acetic acid/HCl and H2SO4/methanol, the chloroform extract contained blue-green pigments of major products accompanied by different minor products. Each product was isolated by column chromatography. By fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR spectrometry, dimethyl esters of N-phenylprotoporphyrin IX and meso, N-diphenylprotoporphyrin IX were determined. Other major products also were determined to be dimethyl esters of triphenyl-and tetraphenyl-substituted protoporphyrins by FAB-MS. The formation of meso, N-diphenylprotoporphyrin indicated that the addition of a phenyl radical to the meso-carbon atom of the protoporphyrin ring occurred. Triphenyl and tetraphenyl adducts also indicated the formation of phenyl radicals in the aerobic reaction of phenylhydrazine with oxyhemoglobins. From these results, we suggest that the formation of phenyl radicals and the replacement of heme with phenyl-substituted protoporphyrins cause the destabilization of hemoglobins to induce Heinz bodies and hemolytic anemia with phenylhydrazine.

  17. Surface reactivity and layer analysis of chemisorbed reaction films in the surface-chemical environment of alkyl octadecenoates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R B Choudhary; O N Anand; O S Tyagi

    2009-05-01

    Studies on surface reactivity of substrate iron (Fe-particles) were made in the tribo-chemical environment of alkyl octadecenoates. Two alkyl octadecenoates namely ethyl octadecenoate and methyl 12-hydroxy octadecenoate, slightly different in their chemical nature, were taken for preparing the chemisorbed reaction films (CRF) at the temperature 100 ± 5°C. The reaction products collected in the composite (amorphous) phase were isolated into three different solvent-soluble fractions (sub-layer films) using polar solvents of increasing polar strength. The FTIR analysis of these films showed that these were primarily organic in nature and were composed of alkyl and/or aryl hydroxy ethers, unsaturated hydroxy ketones, and aromatic structures chemically linked with iron surface. These reaction films also contained large amount of iron (Fe). Further, these film fractions also showed varying thermal behaviour during thermal decomposition in the temperature range of 50-800°C when thermally evaluated in the nitrogen environment.

  18. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND THEIR GROWTH TO SOOT -A REVIEW OF CHEMICAL REACTION PATHWAYS. (R824970)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The generation by combustion processes of airborne species of current health concern such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot particles necessitates a detailed understanding of chemical reaction pathways responsible for their formation. The present review discus...

  19. Surface tectonics of nanoporous networks of melamine-capped molecular building blocks formed through interface Schiff-base reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan-He; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Control over the assembly of molecules on a surface is of great importance for the fabrication of molecule-based miniature devices. Melamine (MA) and molecules with terminal MA units are promising candidates for supramolecular interfacial packing patterning, owing to their multiple hydrogen-bonding sites. Herein, we report the formation of self-assembled structures of MA-capped molecules through a simple on-surface synthetic route. MA terminal groups were successfully fabricated onto rigid molecular cores with 2-fold and 3-fold symmetry through interfacial Schiff-base reactions between MA and aldehyde groups. Sub-molecular scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging of the resultant adlayer revealed the formation of nanoporous networks. Detailed structural analysis indicated that strong hydrogen-bonding interactions between the MA groups persistently drove the formation of nanoporous networks. Herein, we demonstrate that functional groups with strong hydrogen-bond-formation ability are promising building blocks for the guided assembly of nanoporous networks and other hierarchical 2D assemblies. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Temperature perturbations evolution as a possible mechanism of exothermal reaction kernels formation in shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakon, A. V.; Kiverin, A. D.; Yakovenko, I. S.

    2016-11-01

    The basic question raised in the paper concerns the origins of exothermal reaction kernels and the mechanisms of detonation onset behind the reflected shock wave in shock-tube experiments. Using the conventional experimental technique, it is obtained that in the certain diapason of conditions behind the reflected shocks a so-called “mild ignition” arises which is characterized by the detonation formation from the kernel distant from the end-wall. The results of 2-D and 3-D simulations of the flow evolution behind the incident and reflected shocks allow formulation of the following scenario of ignition kernels formation. Initial stage during and after the diaphragm rupture is characterized by a set of non-steady gasdynamical processes. As a result, the flow behind the incident shock occurs to be saturated with temperature perturbations. Further evolution of these perturbations provides generating of the shear stresses in the flow accompanied with intensification of velocity and temperature perturbations. After reflection the shock wave interacts with the formed kernels of higher temperature and more pronounced kernels arise on the background of reactivity profile determined by moving reflected shock. Exothermal reaction starts inside such kernels and propagates into the ambient medium as a spontaneous ignition wave with minimum initial speed equal to the reflected shock wave speed.

  1. Theory of the reaction dynamics of small molecules on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Bret [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2016-09-09

    The objective of this project has been to develop realistic theoretical models for gas-surface interactions, with a focus on processes important in heterogeneous catalysis. The dissociative chemisorption of a molecule on a metal is a key step in many catalyzed reactions, and is often the rate-limiting step. We have explored the dissociative chemisorption of H2, H2O and CH4 on a variety of metal surfaces. Most recently, our extensive studies of methane dissociation on Ni and Pt surfaces have fully elucidated its dependence on translational energy, vibrational state and surface temperature, providing the first accurate comparisons with experimental data. We have explored Eley-Rideal and hot atom reactions of H atoms with H- and C-covered metal surfaces. H atom interactions with graphite have also been explored, including both sticking and Eley-Rideal recombination processes. Again, our methods made it possible to explain several experiments studying these reactions. The sticking of atoms on metal surfaces has also been studied. To help elucidate the experiments that study these processes, we examine how the reaction dynamics depend upon the nature of the molecule-metal interaction, as well as experimental variables such as substrate temperature, beam energy, angle of impact, and the internal states of the molecules. Electronic structure methods based on Density Functional Theory are used to compute each molecule-metal potential energy surface. Both time-dependent quantum scattering techniques and quasi-classical methods are used to examine the reaction or scattering dynamics. Much of our effort has been directed towards developing improved quantum methods that can accurately describe reactions, as well as include the effects of substrate temperature (lattice vibration).

  2. Surface reaction rate and probability of ozone and alpha-terpineol on glass, polyvinyl chloride, and latex paint surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Shi; Morrison, Glenn C

    2011-05-15

    Ozone can react homogeneously with unsaturated organic compounds in buildings to generate undesirable products. However, these reactions can also occur on indoor surfaces, especially for low-volatility organics. Conversion rates of ozone with α-terpineol, a representative low-volatility compound, were quantified on surfaces that mimic indoor substrates. Rates were measured for α-terpineol adsorbed to beads of glass, polyvinylchloride (PVC), and dry latex paint, in a plug flow reactor. A newly defined second-order surface reaction rate coefficient, k(2), was derived from the flow reactor model. The value of k(2) ranged from 0.68 × 10(-14) cm(4)s(-1)molecule(-1) for α-terpineol adsorbed to PVC to 3.17 × 10(-14) cm(4)s(-1)molecule(-1) for glass, but was insensitive to relative humidity. Further, k(2) is only weakly influenced by the adsorbed mass but instead appears to be more strongly related to the interfacial activity α-terpineol. The minimum reaction probability ranged from 3.79 × 10(-6) for glass at 20% RH to 6.75 × 10(-5) for PVC at 50% RH. The combination of high equilibrium surface coverage and high reactivity for α-terpineol suggests that surface conversion rates are fast enough to compete with or even overwhelm other removal mechanisms in buildings such as gas-phase conversion and air exchange.

  3. Oxygen reduction reaction over silver particles with various morphologies and surface chemical states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Junya; Okata, Yui; Watabe, Noriyuki; Katagiri, Makoto; Nakamura, Ayaka; Arikawa, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Ken-ichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Ueda, Wataru; Satsuma, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an alkaline solution was carried out using Ag powders having various particle morphologies and surface chemical states (Size: ca. 40-110 nm in crystalline size. Shape: spherical, worm like, and angular. Surface: smooth with easily reduced AgOx, defective with AgOx, and Ag2CO3 surface layer). The various Ag powders were well characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and stripping voltammetry of underpotential-deposited lead. Defective and oxidized surfaces enhanced the Ag active surface area during the ORR. The ORR activity was affected by the morphology and surface chemical state: Ag particles with defective and angular surfaces showed smaller electron exchange number between three and four but showed higher specific activity compared to Ag particles with smooth surfaces.

  4. Surface chemical reactions induced by molecules electronically-excited in the gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrunin, Victor V.

    2011-01-01

    be readily produced. Products of chemical adsorption and/or chemical reactions induced within adsorbates are aggregated on the surface and observed by light scattering. We will demonstrate how pressure and spectral dependencies of the chemical outcomes, polarization of the light and interference of two laser...... and alignment are taking place, guiding all the molecules towards the intersections with the ground state PES, where transitions to the ground state PES will occur with minimum energy dissipation. The accumulated kinetic energy may be used to overcome the chemical reaction barrier. While recombination chemical...... reactions in a gas phase require participation of a third body, this strong limitation on the reaction rates is removed upon interaction with a surface. To observe the predicted phenomenon, we suggested a new experimental approach, Evanescent Wave Photocatalysis1, based on application of total internal...

  5. Impacts of diffusive transport on carbonate mineral formation from magnesium silicate-CO2-water reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammar, Daniel E; Wang, Fei; Guo, Bin; Surface, J Andrew; Peters, Catherine A; Conradi, Mark S; Hayes, Sophia E

    2014-12-16

    Reactions of CO2 with magnesium silicate minerals to precipitate magnesium carbonates can result in stable carbon sequestration. This process can be employed in ex situ reactors or during geologic carbon sequestration in magnesium-rich formations. The reaction of aqueous CO2 with the magnesium silicate mineral forsterite was studied in systems with transport controlled by diffusion. The approach integrated bench-scale experiments, an in situ spectroscopic technique, and reactive transport modeling. Experiments were performed using a tube packed with forsterite and open at one end to a CO2-rich solution. The location and amounts of carbonate minerals that formed were determined by postexperiment characterization of the solids. Complementing this ex situ characterization, (13)C NMR spectroscopy tracked the inorganic carbon transport and speciation in situ. The data were compared with the output of reactive transport simulations that accounted for diffusive transport processes, aqueous speciation, and the forsterite dissolution rate. All three approaches found that the onset of magnesium carbonate precipitation was spatially localized about 1 cm from the opening of the forsterite bed. Magnesite was the dominant reaction product. Geochemical gradients that developed in the diffusion-limited zones led to locally supersaturated conditions at specific locations even while the volume-averaged properties of the system remained undersaturated.

  6. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun

    2017-08-03

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  7. Carbon Isotopic Fractionation During Formation of Macromolecular Organic Grain Coatings via FTT Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, J. A.; Johnson, N. M.; Elsila-Cook, J.; Kopstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of carbon isotopic fractionation of various organic compounds found in meteorites may provide useful diagnostic information concerning the environments and mechanisms that were responsible for their formation. Unfortunately, carbon has only two stable isotopes, making interpretation of such observations quite problematic. Chemical reactions can increase or decrease the C-13/C-12 ratio by various amounts, but the final ratio will depend on the total reaction pathway followed from the source carbon to the final product, a path not readily discernable after 4.5 billion years. In 1970 Libby showed that the C-13/C-12 ratios of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon were similar by comparing carbon from the Murchison meteorite to that of terrestrial sediments. More recent studies have shown that the C-13/C-12 ratio of the Earth and meteorites may be considerably enriched in C-13 compared to the ratio observed in the solar wind [2], possibly suggesting that carbon produced via ion-molecule reactions in cold dark clouds could be an important source of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon. However, meteoritic carbon has been subjected to parent body processing that could have resulted in significant changes to the C-13/C-12 ratio originally present while significant variation has been observed in the C-13/C-12 ratio of the same molecule extracted from different terrestrial sources. Again we must conclude that understanding the ratio found in meteorites may be difficult.

  8. Radiative capture reaction for $^{17}$Ne formation within a full three-body model

    CERN Document Server

    Casal, J; de Diego, R; Arias, J M; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: The breakout from the hot CNO cycles can trigger the rp-process in type I X-ray bursts. In this environment, a competition between $^{15}\\text{O}(\\alpha,\\gamma){^{19}\\text{Ne}}$ and the two-proton capture reaction $^{15}\\text{O}(2p,\\gamma){^{17}\\text{Ne}}$ is expected. Purpose: Determine the three-body radiative capture reaction rate for ${^{17}\\text{Ne}}$ formation including sequential and direct, resonant and non-resonant contributions on an equal footing. Method: Two different discretization methods have been applied to generate $^{17}$Ne states in a full three-body model: the analytical transformed harmonic oscillator method and the hyperspherical adiabatic expansion method. The binary $p$--$^{15}$O interation has been adjusted to reproduce the known spectrum of the unbound $^{16}$F nucleus. The dominant E1 contributions to the $^{15}\\text{O}(2p,\\gamma){^{17}\\text{Ne}}$ reaction rate have been calculated from the inverse photodissociation process. Results: Three-body calculations provide a rel...

  9. Emotional reactions of different interface formats: Comparing digital and traditional board games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Min Fang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Some games provide both traditional board games and digital versions at the same time in the market. Why the rise of virtual games has not forced traditional physical board games to disappear? Do traditional physical games evoke different emotional reactions and interpersonal relationships? This article explored the subjects’ preferences toward traditional and digital versions of the same game and investigated social interaction while playing games. Based on Norman’s three emotional design levels—visceral, behavioral, and reflective levels—this study examined players’ satisfaction degree. This study also applied Positive and Negative Affect Schedule to measure subjects’ emotional reactions. Monopoly and Jenga games were selected as stimuli. A total of 77 subjects received tests of three different interface formats (physical, desktop, and tablet and then filled out the questionnaire. The findings successfully evidenced the significant differences between digital and traditional board games. The statistical results indicated that satisfaction degrees of digital games declined in visceral, behavioral, and reflective levels. Traditional games not only evoked users’ stronger emotional reactions but also received higher preferences. Traditional games could improve interpersonal relationships as well.

  10. Surface reaction network of CO oxidation on CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liangbing; Xiong, Feng; Jin, Yuekang; Wang, Zhengming; Sun, Guanghui; Huang, Weixin

    2016-11-30

    CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts were prepared and their activity toward the adsorption and co-adsorption of O2, CO, CO2 and water was studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, thermal desorption spectra and temperature-programmed reaction spectra. The Au surface of CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts molecularly adsorbs CO, CO2 and water, and the polycrystalline CeO2 surface of CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts molecularly adsorbs O2, and molecularly and reactively adsorbs CO, CO2 and water. By controllably preparing co-adsorbed surface species on CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts, we successfully identified various surface reaction pathways of CO oxidation to produce CO2 with different barriers both on the CeO2 surface and at the Au-CeO2 interface, including CO oxidation by various oxygen species, and water/hydroxyl group-involved CO oxidation. These results establish a surface reaction network of CO oxidation catalyzed by Au/CeO2 catalysts, greatly advancing the fundamental understandings of catalytic CO oxidation reactions.

  11. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of uranium are topics of sustained interest because of their importance to the development of nuclear fuel processing methods, and a more complete understanding of the factors that govern the mobility and fate of the element in the environment. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used to examine the intrinsic reactivity (i.e., free from influence of solvent and other condensed phase effects) of a wide range of metal ion complexes in a species-specific fashion. Here, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and gas-phase ion-molecule reactions were used to create and characterize ions derived from precursors composed of uranyl cation (UVIO2 2+) coordinated by formate or acetate ligands. Anionic complexes containing UVIO2 2+ and formate ligands fragment by decarboxylation and elimination of CH2=O, ultimately to produce an oxo-hydride species [UVIO2(O)(H)]-. Cationic species ultimately dissociate to make [UVIO2(OH)]+. Anionic complexes containing acetate ligands exhibit an initial loss of acetyloxyl radical, CH3CO2•, with associated reduction of uranyl to UVO2 +. Subsequent CID steps cause elimination of CO2 and CH4, ultimately to produce [UVO2(O)]-. Loss of CH4 occurs by an intra-complex H+ transfer process that leaves UVO2 + coordinated by acetate and acetate enolate ligands. A subsequent dissociation step causes elimination of CH2=C=O to leave [UVO2(O)]-. Elimination of CH4 is also observed as a result of hydrolysis caused by ion-molecule reaction with H2O. The reactions of other anionic species with gas-phase H2O create hydroxyl products, presumably through the elimination of H2.

  12. Visible-light induced isoindoles formation to trigger intermolecular Diels-Alder reactions in the presence of air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao; Zhen, Le; Cheng, Yong; Du, Hong-Jin; Zhao, Hui; Wen, Xiaoan; Kong, Ling-Yi; Xu, Qing-Long; Sun, Hongbin

    2015-06-05

    Visible-light induced isoindole formation triggered an intermolecular Diels-Alder reaction with dienophiles such as acetylenedicarboxylate and maleimides in the presence of air. The reaction resulted in excellent diastereoselctivity and high yields under mild reaction conditions. This protocol provides an atom-economical, transition-metal-free (TM-free) and straightforward approach to structurally diverse bridged-ring heterocycles from easily accessible molecules.

  13. Evidence of extensive diversity in bacterial adherence mechanisms that exploit unanticipated stainless steel surface structural complexity for biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elisabeth M; Li, Dongyang; Shahrooei, Mohammad; Yu, Bin; Muruve, Daniel; Irvin, Randall T

    2013-04-01

    Three protease-resistant bioorganic 304 stainless steel surfaces were created through the reaction of synthetic peptides consisting of the D-enantiomeric isomer (D-K122-4), the retro-inverso D-enantiomeric isomer (RI-K122-4), and a combination of the two peptides (D+RI) of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PilA receptor binding domain with steel surfaces. The peptides used to produce the new materials differ only in handedness of their three-dimensional structure, but they reacted with the steel to yield materials that differed in their surface electron work function (EWF) while displaying an identical chemical composition and equivalent surface adhesive force properties. These surfaces allowed for an assessment of the relative role of surface EWF in initial biofilm formation. We examined the ability of various bacteria (selected strains of Listeria monocytogenes, L. innocua, Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis) to initiate biofilm formation. The D-K1224 generated surface displayed the lowest EWF (classically associated with greater molecular interactions and more extensive biofilm formation) but was observed to be least effectively colonized by bacteria (>50% decrease in bacterial adherence of all strains). The highest surface EWF with the lowest surface free energy (RI-K122-4 generated) was more extensively colonized by bacteria, with the binding of some strains being equivalent to unmodified steel. The D+RI generated surface was least effective in minimizing biofilm formation, where some strains displayed enhanced bacterial colonization. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that the D and RI peptides displayed similar but clearly different binding patterns, suggesting that the peptides recognized different sites on the steel, and that differential binding of the peptides to the steel surfaces influences the binding of different bacterial strains and species. We have demonstrated that stainless steel surfaces can be easily modified by peptides to generate surfaces with

  14. Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0124 Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product...Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0486 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM... Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Grant #FA9550-12-1-0486 2013 Basic Research Initiative (BRI

  15. Highly specific and sensitive electrochemical genotyping via gap ligation reaction and surface hybridization detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, Yan-Li; Xu, Xiangmin; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2009-02-25

    This paper developed a novel electrochemical genotyping strategy based on gap ligation reaction with surface hybridization detection. This strategy utilized homogeneous enzymatic reactions to generate molecular beacon-structured allele-specific products that could be cooperatively annealed to capture probes stably immobilized on the surface via disulfide anchors, thus allowing ultrasensitive surface hybridization detection of the allele-specific products through redox tags in close proximity to the electrode. Such a unique biphasic architecture provided a universal methodology for incorporating enzymatic discrimination reactions in electrochemical genotyping with desirable reproducibility, high efficiency and no interferences from interficial steric hindrance. The developed technique was demonstrated to show intrinsic high sensitivity for direct genomic analysis, and excellent specificity with discriminativity of single nucleotide variations.

  16. Rapid-reaction kinetic characterization of the pathway of streptokinase-plasmin catalytic complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhamme, Ingrid M; Bock, Paul E

    2008-09-19

    Binding of the fibrinolytic proteinase plasmin (Pm) to streptokinase (SK) in a tight stoichiometric complex transforms Pm into a potent proteolytic activator of plasminogen. SK binding to the catalytic domain of Pm, with a dissociation constant of 12 pm, is assisted by SK Lys(414) binding to a Pm kringle, which accounts for a 11-20-fold affinity decrease when Pm lysine binding sites are blocked by 6-aminohexanoic acid (6-AHA) or benzamidine. The pathway of SK.Pm catalytic complex formation was characterized by stopped-flow kinetics of SK and the Lys(414) deletion mutant (SKDeltaK414) binding to Pm labeled at the active site with 5-fluorescein ([5F]FFR-Pm) and the reverse reactions by competitive displacement of [5F]FFR-Pm with active site-blocked Pm. The rate constants for the biexponential fluorescence quenching caused by SK and SKDeltaK414 binding to [5F]FFR-Pm were saturable as a function of SK concentration, reporting encounter complex affinities of 62-110 nm in the absence of lysine analogs and 4900-6500 and 1430-2200 nm in the presence of 6-AHA and benzamidine, respectively. The encounter complex with SKDeltaK414 was approximately 10-fold weaker in the absence of lysine analogs but indistinguishable from that of native SK in the presence of 6-AHA and benzamidine. The studies delineate for the first time the sequence of molecular events in the formation of the SK.Pm catalytic complex and its regulation by kringle ligands. Analysis of the forward and reverse reactions supports a binding mechanism in which SK Lys(414) binding to a Pm kringle accompanies near-diffusion-limited encounter complex formation followed by two slower, tightening conformational changes.

  17. MHD Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions in a Nanofluid due to a Permeable Shrinking Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahira Mansur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MHD homogeneous-heterogeneous reaction in a nanofluid flow due to a permeable shrinking surface is studied. The bvp4c program in MATLAB is used to obtain the numerical solutions for several values of parameters such as suction parameter, magnetic parameter, nanoparticle volume fraction, heterogeneous reaction and homogeneous reaction rates. The results show that dual solutions exist and the magnetic parameter and the nanoparticle volume fraction widen the range of the solution domain. Suction parameter, magnetic parameter and nanoparticle volume fraction cause the skin friction coefficient to increase and the velocity to decrease. The concentration increases as the nanoparticle volume fraction increases but decrease as the homogeneous reaction rate and heterogeneous reaction rate increase.

  18. The (impossible?) formation of acetaldehyde on the grain surfaces: insights from quantum chemical calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Enrique-Romero, Joan; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Balucani, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, it is not clear whether their synthesis occurs on the icy surfaces of interstellar grains or via a series of gas-phase reactions. As a test case of the COMs synthesis in the ISM, we present new quantum chemical calculations on the formation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) from the coupling of the HCO and CH3 radicals, both in gas phase and on water ice surfaces. The binding energies of HCO and CH3 on the amorphous water ice were also computed (2333 and 734 K, respectively). Results indicate that, in gas phase, the products could be either CH3CHO, CH4 + CO, or CH3OCH, depending on the relative orientation of the two radicals. However, on the amorphous water ice, only the CH4 + CO product is possible due to the geometrical constraints imposed by the water ice surface. Therefore, acetaldehyde cannot be synthesized by the CH3 + HCO coupling on the icy grains. We discuss the implications of these results and other cases, such a...

  19. Formation of a silicon terminated (100) diamond surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenk, Alex, E-mail: A.Schenk@latrobe.edu.au; Sear, Michael; Pakes, Chris, E-mail: C.Pakes@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Chemistry and Physics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Tadich, Anton [Department of Chemistry and Physics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); O' Donnell, Kane M. [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Medical Radiation Science, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia 6102 (Australia); Ley, Lothar [Department of Chemistry and Physics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Institut für Technische Physik, Universität Erlangen, Staudtstrasse 1, Erlangen D-91058 (Germany); Stacey, Alastair [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2015-05-11

    We report the preparation of an ordered silicon terminated diamond (100) surface with a two domain 3 × 1 reconstruction as determined by low energy electron diffraction. Based on the dimensions of the surface unit cell and on chemical information provided by core level photoemission spectra, a model for the structure is proposed. The termination should provide a homogeneous, nuclear, and electron spin-free surface for the development of future near-surface diamond quantum device architectures.

  20. Identification of general linear relationships between activation energies and enthalpy changes for dissociation reactions at surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelides, Angelos; Liu, Z-P; Zhang, C J; Alavi, Ali; King, David A; Hu, P

    2003-04-02

    The activation energy to reaction is a key quantity that controls catalytic activity. Having used ab inito calculations to determine an extensive and broad ranging set of activation energies and enthalpy changes for surface-catalyzed reactions, we show that linear relationships exist between dissociation activation energies and enthalpy changes. Known in the literature as empirical Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relationships, we identify and discuss the physical origin of their presence in heterogeneous catalysis. The key implication is that merely from knowledge of adsorption energies the barriers to catalytic elementary reaction steps can be estimated.

  1. Enhanced reactivity of hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to birnessite in soil: reaction kinetics and nonextractable residue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Woong; Lee, Seunghwan; Ryu, Hyerim; Nam, Kyoungphile; Kang, Ki-Hoon

    2008-05-01

    Phenanthrene and pyrene were not transformed by birnessite (delta-MnO2) in the presence of phenol. The phenoxy radicals generated from phenol by birnessite did not act as a mediator for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical reaction under the studied conditions. In contrast, 9-hydroxyphenanthrene and 1-hydroxypyrene were remarkably sensitive to birnessite. The disappearance patterns of the test compounds both in the aqueous phase and soil followed first-order kinetics, with a linear relationship found between the rate constants and the surface area of birnessite. Moreover, the data indicated that the reaction was faster in the presence of soil than in the aqueous phase probably because of the presence of hydroxyl groups in soil organic matter. Sequential solvent extraction was not successful in the recovery of 9-hydroxyphenanthrene from the birnessite-treated soil samples, and capillary electrophoresis data suggest the formation of nonextractable residues of the compound in soil. In addition, the acute toxicity determined by Microtox declined approximately 8.3 times in the soil samples treated with birnessite compared to untreated samples, demonstrating that the toxic compound was no longer present as its parent form.

  2. Formation of submicron magnesite during reaction of natural forsterite in H2O-saturated supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qafoku, Odeta; Hu, Jianzhi; Hess, Nancy J.; Hu, Mary Y.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Feng, Ju; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2014-06-01

    Natural forsterite was reacted in bulk liquid water saturated with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and scCO2 saturated with water at 35-80 °C and 90 atm. The solid reaction products were analyzed with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal Raman spectroscopy. Two carbonate phases, nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3), were identified with the proportions of the two phases depending on experimental conditions. In liquid water saturated with scCO2, nesquehonite was the dominant carbonate phase at 35-80 °C with only a limited number of large, micron size magnesite particles forming at the highest temperature, 80 °C. In contrast, in scCO2 saturated with H2O magnesite formation was identified at all three temperatures: 35, 50, and 80 °C. Magnesite was the dominant carbonation reaction product at 50 and 80 °C, but nesquehonite was dominant at 35 °C. The magnesite particles formed under scCO2 saturated with H2O conditions exhibited an extremely uniform submicron grain-size and nearly identical rhombohedral morphologies at all temperatures. The distribution and form of the particles were not consistent with nucleation and growth on the forsterite surface.

  3. Formation of Submicron Magnesite during Reaction of Natural Forsterite in H2O-Saturated Supercritical CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qafoku, Odeta; Hu, Jian Z.; Hess, Nancy J.; Hu, Mary Y.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Feng, Ju; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2014-06-01

    Natural forsterite was reacted in a) liquid water saturated with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and in b) H2O-saturated scCO2 at 35-80 °C and 90 atm. The solid reaction products were analyzed with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal Raman spectroscopy. Two carbonate phases, nesquehonite (MgCO3.3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3), were identified with the proportions of the two phases depending on experimental conditions. In water saturated with scCO2, nesquehonite was the dominant carbonate phase at 35-80 °C with only a limited number of large, micron size magnesite particles forming at the highest temperature, 80 °C. In contrast, in H2O-saturated scCO2 magnesite formation was identified at all three temperatures: 35 °, 50 °, and 80 °C. Magnesite was the dominant carbonation reaction product at 50 ° and 80 °C; but nesquehonite was dominant at 35 °C. The magnesite particles formed under H2O-saturated scCO2 conditions exhibited an extremely uniform submicron grain-size and nearly identical rhombohedral morphologies at all temperatures. The distribution and form of the particles were not consistent with epitaxial nucleation and growth on the forsterite surface.

  4. Secondary Organic Aerosol formation from the gas-phase reaction of catechol with ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeur-Tourneur, C.; Tomas, A.; Guilloteau, A.; Henry, F.; Ledoux, F.; Visez, N.; Riffault, V.; Wenger, J. C.; Bedjanian, Y.; Foulon, V.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol from the gas-phase reaction of catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) with ozone has been studied in two smog chambers (at the LPCA in France and at the CRAC in Ireland). Aerosol production was monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer. The overall organic aerosol yield (Y) was determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses (Mo) to the total reacted catechol concentrations, assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm-3. Analysis of the data clearly shows that Y is a strong function of Mo and that secondary organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. The aerosol formation is affected by the initial catechol concentration, which leads to aerosol yields ranging from 17% to 86%. The aerosol yields determined in the LPCA and CRAC smog chambers were comparable and were also in accordance with those determined in a previous study performed in EUPHORE (EUropean PHOto REactor, Spain).

  5. Clay catalysis of oligonucleotide formation: kinetics of the reaction of the 5'-phosphorimidazolides of nucleotides with the non-basic heterocycles uracil and hypoxanthine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, K.; Ferris, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The montmorillonite clay catalyzed condensation of activated monocleotides to oligomers of RNA is a possible first step in the formation of the proposed RNA world. The rate constants for the condensation of the phosphorimidazolide of adenosine were measured previously and these studies have been extended to the phosphorimidazolides of inosine and uridine in the present work to determine of substitution of neutral heterocycles for the basic adenine ring changes the reaction rate or regioselectivity. The oligomerization reactions of the 5'-phosphoromidazolides of uridine (ImpU) and inosine (ImpI) on montmorillonite yield oligo(U)s and oligo(I)s as long as heptamers. The rate constants for oligonucleotide formation were determined by measuring the rates of formation of the oligomers by HPLC. Both the apparent rate constants in the reaction mixture and the rate constants on the clay surface were calculated using the partition coefficients of the oligomers between the aqueous and clay phases. The rate constants for trimer formation are much greater than those dimer synthesis but there was little difference in the rate constants for the formation of trimers and higher oligomers. The overall rates of oligomerization of the phosphorimidazolides of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides in the presence of montmorillonite clay are the same suggesting that RNA formed on the primitive Earth could have contained a variety of heterocyclic bases. The rate constants for oligomerization of pyrimidine nucleotides on the clay surface are significantly higher than those of purine nucleotides since the pyrimidine nucleotides bind less strongly to the clay than do the purine nucleotides. The differences in the binding is probably due to Van der Waals interactions between the purine bases and the clay surface. Differences in the basicity of the heterocyclic ring in the nucleotide have little effect on the oligomerization process.

  6. Formation of fouling deposits on a carbon steel surface from Colombian heavy crude oil under preheating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Pinto, D. A.; Cuervo Camargo, S. M.; Orozco Parra, M.; Laverde, D.; García Vergara, S.; Blanco Pinzon, C.

    2016-02-01

    Fouling in heat exchangers is produced by the deposition of undesired materials on metal surfaces. As fouling progresses, pressure drop and heat transfer resistance is observed and therefore the overall thermal efficiency of the equipment diminishes. Fouling is mainly caused by the deposition of suspended particles, such as those from chemical reactions, crystallization of certain salts, and some corrosion processes. In order to understand the formation of fouling deposits from Colombian heavy oil (API≈12.3) on carbon steel SA 516 Gr 70, a batch stirred tank reactor was used. The reactor was operated at a constant pressure of 340psi while varying the temperature and reaction times. To evaluate the formation of deposits on the metal surfaces, the steel samples were characterized by gravimetric analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). On the exposed surfaces, the results revealed an increase in the total mass derived from the deposition of salt compounds, iron oxides and alkaline metals. In general, fouling was modulated by both the temperature and the reaction time, but under the experimental conditions, the temperature seems to be the predominant variable that controls and accelerates fouling.

  7. Meteorological, elevation, and slope effects on surface hoar formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, S.; Schirmer, M.; Jamieson, B.

    2015-08-01

    Failure in layers of buried surface hoar crystals (frost) can cause hazardous snow slab avalanches. Surface hoar crystals form on the snow surface and are sensitive to micro-meteorological conditions. In this study, the role of meteorological and terrain factors was investigated for three layers of surface hoar in the Columbia Mountains of Canada. The distribution of crystals over different elevations and aspects was observed on 20 days of field observations during a period of high pressure. The same layers were modelled over simplified terrain on a 2.5 km horizontal grid by forcing the snow cover model SNOWPACK with forecast weather data from a numerical weather prediction model. Modelled surface hoar growth was associated with warm air temperatures, high humidity, cold surface temperatures, and low wind speeds. Surface hoar was most developed in regions and elevation bands where these conditions existed, although strong winds at high elevations caused some model discrepancies. SNOWPACK simulations on virtual slopes systematically predicted smaller surface hoar on south-facing slopes. In the field, a complex combination of surface hoar and sun crusts were observed, suggesting the simplified model did not adequately resolve the surface energy balance on slopes. Overall, a coupled weather-snow cover model could benefit avalanche forecasters by predicting surface hoar layers on a regional scale over different elevation bands.

  8. Influence of plastic strain on the hydrogen evolution reaction on nickel (100) single crystal surfaces to improve hydrogen embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lekbir, C., E-mail: choukri.lekbir@univ-lr.fr; Creus, J.; Sabot, R.; Feaugas, X.

    2013-08-20

    Hydrogen-induced embrittlement can be accountable for premature failure of structure in relation with physical and/or chemical processes occurring on material's surface or in the bulk of the material. Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) corresponding to the early step of hydrogen ingress in the material is explored in present study in relation with plastic strain. HER on nickel (100) single crystal in sulphuric acid medium can be related by a Volmer–Heyrovsky mechanism. The corresponding elementary kinetic parameters as symmetry coefficients, activation enthalpies, and number of active sites have been identified via a thermokinetic model using experimental data. These parameters can be affected by defects associated with plastic strain. Irreversible plastic strain modifies the density and the distribution of storage dislocations affecting the surface roughness at atomic scale and generating additional active adsorption sites. Furthermore, surface emergence of mobile dislocations induces the formation of slip bands, which modify the surface roughness and the electronic state of the surface and increases the (111) surface density. The consequence of plastic strain on HER is explored and discussed in relation with both processes.

  9. Formation of η{sup '} (958) meson bound states by the {sup 6}Li(γ,d) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyatani, M.; Nagahiro, H.; Hirenzaki, S. [Nara Women' s University, Department of Physics, Nara (Japan); Ikeno, N. [Tottori University, Department of Regional Environment, Tottori (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    We have investigated the {sup 6}Li(γ,d) reaction theoretically for the formation of the η{sup '}(958) mesic nucleus close to the recoilless kinematics. We have developed the theoretical formula and reported the quantitative results of the formation spectra for various cases in this article. We have found that the formation cross sections are reduced by the effects of the fragile deuteron form factor. (orig.)

  10. Reaction of a copper(II)-nitrosyl complex with hydrogen peroxide: putative formation of a copper(I)-peroxynitrite intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Apurba; Kumar, Pankaj; Mondal, Biplab

    2012-05-14

    The reaction of a Cu(II)-nitrosyl complex (1) with hydrogen peroxide at -20 °C in acetonitrile results in the formation of the corresponding Cu(I)-peroxynitrite intermediate. The reduction of the Cu(II) center was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopic studies. Formation of the peroxynitrite intermediate has been confirmed by its characteristic phenol ring nitration reaction as well as isolation of corresponding Cu(I)-nitrate (2). On air oxidation, 2 resulted in the corresponding Cu(II)-nitrate (3). Thus, these results demonstrate a possible decomposition pathway for H(2)O(2) and NO through the formation of a peroxynitrite intermediate in biological systems.

  11. Modeling of hydrogen evolution reaction on the surface of GaInP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woon Ih; Wood, Brandon; Schwegler, Eric; Ogitsu, Tadashi

    2012-02-01

    GaInP2 is promising candidate material for hydrogen production using sunlight. It reduces solvated proton into hydrogen molecule using light-induced excited electrons in the photoelectrochemical cell. However, it is challenging to model hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) using first-principles molecular dynamics. Instead, we use Anderson-Newns model and generalized solvent coordinate in Marcus-Hush theory to describe adiabatic free energy surface of HER. Model parameters are fitted from the DFT calculations. We model Volmer-Heyrovsky reaction path on the surfaces of CuPt phase of GaInP2. We also discuss effects of surface oxide and catalyst atoms that exist on top of bare surfaces in experimental circumstances.

  12. From Molecules to Surfaces: Radical-Based Mechanisms of Si-S and Si-Se Bond Formation on Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buriak, Jillian M; Sikder, Md Delwar H

    2015-08-05

    The derivatization of silicon surfaces can have profound effects on the underlying electronic properties of the semiconductor. In this work, we investigate the radical surface chemistry of silicon with a range of organochalcogenide reagents (comprising S and Se) on a hydride-terminated silicon surface, to cleanly and efficiently produce surface Si-S and Si-Se bonds, at ambient temperature. Using a diazonium-based radical initiator, which induces formation of surface silicon radicals, a group of organochalcogenides were screened for reactivity at room temperature, including di-n-butyl disulfide, diphenyl disulfide, diphenyl diselenide, di-n-butyl sulfide, diphenyl selenide, diphenyl sulfide, 1-octadecanethiol, t-butyl disulfide, and t-butylthiol, which comprises the disulfide, diselenide, thiol, and thioether functionalities. The surface reactions were monitored by transmission mode Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry. Calculation of Si-Hx consumption, a semiquantitative measure of yield of production of surface-bound Si-E bonds (E = S, Se), was carried out via FTIR spectroscopy. Control experiments, sans the BBD diazonium radical initiator, were all negative for any evident incorporation, as determined by FTIR spectroscopy. The functional groups that did react with surface silicon radicals included the dialkyl/diphenyl disulfides, diphenyl diselenide, and 1-octadecanethiol, but not t-butylthiol, diphenyl sulfide/selenide, and di-n-butyl sulfide. Through a comparison with the rich body of literature regarding molecular radicals, and in particular, silyl radicals, reaction mechanisms were proposed for each. Armed with an understanding of the reaction mechanisms, much of the known chemistry within the extensive body of radical-based reactivity has the potential to be harnessed on silicon and could be extended to a range of technologically relevant semiconductor

  13. The α-Effect and Competing Mechanisms: The Gas-Phase Reactions of Microsolvated Anions with Methyl Formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Ditte L.; Nichols, Charles M.; Reece, Jennifer N.; Hammerum, Steen; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2013-12-01

    The enhanced reactivity of α-nucleophiles, which contain an electron lone pair adjacent to the reactive site, has been demonstrated in solution and in the gas phase and, recently, for the gas-phase SN2 reactions of the microsolvated HOO-(H2O) ion with methyl chloride. In the present work, we continue to explore the significance of microsolvation on the α-effect as we compare the gas-phase reactivity of the microsolvated α-nucleophile HOO-(H2O) with that of microsolvated normal alkoxy nucleophiles, RO-(H2O), in reactions with methyl formate, where three competing reactions are possible. The results reveal enhanced reactivity of HOO-(H2O) towards methyl formate, and clearly demonstrate the presence of an overall α-effect for the reactions of the microsolvated α-nucleophile. The association of the nucleophiles with a single water molecule significantly lowers the degree of proton abstraction and increases the SN2 and BAC2 reactivity compared with the unsolvated analogs. HOO-(H2O) reacts with methyl formate exclusively via the BAC2 channel. While microsolvation lowers the overall reaction efficiency, it enhances the BAC2 reaction efficiency for all anions compared with the unsolvated analogs. This may be explained by participation of the solvent water molecule in the BAC2 reaction in a way that continuously stabilizes the negative charge throughout the reaction.

  14. Mechanism of electron transfer reaction for xanthene dye-sensitized formation of methyl viologen radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usui, Y.; Misawa, H.; Sakuragi, H.; Tokumaru, K.

    1987-05-01

    Sensitized reduction of methyl viologen, MV/sup 2 +/, occurs efficiently through electron transfer from triplet xanthene dyes to MV/sup 2 +/ followed by electron transfer to the resulting semioxidized dyes from a reductant like triethanolamine. Unreactive ion pair complexes between these dyes and MV/sup 2 +/ are formed (formation constant: 1.2 x 10/sup 3/ M/sup -1/ for Eosine Y and MV/sup 2 +/ in 50% aqueous ethanol solution). The quantum yield for the reduced methyl viologen radical depends on the concentrations of MV/sup 2 +/ and the amine and on the ionic strength of solution. The efficiency of the electron transfer from triplet dyes to MV/sup 2 +/ is increased by addition of alcohol, and solvent effects on the reaction mechanism are discussed. 38 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Application of Fractional Calculus to Reaction-Subdiffusion Processes and Morphogen Gradient Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Yuste, S B; Lindenberg, K

    2010-01-01

    It is a well known fact that subdiffusion equations in terms of fractional derivatives can be obtained from Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) models with long-tailed waiting time distributions. Over the last years various authors have shown that extensions of such CTRW models incorporating reactive processes to the mesoscopic transport equations may lead to non-intuitive reaction-subdiffusion equations. In particular, one such equation has been recently derived for a subdiffusive random walker subject to a linear (first-order) death process. We take this equation as a starting point to study the developmental biology key problem of morphogen gradient formation, both for the uniform case where the morphogen degradation rate coefficient (reactivity) is constant and for the non-uniform case (position-dependent reactivity). In the uniform case we obtain exponentially decreasing stationary concentration profiles and we study their robustness with respect to perturbations in the incoming morphogen flux. In the non...

  16. A surface physicochemical rationale for calculus formation in the oral cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; White, DJ; Kamminga-Rasker, HJ; van der Mei, HC

    2004-01-01

    Surface free energies of dental hard tissues, including salivary conditioning films on enamel, play a crucial role in mineralization, dissolution and adhesion processes at the tooth surface. These mineralization reactions at oral surfaces control the development and progression of various diseases.

  17. Pore surface engineering in a zirconium metal–organic framework via thiol-ene reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gui, Bo; Hu, Guiping; Zhou, Tailin; Wang, Cheng, E-mail: chengwang@whu.edu.cn

    2015-03-15

    A porous olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework, denoted as UiO-68-allyl, has been constructed. Our results clearly demonstrated that the surface of UiO-68-allyl could be decorated with organic molecule (ethanethiol) via thiol-ene reaction. More importantly, the crystallinity of the framework were maintained during the post-synthetic modification process. However, the microporosity of the framework is retained but the surface area decreased, due to the grafting of ethylthio groups into the pores. From our studies, we can conclude that the strategy of post-synthetic modification of UiO-68-allyl via thiol-ene reaction may be general. Furthermore, we may anchor other desired functional group onto the pore walls in Zr-MOFs via thiol-ene reaction, enabling more potential applications. - graphical abstract: In this manuscript, we reported the post-synthetic modification of an olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework via thiol-ene reaction. - Highlights: • A porous olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework has been constructed. • The surface of olefin-functionalized Zr-MOF could be decorated with organic molecules via thiol-ene reaction. • The crystallinity and permanent porosity of the framework were maintained during the post-synthetic modification process.

  18. Products and Mechanisms of Aerosol Formation from Reactions of OH Radicals with Linear and Branched Alkenes in the Presence of NOx (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemann, P. J.; Matsunaga, A.

    2009-12-01

    The chemical and physical processes involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are complex and can include reactions of volatile organic compounds with a number of atmospheric oxidants (the major ones are O3, and OH and NO3 radicals), as well as surface and condensed-phase reactions, homogeneous nucleation, and gas-particle partitioning. It should come as no surprise that understanding and accurately modeling these processes is a major challenge that has not yet been fully addressed. Alkenes emitted from vegetation are the largest source of non-methane hydrocarbons to the global atmosphere and consist mostly of isoprene (C5H8), monoterpenes (C10H16), and sesquiterpenes (C15H24), compounds with a large range of sizes and molecular structures. Their atmospheric oxidation is initiated primarily by reactions with hydroxyl radicals and can lead to a variety of products, some of which can form SOA. Because of the complexity of terpene reactions and the large numbers of products that are formed, there are advantages to studying the chemistry of simpler alkenes in order to gain insights that can be applied to more complex reaction systems. This is the approach we have taken, and in this talk I will report results of studies of the products, SOA yields, and mechanisms of SOA formation from reactions of a variety of linear and branched alkenes with hydroxyl radicals in the presence of nitrogen oxides. Products consist of a large array of multifunctional compounds, including oligomers, containing carbonyl, hydroxy, carboxyl, and nitrate groups. I will demonstrate some of the ways in which changes in molecular structure can alter both gas and SOA products, including those formed through condensed-phase reactions, and also SOA yields, and suggest explanations for these effects based on current understanding of chemical reaction mechanisms.

  19. On-surface synthesis of single-layered two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks via solid-vapor interface reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan-He; Guan, Cui-Zhong; Ding, San-Yuan; Wang, Wei; Yan, Hui-Juan; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2013-07-17

    Surface covalent organic frameworks (SCOFs), featured by atomic thick sheet with covalently bonded organic building units, are promised to possess unique properties associated with reduced dimensionality, well-defined in-plane structure, and tunable functionality. Although a great deal of effort has been made to obtain SCOFs with different linkages and building blocks via both "top-down" exfoliation and "bottom-up" surface synthesis approaches, the obtained SCOFs generally suffer a low crystallinity, which impedes the understanding of intrinsic properties of the materials. Herein, we demonstrate a self-limiting solid-vapor interface reaction strategy to fabricate highly ordered SCOFs. The coupling reaction is tailored to take place at the solid-vapor interface by introducing one precursor via vaporization to the surface preloaded with the other precursor. Following this strategy, highly ordered honeycomb SCOFs with imine linkage are obtained. The controlled formation of SCOFs in our study shows the possibility of a rational design and synthesis of SCOFs with desired functionality.

  20. In situ TEM observation of the Boudouard reaction: multi-layered graphene formation from CO on cobalt nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremmer, G Marien; Zacharaki, Eirini; Sjåstad, Anja O; Navarro, Violeta; Frenken, Joost W M; Kooyman, Patricia J

    2017-02-09

    Using a MEMS nanoreactor in combination with a specially designed in situ Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) holder and gas supply system, we imaged the formation of multiple layers of graphene encapsulating a cobalt nanoparticle, at 1 bar CO : N2 (1 : 1) and 500 °C. The cobalt nanoparticle was imaged live in a TEM during the Boudouard reaction. The in situ/operando TEM studies give insight into the behaviour of the catalyst at the nanometer-scale, under industrially relevant conditions. When switching from Fischer-Tropsch syngas conditions (CO : H2 : N2 1 : 2 : 3 at 1 bar) to CO-rich conditions (CO : N2 1 : 1 at 1 bar), we observed the formation of multi-layered graphene on Co nanoparticles at 500 °C. Due to the high temperature, the surface of the Co nanoparticles facilitated the Boudouard reaction, causing CO dissociation and the formation of layers of graphene. After the formation of the first patches of graphene at the surface of the nanoparticle, more and more layers grew over the course of about 40 minutes. In its final state, around 10 layers of carbon capped the nanoparticle. During this process, the carbon shell caused mechanical stress in the nanoparticle, inducing permanent deformation.

  1. The relationship between ozone formation and air temperature in the atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belan, Boris D.; Savkin, Denis; Tolmachev, Gennadii

    2016-04-01

    Studying the formation and dynamics of ozone in the atmosphere is important due to several reasons. First, the contribution of tropospheric ozone to the global greenhouse effect is only slightly less than that of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and methane. Second, tropospheric ozone acts as a strong poison that has negative effects on human health, animals, and vegetation. Third, being a potent oxidizer, ozone destroys almost all materials, including platinum group metals and compounds. Fourthly, ozone is formed in situ from precursors as a result of photochemical processes, but not emitted into the atmosphere by any industrial enterprises directly. In this work, we present some results of the study aimed at the revealing relationship between ozone formation rate and surface air temperature in the background atmosphere. It has been found that this relationship is nonlinear. Analysis of the possible reasons showed that the nonlinear character of this relationship may be due to a nonlinear increase in the reaction constants versus air temperature and a quadratic increase in the concentration of hydrocarbons with increasing temperature. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science contract no.14.613.21.0013 (ID: RFMEFI61314X0013).

  2. Formation of surface-attached microstructured polyelectrolyte brushes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Ning Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Surface-attached micropatterned polyelectrolyte brushes on planar solid surfaces are generated using free radical polymerization photo-initiated by self-assembled initiator monolayers. It is shown that the formed patterns can be either negative or positive with different patterning processes.

  3. Formation of prebiotic molecules in liquid water environments on the surface of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine Dorothy

    Saturn's moon Titan represents a unique locale for studying prebiotic chemistry. Reactions occurring in its thick nitrogen-methane atmosphere produce a wide variety of carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen containing organic molecules. If these molecules are exposed to liquid water, they may react further to produce oxygen-containing species, a key step in the formation of terrestrial biomolecules. On average, Titan's surface is too cold for liquid water. However, models indicate that melting caused by impacts and/or cryovolcanism may lead to its episodic availability. One possible cryovolcanic dome, Ganesa Macula, was identified in early observations by the Cassini spacecraft. In this work, I estimate the height and morphology of this feature using a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image. I then use a thermal conduction code to calculate the freezing timescale for an initially liquid dome, yielding freezing timescales of ~10^2 - 10^5 years. To determine how far aqueous organic chemistry can proceed in liquid water environments on Titan, I measure the rate coefficients of Titan analogue organic molecules ("tholins") with low temperature aqueous solutions to produce oxygenated species. These reactions display first-order kinetics with half- lives between 0.4 and 7 days at 273 K (in water) and between 0.3 and 14 days at 253 K (in 13 wt. % ammonia-water). Tholin hydrolysis in aqueous solutions is thus very fast compared to the freezing timescales of impact melts and volcanic sites on Titan, which take hundreds to thousands of years to freeze. The fast incorporation of oxygen, along with new chemistry made available by the introduction of ammonia, may lead to the formation of molecules of prebiotic interest in these transient liquid water environments. This chemistry makes impact craters and cryovolcanoes important targets for future missions to Titan.

  4. Formation of cysteine-S-conjugates in the Maillard reaction of cysteine and xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Christoph; Guntz-Dubini, Renée

    2013-11-15

    Cysteine-S-conjugates (CS-conjugates) occur in foods derived from plant sources like grape, passion fruit, onion, garlic, bell pepper and hops. During eating CS-conjugates are degraded into aroma-active thiols by β-lyases that originate from oral microflora. The present study provides evidence for the formation of the CS-conjugates S-furfuryl-l-cysteine (FFT-S-Cys) and S-(2-methyl-3-furyl)-l-cysteine (MFT-S-Cys) in the Maillard reaction of xylose with cysteine at 100°C for 2h. The CS-conjugates were isolated using cationic exchange and reversed-phase chromatography and identified by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and LC-MS(2). Spectra and LC retention times matched those of authentic standards. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that CS-conjugates are described as Maillard reaction products. Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is proposed as an intermediate which undergoes a nucleophilic substitution with cysteine. Both FFT-S-Cys and MFT-S-Cys are odourless but produce strong aroma when tasted in aqueous solutions, supposedly induced by β -lyases from the oral microflora. The perceived aromas resemble those of the corresponding aroma-active thiols 2-furfurylthiol (FFT) and 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (MFT) which smell coffee-like and meaty, respectively.

  5. Formation of early and advanced Maillard reaction products correlates to the ripening of cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanneberg, Robert; Salzwedel, Grit; Glomb, Marcus A

    2012-01-18

    The present study deals with the characterization of the ripening of cheese. A traditional German acid curd cheese was ripened under defined conditions at elevated temperature, and protein and amino acid modifications were investigated. Degree of proteolysis and analysis of early [Amadori compound furosine (6)] and advanced [N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (4), N(ε)-carboxyethyllysine (5)] Maillard reaction products confirmed the maturation to proceed from the rind to the core of the cheese. Whereas 6 was decreased, 4 and 5 increased over time. Deeper insight into the Maillard reaction during the ripening of cheese was achieved by the determination of selected α-dicarbonyl compounds. Especially methylglyoxal (2) showed a characteristic behavior during storage of the acid curd cheese. Decrease of this reactive structure was directly correlated to the formation of 5. To extend the results of experimental ripening to commercial cheeses, different aged Gouda types were investigated. Maturation times of the samples ranged from 6 to 8 weeks (young) to more than 1 year (aged). Again, increase of 5 and decrease of 2 were able to describe the ripening of this rennet coagulated cheese. Therefore, both chemical parameters are potent markers to characterize the degree of maturation, independent of coagulation.

  6. Formation of photosystem II reaction centers that work as energy sinks in lichen symbiotic Trebouxiophyceae microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéra, Alfredo; Gasulla, Francisco; Barreno, Eva

    2016-04-01

    Lichens are poikilohydric symbiotic organisms that can survive in the absence of water. Photosynthesis must be highly regulated in these organisms, which live under continuous desiccation-rehydration cycles, to avoid photooxidative damage. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction curves in the lichen microalgae of the Trebouxiophyceae Asterochloris erici and in Trebouxia jamesii (TR1) and Trebouxia sp. (TR9) phycobionts, isolated from the lichen Ramalina farinacea, shows differences with higher plants. In the presence of the photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor DCMU, the kinetics of Q(A) reduction is related to variable fluorescence by a sigmoidal function that approaches a horizontal asymptote. An excellent fit to these curves was obtained by applying a model based on the following assumptions: (1) after closure, the reaction centers (RCs) can be converted into "energy sink" centers (sRCs); (2) the probability of energy leaving the sRCs is very low or zero and (3) energy is not transferred from the antenna of PSII units with sRCs to other PSII units. The formation of sRCs units is also induced by repetitive light saturating pulses or at the transition from dark to light and probably requires the accumulation of reduced Q(A), as well as structural changes in the reaction centers of PSII. This type of energy sink would provide a very efficient way to protect symbiotic microalgae against abrupt changes in light intensity.

  7. Formation of phosphonates and pyrophosphates in the reactions of chlorophosphate esters with strong organic bases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K V P Pavan Kumar; K Praveen Kumar; M Vijjulatha; K C Kumara Swamy

    2004-11-01

    The compounds S(6--Bu-4-Me-C6H2O)2P(O)Cl (1), CH2(6--Bu-4-Me-C6H2O)2P(O)Cl (2) and (2,2'-C20H12O2)P(O)Cl (3) react with diazabicycloundecene (DBU) to give rise to, predominantly, the phosphonate compounds [S(6--Bu-4-Me-C6H2O)2P(O)(DBU)]+[Cl]- (4), [CH2(6--Bu-4-Me-C6H2O)2P(O) (DBU)]+[Cl]- (5) and [(2,2'-C20H12O2)P(O)(DBU)]+[Cl]- (6). The first two compounds could be isolated in the pure state. In analogous reactions of 1 and 2 with diazabicyclononene (DBN) or N-methyl imidazole, only the pyrophosphates [S(6--Bu-4-Me-C6H2O)2P(O)]2O (7) and [CH2(6--Bu-4-Me-C6H2O)2P(O)]2O (8) could be isolated, although the reaction mixture showed several other compounds in the phosphorus NMR. A possible pathway for the formation of phosphonate salts is proposed. The X-ray crystal structures of 4, 7 and 8 are also discussed.

  8. Peptide synthesis in aqueous environments: the role of extreme conditions and pyrite mineral surfaces on formation and hydrolysis of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Eduard; Nair, Nisanth N; Wittekindt, Carsten; Marx, Dominik

    2011-06-01

    A comprehensive study of free energy landscapes and mechanisms of COS-mediated polymerization of glycine via N-carboxy anhydrides (NCAs, "Leuchs anhydrides") and peptide hydrolysis at the water-pyrite interface at extreme thermodynamic conditions is presented. Particular emphasis is set on the catalytic effects of the mineral surface including the putative role of the ubiquitous sulfur vacancy defects. It is found that the mere presence of a surface is able to change the free energetics of the elementary reaction steps. This effect can be understood in terms of a reduction of entropic contributions to the reactant state by immobilizing the reactants and/or screening them from bulk water in a purely geometric ("steric") sense. Additionally, the pyrite directly participates chemically in some of the reaction steps, thus changing the reaction mechanism qualitatively compared to the situation in bulk water. First, the adsorption of reactants on the surface can preform a product-like structure due to immobilizing and scaffolding them appropriately. Second, pyrite can act as a proton acceptor, thus replacing water in this role. Third, sulfur vacancies are found to increase the reactivity of the surface. The finding that the presence of pyrite speeds up the rate-determining step in the formation of peptides with respect to the situation in bulk solvent while stabilizing the produced peptide against hydrolysis is of particular interest to the hypothesis of prebiotic peptide formation at hydrothermal aqueous conditions. Apart from these implications, the generality of the studied organic reactions are of immediate relevance to many fields such as (bio)geochemistry, biomineralization, and environmental chemistry.

  9. Surface structure and reaction performances of highly dispersed and supported bimetallic catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林励吾; 杨维慎; 贾继飞; 徐竹生; 张涛; 范以宁; 寇元; 沈俭一

    1999-01-01

    Surface structures of Pt-Sn and Pt-Fe bimetallic catalysts have been investigated by means of Mssbauer spectroscopy, Pt-LⅢ-edge EXAFS and H2-adsorption. The results showed that the second component, such as Sn or Fe, remained in the oxidative state and dispersed on the γ-Al2O3 surface after reduction, while Pt was completely reduced to the metallic state and dispersed on either the metal oxide surface or the γ-Al2O3 surface. By correlating the distribution of Pt species on different surfaces with the reaction and adsorption performances, it is proposed that two kinds of active Pt species existed on the surfaces of both catalysts, named M1 sites and M2 sites. M1 sites are the sites in which Pt directly anchored on the γ-Al2O3 surface, while M2 sites are those in which Pt anchored on the metal oxide surface. M1 sites are favorable for low temperature H2 adsorption, and responsible for the hydrogenolysis reaction and carbon deposition, while M2 sites which adsorb more H2 at higher tem

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions: NO reduction by CO or H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Falcón, L.; Alas, S. J.; Vicente, L.

    2014-01-01

    The development of surface science has given an opportunity to investigate the process of heterogeneous catalysis at a molecular level. In this way there has been a great progress in understanding the mechanism in NO decomposition. Modeling has been an very important tool in this goal. In this work we analyze the reactions NO+H2 and NO+CO. The extremely narrow production peak of N2 and CO2 which occurs in the reaction of NO+CO on Pt(100), a phenomenon known as "surface explosion," is studied using a dynamic Monte Carlo method on a square lattice at low pressure under isothermal conditions. The catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by hydrogen over a Pt surface is also studied by using a dynamic Monte Carlo. Using a Langmuir-Hinshelwod mechanism of reaction, a simplified model with only four adsorbed species (NO, H, O, and N) is constructed. The effect on NO dissociation rate, the limiting step in the whole reaction, is inhibited by coadsorbed NO and H2 molecules, and is enhanced both by the presence of empty sites and adsorbed N atoms as nearest-neighbors. In these simulations experimental parameters values are included, such as: adsorption, desorption and diffusion of the reactants. The phenomenon is studied changing the temperature in the range of 300-550 K. The modeling reproduces well observed TPD and TPR experimental results and allows a visualization of the spatial development of the surface explosion.

  11. Signal Amplification by Enzymatic Reaction in an Immunosensor Based on Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Beom Shin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An enzymatic reaction was employed as a means to enhance the sensitivity of an immunosensor based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR. The reaction occurs after intermolecular binding between an antigen and an antibody on gold nano-island (NI surfaces. For LSPR sensing, the gold NI surface was fabricated on glass substrates using vacuum evaporation and heat treatment. The interferon-g (IFN-g capture antibody was immobilized on the gold NIs, followed by binding of IFN-g to the antibody. Subsequently, a biotinylated antibody and a horseradish peroxidase (HRP conjugated with avidin were simultaneously introduced. A solution of 4-chloro-1-naphthol (4-CN was then used for precipitation; precipitation was the result of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed the HRP on gold NIs. The LSPR spectra were obtained after each binding process. Using this method, the enzyme-catalyzed precipitation reaction on the gold NI surface was found to effectively amplify the change in the signal of the LSPR immunosensor after intermolecular binding.

  12. Surface concentration nonuniformities resulting from chronoamperometry of a reversible reaction at an ultramicrodisk electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Britz, Dieter H.; Strutwolf, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The chronoamperometric experiment at a disk electrode was simulated, assuming a reversible reaction. When the diffusion coefficients of the two substances involved are different, there appears a surface concentration non- uniformity in the radial direction, exhibiting a maximum effect in time. At...

  13. Development of a new molecular dynamics method for tribochemical reaction and its application to formation dynamics of MoS 2 tribofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yusuke; Onodera, Tasuku; Suzuki, Ai; Sahnoun, Riadh; Koyama, Michihisa; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Kubo, Momoji; Del Carpio, Carlos A.; Shin-yoshi, Takatoshi; Nishino, Noriaki; Suzuki, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Akira

    2008-09-01

    Recently we have developed a novel molecular dynamics program NEW-RYUDO-CR, which can deal with chemical reactions. The developed method has been applied to the study of tribochemical reaction dynamics of MoS 2 tribofilm on iron surface. The initially amorphous MoS 2 layer self-organized its structure as result of the tribochemical reactions and formed layered MoS 2 tribofilm. The friction coefficient significantly decreased as the MoS 2 tribofilm was formed. Besides, sliding was observed between sulfur layers of MoS 2 tribofilms which occurred due to repulsive Coulombic interaction forces between sulfur atoms. This indicates that the formation of the layered MoS 2 tribofilm is important to achieve better lubrication properties.

  14. A Lagrangian particle method for reaction-diffusion systems on deforming surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergdorf, Michael; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    Reaction-diffusion processes on complex deforming surfaces are fundamental to a number of biological processes ranging from embryonic development to cancer tumor growth and angiogenesis. The simulation of these processes using continuum reaction-diffusion models requires computational methods capable of accurately tracking the geometric deformations and discretizing on them the governing equations. We employ a Lagrangian level-set formulation to capture the deformation of the geometry and use an embedding formulation and an adaptive particle method to discretize both the level-set equations and the corresponding reaction-diffusion. We validate the proposed method and discuss its advantages and drawbacks through simulations of reaction-diffusion equations on complex and deforming geometries.

  15. Ab Initio Calculation of Rate Constants for Molecule–Surface Reactions with Chemical Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; Alessio, Maristella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ab initio prediction of reaction rate constants for systems with hundreds of atoms with an accuracy that is comparable to experiment is a challenge for computational quantum chemistry. We present a divide‐and‐conquer strategy that departs from the potential energy surfaces obtained by standard density functional theory with inclusion of dispersion. The energies of the reactant and transition structures are refined by wavefunction‐type calculations for the reaction site. Thermal effects and entropies are calculated from vibrational partition functions, and the anharmonic frequencies are calculated separately for each vibrational mode. This method is applied to a key reaction of an industrially relevant catalytic process, the methylation of small alkenes over zeolites. The calculated reaction rate constants (free energies), pre‐exponential factors (entropies), and enthalpy barriers show that our computational strategy yields results that agree with experiment within chemical accuracy limits (less than one order of magnitude). PMID:27008460

  16. Turing pattern formation in the chlorine dioxide-iodine- malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setayeshgar, Sima

    The formation of localized structures in the chlorine dioxide-idodine-malonic acid (CDIMA) reaction-diffusion system is investigated numerically using a realistic model of this system. We analyze the one-dimensional patterns formed along the gradients imposed by boundary feeds, and study their linear stability to symmetry- breaking perturbations (the Turing instability) in the plane transverse to these gradients. We establish that an often-invoked simple local linear analysis which neglects longitudinal diffusion is inappropriate for predicting the linear stability of these patterns. Using a fully nonuniform analysis, we investigate the structure of the patterns formed along the gradients and their stability to transverse Turing pattern formation as a function of the values of two control parameters: the malonic acid feed concentration and the size of the reactor in the dimension along the gradients. The results from this investigation are compared with existing experimental results. We also verify that the two-variable reduction of the chemical model employed in the linear stability analysis is justified. Finally, we present numerical solution of the CDIMA system in two dimensions which is in qualitative agreement with experiments. This result also confirms our linear stability analysis, while demonstrating the feasibility of numerical exploration of realistic chemical models.

  17. Photochemical reactions of divalent mercury with thioglycolic acid: formation of mercuric sulfide particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Lin; Ariya, Parisa A

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a key toxic global pollutant. Studies in aquatic environment have suggested that thiols could be important for mercury speciation. Thioglycolic acid has been detected in various natural water systems and used as a model compound to study the complicated interaction between mercury and polyfunctional dissolved organic matter (DOM). We herein presented the first evidence for mercury particle formation during kinetic and product studies on the photochemistry of divalent mercury (Hg(2+)) with thioglycolic acid at near environmental conditions. Mercuric sulfide (HgS) particles formed upon photolysis were identified by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry and select area electron diffraction. Kinetic data were obtained using UV-visible spectrophotometry and cold vapour atomic fluorescent spectrometry. The apparent first-order reaction rate constant under our experimental conditions was calculated to be (2.3±0.4)×10(-5) s(-1) at T=296±2 K and pH 4.0. It was found that (89±3)% of the reactants undergo photoreduction to generate elemental mercury (Hg(0)). The effects of ionic strengths, pH and potassium ion were also investigated. The formation of HgS particles pointed to the possible involvement of heterogeneous processes. Our kinetic results indicated the importance of weak binding sites on DOM to Hg in photoreduction of Hg(2+) to Hg(0). The potential implications of our data on environmental mercury transformation were discussed.

  18. Combinatorial Density Functional Theory-Based Screening of Surface Alloys for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2009-01-01

    A density functional theory (DFT)-based, combinatorial search for improved oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts is presented. A descriptor-based approach to estimate the ORR activity of binary surface alloys, wherein alloying occurs only in the surface layer, is described, and rigorous......, potential-dependent computational tests of the stability of these alloys in aqueous, acidic environments are presented. These activity and stability criteria are applied to a database of DFT calculations on nearly 750 binary transition metal surface alloys; of these, many are predicted to be active...

  19. Severe inflammatory reaction induced by peritoneal trauma is the key driving mechanism of postoperative adhesion formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pismensky Sergei V

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many factors have been put forward as a driving mechanism of surgery-triggered adhesion formation (AF. In this study, we underline the key role of specific surgical trauma related with open surgery (OS and laparoscopic (LS conditions in postoperative AF and we aimed to study peritoneal tissue inflammatory reaction (TIR, remodelling specific complications of open surgery (OS versus LS and subsequently evaluating AF induced by these conditions. Methods A prospective randomized study was done in 80 anaesthetised female Wistar rats divided equally into 2 groups. Specific traumatic OS conditions were induced by midline incision line (MIL extension and tissue drying and specific LS conditions were remodelled by intraperitoneal CO2 insufflation at the 10 cm of water. TIR was evaluated at the 24th, 72nd, 120th and 168th hour by scoring scale. Statistical analysis was performed by the non-parametric t test and two-way ANOVA using Bonferroni post-tests. Results More pronounced residual TIR was registered after OS than after LS. There were no significant TIR interactions though highly significant differences were observed between the OS and LS groups (p th and 72nd; p th and p th hrs. Adhesion free wounds were observed in 20.0 and 31.0% of cases after creation of OS and LS conditions respectively; with no significant differences between these values (p > 0.05. However larger adhesion size (41.67 ± 33.63 was observed after OS in comparison with LS (20.31 ± 16.38. The upper-lower 95% confidential limits ranged from 60.29 to 23.04 and from 29.04 to 11.59 respectively after OS and LS groups with significant differences (p = 0.03. Analogous changes were observed in adhesion severity values. Subsequently, severe TIR parameters were followed by larger sizes of severe postoperative adhesions in the OS group than those observed in the LS group. Conclusions MIL extension and tissue drying seem to be the key factors in the pathogenesis of

  20. A NEW SOURCE OF CO{sub 2} IN THE UNIVERSE: A PHOTOACTIVATED ELEY-RIDEAL SURFACE REACTION ON WATER ICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Chunqing; Cooke, Ilsa R.; Yates, John T. Jr., E-mail: jty2n@virginia.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2014-08-20

    CO{sub 2} is one of the most abundant components of ices in the interstellar medium; however, its formation mechanism has not been clearly identified. Here we report an experimental observation of an Eley-Rideal-type reaction on a water ice surface, where CO gas molecules react by direct collisions with surface OH radicals, made by photodissociation of H{sub 2}O molecules, to produce CO{sub 2} ice on the surface. The discovery of this source of CO{sub 2} provides a new mechanism to explain the high relative abundance of CO{sub 2} ice in space.

  1. Formation and development of salt crusts on soil surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng

    2015-12-14

    The salt concentration gradually increases at the soil free surface when the evaporation rate exceeds the diffusive counter transport. Eventually, salt precipitates and crystals form a porous sodium chloride crust with a porosity of 0.43 ± 0.14. After detaching from soils, the salt crust still experiences water condensation and salt deliquescence at the bottom, brine transport across the crust driven by the humidity gradient, and continued air-side precipitation. This transport mechanism allows salt crust migration away from the soil surface at a rate of 5 μm/h forming salt domes above soil surfaces. The surface characteristics of mineral substrates and the evaporation rate affect the morphology and the crystal size of precipitated salt. In particular, substrate hydrophobicity and low evaporation rate suppress salt spreading.

  2. Artificial Crater Formation on Satellite Surfaces Using an Orbiting Railgun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissly, R. W.; Miller, K. L.; Carlson, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The specification of greater than 45kW of disposable power available on the JIMO spacecraft raises the possibility of a new class of instrumentation that has utility at such power levels. In this presentation we discuss the concept of an electromagnetic mass driver that can launch projectiles from orbit around one of the Galilean satellites directed on a trajectory that will impact the satellite surface. The resulting impact will create a crater that will provide information on the mechanical properties of surface and near-surface materials, expose subsurface materials for remote spectral identification, and form a vapor cloud that can be sensed for composition either remotely or in-situ. An analog for such a controlled cratering experiment is Deep Impact, a mission to observe the crater and ensuing ejecta cloud formed by a ballistic projectile into a comet surface in July, 2005.

  3. Artificial Crater Formation on Satellite Surfaces Using an Orbiting Railgun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissly, R. W.; Miller, K. L.; Carlson, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The specification of greater than 45kW of disposable power available on the JIMO spacecraft raises the possibility of a new class of instrumentation that has utility at such power levels. In this presentation we discuss the concept of an electromagnetic mass driver that can launch projectiles from orbit around one of the Galilean satellites directed on a trajectory that will impact the satellite surface. The resulting impact will create a crater that will provide information on the mechanical properties of surface and near-surface materials, expose subsurface materials for remote spectral identification, and form a vapor cloud that can be sensed for composition either remotely or in-situ. An analog for such a controlled cratering experiment is Deep Impact, a mission to observe the crater and ensuing ejecta cloud formed by a ballistic projectile into a comet surface in July, 2005.

  4. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazines: Tubular reactor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine, symmetrical dimethylhydrazine, trimethylhydrazine and tetramethylhydrazine were investigated in a metal-powder packed turbular flow reactor at 55 plus or minus 3 C. Hydrazine was completely reacted on all surfaces studied. The major products of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) oxidation were methanol, methane and methyldiazene. The di-, tri- and tetra-methyl hydrazines were essentially unreactive under these conditions. The relative catalytic reactivities toward MMH are: Fe greater than Al2O3 greater than Ti greater than Zn greater than 316 SS greater than Cr greater than Ni greater than Al greater than 304L SS. A kinetic scheme and mechanism involving adsorption, oxidative dehydrogenation and reductive elimination reactions on a metal oxide surface are proposed.

  5. Comparative temporal analysis of multiwalled carbon nanotube oxidation reactions: Evaluating chemical modifications on true nanotube surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Flávia G.; Cotta, Alexandre A. C.; Gorgulho, Honória F.; Santos, Adelina P.; Macedo, Waldemar A. A.; Furtado, Clascídia A.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of extensive purification on oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotube surface composition was studied through the characterization and differentiation of the actual surface submitted to three oxidation methods: microwave-assisted acid oxidation, hydrogen peroxide reflux, and Fenton reaction. The oxidized samples were purified by a multi-step procedure including the sequential use of basic reflux and dispersion in dimethylformamide (DMF). The results showed a significant increase in the amount of oxidation debris with hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reaction times longer than 8 h and strong surface characteristic modification. With regard to sample purification, basic reflux led to a reduction in oxygenated group concentration of only 10% in the samples treated by acid oxidation. On the other hand, the subsequent use of DMF led to a further decrease in concentration of 39%, proving to be a more efficient method for the removal of oxidation debris.

  6. Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface,and Photo-induced reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2004-10-22

    Accurate oxidation rate constants of mercury gas are needed for determining its dispersion and lifetime in the atmosphere. They would also help in developing a technology for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, it is difficult to establish the accurate rate constants primarily due to the fact that mercury easily adsorbs on solid surface and its reactions can be catalyzed by the surface. We have demonstrated a procedure that allows the determination of gas phase, surface-induced, and photo-induced contributions in the kinetic study of the oxidation of mercury by chlorine gas. The kinetics was studied using reactors with various surface to volume ratios. The effect of the surface and the photo irradiation on the reaction was taken into consideration. The pressure dependent study revealed that the gas phase oxidation was a three-body collision process. The third order rate constant was determined to be 7.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -39} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -2}s{sup -1} with N{sub 2} as the third body at 297 {+-} 1 K. The surface induced reaction on quartz window was second order and the rate constant was 2.7 x 10{sup -17} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -1} cm{sup -2} sec. Meanwhile, the 253.7 nm photon employed for mercury detection was found to accelerate the reaction. The utilization efficiency of 253.7 nm photon for Hg{sup 0} oxidation was 6.7 x 10{sup -4} molecules photon{sup -1} under the conditions employed in this study.

  7. Use of molecular beams for kinetic measurements of chemical reactions on solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaera, Francisco

    2017-05-01

    In this review we survey the contributions that molecular beam experiments have provided to our understanding of the dynamics and kinetics of chemical interactions of gas molecules with solid surfaces. First, we describe the experimental details of the different instrumental setups and approaches available for the study of these systems under the ultrahigh vacuum conditions and with the model planar surfaces often used in modern surface-science experiments. Next, a discussion is provided of the most important fundamental aspects of the dynamics of chemical adsorption that have been elucidated with the help of molecular beam experiments, which include the development of potential energy surfaces, the determination of the different channels for energy exchange between the incoming molecules and the surface, the identification of adsorption precursor states, the understanding of dissociative chemisorption, the determination of the contributions of corrugation, steps, and other structural details of the surface to the adsorption process, the effect to molecular steering, the identification of avenues for assisting adsorption, and the molecular details associated with the kinetics of the uptake of adsorbates as a function of coverage. We follow with a summary of the work directed at the determination of kinetic parameters and mechanistic details of surface reactions associated with catalysis, mostly those promoted by late transition metals. This discussion we initiate with an overview of what has been learned about simple bimolecular reactions such as the oxidation of CO and H2 with O2 and the reaction of CO with NO, and continue with the review of the studies of more complex systems such as the oxidation of alcohols, the conversion of organic acids, the hydrogenation and isomerization of olefins, and the oxidative activation of alkanes under conditions of short contact times. Sections 6 and 7 of this review deal with the advances made in the use of molecular beams with

  8. Pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems: From spiral waves to turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsen, Joern

    2009-05-01

    Almost all systems we encounter in nature possess some sort of form or structure. In many cases, the structures arise from an initially unstructured state without the action of an agent that predetermines the pattern. Such self-organized structures emerge from cooperative interactions among the constituents of the system and often exhibit properties that are distinct from those of their constituent elements or molecules. For example, chemical waves in reaction-diffusion systems are at the core of a huge variety of physical, chemical, and biological processes. In (quasi) two-dimensional situations, spiral wave patterns are especially prevalent and determine the characteristics of processes such as surface catalytic oxidation reactions, contraction of the heart muscle, and various signaling mechanisms in biological systems. In this talk, I will review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental results regarding the dynamics, properties and stability of spiral waves and their three-dimensional analog (scroll waves). Special emphasis will be given to synchronization defect lines which generically arise in complex-oscillatory media, and the phenomenon of defect-mediated turbulence or filament turbulence where the dynamics of a pattern is dominated by the rapid motion, nucleation, and annihilation of spirals or scroll waves, respectively. The latter is of direct relevance in the context of ventricular fibrillation - a turbulent electrical wave activity that destroys the coherent contraction of the ventricular muscle and its main pumping function leading to sudden cardiac death.

  9. A Reaction-based Diagonalization Approach to Modeling Surface Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J.; Yeh, G.; Zhang, F.; Wu, T.; Hu, G.

    2005-12-01

    There are many water quality models (e.g., WASP, QAUL2E/QUAL2K, CE-QUAL-ICM, RCA, RMA11, etc.) that have been employed by practitioners in surface water quality modeling. All of these models are similar to each others. The major differences among them are the number of water quality parameters included and the number of biogeochemical processes considered. Because of the limitation on the number of biogeochemical processes considered and, in a lesser extent, on the number of water quality parameters included, these models often perform only fairly in validation and their predictions may be unreliable, even though they can be adequately calibrated in most occasions and excellently in some occasions. Obviously, there is a need to develop a model that would allow the inclusion of any number of water quality parameters and enable the hypothesis of any number of biogeochemical processes. This paper presents the development of a numerical water quality model using a general paradigm of reaction-based approaches. In a reaction-based approach, all conceptualized biogoechemical processes are transformed into a reaction network. Through the decomposition of species governing equations via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network, (1) redundant fast reactions and irrelevant kinetic reactions are removed from the system, which alleviates the problem of unnecessary and erroneous formulation and parameterization of these reactions, and (2) fast reactions and slow reactions are decoupled, which enables robust numerical integrations. The system of species governing equations is transformed into two sets: algebraic equations (either mass action equations or users' specified) of equilibrium variables and differential equations of kinetic variables. As a result, the model alleviates the needs of using simple partitions for fast reactions and uses kinetic-variables instead of biogeochemical species as primary dependent variables. With the diagonalization strategy, it

  10. LixV2O5 - Analysis of surface reactions by spectroscopic quartz crystal mircogravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwort, Jeroen; Berkemeier, Frank; Schmitz, Guido

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the electrochemical side reactions that occur during the cyclic lithiation/delithiation of sputter-deposited LixV2O5 films. For this purpose, the mass change of LixV2O5 films during lithiation/delithiation is measured by quartz crystal microgravimetry, while the electrical charge that is flowing during this reaction is measured by cyclic voltammetry. A time-resolved evaluation of the measurement data, in combination with an advanced type of data processing, finally allows us to calculate time-resolved quantitative mass spectra. These spectra provide information about the chemical species that take part during the electrochemical reactions. Based on this technique, we study the electrochemical side reactions between the LixV2O5 and the corresponding liquid electrolyte, i.e. we investigate the time-resolved formation of the solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer during long term cycling. We are able to identify several chemical species that are formed during cycling and moreover, we identify three different stages of SEI formation.

  11. Palladium- and copper-mediated N-aryl bond formation reactions for the synthesis of biological active compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Koenig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Arylated aliphatic and aromatic amines are important substituents in many biologically active compounds. In the last few years, transition-metal-mediated N-aryl bond formation has become a standard procedure for the introduction of amines into aromatic systems. While N-arylation of simple aromatic halides by simple amines works with many of the described methods in high yield, the reactions may require detailed optimization if applied to the synthesis of complex molecules with additional functional groups, such as natural products or drugs. We discuss and compare in this review the three main N-arylation methods in their application to the synthesis of biologically active compounds: Palladium-catalysed Buchwald–Hartwig-type reactions, copper-mediated Ullmann-type and Chan–Lam-type N-arylation reactions. The discussed examples show that palladium-catalysed reactions are favoured for large-scale applications and tolerate sterically demanding substituents on the coupling partners better than Chan–Lam reactions. Chan–Lam N-arylations are particularly mild and do not require additional ligands, which facilitates the work-up. However, reaction times can be very long. Ullmann- and Buchwald–Hartwig-type methods have been used in intramolecular reactions, giving access to complex ring structures. All three N-arylation methods have specific advantages and disadvantages that should be considered when selecting the reaction conditions for a desired C–N bond formation in the course of a total synthesis or drug synthesis.

  12. Formation of the Surface Space Charge Layer in Fair Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redin, Alexander; Kupovykh, Gennady; Boldyreff, Anton

    2014-05-01

    It is widely known that the positive space charge, caused by electrode effect action, is obtained near surface in fair weather. Space charge density depends on the different local features: meteorological conditions, aerosol particles concentration, convective transfer of the surface layer. Namely space charge determines the local variations of electric field. Space charge could be negative in condition of strong ionization rate in thin air layer near surface. The electrodynamic model, consisting of transfer equations of light ions and nucleuses, generated by interactions between lights ions and aerosol particles, and Poisson equation. The turbulent transfer members, electric field near the surface, the mobility of positive and negative ions, recombination coefficient, ionization rate, the number of elementary charges on the nuclei were took into account in the model equations. The time-space variations of positive and negative small and heavy ions, electric field, electrical conductivity, current density and space charge, depending on aerosol particles concentrations, turbulence and convective transfer ionization rate, aerosol particles size and number of charged on the particles are calculated. The mechanisms of turbulent and convection-turbulent surface layer electrodynamic structure forming in dependence of single and multi-charged aerosol particles for different physical and meteorological conditions are investigated. Increasing of turbulent mixing intensity leads to increasing of character electrode layer thickness, decreasing of space charge density value, decreasing of electric current conductivity value. The electrode effect of the whole layer remains constant. Increasing of aerosol particles concentration leads to decreasing of electrode effect within the whole electrode layer and increasing of electric field values, decreasing of space charge density values and current conductivity density. It was received that increasing of the aerosol particles

  13. Surface reactions of molecular and atomic oxygen with carbon phosphide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorham, Justin; Torres, Jessica; Wolfe, Glenn; d'Agostino, Alfred; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2005-11-01

    The surface reactions of atomic and molecular oxygen with carbon phosphide films have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Carbon phosphide films were produced by ion implantation of trimethylphosphine into polyethylene. Atmospheric oxidation of carbon phosphide films was dominated by phosphorus oxidation and generated a carbon-containing phosphate surface film. This oxidized surface layer acted as an effective diffusion barrier, limiting the depth of phosphorus oxidation within the carbon phosphide film to phosphorus atoms as well as the degree of phosphorus oxidation. For more prolonged AO exposures, a highly oxidized phosphate surface layer formed that appeared to be inert toward further AO-mediated erosion. By utilizing phosphorus-containing hydrocarbon thin films, the phosphorus oxides produced during exposure to AO were found to desorb at temperatures >500 K under vacuum conditions. Results from this study suggest that carbon phosphide films can be used as AO-resistant surface coatings on polymers.

  14. Surface photo reaction processes using synchrotron radiation; Hoshako reiki ni yoru hyomenko hanno process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaizumi, Y. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute for Materials Research; Yoshigoe, A. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan); Urisu, T. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Institute for Molecular Science

    1997-08-20

    This paper introduces the surface photo reaction processes using synchrotron radiation, and its application. A synchrotron radiation process using soft X-rays contained in electron synchrotron radiated light as an excited light source has a possibility of high-resolution processing because of its short wave length. The radiated light can excite efficiently the electronic state of a substance, and can induce a variety of photochemical reactions. In addition, it can excite inner shell electrons efficiently. In the aspect of its application, it has been found that, if radiated light is irradiated on surfaces of solids under fluorine-based reaction gas or Cl2, the surfaces can be etched. This technology is utilized practically. With regard to radiated light excited CVD process, it may be said that anything that can be deposited by the ordinary plasma CVD process can be deposited. Its application to epitaxial crystal growth may be said a nano processing application in thickness direction, such as forming an ultra-lattice structure, the application being subjected to expectation. In micromachine fabricating technologies, a possibility is searched on application of a photo reaction process of the radiated light. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Experimental Study on Hydrocarbon Formation Due to Reactions Between Carbonates and Water or Water—Bearing Minerals in Deep Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁克难; 汪本善; 等

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of formation of abiogenetic hydrocarbons at the depth of the Earth,experimental research on reactions between carbonates and water or waterbearing minerals was carried out at the pressure of about 1GPa and the temperature range of 800-1500℃.The reactions took place in an open and nonequilibrium state.Chromatographic analyses of the gas products indicate that in the experiments there were generated CH4-dominated hydrocarbons,along with some CO2 and CO.Accordingly,we think there is no essential distinction between free-state water and hydroxy in the minerals in the process of hydrocarbon formation.This study indicates that reactions between carbonates and water or water-bearing minerals should be an important factor leading to the formation of abiogenetic hydrocarbons at the Earth's depth.

  16. Mechanic studies of monolayer formation on H-Si(111) surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijksen, B.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Covalently attached organic monolayers on silicon surfaces form thermally and chemically stable platforms for (bio)functionalization of the surface. Recent advances in monolayer formation – yielding increases in monolayer quality and the complete exclusion of oxygen at modified surfaces &ndash

  17. Electro-deposition of Pd on carbon paper and Ni foam via surface limited redox-replacement reaction for oxygen reduction reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pd nanostructured catalysts were electrodeposited by surface-limited redox replacement reactions usingthe electrochemical atomic layer deposition technique. Carbon paper and Ni foam were used as substratesfor the electrodeposition of the metal...

  18. Pattern formation of reaction-diffusion system having self-determined flow in the amoeboid organism of Physarum plasmodium

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, H; Ito, M

    1998-01-01

    The amoeboid organism, the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum, behaves on the basis of spatio-temporal pattern formation by local contraction-oscillators. This biological system can be regarded as a reaction-diffusion system which has spatial interaction by active flow of protoplasmic sol in the cell. Paying attention to the physiological evidence that the flow is determined by contraction pattern in the plasmodium, a reaction-diffusion system having self-determined flow arises. Such a coupling of reaction-diffusion-advection is a characteristic of the biological system, and is expected to relate with control mechanism of amoeboid behaviours. Hence, we have studied effects of the self-determined flow on pattern formation of simple reaction-diffusion systems. By weakly nonlinear analysis near a trivial solution, the envelope dynamics follows the complex Ginzburg-Landau type equation just after bifurcation occurs at finite wave number. The flow term affects the nonlinear term of the equation through the critic...

  19. Formation of alkenes and oxygenated VOCs from light mediated surface chemistry of nonanoic acid at the air-seawater interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L.; Volkamer, R.; Ciuraru, R.; Bernard, F.; George, C.

    2013-12-01

    Organic carbon is relevant in the atmosphere because it affects oxidative capacity that determines the removal rate of climate active gases and modifies aerosols. The significant presence of organic compounds at the surface of the ocean is a source for primary and secondary aerosol formation that potentially can modify cloud cover. Field observations of glyoxal over the remote marine boundary layer, and the tropical free troposphere remain unexplained by atmospheric models, and indicate missing sources of marine organic carbon species from heterogeneous processes mediated by light. We have studied the light induced surface chemistry of synthetic aqueous -mixtures containing NaCl, NaBr, NaI, photosensitizers (humic acids) and an organic surfactant (nonanoic acid) in a photochemical Quartz flowreactor. The air from the flowreactor was transferred to a dark reactor where the products from photosensitized reactions at the air/sea interface were further exposed to ozone. The products were sampled in the presence/absence of light and ozone by Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) and Light-Emitting-Diode Cavity-Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS). In the presence of light nonenal formation is observed. Addition of ozone leads to the formation of glyoxal, among other products. Further experiments were conducted in an atmospheric simulation chamber. We discuss first results and atmospheric implications.

  20. On the onset of surface condensation: formation and transition mechanisms of condensation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Qiang; Sun, Jie; Wang, Qian; Wang, Wen; Wang, Hua Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to investigate the onset of surface condensation. On surfaces with different wettability, we snapshot different condensation modes (no-condensation, dropwise condensation and filmwise condensation) and quantitatively analyze their characteristics by temporal profiles of surface clusters. Two different types of formation of nanoscale droplets are identified, i.e. the formations with and without film-like condensate. We exhibit the effect of surface tensions on the formations of nanoscale droplets and film. We reveal the formation mechanisms of different condensation modes at nanoscale based on our simulation results and classical nucleation theory, which supplements the ‘classical hypotheses’ of the onset of dropwise condensation. We also reveal the transition mechanism between different condensation modes based on the competition between surface tensions and reveal that dropwise condensation represents the transition states from no-condensation to filmwise condensation.

  1. Formation of Surface Corrosion-Resistant Nanocrystalline Structures on Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha; Slobodyan, Zvenomyra; Tsyrulnyk, Oleksandr

    2016-12-01

    Engineering materials with nanocrystalline structure could be exploited under simultaneous action of mechanical loading and corrosion environments; therefore, their corrosion resistance is important. Surface nanocrystalline structure was generated on middle carbon steels by severe plastic deformation using the method of mechanical pulse friction treatment. This treatment additionally includes high temperature phase transformation and alloying. Using a complex of the corrosive, electrochemical and physical investigations, it was established that nanocrystalline structures can be characterized by lower or increased corrosion resistance in comparison with the reference material. It is caused by the action of two confronting factors: arising energy level and anticorrosive alloying of the surface layer.

  2. Surface nanobubbles: formation and universality of the contact angle

    CERN Document Server

    Weijs, J H; Lohse, D

    2011-01-01

    We study surface nanobubbles using molecular dynamics simulation of ternary (gas, liquid, solid) systems of Lennard-Jones fluids. They form for sufficiently low gas solubility in the liquid, i.e., for large relative gas concentration. For strong enough gas-solid attraction, the surface nanobubble is sitting on a gas layer, which forms in between the liquid and the solid. This gas layer is the reason for the universality of the contact angle, which we calculate from the microscopic parameters. Under the present equilibrium conditions the nanobubbles dissolve within less of a microsecond, consistent with the view that the experimentally found nanobubbles are stabilized by a nonequilibrium mechanism.

  3. Origin of Power Laws for Reactions at Metal Surfaces Mediated by Hot Electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of experiments have established that certain chemical reactions at metal surfaces can be driven by multiple hot-electron-mediated excitations of adsorbates. A high transient density of hot electrons is obtained by means of femtosecond laser pulses and a characteristic feature...... of such experiments is the emergence of a power law dependence of the reaction yield on the laser fluence Y similar to F-n. We propose a model of multiple inelastic scattering by hot electrons which reproduces this power law and the observed exponents of several experiments. All parameters are calculated within...

  4. Single-charge-exchange reactions and the neutron density at the surface of the nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loc, Bui Minh; Auerbach, Naftali; Khoa, Dao T.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we study the charge-exchange reaction to the isobaric analog state using two types of transition densities. One transition density is equal to the difference of the total neutron density minus the total proton density and the other one is the density of the excess neutrons only. We show that for projectiles that do not probe the interior of the nucleus but mostly the surface of this nucleus, distinct differences in the cross section arise when two types of transition densities are employed. We demonstrate this by considering the (3He,t ) reaction.

  5. The adsorption and reaction of fluorine on the Si(100) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, J. R.; Nelson, Mark M.; Engel, Thomas

    1989-05-01

    The adsorption and reaction of both molecular and atomic flourine with the Si(100) surface has been examined under ultraligh vacuum conditions with supersonic molecular beam techniques, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), quadrupole mass spectrometry and low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy. Molecular flourine adsorbs dissociatively on the clean Si(100) surface with an initial (zero-coverage) probability of the adsorption of 0.46±0.02, which is essentially independent of both the incident beam energy (flouride adlayers, produced by exposing the clean Si(100) surface a 120 K to a beam of flourine, yielded SiF 2(g) and SiF 4(g) as the only gas phase reaction products. The relative yield to these two gas phase reaction products dependes strongly on the initial coverage of the flourine adatoms-below ˜ ML, SiF 2(g) in the major reaction product, whereas above ˜3 ML, the yield of SiF 2(g) remains constant while that of SiF 2(g) increases continuously. Above initial coverages of 2 ML, the thermal decomposition is terminated near 800 K by the removal of one monolayer of the silicon substrate in the form of SiF 2(g). A detailed analysis of the decomposition for coverages of 3 ML revealed complex behavior, the kinetics depending sensitively on the initial coverage of flourin adatome. For example, for initial coverages of 1-1.3 ML, zero-order kinetics were found to apply as the coverage decreases from 1.0 to 0.3 ML. A qualitative assessment of the adlayer configuration following partial decomposition suggests that the thermal decomposition in the zero-order regime proceeds inhomogenously, leaving separate domains where the local coverage of flourine is either near saturation or zero. We suggest that the spatially inhomogenous decomposition is a manifestation of preferential reactivity at surface defects such as atomic steps. Investigation of the steady-state reaction of preferential reactivity at surface defects such as atomic steps. Investigation of the steady

  6. Chiral BINOL-derived phosphoric acids: privileged Brønsted acid organocatalysts for C-C bond formation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamfir, Alexandru; Schenker, Sebastian; Freund, Matthias; Tsogoeva, Svetlana B

    2010-12-07

    BINOL-derived phosphoric acids have emerged during the last five years as powerful chiral Brønsted acid catalysts in many enantioselective processes. The most successful transformations carried out with chiral BINOL phosphates include C-C bond formation reactions. The recent advances have been reviewed in this article with a focus being placed on hydrocyanations, aldol-type, Mannich, Friedel-Crafts, aza-ene-type, Diels-Alder, as well as cascade and multi-component reactions.

  7. Defect-free surface of quartz glass polished in elastic mode by chemical impact reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭文强; 关朝亮; 李圣怡

    2014-01-01

    Removal of brittle materials in the brittle or ductile mode inevitably causes damaged or strained surface layers containing cracks, scratches or dislocations. Within elastic deformation, the arrangement of each atom can be recovered back to its original position without any defects introduced. Based on surface hydroxylation and chemisorption theory, material removal mechanism of quartz glass in the elastic mode is analyzed to obtain defect-free surface. Elastic contact condition between nanoparticle and quartz glass surface is confirmed from the Hertz contact theory model. Atoms on the quartz glass surface are removed by chemical bond generated by impact reaction in the elastic mode, so no defects are generated without mechanical process. Experiment was conducted on a numerically controlled system for nanoparticle jet polishing, and one flat quartz glass was polished in the elastic mode. Results show that scratches on the sample surface are completely removed away with no mechanical defects introduced, and micro-roughness (Ra) is decreased from 1.23 nm to 0.47 nm. Functional group Ce—O—Si on ceria nanoparticles after polishing was detected directly and indirectly by FTIR, XRD and XPS spectra analysis from which the chemical impact reaction is validated.

  8. Final Report: Mechanisms of sputter ripple formation: coupling among energetic ions, surface kinetics, stress and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chason, Eric; Shenoy, Vivek

    2013-01-22

    Self-organized pattern formation enables the creation of nanoscale surface structures over large areas based on fundamental physical processes rather than an applied template. Low energy ion bombardment is one such method that induces the spontaneous formation of a wide variety of interesting morphological features (e.g., sputter ripples and/or quantum dots). This program focused on the processes controlling sputter ripple formation and the kinetics controlling the evolution of surfaces and nanostructures in high flux environments. This was done by using systematic, quantitative experiments to measure ripple formation under a variety of processing conditions coupled with modeling to interpret the results.

  9. Metal surface defect formation arising by the laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min'ko, L. Y.; Chivel, Yuri A.

    1996-03-01

    Appearance on the surface of metals of microcraters, microparticles, and continuity breaks with characteristics sizes 1 - 10 micrometer was experimentally observed under the action of laser monopulses of duration 40 ns and 300 ns. The model of initial destruction of materials and generation of condensed particles based on exclusively thermal action of laser radiation and natural inhomogeneity of solids is developed.

  10. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (II): Applications to formation and combustion reactions of liquid organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic solvation model (HSM), which was recently developed for evaluating condensed-phase thermodynamics by quantum chemical calculations (Nakai and Ishikawa, 2014), was applied to formation and combustion reactions of simple organic molecules. The conventional ideal gas model (IGM) considerably overestimated the entropies of the liquid molecules. The HSM could significantly improve this overestimation; mean absolute deviations for the Gibbs energies of the formation and combustion reactions were (49.6, 26.7) for the IGM and (9.7, 5.4) for the HSM in kJ/mol.

  11. THE FORMATION OF ENTS ADAPTIVE REACTIONS DEPENDING ON THE TYPE OF PSYCHO-VEGETATIVE REGULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Kazin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the students (12 to 15 years old examination was to identify the integrative criteria of assessing the nature of the functional relationships between the parameters of the psychosocial and physiological adaptation of students, depending on age, individual-typological peculiarities of vegetative regulation, personal potential at different stages of school education.The study of the characteristics of vegetative regulation of the cardiovascular system was made with a help of an automatic cardiac-rhythm programs. The research of psychophysiological parameters was fulfiled using an automatic complex. The measurement of the speed of simple visual-motor reaction (PSMR, reaction to a moving object (WFD, the level of functional mobility of nervous processes (WFP and health brain (DDM were made before. Features psychosocial adaptation was analyzed using 8-color Luscher test.All examinee were divided into three groups on the basis of the statistical characteristics of the cardiac rhythm by the tone source autonomic tone: “vagotonia” (with a predominance of parasympathetic sistems, “somatotonic” (with domination of the sympatholytic effects, “atonic” (balanced type of vegetative nervous system.Based on the analysis of psychodynamic, neurodynamic and vegetative functions showed that students with initial vagotonies tone are characterized by high levels of situational and personal anxiety, low psychosocial adaptation, decreased activity of neurodynamic functions and psychodynamic processes in the learning dynamics, whereas the individuals with dominance of sympatotonics type regulation have high level of neurodynamic processes, psychosocial adaptation, against the background of significant stress mechanisms of vegetative regulation.Students with initial vegetative tone demonstrate a sufficient level of psychosocial adaptation, activity psychodynamic and neuromotor processes, accompanied by the preservation of the functionality of

  12. Role of graphene on the surface chemical reactions of BiPO4-rGO with low OH-related defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Erping; Wang, Wenzhong

    2013-11-21

    Graphene has been widely introduced into photocatalysis to enhance photocatalytic performance due to its unique physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of graphene on the surface chemical reactions of photocatalysis has not been clearly researched, which is important for photocatalysis because photocatalytic reactions ultimately occur on the catalyst surface. Herein, a two-step solution-phase reaction has been designed to synthesize quasi-core-shell structured BiPO4-rGO cuboids and the role of graphene on the surface chemical reactions was investigated in detail. It was found that the introduced graphene modified the process and the mechanism of the surface chemical reactions. The change mainly originates from the interaction between graphene and the adsorbed O2 molecule. Due to the electron transfer from graphene to adsorbed O2, graphene could tune the interfacial charge transport and efficiently activate molecular oxygen to form O2˙(-) anions as the major oxidation species instead of ˙OH. In addition, the two-step synthesis approach could efficiently suppress the formation of OH-related defects in the lattice. As a result, the BiPO4-rGO composite exhibited superior photocatalytic activity to BiPO4 and P25, about 4.3 times that of BiPO4 and 6.9 times that of P25.

  13. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-04-20

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  14. Formation of magnetic microstructure of the nanosized NiFe2O4 synthesized via solid-state reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žák T.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic NiFe2O4 structure formation was studied through structural, compositional and magnetic characterization of obtained reaction products of a simple, high yielding and low-cost solid-state reaction. Initial annealing of the starting oxides mixture at 700ºC did not allow us to observe formation of the desired magnetic phase. In contrast, subsequent thermomagnetic measurements up to 800ºC indicated the considerable increase of the magnetic moment, which can be reasonably assigned to the changes in phase composition and formation of magnetic NiFe2O4 structure during the heating cycle of measurements. Nanosized NiFe2O4 phase formation has been confirmed by the following XRD and MS phase analyses and its nanocrystalline structure by XRD and SEM/TEM techniques. The obtained hysteresis loop taken after TM measurements suggest the increased volume of magnetically active material and thus additionally support the previous findings.

  15. Reaction pathways of furfural, furfuryl alcohol and 2-methylfuran on Cu(111) and NiCu bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ke; Wan, Weiming; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is an important reaction for converting biomass-derived furfural to value-added 2-methylfuran, which is a promising fuel additive. In this work, the HDO of furfural to produce 2-methylfuran occurred on the NiCu bimetallic surfaces prepared on either Ni(111) or Cu(111). The reaction pathways of furfural were investigated on Cu(111) and Ni/Cu(111) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) experiments. These studies provided mechanistic insights into the effects of bimetallic formation on enhancing the HDO activity. Specifically, furfural weakly adsorbed on Cu(111), while it strongly adsorbed on Ni/Cu(111) through an η2(C,O) configuration, which led to the HDO of furfural on Ni/Cu(111). The ability to dissociate H2 on Ni/Cu(111) is also an important factor for enhancing the HDO activity over Cu(111).

  16. Atomic layer deposition-Sequential self-limiting surface reactions for advanced catalyst "bottom-up" synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junling; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Stair, Peter C.

    2016-06-01

    Catalyst synthesis with precise control over the structure of catalytic active sites at the atomic level is of essential importance for the scientific understanding of reaction mechanisms and for rational design of advanced catalysts with high performance. Such precise control is achievable using atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is similar to chemical vapor deposition (CVD), except that the deposition is split into a sequence of two self-limiting surface reactions between gaseous precursor molecules and a substrate. The unique self-limiting feature of ALD allows conformal deposition of catalytic materials on a high surface area catalyst support at the atomic level. The deposited catalytic materials can be precisely constructed on the support by varying the number and type of ALD cycles. As an alternative to the wet-chemistry based conventional methods, ALD provides a cycle-by-cycle "bottom-up" approach for nanostructuring supported catalysts with near atomic precision. In this review, we summarize recent attempts to synthesize supported catalysts with ALD. Nucleation and growth of metals by ALD on oxides and carbon materials for precise synthesis of supported monometallic catalyst are reviewed. The capability of achieving precise control over the particle size of monometallic nanoparticles by ALD is emphasized. The resulting metal catalysts with high dispersions and uniformity often show comparable or remarkably higher activity than those prepared by conventional methods. For supported bimetallic catalyst synthesis, we summarize the strategies for controlling the deposition of the secondary metal selectively on the primary metal nanoparticle but not on the support to exclude monometallic formation. As a review of the surface chemistry and growth behavior of metal ALD on metal surfaces, we demonstrate the ways to precisely tune size, composition and structure of bimetallic metal nanoparticles. The cycle-by-cycle "bottom up" construction of bimetallic (or multiple

  17. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2016-06-01

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily.

  18. Formation of environmentally persistent free radicals from the heterogeneous reaction of ozone and polycyclic aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrowman, Cuyler K; Zhou, Shouming; Burrow, Timothy E; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2016-01-01

    In the 1980s long-lived radical species were identified in cigarette tar. Since then, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) have been observed in ambient particulate matter, and have been generated in particulate matter generated from internal combustion engines. For the first time, we measure in situ the formation and decay of EPFRs through the heterogeneous reaction of ozone and several polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC). Solid anthracene (ANT), pyrene (PY), benzo[a]pyrene (BAP), benzo[ghi]perylene (BGHIP), 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4NQ), and 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) were reacted with gas-phase ozone in a flow system placed in the active cavity of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer, and the formation of radicals was measured on the timescale of tens of minutes at ambient levels of ozone down to 30 ppb. For most substrates the net radical production is initially rapid, slows at intermediate times, and is followed by a slow decay. For oxidized solid BAP, radical signal persists for many days in the absence of ozone. To evaluate the effect of substrate phase, the solid PAHs were also dissolved in squalane, an organic oil inert to ozone, which yielded a much higher maximum radical concentration and faster radical decay when exposed to ozone. With higher mobility, reactants were apparently able to more easily diffuse and react with each other, yielding the higher radical concentrations. The EPR spectra exhibit three radicals types, two of which have been assigned to semiquinone species and one to a PAH-derived, carbon-centered radical. Although our system uses levels of PAC not typically found in the environment it is worth noting that the amounts of radical formed, on the order of 10(18) radicals per g, are comparable to those observed in ambient particulate matter.

  19. C-13 isotopic studies of the surface catalysed reactions of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, M.A.; He, S.J.X.; Adebajo, M. [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Chemistry

    1997-10-01

    The ability of methane to methylate aromatic compounds, which are considered to be models for coal, is being studied. Related to this reaction, but at higher temperatures, is the direct formation of benzene from methane in the presence of these catalysts. Controversy exists in the literature on the former reaction, and {sup 13}C isotope studies are being used to resolve the question. The interest in this reaction arises because the utilisation of methane, in the form of natural gas, in place of hydrogen for direct coal liquefaction would have major economic advantage. For this reason Isotope studies in this area have contributed significantly to an understanding of the methylation reactions. The paper describes experiments utilising methane{sup 13}C, which show that methylation of aromatics such as naphthalene by the methane{sup 13}C is catalysed by microporous, Cu-exchanged SAPO-5, at elevated pressures (6.8 MPa) and temperatures around 400 degree C. The mass spectrometric analysis and n.m.r. study of the isotopic composition of the products of the methylation reaction demonstrate unequivocally that methane provides the additional carbon atom for the methylated products. Thermodynamic calculations predict that the reaction is favourable at high methane pressures under these experimental conditions. The mechanism as suggested by the isotope study is discussed. The catalysts which show activity for the activation of methane for direct methylation of organic compounds, such as naphthalene, toluene, phenol and pyrene, are substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves, EIAPO-5 (where El=Pb, Cu, Ni and Si) and a number of metal substituted zeolites. Our earlier tritium studies had shown that these catalysts will activate alkanes, at least as far as isotope hydrogen exchange reactions are concerned

  20. Bypassing both surface attachment and surface recognition requirements for appressorium formation by overactive ras signaling in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhao, Xinhua; Xue, Chaoyang; Dai, Yafeng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2014-09-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae forms a highly specialized infection structure called an appressorium for plant penetration. In M. oryzae and many other plant-pathogenic fungi, surface attachment and surface recognition are two essential requirements for appressorium formation. Development of appressoria in the air has not been reported. In this study, we found that expression of a dominant active MoRAS2(G18V) allele in M. oryzae resulted in the formation of morphologically abnormal appressoria on nonconducive surfaces, in liquid suspensions, and on aerial hyphae without attachment to hard surfaces. Both the Pmk1 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade and cAMP signaling pathways that regulate surface recognition and appressorium morphogenesis in M. oryzae were overactivated in the MoRAS2(G18V) transformant. In mutants deleted of PMK1 or CPKA, expression of MoRAS2(G18V) had no significant effects on appressorium morphogenesis. Furthermore, expression of dominant MoRAS2 in Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides also caused the formation of appressorium-like structures in aerial hyphae. Overall, our data indicate that MoRas2 functions upstream from both the cAMP-PKA and Pmk1 pathways and overactive Ras signaling leads to improper activation of these two pathways and appressorium formation without surface attachment in appressorium-forming pathogens.

  1. Surface grafted chitosan gels. Part II. Gel formation and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per M.

    2014-01-01

    Responsive biomaterial hydrogels attract significant attention due to their biocompatibility and degradability. In order to make chitosan based gels, we first graft one layer of chitosan to silica, and then build a chitosan/poly(acrylic acid) multilayer using the layer-by-layer approach. After...... cross-linking the chitosan present in the polyelectrolyte multilayer, poly(acrylic acid) is partly removed by exposing the multilayer structure to a concentrated carbonate buffer solution at a high pH, leaving a surface-grafted cross-linked gel. Chemical cross-linking enhances the gel stability against......-linking density. The amount of poly(acrylic acid) trapped inside the surface grafted films was found to decrease with decreasing cross-linking density, as confirmed in situ using TIRR, and ex situ by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements on dried films. The responsiveness of the chitosan-based gels...

  2. Charged group surface accessibility determines micelleplexes formation and cellular interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yang; Sen, Soumyo; Král, Petr; Gemeinhart, Richard A.

    2015-04-01

    Micelleplexes are a class of nucleic acid carriers that have gained acceptance due to their size, stability, and ability to synergistically carry small molecules. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA gene regulator that is consists of 19-22 nucleotides. Altered expression of miRNAs plays an important role in many human diseases. Using a model 22-nucleotide miRNA sequence, we investigated the interaction between charged groups on the micelle surface and miRNA. The model micelle system was formed from methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactide) (mPEG-PLA) mixed with methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactide)-b-oligoarginine (mPEG-PLA-Rx, x = 8 or 15). Surface properties of the micelles were varied by controlling the oligoarginine block length and conjugation density. Micelles were observed to have a core-shell conformation in the aqueous environment where the PLA block constituted the hydrophobic core, mPEG and oligoarginine formed a hydrophilic corona. Significantly different thermodynamic behaviors were observed during the interaction of single stranded miRNA with micelles of different surface properties, and the resulting micelleplexes mediated substantial cellular association. Depending upon the oligoarginine length and density, micelles exhibited miRNA loading capacity directly related to the presentation of charged groups on the surface. The effect of charged group accessibility of cationic micelle on micelleplex properties provides guidance on future miRNA delivery system design.Micelleplexes are a class of nucleic acid carriers that have gained acceptance due to their size, stability, and ability to synergistically carry small molecules. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA gene regulator that is consists of 19-22 nucleotides. Altered expression of miRNAs plays an important role in many human diseases. Using a model 22-nucleotide miRNA sequence, we investigated the interaction between charged groups on the micelle surface and miRNA. The

  3. Nitric oxide formation from the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit hemoglobin at intermediate oxygen saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2008-01-01

    The nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin has received much recent interest because the nitric oxide produced in this reaction may participate in blood flow regulation during hypoxia. The present study used spectral deconvolution to characterize the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit...... hemoglobin at different constant oxygen tensions that generate the full range of physiological relevant oxygen saturations. Carp is a hypoxia-tolerant species with very high hemoglobin oxygen affinity, and the high R-state character and low redox potential of the hemoglobin is hypothesized to promote...... NO generation from nitrite. The reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin leads to a 1 : 1 formation of nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin in both species. At intermediate oxygen saturations, the reaction with deoxyhemoglobin is clearly favored over that with oxyhemoglobin, and the oxyhemoglobin reaction...

  4. The Role of Gas-Silicate Chemisorption Reactions in Modifying Planetary Crusts and Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P. L.; Henley, R. W.; Wykes, J. L.; Renggli, C.; Troitzsch, U.; Clark, D.; O'Neill, H. S.

    2014-12-01

    Evidence for gas-solid reactions is found throughout the solar system: for example, sulfidation reactions in some meteorites and secondary phases coating lunar pyroclastic glasses. On Earth, the products of gas-solid reactions are documented in volcanic systems, metalliferous mineral deposits, impact craters, and on dust or meteorites after passage through the atmosphere - such reactions are also likely on the surfaces of Mars and Venus. To understand the chemical dynamics of such gas-solid reactions, we are undertaking systematic experiments and thermochemical modelling. Experiments were conducted in a vertical gas-mixing furnace at 600 - 800 °C and 1 bar, using SO2and a range of Ca-bearing materials: labradorite, feldspar glass and anorthosite (rock). In each case, anhydrite formed rapidly. In shorter experiments with labradorite, isolated anhydrite is observed surrounded by 'moats' of Ca-depleted silicate. In longer experiments, anhydrite is found as clusters of crystals that, in some cases, extend from the substrate forming precarious 'towers' (Figure). Anhydrite fills cracks in porous samples. We propose that the nucleation and rapid growth of anhydrite on the surface of these Ca-rich phases occurs by chemisorption of SO2(g) molecules with slightly negatively charged oxygen onto available near-surface calcium with slight positive charge. Anhydrite growth is sustained by SO2(g) chemisorption and Ca migration through the reacting silicate lattice, accelerated by increased bond lengths at high temperature. Significantly, the chemisorption reaction indicates that SO2 disproportionates to form both oxidized sulfur (as anhydrite) and a reduced sulfur species (e.g., an S* radical ion). On Earth, in the presence of H2O, the predominant reduced sulfur species is H2S, through an overall reaction: 3CaAl2Si2O8 + 4 SO2(g)+ H2O(g) → 3CaSO4 + 3Al2SiO5 + 3SiO2 + H2S(g)The reduced sulfur may react with gas phase Fe, Ni, Zn and Cu cluster compounds to form metal sulfides

  5. DNA Polymer Brush Patterning through Photocontrollable Surface-Initiated DNA Hybridization Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fujian; Zhou, Xiang; Yao, Dongbao; Xiao, Shiyan; Liang, Haojun

    2015-11-18

    The fabrication of DNA polymer brushes with spatial resolution onto a solid surface is a crucial step for biochip research and related applications, cell-free gene expression study, and even artificial cell fabrication. Here, for the first time, a DNA polymer brush patterning method is reported based on the photoactivation of an ortho-nitrobenzyl linker-embedded DNA hairpin structure and a subsequent surface-initiated DNA hybridization chain reaction (HCR). Inert DNA hairpins are exposed to ultraviolet light irradiation to generate DNA duplexes with two active sticky ends (toeholds) in a programmable manner. These activated DNA duplexes can initiate DNA HCR to generate multifunctional patterned DNA polymer brushes with complex geometrical shapes. Different multifunctional DNA polymer brush patterns can be fabricated on certain areas of the same solid surface using this method. Moreover, the patterned DNA brush surface can be used to capture target molecules in a desired manner.

  6. The adsorption and reaction of vinyl acetate on Au/Pd(100) alloy surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhenjun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Calaza, Florencia C [ORNL; Tysoe, Wilfred [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

    2012-01-01

    The surface chemistry of vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) is studied on Au/Pd(100) alloys as a function of alloy composition using temperature-programmed desorption and reflection adsorption infrared spectroscopy. VAM adsorbs weakly on isolated palladium sites on the alloy with a heat of adsorption of ~55 kJ/mol, with the plane of the VAM adsorbed close to parallel to the surface. The majority of the VAM adsorbed on isolated sites desorbs molecularly with only a small portion decomposing. At lower gold coverages (below ~0.5 ML of gold), where palladium palladium bridge sites are present, VAM binds to the surface in a distorted geometry via a rehybridized vinyl group. A larger proportion of this VAM decomposes and this reaction is initiated by C\\O bond scission in the VAM to form adsorbed acetate and vinyl species. The implication of this surface chemistry for VAM synthesis on Au/Pd(100) alloys is discussed.

  7. Immunoassay utilizing biochemistry reaction product via surface-enhanced Raman scattering in near field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Haiying; NI; Yi; JIANG; Wei; LUO; Peiqing; HUANG; Mei

    2005-01-01

    We propose here a kind of applications of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to immunology. It is a new enzyme immunoassay based on SERS. In the proposed system, antibody immobilized on a solid substrate reacts with antigen, which binds with another antibody labeled with peroxidase. If this immunocomplex is subjected to reaction with o-phenylenediamine and hydrogenperoxide, azoaniline is generated. This azo compound is adsorbed on a silver colloid and only the azo compound gives a strong surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) spectrum. A linear relationship was observed between the peak intensity of the N=N stretching band and the concentration of antigen, revealing that one can determine the concentration of antigen by the SERRS measurement of the reaction product. The detection limit of this SERS enzyme immunoassay method was found to be about 10-15 mol/L.

  8. Electronic structure and chemical reaction of Ca deposition on regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; GUO YuXian; FENG XueFei; ZHANG Liang; ZHANG WenHua; ZHU JunFa

    2009-01-01

    Conjugated polymer, regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rr-P3HT), films were prepared by spin-coating the rr-P3HT chloroform solution onto clean silicon wafer surfaces. The chemical re-action and electronic structure of Ca deposition on rr-P3HT surfaces were in situ investigated by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SRPES) and X-ray photoemission spectros-copy (XPS). Upon Ca deposition, Ca-induced band bending of rr-P3HT is observed. In addition, Ca atoms preferentially react with S atoms of rr-P3HT. No obvious reaction between Ca and C atoms can be found. Through the investigation of the evolution of valence band spectra and secondary electron cut-off of rr-P3HT during the process of Ca deposition, an energy level alignment diagram at the Ca/rr-P3HT interface is derived.

  9. Implicit solvation model for density-functional study of nanocrystal surfaces and reaction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Kiran; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Letchworth-Weaver, Kendra; Arias, T. A.; Hennig, Richard G.

    2014-02-01

    Solid-liquid interfaces are at the heart of many modern-day technologies and provide a challenge to many materials simulation methods. A realistic first-principles computational study of such systems entails the inclusion of solvent effects. In this work, we implement an implicit solvation model that has a firm theoretical foundation into the widely used density-functional code Vienna ab initio Software Package. The implicit solvation model follows the framework of joint density functional theory. We describe the framework, our algorithm and implementation, and benchmarks for small molecular systems. We apply the solvation model to study the surface energies of different facets of semiconducting and metallic nanocrystals and the SN2 reaction pathway. We find that solvation reduces the surface energies of the nanocrystals, especially for the semiconducting ones and increases the energy barrier of the SN2 reaction.

  10. Brominated lipids identify lipid binding sites on the surface of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszak, Aleksander W; Gardiner, Alastair T; Isaacs, Neil W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2007-03-20

    This study describes the use of brominated phospholipids to distinguish between lipid and detergent binding sites on the surface of a typical alpha-helical membrane protein. Reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were cocrystallized with added brominated phospholipids. X-ray structural analysis of these crystals has revealed the presence of two lipid binding sites from the characteristic strong X-ray scattering from the bromine atoms. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this approach to mapping lipid binding sites at the surface of membrane proteins.

  11. In situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of renewing graphite surface accompanied by electrochemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Zhu, Guoyi; Wang, Erkang

    1996-08-01

    In situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ECSTM) has been employed to follow the renewal process of a graphite electrode accompanied by flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) electrochemical reaction which involves adsorption of the reduced form (FADH 2) and desorption of the oxidized form (FAD). The renewal process initiates from steps or kinks on the electrode surface, which provide high active sites for adsorption. This renewal depends on the working electrode potential, especially in the range near the FAD redox potential. Our experiment suggests that delamination of the graphite surface is caused by interaction between the substrate and adsorbed molecules. A simple model is proposed to explain this phenomenon.

  12. Influence of virtual height exposure on postural reactions to support surface translations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleworth, Taylor W; Chua, Romeo; Inglis, J Timothy; Carpenter, Mark G

    2016-06-01

    As fear of falling is related to the increased likelihood of falls, it is important to understand the effects of threat-related factors (fear, anxiety and confidence) on dynamic postural reactions. Previous studies designed to examine threat effects on dynamic postural reactions have methodological limitations and lack a comprehensive analysis of simultaneous kinetic, kinematic and electromyographical recordings. The current study addressed these limitations by examining postural reactions of 26 healthy young adults to unpredictable anterior-posterior support-surface translations (acceleration=0.6m/s(2), constant velocity=0.25m/s, total displacement=0.75m) while standing on a narrow virtual surface at Low (0.4cm) and High (3.2m) virtual heights. Standing at virtual height increased fear and anxiety, and decreased confidence. Prior to perturbations, threat led to increased tonic muscle activity in tibialis anterior, resulting in a higher co-contraction index between lower leg muscles. For backward perturbations, muscle activity in the lower leg and arm, and center of pressure peak displacements, were earlier and larger when standing at virtual height. In addition, arm flexion significantly increased while leg, trunk and center of mass displacements remained unchanged across heights. When controlling for leaning, threat-related factors can influence the neuro-mechanical responses to an unpredictable perturbation, causing specific characteristics of postural reactions to be facilitated in young adults when their balance is threatened. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Non-Thermal Effects on CO-NO Surface Catalytic Reaction on Square Surface: Monte Carlo Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Khalid; A. U. Qaisrani; W. Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    @@ A Monte Carlo simulation of the CO-NO heterogeneous catalytic reaction over a square surface has already been studied with a model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism. The results of this study are well known. Here we study the effects of transient non-thermal mobility of monomer (CO) based on precursor mechanism, diffusion of adsorbed nitrogen and oxygen atoms, on the phase diagram. The interesting feature of this model is the yield of a steady reactiw window, while simple LH mechanism is not capable of producing a steady reactive state.

  14. Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions: NO reduction by CO or H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Álvarez-Falcón, L.; Vicente, L. [Departamento de Física y Química Teórica, Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Escolar s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México Distrito Federal (Mexico); Alas, S. J. [Departamento de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Av. Vasco de Quiroga 4871, Col. Santa Fe Cuajimalpa, 05348 México Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2014-01-14

    The development of surface science has given an opportunity to investigate the process of heterogeneous catalysis at a molecular level. In this way there has been a great progress in understanding the mechanism in NO decomposition. Modeling has been an very important tool in this goal. In this work we analyze the reactions NO+H{sub 2} and NO+CO. The extremely narrow production peak of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} which occurs in the reaction of NO+CO on Pt(100), a phenomenon known as “surface explosion,” is studied using a dynamic Monte Carlo method on a square lattice at low pressure under isothermal conditions. The catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by hydrogen over a Pt surface is also studied by using a dynamic Monte Carlo. Using a Langmuir-Hinshelwod mechanism of reaction, a simplified model with only four adsorbed species (NO, H, O, and N) is constructed. The effect on NO dissociation rate, the limiting step in the whole reaction, is inhibited by coadsorbed NO and H{sub 2} molecules, and is enhanced both by the presence of empty sites and adsorbed N atoms as nearest-neighbors. In these simulations experimental parameters values are included, such as: adsorption, desorption and diffusion of the reactants. The phenomenon is studied changing the temperature in the range of 300–550 K. The modeling reproduces well observed TPD and TPR experimental results and allows a visualization of the spatial development of the surface explosion.

  15. Stochastic Modeling of CO2 Migrations and Chemical Reactions in Deep Saline Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, C.; Lee, I.; Lin, C.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been recognized the feasible technology that can significant reduce the anthropogenic CO2 emissions from large point sources. The CO2 injection in geological formations is one of the options to permanently store the captured CO2. Based on this concept a large number of target formations have been identified and intensively investigated with different types of techniques such as the hydrogeophysical experiments or numerical simulations. The numerical simulations of CO2 migrations in saline formations recently gather much attention because a number of models are available for this purpose and there are potential sites existing in many countries. The lower part of Cholan Formation (CF) near Changhua Coastal Industrial Park (CCIP) in west central Taiwan was identified the largest potential site for CO2 sequestration. The top elevations of the KF in this area varies from 1300 to 1700m below the sea level. Laboratory experiment showed that the permeability of CF is 10-14 to 10-12 m2. Over the years the offshore seismic survey and limited onshore borehole logs have provided information for the simulation of CO2 migration in the CF although the original investigations might not focus on the purpose of CO2 sequestration. In this study we modify the TOUGHREACT model to consider the small-scale heterogeneity in target formation and the cap rock of upper CF. A Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) approach based on the TOUGHREACT model is employed to quantify the effect of small-scale heterogeneity on the CO2 migrations and hydrochemical reactions in the CF. We assume that the small-scale variability of permeability in KF can be described with a known Gaussian distribution. Therefore, the Gaussian type random field generator such as Sequential Gaussian Simulation (SGSIM) in Geostatistical Software Library (GSLIB) can be used to provide the random permeability realizations for the MCS. A variety of statistical parameters such as the variances and

  16. Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on surfaces of variable roughness and hydrophobicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Pillai, Saju; Iversen, Anders

    adhesion. Sol-gel technology and the recent availability of organic modified silicas have lead to development of hybrid organic/inorganic glass ceramic coatings with specialised surface properties. In this study we investigate bacterial adhesion and the subsequent biofilm formation on stainless steel (SS......L.Biofilm formation on surfaces in food production and processing can deteriorate the quality of food products and be a hazard to consumers. The food industry currently uses a number of approaches to either remove biofilm or prevent its formation. Due to the inherent resilience of bacteria...... in biofilm, a particularly attractive approach is the modification of surfaces with the aim to impede the first step in biofilm formation, namely bacterial adhesion. Surface properties such as hydrophobicity, roughness and predisposition for fouling by protein are recognised as important in bacterial...

  17. Phospholipid bilayer formation at a bare Si surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutberlet, T.; Steitz, R.; Fragneto, G.;

    2004-01-01

    Neutron reflectivity was applied to monitor in situ the adsorption of small unilamellar phospholipid vesicles on a solid bare hydrophilic Si interface. The obtained reflectivity curves are consistent with the rupture and fusion model for the adsorption of phosphatidylcholine vesicles to solid...... interfaces. The results show details of the adsorbed bilayer system at ångström resolution and indicate the presence of a thin ∼6 Å thick water leaflet that separates the bilayer from the Si surface. The resolved structural details provide the basis for further investigation of processes such as adsorption...

  18. Surface electronic structure and isomerization reactions of alkanes on some transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrib, A.; Logie, V.; Saurel, N.; Wehrer, P.; Hilaire, L.; Maire, G.

    1997-04-01

    XP spectra of some reduced transition metal oxides are presented. Different number of free nd,( n + 1)s valence electrons in each case could be observed by the presence of a certain density of states (DOS) at the Fermi-level in the valence band (VB) energy region of the XP spectrum. Catalytic isomerization reactions of 2-methylpentane yielding 3-methylpentane and n-hexane at 350°C have been observed on these reduced valence surface states. The bifunctionel mechanism in terms of metallic and acidic sites required for such reactions is proposed by considering the metallic properties of the rutile deformed structure through the C-axis in the case of MoO 2 and WO 2, while the oxygen atom(s) in the lattice structure exhibit Brönsted acidic properties. On the other hand, highly reduced or clean surfaces of these transition metals yield hydrogenolysis catalytic reactions for the same reactant with methane as the major product. In all cases, the exposure of the lower valence oxidation states of bulk transition metal oxides to air results in the surface partial oxidation to the stable oxides such as MoO 3, WO 3, V 2O 5 and Nb 2O 5.

  19. Optimization of reaction conditions for enzymatic synthesis of palm fatty hydrazides using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan Noor Maznee, T I; Hazimah, A H; Wan Zin, W Y

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of the enzymatic synthesis of palm fatty hydrazide by the response surface methodology (RSM) was conducted using the Design-Expert 6 software. The palm fatty hydrazide was synthesized from refined, bleached and deodorized palm olein (RBDPOo) and neutralized hydrazine monohydrate in the presence of Rhizomucor miehei lipase, Lipozyme RMIM, an immobilized lipase in n-hexane. The reaction conditions such as the percentage of enzyme, reaction temperature, stirring speed and reaction time were selected as independent variables or studied factors, while the amount of crude palm fatty hydrazide obtained was selected as a dependent variable or response. The study was conducted using a central composite design (CCD) at five coded levels and the experimental data were analyzed using a quadratic model. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicates that the model was significant at 95% confidence level with Prob>F of 0.0033, where the regression coefficient value, R² was 0.8415 and lack-of-fit of 0.0984. A percentage of enzyme of 6%, a reaction temperature of 40°C, a stirring speed of 350 rpm and a reaction time of 18 h were found to be the optimum conditions for the conversion of RBDPOo into palm fatty hydrazide.

  20. New surface treatment techniques against ice formation and growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megateli, R. [TechnoCentre eolien Gaspesie-les Iles, Murdochville, PQ (Canada). Centre CORUS

    2007-07-01

    The average wind speed in Murdochville, Quebec is 9 m/s, making it one of Canada's richest wind resource regions. As such, it is the site of a natural laboratory for the CORUS Center to study the North American climate and wind energy extraction. This presentation outlined research initiatives at CORUS, with particular reference to innovative treatments against ice accretion on wind turbine blades. Ice changes the aerodynamic profile of turbine blades, overloads the structure, increases vibrations and causes component wear. This results in loss of energy production, frequent failures, reduced service life and increased operating and maintenance costs. CORUS has been working on reducing ice accretion on blade surfaces without affecting the manufacturing process using ion implantation and UV rays irradiation. The ions used in the process are hydrogen, fluorine and argon. The technique modifies the surface chemical properties at the nano-scale depth level. This presentation provided details of the ion implantation procedure and the UV rays exposure procedure. An evaluation of wetting and water contact angles on blade samples was provided. Preliminary results showed that the high hysteresis of the non-treated samples had favourable conditions to ice adhesion. Argon implantation reduced the water contact angles and particularly hysteresis. Hydrogen implantation slightly increased the water contact angles and reduced the hysteresis. The process was beneficial in terms of service life. UV irradiation increased the hysteresis. figs.

  1. Formations of Bacteria-like Textures by dynamic reactions in Meteorite and Syntheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Y.

    2009-05-01

    fixings on iron plates at author's laboratory [4]. 5. Summary 1) Spherule- chained texture with Fe, Ni and Cl has been obtained at the fusion crust of the Kuga iron meteorite found in Japan. 2) As the Kuga iron meteorite is different with the Martian meteorite ALH84001 with composition and formation steps, bacteria-like texture of the Kuga meteorite is first significant example to form fossil-like texture by dynamic reaction of materials in the Solar System. Acknowledgements Author thanks to Dr. T. Kato, Yamaguchi University, for interpretation on bacteria-like texture. References: [1] Miura Y.(2008) 5th AOGS (Asia- Oceania Geosciences Society) Annual Meet. (Busan, Korea), CD#PS07- ST31-A22. [2] Miura Y.(2008). Meteoritics & Planetary Science (USA), 43-7, #5203. [3] McKay D.S. et al. (1996): Science, 273, 924-930. [4]Miura Y. (2009): 6th AGOS (submitted )

  2. Mechanisms and energetics of surface reactions at the copper-water interface. A critical literature review with implications for the debate on corrosion of copper in anoxic water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Adam Johannes; Brinck, Tore [Applied Physical Chemistry, KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    In order to make a critical analysis of the discussion of corrosion of copper in pure anoxic water it is necessary to understand the chemical reactivity at the copper-water interface. Even though the most fundamental issue, i.e. the nature and existence of a hypothetical product that is thermodynamically stable, is still under debate, it is clear that if anoxic corrosion really exists, it must be initiated through oxidative surface reactions at the copper-water interface. This report presents a survey of the peer reviewed literature on the reactivity of copper surfaces in water. Reactions discussed involve molecular adsorption of water, dissociation of the OH-bonds in adsorbed water molecules and hydroxyl groups, the disproportionation/synproportionation equilibrium between hydroxyl groups/hydroxide ions, water molecules and atomic oxygen, the surface diffusion of adsorbed species, and the formation of hydrogen gas (molecular hydrogen). Experimental, as well as theoretical (quantum chemical) studies are reviewed. It is concluded that a limited amount of hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) should be formed as the result of dissociative water adsorption at certain copper surfaces. Quantitative estimates of the amounts of H2 that could form at the copper-water interface are made. Assuming that the water-cleavage/hydrogen-formation reaction proceeds on an ideal [110] or [100] surface until a hydroxyl monolayer (ML) is reached, the amount of H{sub 2} formed is {approx} 2.4 ng cm{sup -2} copper surface. Based on the literature cited, this is most likely possible, thermodynamically as well as kinetically. Although not proven, it is not unlikely that the reaction can proceed until an oxide ML is formed, which would give 4.8 ng cm{sup -2}. If the formation of an oxide ML is thermodynamically feasible the surface will probably react further, since Cu{sub 2}O(s) is known to activate and cleave the water molecule when it adsorbs at the Cu{sub 2}O(s) surface. Assuming the formation of a

  3. Preparation and formation mechanisms of metallic particles with controlled size, shape, structure and surface functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu

    Due to their excellent conductivity and chemical stability, particles of silver (Ag), gold (Au), copper (Cu) and their alloys are widely used in the electronic industry. Other unique properties extend their uses to the biomedical, optical and catalysis fields. All of these applications rely on particles with well controlled size, morphology, structure, and surface properties. Chemical precipitation from homogeneous solutions was selected as the synthetic route for the investigations described in this work. Based on the evaluation of key process parameters (temperature, reactant concentrations, reactant addition rate, mixing, etc.) the general formation mechanisms of metallic particles in various selected precipitation systems were investigated and elucidated. Five different systems for preparing particles with controlled size, morphology, structure and surface functionality are discussed. The first system involves the precipitation of Ag nanoparticles with spherical and anisotropic (platy or fiber-like) morphology. It will be shown that the formation of a stable Ag/Daxad complex has a significant impact on the reaction kinetics, and that the chromonic properties of Daxad molecules are responsible for the particle anisotropy. In the second system, Au-Ag core-shell nanoparticles were prepared in aqueous solution by a two-step precipitation process. The optical properties of these particles can be tailored by varying the thickness of the Ag shell. It was also determined that the stability of the bimetallic metallic sols depends on the Cl-ion concentration in solution. The third system discussed deals with preparation by the polyol process of well dispersed Cu nanospheres with high crystallinity and excellent oxidation resistance. We show that the heterogeneous nucleation (seeding) approach has significant merit in controlling particle size and uniformity. The functionalization of Au nanoparticle surfaces with glutathione molecules is discussed in the next section. The

  4. Photo-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO) on protein surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusel, Hannah; Elshorbany, Yasin; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Selzle, Kathrin; Lelieveld, Jos; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang

    2014-05-01

    The study of nitrous acid (HONO) is of great interest, as the photolysis of HONO leads to the OH radical, which is the most important oxidant in the troposphere. HONO is directly emitted by combustion of fossil fuel and from soil biogenic nitrite (Su et al., 2011), and can also be formed by gas phase reactions of NO and OH and heterogeneous reactions of NO2. Previous atmospheric measurements have shown unexpectedly high HONO concentrations during daytime. Measured mixing ratios were about one order of magnitude higher than model simulations (Kleffmann et al. 2005, Vogel et al. 2003). The additional daytime source of HONO might be attributed to the photolysis of adsorbed nitric acid or heterogeneous photochemistry of NO2 on organic substrates, such as humic acids or polyphenolic compounds (Stemmler et al., 2006), or indirectly through nitration of phenols and subsequent photolysis of nitrophenols (Sosedova et al., 2011, Bejan et al., 2006). An important reactive surface for the heterogeneous formation of HONO could involve proteins, which are ubiquitous in the environment. They are part of coarse biological aerosol particles like pollen grains, fine particles (fragments of pollen, microorganism, plant debris) and dissolved in rainwater, soil and road dust (Miguel et al. 1999). In this project a thin film of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein with 67 kDa and 21 tyrosine residues per molecule, is irradiated and exposed to nitrogen dioxide in humidified nitrogen. The formation of HONO is measured with long path absorption photometry (LOPAP). The generated HONO is in the range of 100 to 1100 ppt depending on light intensity, NO2 concentration and film thickness. Light induced HONO formation on protein surfaces is stable over the 20-hours experiment of irradiation and exposure. On the other hand, light activated proteins reacting with NO2 form nitrated proteins, as detected by liquid chromatography (LC-DAD). Our experiments on tetranitromethane (TNM) nitrated

  5. Method and system for formation and withdrawal of a sample from a surface to be analyzed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2017-10-03

    A method and system for formation and withdrawal of a sample from a surface to be analyzed utilizes a collection instrument having a port through which a liquid solution is conducted onto the surface to be analyzed. The port is positioned adjacent the surface to be analyzed, and the liquid solution is conducted onto the surface through the port so that the liquid solution conducted onto the surface interacts with material comprising the surface. An amount of material is thereafter withdrawn from the surface. Pressure control can be utilized to manipulate the solution balance at the surface to thereby control the withdrawal of the amount of material from the surface. Furthermore, such pressure control can be coordinated with the movement of the surface relative to the port of the collection instrument within the X-Y plane.

  6. Theoretical study on the initial reaction mechanisms of ansa-metallocene zirconium precursor on hydroxylated Si(1 0 0) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangfen; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Shaowen

    2016-05-01

    The initial reaction mechanisms for depositing ZrO2 thin films using ansa-metallocene zirconium (Cp2CMe2)ZrMe2 precursor were studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The (Cp2CMe2)ZrMe2 precursor could be absorbed on the hydroxylated Si(1 0 0) surface via physisorption. Possible reaction pathways of (Cp2CMe2)ZrMe2 were proposed. For each reaction, the activation energies and reaction energies were compared, and stationary points along the reaction pathways were shown. In addition, the influence of dispersion effects on the reactions was evaluated by non-local dispersion corrected DFT calculations.

  7. Stochastic model for photoinduced surface relief grating formation through molecular transport in polymer films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan, M.; Plain, J.; Bachelot, R.; Royer, P.; Gray, S. K.; Wiederrecht, G. P.; Univ. de Technologie de Troyes

    2008-09-01

    We use a stochastic model to study photoinduced surface relief grating (SRG) formation due to molecular transport in azobenzene polymer films. The model is shown to reproduce the essential experimental features of SRG formation. In particular, it predicts SRG formation under both p and s polarizations, and the double peaked topographies that can occur at early times of the process. The evolving molecular positions and orientations during exposure are also followed, providing a useful mechanistic picture of SRG dynamics.

  8. Influence of culture heterogeneity in cell surface charge on adhesion and biofilm formation by Enterococcus faecalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Merode, Annet E.J.; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Krom, BP

    2006-01-01

    Biofilm formation is an increasing problem in medicine, due to the intrinsic resistance of microorganisms in the biofilm mode of growth against the host immune system and antimicrobial therapy. Adhesion is an important step in biofilm formation, influenced, among other factors, by the surface hydrop

  9. Divacancy binding energy, formation energy and surface energy of BCC transition metals using MEAM potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uniyal, Shweta; Chand, Manesh; Joshi, Subodh; Semalty, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    The modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential parameters have been employed to calculate the unrelaxed divacancy formation energy, binding energy and surface energies for low index planes in bcc transition metals. The calculated results of divacancy binding energy and vacancy formation energy compare well with experimental and other available calculated results.

  10. In vivo formation of Maillard reaction free radicals in mouse skin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lloyd, R V; Fong, A J; Sayre, R M

    2001-01-01

    The Maillard browning reaction between carbohydrates and amines is part of an extensive series of reactions that is the basis for the brown color caused by the "sunless tanning" agent dihydroxyacetone...

  11. Loading antifungal drugs onto silica particles grafted with cyclodextrins by means of inclusion complex formation at the solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hbaieb, Souhaira; Kalfat, Rafik; Chevalier, Yves

    2012-12-15

    Immobilization of antifungal drugs to solid particles has been addressed in order to limit the skin penetration to the skin surface during topical administration. Antifungal drug griseofulvin has been immobilized at the surface of silica particles by formation of its inclusion complex with β-cyclodextrins grafted to silica. A simple and fast process for loading griseofulvin into the hydrophobic cavity of cyclodextrins at the surface of the solid particles in aqueous suspension has been designed. It allowed the formation of the griseofulvin:cyclodextrin inclusion complex of 1:1 stoichiometry to completion. Grafting β-cyclodextrins to silica surface has been performed in a two-step procedure. The coupling agent 3-amino-propylmethyldiethoxysilane was reacted onto fumed silica particles as a first step. The second step was the reaction of grafted primary amino groups with tosylated β-cyclodextrin that led to β-cyclodextrin grafted silica. Loading griseofulvin onto grafted silica particles have been investigated by IR spectroscopy and by tracking possible crystals of griseofulvin in aqueous suspension by optical and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Successful formation of the inclusion complex at the surface of grafted silica suggested a strong adsorption of griseofulvin by means of heterogeneous nucleation of crystals, followed by inclusion complexation taking place between the partners being in close proximity at the surface of silica particles. The high adsorption capacity of CD-grafted silica for griseofulvin compared to bare silica and amino-grafted silica supports this interpretation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Kinetic modeling of Secondary Organic Aerosol formation: effects of particle- and gas-phase reactions of semivolatile products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. H. Chan

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The distinguishing mechanism of formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA is the partitioning of semivolatile hydrocarbon oxidation products between the gas and aerosol phases. While SOA formation is typically described in terms of partitioning only, the rate of formation and ultimate yield of SOA can also depend on the kinetics of both gas- and aerosol-phase processes. We present a general equilibrium/kinetic model of SOA formation that provides a framework for evaluating the extent to which the controlling mechanisms of SOA formation can be inferred from laboratory chamber data. With this model we examine the effect on SOA formation of gas-phase oxidation of first-generation products to either more or less volatile species, of particle-phase reaction (both first- and second-order kinetics, of the rate of parent hydrocarbon oxidation, and of the extent of reaction of the parent hydrocarbon. The effect of pre-existing organic aerosol mass on SOA yield, an issue of direct relevance to the translation of laboratory data to atmospheric applications, is examined. The importance of direct chemical measurements of gas- and particle-phase species is underscored in identifying SOA formation mechanisms.

  13. Kinetic modeling of secondary organic aerosol formation: effects of particle- and gas-phase reactions of semivolatile products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. H. Chan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The distinguishing mechanism of formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA is the partitioning of semivolatile hydrocarbon oxidation products between the gas and aerosol phases. While SOA formation is typically described in terms of partitioning only, the rate of formation and ultimate yield of SOA can also depend on the kinetics of both gas- and aerosol-phase processes. We present a general equilibrium/kinetic model of SOA formation that provides a framework for evaluating the extent to which the controlling mechanisms of SOA formation can be inferred from laboratory chamber data. With this model we examine the effect on SOA formation of gas-phase oxidation of first-generation products to either more or less volatile species, of particle-phase reaction (both first- and second-order kinetics, of the rate of parent hydrocarbon oxidation, and of the extent of reaction of the parent hydrocarbon. The effect of pre-existing organic aerosol mass on SOA yield, an issue of direct relevance to the translation of laboratory data to atmospheric applications, is examined. The importance of direct chemical measurements of gas- and particle-phase species is underscored in identifying SOA formation mechanisms.

  14. Reaction of Ynamides with Iminoiodinane-Derived Nitrenes: Formation of Oxazolones and Polyfunctionalized Oxazolidinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Rodriguez, Romain; Grelier, Gwendal; Habert, Loïc; Retailleau, Pascal; Darses, Benjamin; Gillaizeau, Isabelle; Dauban, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    This article describes the reaction of ynamides with metallanitrenes generated in the presence of an iodine(III) oxidant. N-(Boc)-Ynamides are converted to oxazolones via a cyclization reaction. The reaction is mediated by a catalytic dirhodium-bound nitrene species that first behaves as a Lewis acid. The oxazolones can be converted in a one pot manner to functionalized oxazolidinones following a regio- and stereoselective oxyamination reaction with the same nitrene reagent generated in stoichiometric amounts.

  15. An investigation on the formation mechanism of nano ZrB{sub 2} powder by a magnesiothermic reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalaly, M., E-mail: maisam_jalaly@iust.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Narmak, Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bafghi, M.Sh.; Tamizifar, M. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Narmak, Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gotor, F.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-US), Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2014-03-05

    Highlights: • Synthesis of zirconium diboride by magnesiothermic reduction. • Using high energy ball milling to perform mechanochemical reactions. • Study of mechanism of ZrB{sub 2} synthesis by studying subreactions and thermal analysis. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline zirconium diboride (ZrB{sub 2}) powder was produced by mechanochemistry from the magnesiothermic reduction in the Mg/ZrO{sub 2}/B{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. The use of high-energy milling conditions was essential to induce a mechanically induced self-sustaining reaction (MSR) and significantly reduce the milling time required for complete conversion. Under these conditions, it was found that the ignition time for ZrB{sub 2} formation was only about a few minutes. In this study, the mechanism for the formation of ZrB{sub 2} in this system was determined by studying the relevant sub-reactions, the effect of stoichiometry, and the thermal behavior of the system.

  16. The C(3P) + NH3 reaction in interstellar chemistry: I. Investigation of the product formation channels

    CERN Document Server

    Bourgalais, Jeremy; Kailasanathan, Ranjith Kumar Abhinavam; Osborn, David L; Hickson, Kevin M; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Goulay, Fabien; Picard, Sébastien D Le

    2016-01-01

    The product formation channels of ground state carbon atoms, C(3P), reacting with ammonia, NH3, have been investigated using two complementary experiments and electronic structure calculations. Reaction products are detected in a gas flow tube experiment (330 K, 4 Torr) using tunable VUV photoionization coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry. Temporal profiles of the species formed and photoionization spectra are used to identify primary products of the C + NH3 reaction. In addition, H-atom formation is monitored by VUV laser induced fluorescence from room temperature to 50 K in a supersonic gas flow generated by the Laval nozzle technique. Electronic structure calculations are performed to derive intermediates, transition states and complexes formed along the reaction coordinate. The combination of photoionization and laser induced fluorescence experiments supported by theoretical calculations indicate that in the temperature and pressure range investigated, the H + H2CN production channel represents ...

  17. Formation of small-scale magnetic elements: surface mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Gadun, A S; Solanki, S K; 10.3103/50884591305030022

    2012-01-01

    We present the first results of a two-dimensional MHD simulation of the solar magnetogranulation. The medium was assumed to be compressible, gravitationally stratified, radiatively coupl