WorldWideScience

Sample records for formation reactions surface

  1. Fluctuation-Induced Pattern Formation in a Surface Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starke, Jens; Reichert, Christian; Eiswirth, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous nucleation, pulse formation, and propagation failure have been observed experimentally in CO oxidation on Pt(110) at intermediate pressures ($\\approx 10^{-2}$mbar). This phenomenon can be reproduced with a stochastic model which includes temperature effects. Nucleation occurs randomly...... due to fluctuations in the reaction processes, whereas the subsequent damping out essentially follows the deterministic path. Conditions for the occurence of stochastic effects in the pattern formation during CO oxidation on Pt are discussed....

  2. Formation of porous surface layers in reaction bonded silicon nitride during processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, N. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Microstructural examination of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has shown that there is often a region adjacent to the as-nitrided surfaces that is even more porous than the interior of this already quite porous material. Because this layer of large porosity is considered detrimental to both the strength and oxidation resistance of RBSN, a study was undertaken to determine if its formation could be prevented during processing. All test bars studied were made from a single batch of Si powder which was milled for 4 hours in heptane in a vibratory mill using high density alumina cylinders as the grinding media. After air drying the powder, bars were compacted in a single acting die and hydropressed.

  3. Formation of poorly crystalline iron monosulfides: Surface redox reactions on high purity iron, spectroelectrochemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, E.B. [Geological Institute, University of Copenhagen, Oster Voldgade 10, Copenhagen K, DK-1350 (Denmark); Odziemkowski, M.S. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., N2L 3G1 (Canada)]. E-mail: marek@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca; Gillham, R.W. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2006-11-15

    In the use of iron for reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents in ground water, due to presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria the formation of hydrogen sulfide is expected. To simulate those processes the interface between 99.99% pure iron and 0.1 M NaHCO{sub 3} deoxygenated solution with 3.1 x 10{sup -5}-7.8 x 10{sup -3} M Na{sub 2}S . 9H{sub 2}O added was studied. The surface processes were characterised by the in situ normal Raman spectroscopy (NRS) and ex situ techniques; X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The open circuit potential (OCP) was monitored during in situ NRS measurements, and potentiodynamic anodic polarization measurements were carried out to reveal electrochemical behaviour of iron electrode. Open circuit potential-time transients indicated that the native oxide is unstable in deaerated bicarbonate solution and undergoes reductive dissolution (i.e. autoreduction) leaving the metallic Fe covered by Fe(OH){sub 2}, adsorbed OH{sup -}, and patches of 'magnetite-like' oxide. Immediately upon injection of the Na{sub 2}S-solution the iron interface undergoes complex redox surface processes and a poorly crystalline FeS film forms. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization measurements indicated a mechanical breakdown of the FeS film. The origin and initiation of this breakdown process is not clear but is probably a result of internal stress developed during film growth. Based on surface studies supported by electrochemical measurements, a conceptual model for the complex redox processes occurring at the iron interface is proposed. This model describes the structural development of a poorly crystalline FeS, which breaks down, allowing further dissolution of the Fe and formation of FeOOH at the interface. Simultaneously and despite the existence of thick layer of FeS the entrance of hydrogen was evident as the typical hydrogen cracks in bulk of the

  4. Reaction kinetic model of the surface-mediated formation of PCDD/F from pyrolysis of 2-chlorophenol on a CuP/Silica suface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomnicki, S.; Khachatryan, L.; Dellinger, B. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2004-09-15

    One of the major challenges in developing predictive models of the surface mediated pollutant formation and fuel combustion is the construction of reliable reaction kinetic mechanisms and models. While the homogeneous, gas-phase chemistry of various light fuels such as hydrogen and methane is relatively well-known large uncertainties exist in the reaction paths of surface mediated reaction mechanisms for even these very simple species. To date, no detailed kinetic consideration of the surface mechanisms of formation of complex organics such as PCDD/F have been developed. In addition to the complexity of the mechanism, a major difficulty is the lack of reaction kinetic parameters (pre-exponential factor and activation energy) of surface reactions, Consequently, numerical studies of the surface-mediated formation of PCDD/F have often been incorporated only a few reactions. We report the development of a numerical multiple-step surface model based on experimental data of surface mediated (5% CuO/SiO2) conversion of 2-monochlorphenol (2-MCP) to PCDD/F under pyrolytic or oxidative conditions. A reaction kinetic model of the catalytic conversion of 2-MCP on the copper oxide catalyst under pyrolytic conditions was developed based on a detailed multistep surface reaction mechanism developed in our laboratory. The performance of the chemical model is assessed by comparing the numerical predictions with experimental measurements. SURFACE CHEMKIN (version 3.7.1) software was used for modeling. Our results confirm the validity of previously published mechanism of the reaction and provides new insight concerning the formation of PCDD/F formation in combustion processes. This model successfully explains the high yields of PCDD/F at low temperatures that cannot be explained using a purely gas-phase mode.

  5. Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot: The roles of relative humidity and surface composition of soot in surface sulfate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Jinzhu; Ma, Qingxin; He, Hong

    2017-03-01

    The conversion of SO2 to sulfates on the surface of soot is still poorly understood. Soot samples with different fractions of unsaturated hydrocarbons and oxygen-containing groups were prepared by combusting n-hexane under well-controlled conditions. The heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot was investigated using in situ attenuated total internal reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, ion chromatography (IC) and a flow tube reactor at the ambient pressure and relative humidity (RH). Water promoted SO2 adsorption and sulfate formation at the RH range from 6% to 70%, while exceeded water condensed on soot was unfavorable for sulfate formation due to inhibition of SO2 adsorption when RH was higher than 80%. The surface composition of soot, which was governed by combustion conditions, also played an important role in the heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot. This effect was found to greatly depend on RH. At low RH of 6%, soot with the highest fuel/oxygen ratio of 0.162 exhibited a maximum uptake capacity for SO2 because it contained a large amount of aromatic Csbnd H groups, which acted as active sites for SO2 adsorption. At RH of 54%, soot produced with a fuel/oxygen ratio of 0.134 showed the highest reactivity toward SO2 because it contained appropriate amounts of aromatic Csbnd H groups and oxygen-containing groups, subsequently leading to the optimal surface concentrations of both SO2 and water. These results suggest that variation in the surface composition of soot from different sources and/or resulting from chemical aging in the atmosphere likely affects the conversion of SO2 to sulfates.

  6. HBr Formation from the Reaction between Gas-phase Bromine Atom and Vibrationally Excited Chemisorbed Hydrogen Atoms on a Si(001)-(2 x 1) Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ree, J.; Yoon, S. H.; Park, K. G.; Kim, Y. H.

    2004-01-01

    We have calculated the probability of HBr formation and energy disposal of the reaction exothermicity in HBr produced from the reaction of gas-phase bromine with highly covered chemisorbed hydrogen atoms on a Si (001)-(2 x 1) surface. The reaction probability is about 0.20 at gas temperature 1500 K and surface temperature 300 K. Raising the initial vibrational state of the adsorbate(H)-surface(Si) bond from the ground to v = 1, 2 and 3 states causes the vibrational, translational and rotational energies of the product HBr to increase equally. However, the vibrational and translational motions of product HBr share most of the reaction energy. Vibrational population of the HBr molecules produced from the ground state adsorbate-surface bond (vHSi = 0) follows the Boltzmann distribution, but it deviates seriously from the Boltzmann distribution when the initial vibrational energy of the adsorbate-surface bond increases. When the vibration of the adsorbate-surface bond is in the ground state, the amount of energy dissipated into the surface is negative, while it becomes positive as vHSi increases. The energy distributions among the various modes weakly depends on surface temperature in the range of 0-600 K, regardless of the initial vibrational state of H(ad)-Si(s) bond

  7. Modeling of pollutant formation in fully premixing surface burners using a verified practice-oriented experimental reaction-kinetic calculation method. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruy, C.; Kremer, H.

    1996-01-01

    The intent of the present study was to simulate quantitatively pollutant formation in premixing surface burners and to describe qualitatively the share of the premixing flame in pollut emissions from atmospheric burners. For this purpose reaction-kinetic programmes for one-dimensional premixing flames were extended by a terms describing heat discharge through gas radiation. Furthermore, the calculation range for the flame was extended far into the secondary reaction zone. Temperature, CO, and NO x profiles were measured in the secondary reaction zone of premixing burners at standard pressure. The air-fuel ratio was calculated within the practically relevant range between 0.5 and 1.5, as was load behaviour. (DG) [de

  8. Surface compounds and the routes of formation of the reaction products in the interaction of propylene with zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydov, A.A.; Yefremov, A.A.; Mikhalchenko, V.G.; Sokolovskii, V.D.

    1979-06-15

    Temperature programed desorption of propylene and allyl bromide from zinc oxide in the absence and presence of oxygen and an IR spectroscopic study of the adsorbed allyl bromide showed that propylene chemisorbed reversibly as a m-allyl species which may undergo dimerization at higher pressures or temperatures but does not form acrolein because the necessary electron transfer does not proceed on the n-type zinc oxide; that propylene also forms carbon dioxide and water via carbonate/carboxylate intermediates; and that the allyl bromide, which forms cations on the zinc oxide surface, is oxidized to acrolein.

  9. Physics of positronium acceptor complex formation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangopadhyay, Debarshi; Ganguly, Bichitra Nandi; Mukherjee, Tapas; Dutta-Roy, Binayak

    2002-01-01

    Positronium (P s ) reaction rates (κ) with weak Acceptors (Ac) leading to the formation of Ps-Ac complexes show several interesting features: non-monotonic temperature dependence of κ(departing from the usual Arrhenius behaviour), considerable variability of κ with respect to different solvents, and anomalies in response to external pressure at ambient temperature. The object of this work is to explain all these phenomena using a remarkably simple bubble model (the widely used model for the pick-off component of ortho-positronium decay in liquids), which has been revisited several times in the context and as a result smooth diffuse boundary of the bubble was suggested that yields reasonable agreement of the experimental data. The contractile force on the bubble relies much on the surface tension of the liquid, through our calculation the notion of critical surface tension emerges and enables us to explain the experimental observations satisfactorily. (author)

  10. Spur Reaction Model of Positronium Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.

    1974-01-01

    A new model of positronium (Ps) formation is proposed. Positronium is assumed to be formed by a reaction between a positron and an electron in the positron spur. Ps formation must compete with electron‐ion recombination and electron or positron reactions with solvent molecules and scavenger...

  11. Heterogeneous reactions between ions NH3+and NH+andhydrocarbons adsorbed on a tungsten surface.Formation of HCN+in NH+-surface hydrocarbon collisions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harnisch, M.; Scheier, P.; Herman, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 392, DEC 2015 (2015), s. 139-144 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : ion-surface collisions * NH3+ and NH+projectiles * surface hydrocarbons Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  12. CHEMICAL REACTIONS ON ADSORBING SURFACE: KINETIC LEVEL OF DESCRIPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P.Kostrobii

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the effective Hubbard model we suggest a statistical description of reaction-diffusion processes for bimolecular chemical reactions of gas particles adsorbed on the metallic surface. The system of transport equations for description of particles diffusion as well as reactions is obtained. We carry out the analysis of the contributions of all physical processes to the formation of diffusion coefficients and chemical reactions constants.

  13. Difference in surface reactions between titanium and zirconium in Hanks' solution to elucidate mechanism of calcium phosphate formation on titanium using XPS and cathodic polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Y.; Nishimura, D.; Doi, H.; Nomura, N.; Hanawa, T.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium were immersed in Hanks' solution with and without calcium and phosphate ions, and the surfaces were characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine the mechanism of calcium phosphate formation on titanium in simulated body fluids and in a living body. In addition, they were cathodically polarized in the above solutions. XPS characterization and cathodic polarization revealed differences in the surface properties in the ability of calcium phosphate formation between titanium and zirconium. The surface oxide film on titanium is not completely oxidized and is relatively reactive; that on zirconium is more passive and protective than that on titanium. Neither calcium nor phosphate stably exists alone on titanium, and calcium phosphate is naturally formed on it; calcium phosphate formed on titanium is stable and protective. On the other hand, calcium is never incorporated on zirconium, while zirconium phosphate, which is easily formed on zirconium, is highly stable and protective. Our study presents new information regarding the surface property of titanium and demonstrates that the characteristics of titanium and zirconium may be applied to various medical devices and new surface modification techniques.

  14. Reaction Mechanisms for the Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 to CO and Formate on the Cu(100) Surface at 298K from Quantum Mechanics Free Energy Calculations with Explicit Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Xiao, Hai; Goddard, William A

    2016-10-11

    Copper is the only elemental metal that reduces a significant fraction of CO 2 to hydrocarbons and alcohols, but the atomistic reaction mechanism that controls the product distributions are not known because it has not been possible to detect the reaction intermediates on the electrode surface experimentally, or carry out Quantum Mechanics (QM) calculations with a realistic description of the electrolyte (water). Here, we carry out Quantum Mechanics (QM) calculations with an explicit description of water on the Cu(100) surface (experimentally shown to be stable under CO2RR conditions) to examine the initial reaction pathways to form CO and formate (HCOO - ) from CO 2 through free energy calculations at 298K and pH 7. We find that CO formation proceeds from physisorbed CO 2 to chemisorbed CO 2 (*CO 2 δ- ), with a free energy barrier of ΔG ‡ =0.43 eV, the rate determining step (RDS). The subsequent barriers of protonating *CO 2 δ- to form COOH* and then dissociating COOH* to form *CO are 0.37 eV and 0.30 eV, respectively. HCOO - formation proceeds through a very different pathway in which physisorbed CO 2 reacts directly with a surface H* (along with electron transfer), leading to ΔG ‡ = 0.80 eV. Thus, the competition between CO formation and HCOO - formation occurs in the first electron transfer step. On Cu(100), the RDS for CO formation is lower, making CO the predominant product. Thus, to alter the product distribution we need to control this first step of CO 2 binding, which might involve alloying or changing the structure at the nanoscale.

  15. Surface-Activated Coupling Reactions Confined on a Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Liu, Pei Nian; Lin, Nian

    2015-10-20

    Chemical reactions may take place in a pure phase of gas or liquid or at the interface of two phases (gas-solid or liquid-solid). Recently, the emerging field of "surface-confined coupling reactions" has attracted intensive attention. In this process, reactants, intermediates, and products of a coupling reaction are adsorbed on a solid-vacuum or a solid-liquid interface. The solid surface restricts all reaction steps on the interface, in other words, the reaction takes place within a lower-dimensional, for example, two-dimensional, space. Surface atoms that are fixed in the surface and adatoms that move on the surface often activate the surface-confined coupling reactions. The synergy of surface morphology and activity allow some reactions that are inefficient or prohibited in the gas or liquid phase to proceed efficiently when the reactions are confined on a surface. Over the past decade, dozens of well-known "textbook" coupling reactions have been shown to proceed as surface-confined coupling reactions. In most cases, the surface-confined coupling reactions were discovered by trial and error, and the reaction pathways are largely unknown. It is thus highly desirable to unravel the mechanisms, mechanisms of surface activation in particular, of the surface-confined coupling reactions. Because the reactions take place on surfaces, advanced surface science techniques can be applied to study the surface-confined coupling reactions. Among them, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are the two most extensively used experimental tools. The former resolves submolecular structures of individual reactants, intermediates, and products in real space, while the latter monitors the chemical states during the reactions in real time. Combination of the two methods provides unprecedented spatial and temporal information on the reaction pathways. The experimental findings are complemented by theoretical modeling. In particular, density

  16. Influence of phase transition on pattern formation during catalytic reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Roberto Fernandes Silva; Lima, D.; Cunha, F. B.

    2000-01-01

    p.434–445 We investigate the influence of the order of surface phase transitions on pattern formation during chemical reaction on mono-crystal catalysts. We use a model consisting of two partial differential equations, one of which describes the dynamics of the surface state with the help of a Ginzburg–Landau potential. Second- or first-order transitions are described by decreasing or increasing the relative value of the third-order coefficient of the potential. We concentrate on the stabi...

  17. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, Hans-Joachim [Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany). Fritz-Haber-Inst.

    2003-02-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Holiday Inn, Ventura, California, 2/16-21/03. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  18. Specifications for surface reaction analysis apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraoka, Yuden; Yoshigoe, Akitaka

    2001-03-01

    A surface reaction analysis apparatus was installed at the JAERI soft x-ray beamline in the SPring-8 as an experimental end-station for the study of surface chemistry. The apparatus is devoted to the study concerning the influence of translational kinetic energy of incident molecules to chemical reactions on solid surfaces with gas molecules. In order to achieve the research purpose, reactive molecular scattering experiments and photoemission spectroscopic measurements using synchrotron radiation are performed in that apparatus via a supersonic molecular beam generator, an electron energy analyzer and a quadrupole mass analyzer. The detail specifications for the apparatus are described in this report. (author)

  19. Low Energy Nuclear Reaction Products at Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, David J.

    2008-03-01

    This paper examines the evidence for LENR occurring on or very near to the surface of materials. Several types of experimental indications for LENR surface reactions have been reported and will be reviewed. LENR result in two types of products, energy and the appearance of new elements. The level of instantaneous power production can be written as the product of four factors: (1) the total area of the surface on which the reactions can occur, (2) the fraction of the area that is active at any time, (3) the reaction rate, that is, the number of reactions per unit active area per second, and (4) the energy produced per reaction. Each of these factors, and their limits, are reviewed. A graphical means of relating these four factors over their wide variations has been devised. The instantaneous generation of atoms of new elements can also be written as the product of the first three factors and the new elemental mass produced per reaction. Again, a graphical means of presenting the factors and their results over many orders of magnitude has been developed.

  20. Supersonic molecular beam experiments on surface chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Michio

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of a molecule and a surface is important in various fields, and in particular in complex systems like biomaterials and their related chemistry. However, the detailed understanding of the elementary steps in the surface chemistry, for example, stereodynamics, is still insufficient even for simple model systems. In this Personal Account, I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams demonstrate a significant role of the translational energy of the incident molecules. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths specific for the hyperthermal energy region, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. On the other hand, oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility of understanding surface chemical reactions in detail by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for finely monitoring the elementary step of the surface chemical reactions and creating new materials on surfaces. Copyright © 2014 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Basic reactions of osteoblasts on structured material surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Meyer

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess how bone substitute materials determine bone formation in vivo it is useful to understand the mechanisms of the material surface/tissue interaction on a cellular level. Artificial materials are used in two applications, as biomaterials alone or as a scaffold for osteoblasts in a tissue engineering approach. Recently, many efforts have been undertaken to improve bone regeneration by the use of structured material surfaces. In vitro studies of bone cell responses to artificial materials are the basic tool to determine these interactions. Surface properties of materials surfaces as well as biophysical constraints at the biomaterial surface are of major importance since these features will direct the cell responses. Studies on osteoblast-like cell reactivity towards materials will have to focus on the different steps of protein and cell reactions towards defined surface properties. The introduction of new techniques allows nowadays the fabrication of materials with ordered surface structures. This paper gives a review of present knowledge on the various stages of osteoblast reactions on material surfaces, focused on basic cell events under in vitro conditions. Special emphasis is given to cellular reactions towards ordered nano-sized topographies.

  2. Ozone-surface reactions in five homes: surface reaction probabilities, aldehyde yields, and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Morrison, G

    2010-06-01

    Field experiments were conducted in five homes during three seasons (summer 2005, summer 2006 and winter 2007) to quantify ozone-initiated secondary aldehyde yields, surface reaction probabilities, and trends any temporal over a 1.5-year interval. Surfaces examined include living room carpets, bedroom carpets, kitchen floors, kitchen counters, and living room walls. Reaction probabilities for all surfaces for all seasons ranged from 9.4 x 10(-8) to 1.0 x 10(-4). There were no significant temporal trends in reaction probabilities for any surfaces from summer 2005 to summer 2006, nor over the entire 1.5-year period, indicating that it may take significantly longer than this period for surfaces to exhibit any 'ozone aging' or lowering of ozone-surface reactivity. However, all surfaces in three houses exhibited a significant decrease in reaction probabilities from summer 2006 to winter 2007. The total yield of aldehydes for the summer of 2005 were nearly identical to that for summer of 2006, but were significantly higher than for winter 2007. We also observed that older carpets were consistently less reactive than in newer carpets, but that countertops remained consistently reactive, probably because of occupant activities such as cooking and cleaning. Ozone reactions taking place at indoor surfaces significantly influence personal exposure to ozone and volatile reaction products. These field studies show that indoor surfaces only slowly lose their ability to react with ozone over several year time frames, and that this is probably because of a combination of large reservoirs of reactive coatings and periodic additions of reactive coatings in the form of cooking, cleaning, and skin-oil residues. When considering exposure to ozone and its reaction products and in the absence of dramatic changes in occupancy, activities or furnishings, indoor surface reactivity is expected to change very slowly.

  3. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria can attach to any surface in contact with water and proliferate into complex communities enclosed in an adhesive matrix, these communities are called biofilms. The matrix makes the biofilm difficult to remove by physical means, and bacteria in biofilm can survive treatment with many...

  4. Reactions between monolayer Fe and Si(001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, M; Kobayashi, N; Hayashi, N [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Reactions between 1.5 monolayer(ML) Fe deposited on Si(001)-2x1 and -dihydride surfaces were studied in situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction and time-of-flight ion scattering spectrometry with the use of 25 keV H ions. The reactions between Fe and Si which were successively deposited on Si(001)-dihydride surface were also studied. After the room temperature deposition Fe reacted with Si(001)-2x1 substrate resulting in the formation of polycrystalline Fe5Si3. By annealing to 560-650degC composite heteroepitaxial layer of both type A and type B {beta}-FeSi2 was formed. On the dihydride surface polycrystalline Fe was observed after 1.5ML Fe deposition at room temperature, and reaction between Fe and Si(001)-dihydride surface is not likely at room temperature. We observed 3D rough surface when we deposited only Fe layer on the dihydride surface and annealed above 700degC. The hydrogen termination of Si(001) surface prevents the deposited Fe from diffusing into the substrate below 500degC, however the annealing above 710degC leads to the diffusion. We obtained 2D ordered surface, which showed 3x3 RHEED pattern as referenced to the primitive unreconstructed Si(001) surface net, when we deposited 2.5ML Fe and 5.8ML Si successively onto Si(001)-dihydride surface and annealed to 470degC. (author)

  5. The formation reaction of calcium hexa-aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuganova, S.Kh.; Sirajiddinov, N.A.

    1990-01-01

    The formation reaction of CaAl 12 O 19 at interaction of calcium oxide and aluminium in solid form has been studied. Some physical-chemical characteristics of calcium hexa-aluminate are given. (author)

  6. Pattern formation in reaction diffusion systems with finite geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzi, C.; Wio, H.

    1990-04-01

    We analyze the one-component, one-dimensional, reaction-diffusion equation through a simple inverse method. We confine the system and fix the boundary conditions as to induce pattern formation. We analyze the stability of those patterns. Our goal is to get information about the reaction term out of the preknowledgment of the pattern. (author). 5 refs

  7. Formation of flavour compounds in the Maillard reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of the Maillard reaction for food quality and focuses on flavour compound formation. The most important classes of Maillard flavour compounds are indicated and it is shown where they are formed in the Maillard reaction. Some emphasis is given on the kinetics of

  8. Silver-Palladium Surfaces Inhibit Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Schroll, Casper; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2009-01-01

    Undesired biofilm formation is a major concern in many areas. In the present study, we investigated biofilm-inhibiting properties of a silver-palladium surface that kills bacteria by generating microelectric fields and electrochemical redox processes. For evaluation of the biofilm inhibition...... efficacy and study of the biofilm inhibition mechanism, the silver-sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and the silver-resistant E. coli J53[pMG101] strains were used as model organisms, and batch and flow chamber setups were used as model systems. In the case of the silver-sensitive strain, the silver......-palladium surfaces killed the bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low or high bacterial load. In the case of the silver-resistant strain, the silver-palladium surfaces killed surface-associated bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low bacterial load, whereas under...

  9. Evaporation rates and surface profiles on heterogeneous surfaces with mass transfer and surface reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M; Schmidt, L D

    1979-01-01

    Simple models incorporating surface reaction and diffusion of volatile products through a boundary layer are developed to calculate effective rates of evaporation and local surface profiles on surfaces having active and inactive regions. The coupling between surface heterogeneities with respect to a particular reaction and external mass transfer may provide a mechanism for the surface rearrangement and metal loss encountered in several catalytic systems of practical interest. Calculated transport rates for the volatilization of platinum in oxidizing environments and the rearrangement of this metal during the ammonia oxidation reaction agree well with published experimental data.

  10. Reaction and Aggregation Dynamics of Cell Surface Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michelle Dong

    This dissertation is composed of both theoretical and experimental studies of cell surface receptor reaction and aggregation. Project I studies the reaction rate enhancement due to surface diffusion of a bulk dissolved ligand with its membrane embedded target, using numerical calculations. The results show that the reaction rate enhancement is determined by ligand surface adsorption and desorption kinetic rates, surface and bulk diffusion coefficients, and geometry. In particular, we demonstrate that the ligand surface adsorption and desorption kinetic rates, rather than their ratio (the equilibrium constant), are important in rate enhancement. The second and third projects are studies of acetylcholine receptor clusters on cultured rat myotubes using fluorescence techniques after labeling the receptors with tetramethylrhodamine -alpha-bungarotoxin. The second project studies when and where the clusters form by making time-lapse movies. The movies are made from overlay of the pseudocolored total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) images of the cluster, and the schlieren images of the cell cultures. These movies are the first movies made using TIRF, and they clearly show the cluster formation from the myoblast fusion, the first appearance of clusters, and the eventual disappearance of clusters. The third project studies the fine structural features of individual clusters observed under TIRF. The features were characterized with six parameters by developing a novel fluorescence technique: spatial fluorescence autocorrelation. These parameters were then used to study the feature variations with age, and with treatments of drugs (oligomycin and carbachol). The results show little variation with age. However, drug treatment induced significant changes in some parameters. These changes were different for oligomycin and carbachol, which indicates that the two drugs may eliminate clusters through different mechanisms.

  11. EXFOR Systems Manual Nuclear reaction Data Exchange Format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    2000-01-01

    EXFOR is an exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. This document has been written for use by the members of the Network and includes matters of procedure and protocol, as well as detailed rules for the compilation of data. Users may prefer to consult EXFOR Basics' for a brief description of the format

  12. EXFOR SYSTEMS MANUAL NUCLEAR REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    EXFOR is an exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. This document has been written for use by the members of the Network and includes matters of procedure and protocol, as well as detailed rules for the compilation of data. Users may prefer to consult EXFOR Basics' for a brief description of the format.

  13. Pd-catalyzed coupling reaction on the organic monolayer: Sonogashira reaction on the silicon (1 1 1) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Mengnan; Zhang Yuan; He Jinmei; Cao Xiaoping; Zhang Junyan

    2008-01-01

    Iodophenyl-terminated organic monolayers were prepared by thermally induced hydrosilylation on hydrogen-terminated silicon (1 1 1) surfaces. The films were characterized by ellipsometry, contact-angle goniometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). To modify the surface chemistry and the structure of the monolayers, the Sonogashira coupling reaction was performed on the as-prepared monolayers. The iodophenyl groups on the film surfaces reacted with 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene or the 1-chloro-4-ethynylbenzene under the standard Sonogashira reaction conditions for attaching conjugated molecules via the formation of C-C bonds. It is expected that this surface coupling reaction will present a new method to modify the surface chemistry and the structure of monolayers

  14. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum energy path for the addition of a hydrogen atom to N2 is characterized in CASSCF/CCI calculations using the (4s3p2d1f/3s2p1d) basis set, with additional single point calculations at the stationary points of the potential energy surface using the (5s4p3d2f/4s3p2d) basis set. These calculations represent the most extensive set of ab initio calculations completed to date, yielding a zero point corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation of approx. 8.5 kcal mol/1. The lifetime of the HN2 species is estimated from the calculated geometries and energetics using both conventional Transition State Theory and a method which utilizes an Eckart barrier to compute one dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling effects. It is concluded that the lifetime of the HN2 species is very short, greatly limiting its role in both termolecular recombination reactions and combustion processes.

  15. Photocatalytic surface reactions on indoor wall paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salthammer, T; Fuhrmann, F

    2007-09-15

    The reduction of indoor air pollutants by air cleaning systems has received considerable interest, and a number of techniques are now available. So far, the method of photocatalysis was mainly applied by use of titanium dioxide (TiO2) in flow reactors under UV light of high intensity. Nowadays, indoor wall paints are equipped with modified TiO2 to work as a catalyst under indoor daylight or artificial light. In chamber experiments carried out under indoor related conditions itwas shown thatthe method works for nitrogen dioxide with air exchange and for formaldehyde without air exchange at high concentrations. In further experiments with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a small effect was found for terpenoids with high kOH rate constants. For other VOCs and carbon monoxide there was no degradation at all or the surface acted as a reversible sink. Secondary emissions from the reaction of paint constituents were observed on exposure to light. From the results it is concluded that recipes of photocatalytic wall paints need to be optimized for better efficiency under indoor conditions.

  16. Surface chemical reactions probed with scanning force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werts, M.P L; van der Vegte, E.W.; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    In this letter we report the study of surface chemical reactions with scanning force microscopy (SFM) with chemical specificity. Using chemically modified SFM probes, we can determine the local surface reaction conversion during a chemical surface modification. The adhesion forces between a

  17. Formation of phosphonates and pyrophosphates in the reactions of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bu-4-Me-C6H2O)2P(O)]2O (8) could be isolated, although the reaction mixture showed several other compounds in the phosphorus NMR. A possible pathway for the formation of phosphonate salts is proposed. The X-ray crystal structures of 4, ...

  18. Formation of hollow atoms above a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Jean Pierre; Phaneuf, Ronald; Terracol, Stephane; Xie, Zuqi

    2012-06-01

    Slow highly stripped ions approaching or penetrating surfaces are known to capture electrons into outer shells of the ions, leaving the innermost shells empty, and forming hollow atoms. Electron capture occurs above and below the surfaces. The existence of hollow atoms below surfaces e.g. Ar atoms whose K and L shells are empty, with all electrons lying in the M and N shells, was demonstrated in 1990 [1]. At nm above surfaces, the excited ions may not have enough time to decay before hitting the surfaces, and the formation of hollow atoms above surfaces has even been questioned [2]. To observe it, one must increase the time above the surface by decelerating the ions. We have for the first time decelerated O^7+ ions to energies as low as 1 eV/q, below the minimum energy gained by the ions due to the acceleration by their image charge. As expected, no ion backscattering (trampoline effect) above dielectric (Ge) was observed and at the lowest ion kinetic energies, most of the observed x-rays were found to be emitted by the ions after surface contact. [4pt] [1] J. P. Briand et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 65(1990)159.[0pt] [2] J.P. Briand, AIP Conference Proceedings 215 (1990) 513.

  19. Formation of graphene on Ru(0001) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Yi; Shi Dong-Xia; Gao Hong-Jun

    2007-01-01

    We report on the formation of a graphene monolayer on a Ru(0001) surface by annealing the Ru(0001) crystal.The samples are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). STM images show that the Moiré pattern is caused by the graphene layer mismatched with the underlying Ru(0001) surface and has an N × N superlattice. It is further found that the graphene monolayer on a Ru(0001) surface is very stable at high temperatures. Our results provide a simple and convenient method to produce a graphene monolayer on the Ru(0001) surface, which is used as a template for fabricating functional nanostructures needed in future nano devices and catalysis.

  20. On surface reactions of iron tungstate with ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrubov, V.A.; Shchukin, V.P.; Averbukh, A.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    Results of investigation of ethane oxidation reaction upon iron tungstate are presented. It is shown that catalytic oxidation of ethane is accompanied by the surface reaction of the catalyst reduction. Maximum reduction of surface depends upon temperature and considerably affects the direction of ethane oxidation process. Activation energies of ethane oxidation reactions and surface reaction of iron tungstate reduction depend on the surface actual state and at its reduction up to 5% from monolayer change in the limits 36.0-46.0 and 53.0-66.0 kcal/mol respectively

  1. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. In addition to storing the data and its bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine)

  2. Electronic dissipation processes during chemical reactions on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Stella, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Every day in our life is larded with a huge number of chemical reactions on surfaces. Some reactions occur immediately, for others an activation energy has to be supplied. Thus it happens that though a reaction should thermodynamically run off, it is kinetically hindered. Meaning the partners react only to the thermodynamically more stable product state within a mentionable time if the activation energy of the reaction is supplied. With the help of catalysts the activation energy of a reaction can be lowered. Such catalytic processes on surfaces are widely used in industry. A

  3. Religion, Repulsion, and Reaction Formation: Transforming Repellent Attractions and Repulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Dov; Kim, Emily; Hudson, Nathan W

    2017-06-12

    Protestants were more likely than non-Protestants to demonstrate phenomena consistent with the use of reaction formation. Lab experiments showed that when manipulations were designed to produce taboo attractions (to unconventional sexual practices), Protestants instead showed greater repulsion. When implicitly conditioned to produce taboo repulsions (to African Americans), Protestants instead showed greater attraction. Supportive evidence from other studies came from clinicians' judgments, defense mechanism inventories, and a survey of respondent attitudes. Other work showed that Protestants who diminished and displaced threatening affect were more likely to sublimate this affect into creative activities; the present work showed that Protestants who do not or cannot diminish or displace such threatening affect instead reverse it. Traditional individual difference variables showed little ability to predict reaction formation, suggesting that the observed processes go beyond what we normally study when we talk about self-control. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Buffering dissociation/formation reaction of biogenic calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Kazuhiko

    2007-01-01

    The oscillating stability of coral reef seawater pH has been maintained at around physiological pH values over the past 300 years (Pelejero et al., 2005). The stability mechanism of its pH has been interpreted in terms of the buffering dissolution/formation reaction of CaCO(3) as well as the proton consumption/generation reaction in CaCO(3)-saturated water. Here the pH-dependent solubility product [HCO(3)(-)][Ca(2+)] has been derived on the basis of the actual pH-dependent reactions for the atmospheric CO(2)/CO(2 (aq.))/HCO(3)(-)/CO(3)(2-)/Ca(2+)/CaCO(3) system. Overbasic pH peaks appeared between pH approximately 8 and approximately 9.5 during sodium hydroxide titration, as a result of simultaneous CaCO(3) formation and proton generation. The spontaneous and prompt water pH recovery from the acidic to the physiological range has been confirmed by the observation of acid/base time evolution, because of simultaneous CaCO(3) dissolution and proton consumption. The dissolution/formation of CaCO(3) in water at pH 7.5-9 does not take place without a proton consumption/generation reaction, or a buffering chemical reaction of HCO(3)(-)+Ca(2+)right arrow over left arrowCaCO(3)+H(+). SEM images of the CaCO(3) fragments showed that the acid water ate away at the CaCO(3) formed at physiological pH values. Natural coral reefs can thus recover the physiological pH levels of seawater from the acidic range through partial dissolution of their own skeletons.

  5. Shock-induced hotspot formation and chemical reaction initiation in PETN containing a spherical void

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Thompson, Aidan P

    2014-01-01

    We present results of reactive molecular dynamics simulations of hotspot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shock-induced compression of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) with the ReaxFF reactive force field. A supported shockwave is driven through a PETN crystal containing a 20 nm spherical void at a sub-threshold impact velocity of 2 km/s. Formation of a hotspot due to shock-induced void collapse is observed. During void collapse, NO 2 is the dominant species ejected from the upstream void surface. Once the ejecta collide with the downstream void surface and the hotspot develops, formation of final products such as N 2 and H 2 O is observed. The simulation provides a detailed picture of how void collapse and hotspot formation leads to initiation at sub-threshold impact velocities.

  6. Chemical reactions on platinum-group metal surfaces studied by synchrotron-radiation-based spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Hiroshi; Nakai, Ikuyo; Nagasaka, Masanari; Amemiya, Kenta; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    A new version of synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray spectroscopy, wave-length-dispersive near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (dispersive-NEXAFS), and fast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been applied to mechanistic studies on several surface catalytic reactions on platinum-group-metal surfaces. In this review, our approach using above techniques to understand the reaction mechanism and actual application studies on three well-known catalytic surface reactions, CO oxidation on Pt(111) and Pd(111), NO reduction on Rh(111), and H 2 O formation on Pt(111), are introduced. Spectroscopic monitoring of the progress of the surface reactions enabled us to detect reaction intermediates and analyze the reaction kinetics quantitatively which provides information on reaction order, rate constant, pre-exponential factor, activation energy and etc. Such quantitative analyses combined with scanning tunneling microscopy and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations revealed significant contribution of the adsorbate configurations and their dynamic changes to the reaction mechanisms of the above fundamental catalytic surface reactions. (author)

  7. Formation kinetics of gemfibrozil chlorination reaction products: analysis and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krkosek, Wendy H; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M; Gagnon, Graham A

    2014-07-01

    Aqueous chlorination kinetics of the lipid regulator gemfibrozil and the formation of reaction products were investigated in deionized water over the pH range 3 to 9, and in two wastewater matrices. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil was found to be highly dependent on pH. No statistically significant degradation of gemfibrozil was observed at pH values greater than 7. Gemfibrozil oxidation between pH 4 and 7 was best represented by first order kinetics. At pH 3, formation of three reaction products was observed. 4'-C1Gem was the only reaction product formed from pH 4-7 and was modeled with zero order kinetics. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil in two wastewater matrices followed second order kinetics. 4'-C1Gem was only formed in wastewater with pH below 7. Deionized water rate kinetic models were applied to two wastewater effluents with gemfibrozil concentrations reported in literature in order to calculate potential mass loading rates of 4'C1Gem to the receiving water.

  8. Reaction mechanisms for on-surface synthesis of covalent nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Björk, J

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, on-surface synthesis has become an increasingly popular strategy to form covalent nanostructures. The approach has great prospects for facilitating the manufacture of a range of fascinating materials with atomic precision. However, the on-surface reactions are enigmatic to control, currently restricting its bright perspectives and there is a great need to explore how the reactions are governed. The objective of this topical review is to summarize theoretical work that has focused on comprehending on-surface synthesis protocols through studies of reaction mechanisms. (topical review)

  9. Pore-scale studies of multiphase flow and reaction involving CO2 sequestration in geologic formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Q.; Wang, M.; Lichtner, P. C.

    2008-12-01

    In geologic CO2 sequestration, pore-scale interfacial phenomena ultimately govern the key processes of fluid mobility, chemical transport, adsorption, and reaction. However, spatial heterogeneity at the pore scale cannot be resolved at the continuum scale, where averaging occurs over length scales much larger than typical pore sizes. Natural porous media, such as sedimentary rocks and other geological media encountered in subsurface formations, are inherently heterogeneous. This pore-scale heterogeneity can produce variabilities in flow, transport, and reaction processes that take place within a porous medium, and can result in spatial variations in fluid velocity, aqueous concentrations, and reaction rates. Consequently, the unresolved spatial heterogeneity at the pore scale may be important for reactive transport modeling at the larger scale. In addition, current continuum models of surface complexation reactions ignore a fundamental property of physical systems, namely conservation of charge. Therefore, to better understand multiphase flow and reaction involving CO2 sequestration in geologic formations, it is necessary to quantitatively investigate the influence of the pore-scale heterogeneity on the emergent behavior at the field scale. We have applied the lattice Boltzmann method to simulating the injection of CO2 saturated brine or supercritical CO2 into geological formations at the pore scale. Multiple pore-scale processes, including advection, diffusion, homogeneous reactions among multiple aqueous species, heterogeneous reactions between the aqueous solution and minerals, ion exchange and surface complexation, as well as changes in solid and pore geometry are all taken into account. The rich pore scale information will provide a basis for upscaling to the continuum scale.

  10. Fragment formation in light-ion induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Yuichi

    2001-01-01

    The intermediate mass fragment (IMF) formation in the 12 GeV proton induced reaction on Au target is analyzed by the quantum molecular dynamics model combined with the JAM hadronic cascade model and the non-equilibrated percolation model. We show that the sideward peaked angular distribution of IMF occur in the multifragmentation at very short time scale around 20 fm/c where non-equilibrated features of the residual nucleus fluctuates the nucleon density and fragments in the repulsive Coulomb force are pushed for the sideward direction. (author)

  11. Pattern formation in three-dimensional reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, T. K.; Knobloch, E.

    1999-08-01

    Existing group theoretic analysis of pattern formation in three dimensions [T.K. Callahan, E. Knobloch, Symmetry-breaking bifurcations on cubic lattices, Nonlinearity 10 (1997) 1179-1216] is used to make specific predictions about the formation of three-dimensional patterns in two models of the Turing instability, the Brusselator model and the Lengyel-Epstein model. Spatially periodic patterns having the periodicity of the simple cubic (SC), face-centered cubic (FCC) or body-centered cubic (BCC) lattices are considered. An efficient center manifold reduction is described and used to identify parameter regimes permitting stable lamellæ, SC, FCC, double-diamond, hexagonal prism, BCC and BCCI states. Both models possess a special wavenumber k* at which the normal form coefficients take on fixed model-independent ratios and both are described by identical bifurcation diagrams. This property is generic for two-species chemical reaction-diffusion models with a single activator and inhibitor.

  12. Rethinking pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halatek, J.; Frey, E.

    2018-05-01

    The present theoretical framework for the analysis of pattern formation in complex systems is mostly limited to the vicinity of fixed (global) equilibria. Here we present a new theoretical approach to characterize dynamical states arbitrarily far from (global) equilibrium. We show that reaction-diffusion systems that are driven by locally mass-conserving interactions can be understood in terms of local equilibria of diffusively coupled compartments. Diffusive coupling generically induces lateral redistribution of the globally conserved quantities, and the variable local amounts of these quantities determine the local equilibria in each compartment. We find that, even far from global equilibrium, the system is well characterized by its moving local equilibria. We apply this framework to in vitro Min protein pattern formation, a paradigmatic model for biological pattern formation. Within our framework we can predict and explain transitions between chemical turbulence and order arbitrarily far from global equilibrium. Our results reveal conceptually new principles of self-organized pattern formation that may well govern diverse dynamical systems.

  13. Bond-selective control of a gas-surface reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Daniel R.

    The prospect of using light to selectively control chemical reactions has tantalized chemists since the development of the laser. Unfortunately, the realization of laser-directed chemistry is frequently thwarted by the randomization of energy within the molecule through intramolecular vibrational energy distribution (IVR). However, recent results showing vibrational mode-specific reactivity on metal surfaces suggest that IVR may not always be complete for gas-surface reactions. Here, we combine molecular beam techniques and direct laser excitation to characterize the bond-specific reactivity of trideuteromethane on a Ni(111) surface. Our results reveal important details about how vibrational energy is distributed in the reactive molecule. We use a molecular beam to direct state-selected trideuteromethane (CHD 3) molecules onto a nickel single crystal sample and use the results we obtain to describe the flow of vibrational energy in the methane-surface reaction complex. We show that CHD3 molecules initially excited to v=1, J=2, K=0 of the v 1 symmetric C-H stretching mode will dissociate exclusively via C-H cleavage on Ni(111). This result highlights the localization of vibrational energy in the reaction complex, despite the presence of many energy exchange channels with the high state-density surface. We demonstrate, for the first time, highly parallel bond-selective control of a heterogeneously catalyzed reaction. We place our results in the context of recent experiments investigating IVR for molecules in both the gas phase and liquid solutions. If IVR is fast on the reaction timescale, vibrational energy would be randomly distributed throughout the nascent methane-surface reaction complex and vibrational mode-specific behavior would not occur. The short timescale of a direct gas-surface collision may explain how the exchange of energy via IVR is limited to only a small subset of the energetic configurations available to the reaction complex. This framework

  14. Multifractal scaling analysis of autopoisoning reactions over a rough surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhari, Ajay; Yan, Ching-Cher Sanders; Lee, S.-L.

    2003-01-01

    Decay type diffusion-limited reactions (DLR) over a rough surface generated by a random deposition model were performed. To study the effect of the decay profile on the reaction probability distribution (RPD), multifractal scaling analysis has been carried out. The dynamics of these autopoisoning reactions are controlled by the two parameters in the decay function, namely, the initial sticking probability (P ini ) of every site and the decay rate (m). The smaller the decay rate, the narrower is the range of α values in the α-f(α) multifractal spectrum. The results are compared with the earlier work of DLR over a surface of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). We also considered here the autopoisoning reactions over a smooth surface for comparing our results, which show clearly how the roughness affects the chemical reactions. The q-τ(q) multifractal curves for the smooth surface are linear whereas those for the rough surface are nonlinear. The range of α values in the case of a rough surface is wider than that of the smooth surface

  15. Mechanism of chimera formation during the Multiple Displacement Amplification reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stockwell Timothy B

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Displacement Amplification (MDA is a method used for amplifying limiting DNA sources. The high molecular weight amplified DNA is ideal for DNA library construction. While this has enabled genomic sequencing from one or a few cells of unculturable microorganisms, the process is complicated by the tendency of MDA to generate chimeric DNA rearrangements in the amplified DNA. Determining the source of the DNA rearrangements would be an important step towards reducing or eliminating them. Results Here, we characterize the major types of chimeras formed by carrying out an MDA whole genome amplification from a single E. coli cell and sequencing by the 454 Life Sciences method. Analysis of 475 chimeras revealed the predominant reaction mechanisms that create the DNA rearrangements. The highly branched DNA synthesized in MDA can assume many alternative secondary structures. DNA strands extended on an initial template can be displaced becoming available to prime on a second template creating the chimeras. Evidence supports a model in which branch migration can displace 3'-ends freeing them to prime on the new templates. More than 85% of the resulting DNA rearrangements were inverted sequences with intervening deletions that the model predicts. Intramolecular rearrangements were favored, with displaced 3'-ends reannealing to single stranded 5'-strands contained within the same branched DNA molecule. In over 70% of the chimeric junctions, the 3' termini had initiated priming at complimentary sequences of 2–21 nucleotides (nts in the new templates. Conclusion Formation of chimeras is an important limitation to the MDA method, particularly for whole genome sequencing. Identification of the mechanism for chimera formation provides new insight into the MDA reaction and suggests methods to reduce chimeras. The 454 sequencing approach used here will provide a rapid method to assess the utility of reaction modifications.

  16. Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Elnaggar, Mariam S

    2013-07-16

    A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

  17. Surface reactivity and layer analysis of chemisorbed reaction films in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Surface reactivity and layer analysis of chemisorbed reaction films in ... in the nitrogen environment. Keywords. Surface reactivity ... sium (Na–K) compounds in the coating or core of the ..... Barkshire I R, Pruton M and Smith G C 1995 Appl. Sur.

  18. Investigation of heterogeneous reactions of NO2 on aqueous surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertes, S.

    1992-01-01

    A microjet apparatus was developed for the purpose of measuring the loss in the gaseous phase and the uptake in the liquid phase of nitrogen on the basis of heterogeneous processes on a liquid surface. The measurements were to provide information on the mass accomodation coefficient α and on assumed surface reactions of NO 2 . (orig./BBR) [de

  19. Molecular-dynamics analysis of mobile helium cluster reactions near surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios, E-mail: maroudas@ecs.umass.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003-9303 (United States); Hammond, Karl D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    We report the results of a systematic atomic-scale analysis of the reactions of small mobile helium clusters (He{sub n}, 4 ≤ n ≤ 7) near low-Miller-index tungsten (W) surfaces, aiming at a fundamental understanding of the near-surface dynamics of helium-carrying species in plasma-exposed tungsten. These small mobile helium clusters are attracted to the surface and migrate to the surface by Fickian diffusion and drift due to the thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. As the clusters migrate toward the surface, trap mutation (TM) and cluster dissociation reactions are activated at rates higher than in the bulk. TM produces W adatoms and immobile complexes of helium clusters surrounding W vacancies located within the lattice planes at a short distance from the surface. These reactions are identified and characterized in detail based on the analysis of a large number of molecular-dynamics trajectories for each such mobile cluster near W(100), W(110), and W(111) surfaces. TM is found to be the dominant cluster reaction for all cluster and surface combinations, except for the He{sub 4} and He{sub 5} clusters near W(100) where cluster partial dissociation following TM dominates. We find that there exists a critical cluster size, n = 4 near W(100) and W(111) and n = 5 near W(110), beyond which the formation of multiple W adatoms and vacancies in the TM reactions is observed. The identified cluster reactions are responsible for important structural, morphological, and compositional features in the plasma-exposed tungsten, including surface adatom populations, near-surface immobile helium-vacancy complexes, and retained helium content, which are expected to influence the amount of hydrogen re-cycling and tritium retention in fusion tokamaks.

  20. Star formation and the surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.

    1985-01-01

    The (blue) surface brightness of spiral galaxies is significantly correlated with their Hα linewidth. This can be most plausibly interpreted as a correlation of surface brightness with star formation rate. There is also a significant difference in surface brightness between galaxies forming stars in a grand design spiral pattern and those with floc star formation regions. (author)

  1. One-pot reaction for the preparation of biofunctionalized self-assembled monolayers on gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raigoza, Annette F.; Fies, Whitney; Lim, Amber; Onyirioha, Kristeen; Webb, Lauren J., E-mail: lwebb@cm.utexas.edu

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • One-pot synthesis of α-helical-terminated self-assembled monolayers on Au(111). • Synthesis of high density, structured, and covalently bound α-helices on Au(111). • Characterization by surface-averaged and single molecule techniques. • Peptide-terminated surfaces for fabrication of biomaterials and sensors. - Abstract: The Huisgen cycloaddition reaction (“click” chemistry) has been used extensively to functionalize surfaces with macromolecules in a straightforward manner. We have previously developed a procedure using the copper(I)-catalyzed click reaction to tether synthetic α-helical peptides carrying two alkyne groups to a well-ordered azide-terminated alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a Au(111) surface. While convenient, click-based strategies potentially pose significant problems from reagents, solvents, and reaction temperatures that may irreversibly damage some molecules or substrates. Tuning click chemistry conditions would allow individual optimization of reaction conditions for a wide variety of biomolecules and substrate materials. Here, we explore the utility of simultaneous SAM formation and peptide-attachment chemistry in a one-pot reaction. We demonstrate that a formerly multistep reaction can be successfully carried out concurrently by mixing azide-terminated alkanethiols, CuCl, and a propargylglycine-containing peptide over a bare gold surface in ethanol and reacting at 70 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface infrared spectroscopy, surface circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) were used to determine that this one-pot reaction strategy resulted in a high density of surface-bound α-helices without aggregation. This work demonstrates the simplicity and versatility of a SAM-plus-click chemistry strategy for functionalizing Au surfaces with structured biomolecules.

  2. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  3. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH 2 ) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  4. Chemical reactions in the presence of surface modulation and stirring

    OpenAIRE

    Kamhawi, Khalid; Náraigh, Lennon Ó

    2009-01-01

    We study the dynamics of simple reactions where the chemical species are confined on a general, time-modulated surface, and subjected to externally-imposed stirring. The study of these inhomogeneous effects requires a model based on a reaction-advection-diffusion equation, which we derive. We use homogenization methods to show that up to second order in a small scaling parameter, the modulation effects on the concentration field are asymptotically equivalent for systems with or without stirri...

  5. Theoretical Study of Sodium-Water Surface Reaction Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR).

  6. Theoretical study of sodium-water surface reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2012-01-01

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). (author)

  7. Bayesian inversion analysis of nonlinear dynamics in surface heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Toshiaki; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Okamoto, Atsushi; Hukushima, Koji

    2016-09-01

    It is essential to extract nonlinear dynamics from time-series data as an inverse problem in natural sciences. We propose a Bayesian statistical framework for extracting nonlinear dynamics of surface heterogeneous reactions from sparse and noisy observable data. Surface heterogeneous reactions are chemical reactions with conjugation of multiple phases, and they have the intrinsic nonlinearity of their dynamics caused by the effect of surface-area between different phases. We adapt a belief propagation method and an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to partial observation problem, in order to simultaneously estimate the time course of hidden variables and the kinetic parameters underlying dynamics. The proposed belief propagation method is performed by using sequential Monte Carlo algorithm in order to estimate nonlinear dynamical system. Using our proposed method, we show that the rate constants of dissolution and precipitation reactions, which are typical examples of surface heterogeneous reactions, as well as the temporal changes of solid reactants and products, were successfully estimated only from the observable temporal changes in the concentration of the dissolved intermediate product.

  8. Detection of submonolayer oxygen-18 on a gold surface by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L S; Kenny, M J; Wieczorek, L [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1994-12-31

    A gold substrate is the preferred solid surface for formation of an organic self-assembled monolayer ( SAM ). Device fabrication process may require the gold film to be exposed to photolithographic processing and plasma treatment prior to molecular assembly. It has been observed that oxygen plasma treatment prevents the formation of SAMs; however, subsequent treatment with an argon plasma allows assembly of the organic monolayers. To understand the mechanisms involved, a plasma containing 98% {sup 18}O was used and the film surface was analysed using the {sup 18}O (p,{alpha}){sup 15}N nuclear reaction. 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  9. Detection of submonolayer oxygen-18 on a gold surface by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S.; Kenny, M.J.; Wieczorek, L. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1993-12-31

    A gold substrate is the preferred solid surface for formation of an organic self-assembled monolayer ( SAM ). Device fabrication process may require the gold film to be exposed to photolithographic processing and plasma treatment prior to molecular assembly. It has been observed that oxygen plasma treatment prevents the formation of SAMs; however, subsequent treatment with an argon plasma allows assembly of the organic monolayers. To understand the mechanisms involved, a plasma containing 98% {sup 18}O was used and the film surface was analysed using the {sup 18}O (p,{alpha}){sup 15}N nuclear reaction. 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  10. Reaction of water vapor with a clean liquid uranium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siekhaus, W.

    1985-01-01

    To study the reaction of water vapor with uranium, we have exposed clean liquid uranium surfaces to H 2 O under UHV conditions. We have measured the surface concentration of oxygen as a function of exposure, and determined the maximum attainable surface oxygen concentration X 0 /sup s/ as a function of temperature. We have used these measurements to estimate, close to the melting point, the solubility of oxygen (X 0 /sup b/, -4 ) and its surface segregation coefficient β/sup s/(> 10 3 ). 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  11. Studies of the surface of titanium dioxide. IV. The hydrogen-deuterium equilibration reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaki, T.; Katsuta, K.; Miura, M.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of hydrogen with the surface of titanium dioxide has been studied in connection with the hydrogen-reduction mechanism of titanium dioxide, by means of such measurements as weight decrease, magnetic susceptibility, hydrogen uptake, and electrical conductance. It was postulated in the previous study that the rate-determining step of the hydrogen-reduction reaction may be the formation of surface hydroxyl groups, followed by the rapid removal of water molecules from the surface. In this study, the interactions between hydrogen and the surface of titanium dioxide were investigated by measuring the hydrogen-deuterium equilibration reaction, H 2 + D 2 = 2HD, at temperatures above 200 0 C on both surfaces before and after hydrogen reduction to compare the differences in the reactivities

  12. Heterogeneous reactions and aerosol formation in flue gas cleaning by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, W.; Jordan, S.; Leichsenring, C.H.; Maetzing, H.; Paur, H.R.; Schikarski, W.

    1990-08-01

    The electron beam dry scrubbing process is a simultaneous method for the removal of SO 2 and NO x from flue gas. By electron irradiation radicals (OH, O 2 H, O) are formed from the main flue gas components which oxidize NO x and SO 2 into the acids HNO 3 and H 2 SO 4 . These are then neutralized by the injection of NH 3 . A submicron aerosol consisting of ammonium salts is formed which is filtered from the offgas. The main pathways of the gas phase chemistry and product formation have been elucidated by experimental and theoretical studies. Back reactions which occur in the gas and the particle phase limit the energy efficiency of the process. By recirculation of irradiated gas into the reaction vessel (multiple irradiation) a significant improvement of removal yields was obtained. This enhancement of the energy efficiency requires the removal of products between the irradiation steps. Studies show that the material balance is complete. Deficits in the N and S balance of the process are due to the additional formation of molecular nitrogen and the deposition of ammonium sulfate in the ducts. Aerosol formation participates only with 30% in the material balance. The remaining 70% of the product are formed by surface reactions in the filter cake (40%) and in the ducts (30%). (orig.) With 38 figs., 29 tabs [de

  13. Chemical reaction on solid surface observed through isotope tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ken-ichi

    1983-01-01

    In order to know the role of atoms and ions on solid surfaces as the partners participating in elementary processes, the literatures related to the isomerization and hydrogen exchanging reaction of olefines, the hydrogenation of olefines, the metathesis reaction and homologation of olefines based on solid catalysts were reviewed. Various olefines, of which the hydrogen atoms were substituted with deuterium at desired positions, were reacted using various solid catalysts such as ZnO, K 2 CO 3 on C, MoS 2 (single crystal and powder) and molybdenum oxide (with various carriers), and the infra-red spectra of adsorbed olefines on catalysts, the isotope composition of reaction products and the production rate of the reaction products were measured. From the results, the bonding mode of reactant with the atoms and ions on solid surfaces, and the mechanism of the elementary process were considered. The author emphasized that the mechanism of the chemical reaction on solid surfaces and the role of active points or catalysts can be made clear to the considerable extent by combining isotopes suitably. (Yoshitake, I.)

  14. Size Dependence of Doping by a Vacancy Formation Reaction in Copper Sulfide Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elimelech, Orian [The Institute of Chemistry and The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 Israel; Liu, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook NY 11794 USA; Plonka, Anna M. [Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook NY 11794 USA; Frenkel, Anatoly I. [Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook NY 11794 USA; Banin, Uri [The Institute of Chemistry and The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 Israel

    2017-07-19

    Doping of nanocrystals (NCs) is a key, yet underexplored, approach for tuning of the electronic properties of semiconductors. An important route for doping of NCs is by vacancy formation. The size and concentration dependence of doping was studied in copper(I) sulfide (Cu2S) NCs through a redox reaction with iodine molecules (I2), which formed vacancies accompanied by a localized surface plasmon response. X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction reveal transformation from Cu2S to Cu-depleted phases, along with CuI formation. Greater reaction efficiency was observed for larger NCs. This behavior is attributed to interplay of the vacancy formation energy, which decreases for smaller sized NCs, and the growth of CuI on the NC surface, which is favored on well-defined facets of larger NCs. This doping process allows tuning of the plasmonic properties of a semiconductor across a wide range of plasmonic frequencies by varying the size of NCs and the concentration of iodine. Controlled vacancy doping of NCs may be used to tune and tailor semiconductors for use in optoelectronic applications.

  15. Self-activated, self-limiting reactions on Si surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Per; Hvam, Jeanette; Bahari, Ali

    The direct thermally activated reactions of oxygen and ammonia with Si surfaces in furnaces have been used for a very long time in the semiconductor industry for the growth of thick oxides and nitride layers respectively. The oxidation mechanism was described in the Deal-Grove model as a diffusion...... mechanism for the direct growth of ultrathin films (0-3 nm) of oxides and nitrides under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Neutral oxygen and a microwave excited nitrogen plasma interact directly with Si surfaces kept at different temperatures during the reaction. The gas pressures are around 10-6 Torr...... energy of an oxide system, which happened for an ordered structure, at a thickness of 0.7-0.8 nm. Thus this thin oxide structure has definite crystalline features. We have closely monitored the reaction kinetics with normal x-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopies, and also the structure, composition...

  16. General aspects of surface alloy formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergbreiter, Andreas; Engstfeld, Albert K.; Roetter, Ralf T.; Hoster, Harry E.; Behm, R. Juergen [Institute of Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, Ulm University, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Berko, Andras

    2010-07-01

    Surface confined alloys are excellent model systems for studies of structure-property relationships of bimetallic surfaces. They are formed by deposition of a guest metal B onto a substrate A, followed by annealing to a temperature, where place exchange between adatoms and atoms from the underlying surface layer becomes possible and diffusion into the bulk is sufficiently slow. We exemplarily confirmed by scanning tunneling microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy for PtRu/Ru(0001), PdRu/Ru(0001), AuPt/Pt(111), AgPt/Pt(111), and AgPd/Pd(111), surface alloys are obtained for systems where metal B has a negative surface segregation energy within metal A. By exchanging A and B, however, AB surface alloys are most likely overgrown by metal B, which we demonstrate for RuPt/Pt(111) in comparison to PtRu/Ru(0001).

  17. Formation control of marine surface craft: a Lagrangian approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihle, Ivar-Andre F.; Jouffroy, Jerome; Fossen, Thor I.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a method for formation control of marine surface craft inspired by Lagrangian mechanics. The desired formation configuration and response of the marine surface craft are given as a set of constraints in analytical mechanics. Thus, constraints forces arise and feedback from...

  18. Robust combined position and formation control for marine surface craft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihle, Ivar-Andre F.; Jouffroy, Jerome; Fossen, Thor I.

    We consider the robustness properties of a formation control system for marine surface vessels. Intervessel constraint functions are stabilized to achieve the desired formation configuration. We show that the formation dynamics is Input-to-State Stable (ISS) to both environmental perturbations th...

  19. Surface Interrogation Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy for a Photoelectrochemical Reaction: Water Oxidation on a Hematite Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Young; Ahn, Hyun S; Bard, Allen J

    2018-03-06

    To understand the pathway of a photoelectrochemical (PEC) reaction, quantitative knowledge of reaction intermediates is important. We describe here surface interrogation scanning electrochemical microscopy for this purpose (PEC SI-SECM), where a light pulse to a photoactive semiconductor film at a given potential generates intermediates that are then analyzed by a tip generated titrant at known times after the light pulse. The improvements were demonstrated for photoelectrochemical water oxidation (oxygen evolution) reaction on a hematite surface. The density of photoactive sites, proposed to be Fe 4+ species, on a hematite surface was successfully quantified, and the photoelectrochemical water oxidation reaction dynamics were elucidated by time-dependent redox titration experiments. The new configuration of PEC SI-SECM should find expanded usage to understand and investigate more complicated PEC reactions with other materials.

  20. Investigation of Na-CO{sub 2} Reaction with Initial Reaction in Various Reacting Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Su; Park, Gunyeop; Kim, Soo Jae; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Moo Hwan [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Wi, Myung-Hwan [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The reaction products that cause oxidation and erosion are threaten the heat transfer tubes so that it is necessary to investigate Na-CO{sub 2} reaction according to various experimental parameter. Unlike SWR, Na-CO{sub 2} reaction is more complex to deal with reaction kinetics. Since a comprehensive understanding of Na-CO{sub 2} reaction mechanism is crucial for the safety analysis, the reaction phenomenon under the various conditions was investigated. The current issue is to make a database for developing computational code for CO{sub 2} gas leak situation because it is experimentally difficult to analyze the actual accident situation. Most studies on Na-CO{sub 2} interaction reports that chemical reaction is getting vigorous as temperature increased and reactivity is sensitive as temperature change between 400 .deg. C and 600 .deg. C. Therefore, temperature range is determined based on the operating condition (450 - 500 .deg. C) of KALIMER-600 employed as supercritical CO{sub 2} brayton cycle energy conversion system for Na-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger. And next parameter is sodium surface area which contact between sodium and CO{sub 2} when CO{sub 2} is injected into sodium pool in the accident situation. So, the fundamental surface reaction is experimentally studied in the range of 8 - 12cm{sup 2}. Additionally, it has been reported in recent years that CO{sub 2} Flow rate affects reactivity less significantly and CO{sub 2} flow rate is assumed that 5 SLPM (standard liter per minute) is suitable as a basis for a small leakage. The finally selected control parameters is sodium temperature and reacting surface area with constant CO{sub 2} flow rate. Na-CO{sub 2} reaction test is performed for investigating risk of potential accident which contacts with liquid sodium and CO{sub 2}. Amount of reaction is saturated as time passed because of kept a balance between production of solid phase reaction products and amount of diffusivity. These results contribute to make a

  1. Investigation of Na-CO2 Reaction with Initial Reaction in Various Reacting Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Su; Park, Gunyeop; Kim, Soo Jae; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Moo Hwan; Wi, Myung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The reaction products that cause oxidation and erosion are threaten the heat transfer tubes so that it is necessary to investigate Na-CO 2 reaction according to various experimental parameter. Unlike SWR, Na-CO 2 reaction is more complex to deal with reaction kinetics. Since a comprehensive understanding of Na-CO 2 reaction mechanism is crucial for the safety analysis, the reaction phenomenon under the various conditions was investigated. The current issue is to make a database for developing computational code for CO 2 gas leak situation because it is experimentally difficult to analyze the actual accident situation. Most studies on Na-CO 2 interaction reports that chemical reaction is getting vigorous as temperature increased and reactivity is sensitive as temperature change between 400 .deg. C and 600 .deg. C. Therefore, temperature range is determined based on the operating condition (450 - 500 .deg. C) of KALIMER-600 employed as supercritical CO 2 brayton cycle energy conversion system for Na-CO 2 heat exchanger. And next parameter is sodium surface area which contact between sodium and CO 2 when CO 2 is injected into sodium pool in the accident situation. So, the fundamental surface reaction is experimentally studied in the range of 8 - 12cm 2 . Additionally, it has been reported in recent years that CO 2 Flow rate affects reactivity less significantly and CO 2 flow rate is assumed that 5 SLPM (standard liter per minute) is suitable as a basis for a small leakage. The finally selected control parameters is sodium temperature and reacting surface area with constant CO 2 flow rate. Na-CO 2 reaction test is performed for investigating risk of potential accident which contacts with liquid sodium and CO 2 . Amount of reaction is saturated as time passed because of kept a balance between production of solid phase reaction products and amount of diffusivity. These results contribute to make a database for the SFR safety analysis and additional experiments are needed

  2. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathway for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such observables as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method with the Dunning correlation consistent basis sets to obtain accurate energetics, gives useful results for a number of chemically important systems. Applications to complex reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion are discussed.

  3. Dynamical hindrance to compound nucleus formation in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blocki, J.; Feldmeier, H.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    A large number of dynamical trajectories corresponding to colliding nuclei, as represented by an idealized, sharp-surfaced liquid-drop model with one-body dissipation are examined. The objective was to delineate quantitatively, within this model, the behaviour of the extra-extra-push energy E XX in its dependence on the mass /or charge/ numbers of the colliding nuclei. Qualitatively, the results are as anticipated on the basis of earlier studies: the appearance of a dynamical limitation on compound nucleus formation beyond a certain threshold locus in the A 1 . A 2 plane, with the energy E XX rising smoothly but rapidly beyond the threshold. The reduction of the two-dimensional function E XX /A 1 ,A 2 / to a one-dimensional function of a mean fissility x m appears possible as a rough approximation. As expected, the mean fissility x and the entrance channel fissility x 0 . The optimum choice appears to be one in which x is given about twice the weight of x 0

  4. Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, M.; Johansen, C.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended in buf...... from surfaces, and indirect conductometry and found this combination sufficient to quantify bacteria on surfaces...

  5. Recyclable surfaces for amine conjugation chemistry via redox reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Inseong; Yeo, Woon Seok [Dept. of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio/Molecular Informatics Center, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Se Won [Green Materials and Process Group, Research Institute of Sustainable Manufacturing System, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In this study, we extended this strategy to present a switchable surface that allows surface functionalization and removal of functional groups repeatedly. The substrate presenting a benzoquinone acid group is first used to immobilize with an amine-containing (bio)molecule using well-known conjugation chemistry. The benzoquinone group is then converted to the corresponding hydroquinone by treating with a reducing agent. We have described a strategy for the dynamic control of surface properties with recyclability via a simple reduction/ oxidation reaction. A stimuli-responsive quinone derivative was harnessed for the repeated immobilization and release of (bio)molecules, and thus, for the repeated dynamic change of the surface properties according to the characteristics of the immobilized (bio)molecules.

  6. Probing the Surface of Platinum during the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey A. [Physical; Favaro, Marco [Advanced; Joint; Chemical; Ross, Philip N. [Materials; Yano, Junko [Joint; Molecular; Liu, Zhi [State; Division; Hussain, Zahid [Advanced; Crumlin, Ethan J. [Advanced; Joint Center

    2017-11-02

    Understanding the surface chemistry of electrocatalysts in operando can bring insight into the reaction mechanism, and ultimately the design of more efficient materials for sustainable energy storage and conversion. Recent progress in synchrotron based X-ray spectroscopies for in operando characterization allows us to probe the solid/liquid interface directly while applying an external potential, applied here to the model system of Pt in alkaline electrolyte for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We employ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) to identify the oxidation and reduction of Pt-oxides and hydroxides on the surface as a function of applied potential, and further assess the potential for hydrogen adsorption and absorption (hydride formation) during and after the HER. This new window into the surface chemistry of Pt in alkaline brings insight into the nature of the rate limiting step, the extent of H ad/absorption and it’s persistence at more anodic potentials.

  7. In-situ determination of amine/epoxy and carboxylic/epoxy exothermic heat of reaction on surface of modified carbon nanotubes and structural verification of covalent bond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Juliana C.; de Castro, Vinícius G.; Assis, Ana L. S.; Veiga, Amanda G.; Rocco, Maria Luiza M.; Silva, Glaura G.

    2018-04-01

    An effective nanofiller-matrix interaction is considered crucial to produce enhanced nanocomposites. Nevertheless, there is lack of experiments focused in the direct measurement of possible filler-matrix covalent linkage, which was the main goal of this work for a carbon nanotube (CNT)/epoxy system. CNT were functionalized with oxygenated (ox) functions and further with triethylenetetramine (TETA). An in-situ determination methodology of epoxy-CNTs heat of reaction was developed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Values of -(8.7 ± 0.4) and -(6.0 ± 0.6) J/g were observed for epoxy with CNT-ox and CNT-TETA, respectively. These results confirm the occurrence of covalent bonds for both functionalized CNTs, a very important information due to the literature generally disregard this possibility for oxygenated functions. The higher value obtained for CNT-ox can be attributed to a not complete amidation and to steric impediments in the CNT-TETA structure. The modified CNTs produced by DSC experiments were then characterized by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Thermogravimetry, which confirmed the covalent linkage. This characterization methodology can be used to verify the occurrence of covalent bonds in various nanocomposites with a quantitative evaluation, providing data for better understanding of the role of CNT functional groups and for tailoring its interface with polymers.

  8. Deuterium secondary isotope kinetic effects in imine formation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, L. do; Rossi, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetic α-deuterium isotope effects, K D /K H , for reaction mechanisms is studied. The reaction of pH function to m-bromobenzaldehyde, semicarbazide nucleophile, methoxy-amine and hydroxylamine are analysed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  9. Polygon formation and surface flow on a rotating fluid surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Raymond; Tophøj, Laust Emil Hjerrild; Homan, T. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of polygons forming on the free surface of a water flow confined to a stationary cylinder and driven by a rotating bottom plate as described by Jansson et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 96, 2006, 174502). In particular, we study the case of a triangular structure, either completely...... there the symmetry breaking proceeds like a low-dimensional linear instability. We show that the circular state and the unstable manifold connecting it with the polygon solution are universal in the sense that very different initial conditions lead to the same circular state and unstable manifold. For a wet triangle......, we measure the surface flows by particle image velocimetry (PIV) and show that there are three vortices present, but that the strength of these vortices is far too weak to account for the rotation velocity of the polygon. We show that partial blocking of the surface flow destroys the polygons and re...

  10. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathways for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such parameters as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. For some dynamics methods, global potential energy surfaces are required. In this case, it is necessary to obtain the energy at a complete sampling of all the possible arrangements of the nuclei, which are energetically accessible, and then a fitting function must be obtained to interpolate between the computed points. In other cases, characterization of the stationary points and the reaction pathway connecting them is sufficient. These properties may be readily obtained using analytical derivative methods. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method to obtain accurate energetics, gives usefull results for a number of chemically important systems. The talk will focus on a number of applications including global potential energy surfaces, H + O2, H + N2, O(3p) + H2, and reaction pathways for complex reactions, including reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion.

  11. Reactions of BBr(n)(+) (n = 0--2) at fluorinated and hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayer surfaces: observations of chemical selectivity in ion--surface scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, N; Shen, J; Koskinen, J; Cooks, R G

    2001-07-01

    Ion-surface reactions involving BBr(n)(+) (n = 0--2) with a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (F-SAM) surface were investigated using a multi-sector scattering mass spectrometer. Collisions of the B(+) ion yield BF(2)(+) at threshold energy with the simpler product ion BF(+)* appearing at higher collision energies and remaining of lower abundance than BF(2)(+) at all energies examined. In addition, the reactively sputtered ion CF(+) accompanies the formation of BF(2)(+) at low collision energies. These results stand in contrast with previous data on the ion-surface reactions of atomic ions with the F-SAM surface in that the threshold and most abundant reaction products in those cases involved the abstraction of a single fluorine atom. Gas-phase enthalpy data are consistent with BF(2)(+) being the thermodynamically favored product. The fact that the abundance of BF(2)(+) is relatively low and relatively insensitive to changes in collision energy suggests that this reaction proceeds through an entropically demanding intermediate at the vacuum--surface interface, one which involves interaction of the B(+) ion simultaneously with two fluorine atoms. By contrast with the reaction of B(+), the odd-electron species BBr(+)* reacts with the F-SAM surface to yield an abundant single-fluorine abstraction product, BBrF(+). Corresponding gas-phase ion--molecule experiments involving B(+) and BBr(+)* with C(6)F(14) also yield the products BF(+)* and BF(2)(+), but only in extremely low abundances and with no preference for double fluorine abstraction. Ion--surface reactions were also investigated for BBr(n)(+) (n = 0-2) with a hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayer (H-SAM) surface. Reaction of the B(+) ion and dissociative reactions of BBr(+)* result in the formation of BH(2)(+), while the thermodynamically less favorable product BH(+)* is not observed. Collisions of BBr(2)(+) with the H-SAM surface yield the dissociative ion-surface reaction products, BBrH(+) and BBrCH(3

  12. Numerical simulation of hydrogen-air reacting flows in rectangular channels with catalytic surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ryoichi S.; Abou-Ellail, Mohsen M.; Elhaw, Samer; Saeed Ibrahim, Mohamed

    2013-09-01

    In this work a prediction was numerically modeled for a catalytically stabilized thermal combustion of a lean homogeneous mixture of air and hydrogen. The mixture flows in a narrow rectangular channel lined with a thin coating of platinum catalyst. The solution using an in-house code is based on the steady state partial differential continuity, momentum and energy conservation equations for the mixture and species involved in the reactions. A marching technique is used along the streamwise direction to solve the 2-D plane-symmetric laminar flow of the gas. Two chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms were included; one for the gas phase reactions consisting of 17 elementary reactions; of which 7 are forward-backward reactions while the other mechanism is for the surface reactions—which are the prime mover of the combustion under a lean mixture condition—consisting of 16 elementary reactions. The results were compared with a former congruent experimental work where temperature was measured using thermocouples, while using PLIF laser for measuring water and hydrogen mole fractions. The comparison showed good agreement. More results for the velocities, mole fractions of other species were carried out across the transverse and along the streamwise directions providing a complete picture of overall mechanism—gas and surface—and on the production, consumptions and travel of the different species. The variations of the average OH mole fraction with the streamwise direction showed a sudden increase in the region where the ignition occurred. Also the rate of reactions of the entire surface species were calculated along the streamwise direction and a surface water production flux equation was derived by calculating the law of mass action's constants from the concentrations of hydrogen, oxygen and the rate of formation of water near the surface.

  13. Formation and surface characterization of nanostructured Al2O3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Page 1. Electronic Supplementary Material. Graphical abstract. Formation and surface characterization of nanostructured Al2O3–TiO2 coatings by Vairamuthu Raj and Mohamed Sirajudeen Mumjitha. (pp 1411–1418).

  14. Effect of surface structure on catalytic reactions: A sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrea, Keith R.

    2001-01-01

    In the results discussed above, it is clear that Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) is a unique tool that allows the detection of vibrational spectra of adsorbed molecules present on single crystal surfaces under catalytic reaction conditions. Not only is it possible to detect active surface intermediates, it is also possible to detect spectator species which are not responsible for the measured turnover rates. By correlating high-pressure SFG spectra under reaction conditions and gas chromatography (GC) kinetic data, it is possible to determine which species are important under reaction intermediates. Because of the flexibility of this technique for studying surface intermediates, it is possible to determine how the structures of single crystal surfaces affect the observed rates of catalytic reactions. As an example of a structure insensitive reaction, ethylene hydrogenation was explored on both Pt(111) and Pt(100). The rates were determined to be essentially the same. It was observed that both ethylidyne and di-(sigma) bonded ethylene were present on the surface under reaction conditions on both crystals, although in different concentrations. This result shows that these two species are not responsible for the measured turnover rate, as it would be expected that one of the two crystals would be more active than the other, since the concentration of the surface intermediate would be different on the two crystals. The most likely active intermediates are weakly adsorbed molecules such as(pi)-bonded ethylene and ethyl. These species are not easily detected because their concentration lies at the detection limit of SFG. The SFG spectra and GC data essentially show that ethylene hydrogenation is structure insensitive for Pt(111) and Pt(100). SFG has proven to be a unique and excellent technique for studying adsorbed species on single crystal surfaces under high-pressure catalytic reactions. Coupled with kinetic data obtained from gas chromatography measurements, it can

  15. A full understanding of oxygen reduction reaction mechanism on Au(1 1 1) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Dai, Changqing; Fisher, Adrian; Shen, Yanchun; Cheng, Daojian

    2017-09-01

    Oxygen reduction and hydrogen peroxide reduction are technologically important reactions in energy-conversion devices. In this work, a full understanding of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanism on Au(1 1 1) surface is investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, including the reaction mechanisms of O2 dissociation, OOH dissociation, and H2O2 dissociation. Among these ORR mechanisms on Au(1 1 1), the activation energy of \\text{O}2* hydrogenation reaction is much lower than that of \\text{O}2* dissociation, indicating that \\text{O}2* hydrogenation reaction is more appropriate at the first step than \\text{O}2* dissociation. In the following, H2O2 can be formed with the lower activation energy compared with the OOH dissociation reaction, and finally H2O2 could be generated as a detectable product due to the high activation energy of H2O2 dissociation reaction. Furthermore, the potential dependent free energy study suggests that the H2O2 formation is thermodynamically favorable up to 0.4 V on Au(1 1 1), reducing the overpotential for 2e - ORR process. And the elementary step of first H2O formation becomes non-spontaneous at 0.4 V, indicating the difficulty of 4e - reduction pathway. Our DFT calculations show that H2O2 can be generated on Au(1 1 1) and the first electron transfer is the rate determining step. Our results show that gold surface could be used as a good catalyst for small-scale manufacture and on-site production of H2O2.

  16. Covalent-Bond Formation via On-Surface Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Philipp Alexander; Fuchs, Harald; Studer, Armido

    2017-05-02

    In this Review article pioneering work and recent achievements in the emerging research area of on-surface chemistry is discussed. On-surface chemistry, sometimes also called two-dimensional chemistry, shows great potential for bottom-up preparation of defined nanostructures. In contrast to traditional organic synthesis, where reactions are generally conducted in well-defined reaction flasks in solution, on-surface chemistry is performed in the cavity of a scanning probe microscope on a metal crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The metal first acts as a platform for self-assembly of the organic building blocks and in many cases it also acts as a catalyst for the given chemical transformation. Products and hence success of the reaction are directly analyzed by scanning probe microscopy. This Review provides a general overview of this chemistry highlighting advantages and disadvantages as compared to traditional reaction setups. The second part of the Review then focuses on reactions that have been successfully conducted as on-surface processes. On-surface Ullmann and Glaser couplings are addressed. In addition, cyclodehydrogenation reactions and cycloadditions are discussed and reactions involving the carbonyl functionality are highlighted. Finally, the first examples of sequential on-surface chemistry are considered in which two different functionalities are chemoselectively addressed. The Review gives an overview for experts working in the area but also offers a starting point to non-experts to enter into this exciting new interdisciplinary research field. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Collisions of polyatomic ions with surfaces: incident energy partitioning and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabka, J.; Roithova, J.; Dolejsek, Z.; Herman, Z.

    2002-01-01

    transformed into the product ion translation energy varied with the incident angle between 18 - 45 % of the incident energy for the incident angle 40 o - 80 o with respect to the surface normal, respectively. The rest of the incident energy was absorbed by the surface. The only exception was the perfuloro-hydrocarbon SAM, where about 17 % of the incident energy was transformed into internal energy of the polyatomic projectile. The hydrocarbon SAM behaved very similarly as the stainless steel or carbon surfaces, covered by hydrocarbons. The peak of the angular distribution of the product ions showed a simple correlation between the parallel and perpendicular components of the velocities of the incident and product ions. Collisions of small polyatomic ions CD 5 + , CD 4 + , CD 3 + (from methane) with carbon HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) surface were investigated at room and elevated (600 o C) temperature of the surface. At the room temperature and collision energies of 7 - 52 eV, the main processes was inelastic dissociation of the projectile ion and chemical reactions with surface hydrocarbons. The main chemical product with CD 4 + projectiles was CD 4 H - (H-atom transfer) and its dissociation products, and formation of C 2 X 3 + and C 3 X 3 + (X 0 H 2 D) in reactions with terminal groups of the surface hydrocarbons. Complementary experiments with CH 4 - and 13 CH 4 + enable determination of the fraction of the product from projectile ion-surface chemical reactions and surface sputtering. Translation energy and angular distributions of the product ions together with the isotopic scrambling data provided new information of the details of the ion-surface chemical processes. (author)

  18. Cirrus cloud mimic surfaces in the laboratory: organic acids, bases and NOx heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodeau, J.; Oriordan, B.

    2003-04-01

    CIRRUS CLOUD MIMIC SURFACES IN THE LABORATORY:ORGANIC ACIDS, BASES AND NOX HETEROGENEOUS REACTIONS. B. ORiordan, J. Sodeau Department of Chemistry and Environment Research Institute, University College Cork, Ireland j.sodeau@ucc.ie /Fax: +353-21-4902680 There are a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic sources for the simple carboxylic acids to be found in the troposphere giving rise to levels as high as 45 ppb in certain urban areas. In this regard it is of note that ants of genus Formica produce some 10Tg of formic acid each year; some ten times that produced by industry. The expected sinks are those generally associated with tropospheric chemistry: the major routes studied, to date, being wet and dry deposition. No studies have been carried out hitherto on the role of water-ice surfaces in the atmospheric chemistry of carboxylic acids and the purpose of this paper is to indicate their potential function in the heterogeneous release of atmospheric species such as HONO. The deposition of formic acid on a water-ice surface was studied using FT-RAIR spectroscopy over a range of temperatures between 100 and 165K. In all cases ionization to the formate (and oxonium) ions was observed. The results were confirmed by TPD (Temperature Programmed Desorption) measurements, which indicated that two distinct surface species adsorb to the ice. Potential reactions between the formic acid/formate ion surface and nitrogen dioxide were subsequently investigated by FT-RAIRS. Co-deposition experiments showed that N2O3 and the NO+ ion (associated with water) were formed as products. A mechanism is proposed to explain these results, which involves direct reaction between the organic acid and nitrogen dioxide. Similar experiments involving acetic acid also indicate ionization on a water-ice surface. The results are put into the context of atmospheric chemistry potentially occuring on cirrus cloud surfaces.

  19. Ring formation on an inclined surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Robert; Du, Xiyu

    2015-11-01

    A drop dried on a solid surface will typically leave a narrow band of solute deposited along the contact line. We examined variations of this deposit due to the inclination of the substrate using numerical simulations of a two-dimensional drop, equivalent to a strip-like drop. An asymptotic analysis of the contact line region predicts that the upslope deposit will grow faster at early times, but the growth of this deposit ends sooner because the upper contact line depins first. From our simulations we find that the deposit can be larger at either the upper or lower contact line depending on the initial drop volume and substrate inclination. For larger drops and steeper inclinations, the early lead in deposited mass at the upper contact line is wiped out by the earlier depinning of the upper contact line and subsequent continued growth at the lower contact line. Conversely, for smaller drops and shallower inclinations, the early lead of the upper contact line is insurmountable despite its earlier termination in growth. Our results show that it is difficult to reconstruct a postiorithe inclination of the substrate based solely on the shape of the deposit. The authors thank the James S. McDonnell Foundation for support through a 21st Century Science Initiative in Studying Complex Systems Research Award, and the National Science Foundation for support under Grant No. 0932600.

  20. Self-cleaning and surface chemical reactions during hafnium dioxide atomic layer deposition on indium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Rainer; Head, Ashley R; Yngman, Sofie; Knutsson, Johan V; Hjort, Martin; McKibbin, Sarah R; Troian, Andrea; Persson, Olof; Urpelainen, Samuli; Knudsen, Jan; Schnadt, Joachim; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2018-04-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables the ultrathin high-quality oxide layers that are central to all modern metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. Crucial to achieving superior device performance are the chemical reactions during the first deposition cycle, which could ultimately result in atomic-scale perfection of the semiconductor-oxide interface. Here, we directly observe the chemical reactions at the surface during the first cycle of hafnium dioxide deposition on indium arsenide under realistic synthesis conditions using photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the widely used ligand exchange model of the ALD process for the removal of native oxide on the semiconductor and the simultaneous formation of the first hafnium dioxide layer must be significantly revised. Our study provides substantial evidence that the efficiency of the self-cleaning process and the quality of the resulting semiconductor-oxide interface can be controlled by the molecular adsorption process of the ALD precursors, rather than the subsequent oxide formation.

  1. Production of Organic Grain Coatings by Surface-Mediated Reactions and the Consequences of This Process for Meteoritic Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2011-01-01

    When hydrogen, nitrogen and CO are exposed to amorphous iron silicate surfaces at temperatures between 500 - 900K, a carbonaceous coating forms via Fischer-Tropsch type reactions. Under normal circumstances such a catalytic coating would impede or stop further reaction. However, we find that this coating is a better catalyst than the amorphous iron silicates that initiate these reactions. The formation of a self-perpetuating catalytic coating on grain surfaces could explain the rich deposits of macromolecular carbon found in primitive meteorites and would imply that protostellar nebulae should be rich in organic material. Many more experiments are needed to understand this chemical system and its application to protostellar nebulae.

  2. Investigations Of Surface-Catalyzed Reactions In A Mars Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Max; Owens, W.; Meyers, J.; Fletcher, D. G.

    2011-05-01

    In the design of a thermal protection system (TPS) for a planetary entry vehicle, accurate modeling of the trajectory aero-heating poses a significant challenge owing to large uncertainties in chemical processes taking place at the surface. Even for surface-catalyzed reactions, which have been investigated extensively, there is no consensus on how they should be modeled; or, in some cases, on which reactions are likely to occur. Current TPS designs for Mars missions rely on a super-catalytic boundary condition, which assumes that all dissociated species recombine to the free stream composition.While this is recognized to be the the most conservative approach, discrepancies in aero-heating measurements in ground test facilities preclude less conservative design options, resulting in an increased TPS mass at the expense of scientific pay- load.Using two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence in a 30 kW inductively coupled plasma torch facility, preliminary studies have been performed to obtain spatially-resolved measurements of the dominant species in a plasma boundary layer for a Martian atmosphere mixture over catalytic and non-catalytic surfaces.

  3. Microanalysis of solid surfaces by nuclear reactions and elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agius, B.

    1975-01-01

    The principles involved in the use of monokinetic light ions beams, of about 1MeV, to the study of surface phenomena are presented. Two complementary techniques are described: the use of elastic scattering, which allows the analysis of impurity elements heavier than the substrate components and the use of nuclear reactions specific of light elements. Typical sensitivities are of the order of 10 11 at/cm 2 in good cases. The depth resolution varies, according to the cases, from about a hundred angstroems to a few thousand angstroems [fr

  4. An investigation of molybdenum and molybdenum oxide catalyzed hydrocarbon formation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tysoe, W.T.

    1995-09-01

    The document is divided into: experiments on model catalysts at high pressure, reaction studies on metallic Mo, surface chemistry experiments (metallic surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum; Mo(CO){sub 6} adsorption on alumina), and theoretical calculations.

  5. Formation of palladium(0) nanoparticles at microbial surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunge, Michael; Søbjerg, Lina S; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena

    2010-01-01

    ) nanoparticles were still deposited on autoclaved cells of C. necator that had no hydrogenase activity, suggesting a hydrogenase-independent formation mechanism. The catalytic properties of Pd(0) and bioPd(0) were determined by the amount of hydrogen released in a reaction with hypophosphite. Generally, bioPd(0...... potential. Hitherto, bacteria with the property of dissimilatory metal reduction have been in focus, although the biochemical reactions linking enzymatic Pd(II) reduction and Pd(0) deposition have not yet been identified. In this study we investigated Pd(II) reduction with formate as the electron donor......) demonstrated a lower level of activity than the Pd(0) control, possibly due to the inaccessibility of the Pd(0) fraction embedded in the cell envelope. Our results demonstrate the suitability of bacterial cells for the recovery of Pd(0), and formation and immobilization of Pd(0) nanoparticles inside the cell...

  6. EXFOR Basics. A short guide to the neutron reaction data exchange format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-01-01

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969.3 As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: l that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); l that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data

  7. Reactions of phenols and alcohols over thoria: mechanism of ether formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karuppannasamy, S.; Narayanan, K.; Pillai, C.N.

    1980-01-01

    The dehydration of phenols and alkylation of phenols by alcohols over thoria were studied at 400 to 500 0 C and atmospheric pressure. Phenol and cresols, when dehydrated gave diaryl ethers as main products. With para-substituted phenols such as p-methoxy, p-t-butyl, p-chloro, and p-nitrophenol no ether formation was noticed. All the reactions were accompanied by considerable amount of coke formation. Alkylation of phenols by alcohols gave a mixture of O- and C-alkylated products under the same reaction conditions. O-alkylation and C-alkylation are parallel reactions. The mechanistic aspects of the reactions are discussed. 3 figures, 3 tables

  8. Surface reaction of SnII on goethite (α-FeOOH): surface complexation, redox reaction, reductive dissolution, and phase transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulnee, Siriwan; Scheinost, Andreas C

    2014-08-19

    To elucidate the potential risk of (126)Sn migration from nuclear waste repositories, we investigated the surface reactions of Sn(II) on goethite as a function of pH and Sn(II) loading under anoxic condition with O2 level redox state and surface structure were investigated by Sn K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), goethite phase transformations were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The results demonstrate the rapid and complete oxidation of Sn(II) by goethite and formation of Sn(IV) (1)E and (2)C surface complexes. The contribution of (2)C complexes increases with Sn loading. The Sn(II) oxidation leads to a quantitative release of Fe(II) from goethite at low pH, and to the precipitation of magnetite at higher pH. To predict Sn sorption, we applied surface complexation modeling using the charge distribution multisite complexation approach and the XAS-derived surface complexes. Log K values of 15.5 ± 1.4 for the (1)E complex and 19.2 ± 0.6 for the (2)C complex consistently predict Sn sorption across pH 2-12 and for two different Sn loadings and confirm the strong retention of Sn(II) even under anoxic conditions.

  9. Heterogeneous-catalytic redox reactions in nitrate - formate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananiev, A.V.; Shilov, V.P.; Tananaev, I.G.; Brossard, Ph.; Broudic, J.Ch.

    2000-01-01

    It was found that an intensive destruction of various organic and mineral substances - usual components of aqueous waste solutions (oxalic acid, complexones, urea, hydrazine, ammonium nitrate, etc.) takes place under the conditions of catalytic denitration. Kinetics and mechanisms of urea and ammonium nitrate decomposition in the system HNO 3 - HCOOH - Pt/SiO 2 are comprehensively investigated. The behaviour of uranium, neptunium and plutonium under the conditions of catalytic denitration is studied. It is shown, that under the certain conditions the formic acid is an effective reducer of the uranium (VI), neptunium (VI, V) and plutonium (VI, IV) ions. Kinetics of heterogeneous-catalytic red-ox reactions of uranium (VI), neptunium (VI, V) and plutonium (VI, IV) with formic acid are investigated. The mechanisms of the appropriate reactions are evaluated. (authors)

  10. Alcali-silica reactions: Mechanisms for crack formations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2006-01-01

    Alkali-silica reactions (ASR) are found all over the world and cause a large number of damage, which have lead to different sets of requirements in the different countries for the aggregates, the cements and the admixtures. One of the reasons for the damage and the different requirements is that ......Alkali-silica reactions (ASR) are found all over the world and cause a large number of damage, which have lead to different sets of requirements in the different countries for the aggregates, the cements and the admixtures. One of the reasons for the damage and the different requirements...... is that the mechanical behavior of the ASR has not been fully investigated, although the chemical aspects of ASR have been dealt with in depth. This paper presents a unified, mechanical explanation of the ASR damage mechanism, covering the relevant aspects of the diffusion model; the stress-variations in the aggregate...

  11. Calculations of oxide formation on low-index Cu surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Xin; Liu, Renlong, E-mail: lrl@cqu.edu.cn, E-mail: henkelman@utexas.edu [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Xiao, Penghao; Yang, Sheng-Che; Henkelman, Graeme, E-mail: lrl@cqu.edu.cn, E-mail: henkelman@utexas.edu [Department of Chemistry and the Institute for Computational and Engineering Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-0165 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    Density-functional theory is used to evaluate the mechanism of copper surface oxidation. Reaction pathways of O{sub 2} dissociation on the surface and oxidation of the sub-surface are found on the Cu(100), Cu(110), and Cu(111) facets. At low oxygen coverage, all three surfaces dissociate O{sub 2} spontaneously. As oxygen accumulates on the surfaces, O{sub 2} dissociation becomes more difficult. A bottleneck to further oxidation occurs when the surfaces are saturated with oxygen. The barriers for O{sub 2} dissociation on the O-saturated Cu(100)-c(2×2)-0.5 monolayer (ML) and Cu(100) missing-row structures are 0.97 eV and 0.75 eV, respectively; significantly lower than those have been reported previously. Oxidation of Cu(110)-c(6×2), the most stable (110) surface oxide, has a barrier of 0.72 eV. As the reconstructions grow from step edges, clean Cu(110) surfaces can dissociatively adsorb oxygen until the surface Cu atoms are saturated. After slight rearrangements, these surface areas form a “1 ML” oxide structure which has not been reported in the literature. The barrier for further oxidation of this “1 ML” phase is only 0.31 eV. Finally the oxidized Cu(111) surface has a relatively low reaction energy barrier for O{sub 2} dissociation, even at high oxygen coverage, and allows for facile oxidation of the subsurface by fast O diffusion through the surface oxide. The kinetic mechanisms found provide a qualitative explanation of the observed oxidation of the low-index Cu surfaces.

  12. Productions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Surface Waters from Reactions with Atmospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Frances; Bell, Thomas; Yang, Mingxi

    2017-04-01

    Ozone (O3) is a key atmospheric oxidant, greenhouse gas and air pollutant. In marine environments, some atmospheric ozone is lost by reactions with aqueous compounds (e.g. dissolved organic material, DOM, dimethyl sulfide, DMS, and iodide) near the sea surface. These reactions also lead to formations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Removal of O3 by the ocean remains a large uncertainty in global and regional chemical transport models, hampering coastal air quality forecasts. To better understand the role of the ocean in controlling O3 concentrations in the coastal marine atmosphere, we designed and implemented a series of laboratory experiments whereby ambient surface seawater was bubbled with O3-enriched, VOC-free air in a custom-made glass bubble equilibration system. Gas phase concentrations of a range of VOCs were monitored continuously over the mass range m/z 33 - 137 at the outflow of the bubble equilibrator by a proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Gas phase O3 was also measured at the input and output of the equilibrator to monitor the uptake due to reactions with dissolved compounds in seawater. We observed consistent productions of a variety of VOCs upon reaction with O3, notably isoprene, aldehydes, and ketones. Aqueous DMS is rapidly removed from the reactions with O3. To test the importance of dissolved organic matter precursors, we added increasing (milliliter) volumes of Emiliania huxleyi culture to the equilibrator filled with aged seawater, and observed significant linear increases in gas phase concentrations of a number of VOCs. Reactions between DOM and O3 at the sea-air interface represent a potentially significant source of VOCs in marine air and a sink of atmospheric O3.

  13. Synergistic reaction between SO2 and NO2 on mineral oxides: a potential formation pathway of sulfate aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Ma, Qingxin; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Jinzhu; He, Hong

    2012-02-07

    Sulfate is one of the most important aerosols in the atmosphere. A new sulfate formation pathway via synergistic reactions between SO(2) and NO(2) on mineral oxides was proposed. The heterogeneous reactions of SO(2) and NO(2) on CaO, α-Fe(2)O(3), ZnO, MgO, α-Al(2)O(3), TiO(2), and SiO(2) were investigated by in situ Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS) at ambient temperature. Formation of sulfate from adsorbed SO(2) was promoted by the coexisting NO(2), while surface N(2)O(4) was observed as the crucial oxidant for the oxidation of surface sulfite. This process was significantly promoted by the presence of O(2). The synergistic effect between SO(2) and NO(2) was not observed on other mineral particles (such as CaCO(3) and CaSO(4)) probably due to the lack of the surface reactive oxygen sites. The synergistic reaction between SO(2) and NO(2) on mineral oxides resulted in the formation of internal mixtures of sulfate, nitrate, and mineral oxides. The change of mixture state will affect the physicochemical properties of atmospheric particles and therefore further influence their environmental and climate effects.

  14. STUDY OF REACTION SEQUENCES FOR FORMATION OF SOLID ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    31 déc. 2012 ... phase intermédiaire PbTiO3 et la formation de PZT à 800 °C. ... matériau céramique de type PZT de formule chimique: 0,48PbZrO3-0 .... (ATG) relative au mélange par un changement de perte visible équivalente à 3%.

  15. Reaction dynamics of small molecules at metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, P.A.

    1999-09-01

    The dissociation-desorption dynamics of D 2 upon the Sn/Pt(111) surface alloy are dependent on the surface concentration of Sn. The p(2 x 2) Sn/Pt(111) alloy surface (Θ Sn = 0.25 ML), is initially ∼30 times less reactive towards D 2 adsorption than clean Pt(111). On the (√3 x √3) R30 deg Sn/Pt(111) alloy surface (Θ Sn = 0.33 ML), increased inhibition of D 2 adsorption is reported, with S o ∼ 10 -5 at low energy, coinciding with the loss of stable Pt 3 hollow sites and a significant reduction in the D atom binding energy. Sticking on the √3 alloy is activated with an increased energy threshold of ∼280 meV, with no evidence that vibration enhances dissociation. The barrier to dissociation remains in the entrance channel before the D 2 bond begins to stretch. Vibrational excitation is, however, observed in nitrogen desorption from the catalytic reaction of NO + H 2 over Pd(110). For a surface at 600 K, N 2 vibrational state population ratios of P(v=1/v=0) = 0.50 ± 0.05 and P(v=2/v=0) = 0.60 ± 0.20 are reported. Desorption occurs via the N(ad) + N(ad) recombination channel with little energy released into translation and rotation. The translational energy release observed is dependent on the N 2 vibrational state, with translational temperatures of 425 K, 315 K and 180 K reported for the v=0, 1 and 2 states respectively. Sub-thermal energy releases and normally directed angular distributions suggest the influence of a trapping mechanism, recombining molecules scattering through a molecularly adsorbed state, with a transition state of large d NN responsible for the product vibrational excitation. Although N 2 dissociation on Fe(100) forms a simple overlayer structure, on Fe(110), molecular chemisorption does not occur at or above room temperature and the sticking is extremely small (∼10 -6 to 10 -7 ). Activated nitrogen bombardment can be used to prepare a 'surface nitride' with a structure related to the geometry of bulk Fe 4 N. Scanning tunnelling

  16. Enzymatic Transesterification of Ethyl Ferulate with Fish Oil and Reaction Optimization by Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic transesterification of ethyl ferulate (EF with fish oil from cod liver was investigated with Novozym® 435 as catalyst under solvent-free conditions. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the synthesis system for the production of feruloyl fish oil in industry. The modified HPLC method was first set up to characterise the reaction products together with liquid chromatography electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-TOF-MS. The influence of the addition of glycerol to the system on the feruloyl acylglycerol profile was investigated in terms of transesterification performance. The bioconversion rate of EF can be significantly increased with the increased formation of feruloyl fish oil products when appropriate amount of glycerol is present in the reaction. Therefore, an equivalent molar amount of glycerol was added to EF for the practical optimization of the system. The mutual effects of temperature (40 to 70 °C, reaction time (1 to 5 days, enzyme load (2 to 20 % and molar ratio of fish oil and EF in the substrate (1 to 5 were thus studied with the assistance of response surface methodology (RSM for the purpose of maximizing the formation of feruloyl fish oil. The models were well fitted and verified. The optimized conditions were found to be: temperature 70 °C, enzyme load 4.3 %, substrate ratio 4.7, and reaction time 5 days. Under these conditions, the maximum conversion of EF reached 92.4 %, and the formation of feruloyl fish oil reached 80.4 %, but the formation of by-product was minimized to 11.4 % only.

  17. Biofilm Formation of Listeria monocytogenes on Various Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mahdavi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Listeria monocytogenes is considered as a ubiquitous foodborne pathogen which can lead to serious infections, especially in newborns, elderly, pregnant, and immunocompromised people. The organism has been isolated from many foods and may cause meningitis, septicemia and abortion in pregnant women. Also L. monocytogenes forms biofilms on many food contact surface materials and medical devices. Development of biofilms on many surfaces is a potential source of contamination of foods that may lead to spoilage or transmission of foodborne pathogens. Materials & Methods: Biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes (RITCC 1293 serotype 4a was investigated. Hydrophobicity of L. monocytogenes was measured by MATH method. Then biofilm formation of the organism was assessed at 2, 4, 8, 16 and 20 hours on stainless steel (type 304 no 2B, polyethylene and glass by drop plate method. Results: Results indicated that L. monocytogenes with 85% of hydrophobicity formed biofilm on each of three surfaces. Biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces was significantly more than other surfaces (p<0.05. Conclusion: The ability of biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes on medical devices and food containers is very important as far as hygiene and disease outbreaks are concerned.

  18. Unified interpretation of exciplex formation and marcus electron transfer on the basis of two-dimensional free energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Shigeo; Tachiya, M

    2007-09-27

    The mechanism of exciplex formation proposed in a previous paper has been refined to show how exciplex formation and Marcus electron transfer (ET) in fluorescence quenching are related to each other. This was done by making simple calculations of the free energies of the initial (DA*) and final (D+A-) states of ET. First it was shown that the decrease in D-A distance can induce intermolecular ET even in nonpolar solvents where solvent orientational polarization is absent, and that it leads to exciplex formation. This is consistent with experimental results that exciplex is most often observed in nonpolar solvents. The calculation was then extended to ET in polar solvents where the free energies are functions of both D-A distance and solvent orientational polarization. This enabled us to discuss both exciplex formation and Marcus ET in the same D-A pair and solvent on the basis of 2-dimensional free energy surfaces. The surfaces contain more information about the rates of these reactions, the mechanism of fluorescence quenching by ET, etc., than simple reaction schemes. By changing the parameters such as the free energy change of reaction, solvent dielectric constants, etc., one can construct the free energy surfaces for various systems. The effects of free energy change of reaction and of solvent polarity on the mechanism and relative importance of exciplex formation and Marcus ET in fluorescence quenching can be well explained. The free energy surface will also be useful for discussion of other phenomena related to ET reactions.

  19. What happens when iron becomes wet? Observation of reactions at interfaces between liquid and metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, M

    2003-01-01

    Synchrotron-radiation has been applied to investigation of interfaces between liquid and metal surfaces, with a special attention to corrosion. Three topics are shown: (1) nano structures of rusts formed on steel after atmospheric corrosion. Evolution of 'Fe(O, OH) sub 6 network' is the key to understand how the durable rusts prevent from formation of more rusts. (2) In situ observation of reactions at the interface has been carried out for localized corrosion of stainless steel. It is shown that change in states of Cr sup 3 sup + and Br sup - ions near the interface is deeply related with a breakout of the passivation film. (3) A structural phase transformation on a Cu sub 3 Au(001) surface was investigated. Ordering remains even at a temperature higher than the bulk-critical temperature, showing surface-induced ordering. These approaches gives us crucial information for a new steel-product. (author)

  20. Formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) from reaction of monochloramine: a new disinfection by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junghoon; Valentine, Richard L

    2002-02-01

    Studies have been conducted specifically to investigate the hypothesis that N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) can be produced by reactions involving monochloramine. Experiments were conducted using dimethylamine (DMA) as a model precursor. NDMA was formed from the reaction between DMA and monochloramine indicating that it should be considered a potential disinfection by-product. The formation of NDMA increased with increased monochloramine concentration and showed maximum in yield when DMA was varied at fixed monochloramine concentrations. The mass spectra of the NDMA formed from DMA and 15N isotope labeled monochloramine (15NH2Cl) showed that the source of one of the nitrogen atoms in the nitroso group in NDMA was from monochloramine. Addition of 0.05 and 0.5 mM of preformed monochloramine to a secondarily treated wastewater at pH 7.2 also resulted in the formation of 3.6 and 111 ng/L of NDMA, respectively, showing that this is indeed an environmentally relevant NDMA formation pathway. The proposed NDMA formation mechanism consists of (i) the formation of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) intermediate from the reaction of DMA with monochloramine followed by, (ii) the oxidation of UDMH by monochloramine to NDMA, and (iii) the reversible chlorine transfer reaction between monochloramine and DMA which is parallel to (i). We conclude that reactions involving monochloramine in addition to classical nitrosation reactions are potentially important pathways for NDMA formation.

  1. Nanoparticles dynamics on a surface: fractal pattern formation and fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Veronika V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review our recent results on the formation and the post-growth relaxation processes of nanofractals on surface. For this study we developed a method which describes the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal and accounts for their diffusion and detachment. We demonstrate...... that these kinetic processes determine the final shape of the islands on surface after post-growth relaxation. We consider different scenarios of fractal relaxation and analyze the time evolution of the island's morphology....

  2. Spontaneous formation of optically induced surface relief gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblond, H; Barille, R; Ahmadi-Kandjani, S; Nunzi, J-M; Ortyl, E; Kucharski, S

    2009-01-01

    We develop a model based on Fick's law of diffusion as a phenomenological description of the molecular motion, and on the coupled mode theory, to describe single-beam surface relief grating formation in azopolymer thin films. The model allows us to explain the mechanism of spontaneous patterning, and self-organization. It allows us to compute the surface relief profile and its evolution, with good agreement with experiments.

  3. Spontaneous formation of optically induced surface relief gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblond, H; Barille, R; Ahmadi-Kandjani, S; Nunzi, J-M [Laboratoire POMA, Universite d' Angers, CNRS FRE 2988, 2, Bd Lavoisier, 49045 Angers (France); Ortyl, E; Kucharski, S, E-mail: herve.leblond@univ-angers.f [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Polymer Engineering and Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2009-10-28

    We develop a model based on Fick's law of diffusion as a phenomenological description of the molecular motion, and on the coupled mode theory, to describe single-beam surface relief grating formation in azopolymer thin films. The model allows us to explain the mechanism of spontaneous patterning, and self-organization. It allows us to compute the surface relief profile and its evolution, with good agreement with experiments.

  4. Quasifission in heavy and superheavy element formation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinde, D.J.; Dasgupta, M.; Jeung, D.Y.; Mohanto, G.; Prasad, E.; Simenel, C.; Walshe, J.; Wahkle, A.; Williams, E.; Carter, I.P.; Cook, K.J.; Kalkal, Sunil; Rafferty, D.C.; Rietz, R. du; Simpson, E.C.; David, H.M.; Düllmann, Ch.E.; Khuyagbaatar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Superheavy elements are created in the laboratory by the fusion of two heavy nuclei. The large Coulomb repulsion that makes superheavy elements decay also makes the fusion process that forms them very unlikely. Instead, after sticking together for a short time, the two nuclei usually come apart, in a process called quasifission. Mass-angle distributions give the most direct information on the characteristics and time scales of quasifission. A systematic study of carefully chosen mass-angle distributions has provided information on the global trends of quasifission. Large deviations from these systematics reveal the major role played by the nuclear structure of the two colliding nuclei in determining the reaction outcome, and thus implicitly in hindering or favouring superheavy element production.

  5. Some insights into formamide formation through gas-phase reactions in the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We study the viability of different gas-phase ion-molecule reactions that could produce precursors of formamide in the interstellar medium. We analyze different reactions between cations containing a nitrogen atom (NH 3 + , NH 4 + , NH 3 OH + , and NH 2 OH + ) and neutral molecules having one carbonyl group (H 2 CO and HCOOH). First, we report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies for the proposed processes. Second, for more favorable reactions, from a thermodynamic point of view, we perform a theoretical study of the potential energy surface. In particular, the more exothermic processes correspond to the reactions of ionized and protonated hydroxylamine with formaldehyde. In addition, a neutral-neutral reaction has also been considered. The analysis of the potential energy surfaces corresponding to these reactions shows that these processes present a net activation barrier and that they cannot be considered as a source of formamide in space.

  6. Some Insights into Formamide Formation through Gas-phase Reactions in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We study the viability of different gas-phase ion-molecule reactions that could produce precursors of formamide in the interstellar medium. We analyze different reactions between cations containing a nitrogen atom (NH_{3}^{+}, NH_{4}^{+}, NH3OH+, and NH2OH+) and neutral molecules having one carbonyl group (H2CO and HCOOH). First, we report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies for the proposed processes. Second, for more favorable reactions, from a thermodynamic point of view, we perform a theoretical study of the potential energy surface. In particular, the more exothermic processes correspond to the reactions of ionized and protonated hydroxylamine with formaldehyde. In addition, a neutral-neutral reaction has also been considered. The analysis of the potential energy surfaces corresponding to these reactions shows that these processes present a net activation barrier and that they cannot be considered as a source of formamide in space.

  7. Nanostructure formation on refractory metal surfaces irradiated by helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, Shuichi; Kajita, Shin; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2013-01-01

    Helium defects on plasma-facing refractory metals like tungsten have been studied in fusion sciences from the view point of the effects on metal surface properties, concentrating on the bubble formation. However, the surface morphology over the lower surface temperature range was found recently to be changed drastically, something like cotton down or arborescence, sometimes called as “fuzz”. The formation process, although still open problem, would be discussed in terms of viscoelastic model with the effect of surface tension, taking account of its thermal properties and nano-bubbles inside the thin fibers. Some physical surface characteristics like electron emission, radiation emissivity and sputtering are quite influenced by its forest-like structure. Unipolar arcing has been newly studied by using such a surface structure which makes its initiation controllable. In the present report, other examples of nanostructure formation in a variety of particle incident conditions have been introduced as well as the possibility of its industrial applications to enhance interdisciplinary interests. (author)

  8. Surface oxidization-reduction reactions in Columbia Plateau basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.F.; Yee, A.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented which define principal oxidation-reduction reactions expected between ground water and iron in the Umtanum and Cohassett basalt flows of south central Washington. Data include kinetics of aqueous iron speciation, rates of O 2 uptake and nature of oxyhydroxide precipitates. Such data are important in predicting behavior of radionuclides in basalt aquifers including determination of valence states, speciation, solubility, sorption, and coprecipitation on iron oxyhydroxide substrates and colloids. Analyses of the basalt by XPS indicates that ferrous iron is oxidized to ferric iron on the surface and that the total iron decreases as a function of pH during experimental weathering. Iron oxyhydroxide phases did not form surface coating on basalt surfaces but rather nucleated as separate plases in solution. No significant increases in Cs or Sr sorption were observed with increased weathering of the basalt. Concurrent increases in Fe(II) and decreases in Fe(III) in slightly to moderately acid solutions indicated continued oxidization of ferrous iron in the basalt. At neutral to basic pH, Fe(II) was strongly sorbed onto the basalt surface (Kd = 6.5 x 10 -3 1 x m 2 ) resulting in low dissolved concentrations even under anoxic conditions. The rate of O 2 uptake increased with decreasing pH. Diffusion rates (-- 10 -14 cm 2 x s -1 ), calculated using a one-dimensional analytical model, indicate grain boundary diffusion. Comparisons of Eh values calculated by Pt electrode, dissolved O 2 and Fe(II)/Fe(III) measurements showed considerable divergence, with the ferric-ferrous couple being the preferred method of estimating Eh

  9. Hydrogeological aspects of radioactive waste disposal into surface formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    1980-01-01

    Safe disposal is discussed of radioactive wastes in geological surface formations and basic criteria are shown of the radiological protection of population from possible effects of radioactive materials diffused in the environment. Main principles are listed governing the selection of suitable localities with respect to possible interactions of the locality and the storage site with the environment. (author)

  10. Skeletal Diversity in Combinatorial Fashion: A New Format for the Castagnoli-Cushman Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepikhina, Anastasia; Dar'in, Dmitry; Bakulina, Olga; Chupakhin, Evgeny; Krasavin, Mikhail

    2017-11-13

    A new format for the Castagnoli-Cushman reaction of structurally diverse dicarboxylic acids, amines, and aldehydes in the presence of acetic anhydride as dehydrating agent is described. The reaction is distinctly amenable to parallel format: the combinatorial array of 180 reactions delivered 157 products of >85% purity without chromatographic purification (of this number, 143 compounds had >94% purity). The new method offers a convenient preparation of the skeletally and peripherally diverse, lead- and druglike γ- and δ-lactam carboxylic acids with high diastereoselectivity in combinatorial fashion.

  11. Exchange reaction between hydrogen and deuterium. I. Importance of surface reactions in the steady-state mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marteau, C; Gaillard-Cusin, F; James, H [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France). Centre de Recherches sur la Chimie de Combustion et des Hautes Temperatures

    1978-05-01

    Investigation of heterogeneous initiation process of gas phase linear chain reactions is carried out through the study of H/sub 2/-D/sub 2/ exchange reaction. Experimental data under study concern mainly the stationary rate of HD formation and the prestationary proceeding. Steady-state method accounts for the first one of these data; it allows to clearly compare the wall process part to the part played by the homogeneous chain reaction towards HD formation. Activation energy of exchange elementary step between chemisorbed hydrogen (on silica) and gaseous deuterium has been evaluated: Esub(e1)=52+-1 Kcal/mole.

  12. Unraveling the Reaction Chemistry of Icy Ocean World Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Gerakines, P.

    2017-12-01

    The diverse endogenic chemistry of ocean worlds can be divided among interior, surface, and above-surface process, with contributions from exogenic agents such as solar, cosmic, and magnetospheric radiation. Bombardment from micrometeorites to comets also can influence chemistry by both delivering new materials and altering pre-existing ones, and providing energy to drive reactions. Geological processes further complicate the chemistry by transporting materials from one environment to another. In this presentation the focus will be on some of the thermally driven and radiation-induced changes expected from icy materials, primarily covalent and ionic compounds. Low-temperature conversions of a few relatively simple molecules into ions possessing distinct infrared (IR) features will be covered, with an emphasis on such features as might be identified through either orbiting spacecraft or landers. The low-temperature degradation of a few bioorganic molecules, such as DNA nucleobases and some common amino acids, will be used as examples of the more complex, and potentially misleading, chemistry expected for icy moons of the outer solar system. This work was supported by NASA's Emerging Worlds and Outer Planets Research programs, as well as the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Goddard Center for Astrobiology.

  13. Reaction of a phospholipid monolayer with gas-phase ozone at the air-water interface: measurement of surface excess and surface pressure in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Katherine C; Rennie, Adrian R; King, Martin D; Hardman, Samantha J O; Lucas, Claire O M; Pfrang, Christian; Hughes, Brian R; Hughes, Arwel V

    2010-11-16

    The reaction between gas-phase ozone and monolayers of the unsaturated lipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, POPC, on aqueous solutions has been studied in real time using neutron reflection and surface pressure measurements. The reaction between ozone and lung surfactant, which contains POPC, leads to decreased pulmonary function, but little is known about the changes that occur to the interfacial material as a result of oxidation. The results reveal that the initial reaction of ozone with POPC leads to a rapid increase in surface pressure followed by a slow decrease to very low values. The neutron reflection measurements, performed on an isotopologue of POPC with a selectively deuterated palmitoyl strand, reveal that the reaction leads to loss of this strand from the air-water interface, suggesting either solubilization of the product lipid or degradation of the palmitoyl strand by a reactive species. Reactions of (1)H-POPC on D(2)O reveal that the headgroup region of the lipids in aqueous solution is not dramatically perturbed by the reaction of POPC monolayers with ozone supporting degradation of the palmitoyl strand rather than solubilization. The results are consistent with the reaction of ozone with the oleoyl strand of POPC at the air-water interface leading to the formation of OH radicals. The highly reactive OH radicals produced can then go on to react with the saturated palmitoyl strands leading to the formation of oxidized lipids with shorter alkyl tails.

  14. The formation of illite from nontronite by mesophilic and thermophilic bacterial reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Dong, Hailiang; Kim, Jinwook

    2011-01-01

    The formation of illite through the smectite-to-illite (S-I) reaction is considered to be one of the most important mineral reactions occurring during diagenesis. In biologically catalyzed systems, however, this transformation has been suggested to be rapid and to bypass the high temperature and long time requirements. To understand the factors that promote the S-I reaction, the present study focused on the effects of pH, temperature, solution chemistry, and aging on the S-I reaction in microbially mediated systems. Fe(III)-reduction experiments were performed in both growth and non-growth media with two types of bacteria: mesophilic (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32) and thermophilic (Thermus scotoductus SA-01). Reductive dissolution of NAu-2 was observed and the formation of illite in treatment with thermophilic SA-01 was indicated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A basic pH (8.4) and high temperature (65°C) were the most favorable conditions for the formation of illite. A long incubation time was also found to enhance the formation of illite. K-nontronite (non-permanent fixation of K) was also detected and differentiated from the discrete illite in the XRD profiles. These results collectively suggested that the formation of illite associated with the biologically catalyzed smectite-to-illite reaction pathway may bypass the prolonged time and high temperature required for the S-I reaction in the absence of microbial activity.

  15. Formation of negative ions on a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amersfoort, P.W. van.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis a fundamental study of the charge exchange process of positive ions on the converter surface is presented. Beams of hydrogen ad cesium ions are scattered from a thoroughly cleaned W(110) surface, under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The cesium coverage of the surface is a controlled parameter. Ch. 2 deals with the negative-ion formation probability for hydrogen atoms. The influence of coabsorption of hydrogen is studied in Ch. 3. These measurements are important for understanding the formation process in plasma sources, because the converter surface is expected to be strongly contaminated with hydrogen. The charge state of scattered cesium particles is investigated in Ch. 4. Knowledge of this parameter is essential for Ch. 5, in which a model study of adsorption of cesium on a metal surface in contact with a plasma is presented. Finally, the negative-ion formation process in a plasma environment is studied in Ch. 6. Measurements done on a hollow-cathode discharge equipped with a novel type of converter, a porous tungsten button, are discussed. Liquid cesium diffuses through this button towards the side in contact with the plasma. (Auth.)

  16. Surface roughness effects on blister formation in polycrystalline molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidoh, Masahiro; Sone, Kazuho; Yamada, Rayji; Ohtsuka, Hidewo; Murakami, Yoshio

    1977-07-01

    Polycrystalline molybdenum targets with electropolished and roughened surfaces were bombarded with 100 keV He + and 200 keV H 2 + ions at room temperature. It has been demonstrated that the blister formation is largely or completely suppressed by roughening the electropolished surface with emery paper of No. 1200, No. 400 and No. 100. Up to a He + fluence of 1.0 x 10 19 particles/cm 2 , no blisters are observed in the targets with the two roughest surfaces, while on the smooth surface blisters begin to occur at a fluence of 7.5 x 10 17 particles/cm 2 . The surface roughness effect on blister suppression is discussed in relation to the projected range of incident particles. (auth.)

  17. Competing reactions of selected atmospheric gases on Fe3O4 nanoparticles surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltouny, N; Ariya, Parisa A

    2014-11-14

    Heterogeneous reactions on atmospheric aerosol surfaces are increasingly considered important in understanding aerosol-cloud nucleation and climate change. To understand potential reactions in polluted atmospheres, the co-adsorption of NO2 and toluene to magnetite (Fe3O4i.e. FeO·Fe2O3) nanoparticles at ambient conditions was investigated for the first time. The surface area, size distribution, and morphology of Fe3O4 nanoparticles were characterized by BET method and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Adsorption isotherms, collected by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection, showed that the presence of NO2 decreased the adsorption of toluene. The analyses of the surface chemical composition of Fe3O4 by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal that, upon the addition of NO2, the surface is oxidized and a contribution at 532.5 ± 0.4 eV in the O1s spectrum appears, showing that NO2 likely competes with toluene by dissociating on Fe(2+) sites and forming NO3(-). Different competing effects were observed for oxidized Fe3O4; oxidation occurred when exposed solely to NO2, whereas, the mixture of toluene and NO2 resulted in a reduction of the surface i.e. increased Fe(2+)/Fe(3+). Analyses by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry further suggest toluene reacts with Fe(3+) sites forming oxygenated organics. Our results indicate that on reduced magnetite, NO2 is more reactive and competes with toluene; in contrast, on oxidized Fe3O4, toluene is more reactive. Because magnetite can assume a range of oxidation ratios in the environment, different competing interactions between pollutants like NO2 and toluene could influence atmospheric processes, namely, the formation of Fe(2+) and the formation of atmospheric oxidants.

  18. The synthesis of PdPt/carbon paper via surface limited redox replacement reactions for oxygen reduction reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motsoeneng, RG

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface-limited redox replacement reactions using the electrochemical atomic layer deposition (EC-ALD) technique were used to synthesize PdPt bimetallic electrocatalysts on carbon paper substrate. Electrocatalysts having different Pd:Pt ratio were...

  19. EXFOR basics: A short guide to the nuclear reaction data exchange format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear data compilation centers. This format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data

  20. Shewanella putrefaciens Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Food Processing Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, Mette; Johansen, Charlotte; Huber, Ingrid; Gram, Lone

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended in buffer adhered readily to stainless steel surfaces. Maximum numbers of adherent bacteria per square centimeter were reached in 8 h at 25°C and reflected the cell density in suspension. Numbers of adhering bacteria from a suspension containing 108 CFU/ml were much lower in a laminar flow system (modified Robbins device) (reaching 102 CFU/cm2) than in a batch system (reaching 107 CFU/cm2), and maximum numbers were reached after 24 h. When nutrients were supplied, S. putrefaciens grew in biofilms with layers of bacteria. The rate of biofilm formation and the thickness of the film were not dependent on the availability of carbohydrate (lactate or glucose) or on iron starvation. The number of S. putrefaciens bacteria on the surface was partly influenced by the presence of other bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) which reduced the numbers of S. putrefaciens bacteria in the biofilm. Numbers of bacteria on the surface must be quantified to evaluate the influence of environmental factors on adhesion and biofilm formation. We used a combination of fluorescence microscopy (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and in situ hybridization, for mixed-culture studies), ultrasonic removal of bacteria from surfaces, and indirect conductometry and found this combination sufficient to quantify bacteria on surfaces. PMID:11319118

  1. A density functional theory study on the carbon chain growth of ethanol formation on Cu-Co (111) and (211) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Bohua; Dong, Xiuqin; Yu, Yingzhe [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China); Wen, Guobin [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, Minhua, E-mail: mhzhang@tju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Calculations based on the first-principle density functional theory were carried out to study ethanol formation from syngas on Cu-Co surfaces. • The most controversial reactions in ethanol formation from syngas were researched: CO dissociation mechanism and the key reactions of carbon chain growth of ethanol formation (HCO insertion reactions (CHx + HCO → CHxCHO (x = 1–3))). • Four model surfaces (Cu-Co (111) and (211) with Cu-rich or Co-rich surfaces) were built to investigate the synergy of the Cu and Co components. • The PDOS of 4d orbitals and d-band center analysis of surface Cu and Co atoms of all surfaces were studied to reveal correlation between electronic property and catalytic performance. - Abstract: Calculations based on the first-principle density functional theory were carried out to study the most controversial reactions in ethanol formation from syngas on Cu-Co surfaces: CO dissociation mechanism and the key reactions of carbon chain growth of ethanol formation (HCO insertion reactions) on four model surfaces (Cu-Co (111) and (211) with Cu-rich or Co-rich surfaces) to investigate the synergy of the Cu and Co components since the complete reaction network of ethanol formation from syngas is a huge computational burden to calculate on four Cu-Co surface models. We investigated adsorption of important species involved in these reactions, activation barrier and reaction energy of H-assisted dissociation mechanism, directly dissociation of CO, and HCO insertion reactions (CH{sub x} + HCO → CH{sub x}CHO (x = 1–3)) on four Cu-Co surface models. It was found that reactions on Cu-rich (111) and (211) surfaces all have lower activation barrier in H-assisted dissociation and HCO insertion reactions, especially CH + HCO → CHCHO reaction. The PDOS of 4d orbitals of surface Cu and Co atoms of all surfaces were studied. Analysis of d-band center of Cu and Co atoms and the activation barrier data suggested the correlation between

  2. Nicotiana tabacum as model for ozone - plant surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain; Canaval, Eva; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. The ensuing injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through the stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. A striking question of current research is the environment and plant specific partitioning of ozone loss between gas phase, stomatal or plant surface sink terms. Here we show results from ozone fumigation experiments using various Nicotiana Tabacum varieties, whose surfaces are covered with different amounts of unsaturated diterpenoids exuded by their glandular trichomes. Exposure to elevated ozone levels (50 to 150 ppbv) for 5 to 15 hours in an exceptionally clean cuvette system did neither result in a reduction of photosynthesis nor caused any visible leaf damage. Both these ozone induced stress effects have been observed previously in ozone fumigation experiments with the ozone sensitive tobacco line Bel-W3. In our case ozone fumigation was accompanied by a continuous release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be clearly associated to their condensed phase precursors for the first time. Gas phase reactions of ozone were avoided by choosing a high enough gas exchange rate of the plant cuvette system. In the case of the Ambalema variety, that is known to exude only the diterpenoid cis-abienol, ozone fumigation experiments yield the volatiles formaldehyde and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK). The latter could be unequivocally separated from isomeric methacrolein (MACR) by the aid of a Selective Reagent Ion Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SRI-ToF-MS), which was switched every six minutes from H3O+ to NO+ primary ion mode and vice versa. Consistent with the picture of an ozone protection mechanism caused by reactive diterpenoids at the leaf surface are the results from dark-light experiments. The ozone loss obtained from the

  3. Surface chloride salt formation on Space Shuttle exhaust alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Pellett, G. L.; Sebacher, D. I.; Wakelyn, N. T.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum oxide samples from the exhaust of Space Shuttle launches STS-1, STS-4, STS-5, and STS-6 were collected from surfaces on or around the launch pad complex and chemically analyzed. The results indicate that the particulate solid-propellant rocket motor (SRM) alumina was heavily chlorided. Concentrations of water-soluble aluminum (III) ion were large, suggesting that the surface of the SRM alumina particles was rendered soluble by prior reactions with HCl and H2O in the SRM exhaust cloud. These results suggest that Space Shuttle exhaust alumina particles are good sites for nucleation and condensation of atmospheric water. Laboratory experiments conducted at 220 C suggest that partial surface chloriding of alumina may occur in hot Space Shuttle exhaust plumes.

  4. Evaluation of scale formation in waterwall heated surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylasheva Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the possibility of forecasting assessments of the speed and the time of formation of depositions in the evaporator-tube elements of double-drum boilers. The values of thermal flow in the wall region of tank screens of boiler furnace are obtained, besides the velocity values of scaling metal corrosion products are obtained. Conclusions about the ability of forecasting unnominal situations and emergency risks dependent with damage to the screen surface heating pipes are made.

  5. Bacterial biofilm formation in different surfaces of food industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Angélica Dalla Costa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The term biofilm describes the sessile microbial life form, characterized by microorganism adhesion to any surface and with the production of extracellular polymeric substances. In food industries, the formation of biofilms results in serious problems, since it can be a contamination source of the food product, compromising the final product quality and consumer health. The aim of this study was to verify the adhesion of biofilms (sessile cells of pathogenic and/or deteriorating bacteria against surfaces of the food industry. The bacterial species tested were Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 and Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028. It was used stainless steel and polypropylene coupons as contact surfaces. The results demonstrated that P. aeruginosa and S. Typhimurium showed higher biofilm formation capacity. Statistically, there was no difference in count of P. aeruginosa and S. Typhimurium (p > 0.05 cells. The same occurred between L. monocytogenes and S. aureus. However, the counts of P. aeruginosa and S. Typhimurium cells were statistically higher than S. aureus and L. monocytogenes (p < 0.05. By means of scanning electron microscopy it was also found increased adhesion of P. aeruginosa. The results revealed that P. aeruginosa was the bacterial species with higher biofilm formation capacity among the others.

  6. SurfKin: an ab initio kinetic code for modeling surface reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thong Nguyen-Minh; Liu, Bin; Huynh, Lam K

    2014-10-05

    In this article, we describe a C/C++ program called SurfKin (Surface Kinetics) to construct microkinetic mechanisms for modeling gas-surface reactions. Thermodynamic properties of reaction species are estimated based on density functional theory calculations and statistical mechanics. Rate constants for elementary steps (including adsorption, desorption, and chemical reactions on surfaces) are calculated using the classical collision theory and transition state theory. Methane decomposition and water-gas shift reaction on Ni(111) surface were chosen as test cases to validate the code implementations. The good agreement with literature data suggests this is a powerful tool to facilitate the analysis of complex reactions on surfaces, and thus it helps to effectively construct detailed microkinetic mechanisms for such surface reactions. SurfKin also opens a possibility for designing nanoscale model catalysts. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Formation, transformation and dissolution of phases formed on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.

    1983-03-01

    The basic mechanisms of film growth, transformation, and dissolution of phases formed on surfaces are discussed. Film growth can occur via solid-state processes or via substrate (usally metal or alloy) dissolution, followed by local supersaturation and precipitation of an insoluble phase. The phase(s) formed may be metastable and transform to a more stable phase, via either solid-state or dissolution-reprecipitation processes. Film dissolution reactions can also occur via a variety of mechanisms, including: (i) direct chemical dissolution when no oxidation state change occurs; (ii) redox dissolution when the film dissolves via a redox reaction involving a reducing or oxidizing agent in solution; and (iii) autoreduction, where film dissolution is coupled to metal dissolution. Such film-growth and dissolution processes, which often produce complex multilayer films, are common in the nuclear industry. A number of examples are discussed

  8. Surface grafted chitosan gels. Part II. Gel formation and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per M.

    2014-01-01

    Responsive biomaterial hydrogels attract significant attention due to their biocompatibility and degradability. In order to make chitosan based gels, we first graft one layer of chitosan to silica, and then build a chitosan/poly(acrylic acid) multilayer using the layer-by-layer approach. After...... cross-linking the chitosan present in the polyelectrolyte multilayer, poly(acrylic acid) is partly removed by exposing the multilayer structure to a concentrated carbonate buffer solution at a high pH, leaving a surface-grafted cross-linked gel. Chemical cross-linking enhances the gel stability against...... detachment and decomposition. The chemical reaction between gluteraldehyde, the cross-linking agent, and chitosan was followed in situ using total internal reflection Raman (TIRR) spectroscopy, which provided a molecular insight into the complex reaction mechanism, as well as the means to quantify the cross...

  9. Swarm formation control utilizing elliptical surfaces and limiting functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Laura E; Fields, Mary Anne; Valavanis, Kimon P

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present a strategy for organizing swarms of unmanned vehicles into a formation by utilizing artificial potential fields that were generated from normal and sigmoid functions. These functions construct the surface on which swarm members travel, controlling the overall swarm geometry and the individual member spacing. Nonlinear limiting functions are defined to provide tighter swarm control by modifying and adjusting a set of control variables that force the swarm to behave according to set constraints, formation, and member spacing. The artificial potential functions and limiting functions are combined to control swarm formation, orientation, and swarm movement as a whole. Parameters are chosen based on desired formation and user-defined constraints. This approach is computationally efficient and scales well to different swarm sizes, to heterogeneous systems, and to both centralized and decentralized swarm models. Simulation results are presented for a swarm of 10 and 40 robots that follow circle, ellipse, and wedge formations. Experimental results are included to demonstrate the applicability of the approach on a swarm of four custom-built unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs).

  10. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Hohmann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application.

  11. Surface Properties of Titanium dioxide and its Structural Modifications by Reactions with Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpegamage, Sandamali

    Surfaces of metal oxides play a vital role in many technologically important applications. The surfaces of titanium dioxide, in particular, show quite promising properties that can be utilized in solid-state gas sensing and photocatalysis applications. In the first part of this dissertation we investigate these properties of TiO2 surfaces through a vigorous surface scientific approach. In the second part, we investigate the possibilities of modifying the TiO2 surfaces by depositing multi-component transition metal oxide monolayers so that the properties of bare TiO2 surface can be influenced in a beneficial way. For instance, via formation of new surface sites or cations that have different valance states, the chemisorption and catalytic properties can be modified. We use sophisticated experimental surface science techniques that are compatible with ultra-high vacuum technology for surface characterization. All the experimental results, except for the photocatalysis experiments, were compared to and verified by supporting DFT-based theoretical results produced by our theory collaborators. TiO2 based solid-state gas sensors have been used before for detecting trace amounts of explosives such as 2,4-dinitrololuene (DNT), a toxic decomposition product of the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) that have very low vapor pressure. However, the adsorption, desorption and reaction mechanism were not well- understood. Here, we investigate 2,4-DNT adsorption on rutile-TiO2(110) surface in order to gain insight about these mechanisms in an atomistic level and we propose an efficient way of desorbing DNT from the surface through UV-light induced photoreactions. TiO2 exists in different polymorphs and the photocatalytic activity differs from one polymorph to another. Rutile and anatase are the most famous forms of TiO2 in photocatalysis and anatase is known to show higher activity than rutile. The photoactivity also varies depending on the surface orientation for the same

  12. Chemical-Reaction-Controlled Phase Separated Drops: Formation, Size Selection, and Coarsening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtz, Jean David; Lee, Chiu Fan

    2018-02-01

    Phase separation under nonequilibrium conditions is exploited by biological cells to organize their cytoplasm but remains poorly understood as a physical phenomenon. Here, we study a ternary fluid model in which phase-separating molecules can be converted into soluble molecules, and vice versa, via chemical reactions. We elucidate using analytical and simulation methods how drop size, formation, and coarsening can be controlled by the chemical reaction rates, and categorize the qualitative behavior of the system into distinct regimes. Ostwald ripening arrest occurs above critical reaction rates, demonstrating that this transition belongs entirely to the nonequilibrium regime. Our model is a minimal representation of the cell cytoplasm.

  13. Formation and reactions of radical cations of substituted benzenes in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcman, J.

    1977-08-01

    Radical cations of anisole, methylated benzenes, ethylbenzene, isopropylbenzene, tert-butylbenzene and N,N-dimethylaniline were studied in aqueous media by pulse radiolytic technique. Absorption spectra and reaction kinetics of the radical cations were recorded. The radical cations are formed from the corresponding OH adducts by the elimination of OH - , either by a simple dissociation or by an acid catalyzed reaction. The rate constants of the formation of the radical cations and their reactions with water, OH - and Fe 2+ , or the reaction of a proton loss, were measured. The rate constants for the reaction with water and OH - , together with the rate constants for the dissociation of the OH adducts, are correlated with the ionization potential of the parent compound. These correlations offer a possibility of predicting the acid-base properties of radical cations of substituted benzenes, or the estimation of their ionization potential. (author)

  14. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format. Revision 97/1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    1997-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Center Network. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility rather than optimization of data processing in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine)

  15. Functionalized Surface Geometries Induce: “Bone: Formation by Autoinduction”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Ripamonti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The induction of tissue formation, and the allied disciplines of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, have flooded the twenty-first century tissue biology scenario and morphed into high expectations of a fulfilling regenerative dream of molecularly generated tissues and organs in assembling human tissue factories. The grand conceptualization of deploying soluble molecular signals, first defined by Turing as forms generating substances, or morphogens, stemmed from classic last century studies that hypothesized the presence of morphogens in several mineralized and non-mineralized mammalian matrices. The realization of morphogens within mammalian matrices devised dissociative extractions and chromatographic procedures to isolate, purify, and finally reconstitute the cloned morphogens, found to be members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β supergene family, with insoluble signals or substrata to induce de novo tissue induction and morphogenesis. Can we however construct macroporous bioreactors per se capable of inducing bone formation even without the exogenous applications of the osteogenic soluble molecular signals of the TGF-β supergene family? This review describes original research on coral-derived calcium phosphate-based macroporous constructs showing that the formation of bone is independent of the exogenous application of the osteogenic soluble signals of the TGF-β supergene family. Such signals are the molecular bases of the induction of bone formation. The aim of this review is to primarily describe today's hottest topic of biomaterials' science, i.e., to construct and define osteogenetic biomaterials' surfaces that per se, in its own right, do initiate the induction of bone formation. Biomaterials are often used to reconstruct osseous defects particularly in the craniofacial skeleton. Edentulism did spring titanium implants as tooth replacement strategies. No were else that titanium surfaces require functionalized

  16. The Effectiveness of Surface Coatings on Preventing Interfacial Reaction During Ultrasonic Welding of Aluminum to Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteli, Alexandria; Robson, Joseph D.; Chen, Ying-Chun; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2013-12-01

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (USW) is a solid-state joining process that is advantageous for welding difficult dissimilar material couples, like magnesium to aluminum. USW is also a useful technique for testing methods of controlling interfacial reaction in welding as the interface is not greatly displaced by the process. However, the high strain rate deformation in USW has been found to accelerate intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and a thick Al12Mg17 and Al3Mg2 reaction layer forms after relatively short welding times. In this work, we have investigated the potential of two approaches for reducing the IMC reaction rate in dissimilar Al-Mg ultrasonic welds, both involving coatings on the Mg sheet surface to (i) separate the join line from the weld interface, using a 100- μm-thick Al cold spray coating, and (ii) provide a diffusion barrier layer, using a thin manganese physical vapor deposition (PVD) coating. Both methods were found to reduce the level of reaction and increase the failure energy of the welds, but their effectiveness was limited due to issues with coating attachment and survivability during the welding cycle. The effect of the coatings on the joint's interface microstructure, and the fracture behavior have been investigated in detail. Kinetic modeling has been used to show that the benefit of the cold spray coating can be attributed to the reaction rate reverting to that expected under static conditions. This reduces the IMC growth rate by over 50 pct because at the weld line, the high strain rate dynamic deformation in USW normally enhances diffusion through the IMC layer. In comparison, the thin PVD barrier coating was found to rapidly break up early in USW and become dispersed throughout the deformation layer reducing its effectiveness.

  17. Library of Antifouling Surfaces Derived From Natural Amino Acids by Click Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Hu, Xin; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Ye-Min; Liu, Xiao-Jiu; Xie, Bin-Bin; Yao, Chen; Li, Yi; Li, Xin-Song

    2015-08-12

    Biofouling is of great concern in numerous applications ranging from ophthalmological implants to catheters, and from bioseparation to biosensors. In this report, a general and facile strategy to combat surface fouling is developed by grafting of amino acids onto polymer substrates to form zwitterionic structure through amino groups induced epoxy ring opening click reaction. First of all, a library of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) hydrogels with zwitterionic surfaces were prepared, resulting in the formation of pairs of carboxyl anions and protonated secondary amino cations. The analysis of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the successful immobilization of amino acids on the hydrogel surfaces. After that, the contact angle and equilibrium water content of the modified hydrogels showed that the hydrogels exhibited improved hydrophilicity compared with the parent hydrogel. Furthermore, the protein deposition was evaluated by bicinchoninic acid assay using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme as models. The results indicated that the performance of the hydrogels was determined by the nature of incorporated amino acid: the hydrogels incorporated with neutral amino acids had nonspecific antiadsorption capability to both BSA and lysozyme; the hydrogels incorporated with charged amino acids showed antiadsorption behaviors against protein with same charge and enhanced adsorption to the protein with opposite charge; the optimal antiadsorption performance was observed on the hydrogels incorporated with polar amino acids with a hydroxyl residual. The improvement of antiprotein fouling of the neutral amino acids grafted hydrogels can be ascribed to the formation of zwitterionic surfaces. Finally, a couple of soft contact lenses grafted with amino acids were fabricated having improved antifouling property and hydrophilicity. The result demonstrated the success of

  18. Antiseptics and microcosm biofilm formation on titanium surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia VERARDI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oral rehabilitation with osseointegrated implants is a way to restore esthetics and masticatory function in edentulous patients, but bacterial colonization around the implants may lead to mucositis or peri-implantitis and consequent implant loss. Peri-implantitis is the main complication of oral rehabilitation with dental implants and, therefore, it is necessary to take into account the potential effects of antiseptics such as chlorhexidine (CHX, chloramine T (CHT, triclosan (TRI, and essential oils (EO on bacterial adhesion and on biofilm formation. To assess the action of these substances, we used the microcosm technique, in which the oral environment and periodontal conditions are simulated in vitro on titanium discs with different surface treatments (smooth surface - SS, acid-etched smooth surface - AESS, sand-blasted surface - SBS, and sand-blasted and acid-etched surface - SBAES. Roughness measurements yielded the following results: SS: 0.47 µm, AESS: 0.43 µm, SB: 0.79 µm, and SBAES: 0.72 µm. There was statistical difference only between SBS and AESS. There was no statistical difference among antiseptic treatments. However, EO and CHT showed lower bacterial counts compared with the saline solution treatment (control group. Thus, the current gold standard (CHX did not outperform CHT and EO, which were efficient in reducing the biofilm biomass compared with saline solution.

  19. Structural and surface changes of cobalt modified manganese oxide during activation and ethanol steam reforming reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gac, Wojciech; Greluk, Magdalena; Słowik, Grzegorz; Turczyniak-Surdacka, Sylwia

    2018-05-01

    Surface and structural changes of unmodified manganese and cobalt-manganese oxide during activation and ethanol steam reforming reaction conditions (ESR) were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction/oxidation (TPR/TPO) and transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that synthesis of cobalt manganese oxide by the redox precipitation method led to the formation of strongly dispersed cobalt ionic species within cryptomelane-based manganese oxide structure. Development of large cube-like MnO nanoparticles with spherical cobalt metallic crystallites decorated by manganese oxide on the high oxidation state and potassium species was observed during reduction. Cobalt manganese catalyst showed high initial activity and selectivity to H2 and CO2 in ethanol stem reforming reaction in the range of 390-480 °C. The drop of ethanol conversion and changes of selectivity with the time-on-stream were observed. An increase of reaction temperature led to intensification of deactivation phenomena. TEM studies evidenced coexistence of Co and CoOx nanoparticles formed under ethanol steam reforming conditions, partially covered by filamentous and encapsulating carbonaceous deposits.

  20. Interface formation between hydrocarbon ring molecules and III-V semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passmann, Regina

    2008-08-15

    In this work a systematical study to investigate the adsorption structures of small hydrocarbon ring shaped molecules on III-V semiconductor surfaces with Photo-Emission Spectroscopy (PES), Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) as well as Low Electron Energy Diffraction (LEED) was performed. To investigate the influence of the surface structure in detail the surface dimer configuration to the adsorption process of organic molecules GaAs(001) surfaces, the c(4 x 4), the (2 x 4) and the (4 x 2) have been investigated as well as the adsorption of cyclopentene on the InP(001)(2 x 4) reconstructed surface. In the direct comparison it is shown that cyclopentene bonds to the InP(001)(2 x 4) surface via a cycloaddition like reaction. During this adsorption the double bond splits which is in contrast to the adsorption of cyclopentene on the GaAs(001) surfaces. Therefrom it is concluded that the surface geometry has an influence on the resulting adsorption structure. In order to investigate the influence of the intra-molecular double bonds, cyclopentene (one double bond), 1,4-cyclohexadiene (two double bonds) and benzene (three double bonds) were used for the characterization of the interface formation. With the investigations on the GaAs(001) reconstructed surfaces it was shown that a dependency of the bonding configuration on the intra-molecular double bonds exists. During the adsorption of cyclopentene no evidence was found that the double bond has to be involved in the interface formation while during the adsorption of 1,4-cyclohexadiene and benzene the double bonds are involved. Furthermore it was found that a bonding to As atoms of the surface is more likely than a bonding to Ga atoms. (orig.)

  1. Interface formation between hydrocarbon ring molecules and III-V semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passmann, Regina

    2008-01-01

    In this work a systematical study to investigate the adsorption structures of small hydrocarbon ring shaped molecules on III-V semiconductor surfaces with Photo-Emission Spectroscopy (PES), Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) as well as Low Electron Energy Diffraction (LEED) was performed. To investigate the influence of the surface structure in detail the surface dimer configuration to the adsorption process of organic molecules GaAs(001) surfaces, the c(4 x 4), the (2 x 4) and the (4 x 2) have been investigated as well as the adsorption of cyclopentene on the InP(001)(2 x 4) reconstructed surface. In the direct comparison it is shown that cyclopentene bonds to the InP(001)(2 x 4) surface via a cycloaddition like reaction. During this adsorption the double bond splits which is in contrast to the adsorption of cyclopentene on the GaAs(001) surfaces. Therefrom it is concluded that the surface geometry has an influence on the resulting adsorption structure. In order to investigate the influence of the intra-molecular double bonds, cyclopentene (one double bond), 1,4-cyclohexadiene (two double bonds) and benzene (three double bonds) were used for the characterization of the interface formation. With the investigations on the GaAs(001) reconstructed surfaces it was shown that a dependency of the bonding configuration on the intra-molecular double bonds exists. During the adsorption of cyclopentene no evidence was found that the double bond has to be involved in the interface formation while during the adsorption of 1,4-cyclohexadiene and benzene the double bonds are involved. Furthermore it was found that a bonding to As atoms of the surface is more likely than a bonding to Ga atoms. (orig.)

  2. Effects of online advertising format and persuasion knowledge on audience reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tutaj, K.; van Reijmersdal, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    In an experiment (N = 99), effects of subtle and prominent online advertising formats, respectively sponsored content and banner ads, on audience reactions toward the advertisement are tested. In addition, the role of several persuasion knowledge elements such as understanding of persuasive intent

  3. In-situ X-ray diffraction : a useful tool to investigate hydride-formation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, P.H.L.; Daams, J.L.C.; Veirman, de A.E.M.; Staals, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    A high-pressure X-ray diffraction (XRD) cell has been designed which allowed us to study simultaneously hydrogen absorption/desorption isotherms and XRD powder diffraction patterns on (de)hydrided intermetallic compounds. The hydride formation reaction was investigated in the case of LaNi5 under

  4. Toward a Kinetic Model for Acrylamide Formation in a Glucose-Asparagine Reaction System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, J.J.; Loon, W.A.M.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Ruck, A.L.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A kinetic model for the formation of acrylamide in a glucose-asparagine reaction system is pro-posed. Equimolar solutions (0.2 M) of glucose and asparagine were heated at different tempera-tures (120-200 C) at pH 6.8. Besides the reactants, acrylamide, fructose, and melanoidins were quantified after

  5. Study of reaction sequences for formation of solid solution: 0,48 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of a low concentration of ions forming the perovskite structure PZT (Pb2+, Zr4+ et Ti4+) by other ions (Zn2+, Cr3+ et Sb+5 in our study) alters the reaction sequences training of the solid solution PZT and especially the formation of intermediate phase. Keywords: PZT / Calcination / TGA / DTA / RX / Piezoelectric Ceramics ...

  6. Formation of amorphous Ti-50at.%Pt by solid state reactions during mechanical alloying

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahlatji, ML

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical alloying of an equiatomic mixture of crystalline elemental powders of Ti and Pt in a high-energy ball mill results in formation of an amorphous alloy by solid-state reactions. Mechanical alloying was carried out in an argon atmosphere...

  7. Competition between reaction-induced expansion and creep compaction during gypsum formation: Experimental and numerical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarbek, R. M.; Savage, H. M.; Spiegelman, M. W.; Kelemen, P. B.; Yancopoulos, D.

    2017-12-01

    Deformation and cracking caused by reaction-driven volume increase is an important process in many geological settings, however the conditions controlling these processes are poorly understood. The interaction of rocks with reactive fluids can change permeability and reactive surface area, leading to a large variety of feedbacks. Gypsum is an ideal material to study these processes. It forms rapidly at room temperature via bassanite hydration, and is commonly used as an analogue for rocks in high-temperature, high-pressure conditions. We conducted uniaxial strain experiments to study the effects of applied axial load on deformation and fluid flow during the formation of gypsum from bassanite. While hydration of bassanite to gypsum involves a solid volume increase, gypsum exhibits significant creep compaction when in contact with water. These two volume changing processes occur simultaneously during fluid flow through bassanite. We cold-pressed bassanite powder to form cylinders 2.5 cm in height and 1.2 cm in diameter. Samples were compressed with a static axial load of 0.01 to 4 MPa. Water infiltrated initially unsaturated samples through the bottom face and the height of the samples was recorded as a measure of the total volume change. We also performed experiments on pure gypsum samples to constrain the amount of creep observed in tests on bassanite hydration. At axial loads 1 MPa, creep in the gypsum dominates and samples exhibit monotonic compaction. At intermediate loads, samples exhibit alternating phases of compaction and expansion due to the interplay of the two volume changing processes. We observed a change from net compaction to net expansion at an axial load of 0.250 MPa. We explain this behavior with a simple model that predicts the strain evolution, but does not take fluid flow into account. We also implement a 1D poro-visco-elastic model of the imbibition process that includes the reaction and gypsum creep. We use the results of these models, with

  8. A density functional theory study on the carbon chain growth of ethanol formation on Cu-Co (111) and (211) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Bohua; Dong, Xiuqin; Yu, Yingzhe; Wen, Guobin; Zhang, Minhua

    2017-08-01

    Calculations based on the first-principle density functional theory were carried out to study the most controversial reactions in ethanol formation from syngas on Cu-Co surfaces: CO dissociation mechanism and the key reactions of carbon chain growth of ethanol formation (HCO insertion reactions) on four model surfaces (Cu-Co (111) and (211) with Cu-rich or Co-rich surfaces) to investigate the synergy of the Cu and Co components since the complete reaction network of ethanol formation from syngas is a huge computational burden to calculate on four Cu-Co surface models. We investigated adsorption of important species involved in these reactions, activation barrier and reaction energy of H-assisted dissociation mechanism, directly dissociation of CO, and HCO insertion reactions (CHx + HCO → CHxCHO (x = 1-3)) on four Cu-Co surface models. It was found that reactions on Cu-rich (111) and (211) surfaces all have lower activation barrier in H-assisted dissociation and HCO insertion reactions, especially CH + HCO → CHCHO reaction. The PDOS of 4d orbitals of surface Cu and Co atoms of all surfaces were studied. Analysis of d-band center of Cu and Co atoms and the activation barrier data suggested the correlation between electronic property and catalytic performance. Cu-Co bimetallic with Cu-rich surface allows Co to have higher catalytic activity through the interaction of Cu and Co atom. Then it will improve the adsorption of CO and catalytic activity of Co. Thus it is more favorable to the carbon chain growth in ethanol formation. Our study revealed the factors influencing the carbon chain growth in ethanol production and explained the internal mechanism from electronic property aspect.

  9. Quantitative surface analysis using deuteron-induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afarideh, Hossein

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique consists of looking at the energies of the reaction products which uniquely define the particular elements present in the sample and it analysis the yield/energy distribution to reveal depth profiles. A summary of the basic features of the nuclear reaction analysis technique is given, in particular emphasis is placed on quantitative light element determination using (d,p) and (d,alpha) reactions. The experimental apparatus is also described. Finally a set of (d,p) spectra for the elements Z=3 to Z=17 using 2 MeV incident deutrons is included together with example of more applications of the (d,alpha) spectra. (author)

  10. [Formation of microbial populations on the surface of protective coatings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopteva, Zh P; Zanina, V V; Piliashenko-Novokhatnyĭ, A I; Kopteva, A E; Kozlova, I A

    2001-01-01

    Formation of microbial cenosis on the surface of polyethylene-, polyurethane- and oil-bitumen-based protective coatings was studied in dynamics during 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days. It has been shown that the biofilm was formed on the protective materials during 14 days and consisted of ammonifying, denitrifying, hydrocarbon-oxidizing and sulphate-reducing bacteria referred to Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Kesulfovibrio genera. The bacteria which form the biofilm on coatings possess high denitrifying and sulphate-reducing activities. Corrosion inhibitors-biocydes, introduced in composition of oil-bitumen coatings suppressed growth and metabolic activity of corrosion-active bacteria.

  11. Energy Accommodation from Surface Catalyzed Reactions in Air Plasmas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Understanding energy transport at the gas-surface interface between catalytic/reacting surfaces exposed to highly dissociated plasmas remains a significant research...

  12. Organosulfate Formation through the Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide with Unsaturated Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, C.; Passananti, M.; Kong, L.; Shang, J.; Perrier, S.; Jianmin, C.; Donaldson, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric formation of organosulfur derivatives through reaction with SO2 is generally mediated by oxidants such as O3, OH; recently we have proposed a direct reaction between SO2 and unsaturated compounds as another possible pathway for organosulfate formation in the troposphere. For the first time it was shown recently that a heterogeneous reaction between SO2 and oleic acid (OA; an unsaturated fatty acid) takes place and leads efficiently to the formation of organosulfur products. Here, we demonstrate that this reaction proceeds on various unsaturated compounds, and may therefore have a general environmental impact. We used different experimental strategies i.e., a coated flow tube (CFT), an aerosol flow tube (AFT) and a DRIFT (diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform) cell. The reaction products were analyzed by means of liquid chromatography coupled to a high resolution mass spectrometer (LC-HR-MS). We report indeed that SO2 reacts with large variety of C=C unsaturations and that even in the presence of ozone, SO2 reacts with OA leading to organosulfur products. A strong enhancement in product formation is observed under actinic illumination, increases the atmospheric significance of this chemical pathway. This is probably due to the chromophoric nature of the SO2 adduct with C=C bonds, and means that the contribution of this direct addition of SO2 could be in excess of 5%. The detection in atmospheric aerosols of organosulfur compounds with the same chemical formulae as the products identified here seems to confirm the importance of this reaction in the atmosphere.

  13. Reaction of Br2 with adsorbed CO on Pt, studied by the surface interrogation mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Bard, Allen J

    2009-12-02

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy surface interrogation (SI-SECM) in the cyclic voltammetry mode was successfully used to detect and quantify adsorbed CO on a Pt electrode by reaction with electrogenerated Br(2). The two-electrode setup used in this new technique allowed the production of Br(2) on an interrogator tip, which reported a transient positive feedback above a Pt substrate at open circuit as an indication of the reactivity of this halogen with CO((ads)). Br(-) and CO(2) are shown to be the main products of the reaction (in the absence of O(2)), which may involve the formation of bromophosgene as a hydrolyzable intermediate. Under saturation conditions, CO((ads)) was reproducibly quantified at the polycrystalline Pt surface with theta(CO) approximately = 0.5. The reaction is shown to be blocked by the action of pre-adsorbed cyanide, which demonstrates the surface character of the process. The formation of CO(2) as an end product was further tested in a bulk experiment: addition of Pt black to a mixture of Br(2) in 0.5 M H(2)SO(4) through which CO was bubbled gave a precipitate of BaCO(3) in a saturated solution of Ba(OH)(2). The use of SI-SECM allowed access to a reaction that would otherwise be difficult to prove through conventional electrochemistry on a single electrode.

  14. Some insights into formamide formation through gas-phase reactions in the interstellar medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio, E-mail: predondo@qf.uva.es [Computational Chemistry Group, Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-01-10

    We study the viability of different gas-phase ion-molecule reactions that could produce precursors of formamide in the interstellar medium. We analyze different reactions between cations containing a nitrogen atom (NH{sub 3}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, NH{sub 3}OH{sup +}, and NH{sub 2}OH{sup +}) and neutral molecules having one carbonyl group (H{sub 2}CO and HCOOH). First, we report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies for the proposed processes. Second, for more favorable reactions, from a thermodynamic point of view, we perform a theoretical study of the potential energy surface. In particular, the more exothermic processes correspond to the reactions of ionized and protonated hydroxylamine with formaldehyde. In addition, a neutral-neutral reaction has also been considered. The analysis of the potential energy surfaces corresponding to these reactions shows that these processes present a net activation barrier and that they cannot be considered as a source of formamide in space.

  15. The effect of surface modification on initial ice formation on aluminum surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Maral; Afshari, Alireza; Fojan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    material of heat exchanger fins is aluminum, this paper focuses on the effect of aluminum wettability on the initial stages of ice formation. The ice growth was studied on bare as well as hydrophilically and hydrophobically modified surfaces of aluminum (8011A) sheets, commonly used in heat exchangers...

  16. Integrated in situ characterization of molten salt catalyst surface: Evidence of sodium peroxide and OH radical formation

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Khan, Abdulaziz M.; Tang, Yu; Nguyen, Luan; Ziani, Ahmed; Jacobs, Benjamin W; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Sarathy, S Mani; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2017-01-01

    Na-based catalysts (i.e., Na2WO4) were proposed to selectively catalyze OH radical formation from H2O and O2 at high temperatures. This reaction may proceed on molten salt state surfaces due to the lower melting point of the used Na salts compared to the reaction temperature. This study provides direct evidence of the molten salt state of Na2WO4, which can form OH radicals, using in situ techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometer, and ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS). As a result, Na2O2 species, which were hypothesized to be responsible for the formation of OH radicals, has been identified on the outer surfaces at temperatures ≥800°C, and these species are useful for various gas-phase hydrocarbon reactions including the selective transformation of methane to ethane.

  17. Integrated in situ characterization of molten salt catalyst surface: Evidence of sodium peroxide and OH radical formation

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2017-06-26

    Na-based catalysts (i.e., Na2WO4) were proposed to selectively catalyze OH radical formation from H2O and O2 at high temperatures. This reaction may proceed on molten salt state surfaces due to the lower melting point of the used Na salts compared to the reaction temperature. This study provides direct evidence of the molten salt state of Na2WO4, which can form OH radicals, using in situ techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometer, and ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS). As a result, Na2O2 species, which were hypothesized to be responsible for the formation of OH radicals, has been identified on the outer surfaces at temperatures ≥800°C, and these species are useful for various gas-phase hydrocarbon reactions including the selective transformation of methane to ethane.

  18. Capability of LEP-type surfaces to describe noncollinear reactions 2 - Polyatomic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa-Garcia, Joaquin

    2001-01-01

    In this second article of the series, the popular LEP-type surface for collinear reaction paths and a "bent" surface, which involves a saddle point geometry with a nonlinear central angle, were used to examine the capacity of LEP-type surfaces to describe the kinetics and dynamics of noncollinear reaction paths in polyatomic systems. Analyzing the geometries, vibrational frequencies, curvature along the reaction path (to estimate the tunneling effect and the reaction coordinate-bound modes coupling), and the variational transition- state theory thermal rate constants for the NH//3 + O(**3P) reaction, we found that the "collinear" LEP-type and the "bent" surfaces for this polyatomic system show similar behavior, thus allowing a considerable saving in time and computational effort. This agreement is especially encouraging for this polyatomic system because in the Cs symmetry the reaction proceeds via two electronic states of symmetries **3A prime and **3A double prime , which had to be independently calibrated....

  19. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-09-01

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  20. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorenko, S. G. [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Burshtein, A. I. [Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100, Rehovot (Israel)

    2014-09-21

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  1. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-01-01

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics

  2. Surface proteins and the formation of biofilms by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Joon; Chang, James; Rimal, Binayak; Yang, Hao; Schaefer, Jacob

    2018-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms pose a serious clinical threat as reservoirs for persistent infections. Despite this clinical significance, the composition and mechanism of formation of S. aureus biofilms are unknown. To address these problems, we used solid-state NMR to examine S. aureus (SA113), a strong biofilm-forming strain. We labeled whole cells and cell walls of planktonic cells, young biofilms formed for 12-24h after stationary phase, and more mature biofilms formed for up to 60h after stationary phase. All samples were labeled either by (i) [ 15 N]glycine and l-[1- 13 C]threonine, or in separate experiments, by (ii) l-[2- 13 C, 15 N]leucine. We then measured 13 C- 15 N direct bonds by C{N} rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR). The increase in peptidoglycan stems that have bridges connected to a surface protein was determined directly by a cell-wall double difference (biofilm REDOR difference minus planktonic REDOR difference). This procedure eliminates errors arising from differences in 15 N isotopic enrichments and from the routing of 13 C label from threonine degradation to glycine. For both planktonic cells and the mature biofilm, 20% of pentaglycyl bridges are not cross-linked and are potential surface-protein attachment sites. None of these sites has a surface protein attached in the planktonic cells, but one-fourth have a surface protein attached in the mature biofilm. Moreover, the leucine-label shows that the concentration of β-strands in leucine-rich regions doubles in the mature biofilm. Thus, a primary event in establishing a S. aureus biofilm is extensive decoration of the cell surface with surface proteins that are linked covalently to the cell wall and promote cell-cell adhesion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinetic and mechanism formation reaction of complex compound Cu with di-n-buthildithiocarbamate (dbdtc) ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryani, S.; Kurniawan, C.; Kasmui

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis of complex compound is one field of research which intensively studied. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes find wide-ranging applications in nanomaterial and metal separation science, and have potential use as chemotherapeutic, pesticides, and as additives to lubricants. However, the information about is reaction kinetic and mechanism are very much lacking. The research and analyzes results show that reaction synthesis ligand DBDTC and complex compounds Cu-DBDTC. Optimum reaction condition of formation of complex compounds Cu with DBDTC at pH=3, [DBDTC] = 4.10-3 M, and the time of reaction 5 minutes. Based the analysis varian reaction of complex compounds at pH 3 and 4, diffrence significance at the other pH: 5; 5,5; 6; 6,5 ; 7; and 8. The various of mole with reactants comosition difference sigbificance, those the time reaction for 5 and 6 minutes diffrence by significance with the other time, it is 3,4,8, and 10 minutes. The great product to at condition pH 6, the time optimum at 5 minutes and molar ratio of logam: ligand = 1:2. The reaction kinetic equation of complex compound Cu with chelathing ligand DBDTC is V=0.917106 [Cu2+]0.87921 [DBDTC]2.03021. Based on the kinetic data, and formed complex compounds estimation, the mechanism explaining by 2 stages. In the first stage formation of [Cu(DBDTC)], and then [Cu(DBDTC)2] with the last structure geomethry planar rectangle. The result of this research will be more useful if an effort is being done in reaction mechanism by chemical computation method for obtain intermediate, and for constant “k” in same stage, k1.k2. and compound complex constanta (β).

  4. Near surface silicide formation after off-normal Fe-implantation of Si(001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanbabaee, B., E-mail: khanbabaee@physik.uni-siegen.de; Pietsch, U. [Solid State Physics, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D. [Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universität Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Hübner, R.; Grenzer, J.; Facsko, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-14

    We report on formation of non-crystalline Fe-silicides of various stoichiometries below the amorphized surface of crystalline Si(001) after irradiation with 5 keV Fe{sup +} ions under off-normal incidence. We examined samples prepared with ion fluences of 0.1 × 10{sup 17} and 5 × 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup −2} exhibiting a flat and patterned surface morphology, respectively. Whereas the iron silicides are found across the whole surface of the flat sample, they are concentrated at the top of ridges at the rippled surface. A depth resolved analysis of the chemical states of Si and Fe atoms in the near surface region was performed by combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. The chemical shift and the line shape of the Si 2p core levels and valence bands were measured and associated with the formation of silicide bonds of different stoichiometric composition changing from an Fe-rich silicides (Fe{sub 3}Si) close to the surface into a Si-rich silicide (FeSi{sub 2}) towards the inner interface to the Si(001) substrate. This finding is supported by XAS analysis at the Fe K-edge which shows changes of the chemical environment and the near order atomic coordination of the Fe atoms in the region close to surface. Because a similar Fe depth profile has been found for samples co-sputtered with Fe during Kr{sup +} ion irradiation, our results suggest the importance of chemically bonded Fe in the surface region for the process of ripple formation.

  5. Magnetization of individual yeast cells by in situ formation of iron oxide on cell surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinsu; Lee, Hojae; Choi, Insung S.; Yang, Sung Ho

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic functionalization of living cells has intensively been investigated with the aim of various bioapplications such as selective separation, targeting, and localization of the cells by using an external magnetic field. However, the magnetism has not been introduced to individual living cells through the in situ chemical reactions because of harsh conditions required for synthesis of magnetic materials. In this work, magnetic iron oxide was formed on the surface of living cells by optimizing reactions conditions to be mild sufficiently enough to sustain cell viability. Specifically, the reactive LbL strategy led to formation of magnetically responsive yeast cells with iron oxide shells. This facile and direct post-magnetization method would be a useful tool for remote manipulation of living cells with magnetic interactions, which is an important technique for the integration of cell-based circuits and the isolation of cell in microfluidic devices.

  6. The formation of light absorbing insoluble organic compounds from the reaction of biomass burning precursors and Fe(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Avi; Lin, Peng; Bhaduri, Bhaskar; Laskin, Alexander; Rudich, Yinon

    2017-04-01

    Dust particles and volatile organic compounds from fuel or biomass burning are two major components that affect air quality in urban polluted areas. We characterized the products from the reaction of soluble Fe(III), a reactive transition metal originating from dust particles dissolution processes, with phenolic compounds , namely, guaiacol, syringol, catechol, o- and p- cresol that are known products of incomplete fuel and biomass combustion but also from other natural sources such as humic compounds degradation. We found that under acidic conditions comparable to those expected on a dust particle surface, phenolic compounds readily react with dissolved Fe(III), leading to the formation of insoluble polymeric compounds. We characterized the insoluble products by x-ray photoelectron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, elemental analysis and thermo-gravimetric analysis. We found that the major chromophores formed are oligomers (from dimers to pentamers) of the reaction precursors that efficiently absorb light between 300nm and 500nm. High variability of the mass absorption coefficient of the reaction products was observed with catechol and guaiacol showing high absorption at the 300-500nm range that is comparable to that of brown carbon (BrC) from biomass burning studies. The studied reaction is a potential source for the in-situ production of secondary BrC material under dark conditions. Our results suggest a reaction path for the formation of bio-available iron in coastal polluted areas where dust particles mix with biomass burning pollution plumes. Such mixing can occur, for instance in the coast of West Africa or North Africa during dust and biomass burning seasons

  7. Reactions and Surface Transformations of a Bone-Bioactive Material in a Simulated Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, S.; Ducheyne, P.; Ayyaswamy, P. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive program to investigate the expeditious in vitro formation of three-dimensional bone-like tissue is currently underway at the University of Pennsylvania. The study reported here forms a part of that program. Three-dimensional bone-like tissue structures may be grown under the simulated microgravity conditions of NASA designed Rotating Wall Bioreactor Vessels (RWV's). Such tissue growth will have wide clinical applications. In addition, an understanding of the fundamental changes that occur to bone cells under simulated microgravity would yield important information that will help in preventing or minimizing astronaut bone loss, a major health issue with travel or stay in space over long periods of time. The growth of three-dimensional bone-like tissue structures in RWV's is facilitated by the use of microcarriers which provide structural support. If the microcarrier material additionally promotes bone cell growth, then it is particularly advantageous to employ such microcarriers. We have found that reactive, bone-bioactive glass (BBG) is an attractive candidate for use as microcarrier material. Specifically, it has been found that BBG containing Ca- and P- oxides upregulates osteoprogenitor cells to osteoblasts. This effect on cells is preceded by BBG reactions in solution which result in the formation of a Ca-P surface layer. This surface further transforms to a bone-like mineral (i.e., carbonated crystalline hydroxyapatite (c-HA)). At normal gravity, time-dependent, immersion-induced BBG reactions and transformations are greatly affected both by variations in the composition of the milieu in which the glass is immersed and on the immersion conditions. However, the nature of BBG reactions and phase transformations under the simulated microgravity conditions of RWV's are unknown, and must be understood in order to successfully use BBG as microcarrier material in RWV'S. In this paper, we report some of our recent findings in this regard using

  8. A multimodal optical and electrochemical device for monitoring surface reactions: redox active surfaces in porous silicon Rugate filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampi, Simone; Guan, Bin; Darwish, Nadim A; Zhu, Ying; Reece, Peter J; Gooding, J Justin

    2012-12-21

    Herein, mesoporous silicon (PSi) is configured as a single sensing device that has dual readouts; as a photonic crystal sensor in a Rugate filter configuration, and as a high surface area porous electrode. The as-prepared PSi is chemically modified to provide it with stability in aqueous media and to allow for the subsequent coupling of chemical species, such as via Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions between 1-alkynes and azides ("click" reactions). The utility of the bimodal capabilities of the PSi sensor for monitoring surface coupling procedures is demonstrated by the covalent coupling of a ferrocene derivative, as well as by demonstrating ligand-exchange reactions (LER) at the PSi surface. Both types of reactions were monitored through optical reflectivity measurements, as well as electrochemically via the oxidation/reduction of the surface tethered redox species.

  9. Systematic Search for Chemical Reactions in Gas Phase Contributing to Methanol Formation in Interstellar Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez-Garcia, Victoria G; Galano, Annia

    2017-10-05

    A massive search for chemical routes leading to methanol formation in gas phase has been conducted using computational chemistry, at the CBS-QB3 level of theory. The calculations were performed at five different temperatures (100, 80, 50, 20, and 10 K) and at three pressures (0.1, 0.01, and 0.001 atm) for each temperature. The search was focused on identifying reactions with the necessary features to be viable in the interstellar medium (ISM). A searching strategy was applied to that purpose, which allowed to reduce an initial set of 678 possible reactions to a subset of 11 chemical routes that are recommended, for the first time, as potential candidates for contributing to methanol formation in the gas phase of the ISM. They are all barrier-less, and thus they are expected to take place at collision rates. Hopefully, including these reactions in the currently available models, for the gas-phase methanol formation in the ISM, would help improving the predicted fractional abundance of this molecule in dark clouds. Further investigations, especially those dealing with grain chemistry and electronic excited states, would be crucial to get a complete picture of the methanol formation in the ISM.

  10. Can Dietary Polyphenols Prevent the Formation of Toxic Compounds from Maillard Reaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Turco, Serena; Basta, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols are functional compounds in edible vegetable and food such as tea, coffee and red wine and increasing evidence demonstrates a positive link between consumption of polyphenol-rich foods and disease prevention. In this review we have focused on the current knowledge of the potential anti-glycation effects of polyphenols, particularly in regard to their influence on Maillard reaction, a non-enzymatic reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars that contributes to the production of toxic compounds, mainly reactive carbonyl species, advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and other toxicants. The Maillard reaction occurs in the human body during hyperglycemic condition, but it is well known as browning reaction in thermally processed foods and it is responsible for flavor and toxicant formation. Dietary polyphenols can have anti-glycation effects and actively participate in Maillard reaction, mitigating the AGE formation and the heat-induced production of toxic compounds. In a time in which the role of a healthy diet in the prevention of chronic diseases is welcome and the borderline between food and medicine is becoming very thin, an improved mechanistic knowledge of how polyphenols can function to reduce harmful and unhealthy substances is mandatory.

  11. Formation of molecular hydrogen on carbonaceous grains from the interstellar medium. Role of the surface, her relaxation, her morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachellerie, D.

    2008-12-01

    The formation of H 2 in the interstellar medium, from two hydrogen atoms, is a fundamental question in astrophysics. This very exothermic reaction is indeed the first step of a series of essential reactions for the interstellar physical-chemistry that takes place on the surface of interstellar dust grains. In the warm regions of the ISM, diffuse clouds and Photodissociation regions, the invoked formation mechanism is the Eley-Rideal heterogeneous catalysis reaction, in which one H atom is initially chemisorbed. The grains have mainly carbonaceous graphitic-like composition. Previous theoretical works carried out using constrained geometries were unable to explain the formation of H 2 in the observed rovibrationnal states (v≤5). In order to take into account the degrees of freedom of all relevant atoms, we have built, from the Brenner potential, a new potential that models the graphene H-H system.With this potential, we have completed a classical molecular dynamics study of the formation of H 2 . This work has been performed for collision energies of the impinging H atoms from 0.015 eV to 0.2 eV and for surface temperature of 0, 10 and 30 K. One of the salient results is that the reaction cross section is directly related with the shape of the potential seen by the impinging H atom. Furthermore, the rovibrationnal distribution obtained by allowing the surface atoms to move is in better agreement with the one observed by astrophysicists (v≤6), the surface absorbs a large part (∼25%) of the available energy. Some works about the influence of: an additional H atom upon the surface or a possible porous structure of the grains, on the formation of H 2 are presented in appendices. (author)

  12. Potential surfaces in symmetric heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, G.; Piller, C.; Mignen, J.; Raffray, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The entrance channel in symmetric heavy-ion reactions is studied in the liquid-drop model approach including the nuclear proximity energy and allowing ellipsoidal deformations of the colliding nuclei. In the whole mass range a sudden transition occurs from oblate to prolate shapes when the proximity forces become important. This strongly affects the effective moment of inertia. The ellipsoidal deformations reduce the fusion barrier width for light systems and lower the potential barrier height for medium and heavy nuclei. The results are in agreement with the empirical effective barrier shift determined by Aguiar et al for the 58 Ni + 58 Ni, 74 Ge + 74 Ge and 80 Se + 80 Se systems. The sub-barrier fusion enhancement in heavy-ion reactions might be explained by the slowness of the process. Below the static fusion barrier, the reaction time is long; allowing some adiabaticity and deformations of the colliding ions. Above the barrier, the reaction is more sudden and the deformation degree of freedom is frozen

  13. Surface chemical reactions during electron beam irradiation of nanocrystalline CaS:Ce3+ phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vinay; Pitale, Shreyas S.; Nagpure, I. M.; Coetsee, E.; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Terblans, J. J.; Swart, H. C.; Mishra, Varun

    2010-01-01

    The effects of accelerating voltage (0.5-5 keV) on the green cathodoluminescence (CL) of CaS:Ce 3+ nanocrystalline powder phosphors is reported. An increase in the CL intensity was observed from the powders when the accelerating voltage was varied from 0.5 to 5 keV, which is a relevant property for a phosphor to be used in field emission displays (FEDs). The CL degradation induced by prolonged electron beam irradiation was analyzed using CL spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The AES data showed the decrease in the S peak intensity and an increase in the O peak intensity during electron bombardment. The CL intensity was found to decrease to 30% of its original intensity after about 50 C/cm 2 . XPS was used to study the chemical composition of the CaS:Ce 3+ nanophosphor before and after degradation. The XPS data confirms that a nonluminescent CaSO 4 layer has formed on the surface during the degradation process, which may partially be responsible for the CL degradation. The electron stimulated surface chemical reaction mechanism was used to explain the effects of S desorption and the formation of the nonluminescent CaSO 4 layer on the surface.

  14. Char and coke formation as unwanted side reaction of the hydrothermal biomass gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karayildirim, T. [Department of Chemistry, Science Faculty, Ege University, Bornova-Izmir (Turkey); Sinag, A. [Department of Chemistry, Science Faculty, Ankara University, Besevler-Ankara (Turkey); Kruse, A. [Institut fuer Technische Chemie CPV, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    The hydrothermal biomass gasification is a promising technology to produce hydrogen and/or methane from wet biomass with a water content of {>=}80 % (g/g). In the process, the coke formation usually is very low, but already low amounts may cause problems like, e.g., fouling in the heat exchanger. To learn more about the product formation, the results of the hydrothermal treatment (at 400,500,600 C and 1 h) of different biomass feedstocks (artichoke stalk, pinecone, sawdust, and cellulose as model biomass) in a microreactor are compared. The gas composition and the total organic carbon content of the aqueous phase were determined after reaction. The gas formation rises with increasing temperature. The formation of carbon deposits and their characterization has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The variation of the solid morphology during the hydrothermal conversion is discussed based on chemical pathways occurring during hydrothermal biomass degradation. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Performing chemical reactions in virtual capillary of surface tension ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The flow paths were fabricated by making parallel lines using permanent marker pen ink or other polymer on glass surfaces. Two mirror image patterned glass plates were then sandwiched one on top of the other, separated by a thin gap - created using a spacer. The aqueous liquid moves between the surfaces by capillary ...

  16. Role of Streptococcus mutans surface proteins for biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiyo Matsumoto-Nakano

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Streptococcus mutans has been implicated as a primary causative agent of dental caries in humans. An important virulence property of the bacterium is its ability to form biofilm known as dental plaque on tooth surfaces. In addition, this organism also produces glucosyltransferases, multiple glucan-binding proteins, protein antigen c, and collagen-binding protein, surface proteins that coordinate to produce dental plaque, thus inducing dental caries. Bacteria utilize quorum-sensing systems to modulate environmental stress responses. A major mechanism of response to signals is represented by the so called two-component signal transduction system, which enables bacteria to regulate their gene expression and coordinate activities in response to environmental stress. As for S. mutans, a signal peptide-mediated quorum-sensing system encoded by comCDE has been found to be a regulatory system that responds to cell density and certain environmental stresses by excreting a peptide signal molecule termed CSP (competence-stimulating peptide. One of its principal virulence factors is production of bacteriocins (peptide antibiotics referred to as mutacins. Two-component signal transduction systems are commonly utilized by bacteria to regulate bacteriocin gene expression and are also related to biofilm formation by S. mutans. Keywords: Streptococcus mutans, Surface proteins, Biofilm, Signal transduction

  17. Exploring Reaction Mechanism on Generalized Force Modified Potential Energy Surfaces (G-FMPES) for Diels-Alder Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Sanjiv; Brown, Katie; Subramanian, Gopinath

    We apply a recent formulation for searching minimum energy reaction path (MERP) and saddle point to atomic systems subjected to an external force. We demonstrate the effect of a loading modality resembling hydrostatic pressure on the trans to cis conformational change of 1,3-butadiene, and the simplest Diels-Alder reaction between ethylene and 1,3-butadiene. The calculated MERP and saddle points on the generalized force modified potential energy surface (G-FMPES) are compared with the corresponding quantities on an unmodified potential energy surface. Our study is performed using electronic structure calculations at the HF/6-31G** level as implemented in the AIMS-MOLPRO code. Our calculations suggest that the added compressive pressure lowers the energy of cis butadiene. The activation energy barrier for the concerted Diels-Alder reaction is found to decrease progressively with increasing compressive pressure.

  18. NO oxidation on Zeolite Supported Cu Catalysts: Formation and Reactivity of Surface Nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hai-Ying; Wei, Zhehao; Kollar, Marton; Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2016-04-18

    The comparative activities of a small-pore Cu-CHA and a large-pore Cu-BEA catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3, and for the oxidation of NO to NO2 and the subsequent formation of surface nitrates were investigated. Although both catalysts are highly active in SCR reactions, they exhibit very low NO oxidation activity. Furthermore, Cu-CHA is even less active than Cu-BEA in catalyzing NO oxidation but is clearly more active for SCR reactions. Temperature-programed desorption (TPD) experiments following the adsorption of (NO2 + NO + O2) with different NO2:NO ratios reveal that the poor NO oxidation activity of the two catalysts is not due to the formation of stable surface nitrates. On the contrary, NO is found to reduce and decompose the surface nitrates on both catalysts. To monitor the reaction pathways, isotope exchange experiments were conducted by using 15NO to react with 14N-nitrate covered catalyst surfaces. The evolution of FTIR spectra during the isotope exchange process demonstrates that 14N-nitrates are simply displaced with no formation of 15N-nitrates on the Cu-CHA sample, which is clearly different from that observed on the Cu-BEA sample where formation of 15N-nitrates is apparent. The results suggest that the formal oxidation state of N during the NO oxidation on Cu-CHA mainly proceeds from its original +2 to a +3 oxidation state, whereas reaching a higher oxidation state for N, such as +4 or +5, is possible on Cu-BEA. The authors at PNNL gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  19. DFT study of benzyl alcohol/TiO2 interfacial surface complex: reaction pathway and mechanism of visible light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Gu, Feng Long; Kim, Minjae; Miao, Maosheng; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2017-09-24

    We propose a new pathway for the adsorption of benzyl alcohol on the surface of TiO 2 and the formation of interfacial surface complex (ISC). The reaction free energies and reaction kinetics were thoroughly investigated by density functional calculations. The TiO 2 surfaces were modeled by clusters consisting of 4 Ti atoms and 18 O atoms passivated by H, OH group and H 2 O molecules. Compared with solid-state calculations utilizing the periodicity of the materials, such cluster modeling allows inclusion of the high-order correlation effects that seem to be essential for the adsorption of organic molecules onto solid surfaces. The effects of both acidity and solvation are included in our calculations, which demonstrate that the new pathway is competitive with a previous pathway. The electronic structure calculations based on the relaxed ISC structures reveal that the chemisorption of benzyl alcohol on the TiO 2 surface greatly alters the nature of the frontier molecular orbitals. The resulted reduced energy gap in ISC matches the energy of visible light, showing how the adsorption of benzyl alcohol sensitizes the TiO 2 surface. Graphical Abstract The chemisorption of benzyl alcohol on TiO 2 surface greatly alters the nature of the frontier molecular orbitals and the formed interfacial surface complex can be sensitized by visible light.

  20. Hot spot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shocked HMX crystals with nanovoids: a large-scale reactive molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tingting; Lou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yangeng; Song, Huajie; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-07-14

    We report million-atom reactive molecular dynamic simulations of shock initiation of β-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (β-HMX) single crystals containing nanometer-scale spherical voids. Shock induced void collapse and subsequent hot spot formation as well as chemical reaction initiation are observed which depend on the void size and impact strength. For an impact velocity of 1 km s(-1) and a void radius of 4 nm, the void collapse process includes three stages; the dominant mechanism is the convergence of upstream molecules toward the centerline and the downstream surface of the void forming flowing molecules. Hot spot formation also undergoes three stages, and the principal mechanism is kinetic energy transforming to thermal energy due to the collision of flowing molecules on the downstream surface. The high temperature of the hot spot initiates a local chemical reaction, and the breakage of the N-NO2 bond plays the key role in the initial reaction mechanism. The impact strength and void size have noticeable effects on the shock dynamical process, resulting in a variation of the predominant mechanisms leading to void collapse and hot spot formation. Larger voids or stronger shocks result in more intense hot spots and, thus, more violent chemical reactions, promoting more reaction channels and generating more reaction products in a shorter duration. The reaction products are mainly concentrated in the developed hot spot, indicating that the chemical reactivity of the hmx crystal is greatly enhanced by void collapse. The detailed information derived from this study can aid a thorough understanding of the role of void collapse in hot spot formation and the chemical reaction initiation of explosives.

  1. Kinetics of contrail particles formation and heterogeneous reactions on such particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogan, M.N.; Butkovsky, A.V.; Erofeev, A.I.; Freedlender, O.G.; Makashev, N.K. [Central Aerohydrodynamic Inst., Zhukovsky (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The research of impact of aircraft emissions upon the atmosphere is very complex and difficult problem. More than two decades of intensive investigations of the problem of ozone decay do not permit to make definite conclusions. Many important problems still remain unsolved in the aircraft/atmosphere interaction: engine, nozzle, jet, jet/vortex system interaction, vortex breakdown, contrail formation, meso-scale and global processes, their effects on climate. The particles formation and heterogeneous reactions play an important role in some of these processes. These problems are discussed. (author) 11 refs.

  2. Kinetics of contrail particles formation and heterogeneous reactions on such particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogan, M N; Butkovsky, A V; Erofeev, A I; Freedlender, O G; Makashev, N K [Central Aerohydrodynamic Inst., Zhukovsky (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The research of impact of aircraft emissions upon the atmosphere is very complex and difficult problem. More than two decades of intensive investigations of the problem of ozone decay do not permit to make definite conclusions. Many important problems still remain unsolved in the aircraft/atmosphere interaction: engine, nozzle, jet, jet/vortex system interaction, vortex breakdown, contrail formation, meso-scale and global processes, their effects on climate. The particles formation and heterogeneous reactions play an important role in some of these processes. These problems are discussed. (author) 11 refs.

  3. Quantum dynamics of the Eley-Rideal hydrogen formation reaction on graphite at typical interstellar cloud conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casolo, Simone; Martinazzo, Rocco; Bonfanti, Matteo; Tantardini, Gian Franco

    2009-12-31

    Eley-Rideal formation of hydrogen molecules on graphite, as well as competing collision induced processes, are investigated quantum dynamically at typical interstellar cloud conditions, focusing in particular on gas-phase temperatures below 100 K, where much of the chemistry of the so-called diffuse clouds takes place on the surface of bare carbonaceous dust grains. Collisions of gas-phase hydrogen atoms with both chemisorbed and physisorbed species are considered using available potential energy surfaces (Sha et al., J. Chem. Phys.2002 116, 7158), and state-to-state, energy-resolved cross sections are computed for a number of initial vibrational states of the hydrogen atoms bound to the surface. Results show that (i) product molecules are internally hot in both cases, with vibrational distributions sharply peaked around few (one or two) vibrational levels, and (ii) cross sections for chemisorbed species are 2-3x smaller than those for physisorbed ones. In particular, we find that H(2) formation cross sections out of chemically bound species decrease steadily when the temperature drops below approximately 1000 K, and this is likely due to a quantum reflection phenomenon. This suggests that such Eley-Rideal reaction is all but efficient in the relevant gas-phase temperature range, even when gas-phase H atoms happen to chemisorb barrierless to the surface as observed, e.g., for forming so-called para dimers. Comparison with results from classical trajectory calculations highlights the need of a quantum description of the dynamics in the astrophysically relevant energy range, whereas preliminary results of an extensive first-principles investigation of the reaction energetics reveal the importance of the adopted substrate model.

  4. Direct detection of pyridine formation by the reaction of CH (CD) with pyrrole: a ring expansion reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soorkia, Satchin; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2010-03-16

    The reaction of the ground state methylidyne radical CH (X2Pi) with pyrrole (C4H5N) has been studied in a slow flow tube reactor using Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometry coupled to quasi-continuous tunable VUV synchrotron radiation at room temperature (295 K) and 90 oC (363 K), at 4 Torr (533 Pa). Laser photolysis of bromoform (CHBr3) at 248 nm (KrF excimer laser) is used to produce CH radicals that are free to react with pyrrole molecules in the gaseous mixture. A signal at m/z = 79 (C5H5N) is identified as the product of the reaction and resolved from 79Br atoms, and the result is consistent with CH addition to pyrrole followed by Helimination. The Photoionization Efficiency curve unambiguously identifies m/z = 79 as pyridine. With deuterated methylidyne radicals (CD), the product mass peak is shifted by +1 mass unit, consistent with the formation of C5H4DN and identified as deuterated pyridine (dpyridine). Within detection limits, there is no evidence that the addition intermediate complex undergoes hydrogen scrambling. The results are consistent with a reaction mechanism that proceeds via the direct CH (CD) cycloaddition or insertion into the five-member pyrrole ring, giving rise to ring expansion, followed by H atom elimination from the nitrogen atom in the intermediate to form the resonance stabilized pyridine (d-pyridine) molecule. Implications to interstellar chemistry and planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as well as in gas-phase combustion processes, are discussed.

  5. Formation of Broensted acids sites in the reaction of cyclohexanol on NaCeY zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, O.; Nattich, M.; Datka, J.; Gil, B.

    2002-01-01

    This study was undertaken to elucidate why the catalytic activity of NaCeY in cyclohexanol reactions carried out in a pulse reactor increases with the pulse number. We studied therefore the effect of cyclohexanol and also of ethanol and water on catalytic activity NaCeY (of exchange degrees 36 and 72%) in cyclohexanol reactions: isomerization and disproportionation. We also studied the reaction of cyclohexanol and water with NaCeY zeolite by IR spectroscopy. Our results evidenced that new Broensted acid sites were formed by the reaction of cyclohexanol and water. This was shown by IR spectroscopy: the increase of Si-O 1 H-Al band 3638 cm -1 and in increase of ammonium ions band (upon ammonia adsorption). The new sites were formed by hydrolysis of Ce 3+ ions with water introduced in a pulse, or produced by dehydration of cyclohexanol catalyzed by acid sites. Formation of new Broensted acid sites resulted in an increase of catalytic activity of NaCeY in cyclohexane reaction as observed in this study and also in cyclohexanol reactions. (author)

  6. Controlled reactions between chromia and coating on alloy surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren

    1996-01-01

    An electrically conducting Sr-doped lanthanum chromite (LSC) coating has been produced by reacting a coating of fine particles of La oxide and Sr oxide with chromia formed as an external scale on a metallic alloy. In addition to the formation of LSC the coating also resulted in much reduced...... buckling of the underlying chromia layer compared with a non-coated alloy....

  7. Interactions between bubble formation and heating surface in nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The heat transfer and bubble formation is investigated in pool boiling of propane. Size distributions of active nucleation sites on single horizontal copper and steel tubes with different diameter and surface finishes have been calculated from heat transfer measurements over wide ranges of heat flux and selected pressure. The model assumptions of Luke and Gorenflo for the heat transfer near growing and departing bubbles, which were applied in the calculations, have been slightly modified and the calculated results have been compared to experimental investigations by high speed video techniques. The calculated number of active sites shows a good coincidence for the tube with smaller diameter, while the results for the tube with larger diameter describe the same relative increase of the active sites. The comparison of the cumulative size distribution of the active and potential nucleation sites demonstrates the same slope of the curve and that the critical radius of a stable bubble nuclei is smaller than the average cavity size. (author)

  8. Interactions between bubble formation and heating surface in nucleate boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke, Andrea [Leibniz University, Hannover (Denmark). Inst. of Thermodynamics], e-mail: ift@ift.uni-hannover.de

    2009-07-01

    The heat transfer and bubble formation is investigated in pool boiling of propane. Size distributions of active nucleation sites on single horizontal copper and steel tubes with different diameter and surface finishes have been calculated from heat transfer measurements over wide ranges of heat flux and selected pressure. The model assumptions of Luke and Gorenflo for the heat transfer near growing and departing bubbles, which were applied in the calculations, have been slightly modified and the calculated results have been compared to experimental investigations by high speed video techniques. The calculated number of active sites shows a good coincidence for the tube with smaller diameter, while the results for the tube with larger diameter describe the same relative increase of the active sites. The comparison of the cumulative size distribution of the active and potential nucleation sites demonstrates the same slope of the curve and that the critical radius of a stable bubble nuclei is smaller than the average cavity size. (author)

  9. Quantifying Fenton reaction pathways driven by self-generated H2O2 on pyrite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Lozano, C.; Davila, A. F.; Losa-Adams, E.; Fairén, A. G.; Gago-Duport, L.

    2017-03-01

    Oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) plays a significant role in the redox cycling of iron and sulfur on Earth and is the primary cause of acid mine drainage (AMD). It has been established that this process involves multi-step electron-transfer reactions between surface defects and adsorbed O2 and H2O, releasing sulfoxy species (e.g., S2O32-, SO42-) and ferrous iron (Fe2+) to the solution and also producing intermediate by-products, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), however, our understanding of the kinetics of these transient species is still limited. We investigated the kinetics of H2O2 formation in aqueous suspensions of FeS2 microparticles by monitoring, in real time, the H2O2 and dissolved O2 concentration under oxic and anoxic conditions using amperometric microsensors. Additional spectroscopic and structural analyses were done to track the dependencies between the process of FeS2 dissolution and the degradation of H2O2 through the Fenton reaction. Based on our experimental results, we built a kinetic model which explains the observed trend of H2O2, showing that FeS2 dissolution can act as a natural Fenton reagent, influencing the oxidation of third-party species during the long term evolution of geochemical systems, even in oxygen-limited environments.

  10. Simulation of surface profile formation in oxygen laser cutting of mild steel due to combustion cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermolaev, G V; Kovalev, O B [Khristianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Institutskaya Str 4/1, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-21

    A physicomathematical model of cyclic iron combustion in an oxygen flow during oxygen laser cutting of metal sheets is developed. The combustion front is set into motion by focused laser radiation and a heterogeneous oxidation reaction in oxygen. The burning rate is limited by oxygen supply from the gas phase towards the metal surface, and the interface motion depends on the local temperature. A 3D numerical simulation predicts wavy structures on the metal surface; their linear sizes depend on the scanning speed of the laser beam, the thickness of the produced liquid oxide film and the parameters of the oxygen jet flow. Simulation results help in understanding the mechanism of striation formation during oxygen gas-laser cutting of mild steel and are in qualitative agreement with experimental findings.

  11. Surface Defect Passivation and Reaction of c-Si in H2S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiang-Yu; Das, Ujjwal K; Birkmire, Robert W

    2017-12-26

    A unique passivation process of Si surface dangling bonds through reaction with hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is demonstrated in this paper. A high-level passivation quality with an effective minority carrier lifetime (τ eff ) of >2000 μs corresponding to a surface recombination velocity of passivation by monolayer coverage of S on the Si surface. However, S passivation of the Si surface is highly unstable because of thermodynamically favorable reaction with atmospheric H 2 O and O 2 . This instability can be eliminated by capping the S-passivated Si surface with a protective thin film such as low-temperature-deposited amorphous silicon nitride.

  12. EXFOR basics. A short guide to the nuclear reaction data exchange format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, Victoria

    2000-01-01

    EXFOR is the agreed exchange format for the transmission of experimental nuclear reaction data between national and international nuclear data centers for the benefit of nuclear data users in all countries. This report is intended as a guide to data users. For a complete guide to the EXFOR system see: EXFOR Systems Manual, IAEA-NDS-207 (BNL-NCS-63330-00/04-Rev.) (author)

  13. Formation of degradation compounds from lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery: sugar reaction mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helena; Sørensen, Hanne R.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    , several aldehydes and ketones and many different organic acids and aromatic compounds may be generated during hydrothermal treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. The reaction mechanisms are of interest because the very same compounds that are possible inhibitors for biomass processing enzymes......The degradation compounds formed during pretreatment when lignocellulosic biomass is processed to ethanol or other biorefinery products include furans, phenolics, organic acids, as well as mono- and oligomeric pentoses and hexoses. Depending on the reaction conditions glucose can be converted to 5......-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde (HMF) and/or levulinic acid, formic acid and different phenolics at elevated temperatures. Correspondingly, xylose can follow different reaction mechanisms resulting in the formation of furan-2-carbaldehyde (furfural) and/or various C-1 and C-4 compounds. At least four routes...

  14. Formation, separation and detection of evaporation residues produced in complete fusion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sagaidak, R N

    2015-01-01

    Some aspects of formation, separation and detection of evaporation residues (ERs) produced in complete fusion reactions induced by accelerated heavy ions are considered. These reactions allow to obtain heavy neutron-deficient nuclei and to study their properties. The statistical model analysis of the production cross sections for these nuclei obtained in a wide range of their neutron numbers allows to trace the changes in their macroscopic properties such as fission barriers. The fusion probability of massive projectile and target nuclei is of interest. Empirical estimates of this value allow to verify the predictions of theoretical models for the optimal ways of synthesis of unknown nuclei. Some peculiarities in the separation and detection of ERs in experiments are briefly considered by the example of the Ra ERs produced in the 12 C+Pb reactions. The reliable cross sections for ERs produced in very asymmetric projectile-target combination, such as 12 C+Pb, are important for the em...

  15. Study on the surface reaction of LaNi{sub 5} alloy during discharge process in KOH solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan Zuxian [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yang Yifu [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)]. E-mail: yang-y-f1@vip.sina.com; Jiang Fengshan [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Shao Huixia [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2006-10-05

    A new method for studying surface reaction of LaNi{sub 5} absorbing alloy in KOH solution (pH 12) was established. It is based on tip-substrate voltammetry of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) where the tip faradic current is recorded while scanning the substrate potential. The Pt electrode is selected as tip electrode, and the Pt oxide formation-reduction is used as a pH-dependent reaction while the tip potential is held at a constant value. As substrate surface reactions proceed, the pH of solution can be changed, and then the tip faradic current is recorded. The mechanism of discharge process of LaNi{sub 5} alloy was analyzed by comparing the tip current (I {sub tip}) versus substrate potential (E {sub sub}) curve, which reflects the exchange of H{sup +} or OH{sup -} between the alloy surface and the solution, with the substrate current (I {sub sub}) versus substrate potential (E {sub sub}) curve, which reflects the exchange of electron on the LaNi{sub 5} alloy surface. The results showed that the OH{sup -} adsorption process is occurred before the electron transfer process during discharge process, and the adsorptive OH{sup -} helps the oxidation of adsorbed hydrogen atom on the alloy surface. A quantitative assessment for the maximum changes of pH during discharge process is also proposed, and the variation as large as 2.65 pH unit was detected.

  16. Study on the surface reaction of LaNi{sub 5} alloy during discharge process in KOH solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Zuxian; Yang, Yifu; Jiang, Fengshan; Shao, Huixia [Wuhan University, Wuhan (China). Department of Chemistry

    2006-10-05

    A new method for studying surface reaction of LaNi{sub 5} absorbing alloy in KOH solution (pH 12) was established. It is based on tip-substrate voltammetry of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) where the tip faradic current is recorded while scanning the substrate potential. The Pt electrode is selected as tip electrode, and the Pt oxide formation-reduction is used as a pH-dependent reaction while the tip potential is held at a constant value. As substrate surface reactions proceed, the pH of solution can be changed, and then the tip faradic current is recorded. The mechanism of discharge process of LaNi{sub 5} alloy was analyzed by comparing the tip current (I{sub tip}) versus substrate potential (E{sub sub}) curve, which reflects the exchange of H{sup +} or OH{sup -} between the alloy surface and the solution, with the substrate current (I{sub sub}) versus substrate potential (E{sub sub}) curve, which reflects the exchange of electron on the LaNi{sub 5} alloy surface. The results showed that the OH{sup -} adsorption process is occurred before the electron transfer process during discharge process, and the adsorptive OH{sup -} helps the oxidation of adsorbed hydrogen atom on the alloy surface. A quantitative assessment for the maximum changes of pH during discharge process is also proposed, and the variation as large as 2.65 pH unit was detected. (author)

  17. C—C bond formation in the intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction of triene amides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelilah Benallou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism nature of the intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction has been performed; and thus, the changes of C—C bond forming/breaking along IRC are characterized in this study. Conceptual DFT analyses of the most favorable adduct fused/exo shows that the flux electronic will take place from diene to dienophile moiety. Moreover, ELF topological analysis based on the electron density predicts that C—C bond is formed by the coupling of two pseudoradical centers generated at the most significant atoms of the molecules. However, C2 vs C3, also C1 and C4 interaction comes mainly from the global electron density transfer which takes place along the reaction. Two- stage one-step is the proposed mechanism of this reaction, the first stage aims for the formation of C2—C3 σ bond while the second stage aims for C1—C4 σ bond formation. Interestingly, the observed asynchronicity of this IMDA reaction due principally to the asymmetric reorganization of electron density at the most attractive centers.

  18. C-C bond formation in the intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction of triene amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benallou, Abdelilah; El Alaoui El Abdallaoui, Habib; Garmes, Hocine

    2018-02-01

    The mechanism nature of the intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction has been performed; and thus, the changes of C-C bond forming/breaking along IRC are characterized in this study. Conceptual DFT analyses of the most favorable adduct fused/exo shows that the flux electronic will take place from diene to dienophile moiety. Moreover, ELF topological analysis based on the electron density predicts that C-C bond is formed by the coupling of two pseudoradical centers generated at the most significant atoms of the molecules. However, C2 vs C3, also C1 and C4 interaction comes mainly from the global electron density transfer which takes place along the reaction. Two- stage one-step is the proposed mechanism of this reaction, the first stage aims for the formation of C2-C3 σ bond while the second stage aims for C1-C4 σ bond formation. Interestingly, the observed asynchronicity of this IMDA reaction due principally to the asymmetric reorganization of electron density at the most attractive centers.

  19. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  20. Reactions and reaction intermediates on iron surfaces--1. Methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol on Fe(100). 2. Hydrocarbons and carboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benziger, J.B.; Madix, R.J.

    1980-09-01

    Temperature-programed desorption and ESCA showed that the alcohols formed alkoxy intermediates on Fe(100) surfaces at room temperature, but that the methoxy and ethoxy species were much more stable than the isopropoxy intermediate. The alkoxy species reacted above 400/sup 0/K by decomposing into carbon monoxide and hydrogen, hydrogenation to alcohol, and scission of C-C and C-O bonds with hydrogenation of the hydrocarbon fragments. Ethylene, acetylene, and cis-2-butene formed stable, unidentified surface species. Methyl chloride formed stable surface methyl groups which decomposed into hydrogen and surface carbide at 475/sup 0/K. Formic and acetic acids yielded stable carboxylate intermediates which decomposed above 490/sup 0/K to hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The studies suggested that the alkoxy surface species may be important intermediates in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction on iron.

  1. Formation and Migration of Oxygen Vacancies in SrCoO3 and their effect on Oxygen Evolution Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, Hassan A.

    2016-07-18

    Perovskite SrCoO3 is a potentially useful material for promoting the electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction, with high activities predicted theoretically and observed experimentally for closely related doped perovskite materials. However, complete stoichiometric oxidation is very difficult to realize experimentally – in almost all cases there are significant fractions of oxygen vacancies present. Here, using first principles calculations we study oxygen vacancies in perovskite SrCoO3 from thermodynamic, electronic and kinetic points of view. We find that an oxygen vacancy donates two electrons to neighboring Co sites in the form of localized charge. The formation energy of a single vacancy is very low and estimated to be 1.26 eV in the dilute limit. We find that a vacancy is quite mobile with a migration energy of ~0.5 eV. Moreover, we predict that oxygen vacancies exhibit a tendency towards clustering which is in accordance with the material’s ability to form a variety of oxygen-deficient structures. These vacancies have a profound effect on the material’s ability to facilitate OER, increasing the overpotential from ~0.3 V for the perfect material to ~0.7 for defective surfaces. A moderate compressive biaxial strain (2%) is predicted here to increase the surface oxygen vacancy formation energy by ca. 30%, thus reducing the concentration of surface vacancies and thereby preserving the OER activity of the material.

  2. Formation and Migration of Oxygen Vacancies in SrCoO3 and their effect on Oxygen Evolution Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, Hassan A.; Tan, Xin; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Smith, Sean C.

    2016-01-01

    Perovskite SrCoO3 is a potentially useful material for promoting the electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction, with high activities predicted theoretically and observed experimentally for closely related doped perovskite materials. However, complete stoichiometric oxidation is very difficult to realize experimentally – in almost all cases there are significant fractions of oxygen vacancies present. Here, using first principles calculations we study oxygen vacancies in perovskite SrCoO3 from thermodynamic, electronic and kinetic points of view. We find that an oxygen vacancy donates two electrons to neighboring Co sites in the form of localized charge. The formation energy of a single vacancy is very low and estimated to be 1.26 eV in the dilute limit. We find that a vacancy is quite mobile with a migration energy of ~0.5 eV. Moreover, we predict that oxygen vacancies exhibit a tendency towards clustering which is in accordance with the material’s ability to form a variety of oxygen-deficient structures. These vacancies have a profound effect on the material’s ability to facilitate OER, increasing the overpotential from ~0.3 V for the perfect material to ~0.7 for defective surfaces. A moderate compressive biaxial strain (2%) is predicted here to increase the surface oxygen vacancy formation energy by ca. 30%, thus reducing the concentration of surface vacancies and thereby preserving the OER activity of the material.

  3. Quantum state-resolved gas/surface reaction dynamics probed by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Li [Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, Goettingen (Germany); Ueta, Hirokazu; Beck, Rainer D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Moleculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Bisson, Regis [Aix-Marseille Universite, PIIM, CNRS, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France)

    2013-05-15

    We report the design and characterization of a new molecular-beam/surface-science apparatus for quantum state-resolved studies of gas/surface reaction dynamics combining optical state-specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage with detection of surface-bound reaction products by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). RAIRS is a non-invasive infrared spectroscopic detection technique that enables online monitoring of the buildup of reaction products on the target surface during reactant deposition by a molecular beam. The product uptake rate obtained by calibrated RAIRS detection yields the coverage dependent state-resolved reaction probability S({theta}). Furthermore, the infrared absorption spectra of the adsorbed products obtained by the RAIRS technique provide structural information, which help to identify nascent reaction products, investigate reaction pathways, and determine branching ratios for different pathways of a chemisorption reaction. Measurements of the dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111) with this new apparatus are presented to illustrate the utility of RAIRS detection for highly detailed studies of chemical reactions at the gas/surface interface.

  4. Optimization of Si–C reaction temperature and Ge thickness in C-mediated Ge dot formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yuhki, E-mail: yu-ki@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Itoh, Yuhki; Kawashima, Tomoyuki; Washio, Katsuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    To form Ge dots on a Si substrate, the effect of thermal reaction temperature of sub-monolayer C with Si (100) was investigated and the deposited Ge thickness was optimized. The samples were prepared by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy with an electron-beam gun for C sublimation and a Knudsen cell for Ge evaporation. C of 0.25 ML was deposited on Si (100) at a substrate temperature of 200 °C, followed by a high-temperature treatment at the reaction temperature (T{sub R}) of 650–1000 °C to create Si–C bonds. Ge equivalent to 2 to 5 nm thick was subsequently deposited at 550 °C. Small and dense dots were obtained for T{sub R} = 750 °C but the dot density decreased and the dot diameter varied widely in the case of lower and higher T{sub R}. A dot density of about 2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} was achieved for Ge deposition equivalent to 3 to 5 nm thick and a standard deviation of dot diameter was the lowest of 10 nm for 5 nm thick Ge. These results mean that C-mediated Ge dot formation was strongly influenced not only by the c(4 × 4) reconstruction condition through the Si–C reaction but also the relationship between the Ge deposition thickness and the exposed Si (100)-(2 × 1) surface area. - Highlights: • The effect of Si–C reaction temperature on Ge dot formation was investigated. • Small and dense dots were obtained for T{sub R} = 750 °C. • The dot density of about 2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} was achieved for Ge = 3 to 5 nm. • The standard deviation of dot diameter was the lowest of 10 nm at Ge = 5 nm.

  5. Formation of Reversible Solid Electrolyte Interface on Graphite Surface from Concentrated Electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Dongping; Tao, Jinhui; Yan, Pengfei; Henderson, Wesley A.; Li, Qiuyan; Shao, Yuyan; Helm, Monte L.; Borodin, Oleg; Graff, Gordon L.; Polzin, Bryant; Wang, Chong-Min; Engelhard, Mark; Zhang, Ji-Guang; De Yoreo, James J.; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2017-02-10

    Interfacial phenomena have always been key determinants for the performance of energy storage technologies. The solid electrolyte interfacial (SEI) layer, pervasive on the surfaces of battery electrodes for numerous chemical couples, directly affects the ion transport, charge transfer and lifespan of the entire energy system. Almost all SEI layers, however, are unstable resulting in the continuous consumption of the electrolyte. Typically, this leads to the accumulation of degradation products on/restructuring of the electrode surface and thus increased cell impedance, which largely limits the long-term operation of the electrochemical reactions. Herein, a completely new SEI formation mechanism has been discovered, in which the electrolyte components reversibly self-assemble into a protective surface coating on a graphite electrode upon changing the potential. In contrast to the established wisdom regarding the necessity of employing the solvent ethylene carbonate (EC) to form a protective SEI layer on graphite, a wide range of EC-free electrolytes are demonstrated for the reversible intercalation/deintercalation of Li+ cations within a graphite lattice, thereby providing tremendous flexibility in electrolyte tailoring for battery couples. This novel finding is broadly applicable and provides guidance for how to control interfacial reactions through the relationship between ion aggregation and solvent decomposition at polarized interfaces.

  6. Arsenic Sulfide Nanowire Formation on Fused Quartz Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmstead, J.; Riley, B.J.; Johnson, B.R.; Sundaram, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic sulfide (AsxSy) nanowires were synthesized by an evaporation-condensation process in evacuated fused quartz ampoules. During the deposition process, a thin, colored film of AsxSy was deposited along the upper, cooler portion of the ampoule. The ampoule was sectioned and the deposited film analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to characterize and semi-quantitatively evaluate the microstructural features of the deposited film. A variety of microstructures were observed that ranged from a continuous thin film (warmer portion of the ampoule), to isolated micron- and nano-scale droplets (in the intermediate portion), as well as nanowires (colder portion of the ampoule). Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of ampoule cleaning methods (e.g. modify surface chemistry) and quantity of source material on nanowire formation. The evolution of these microstructures in the thin film was determined to be a function of initial pressure, substrate temperature, substrate surface treatment, and initial volume of As2S3 glass. In a set of two experiments where the initial pressure, substrate thermal gradient, and surface treatment were the same, the initial quantity of As2S3 glass per internal ampoule volume was doubled from one test to the other. The results showed that AsxSy nanowires were only formed in the test with the greater initial quantity of As2S3 per internal ampoule volume. The growth data for variation in diameter (e.g. nanowire or droplet) as a function of substrate temperature was fit to an exponential trendline with the form y = Aekx, where y is the structure diameter, A = 1.25×10-3, k = 3.96×10-2, and x is the temperature with correlation coefficient, R2 = 0.979, indicating a thermally-activated process.

  7. Enhanced Colloidal Stability of CeO2 Nanoparticles by Ferrous Ions: Adsorption, Redox Reaction, and Surface Precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuyang; Ray, Jessica R; Neil, Chelsea W; Li, Qingyun; Jun, Young-Shin

    2015-05-05

    Due to the toxicity of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (NPs), a better understanding of the redox reaction-induced surface property changes of CeO2 NPs and their transport in natural and engineered aqueous systems is needed. This study investigates the impact of redox reactions with ferrous ions (Fe2+) on the colloidal stability of CeO2 NPs. We demonstrated that under anaerobic conditions, suspended CeO2 NPs in a 3 mM FeCl2 solution at pH 4.8 were much more stable against sedimentation than those in the absence of Fe2+. Redox reactions between CeO2 NPs and Fe2+ lead to the formation of 6-line ferrihydrite on the CeO2 surfaces, which enhanced the colloidal stability by increasing the zeta potential and hydrophilicity of CeO2 NPs. These redox reactions can affect the toxicity of CeO2 NPs by increasing cerium dissolution, and by creating new Fe(III) (hydr)oxide reactive surface layers. Thus, these findings have significant implications for elucidating the phase transformation and transport of redox reactive NPs in the environment.

  8. Reaction dynamics of molecular hydrogen on silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratu, P.; Brenig, W.; Gross, A.

    1996-01-01

    of the preexponential factor by about one order of magnitude per lateral degree of freedom. Molecular vibrations have practically no effect on the adsorption/desorption dynamics itself, but lead to vibrational heating in desorption with a strong isotope effect. Ab initio calculations for the H-2 interaction...... between the two surfaces. These results indicate that tunneling, molecular vibrations, and the structural details of the surface play only a minor role for the adsorption dynamics. Instead, they appear to be governed by the localized H-Si bonding and Si-Si lattice vibrations. Theoretically, an effective......Experimental and theoretical results on the dynamics of dissociative adsorption and recombinative desorption of hydrogen on silicon are presented. Using optical second-harmonic generation, extremely small sticking probabilities in the range 10(-9)-10(-5) could be measured for H-2 and D-2 on Si(111...

  9. Near-surface analysis with nuclear reactions and scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, K.L.; Hirvonen, J.K.

    1974-01-01

    Very useful information about the elemental composition of solids in the surface and near-surface regions can be obtained with small accelerators and suitable auxiliary apparatus. Two methods which produce data from which quantitative concentration depth profiles can be constructed and which have been used extensively at this laboratory are: nuclear resonance profiling and Rutherford backscattering. The first method is described in detail. Data are given on profiles of Al and Al + Na films implanted on silicon substrates. Rutherford backscattering spectra for chromium implanted into silicon dioxide are used to illustrate the improved depth sensitivity that can be obtained with a magnetic spectrometer in depth concentration profiles of heavy impurities relative to that obtainable with a conventional semiconductor detector

  10. Electrochemical Characterization of Surface Reactions on Biomedical Titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Alkhateeb, Emad Hashim

    2008-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are successfully used as implant materials for dental, orthopedic and osteosynthesis applications. The processes that take place at the implant tissue interface are important for the acceptance and integration of the implant. This thesis is divided into two parts: the first part deals with surface modification of titanium to improve the osseointegration, and the second part studies metastable pitting of titanium and its alloys. The weakly attached layer of a bone-like ...

  11. Evidence concerning oxidation as a surface reaction in Baltic amber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    , obtained from pressed amber powder, were subjected to accelerated thermal ageing. Cross-sections of the pellets were analyzed by infrared micro-spectroscopy, in order to identify and quantify changes in chemical properties. The experimental results showed strong oxidation exclusively at the exterior part...... of cross-sections from samples subjected to long-term thermal ageing, confirming that oxidation of Baltic amber starts from the surface....

  12. COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF INTERSTELLAR GLYCINE FORMATION OCCURRING AT RADICAL SURFACES OF WATER-ICE DUST PARTICLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona; Ugliengo, Piero

    2012-01-01

    Glycine is the simplest amino acid, and due to the significant astrobiological implications that suppose its detection, the search for it in the interstellar medium (ISM), meteorites, and comets is intensively investigated. In the present work, quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory have been used to model the glycine formation on water-ice clusters present in the ISM. The removal of either one H atom or one electron from the water-ice cluster has been considered to simulate the effect of photolytic radiation and of ionizing particles, respectively, which lead to the formation of OH . radical and H 3 O + surface defects. The coupling of incoming CO molecules with the surface OH . radicals on the ice clusters yields the formation of the COOH . radicals via ZPE-corrected energy barriers and reaction energies of about 4-5 kcal mol –1 and –22 kcal mol –1 , respectively. The COOH . radicals couple with incoming NH=CH 2 molecules (experimentally detected in the ISM) to form the NHCH 2 COOH . radical glycine through energy barriers of 12 kcal mol –1 , exceedingly high at ISM cryogenic temperatures. Nonetheless, when H 3 O + is present, one proton may be barrierless transferred to NH=CH 2 to give NH 2 =CH 2 + . This latter may react with the COOH . radical to give the NH 2 CH 2 COOH +. glycine radical cation which can then be transformed into the NH 2 CHC(OH) 2 +. species (the most stable form of glycine in its radical cation state) or into the NH 2 CHCOOH . neutral radical glycine. Estimated rate constants of these events suggest that they are kinetically feasible at temperatures of 100-200 K, which indicate that their occurrence may take place in hot molecular cores or in comets exposed to warmer regions of solar systems. Present results provide quantum chemical evidence that defects formed on water ices due to the harsh-physical conditions of the ISM may trigger reactions of cosmochemical interest. The relevance of surface H 3 O

  13. Computational Study of Interstellar Glycine Formation Occurring at Radical Surfaces of Water-ice Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona; Ugliengo, Piero

    2012-07-01

    Glycine is the simplest amino acid, and due to the significant astrobiological implications that suppose its detection, the search for it in the interstellar medium (ISM), meteorites, and comets is intensively investigated. In the present work, quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory have been used to model the glycine formation on water-ice clusters present in the ISM. The removal of either one H atom or one electron from the water-ice cluster has been considered to simulate the effect of photolytic radiation and of ionizing particles, respectively, which lead to the formation of OH• radical and H3O+ surface defects. The coupling of incoming CO molecules with the surface OH• radicals on the ice clusters yields the formation of the COOH• radicals via ZPE-corrected energy barriers and reaction energies of about 4-5 kcal mol-1 and -22 kcal mol-1, respectively. The COOH• radicals couple with incoming NH=CH2 molecules (experimentally detected in the ISM) to form the NHCH2COOH• radical glycine through energy barriers of 12 kcal mol-1, exceedingly high at ISM cryogenic temperatures. Nonetheless, when H3O+ is present, one proton may be barrierless transferred to NH=CH2 to give NH2=CH2 +. This latter may react with the COOH• radical to give the NH2CH2COOH+• glycine radical cation which can then be transformed into the NH2CHC(OH)2 +• species (the most stable form of glycine in its radical cation state) or into the NH2CHCOOH• neutral radical glycine. Estimated rate constants of these events suggest that they are kinetically feasible at temperatures of 100-200 K, which indicate that their occurrence may take place in hot molecular cores or in comets exposed to warmer regions of solar systems. Present results provide quantum chemical evidence that defects formed on water ices due to the harsh-physical conditions of the ISM may trigger reactions of cosmochemical interest. The relevance of surface H3O+ ions to facilitate chemical

  14. COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF INTERSTELLAR GLYCINE FORMATION OCCURRING AT RADICAL SURFACES OF WATER-ICE DUST PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona [Departament de Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Ugliengo, Piero, E-mail: albert.rimola@uab.cat [Dipartimento di Chimica, NIS Centre of Excellence and INSTM (Materials and Technology National Consortium), UdR Torino, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2012-07-20

    Glycine is the simplest amino acid, and due to the significant astrobiological implications that suppose its detection, the search for it in the interstellar medium (ISM), meteorites, and comets is intensively investigated. In the present work, quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory have been used to model the glycine formation on water-ice clusters present in the ISM. The removal of either one H atom or one electron from the water-ice cluster has been considered to simulate the effect of photolytic radiation and of ionizing particles, respectively, which lead to the formation of OH{sup .} radical and H{sub 3}O{sup +} surface defects. The coupling of incoming CO molecules with the surface OH{sup .} radicals on the ice clusters yields the formation of the COOH{sup .} radicals via ZPE-corrected energy barriers and reaction energies of about 4-5 kcal mol{sup -1} and -22 kcal mol{sup -1}, respectively. The COOH{sup .} radicals couple with incoming NH=CH{sub 2} molecules (experimentally detected in the ISM) to form the NHCH{sub 2}COOH{sup .} radical glycine through energy barriers of 12 kcal mol{sup -1}, exceedingly high at ISM cryogenic temperatures. Nonetheless, when H{sub 3}O{sup +} is present, one proton may be barrierless transferred to NH=CH{sub 2} to give NH{sub 2}=CH{sub 2}{sup +}. This latter may react with the COOH{sup .} radical to give the NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH{sup +.} glycine radical cation which can then be transformed into the NH{sub 2}CHC(OH){sub 2}{sup +.} species (the most stable form of glycine in its radical cation state) or into the NH{sub 2}CHCOOH{sup .} neutral radical glycine. Estimated rate constants of these events suggest that they are kinetically feasible at temperatures of 100-200 K, which indicate that their occurrence may take place in hot molecular cores or in comets exposed to warmer regions of solar systems. Present results provide quantum chemical evidence that defects formed on water ices due to the harsh

  15. Light-induced heterogeneous reactions of NO2 on indoor surfaces: How they affect the balance of nitrous acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Alvarez, E.; Soergel, M.; Bassil, S.; Zetzsch, C.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important indoor pollutant. The adverse health effects due to the formation of nitrosamines are well known. HONO acts as a nitrosating agent after wall reactions of HONO with nicotine [Sleiman et al., 2010]. Indoor air can be surprisingly rich in HONO (homes with fireplaces, stoves, gas heating and cooking) and also surfaces are abundant. High HONO concentrations have been measured in indoor environments, from the direct emissions and heterogeneous reactions of NO2 in darkness. However, the measured HONO concentrations do not correspond to the HONO levels determined by the models [Carslaw, 2007]. We have tested in a flow tube reactor on-line coupled to a NOx analyzer and a sensitive Long Path Absorption Photometry instrument, the behaviour of various indoor surfaces towards NO2 under simulated solar light irradiation (λ= 300-700 nm). Our study has allowed us to obtain a deeper knowledge on the mechanisms of heterogeneous formation of HONO, quantifying the dependence of HONO formation on behalf of NO2 concentration and relative humidity and the enhancement of HONO formation in the presence of light. Pyrex, acidic detergent, alkaline detergent, paint and lacquer were tested on behalf of their heterogeneous reactivity towards NO2 in the absence and in presence of light. The results obtained demonstrated that indoor surfaces are photo-chemically active under atmospherically relevant conditions. The strongly alkaline surfaces (such as certain types of detergent) show a strong long-term uptake capacity. However, other surfaces such as detergents with a more acidic character released HONO. In some cases such as paint and varnish, a strong HONO release with light was detected, which was significantly higher than that obtained over clean glass surfaces. Certain organics present on their composition could exert a photo-sensitizing effect that may explain their increased reactivity. Unfortunately, the final balance points towards an important net

  16. AES study of the reaction between a thin Fe-film and β-SiC (100) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizokawa, Yusuke; Nakanishi, Shigemitsu; Miyase, Sunao

    1989-01-01

    The solid state reaction between thin Fe-films and β-SiC(100) in UHV has been studied using AES. Even at room temperature, the reaction between the thin Fe-film and SiC occurred and formed Fe-silicide and graphite with a minor product of Fe-carbide (Fe 3 C). The reaction proceeded with an increase of Fe-coverage to some extent. With annealing of 15 A-Fe-film/SiC below 540degC, the Fe-silicide formation was accelerated, but because the amount of available Fe was small, the dissolved carbon atoms were forced to form not the Fe-carbide but the graphite phase. Above 640degC, the Fe-silicide started to decompose and the carbon atoms diffused to the surface and formed surface graphite layers. With annealing at 1080degC, the free-Si segregats at the surface and formed Si-Si bonds, as well as the Si-C bonds consuming the surface graphite phase. (author)

  17. Water entry without surface seal: Extended cavity formation

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad M.

    2014-03-01

    We report results from an experimental study of cavity formation during the impact of superhydrophobic spheres onto water. Using a simple splash-guard mechanism, we block the spray emerging during initial contact from closing thus eliminating the phenomenon known as \\'surface seal\\', which typically occurs at Froude numbers Fr= V0 2/(gR0) = O(100). As such, we are able to observe the evolution of a smooth cavity in a more extended parameter space than has been achieved in previous studies. Furthermore, by systematically varying the tank size and sphere diameter, we examine the influence of increasing wall effects on these guarded impact cavities and note the formation of surface undulations with wavelength λ =O(10)cm and acoustic waves λa=O(D0) along the cavity interface, which produce multiple pinch-off points. Acoustic waves are initiated by pressure perturbations, which themselves are generated by the primary cavity pinch-off. Using high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques we study the bulk fluid flow for the most constrained geometry and show the larger undulations ( λ =O (10cm)) have a fixed nature with respect to the lab frame. We show that previously deduced scalings for the normalized (primary) pinch-off location (ratio of pinch-off depth to sphere depth at pinch-off time), Hp/H = 1/2, and pinch-off time, τ α (R0/g) 1/2, do not hold for these extended cavities in the presence of strong wall effects (sphere-to-tank diameter ratio), ε = D 0/Dtank 1/16. Instead, we find multiple distinct regimes for values of Hp/H as the observed undulations are induced above the first pinch-off point as the impact speed increases. We also report observations of \\'kinked\\' pinch-off points and the suppression of downward facing jets in the presence of wall effects. Surprisingly, upward facing jets emanating from first cavity pinch-off points evolve into a \\'flat\\' structure at high impact speeds, both in the presence and absence of wall effects.

  18. Formation of hydroxyl radical (sm-bulletOH) in illuminated surface waters contaminated with acidic mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.M.; Lucas, S.; Allen, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    Formation rates and steady-state concentrations of hydroxyl radical ( sm-bullet OH) in illuminated surface water samples collected in west-central Indiana that receive acidic mine drainage runoff are reported. Formation rates for sm-bullet OH in samples were measured by the addition of 1 x 10 -3 M benzene prior to illuminate in order to effectively scavenge all of the sm-bullet OH formed, thereby yielding phenol. The sm-bullet OH formation rates were calculated from the measured phenol formation rates. Steady-state concentrations of sm-bullet OH were measured by the addition of 5 x 10 -7 M nitrobenzene to the samples prior to illumination. Estimated sunlight sm-bullet OH formation rates range from 16 microM h -1 to 265 microM h -1 . Estimated sunlight steady-state sm-bullet OH concentrations range from 6.7 x 10 -15 to 4.0 x 10 -12 M. Both the formation rates and steady-state concentrations for sm-bullet OH are thus two to three orders of magnitude higher than values reported in the literature for other sunlit surface water samples. Due to the very high rates of formation and steady-state concentrations for sm-bullet OH in these samples, the authors conclude that aqueous-phase reactions involving sm-bullet OH represent a significant pathway by which organic pollutants in illuminated surface waters receiving acidic mine drainage runoff may be consumed

  19. The effect of coadsorbed oxygen on the reaction of methanol on Rh(111) and on a rhodium/vanadium surface alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schennach, R.; Krenn, G.; Rendulic, K.D.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Molecular adsorption of methanol can be observed on all transition metal surfaces at low temperatures. Methanol is adsorbed on Rh (111) at 98 K. With increasing methanol exposure first a mono-layer and then multi-layers of methanol are formed at this surface temperature. During heating, desorption of the methanol from physisorbed multi-layers is detected at about 120 K, followed by desorption of methanol from a chemisorbed mono-layer at 170 K. About 50 % of the adsorbed methanol undergoes a dehydrogenation reaction to form hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorbed on the surface. These reaction products desorb at 300 K and 480 K, respectively. Less than 0.05 monolayers of coadsorbed oxygen increases the amount of methanol that reacts on the surface to about 80 %. Experiments using a Rh/V surface alloy were performed, in order to distinguish between steric and electronic effects in the adsorption and reaction processes. Deposition of 0.3 monolayers of V on the Rh (111) surface leads to the formation of a subsurface alloy, with V atoms in the second atomic layer only. The initial reaction probability was measured as a function of surface temperature and molecular beam energy. A marked difference was found between the two surfaces. On the clean surface methanol adsorption and reaction stops above 198 K, whereas on the alloy surface adsorption and subsequent reaction occurs up to 473 K. The effects of coadsorbed oxygen are similar on both surfaces. The results are discussed in terms of the possible reactions of the adsorbed methanol on the surface. (author)

  20. The Role of Electronic Excitations on Chemical Reaction Dynamics at Metal, Semiconductor and Nanoparticle Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tully, John C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-06-10

    Chemical reactions are often facilitated and steered when carried out on solid surfaces, essential for applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, solar energy conversion, corrosion, materials processing, and many others. A critical factor that can determine the rates and pathways of chemical reactions at surfaces is the efficiency and specificity of energy transfer; how fast does energy move around and where does it go? For reactions on insulator surfaces energy transfer generally moves in and out of vibrations of the adsorbed molecule and the underlying substrate. By contrast, on metal surfaces, metallic nanoparticles and semiconductors, another pathway for energy flow opens up, excitation and de-excitation of electrons. This so-called “nonadiabatic” mechanism often dominates the transfer of energy and can directly impact the course of a chemical reaction. Conventional computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation do not account for this nonadiabatic behavior. The current DOE-BES funded project has focused on developing the underlying theoretical foundation and the computational methodology for the prediction of nonadiabatic chemical reaction dynamics at surfaces. The research has successfully opened up new methodology and new applications for molecular simulation. In particular, over the last three years, the “Electronic Friction” theory, pioneered by the PI, has now been developed into a stable and accurate computational method that is sufficiently practical to allow first principles “on-the-fly” simulation of chemical reaction dynamics at metal surfaces.

  1. Formation of nitrogen-containing compounds during microwave pyrolysis of microalgae: Product distribution and reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Tahmasebi, Arash; Maliutina, Kristina; Yu, Jianglong

    2017-12-01

    The formation of nitrogen-containing compounds in bio-oil during microwave pyrolysis of Chlorella and Spirulina microalgae has been investigated in this study. Activated carbon (AC) and magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) were used as microwave receptors during microwave pyrolysis experiments. It has been found that the use of Fe 3 O 4 increased the total yield of bio-oil. The use of different microwave receptors did not seem to have affected the total yield of nitrogen-containing compounds in the bio-oil. However, Fe 3 O 4 promoted the formation of nitrogen-containing aliphatics, thereby reducing the formation of nitrogen-containing aromatics. The use of AC promoted the dehydration reactions during amino acid decomposition, thereby enhancing the formation of nitrogen-containing aromatics during pyrolysis. From the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis results, the major high-value nitrogen-containing compounds in the pyrolysis bio-oil of Chlorella and Spirulina were identified as indole and dodecamide. The formation mechanisms of nitrogen-containing compounds were proposed and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Monitoring benzene formation from benzoate in model systems by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Carlin, Silvia; Märk, Tilmann D.; Gasperi, Flavia

    2008-08-01

    The presence of benzene in food and in particular in soft drinks has been reported in several studies and should be considered in fundamental investigations about formation of this carcinogen compound as well as in quality control. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been used here for rapid, direct quantification of benzene and to monitor its formation in model systems related to the use of benzoate, a common preservative, in presence of ascorbic acid: a widespread situation that yields benzene in, e.g., soft drinks and fruit juices. Firstly, we demonstrate here that PTR-MS allows a rapid determination of benzene that is in quantitative agreement with independent solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography (SPME/GC) analysis. Secondly, as a case study, the effect of different sugars (sucrose, fructose and glucose) on benzene formation is investigated indicating that they inhibit its formation and that this effect is enhanced for reducing sugars. The sugar-induced inhibition of benzene formation depends on several parameters (type and concentration of sugar, temperature, time) but can be more than 80% in situations that can be expected in the storage of commercial soft drinks. This is consistent with the reported observations of higher benzene concentrations in sugar-free soft drinks.

  3. Surface analytical investigations of the thermal behaviour of passivated Zircaloy-4 surfaces and of the reaction behaviour of iodine with Zircaloy-4 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, R.

    1988-07-01

    In the first part of the present work the thermal behaviour of atmospherically oxidized Zircaloy-4 samples was investigated at various temperatures. In a next step the amount of iodine adsorbed at the metallic surface was determined as well at room temperature with varying iodine exposures as for constant exposure but varying temperatures. Furthermore, the zirconium iodide species resulting from the interaction of iodine with the Zircaloy-4 and desorbed at higher temperatures were identified by means of residual gas analysis. During these studies it was found that the oxidic overlayer of the passivated Zircaloy-4 samples is decomposed at temperatures above 200 0 C. The iodine uptake at metallic surfaces (cleaned by Ar-ion sputtering) at room temperature slows markedly down after formation of a closed zirconium-iodide overlayer and consequently the further reaction proceeds diffusion-controlled. At 200 0 C ZrI 4 is formed being the thermodynamically most stable Zr-iodide. During desorption experiments using iodine exposed Zircaloy-4 samples the release of ZrI 4 was proved. The results obtained from the various experiments are finally discussed with respect to the iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking process and the underlying basic mechanisms and a transport mechanism for the SCC in nuclear fuel rods is proposed. (orig./RB) [de

  4. Pressure Dependent Product Formation in the Photochemically Initiated Allyl + Allyl Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Zeuch

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Photochemically driven reactions involving unsaturated radicals produce a thick global layer of organic haze on Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. The allyl radical self-reaction is an example for this type of chemistry and was examined at room temperature from an experimental and kinetic modelling perspective. The experiments were performed in a static reactor with a volume of 5 L under wall free conditions. The allyl radicals were produced from laser flash photolysis of three different precursors allyl bromide (C3H5Br, allyl chloride (C3H5Cl, and 1,5-hexadiene (CH2CH(CH22CHCH2 at 193 nm. Stable products were identified by their characteristic vibrational modes and quantified using FTIR spectroscopy. In addition to the (re- combination pathway C3H5+C3H5 → C6H10 we found at low pressures around 1 mbar the highest final product yields for allene and propene for the precursor C3H5Br. A kinetic analysis indicates that the end product formation is influenced by specific reaction kinetics of photochemically activated allyl radicals. Above 10 mbar the (re- combination pathway becomes dominant. These findings exemplify the specificities of reaction kinetics involving chemically activated species, which for certain conditions cannot be simply deduced from combustion kinetics or atmospheric chemistry on Earth.

  5. Surface chemistry of tribochemical reactions explored in ultrahigh vacuum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara-Romero, Javier; Maya-Yescas, Rafael; Rico-Cerda, Jose Luis; Rivera-Rojas, Jose Luis; Castillo, Fernando Chinas; Kaltchev, Matey; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of model extreme-pressure lubricant additives on clean iron was studied in ultrahigh vacuum conditions using molecular beam strategies. Methylene chloride and chloroform react to deposit a solid film consisting of FeCl 2 and carbon, and evolve only hydrogen into the gas phase. No gas-phase products and less carbon on the surface are detected in the case of carbon tetrachloride. Dimethyl and diethyl disulfide react on clean iron to deposit a saturated sulfur plus carbon layer at low temperatures (∼600 K) and an iron sulfide film onto a Fe + C underlayer at higher temperatures (∼950 K). Methane is the only gas-phase product when dimethyl disulfide reacts with iron. Ethylene and hydrogen are detected when diethyl disulfide is used

  6. OH+ Formation in the Low-temperature O+(4S) + H2 Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Artem; Dung Tran, Thuy; Rednyk, Serhiy; Roučka, Štěpán; Dohnal, Petr; Plašil, Radek; Gerlich, Dieter; Glosík, Juraj

    2018-04-01

    Formation of OH+ in collisions of ground-state O+(4S) ions with normal H2 has been studied using a variable temperature 22-pole RF ion trap. From 300 to 30 K the measured reaction rate coefficient is temperature-independent, with a small decrease toward 15 K. The recent wave packet calculation predicts a slightly steeper temperature dependence. The rate coefficients at 300 and 15 K are almost the same, (1.4 ± 0.3) × 10‑9 cm3 s‑1 and (1.3 ± 0.3) × 10‑9 cm3 s‑1, respectively. The influence of traces of the two metastable ions, O+(2D) and O+(2P), has been examined by monitoring the H+ products of their reactions with H2, as well as by chemically probing them with N2 reactant gas.

  7. Dichotomous-noise-induced pattern formation in a reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debojyoti; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2013-06-01

    We consider a generic reaction-diffusion system in which one of the parameters is subjected to dichotomous noise by controlling the flow of one of the reacting species in a continuous-flow-stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) -membrane reactor. The linear stability analysis in an extended phase space is carried out by invoking Furutzu-Novikov procedure for exponentially correlated multiplicative noise to derive the instability condition in the plane of the noise parameters (correlation time and strength of the noise). We demonstrate that depending on the correlation time an optimal strength of noise governs the self-organization. Our theoretical analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on pattern formation in a chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system.

  8. Formation of quinones, indanones and furans by the reaction of molybdenum carbene complexes with alkynes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doetz, K.H.; Larbig, H.

    1992-01-01

    (Alkoxy)carbene complexes of molybdenum react with terminal alkynes to give carbene annulation of cycloaddition products, the skeleton of which depends on the carbene substitution pattern and the alkyne used. (CO) 5 Mo=C(OMe)-p-tol undergoes carbene annulation upon reaction with trimethylsilylacetylene leading to naphthoquinone after oxidative work-up. Similar products are obtained from (CO) 5 Mo=C(OMe)2-furyl and hex-1-yne or oct-1-yne. The reaction of these alkynes results in the formation of indanones as five-membered annulation products. In the presence of 3.3-dimethylbut-1-yne the (phenyl) carbene ligands act as a C 1 -synthon, which is incorporated into the furan cycloaddition products

  9. Prediction of Tetraoxygen Reaction Mechanism with Sulfur Atom on the Singlet Potential Energy Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Khademzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of S+O4 (D2h reaction has been investigated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df and CCSD levels on the singlet potential energy surface. One stable complex has been found for the S+O4 (D2h reaction, IN1, on the singlet potential energy surface. For the title reaction, we obtained four kinds of products at the B3LYP level, which have enough thermodynamic stability. The results reveal that the product P3 is spontaneous and exothermic with −188.042 and −179.147 kcal/mol in Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of reaction, respectively. Because P1 adduct is produced after passing two low energy level transition states, kinetically, it is the most favorable adduct in the 1S+1O4 (D2h atmospheric reactions.

  10. Study on the surface reaction of uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere with XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Zuo Changming; Zhao Chunpei; Chen Hong

    1998-01-01

    The surface reactions of uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere at 25 degree C and 200 degree C and effects of temperature and carbon monoxide to the hydriding reaction have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The reaction between H 2 and uranium metal at 25 degree C leads to the further oxidation of surface layer of metal due to traces of water vapor. At 200 degree C, it may lead to the hydriding reaction of uranium and the hydriding increases with increasing exposure to H 2 in the initial stages. The U4f 7/2 binding energy of UH 3 has been found to be 378.6 eV. Investigation indicates carbon monoxide inhibits both the hydriding reaction and oxidation on the condition of H 2 -CO atmosphere

  11. Evaluation of the atmospheric significance of multiphase reactions in atmospheric secondary organic aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelencsér

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In a simple conceptual cloud-aerosol model the mass of secondary organic aerosol (SOA that may be formed in multiphase reaction in an idealized scenario involving two cloud cycles separated with a cloud-free period is evaluated. The conditions are set to those typical of continental clouds, and each parameter used in the model calculations is selected as a mean of available observational data of individual species for which the multiphase SOA formation route has been established. In the idealized setting gas and aqueous-phase reactions are both considered, but only the latter is expected to yield products of sufficiently low volatility to be retained by aerosol particles after the cloud dissipates. The key variable of the model is the Henry-constant which primarily determines how important multiphase reactions are relative to gas-phase photooxidation processes. The precursor considered in the model is assumed to already have some affinity to water, i.e. it is a compound having oxygen-containing functional group(s. As a principal model output an aerosol yield parameter is calculated for the multiphase SOA formation route as a function of the Henry-constant, and has been found to be significant already above H~103 M atm-1. Among the potential precursors that may be eligible for this mechanism based on their Henry constants, there are a suite of oxygenated compounds such as primary oxidation products of biogenic and anthropogenic hydrocarbons, including, for example, pinonaldehyde. Finally, the analogy of multiphase SOA formation to in-cloud sulfate production is exploited.

  12. Robust formation control of marine surface craft using Lagrange multipliers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihle, Ivar-Andre F.; Jouffroy, Jerome; Fossen, Thor I.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a formation modelling scheme based on a set of inter-body constraint functions and Lagrangian multipliers. Formation control for a °eet of marine craft is achieved by stabilizing the auxiliary constraints such that the desired formation con¯guration appears. In the proposed fr...

  13. Study on the kinetics of gel formation in the radiation crosslinking reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingjun; Liu Yuming

    1988-01-01

    From the kinetic equation of gel formation obtained by the authors, the mechanism of gel formation may be interpreted clearly as follows: (1) When the degree of crosslinking q g , the system is sol and the crosslinking reaction is only carried out between the sol molecules. (q g is the gel point). (2) When q=q g , there exists a beginning point where the gel is coexisted with the sol, and the system is still sol, and the crosslinking reaction is still carried out between the sol molecules. (3) When q>q g , the crosslinking reaction exceeds the gel point and the gel is coexisted with the sol. The kinetic equation shows clearly that the transformation from sol into gel is caused by crosslinking reaction of the uncrosslinked chain units between the sol and gel molecules. As a result the sol molecules are transformed into the gel molecules gradually, and the sol fraction is reduced. When the chain units P-barw(s)S(1-s)dq in sol are crosslinked with gel, the sol fraction in the system is reduced ds (where P-barw(s) is a function of the radiation dose and s is sol frection). The degree of crosslinking per unit dose (q 0 ) is a reduced function of dose (R). The equation for calculating its value for every irradiation dose is obtained. After knowing the correlation between P-bar W(s) vs R and q 0 vs R, the distribution of gel and sol in the process of radiation crosslinking can be discussed as well

  14. Assessment of the potential for ammonium nitrate formation and reaction in Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    Two principal scenarios by which ammonium nitrate may be formed were considered: (a) precipitation of ammonium nitrate in the waste, and (b) ammonium nitrate formation via the gas phase reaction of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The first of these can be dismissed because ammonium ions, which are necessary for ammonium nitrate precipitation, can exist only in negligibly small concentrations in strongly alkaline solutions. Gas phase reactions between ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor in the gas phase represent the most likely means by which ammonium nitrate aerosols could be formed in Tank 241-SY-101. Predicted ammonium nitrate formation rates are largely controlled by the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. This gas has not been detected among those gases vented from the wastes using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. While detection limits for nitrogen dioxide have not been established experimentally, the maximum concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase in Tank 241-SY-101 was estimated at 0.1 ppm based on calculations using the HITRAN data base and on FTIR spectra of gases vented from the wastes. At 50 C and with 100 ppm ammonia also present, less than one gram of ammonium nitrate per year is estimated to be formed in the tank. To date, ammonium nitrate has not been detected on HEPA filters in the ventilation system, so any quantity that has been formed in the tank must be quite small, in good agreement with rate calculations. The potential for runaway exothermic reactions involving ammonium nitrate in Tank 241-SY-101 is minimal. Dilution by non-reacting waste components, particularly water, would prevent hazardous exothermic reactions from occurring within the waste slurry, even if ammonium nitrate were present. 41 refs

  15. Computational studies of atmospherically-relevant chemical reactions in water clusters and on liquid water and ice surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, R Benny; Varner, Mychel E; Hammerich, Audrey D; Riikonen, Sampsa; Murdachaew, Garold; Shemesh, Dorit; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Reactions on water and ice surfaces and in other aqueous media are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, but the microscopic mechanisms of most of these processes are as yet unknown. This Account examines recent progress in atomistic simulations of such reactions and the insights provided into mechanisms and interpretation of experiments. Illustrative examples are discussed. The main computational approaches employed are classical trajectory simulations using interaction potentials derived from quantum chemical methods. This comprises both ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and semiempirical molecular dynamics (SEMD), the latter referring to semiempirical quantum chemical methods. Presented examples are as follows: (i) Reaction of the (NO(+))(NO3(-)) ion pair with a water cluster to produce the atmospherically important HONO and HNO3. The simulations show that a cluster with four water molecules describes the reaction. This provides a hydrogen-bonding network supporting the transition state. The reaction is triggered by thermal structural fluctuations, and ultrafast changes in atomic partial charges play a key role. This is an example where a reaction in a small cluster can provide a model for a corresponding bulk process. The results support the proposed mechanism for production of HONO by hydrolysis of NO2 (N2O4). (ii) The reactions of gaseous HCl with N2O4 and N2O5 on liquid water surfaces. Ionization of HCl at the water/air interface is followed by nucleophilic attack of Cl(-) on N2O4 or N2O5. Both reactions proceed by an SN2 mechanism. The products are ClNO and ClNO2, precursors of atmospheric atomic chlorine. Because this mechanism cannot result from a cluster too small for HCl ionization, an extended water film model was simulated. The results explain ClNO formation experiments. Predicted ClNO2 formation is less efficient. (iii) Ionization of acids at ice surfaces. No ionization is found on ideal crystalline surfaces, but the process is efficient on

  16. The Effect of Simulated Microgravity Environment of RWV Bioreactors on Surface Reactions and Adsorption of Serum Proteins on Bone-bioactive Microcarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, Shula; Ducheyne, P.; Ayyaswamy, P. S.

    2003-01-01

    Biomimetically modified bioactive materials with bone-like surface properties are attractive candidates for use as microcarriers for 3-D bone-like tissue engineering under simulated microgravity conditions of NASA designed rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors. The simulated microgravity environment is attainable under suitable parametric conditions of the RWV bioreactors. Ca-P containing bioactive glass (BG), whose stimulatory effect on bone cell function had been previously demonstrated, was used in the present study. BG surface modification via reactions in solution, resulting formation of bone-like minerals at the surface and adsorption of serum proteins is critical for obtaining the stimulatory effect. In this paper, we report on the major effects of simulated microgravity conditions of the RWV on the BG reactions surface reactions and protein adsorption in physiological solutions. Control tests at normal gravity were conducted at static and dynamic conditions. The study revealed that simulated microgravity remarkably enhanced reactions involved in the BG surface modification, including BG dissolution, formation of bone-like minerals at the surface and adsorption of serum proteins. Simultaneously, numerical models were developed to simulate the mass transport of chemical species to and from the BG surface under normal gravity and simulated microgravity conditions. The numerical results showed an excellent agreement with the experimental data at both testing conditions.

  17. Fragment formation in GeV-energy proton and light heavy-ion induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, T.; Haga, M.; Haseno, M.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated similarities and differences among the fragment formation processes in GeV-energy light-ion and light heavy-ion induced reactions. We have newly measured inclusive and exclusive energy spectra of intermediate mass fragments (3 ≤ Z ≤ 30; IMFs) for 8-GeV 16 O and 20 Ne and 12-GeV 20 Ne induced target multifragmentations (TMFs) in order to compare them with those previously measured for 8- and 12-GeV proton induced TMFs. We fond noticeable difference in their spectrum shapes and magnitudes but all of them clearly indicate the existence of sideward-peaked components, indicating fragment formations are mainly dictated not by a incident energy per nucleon but by a total energy of the projectile. (author)

  18. Secondary organic aerosol formation from ozone-initiated reactions with nicotine and secondhand tobacco smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Destaillats, Hugo; Smith, Jared D.; Liu, Chen-Lin; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Gundel, Lara A.

    2010-11-01

    We used controlled laboratory experiments to evaluate the aerosol-forming potential of ozone reactions with nicotine and secondhand smoke. Special attention was devoted to real-time monitoring of the particle size distribution and chemical composition of SOA as they are believed to be key factors determining the toxicity of SOA. The experimental approach was based on using a vacuum ultraviolet photon ionization time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (VUV-AMS), a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and off-line thermal desorption coupled to mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) for gas-phase byproducts analysis. Results showed that exposure of SHS to ozone induced the formation of ultrafine particles (smoke that is associated with the formation of ultrafine particles (UFP) through oxidative aging of secondhand smoke. The significance of this chemistry for indoor exposure and health effects is highlighted.

  19. Study of Reaction of Curium Oxy-Compound Formation in Molten Chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipenko, A.G.; Mayorshin, A.A.; Bychkov, A.V. [Dimitrovgrad-10, Ulyanovsk region, 433510 (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    The method of potentiometric titration using oxygen sensors with solid electrolyte membrane was applied for the study of the interaction of curium cations with oxygen anions in the molten alkali metal chlorides in the temperature range of 450-850 C degrees depending on oxy-acidity of the environment. Assumptions were made concerning ion and phase composition of the obtained high-temperature compounds and chemical reactions taking place in the melts. This scheme assumes that as the basicity of the melt increases, initially the formation of soluble curium oxychlorides takes place in the melt (presumably CmO{sup -}) that is followed by formation of solid CmOCl and finally sesquioxide Cm{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Basic thermodynamic values were calculated for the resultant curium oxy-compounds.

  20. Study on the formation of fission isomer via 232Th + α reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianna, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The formation of fission isomer through 232 Th+α reaction is studied using the distance-recoil method, employing policarbonate MAKROFOL detector. The total isomeric half-life measured has the value T 1/2 = 0.23 ± 0.03 ns and an ratio of formation of isomeric fission relative to prompt fission(σ i /σ p =0.75x10 -5 ). According to the energy of incident particle (Eα = 28 MeV), the cross-sections presented in the literature and the low value found for the total isomeric half-life, we attribute these half-life value to the 234 U isomer (even-even nucleus). The results were compared with those existent in the literature (La69, E170, Re70, Wo70, Po70, Br71) for this isomer. (author) [pt

  1. Monitorizing nitinol alloy surface reactions for biofouling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinu, C.Z.; Dinca, V.C.; Soare, S.; Moldovan, A.; Smarandache, D.; Scarisoareanu, N.; Barbalat, A.; Birjega, R.; Dinescu, M.; DiStefano, V. Ferrari

    2007-01-01

    Growth and deposition of unwanted bacteria on implant metal alloys affect their use as biomedical samples. Monitoring any bacterial biofilm accumulation will provide early countermeasures. For a reliable antifouling strategy we prepared nitinol (NiTi) thin films on Ti-derived substrates by using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. As the microstructure of Ti-alloy is dictated by the tensile strength, fatigue and the fracture toughness we tested the use of hydrogen as an alloying element. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigated the crystalline structure, chemical composition and respectively the surface morphology of the nitinol hydrogen and hydrogen-free samples. Moreover, the alloys were integrated and tested using a cellular metric and their responses were systematic evaluated and quantified. Our attractive approach is meant to select the suitable components for an effective and trustworthy anti-fouling strategy. A greater understanding of such processes should lead to novel and effective control methods that would improve in the future implant stability and capabilities

  2. Study of aniline polymerization reactions through the particle size formation in acidic and neutral medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aribowo, Slamet; Hafizah, Mas Ayu Elita; Manaf, Azwar; Andreas

    2018-04-01

    In the present paper, we reported particle size kinetic studies on the conducting polyaniline (PANI) which synthesized through a chemical oxidative polymerization technique from aniline monomer. PANI was prepared using ammonium persulfate (APS) as oxidizing agent which carried out in acidic and neutral medium at various batch temperatures of respectively 20, 30 and 50 °C. From the studies, it was noticed that the complete polymerization reaction progressed within 480 minutes duration time. The pH of the solution during reaction kinetic reached values 0.8 - to 1.2 in acidic media, while in the neutral media the pH value reached values 3.8 - 4.9. The batch temperature controlled the polymerization reaction in which the reaction progressing, which followed by the temperature rise of solution above the batch temperature before settled down to the initial temperature. An increment in the batch temperature gave highest rise in the solution temperature for the two media which cannot be more than 50 °C. The final product of polymerization reaction was PANI confirmed by Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectrophotometer for molecule structure identification. The averages particle size of PANI which carried out in the two different media is evidently similar in the range 30 - 40 μm and insensitive to the batch temperature. However, the particle size of PANI which obtained from the polymerization reaction at a batch temperature of 50 °C under acidic condition reached ˜53.1 μm at the tip of the propagation stage which started in the first 5 minutes. The size is obviously being the largest among the batch temperatures. Whereas, under neutral condition the particle size is much larger which reached the size 135 μm at the batch temperature of 20 °C. It is concluded that the particle size formation during the polymerization reaction being one of the important parameter to determine particle growing of polymer which indicated the reaction kinetics mechanism of synthesize

  3. Reaction kinetics of the formation of intermetallic Fe – Zn during hot - dip galvanizing of steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review article mainly describes the composition of intermetallic Fe - Zn, i.e. zeta (ζ, delta (δ1k + δ1p, gamma1 (Γ1 and gamma (Γ on galvanized steel during low temperature galvanization (t ~ 450 °C. It gives detailed the formation, growth of individual phases during galvanization and their interaction. In terms of the kinetics, the formation of the coating is defined by a parabolic kinetic equation of the growth of different intermetallic phases under ideal conditions. From the available literature the rate constants of the formation of individual intermetallic phases and also for the total coating are cited. The composition of the intermetallic phases, iron content, crystal structure, and group symmetry in which the surface of galvanized steel forms.

  4. Positronium formation at surfaces and studies towards the production of low energy antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, David Barry

    A magnetically guided slow positron beam has been used to measure positronium formation fractions via spectroscopy of annihilation radiation. Positrons with energies in the range 0-3 keV were implanted into tungsten, copper, magnesium oxide powder and silica aerogel targets at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures ( 30 K). This was done with and without nitrogen gas condensed on the surface of these materials. The resulting gamma rays were detected by a CsI detector and an associated PC-based spectroscopy system. In most cases studied the measured energy dependence of the positronium fractions was consistent with previous similar work, however, anomalous behaviour was found in some of the data when gas was condensed on metal surfaces. Using the same positron beam initial measurements of positronium energy distributions have been made. This was accomplished using a HPGe detector to measure the Doppler shift of the energy' of the positronium annihilation radiation. This novel technique has not yet been refined and estimates of its potential are reported. A Monte Carlo simulation of the reaction to form antihydrogen by positronium impact upon antiprotons has been undertaken. Total and differential cross sections have been utilised as input to the simulation which models the conditions foreseen in planned antihydrogen formation experiments using antiprotons and positrons held in Penning traps. Thus, predictions of antihydrogen production rates, angular distributions and the variation of the mean antihydrogen temperature as a function of the incident positronium energy have been made.

  5. To address surface reaction network complexity using scaling relations machine learning and DFT calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulissi, Zachary W.; Medford, Andrew J.; Bligaard, Thomas; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2017-01-01

    Surface reaction networks involving hydrocarbons exhibit enormous complexity with thousands of species and reactions for all but the very simplest of chemistries. We present a framework for optimization under uncertainty for heterogeneous catalysis reaction networks using surrogate models that are trained on the fly. The surrogate model is constructed by teaching a Gaussian process adsorption energies based on group additivity fingerprints, combined with transition-state scaling relations and a simple classifier for determining the rate-limiting step. The surrogate model is iteratively used to predict the most important reaction step to be calculated explicitly with computationally demanding electronic structure theory. Applying these methods to the reaction of syngas on rhodium(111), we identify the most likely reaction mechanism. Lastly, propagating uncertainty throughout this process yields the likelihood that the final mechanism is complete given measurements on only a subset of the entire network and uncertainty in the underlying density functional theory calculations.

  6. Correlation between Gas Bubble Formation and Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Kinetics at Nanoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianjin; Luo, Long

    2018-04-17

    We report the correlation between H 2 gas bubble formation potential and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activity for Au and Pt nanodisk electrodes (NEs). Microkinetic models were formulated to obtain the HER kinetic information for individual Au and Pt NEs. We found that the rate-determining steps for the HER at Au and Pt NEs were the Volmer step and the Heyrovsky step, respectively. More interestingly, the standard rate constant ( k 0 ) of the rate-determining step was found to vary over 2 orders of magnitude for the same type of NEs. The observed variations indicate the HER activity heterogeneity at the nanoscale. Furthermore, we discovered a linear relationship between bubble formation potential ( E bubble ) and log( k 0 ) with a slope of 125 mV/decade for both Au and Pt NEs. As log ( k 0 ) increases, E bubble shifts linearly to more positive potentials, meaning NEs with higher HER activities form H 2 bubbles at less negative potentials. Our theoretical model suggests that such linear relationship is caused by the similar critical bubble formation condition for Au and Pt NEs with varied sizes. Our results have potential implications for using gas bubble formation to evaluate the HER activity distribution of nanoparticles in an ensemble.

  7. Surface confined metallosupramolecular architectures: formation and scanning tunneling microscopy characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan-Shan; Northrop, Brian H; Yuan, Qun-Hui; Wan, Li-Jun; Stang, Peter J

    2009-02-17

    Metallosupramolecular compounds have attracted a great deal of attention over the past two decades largely because of their unique, highly complex structural characteristics and their potential electronic, magnetic, optical, and catalytic properties. These molecules can be prepared with relative ease using coordination-driven self-assembly techniques. In particular, the use of electron-poor square-planar Pt(II) transition metals in conjunction with rigid, electron-rich pyridyl donors has enabled the spontaneous self-assembly of a rich library of 2D metallacyclic and 3D metallacage assemblies via the directional-bonding approach. With this progress in the preparation and characterization of metallosupramolecules, researchers have now turned their attention toward fully exploring and developing their materials properties. Assembling metallosupramolecular compounds on solid supports represents a vitally important step toward developing their materials properties. Surfaces provide a means of uniformly aligning and orienting these highly symmetric metallacycles and metallacages. This uniformity increases the level of coherence between molecules above that which can be achieved in the solution phase and provides a way to integrate adsorbed layers, or adlayers, into a solid-state materials setting. The dynamic nature of kinetically labile Pt(II)-N coordination bonds requires us to adjust deposition and imaging conditions to retain the assemblies' stability. Toward these aims, we have used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to image these adlayers and to understand the factors that govern surface self-assembly and the interactions that influence their structure and stability. This Account describes our efforts to deposit 2D rectangular and square metallacycles and 3D trigonal bipyramidal and chiral trigonal prism metallacages on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and Au(111) substrates to give intact assemblies and ordered adlayers. We have investigated the effects

  8. Time-resolved SFG study of formate on a Ni( 1 1 1 ) surface under irradiation of picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, H.; Okada, T.; Onda, K.; Kano, S. S.; Wada, A.; Domen, K.

    2003-03-01

    Time-resolved sum-frequency generation spectroscopy was carried out on a deuterated formate (DCOO) adsorbed on Ni(1 1 1) surface to investigate the surface reaction dynamics under instantaneous surface temperature jump induced by the irradiation by picosecond laser pulses. The irradiation of pump pulse (800 nm) caused the rapid intensity decrease of both CD and OCO stretching modes of bridged formate on Ni(1 1 1). Different temporal behaviors of intensity recovery between these two vibrational modes were observed, i.e., CD stretching mode recovered faster than OCO. This is the first result to show that the dynamics of adsorbates on metals strongly depends on the observed vibrational mode. From the results of temperature and pump fluence dependence, we concluded that the observed intensity change was not due to the decomposition or desorption, but was induced by a non-thermal process.

  9. Molecular hydrogen formation on surfaces of astrophysical interest: first results on water ice at very low temperature and on graphite at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baouche, Saoud

    2004-01-01

    As the generally admitted mechanism of formation of the H_2 molecule in the interstellar medium (ISM) is a catalytic reaction between two atoms of H on the surface of cosmic powder grains, where grains are supposed to be carbons or silicates and could have ice coats, this research thesis aims at providing some elements about the efficiency of this reaction, what happens to the bound energy released after formation of the H_2 molecule. The author first describes the FORMOLISM experiment (Formation of molecule in the ISM), and then reports the study of the source of H or D atoms which is a very important component of the experiment. He reports and comments results obtained on the formation of H_2 and D_2 molecules on amorphous water ice. He reports the study of the dynamics of formation of the D_2 molecule on a graphite surface by using the laser-aided associative adsorption technique

  10. Construction of Polarized Carbon-Nickel Catalytic Surfaces for Potent, Durable, and Economic Hydrogen Evolution Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Weng, Qunhong; Popov, Zakhar I; Yang, Yijun; Antipina, Liubov Yu; Sorokin, Pavel B; Wang, Xi; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2018-05-22

    Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline solution is hindered by its sluggish kinetics toward water dissociation. Nickel-based catalysts, as low-cost and effective candidates, show great potentials to replace platinum (Pt)-based materials in the alkaline media. The main challenge regarding this type of catalysts is their relatively poor durability. In this work, we conceive and construct a charge-polarized carbon layer derived from carbon quantum dots (CQDs) on Ni 3 N nanostructure (Ni 3 N@CQDs) surfaces, which simultaneously exhibit durable and enhanced catalytic activity. The Ni 3 N@CQDs shows an overpotential of 69 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm -2 in a 1 M KOH aqueous solution, lower than that of Pt electrode (116 mV) at the same conditions. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations reveal that Ni 3 N and interfacial oxygen polarize charge distributions between originally equal C-C bonds in CQDs. The partially negatively charged C sites become effective catalytic centers for the key water dissociation step via the formation of new C-H bond (Volmer step) and thus boost the HER activity. Furthermore, the coated carbon is also found to protect interior Ni 3 N from oxidization/hydroxylation and therefore guarantees its durability. This work provides a practical design of robust and durable HER electrocatalysts based on nonprecious metals.

  11. VIRGIN2007, Calculates Un-collided Neutron Flux and Neutron Reactions from Transmission in ENDF Format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: VIRGIN calculates un-collided flux and reactions due to transmission of a mono-directional beam of neutrons through any thickness of material. In order to simulate an experimental measurement the results are given as integrals over energy tally groups (as opposed to point-wise in energy). IAEA0932/10: This version include the updates up to January 30, 2007. Changes in ENDF/B-VII Format and procedures, as well as the evaluations themselves, make it impossible for versions of the ENDF/B pre-processing codes earlier than PREPRO 2007 (2007 Version) to accurately process current ENDF/B-VII evaluations. The present code can handle all existing ENDF/B-VI evaluations through release 8, which will be the last release of ENDF/B-VI. Modifications from previous versions: Virgin VERS. 2007-1 (Jan. 2007): checked against all ENDF/B-VII; increased in-core page size from 60,000 to 240,000. 2 - Method of solution: By taking the ratio of reactions to flux in each group an equivalent spatially dependent group averaged cross section is calculated. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The evaluated data must be in the ENDF/B format. However it must be linear-linear interpolable in energy-cross section between tabulated points. Since only cross sections (file 3) are used, this program will work on any version of ENDF/B

  12. Formation control of surface marine craft using Lagrange multipliers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihle, Ivar-Andre F.; Jouffroy, Jerome; Fossen, Thor I.

    We propose a method for constructing control laws for formation control of marine craft using classical tools from analytical mechanics. The control law is based on applying inter-vessel constraint functions which again impose forces on the individual vessels that maintain the given constraints...... on the total system. In this way, a formation can be assembled and stay together when exposed to external forces. A brief comparison with other control designs for a group of marine craft is done. Further, control laws for formation assembling (with dynamic positioning), and formation keeping during...

  13. Surface confined retro Diels-Alder reaction driven by the swelling of weak polyelectrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Beier; Cha, Wenli; Mao, Tingting; Wu, Yuanzi; Qian, Hujun; Zhou, Yitian; Chen, Xiuli; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Lanying; Yang, Guang; Lu, Zhongyuan; Zhu, Qiang; Ma, Hongwei

    2015-03-25

    Recently, the type of reactions driven by mechanical force has increased significantly; however, the number of methods for activating those mechanochemical reactions stays relatively limited. Furthermore, in situ characterization of a reaction is usually hampered by the inherent properties of conventional methods. In this study, we report a new platform that utilizes mechanical force generated by the swelling of surface tethered weak polyelectrolytes. An initiator with Diels-Alder (DA) adduct structure was applied to prepare the polyelectrolyte-carboxylated poly(OEGMA-r-HEMA), so that the force could trigger the retro DA reaction. The reaction was monitored in real time by quartz crystal microbalance and confirmed with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the conventional heating method, the swelling-induced retro DA reaction proceeded rapidly with high conversion ratio and selectivity. A 23.61 kcal/mol theoretical energy barrier supported the practicability of this retro DA reaction being triggered mechanically at ambient temperature. During swelling, the tensile force was controllable and persistent. This unique feature imparts this mechanochemical platform the potential to "freeze" an intermediate state of a reaction for in situ spectroscopic observations, such as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and frequency generation spectroscopy.

  14. Formation of Nitriles in the Interstellar Medium via Reactions of Cyano Radicals, CN(X2Σ+), with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balucani, N.; Asvany, O.; Huang, L. C. L.; Lee, Y. T.; Kaiser, R. I.; Osamura, Y.; Bettinger, H. F.

    2000-12-01

    Crossed molecular beam experiments of cyano radicals, CN(X2Σ+, ν=0), in their electronic and vibrational ground state reacting with unsaturated hydrocarbons acetylene, C2H2(X1Σ+g), ethylene, C2H4(X1Ag), methylacetylene, CH3CCH(X1A1), allene, H2CCCH2(X1A1), dimethylacetylene, CH3CCCH3(X1A1'), and benzene, C6H6 (X1A1g), were performed at relative collision energies between 13.3 and 36.4 kJ mol-1 to unravel the formation of unsaturated nitriles in the outflows of late-type AGB carbon stars and molecular clouds. In all reactions, the CN radical was found to attack the π electron density of the hydrocarbon molecule with the radical center located at the carbon atom; the formation of an initial addition complex is a prevalent pathway on all the involved potential energy surfaces. A subsequent carbon-hydrogen bond rupture yields the nitriles cyanoacetylene, HCCCN (X1Σ+), vinylcyanide, C2H3CN (X1A'), 1-methylcyanoacetylene, CH3CCCN (X1A1), cyanoallene, H2CCCH(CN) (X1A'), 3-methylcyanoacetylene, HCCCH2CN(X1A'), 1,1-cyanomethylallene, H2CCC(CN)(CH3) (X1A'), and cyanobenzene, C6H5CN (X1A1). In case of acetylene and ethylene, a second reaction channel involves a [1, 2]-H atom shift in the initial HCCHCN and H2CCH2CN collision complexes prior to a hydrogen atom release to form cyanoacetylene, HCCCN (X1Σ+), and vinylcyanide, C2H3CN (X1A'). Since all these radical-neutral reactions show no entrance barriers, have exit barriers well below the energy of the reactant molecules, and are exothermic, the explicit identification of this CN versus H atom exchange pathway under single collision conditions makes this reaction class a compelling candidate to synthesize unsaturated nitriles in interstellar environments holding temperatures as low as 10 K. This general concept makes it even feasible to predict the formation of nitriles once the corresponding unsaturated hydrocarbons are identified in the interstellar medium. Here HCCCN, C2H3CN, and CH3CCCN have been already observed

  15. Formation of Germa-ketenimine on the Ge(100) Surface by Adsorption of tert-Butyl Isocyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shong, Bonggeun; Yoo, Jong Suk; Sandoval, Tania E; Bent, Stacey F

    2017-06-28

    Reactions of the (100) surfaces of Ge and Si with organic molecules have been generally understood within the concept of "dimers" formed by the 2 × 1 surface reconstruction. In this work, the adsorption of tert-butyl isocyanide on the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface at large exposures is investigated under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. A combination of infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and temperature-programmed desorption experiments along with dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations is used to determine the surface products. Upon adsorption of a dense monolayer of tert-butyl isocyanide, a product whose structure resembles a germa-ketenimine (N=C=Ge) with σ donation toward and π back-donation from the Ge(100) surface appears. Formation of this structure involves divalent-type surface Ge atoms that arise from cleavage of the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface dimers. Our results reveal an unprecedented class of reactions of organic molecules at the Ge(100) surface.

  16. Reaction Mechanism for the Formation of Nitrogen Oxides (NO x ) During Coke Oxidation in Fluidized Catalytic Cracking Units

    KAUST Repository

    Chaparala, Sree Vidya; Raj, Abhijeet; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    and accurate kinetics for NOx formation. Based on the nitrogen-containing functional groups on coke, model molecules are selected to study reactions between coke-bound nitrogen and O2 to form NO and NO2 using density functional theory. The reaction kinetics

  17. Emotional reactions of different interface formats: Comparing digital and traditional board games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Min Fang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Some games provide both traditional board games and digital versions at the same time in the market. Why the rise of virtual games has not forced traditional physical board games to disappear? Do traditional physical games evoke different emotional reactions and interpersonal relationships? This article explored the subjects’ preferences toward traditional and digital versions of the same game and investigated social interaction while playing games. Based on Norman’s three emotional design levels—visceral, behavioral, and reflective levels—this study examined players’ satisfaction degree. This study also applied Positive and Negative Affect Schedule to measure subjects’ emotional reactions. Monopoly and Jenga games were selected as stimuli. A total of 77 subjects received tests of three different interface formats (physical, desktop, and tablet and then filled out the questionnaire. The findings successfully evidenced the significant differences between digital and traditional board games. The statistical results indicated that satisfaction degrees of digital games declined in visceral, behavioral, and reflective levels. Traditional games not only evoked users’ stronger emotional reactions but also received higher preferences. Traditional games could improve interpersonal relationships as well.

  18. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun; Khaled, Fathi; Ning, Hongbo; Ma, Liuhao; Farooq, Aamir; Ren, Wei

    2017-01-01

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  19. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun

    2017-08-03

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  20. Chemically activated formation of organic acids in reactions of the Criegee intermediate with aldehydes and ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W; Green, William H

    2013-10-21

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, ˙CH2OO˙) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between ˙CH2OO˙ and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48-51 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy, formed via 1,3-cycloaddition of ˙CH2OO˙ across the C=O bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O-O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  1. Radiation induced Maillard reactions (the kinetic of colour formation during heating)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegota, A.; Bachman, S.

    1998-01-01

    The results are presented of the investigation of the effect of ionizing radiation from 60 Co on the acceleration of the Maillard reactions in a model system containing an aqueous solution of fructose (F) at 0.03 mol/dm 3 and alanine (Ala) at 0.01 mol/dm 3 . Solutions of F/Ala irradiated with 5 to 30 kGy at a dose rate 1.4 Gy/s were then heated for a few hours at different temperatures: 400, 600, 800, and 1000 deg C. The colour intensity of the solutions was measured via their absorbance at 450 nm. The reaction constant estimates increased with increasing radiation dose and temperature. The activation energy of colour development determined over the range of 600 deg C to 1000 deg C decreased with dose from 70.6 kJ/mol for 5 kGy to 60.7 kJ/mol for 30 kGy. The results confirmed the formation of carbonyl products from fructose radiolysis and their participation in the acceleration of the non-enzymatic browning reactions. The aldehyde products formed from the amino acids as a result of the Strecker degradation are responsible for the formation of odour typical of the Maillard reaction during heating. The changes in the F and Ala concentrations during irradiation of the solutions were proportional to the radiation dose. The radiation yield of fructose and alanine decomposition was G = 2.6 and 0.22, respectively. In the irradiated solutions of F/Ala, serine has been found, which has not been mentioned so far as a product of alanine radiolysis. The study demonstrates the influence of radiation and acceleration of the Maillard reaction during subsequent heating at 400 deg C up to 1000 deg C of systems containing reducing sugars and amino acids. It should be taken under consideration in the studies on introducing radiation technology of food products preservation connected with further thermal treatment

  2. Prompt HO2 formation following the reaction of OH with aromatic compounds under atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehr, Sascha; Bohn, Birger; Wahner, Andreas

    2012-06-21

    The secondary formation of HO(2) radicals following OH + aromatic hydrocarbon reactions in synthetic air under normal pressure and temperature was investigated in the absence of NO after pulsed production of OH radicals. OH and HO(x) (=OH + HO(2)) decay curves were recorded using laser-induced fluorescence after gas-expansion. The prompt HO(2) yields (HO(2) formed without preceding NO reactions) were determined by comparison to results obtained with CO as a reference compound. This approach was recently introduced and applied to the OH + benzene reaction and was extended here for a number of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The measured HO(2) formation yields are as follows: toluene, 0.42 ± 0.11; ethylbenzene, 0.53 ± 0.10; o-xylene, 0.41 ± 0.08; m-xylene, 0.27 ± 0.06; p-xylene, 0.40 ± 0.09; 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 0.31 ± 0.06; 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 0.37 ± 0.09; 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, 0.29 ± 0.08; hexamethylbenzene, 0.32 ± 0.08; phenol, 0.89 ± 0.29; o-cresol, 0.87 ± 0.29; 2,5-dimethylphenol, 0.72 ± 0.12; 2,4,6-trimethylphenol, 0.45 ± 0.13. For the alkylbenzenes HO(2) is the proposed coproduct of phenols, epoxides, and possibly oxepins formed in secondary reactions with O(2). In most product studies the only quantified coproducts were phenols whereas only a few studies reported yields of epoxides. Oxepins have not been observed so far. Together with the yields of phenols from other studies, the HO(2) yields determined in this work set an upper limit to the combined yields of epoxides and oxepins that was found to be significant (≤0.3) for all investigated alkylbenzenes except m-xylene. For the hydroxybenzenes the currently proposed HO(2) coproducts are dihydroxybenzenes. For phenol and o-cresol the determined HO(2) yields are matching the previously reported dihydroxybenzene yields, indicating that these are the only HO(2) forming reaction channels. For 2,5-dimethylphenol and 2,4,6-trimethylphenol no complementary product studies are available.

  3. Sub-barrier quasifission in heavy element formation reactions with deformed actinide target nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, D. J.; Jeung, D. Y.; Prasad, E.; Wakhle, A.; Dasgupta, M.; Evers, M.; Luong, D. H.; du Rietz, R.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.

    2018-02-01

    Background: The formation of superheavy elements (SHEs) by fusion of two massive nuclei is severely inhibited by the competing quasifission process. Low excitation energies favor SHE survival against fusion-fission competition. In "cold" fusion with spherical target nuclei near 208Pb, SHE yields are largest at beam energies significantly below the average capture barrier. In "hot" fusion with statically deformed actinide nuclei, this is not the case. Here the elongated deformation-aligned configurations in sub-barrier capture reactions inhibits fusion (formation of a compact compound nucleus), instead favoring rapid reseparation through quasifission. Purpose: To determine the probabilities of fast and slow quasifission in reactions with prolate statically deformed actinide nuclei, through measurement and quantitative analysis of the dependence of quasifission characteristics at beam energies spanning the average capture barrier energy. Methods: The Australian National University Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility and CUBE fission spectrometer have been used to measure fission and quasifission mass and angle distributions for reactions with projectiles from C to S, bombarding Th and U target nuclei. Results: Mass-asymmetric quasifission occurring on a fast time scale, associated with collisions with the tips of the prolate actinide nuclei, shows a rapid increase in probability with increasing projectile charge, the transition being centered around projectile atomic number ZP=14 . For mass-symmetric fission events, deviations of angular anisotropies from expectations for fusion fission, indicating a component of slower quasifission, suggest a similar transition, but centered around ZP˜8 . Conclusions: Collisions with the tips of statically deformed prolate actinide nuclei show evidence for two distinct quasifission processes of different time scales. Their probabilities both increase rapidly with the projectile charge. The probability of fusion can be severely

  4. Surface tectonics of nanoporous networks of melamine-capped molecular building blocks formed through interface Schiff-base reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan-He; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Control over the assembly of molecules on a surface is of great importance for the fabrication of molecule-based miniature devices. Melamine (MA) and molecules with terminal MA units are promising candidates for supramolecular interfacial packing patterning, owing to their multiple hydrogen-bonding sites. Herein, we report the formation of self-assembled structures of MA-capped molecules through a simple on-surface synthetic route. MA terminal groups were successfully fabricated onto rigid molecular cores with 2-fold and 3-fold symmetry through interfacial Schiff-base reactions between MA and aldehyde groups. Sub-molecular scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging of the resultant adlayer revealed the formation of nanoporous networks. Detailed structural analysis indicated that strong hydrogen-bonding interactions between the MA groups persistently drove the formation of nanoporous networks. Herein, we demonstrate that functional groups with strong hydrogen-bond-formation ability are promising building blocks for the guided assembly of nanoporous networks and other hierarchical 2D assemblies. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Evidence of extensive diversity in bacterial adherence mechanisms that exploit unanticipated stainless steel surface structural complexity for biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elisabeth M; Li, Dongyang; Shahrooei, Mohammad; Yu, Bin; Muruve, Daniel; Irvin, Randall T

    2013-04-01

    Three protease-resistant bioorganic 304 stainless steel surfaces were created through the reaction of synthetic peptides consisting of the D-enantiomeric isomer (D-K122-4), the retro-inverso D-enantiomeric isomer (RI-K122-4), and a combination of the two peptides (D+RI) of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PilA receptor binding domain with steel surfaces. The peptides used to produce the new materials differ only in handedness of their three-dimensional structure, but they reacted with the steel to yield materials that differed in their surface electron work function (EWF) while displaying an identical chemical composition and equivalent surface adhesive force properties. These surfaces allowed for an assessment of the relative role of surface EWF in initial biofilm formation. We examined the ability of various bacteria (selected strains of Listeria monocytogenes, L. innocua, Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis) to initiate biofilm formation. The D-K1224 generated surface displayed the lowest EWF (classically associated with greater molecular interactions and more extensive biofilm formation) but was observed to be least effectively colonized by bacteria (>50% decrease in bacterial adherence of all strains). The highest surface EWF with the lowest surface free energy (RI-K122-4 generated) was more extensively colonized by bacteria, with the binding of some strains being equivalent to unmodified steel. The D+RI generated surface was least effective in minimizing biofilm formation, where some strains displayed enhanced bacterial colonization. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that the D and RI peptides displayed similar but clearly different binding patterns, suggesting that the peptides recognized different sites on the steel, and that differential binding of the peptides to the steel surfaces influences the binding of different bacterial strains and species. We have demonstrated that stainless steel surfaces can be easily modified by peptides to generate surfaces with

  6. Adsorption and reaction of propanal, 2-propenol and 1-propanol on Ni/Pt(111) bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Luis E.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2008-07-01

    The hydrogenation of acrolein (CH 2dbnd CH sbnd CH dbnd O) can lead to the formation of three hydrogenation products, 2-propenol (CH 2dbnd CH sbnd CH 2sbnd OH), propanal (CH 3sbnd CH 2sbnd CH dbnd O), and 1-propanol (CH 3sbnd CH 2sbnd CH 2sbnd OH). In the current study the adsorption and reaction of these three molecules were investigated on Ni/Pt(111) surfaces to understand the different hydrogenation pathways of acrolein, using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). TPD experiments showed that 2-propenol underwent isomerization toward propanal on Pt(111) and the Pt sbnd Ni sbnd Pt(111) bimetallic surface, with a dominant decarbonylation pathway on the Pt(111) surface. A self-hydrogenation (disproportionation) pathway toward 1-propanol was observed on the Ni(111) film, however, the decarbonylation pathway was found to be the most dominant on this surface. Unlike 2-propenol, propanal did not undergo isomerization or self-hydrogenation pathways on any of the surfaces, with the dominant pathway being primarily the decarbonylation on Pt(111) and Ni(111). In contrast, 1-propanol underwent mainly molecular desorption from all three surfaces. These results provided additional understanding of previous studies of hydrogenation pathways of acrolein on the Ni/Pt(111) surfaces.

  7. Theory of the reaction dynamics of small molecules on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Bret [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2016-09-09

    The objective of this project has been to develop realistic theoretical models for gas-surface interactions, with a focus on processes important in heterogeneous catalysis. The dissociative chemisorption of a molecule on a metal is a key step in many catalyzed reactions, and is often the rate-limiting step. We have explored the dissociative chemisorption of H2, H2O and CH4 on a variety of metal surfaces. Most recently, our extensive studies of methane dissociation on Ni and Pt surfaces have fully elucidated its dependence on translational energy, vibrational state and surface temperature, providing the first accurate comparisons with experimental data. We have explored Eley-Rideal and hot atom reactions of H atoms with H- and C-covered metal surfaces. H atom interactions with graphite have also been explored, including both sticking and Eley-Rideal recombination processes. Again, our methods made it possible to explain several experiments studying these reactions. The sticking of atoms on metal surfaces has also been studied. To help elucidate the experiments that study these processes, we examine how the reaction dynamics depend upon the nature of the molecule-metal interaction, as well as experimental variables such as substrate temperature, beam energy, angle of impact, and the internal states of the molecules. Electronic structure methods based on Density Functional Theory are used to compute each molecule-metal potential energy surface. Both time-dependent quantum scattering techniques and quasi-classical methods are used to examine the reaction or scattering dynamics. Much of our effort has been directed towards developing improved quantum methods that can accurately describe reactions, as well as include the effects of substrate temperature (lattice vibration).

  8. COMPOSITION AND METHOD FOR CONTROLLING MICROBIAL ADHESION AND BIOFILM FORMATION OF SURFACES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention describes how coating of surfaces with an extract, particularly a fish extract, can significantly reduce microbial adhesion, attachment, colonization and biofilm formation on surfaces. Such reduction of microbial adherence, attachment and colonization will be applicable...

  9. Evaluation of maillard reaction variables and their effect on heterocyclic amine formation in chemical model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Cara; Karim, Faris; Smith, J Scott

    2015-02-01

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs), highly mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic by-products, form during Maillard browning reactions, specifically in muscle-rich foods. Chemical model systems allow examination of in vitro formation of HCAs while eliminating complex matrices of meat. Limited research has evaluated the effects of Maillard reaction parameters on HCA formation. Therefore, 4 essential Maillard variables (precursors molar concentrations, water amount, sugar type, and sugar amounts) were evaluated to optimize a model system for the study of 4 HCAs: 2-amino-3-methylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoline, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline. Model systems were dissolved in diethylene glycol, heated at 175 °C for 40 min, and separated using reversed-phase liquid chromatography. To define the model system, precursor amounts (threonine and creatinine) were adjusted in molar increments (0.2/0.2, 0.4/0.4, 0.6/0.6, and 0.8/0.8 mmol) and water amounts by percentage (0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%). Sugars (lactose, glucose, galactose, and fructose) were evaluated in several molar amounts proportional to threonine and creatinine (quarter, half, equi, and double). The precursor levels and amounts of sugar were significantly different (P < 0.05) in regards to total HCA formation, with 0.6/0.6/1.2 mmol producing higher levels. Water concentration and sugar type also had a significant effect (P < 0.05), with 5% water and lactose producing higher total HCA amounts. A model system containing threonine (0.6 mmol), creatinine (0.6 mmol), and glucose (1.2 mmol), with 15% water was determined to be the optimal model system with glucose and 15% water being a better representation of meat systems. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Formation of a silicon terminated (100) diamond surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenk, Alex; Sear, Michael; Pakes, Chris; Tadich, Anton; O'Donnell, Kane M.; Ley, Lothar; Stacey, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    We report the preparation of an ordered silicon terminated diamond (100) surface with a two domain 3 × 1 reconstruction as determined by low energy electron diffraction. Based on the dimensions of the surface unit cell and on chemical information provided by core level photoemission spectra, a model for the structure is proposed. The termination should provide a homogeneous, nuclear, and electron spin-free surface for the development of future near-surface diamond quantum device architectures

  11. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low temperature combustion and the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in earth’s atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization make characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, while master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  12. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-05-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low-temperature combustion and in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in Earth's atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization makes characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, and master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  13. Surface reaction rate and probability of ozone and alpha-terpineol on glass, polyvinyl chloride, and latex paint surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Shi; Morrison, Glenn C

    2011-05-15

    Ozone can react homogeneously with unsaturated organic compounds in buildings to generate undesirable products. However, these reactions can also occur on indoor surfaces, especially for low-volatility organics. Conversion rates of ozone with α-terpineol, a representative low-volatility compound, were quantified on surfaces that mimic indoor substrates. Rates were measured for α-terpineol adsorbed to beads of glass, polyvinylchloride (PVC), and dry latex paint, in a plug flow reactor. A newly defined second-order surface reaction rate coefficient, k(2), was derived from the flow reactor model. The value of k(2) ranged from 0.68 × 10(-14) cm(4)s(-1)molecule(-1) for α-terpineol adsorbed to PVC to 3.17 × 10(-14) cm(4)s(-1)molecule(-1) for glass, but was insensitive to relative humidity. Further, k(2) is only weakly influenced by the adsorbed mass but instead appears to be more strongly related to the interfacial activity α-terpineol. The minimum reaction probability ranged from 3.79 × 10(-6) for glass at 20% RH to 6.75 × 10(-5) for PVC at 50% RH. The combination of high equilibrium surface coverage and high reactivity for α-terpineol suggests that surface conversion rates are fast enough to compete with or even overwhelm other removal mechanisms in buildings such as gas-phase conversion and air exchange.

  14. Promotion of Pt-Ru/C catalysts driven by heat treated induced surface segregation for methanol oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Yuchen; Liu Chenwei; Chang Weijung; Wang Kuanwen

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Thermal treatments on the Pt-Ru/C induce different extents of surface segregation. → O 2 treatment results in obvious Ru segregation and formation of RuO 2 . → Catalysts treated in H 2 have the excellent CO de-poisoning ability. → N 2 treatment suppresses the surface Pt depletion and hence promotes the MOR. - Abstract: Carbon supported Pt-Ru/C (1:1) alloy catalysts supplied by E-TEK are widely used for fuel cell research. Heat treatments in various atmospheres are conducted for the promotion of the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and the investigation of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of the catalysts. The alloy structures, surface compositions, surface species, and electro-catalytic activities of the alloy catalysts are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV), respectively. The as-received Pt-Ru/C catalysts have a Ru rich in the inner core and Pt rich on the outer shell structure. Thermal treatments on the catalysts induce Ru surface segregation in different extents and thereby lead to their alteration of the alloying degrees. O 2 treatment results in obvious Ru segregation and formation of RuO 2 . Catalysts treated in H 2 have the highest I f /I b value in the CV scans among all samples, indicating the catalysts have the excellent CO de-poisoning ability as evidenced by anodic CO stripping experiments. N 2 treatment may serve as an adjustment process for the surface composition and structure of the catalysts, which can suppress the surface Pt depletion (∼60% Pt on the surface), make the components stable and hence promote the MOR significantly.

  15. Promotion of Pt-Ru/C catalysts driven by heat treated induced surface segregation for methanol oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Yuchen; Liu Chenwei; Chang Weijung [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Wang Kuanwen, E-mail: kuanwen.wang@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-12

    Research highlights: > Thermal treatments on the Pt-Ru/C induce different extents of surface segregation. > O{sub 2} treatment results in obvious Ru segregation and formation of RuO{sub 2}. > Catalysts treated in H{sub 2} have the excellent CO de-poisoning ability. > N{sub 2} treatment suppresses the surface Pt depletion and hence promotes the MOR. - Abstract: Carbon supported Pt-Ru/C (1:1) alloy catalysts supplied by E-TEK are widely used for fuel cell research. Heat treatments in various atmospheres are conducted for the promotion of the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and the investigation of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of the catalysts. The alloy structures, surface compositions, surface species, and electro-catalytic activities of the alloy catalysts are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV), respectively. The as-received Pt-Ru/C catalysts have a Ru rich in the inner core and Pt rich on the outer shell structure. Thermal treatments on the catalysts induce Ru surface segregation in different extents and thereby lead to their alteration of the alloying degrees. O{sub 2} treatment results in obvious Ru segregation and formation of RuO{sub 2}. Catalysts treated in H{sub 2} have the highest I{sub f}/I{sub b} value in the CV scans among all samples, indicating the catalysts have the excellent CO de-poisoning ability as evidenced by anodic CO stripping experiments. N{sub 2} treatment may serve as an adjustment process for the surface composition and structure of the catalysts, which can suppress the surface Pt depletion ({approx}60% Pt on the surface), make the components stable and hence promote the MOR significantly.

  16. Surface reaction modification: The effect of structured overlayers of sulfur on the kinetics and mechanism of the decomposition of formic acid on Pt(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, N.; Madix, R. J.

    The reaction of formic acid (DCOOH) on Pt(111), Pt(111)-(2×2)S and Pt(111)-(√3×√3)R30°S surfaces was examined by temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy. On the clean surface formic acid decomposed to yield primarily carbon dioxide and the hydrogenic species (H 2, HD and D 2) at low coverages. Although the formation of water and carbon monoxide via a dehydration reaction was observed at these coverages, the yield of these products was small when compared to the other products of reaction. The evolution of CO 2 at low temperature was ascribed to the decomposition of the formate intermediate. In the presence of sulfur the amount of molecularly adsorbed formic acid decreased up to a factor of three on the (√3×√3)R30°S surface, and a decline in the reactivity of over an order of magnitude was also observed. The only products formed were the hydrogenic species and carbon dioxide. The absence of carbon monoxide indicated that the dehydration pathway was blocked by sulfur. In addition to the low temperature CO 2 peak a high temperature CO 2-producing path was also evident. It was inferred from both the stoichiometry and the coincident evolution of D 2 and CO 2 in the high temperature states that these products also evolved due to the decomposition of the formate intermediate. On increasing the sulfur coverage to one-third monolayer this intermediate was further stabilized, and a predominance of the decomposition via the high temperature path was observed. Stability of the formate intermediate was attributed to inhibition of the decomposition reaction by sulfur atoms. The activation energy for formate decomposition increased from 15 kcal/gmole on the clean surface to 24.3 kcal/gmol on the (√3×√3)R30°S overlayer.

  17. Unravelling the kinetics of the formation of acrylamide in the Maillard reaction of fructose and asparagine by multiresponse modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, J.J.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2010-01-01

    A kinetic model for the formation of acrylamide in a fructose–asparagine reaction system at initial pH 5.5 is proposed, based on an approach called multiresponse kinetic modelling. The formation of acetic acid and formic acid from the degradation of fructose and its isomer glucose was included in

  18. FLUID EVOLUTION AND MINERAL REACTIONS DURING SHEAR ZONE FORMATION AT NUSFJORD, LOFOTEN, NORWAY (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullerud, K.

    2009-12-01

    At Nusfjord in Lofoten, Norway, three 0.3 - 3 m thick shear zones occur in a gabbro-anorthosite. During deformation, the shear zones were infiltrated by a hydrous fluid enriched in Cl. In the central parts of the shear zones, fluid-rock interaction resulted in complete break-down of the primary mafic silicates. Complete hydration of these minerals to Cl-free amphibole and biotite suggests that the hydrous fluid was present in excess during deformation in these parts of the shear zones. Along the margins of the shear zones, however, the igneous mafic silicates (Cpx, Bt, Opx) were only partly overgrown by hydrous minerals. Here, Cl-enriched minerals (Amph, Bt, Scp, Ap) can be observed. Amphibole shows compositions covering the range 0.1 - 4.0 wt % Cl within single thin sections. Mineral textures and extreme compositional variations of the Cl-bearing minerals indicate large chemical gradients of the fluid phase. Relics of primary mafic silicates and compositionally zoned reaction coronas around primary mafic silicates suggest that the free fluid was totally consumed before the alteration of the primary phases were completed. The extreme variations in the Cl-content of amphibole are inferred to monitor a gradual desiccation of the Cl-bearing grain-boundary fluid during fluid-mineral reactions accordingly: 1) The first amphibole that formed during the reactions principally extracted water from the fluid, resulting in a slight increase in the Cl content of the fluid. 2) Continued amphibole-forming reactions resulted in gradual consumption of the free fluid phase, principally by extracting water from the fluid, resulting in an increase in its Cl-content. Higher Cl-content of the fluid resulted in higher Cl-content of the equilibrium amphibole. 3) The most Cl-enriched amphibole (4 wt % Cl) formed in equilibrium with the last volumes of the grain-boundary fluid, which had evolved to a highly saline solution. Mineral reactions within a 1-2 thick zone of the host rock along

  19. Formation of fouling deposits on a carbon steel surface from Colombian heavy crude oil under preheating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Pinto, D. A.; Cuervo Camargo, S. M.; Orozco Parra, M.; Laverde, D.; García Vergara, S.; Blanco Pinzon, C.

    2016-02-01

    Fouling in heat exchangers is produced by the deposition of undesired materials on metal surfaces. As fouling progresses, pressure drop and heat transfer resistance is observed and therefore the overall thermal efficiency of the equipment diminishes. Fouling is mainly caused by the deposition of suspended particles, such as those from chemical reactions, crystallization of certain salts, and some corrosion processes. In order to understand the formation of fouling deposits from Colombian heavy oil (API≈12.3) on carbon steel SA 516 Gr 70, a batch stirred tank reactor was used. The reactor was operated at a constant pressure of 340psi while varying the temperature and reaction times. To evaluate the formation of deposits on the metal surfaces, the steel samples were characterized by gravimetric analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). On the exposed surfaces, the results revealed an increase in the total mass derived from the deposition of salt compounds, iron oxides and alkaline metals. In general, fouling was modulated by both the temperature and the reaction time, but under the experimental conditions, the temperature seems to be the predominant variable that controls and accelerates fouling.

  20. Optimization of Maillard Reaction in Model System of Glucosamine and Cysteine Using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchi, Shanika Jeewantha Thewarapperuma; Kim, Ye-Joo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Oh, Sang-Chul; Lee, Yang-Bong

    2017-03-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids play important roles in good flavor generation in Maillard reaction of non-enzymatic browning, so aqueous model systems of glucosamine and cysteine were studied to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, initial pH, reaction time, and concentration ratio of glucosamine and cysteine. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the independent reaction parameters of cysteine and glucosamine in Maillard reaction. Box-Behnken factorial design was used with 30 runs of 16 factorial levels, 8 axial levels and 6 central levels. The degree of Maillard reaction was determined by reading absorption at 425 nm in a spectrophotometer and Hunter's L, a, and b values. ΔE was consequently set as the fifth response factor. In the statistical analyses, determination coefficients (R 2 ) for their absorbance, Hunter's L, a, b values, and ΔE were 0.94, 0.79, 0.73, 0.96, and 0.79, respectively, showing that the absorbance and Hunter's b value were good dependent variables for this model system. The optimum processing parameters were determined to yield glucosamine-cysteine Maillard reaction product with higher absorbance and higher colour change. The optimum estimated absorbance was achieved at the condition of initial pH 8.0, 111°C reaction temperature, 2.47 h reaction time, and 1.30 concentration ratio. The optimum condition for colour change measured by Hunter's b value was 2.41 h reaction time, 114°C reaction temperature, initial pH 8.3, and 1.26 concentration ratio. These results can provide the basic information for Maillard reaction of aqueous model system between glucosamine and cysteine.

  1. FORMATION OF ANTIBACTERIAL EFFECT ON CERAMIC TILE SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk ÖZCAN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Biocidal antimicrobial molecular barrier (BAMB solutions are known to provide antimicrobial effect on the surfaces in industrial applications. However, there has been a lack of scientific reports about the subject in the literature. In this study, in order to impart an antimicrobial surface property on ceramic surfaces, a BAMB solution was applied on gloss fired ceramic wall tile substrates and the surface antimicrobial activity results were compared with that of plain wall tiles (without BAMB application. The ceramic surfaces were cleaned, and stove dried at120°C prior to spray coating with a BAMB solution. The coated substrates were dried in the ambient. The intactness of the coatings was checked with the bromophenol blue test. The microstructural and molecular characterization of the BAMB coated surfaces were carried out with SEM imaging and surface FTIR, respectively. The antimicrobial activity tests of the surfaces were conducted according to ASTM E2180-07 (Standard Test Method for Determining the Activity of Incorporated Antimicrobial Agent in Polymeric or Hydrophobic Materials. The microorganisms used were Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 15442 bacteria. The BAMB coated surfaces showed less flocculent bacterial growth in comparison to uncoated ceramic surfaces leading to the conclusion that the BAMB improved the antimicrobial property.

  2. Discovery of Amadori-Type Conjugates in a Peptide Maillard Reaction and Their Corresponding Influence on the Formation of Pyrazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tingting; Liu, Jianbin; Song, Huanlu; Liu, Ye

    2018-05-10

    Knowledge of the role of peptides in the Maillard reaction is rather limited. In this study, peptide Maillard reaction model systems were established. Volatile and nonvolatile MRPs (Maillard reaction products) were investigated by GC-O-MS and LC-MS. Carbohydrate module labeling (CAMOLA) experiments were performed to elucidate the carbon skeleton of these compounds. Results showed that the peptide reaction system generated more pyrazines than the free amino acid group. Several new Amadori-type conjugates were identified as novel Maillard reaction products that could greatly influence the formation of pyrazines. Our work suggested anew mechanism involving these Amadori-type conjugates and subsequent investigation revealed that the conjugates could be important intermediate products in the reaction between dicarbonyl and dipeptide. Our findings demonstrate anew pyrazine generation mechanism in the dipeptide Maillard reaction. We found that a dipeptide Maillard reaction system generated more pyrazines than a reaction system composed of free amino acids. New cross-linked peptide-sugar compounds were identified and found to impact the formation of pyrazines. The results of this study may help in the preparation of thermal reaction flavors using enzymatically hydrolyzed vegetable/animal proteins, which contain a considerable amount of peptides, as one of the major reactants. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  3. Density functional computational studies on the glucose and glycine Maillard reaction: Formation of the Amadori rearrangement products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Roy, Amlan K.; Shipar, Abul Haider; Ahmed, M. Samsuddin

    Theoretical energy changes of various intermediates leading to the formation of the Amadori rearrangement products (ARPs) under different mechanistic assumptions have been calculated, by using open chain glucose (O-Glu)/closed chain glucose (A-Glu and B-Glu) and glycine (Gly) as a model for the Maillard reaction. Density functional theory (DFT) computations have been applied on the proposed mechanisms under different pH conditions. Thus, the possibility of the formation of different compounds and electronic energy changes for different steps in the proposed mechanisms has been evaluated. B-Glu has been found to be more efficient than A-Glu, and A-Glu has been found more efficient than O-Glu in the reaction. The reaction under basic condition is the most favorable for the formation of ARPs. Other reaction pathways have been computed and discussed in this work.0

  4. XPS study on the surface reaction of uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 200 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoling; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Huang Ruiliang

    1996-12-01

    The surface reaction of uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 200 degree C has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The carbon monoxide adsorption on the surface oxide layer resulted in U4f peak shifting to the lower binding energy and the content of oxygen in the oxide is decreased. O/U radio decreases with increasing the exposure of carbon monoxide to the surface layer. The investigation indicated the surface layer of uranium metal was further reduced in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide at high temperature. (3 refs., 5 figs.)

  5. Surface/subsurface observation and removal mechanisms of ground reaction bonded silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wang; Zhang, Yu-Min; Han, Jie-cai; Zhang, Yun-long; Zhang, Jian-han; Zhou, Yu-feng; Han, Yuan-yuan

    2006-01-01

    Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide (RBSiC) has long been recognized as a promising material for optical applications because of its unique combination of favorable properties and low-cost fabrication. Grinding of silicon carbide is difficult because of its high hardness and brittleness. Grinding often induces surface and subsurface damage, residual stress and other types of damage, which have great influence on the ceramic components for optical application. In this paper, surface integrity, subsurface damage and material removal mechanisms of RBSiC ground using diamond grinding wheel on creep-feed surface grinding machine are investigated. The surface and subsurface are studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. The effects of grinding conditions on surface and subsurface damage are discussed. This research links the surface roughness, surface and subsurface cracks to grinding parameters and provides valuable insights into the material removal mechanism and the dependence of grind induced damage on grinding conditions.

  6. MECHANISMS OF THE COMPLEX FORMATION BY d-METALS ON POROUS SUPPORTS AND THE CATALYTIC ACTIVITY OF THE FORMED COMPLEXES IN REDOX REACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Rakitskaya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of supported complexes of d metals in redox reactions with participation of gaseous toxicants, PH3, CO, O3, and SO2, depends on their composition. Owing to the variety of physicochemical and structural-adsorption properties of available supports, their influence on complex formation processes, the composition and catalytic activity of metal complexes anchored on them varies over a wide range. The metal complex formation on sup-ports with weak ion-exchanging properties is similar to that in aqueous solutions. In this case, the support role mainly adds up to the ability to reduce the activity of water adsorbed on them. The interaction between a metal complex and a support surface occurs through adsorbed water molecules. Such supports can also affect complex formation processes owing to protolytic reactions on account of acidic properties of sorbents used as supports. The catalytic activity of metal complexes supported on polyphase natural sorbents considerably depends on their phase relationship. In the case of supports with the nonsimple structure and pronounced ion-exchanging properties, for instance, zeolites and laminar silicates, it is necessary to take into account the variety of places where metal ions can be located. Such location places determine distinctions in the coordination environment of the metal ions and the strength of their bonding with surface adsorption sites and, therefore, the catalytic activity of surface complexes formed by theses metal ions. Because of the energy surface inhomogeneity, it is important to determine a relationship between the strength of a metal complex bonding with a support surface and its catalytic activity. For example, bimetallic complexes are catalytically active in the reactions of oxidation of the above gaseous toxicants. In particular, in the case of carbon monoxide oxidation, the most catalytic activity is shown by palladium-copper complexes in which copper(II is strongly

  7. MODELING OF QUALITY FORMATION OF PIG IRON BILLET SURFACE AT WIRE BRUSH MILLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Barshaj

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of topography, geometrical structure and micro-hardness of pig iron billet surface is considered in the paper. Mathematical models pertaining to formation of the above-mentioned characteristics of surface quality according to parameters of machining regime have been developed on the basis of the executed investigations.

  8. Reaction of Tri-methylaluminum on Si (001) Surface for Initial Aluminum Oxide Thin-Film Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Hee; Kim, Dae Hyun; Jeong, Yong Chan; Seo, Hwa Il; Kim, Yeong Cheol

    2010-01-01

    We studied the reaction of tri-methylaluminum (TMA) on hydroxyl (OH)-terminated Si (001) surfaces for the initial growth of aluminum oxide thin-films using density functional theory. TMA was adsorbed on the oxygen atom of OH due to the oxygen atom's lone pair electrons. The adsorbed TMA reacted with the hydrogen atom of OH to produce a di-methylaluminum group (DMA) and methane with an energy barrier of 0.50 eV. Low energy barriers in the range of 0 - 0.11 eV were required for DMA migration to the inter-dimer, intra-dimer, and inter-row sites on the surface. A unimethylaluminum group (UMA) was generated at each site with low energy barriers in the range of 0.21 - 0.25 eV. Among the three sites, the inter-dimer site was the most probable for UMA formation

  9. A surface physicochemical rationale for calculus formation in the oral cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; White, DJ; Kamminga-Rasker, HJ; van der Mei, HC

    2004-01-01

    Surface free energies of dental hard tissues, including salivary conditioning films on enamel, play a crucial role in mineralization, dissolution and adhesion processes at the tooth surface. These mineralization reactions at oral surfaces control the development and progression of various diseases.

  10. Palladium-catalyzed cyclization reactions of 2-vinylthiiranes with heterocumulenes. Regioselective and enantioselective formation of thiazolidine, oxathiolane, and dithiolane derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larksarp, C; Sellier, O; Alper, H

    2001-05-18

    The first palladium-catalyzed ring-expansion reaction of 2-vinylthiiranes with heterocumulenes to form sulfur-containing five-membered-ring heterocycles is described. This regioselective reaction requires 5 mol % of Pd(2)(dba)(3).CHCl(3) and 10 mol % of bidendate phosphine ligand (dppp, BINAP), at 50-80 degrees C, in THF. The reaction of 2-vinylthiiranes with carbodiimides, isocyanates, and ketenimines affords 1,3-thiazolidine derivatives, whereas the reaction with diphenylketene or isothiocyanates results in the formation of 1,3-oxathiolane or 1,3-dithiolane compounds in good to excellent isolated yields and in up to 78% ee.

  11. Formation of intermediate structures during the thermal transformation of lignin. 5. Contribution of the reactions of formation and recombination of paramagnetic centres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domburg, G E; Skripchenko, T N

    1982-01-01

    ESR spectra were determined for samples of softwood (spruce) lignin and hardwood (aspen or birch) lignin at 20-400 degrees C and after cooling to 20 degrees C. Results provide evidence for a change from low-temperature to high-temperature reactions at 300-350 degrees C (higher in hardwoods than softwoods) associated with increased formation and recombination of paramagnetic centres (free radicals). A scheme is presented for the sequence of reactions leading to charcoal formation over the temperature range 100-500 degrees C.

  12. Reaction of iminopropadienones with amines: mechanistic explanations of zwitterionic intermediate, ketene and ketenimine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Rainer; Finnerty, Justin J; Bruhn, Torsten; Borget, Fabien; Wentrup, Curt

    2008-09-25

    The complex reaction of thermally generated iminopropadienones with amines in the gas phase and upon matrix deposition and its varying product composition is investigated using density functional theory. In the high energy gas phase addition a single amine molecule reacts readily with iminopropadienone with the decisive step being a 1,3-hydrogen shift and activation barriers of at least 100 kJ/mol. In accordance with the experiment, the formation of ketenes is favored. In the condensed phase of an amine matrix, the utilization of amine dimers both as reagents and as explicit solvents lowers the activation energy required to a feasible 20-30 kJ/mol and predicts ketenimines as the main products, as observed experimentally.

  13. Formation of barium strontium titanate powder by solid state reaction using different calcination temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teoh Wah Tzu; Ahmad Fauzi Mohd Noor; Zainal Arifin Ahmad

    2002-01-01

    The unique electrical properties of large permittivity in Barium Strontium Titanate have been widely used to make capacitors; it can be produced by solid state reaction. In this study, the mixture of Barium Carbonate, Strontium Carbonate and Titanium Dioxide was calcined at 500 degree C, 1000 degree C, 1100 degree C , 1150 degree C, 1200 degree C, 1250 degree C and 1300 degree C. The results of the phases change in each stage were investigated via X ay Diffraction. The results show that the formation of Barium Strontium Titanate started at 1100 degree C with the presence of other phases. The mixture is fully reacted to form Barium Strontium Titanate at 1150 degree C. Only Barium Strontium Titanate was formed as the calcination temperature was set higher. (Author)

  14. Fuel-sodium reaction product formation in breached mixed-oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottcher, J.H.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Strain, R.V.; Ukai, S.; Shibahara, S.

    1988-01-01

    The run-beyond-cladding-breach (RBCB) operation of mixed-oxide LMR fuel pins has been studied for six years in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as part of a joint program between the US Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. The formation of fuel-sodium reaction product (FSRP), Na 3 MO 4 , where M = U/sub 1-y/Pu/sub y/, in the outer fuel regions is the major phenomenon governing RBCB behavior. It increases fuel volume, decreases fuel stoichiometry, modifies fission-product distributions, and alters thermal performance of a pin. This paper describes the morphology of Na 3 MO 4 observed in 5.84-mm diameter pins covering a variety of conditions and RBCB times up to 150 EFPD's. 8 refs., 1 fig

  15. On determination of enthalpies of complex formation reactions by means of temperature coefficient of complexing degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povar, I.G.

    1995-01-01

    Equations describing the relation between temperature coefficient of ∂lnα/∂T complexing degree and the sum of changes in the enthalpy of complex formation of the composition M m L n δH mn multiplied by the weight coefficients k mm , are presented. A method to determine changes in the enthalpy of certain ΔH mm reactions from ∂lnα/∂T derivatives has been suggested. The best approximating equation from lnα/(T) dependence has been found. Errors of thus determined δH mm values are estimated and the results of calculation experiment for the system In 3+ -F - are provided. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Modeling the formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) from the reaction of natural organic matter (NOM) with monochloramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Valentine, Richard L

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents mechanistic studies on the formation of NDMA, a newly identified chloramination disinfection byproduct, from reactions of monochloramine with natural organic matter. A kinetic model was developed to validate proposed reactions and to predict NDMA formation in chloraminated water during the time frame of 1-5 days. This involved incorporating NDMA formation reactions into an established comprehensive model describing the oxidation of humic-type natural organic matter by monochloramine. A rate-limiting step involving the oxidation of NOM is theorized to control the rate of NDMA formation which is assumed to be proportional to the rate of NOM oxidized by monochloramine. The applicability of the model to describe NDMA formation in the presence of three NOM sources over a wide range in water quality (i.e., pH, DOC, and ammonia concentrations) was evaluated. Results show that with accurate measurement of monochloramine demand for a specific supply, NDMA formation could be modeled over an extended range of experimental conditions by considering a single NOM source-specific value of thetaNDMA, a stoichiometric coefficient relating the amount of NDMA produced to the amount of NOM oxidized, and several kinetic parameters describing NOM oxidation. Furthermore, the oxidation of NOM is the rate-limiting step governing NDMA formation. This suggests that NDMA formation over a 1-5 day time frame may be estimated from information on the chloramine or free chlorine demand of the NOM and the source-specific linear relationship between this demand and NDMA formation. Although the proposed model has not yet been validated for shorter time periods that may better characterize the residence time in some distribution systems, the improved understanding of the important reactions governing NDMA formation and the resulting model should benefit the water treatment industry as a tool in developing strategies that minimize NDMA formation.

  17. Reaction pathway towards formation of cobalt single chain magnets and nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, G.; Desilva, Rohini M.; Palshin, V. [Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States); Desilva, N. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Palmer, G. [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Rice University, MS 140, 6100 Main street, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Kumar, Challa S.S.R., E-mail: ckumar1@lsu.ed [Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    With the advent of molecular magnets the quest for suitable high density magnetic storage materials has fuelled further research in this area. Here in this report, we present a detailed mechanistic investigation of thermal decomposition of cyclopentadienyl cobalt [CoCp(CO){sub 2}] precursor where Cp is the cyclopentadienyl moiety. The reaction revealed the formation of cobalt nanoparticles (Co-NPs) through an isolable reaction intermediate characterized as a Single Chain Magnet (SCM), [Co(Cp){sub 2}]{sub 2}CoCl{sub 4} (1). The SQUID magnetic measurements showed the presence of very strong antiferromagnetic interactions between Co{sup 2+} ions. The zero-field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) magnetization curves branch out below 5 K and there is evidence for frequency dependent complex susceptibility along with a maximum observed around 2.5 K. The optical studies indicated that the Co{sup 2+} d-d transition is influenced by the polarity of the solvents. The cobalt nanoparticles (Co-NPs) were obtained, either directly from 1 or from its precursor. They are spherical in shape with a mean size 15 nm, have fcc crystal structure and were found to be ferromagnetic at room temperature.

  18. Formation of early and advanced Maillard reaction products correlates to the ripening of cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanneberg, Robert; Salzwedel, Grit; Glomb, Marcus A

    2012-01-18

    The present study deals with the characterization of the ripening of cheese. A traditional German acid curd cheese was ripened under defined conditions at elevated temperature, and protein and amino acid modifications were investigated. Degree of proteolysis and analysis of early [Amadori compound furosine (6)] and advanced [N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (4), N(ε)-carboxyethyllysine (5)] Maillard reaction products confirmed the maturation to proceed from the rind to the core of the cheese. Whereas 6 was decreased, 4 and 5 increased over time. Deeper insight into the Maillard reaction during the ripening of cheese was achieved by the determination of selected α-dicarbonyl compounds. Especially methylglyoxal (2) showed a characteristic behavior during storage of the acid curd cheese. Decrease of this reactive structure was directly correlated to the formation of 5. To extend the results of experimental ripening to commercial cheeses, different aged Gouda types were investigated. Maturation times of the samples ranged from 6 to 8 weeks (young) to more than 1 year (aged). Again, increase of 5 and decrease of 2 were able to describe the ripening of this rennet coagulated cheese. Therefore, both chemical parameters are potent markers to characterize the degree of maturation, independent of coagulation.

  19. Boron-Based Catalysts for C-C Bond-Formation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Bin; Kinjo, Rei

    2018-05-02

    Because the construction of the C-C bond is one of the most significant reactions in organic chemistry, the development of an efficient strategy has attracted much attention throughout the synthetic community. Among various protocols to form C-C bonds, organoboron compounds are not just limited to stoichiometric reagents, but have also made great achievements as catalysts because of the easy modification of the electronic and steric impacts on the boron center. This review presents recent developments of boron-based catalysts applied in the field of C-C bond-formation reactions, which are classified into four kinds on the basis of the type of boron catalyst: 1) highly Lewis acidic borane, B(C 6 F 5 ) 3 ; 2) organoboron acids, RB(OH) 2 , and their ester derivatives; 3) borenium ions, (R 2 BL)X; and 4) other miscellaneous kinds. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of cobalt-nichel oxides for the oxygen formation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales G, P.

    2001-01-01

    In this work the compounds of cobalt and nickel oxides and the mixtures of cobalt-nickel were prepared which were characterized and evaluated as electrocatalysts in the oxygen release reaction in alkaline media. The compounds were synthesised by the sol-gel method: heated at 400 and 500 Centigrade. The compounds characterization was realized by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy. As the Co 3 O 4 and the Ni O as the mixtures Ni O/Co 3 O 4 were obtained as a porous material with a small particle size, characteristics which are presented by cause of the low temperature of synthesis. The electrocatalytic evaluation for the synthesised compounds for the oxygen release reaction was realized by cyclic volt amperometry in a 0.5M KOH solution. The oxides mixtures presented a well electrocatalytic activity to be used in the electrochemical release of oxygen. The current density and the electrochemically active area, in all the cases of mixtures is very higher to the Co 3 O 4 and Ni O ones. Observing with greater clearness the synergic effects, in the obtained mixture at 400 C. The oxides mixtures heated at 400 C were stables for the oxygen formation reaction. Therefore it is be able to say that the Ni O/Co 3 O 4 mixture counts on a great reactive area: electrocatalytic characteristic desirable to be a material used as anode in the electrolysis of water, which increases the oxygen release in the anode and so the hydrogen release in the cathode. (Author)

  1. Development of a new molecular dynamics method for tribochemical reaction and its application to formation dynamics of MoS2 tribofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Yusuke; Onodera, Tasuku; Suzuki, Ai; Sahnoun, Riadh; Koyama, Michihisa; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Kubo, Momoji; Del Carpio, Carlos A.; Shin-yoshi, Takatoshi; Nishino, Noriaki; Suzuki, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Recently we have developed a novel molecular dynamics program NEW-RYUDO-CR, which can deal with chemical reactions. The developed method has been applied to the study of tribochemical reaction dynamics of MoS 2 tribofilm on iron surface. The initially amorphous MoS 2 layer self-organized its structure as result of the tribochemical reactions and formed layered MoS 2 tribofilm. The friction coefficient significantly decreased as the MoS 2 tribofilm was formed. Besides, sliding was observed between sulfur layers of MoS 2 tribofilms which occurred due to repulsive Coulombic interaction forces between sulfur atoms. This indicates that the formation of the layered MoS 2 tribofilm is important to achieve better lubrication properties

  2. Corrosion of ferritic steels by molten lithium: Influence of competing thermal gradient mass transfer and surface product reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1987-10-01

    An Fe-12Cr-1MoVW steel was exposed to thermally convective lithium for 6962 h. Results showed that the weight change profile of Fe-12Cr-1MoVW steel changed substantially as the maximum loop temperature was raised from 500 to 600 0 C. Furthermore, for a particular loop experiment, changes in the structure and composition of the exposed surfaces did not reflect typical thermal gradient mass transfer effects for all elements: the surface concentration of chromium was often a maximum at intermediate temperatures, while nickel (present at low concentrations in the starting material) tended to be transported to the coldest part of the loop. Such data were interpreted in terms of a qualitative model in which there are different dominant reactions or the various constituents of the ferritic steels (surface product formation involving nitrogen and/or carbon and solubility-driven elemental transport). This competition among different reactions is important in evaluating overall corrosion behavior and the effects of temperature. The overall corrosion rate of the 12Cr-1MoVW steel was relatively low when compared to that for austenitic stainless steel exposed under similar conditions

  3. Humic-like Products Formation via the Reaction of Phenol with Nitrite in Ice Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, D. W.; Choi, W.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the chemical nature of humic substances is very important but the origin of humic substances in nature is not well known. Therefore, elucidating the mechanisms leading to the generation of humic substances in nature is of great interests. It is believed that humic substances are produced from the transformation of natural organic matters, like lignin, by biological pathways. Recently, it has been reported that monomer molecules like quinones and sugars could be polymerized with amino compounds to form humic-like substances. This humification process is considered as a possible mechanism of humic substances production in the environment. In this work, we report the first observation on the formation of humic-like substances from the reaction between phenol and nitrite under a frozen state. In aqueous solution, nitrite slowly reacts with phenol, producing phenolic compounds like nitrophenol. Under frozen state, however, phenol reacted rapidly with nitrite and produced diverse organic compounds, like hydroquinone, dimerized phenolic substances, and much bigger molecules such as humic-like substances. The humic-like substances produced in ice are likely caused by the formation of phenolic radical and nitrosonium ion. This work may provide some insights into unknown pathways for the origin of humic substances especially in frozen environments.

  4. Laser gas assisted texturing and formation of nitride and oxynitride compounds on alumina surface: Surface response to environmental dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.; Al-Sharafi, A.; Al-Aqeeli, N.

    2018-03-01

    Laser gas assisted texturing of alumina surface is carried out, and formation of nitride and oxynitride compounds in the surface vicinity is examined. The laser parameters are selected to create the surface topology consisting of micro/nano pillars with minimum defect sites including micro-cracks, voids and large size cavities. Morphological and hydrophobic characteristics of the textured surface are examined using the analytical tools. The characteristics of the environmental dust and its influence on the laser textured surface are studied while mimicking the local humid air ambient. Adhesion of the dry mud on the laser textured surface is assessed through the measurement of the tangential force, which is required to remove the dry mud from the surface. It is found that laser texturing gives rise to micro/nano pillars topology and the formation of AlN and AlON compounds in the surface vicinity. This, in turn, lowers the free energy of the textured surface and enhances the hydrophobicity of the surface. The liquid solution resulted from the dissolution of alkaline and alkaline earth metals of the dust particles in water condensate forms locally scattered liquid islands at the interface of mud and textured surface. The dried liquid solution at the interface increases the dry mud adhesion on the textured surface. Some dry mud residues remain on the textured surface after the dry mud is removed by a pressurized desalinated water jet.

  5. Vibrational Mode-Specific Reaction of Methane on a Nickel Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Rainer D.; Maroni, Plinio; Papageorgopoulos, Dimitrios C.; Dang, Tung T.; Schmid, Mathieu P.; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2003-10-01

    The dissociation of methane on a nickel catalyst is a key step in steam reforming of natural gas for hydrogen production. Despite substantial effort in both experiment and theory, there is still no atomic-scale description of this important gas-surface reaction. We report quantum state-resolved studies, using pulsed laser and molecular beam techniques, of vibrationally excited methane reacting on the nickel (100) surface. For doubly deuterated methane (CD2H2), we observed that the reaction probability with two quanta of excitation in one C-H bond was greater (by as much as a factor of 5) than with one quantum in each of two C-H bonds. These results clearly exclude the possibility of statistical models correctly describing the mechanism of this process and attest to the importance of full-dimensional calculations of the reaction dynamics.

  6. Research project AUS-10370/CF: electron impact ionization and surface induced reactions of edge plasma constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerk, T.D.

    1999-01-01

    In order to better understand elementary reactions which are taking place at the plasma edge of thermonuclear fusion devices, three areas of research were persuaded: I) Experimental studies about electron ionization of neutrals and ions and electron attachment to molecules, II) Theoretical studies about electron ionisation of neutrals and ions and III) Reactive interaction of molecular ions with surfaces

  7. Formation and development of salt crusts on soil surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng; Shin, Hosung; Santamarina, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The salt concentration gradually increases at the soil free surface when the evaporation rate exceeds the diffusive counter transport. Eventually, salt precipitates and crystals form a porous sodium chloride crust with a porosity of 0.43 ± 0.14. After detaching from soils, the salt crust still experiences water condensation and salt deliquescence at the bottom, brine transport across the crust driven by the humidity gradient, and continued air-side precipitation. This transport mechanism allows salt crust migration away from the soil surface at a rate of 5 μm/h forming salt domes above soil surfaces. The surface characteristics of mineral substrates and the evaporation rate affect the morphology and the crystal size of precipitated salt. In particular, substrate hydrophobicity and low evaporation rate suppress salt spreading.

  8. Formation and development of salt crusts on soil surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng

    2015-12-14

    The salt concentration gradually increases at the soil free surface when the evaporation rate exceeds the diffusive counter transport. Eventually, salt precipitates and crystals form a porous sodium chloride crust with a porosity of 0.43 ± 0.14. After detaching from soils, the salt crust still experiences water condensation and salt deliquescence at the bottom, brine transport across the crust driven by the humidity gradient, and continued air-side precipitation. This transport mechanism allows salt crust migration away from the soil surface at a rate of 5 μm/h forming salt domes above soil surfaces. The surface characteristics of mineral substrates and the evaporation rate affect the morphology and the crystal size of precipitated salt. In particular, substrate hydrophobicity and low evaporation rate suppress salt spreading.

  9. Biofilm formation on a TiO2 nanotube with controlled pore diameter and surface wettability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anitha, V C; Narayan Banerjee, Arghya; Woo Joo, Sang; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jintae; Ki Min, Bong

    2015-01-01

    Titania (TiO 2 ) nanotube arrays (TNAs) with different pore diameters (140 − 20 nm) are fabricated via anodization using hydrofluoric acid (HF) containing ethylene glycol (EG) by changing the HF-to-EG volume ratio and the anodization voltage. To evaluate the effects of different pore diameters of TiO 2 nanotubes on bacterial biofilm formation, Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis) MR-1 cells and a crystal-violet biofilm assay are used. The surface roughness and wettability of the TNA surfaces as a function of pore diameter, measured via the contact angle and AFM techniques, are correlated with the controlled biofilm formation. Biofilm formation increases with the decreasing nanotube pore diameter, and a 20 nm TiO 2 nanotube shows the maximum biofilm formation. The measurements revealed that 20 nm surfaces have the least hydrophilicity with the highest surface roughness of ∼17 nm and that they show almost a 90% increase in the effective surface area relative to the 140 nm TNAs, which stimulate the cells more effectively to produce the pili to attach to the surface for more biofilm formation. The results demonstrate that bacterial cell adhesion (and hence, biofilm formation) can effectively be controlled by tuning the roughness and wettability of TNAs via controlling the pore diameters of TNA surfaces. This biofilm formation as a function of the surface properties of TNAs can be a potential candidate for both medical applications and as electrodes in microbial fuel cells. (paper)

  10. Formation of furan and methylfuran by maillard-type reactions in model systems and food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limacher, Anita; Kerler, Josef; Davidek, Tomas; Schmalzried, Frank; Blank, Imre

    2008-05-28

    The formation of furan and 2-methylfuran was studied in model systems based on sugars and selected amino acids. Both compounds were preferably formed under roasting conditions in closed systems yielding up to 330 micromol of furan and 260 micromol of 2-methylfuran per mol of precursor. The amounts obtained under pressure cooking conditions were much lower, usually below 20 micromol/mol, except for 2-furaldehyde, which yielded 70-100 micromol/mol of furan. Labeling studies indicated two major formation pathways for both furans: (i) from the intact sugar skeleton and (ii) by recombination of reactive C(2) and/or C(3) fragments. Under roasting conditions in the absence of amino acids, furan was mainly formed from the intact sugar skeleton. Formic and acetic acid were identified as byproducts of sugar degradation, indicating the split off of C(1) and/or C(2) units from hexoses. The presence of alanine, threonine, or serine promoted furan formation by the recombination of C(2) fragments, such as acetaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, which may originate from both sugars and amino acids. In aqueous solution, about half of furan was generated by the recombination of sugar fragments. 2-Methylfuran was preferably formed in the presence of amino acids by aldol-type reactions of C(2) and C(3) fragments with lactaldehyde as a key intermediate, the Strecker aldehyde of threonine. The total furan levels in cooked vegetables were increased by spiking with hexoses. However, in pumpkin puree, only about 20% of furan was formed from sugars, preferably from the intact carbon skeleton.

  11. Surface chemical reactions induced by molecules electronically-excited in the gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrunin, Victor V.

    2011-01-01

    and alignment are taking place, guiding all the molecules towards the intersections with the ground state PES, where transitions to the ground state PES will occur with minimum energy dissipation. The accumulated kinetic energy may be used to overcome the chemical reaction barrier. While recombination chemical...... be readily produced. Products of chemical adsorption and/or chemical reactions induced within adsorbates are aggregated on the surface and observed by light scattering. We will demonstrate how pressure and spectral dependencies of the chemical outcomes, polarization of the light and interference of two laser...... beams inducing the reaction can be used to distinguish the new process we try to investigate from chemical reactions induced by photoexcitation within adsorbed molecules and/or gas phase photolysis....

  12. Mass effect of redox reactions: A novel mode for surface plasmon resonance-based bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Pei-Xin; Deng, Sheng-Yuan; Xin, Peng; Ji, Xu-Bo; Shan, Dan; Cosnier, Serge

    2015-12-15

    The pursuit of more specific and sensitive response is a perpetual goal for modern bioassays. This work proposed a novel label-free strategy about redox-related mass effect based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique for ultrasensitive determination of DNA. The protocol starts with the modification of SPR gilded disk with the capture DNA (cDNA). After the conjugation of immobilized cDNA with the target DNA (tDNA), the hybridization chain reaction was triggered by the introduction of mutual partial complementary primers to elongate the terminal into a nanoscale duplex. As it is reported that porphyrin could intercalate into the grooves of the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) scaffold, multiple positive-charged Fe(III)meso-tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine (FeTMPyP) with symmetric structure were uptaken for in situ formation of porphyrin-dsDNA complex. Given FeTMPyP a highly efficient catalysis for the peroxide reduction, its presence as a biomimetic cofactor was validated via circular dichroism and UV-vis spectroscopy, demonstrating a tight binding as well as high catalytic activity and stability. Using 4-chloro-1-naphthol as a proton donor, the catalytic reduction of H2O2 would oxidize it into insoluble benzo-4-chloro-hexadienone, which simultaneously deposited on the heterogeneous interface, leading to a significant amplification in both SPR response and topological height profile. The signal increment was proportional to the concentration of tDNA, thus an ultrasensitive SPR-based DNA assay was developed with a linear range over four orders of magnitudes and a sub-femtomolar detection limit of 0.73 fM. The developed methodology exemplifies a different way of thinking about mass-sensing modes, extending conventional SPR-based DNA analysis to relevant biomedical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Computational Investigation of the Competition between the Concerted Diels-Alder Reaction and Formation of Diradicals in Reactions of Acrylonitrile with Non-Polar Dienes

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Natalie C.; Um, Joann M.; Padias, Anne B.; Hall, H. K.; Houk, K. N.

    2013-01-01

    The energetics of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions of several 1,3-dienes with acrylonitrile, and the energetics of formation of diradicals, were investigated with density functional theory (B3LYP and M06-2X) and compared to experimental data. For the reaction of 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene with acrylonitrile, the concerted reaction is favored over the diradical pathway by 2.5 kcal/mol using B3LYP/6-31G(d); experimentally this reaction gives both cycloadduct and copolymer. The concerted cycloaddition of cyclopentadiene with acrylonitrile is preferred computationally over the stepwise pathway by 5.9 kcal/mol; experimentally, only the Diels-Alder adduct is formed. For the reactions of (E)-1,3-pentadiene and acrylonitrile, both cycloaddition and copolymerization were observed experimentally; these trends were mimicked by the computational results, which showed only a 1.2 kcal/mol preference for the concerted pathway. For the reactions of (Z)-1,3-pentadiene and acrylonitrile, the stepwise pathway is preferred by 3.9 kcal/mol, in agreement with previous experimental findings that only polymerization occurs. M06-2X is known to give more accurate activation and reaction energetics but the energies of diradicals are too high. PMID:23758325

  14. Surface modification of platelet concentrate bags to reduce biofilm formation and transfusion sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Nieuwenhuis, Joels S T; Dempsey-Hibbert, Nina; Liauw, Christopher M; Whitehead, Kathryn A

    2017-12-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood products poses a major risk in transfusion medicine, including transfusions involving platelet products. Although testing systems are in place for routine screening of platelet units, the formation of bacterial biofilms in such units may decrease the likelihood that bacteria will be detected. This work determined the surface properties of p-PVC platelet concentrate bags and investigated how these characteristics influenced biofilm formation. Serratia marcescens and Staphylococcus epidermidis, two species commonly implicated in platelet contamination, were used to study biofilm growth. The platelet concentrate bags were physically flattened to determine if reducing the surface roughness altered biofilm formation. The results demonstrated that the flattening process of the platelet bags affected the chemistry of the surface and reduced the surface hydrophobicity. Flattening of the surfaces resulted in a reduction in biofilm formation for both species after 5 days, with S. marcescens demonstrating a greater reduction. However, there was no significant difference between the smooth and flat surfaces following 7 days' incubation for S. marcescens and no significant differences between any of the surfaces following 7 days' incubation for S. epidermidis. The results suggest that flattening the p-PVC surfaces may limit potential biofilm formation for the current duration of platelet storage time of 5 days. It is hoped that this work will enhance the understanding of how surface properties influence the development of microbial biofilms in platelet concentrate bags in order to devise a solution to discourage biofilm formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Palladium- and copper-mediated N-aryl bond formation reactions for the synthesis of biological active compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Koenig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Arylated aliphatic and aromatic amines are important substituents in many biologically active compounds. In the last few years, transition-metal-mediated N-aryl bond formation has become a standard procedure for the introduction of amines into aromatic systems. While N-arylation of simple aromatic halides by simple amines works with many of the described methods in high yield, the reactions may require detailed optimization if applied to the synthesis of complex molecules with additional functional groups, such as natural products or drugs. We discuss and compare in this review the three main N-arylation methods in their application to the synthesis of biologically active compounds: Palladium-catalysed Buchwald–Hartwig-type reactions, copper-mediated Ullmann-type and Chan–Lam-type N-arylation reactions. The discussed examples show that palladium-catalysed reactions are favoured for large-scale applications and tolerate sterically demanding substituents on the coupling partners better than Chan–Lam reactions. Chan–Lam N-arylations are particularly mild and do not require additional ligands, which facilitates the work-up. However, reaction times can be very long. Ullmann- and Buchwald–Hartwig-type methods have been used in intramolecular reactions, giving access to complex ring structures. All three N-arylation methods have specific advantages and disadvantages that should be considered when selecting the reaction conditions for a desired C–N bond formation in the course of a total synthesis or drug synthesis.

  16. Influence of growth conditions and surface reaction byproducts on GaN grown via metal organic molecular beam epitaxy: Toward an understanding of surface reaction chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, David; Henderson, Walter; Burnham, Shawn D.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2006-04-01

    The surface reaction byproducts during the growth of GaN films via metal organic molecular beam epitaxy (MOMBE) were investigated as a means to optimize material properties. Ethylene and ethane were identified as the dominant surface reaction hydrocarbon byproducts, averaging 27.63% and 7.15% of the total gas content present during growth. Intense ultraviolet (UV) photoexcitation during growth was found to significantly increase the abundance of ethylene and ethane while reducing the presence of H2 and N2. At 920°C, UV excitation was shown to enhance growth rate and crystalline quality while reducing carbon incorporation. Over a limited growth condition range, a 4.5×1019-3.4×1020 cm-3 variation in carbon incorporation was achieved at constant high vacuum. Coupled with growth rate gains, UV excitation yielded films with ˜58% less integrated carbon content. Structural material property variations are reported for various ammonia flows and growth temperatures. The results suggest that high carbon incorporation can be achieved and regulated during MOMBE growth and that in-situ optimization through hydrocarbon analysis may provide further enhancement in the allowable carbon concentration range.

  17. Reaction pathways of model compounds of biomass-derived oxygenates on Fe/Ni bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weiting; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-10-01

    Controlling the activity and selectivity of converting biomass-derivatives to fuels and valuable chemicals is critical for the utilization of biomass feedstocks. There are primarily three classes of non-food competing biomass, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In the current work, glycolaldehyde, furfural and acetaldehyde are studied as model compounds of the three classes of biomass-derivatives. Monometallic Ni(111) and monolayer (ML) Fe/Ni(111) bimetallic surfaces are studied for the reaction pathways of the three biomass surrogates. The ML Fe/Ni(111) surface is identified as an efficient surface for the conversion of biomass-derivatives from the combined results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments. A correlation is also established between the optimized adsorption geometry and experimental reaction pathways. These results should provide helpful insights in catalyst design for the upgrading and conversion of biomass.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of sodium aluminosilicate glass structures and glass surface-water reactions using the reactive force field (ReaxFF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongol, R.; Wang, L.; Cormack, A. N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    Reactive potentials are increasingly used to study the properties of glasses and glass water reactions in a reactive molecular dynamics (MD) framework. In this study, we have simulated a ternary sodium aluminosilicate glass and investigated the initial stages of the glass surface-water reactions at 300 K using reactive force field (ReaxFF). On comparison of the simulated glass structures generated using ReaxFF and classical Buckingham potentials, our results show that the atomic density profiles calculated for the surface glass structures indicate a bond-angle distribution dependency. The atomic density profiles also show higher concentrations of non-bridging oxygens (NBOs) and sodium ions at the glass surface. Additionally, we present our results of formation of silanol species and the diffusion of water molecules at the glass surface using ReaxFF.

  19. Study on reduction reactions of neptunium(V) on magnetite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira; Kamei, Gento; Nakata, Kotaro; Tanaka, Satoru; Tomura, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    Redox reactions between neptunium(V) (Np(V)) and magnetite (Fe(II) 1 Fe(III) 2 O 4 ) surface were investigated in N 2 gas atmosphere. A batch method was applied to the experiment. A magnetite sample and a 0.1 M NaCl solution were mixed in a polypropylene tube, and pH, redox potential and concentration of dissolved neptunium were measured as a function of shaking time, temperature and liquid/solid ratio. The concentration of dissolved neptunium was reduced rapidly within a day, due to the reducing reaction of Np(V) to Np(IV) and the precipitation of Np(IV). The rate constant of the redox reaction and the activation energy for the rate constant were preliminarily obtained. On the other hand, redox reactions between Np(V) and aqueous Fe(II) were hardly observed. Considering the number of transferred electrons, it was suggested that the redox reaction was promoted by not only Fe(II) on the magnetite surface, but also Fe(II) inside the magnetite. (author)

  20. Surface photo reaction processes using synchrotron radiation; Hoshako reiki ni yoru hyomenko hanno process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaizumi, Y. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute for Materials Research; Yoshigoe, A. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan); Urisu, T. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Institute for Molecular Science

    1997-08-20

    This paper introduces the surface photo reaction processes using synchrotron radiation, and its application. A synchrotron radiation process using soft X-rays contained in electron synchrotron radiated light as an excited light source has a possibility of high-resolution processing because of its short wave length. The radiated light can excite efficiently the electronic state of a substance, and can induce a variety of photochemical reactions. In addition, it can excite inner shell electrons efficiently. In the aspect of its application, it has been found that, if radiated light is irradiated on surfaces of solids under fluorine-based reaction gas or Cl2, the surfaces can be etched. This technology is utilized practically. With regard to radiated light excited CVD process, it may be said that anything that can be deposited by the ordinary plasma CVD process can be deposited. Its application to epitaxial crystal growth may be said a nano processing application in thickness direction, such as forming an ultra-lattice structure, the application being subjected to expectation. In micromachine fabricating technologies, a possibility is searched on application of a photo reaction process of the radiated light. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Small leak detection by measuring surface oscillation during sodium-water reaction in steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nei, Hiromichi; Hori, Masao

    1977-01-01

    Small leak sodium-water reaction tests were conducted to develop various kinds of leak detectors for the sodium-heated steam generator in FBR. The super-heated steam was injected into sodium in a reaction vessel having a sodium free surface, simulating the steam generator. The level gauge in the reaction vessel generated the most reliable signal among detectors, as long as the leak rates were relatively high. The level gauge signal was estimated to be the sodium surface oscillation caused by hydrogen bubbles produced in sodium-water reaction. Experimental correlation was derived, predicting the amplitude as a function of leak rate, hydrogen dissolution ratio, bubble rise velocity and other parameters concerned, assuming that the surface oscillation is in proportion to the gas hold-up. The noise amplitude under normal operation without water leak was increased with sodium flow rate and found to be well correlated with Froud number. These two correlations predict that a water leak in a ''MONJU'' class (300 MWe) steam generator could possibly be detected by level gauges at a leak rate above 2 g/sec. (auth.)

  2. Final Report: Mechanisms of sputter ripple formation: coupling among energetic ions, surface kinetics, stress and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chason, Eric; Shenoy, Vivek

    2013-01-22

    Self-organized pattern formation enables the creation of nanoscale surface structures over large areas based on fundamental physical processes rather than an applied template. Low energy ion bombardment is one such method that induces the spontaneous formation of a wide variety of interesting morphological features (e.g., sputter ripples and/or quantum dots). This program focused on the processes controlling sputter ripple formation and the kinetics controlling the evolution of surfaces and nanostructures in high flux environments. This was done by using systematic, quantitative experiments to measure ripple formation under a variety of processing conditions coupled with modeling to interpret the results.

  3. Electro-deposition of Pd on carbon paper and Ni foam via surface limited redox-replacement reaction for oxygen reduction reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pd nanostructured catalysts were electrodeposited by surface-limited redox replacement reactions usingthe electrochemical atomic layer deposition technique. Carbon paper and Ni foam were used as substratesfor the electrodeposition of the metal...

  4. Mass Spectral Investigation of Laboratory Made Tholins and Their Reaction Products: Implications to Tholin Surface Chemistry on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Arpad; Smith, M. A.

    2006-09-01

    The success of the Huygens mission does not overshadow the importance of laboratory simulations of gas-phase and surface reactions that might occur in Titan's atmosphere and surface, respectively. We present here our latest results on chemical reactions (hydrolysis, peroxidation and hydrogenation) of laboratory made tholins obtained by FT-ICR mass spectrometry. The laboratory synthesis of tholins has been described in our earlier papers [1,2]. Overall, we conclude that our laboratory tholins are reactive materials that undergo fast hydrolysis, oxidation and reduction. Thus, if the tholin on Titan's surface resemble our laboratory made tholins, it can be considered as a potential starting material for several synthetic processes that can provide organic compounds of pre-biotic interest. Hydrolysis reactions occur with rate constants of 2-10 hour-1 at room temperature. Formal water addition to several species of CxHyNz has been observed by detecting the formation of CxHy+2NzO species. MS/MS fragmentation of the oxygen containing ions leads to the loss of water, ammonia, HCN, acetonitrile, etc. This suggests that tholin hydrolysis may occur in temporary melted ponds of water/ammonia ice on Titan. Peroxidation, which can be considered as a very harsh oxidation, leads to mono-, and multiple oxygenated compounds within a few minutes. The MS/MS fragmentation of these compounds suggests the presence of organic amides and, presumably, amino acid like compounds. Hydrogenation leads to compounds in which the originally present carbon-carbon or carbon-nitrogen double and triple bonds are saturated. H/D exchange experiments show different kinetics depending on the degree of unsaturation/saturation and the number of N atoms. [1] Sarker, N.; Somogyi, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Smith, M. A. Astrobiology, 2003, 3, 719-726. [2] Somogyi, A.; Oh, C-H.; Lunine, J. I.; Smith, M. A. J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 2005, 16, 850-859.

  5. Optimised formation of blue Maillard reaction products of xylose and glycine model systems and associated antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zi; Sun, Qian; Zhang, Xi; Jing, Hao

    2014-05-01

    A blue colour can be formed in the xylose (Xyl) and glycine (Gly) Maillard reaction (MR) model system. However, there are fewer studies on the reaction conditions for the blue Maillard reaction products (MRPs). The objective of this study is to investigate characteristic colour formation and antioxidant activities in four different MR model systems and to determine the optimum reaction conditions for the blue colour formation in a Xyl-Gly MR model system, using the random centroid optimisation program. The blue colour with an absorbance peak at 630 nm appeared before browning in the Xyl-Gly MR model system, while no blue colour formation but only browning was observed in the xylose-alanine, xylose-aspartic acid and glucose-glycine MR model systems. The Xyl-Gly MR model system also showed higher antioxidant activity than the other three model systems. The optimum conditions for blue colour formation were as follows: xylose and glycine ratio 1:0.16 (M:M), 0.20 mol L⁻¹ NaHCO₃, 406.1 mL L⁻¹ ethanol, initial pH 8.63, 33.7°C for 22.06 h, which gave a much brighter blue colour and a higher peak at 630 nm. A characteristic blue colour could be formed in the Xyl-Gly MR model system and the optimum conditions for the blue colour formation were proposed and confirmed. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Origin of Power Laws for Reactions at Metal Surfaces Mediated by Hot Electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of experiments have established that certain chemical reactions at metal surfaces can be driven by multiple hot-electron-mediated excitations of adsorbates. A high transient density of hot electrons is obtained by means of femtosecond laser pulses and a characteristic feature of such...... density functional theory and the delta self-consistent field method. With a simplifying assumption, the power law becomes exact and we obtain a simple physical interpretation of the exponent n, which represents the number of adsorbate vibrational states participating in the reaction....

  7. Modeling heat dissipation at the nanoscale: an embedding approach for chemical reaction dynamics on metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jörg; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-04-25

    We present an embedding technique for metallic systems that makes it possible to model energy dissipation into substrate phonons during surface chemical reactions from first principles. The separation of chemical and elastic contributions to the interaction potential provides a quantitative description of both electronic and phononic band structure. Application to the dissociation of O2 at Pd(100) predicts translationally "hot" oxygen adsorbates as a consequence of the released adsorption energy (ca. 2.6 eV). This finding questions the instant thermalization of reaction enthalpies generally assumed in models of heterogeneous catalysis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Molecular resonances, fusion reactions and surface transparency of interaction between heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yasuhisa.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the Band Crossing Model is given, including recent results on the 16 O + 16 O system. Surface Transparency is discussed in the light of the recent development in our understanding of the fusion reaction mechanisms and by calculating the number of open channels available to direct reactions. The existence of the Molecular Resonance Region is suggested in several systems by the fact that Band Crossing Region overlaps with the Transparent Region. A systematic study predicts molecular resonances in the 14 C + 14 C and 12 C + 14 C systems as prominent as those observed in the 16 O + 16 O and 12 C + 16 O systems

  9. Surface Modification Reaction of Photocatalytic Titanium Dioxide with Triethoxysilane for Improving Dispersibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Jin; Kim, Ji Ho; Park, Young Tae

    2010-01-01

    We have carried out the surface modification of photocatalytic TiO 2 with triethoxysilane through dehydrogenation reaction and characterized the modified photocatalyst by spectroscopic methods, such as FT-IR, solid-state 29 Si MAS NMR, XPS, and XRF, etc. We also examined photocatalytic activity of the immobilized photocatalytic titanium dioxide with triethoxysilane by decolorization reaction of dyes such as cong red and methylene blue under visible light. Dispersion test showed that the photocatalytic titanium dioxide immobilized with triethoxysilane group has kept higher dispersibility than titanium dioxide itself. No appreciable precipitation takes place even after standing for 24 h in the 4:6 mixture ratio of ethanol and water

  10. Surface Passivation and Junction Formation Using Low Energy Hydrogen Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    New applications for high current, low energy hydrogen ion implants on single crystal and polycrystal silicon grain boundaries are discussed. The effects of low energy hydrogen ion beams on crystalline Si surfaces are considered. The effect of these beams on bulk defects in crystalline Si is addressed. Specific applications of H+ implants to crystalline Si processing are discussed. In all of the situations reported on, the hydrogen beams were produced using a high current Kaufman ion source.

  11. Role of graphene on the surface chemical reactions of BiPO4-rGO with low OH-related defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Erping; Wang, Wenzhong

    2013-11-21

    Graphene has been widely introduced into photocatalysis to enhance photocatalytic performance due to its unique physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of graphene on the surface chemical reactions of photocatalysis has not been clearly researched, which is important for photocatalysis because photocatalytic reactions ultimately occur on the catalyst surface. Herein, a two-step solution-phase reaction has been designed to synthesize quasi-core-shell structured BiPO4-rGO cuboids and the role of graphene on the surface chemical reactions was investigated in detail. It was found that the introduced graphene modified the process and the mechanism of the surface chemical reactions. The change mainly originates from the interaction between graphene and the adsorbed O2 molecule. Due to the electron transfer from graphene to adsorbed O2, graphene could tune the interfacial charge transport and efficiently activate molecular oxygen to form O2˙(-) anions as the major oxidation species instead of ˙OH. In addition, the two-step synthesis approach could efficiently suppress the formation of OH-related defects in the lattice. As a result, the BiPO4-rGO composite exhibited superior photocatalytic activity to BiPO4 and P25, about 4.3 times that of BiPO4 and 6.9 times that of P25.

  12. Factorial analysis of the trihalomethane formation in the reaction of colloidal, hydrophobic, and transphilic fractions of DOM with free chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platikanov, Stefan; Tauler, Roma; Rodrigues, Pedro M S M; Antunes, Maria Cristina G; Pereira, Dilson; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2010-09-01

    This study focuses on the factors that affect trihalomethane (THMs) formation when dissolved organic matter (DOM) fractions (colloidal, hydrophobic, and transphilic fractions) in aqueous solutions were disinfected with chlorine. DOM fractions were isolated and fractionated from filtered lake water and were characterized by elemental analysis. The investigation involved a screening Placket-Burman factorial analysis design of five factors (DOM concentration, chlorine dose, temperature, pH, and bromide concentration) and a Box-Behnken design for a detailed assessment of the three most important factor effects (DOM concentration, chlorine dose, and temperature). The results showed that colloidal fraction has a relatively low contribution to THM formation; transphilic fraction was responsible for about 50% of the chloroform generation, and the hydrophobic fraction was the most important to the brominated THM formation. When colloidal and hydrophobic fraction solutions were disinfected, the most significant factors were the following: higher DOM fraction concentration led to higher THM concentration, an increase of pH corresponded to higher concentration levels of chloroform and reduced bromoform, higher levels of chlorine dose and temperature produced a rise in the total THM formation, especially of the chlorinated THMs; higher bromide concentration generates higher concentrations of brominated THMs. Moreover, linear models were implemented and response surface plots were obtained for the four THM concentrations and their total sum in the disinfection solution as a function of the DOM concentration, chlorine dose, and temperature. Overall, results indicated that THM formation models were very complex due to individual factor effects and significant interactions among the factors. In order to reduce the concentration of THMs in drinking water, DOM concentrations must be reduced in the water prior to the disinfection. Fractionation of DOM, together with an elemental

  13. In situ electrochemical-mass spectroscopic investigation of solid electrolyte interphase formation on the surface of a carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourdin, Gerald; Zheng, Dong; Smith, Patricia H.; Qu, Deyang

    2013-01-01

    The energy density of an electrochemical capacitor can be significantly improved by utilizing a lithiated negative electrode and a high surface area positive electrode. During lithiation of the negative carbon electrode, the electrolyte reacts with the electrode surface and undergoes decomposition to form a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer that passivates the surface of the carbon electrode from further reactions between Li and the electrolyte. The reduction reactions that the solvent undergoes also form insoluble and gaseous by-products. In this work, those gaseous by-products generated by reductive decomposition of a carbonate-based electrolyte, 1.2 M LiPF 6 in EC/PC/DEC (3:1:4), were analyzed at different stages during the lithiation process of an amorphous carbon electrode. The stages in the generation of gaseous by-products were determined to come as a result of two, 1-electron reduction steps of the cyclic carbonate components of the electrolyte. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was also used to investigate the two distinct electrochemical processes and the development of the two phases of the SEI structure. This is the first time that the state of an electrochemical cell during the formation of the SEI layer has been systematically correlated with theoretical reaction mechanisms through the use of in situ electrochemical-MS and impedance spectroscopy analyses

  14. Chemical surface reactions by click chemistry: coumarin dye modification of 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haensch, Claudia; Hoeppener, Stephanie; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2008-01-01

    The functionalization of surfaces and the ability to tailor their properties with desired physico-chemical functions is an important field of research with a broad spectrum of applications. These applications range from the modification of wetting properties, over the alteration of optical properties, to the fabrication of molecular electronic devices. In each of these fields, it is of specific importance to be able to control the quality of the layers with high precision. The present study demonstrates an approach that utilizes the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of terminal acetylenes to prepare triazole-terminated monolayers on different substrates. The characterization of the precursor monolayers, the optimization of the chemical surface reactions as well as the clicking of a fluorescent dye molecule on such azide-terminated monolayers was carried out. A coumarin 343 derivative was utilized to discuss the aspects of the functionalization approach. Based on this approach, a number of potential surface reactions, facilitated via the acetylene-substituted functional molecules, for a broad range of applications is at hand, thus leading to numerous possibilities where surface modifications are concerned. These modifications can be applied on non-structured surfaces of silicon or glass or can be used on structured surfaces. Various possibilities are discussed

  15. The passivation of uranium metal surfaces by nitrogen bombardment — the formation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Geoffrey C.; Holmes, Nigel R.

    1988-05-01

    As part of a detailed investigation of the behaviour of metallic uranium in various atmospheres, we have examined the reaction between nitrogen gas and uranium metal. At room temperature there was no evidence of reaction between nitrogen gas and a clean metal surface; the only changes observed could be attributed to reaction between the metal and traces of oxygen (less than 0.1 ppm) in the nitrogen gas. Reaction between the metal and nitrogen was induced, however, by accelerating nitrogen towards the surface using a fast atom gun. The resulting nitrided surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its oxidation behaviour was monitored over an extended period in UHV and in air.

  16. The passivation of uranium metal surfaces by nitrogen bombardment - the formation of uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Holmes, N.R.

    1987-08-01

    As part of a detailed investigation of the behaviour of metallic uranium in various atmospheres, we have examined the reaction between nitrogen gas and uranium metal. At room temperature there was no evidence of reaction between nitrogen gas and a clean metal surface; the only changes observed could be attributed to reaction between the metal and traces of oxygen (less than 0.1 ppm) in the nitrogen gas. Reaction between the metal and nitrogen was induced however by accelerating nitrogen towards the surface using a fast atom gun. The resulting nitrided surface was characterised by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its oxidation behaviour was monitored over an extended period in UHV and in air. (author)

  17. The passivation of uranium metal surfaces by nitrogen bombardment - the formation of uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Holmes, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    As part of a detailed investigation of the behaviour of metallic uranium in various atmospheres, we have examined the reaction between nitrogen gas and uranium metal. At room temperature there was no evidence of reaction between nitrogen gas and a clean metal surface; the only changes observed could be attributed to reaction between the metal and traces of oxygen (less than 0.1 ppm) in the nitrogen gas. Reaction between the metal and nitrogen was induced, however, by accelerating nitrogen towards the surface using a fast atom gun. The resulting nitrided surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its oxidation behaviour was monitored over an extended period in UHV and in air. (orig.)

  18. The samarium Grignard reaction. In situ formation and reactions of primary and secondary alkylsamarium(III) reagents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curran, D.P.; Totleben, M.J. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1992-07-15

    This work shows that primary and secondary radicals are rapidly reduced in THF/HMPA to form primary- and secondary-alkylsamarium reagents. The primary- and secondary-radicals can be formed either by direct SmI{sup 2} reductions of primary- and secondary-halides or by a previous rapid radical cyclization. The samarium reagents have moderate stability in solution, and they react with a variety of typical electrophiles, including aldehydes and ketones. The work further shows that organosamarium intermediates can be involved in the traditional samarium Barbier reaction of aldehydes and ketones conducted in THF/HMPA. A new procedure called the {open_quotes}samarium Grignard{close_quotes} method is introduced, and it is suggested that this new procedure will have considerably more scope and generality than the samarium Barbier reaction. 37 refs., 4 tabs.

  19. Formation of C-C and C-O bonds and oxygen removal in reactions of alkanediols, alkanols, and alkanals on copper catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sad, María E; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2011-12-21

    This study reports evidence for catalytic deoxygenation of alkanols, alkanals, and alkanediols on dispersed Cu clusters with minimal use of external H(2) and with the concurrent formation of new C-C and C-O bonds. These catalysts selectively remove O-atoms from these oxygenates as CO or CO(2) through decarbonylation or decarboxylation routes, respectively, that use C-atoms present within reactants or as H(2)O using H(2) added or formed in situ from CO/H(2)O mixtures via water-gas shift. Cu catalysts fully convert 1,3-propanediol to equilibrated propanol-propanal intermediates that subsequently form larger oxygenates via aldol-type condensation and esterification routes without detectable involvement of the oxide supports. Propanal-propanol-H(2) equilibration is mediated by their chemisorption and interconversion at surfaces via C-H and O-H activation and propoxide intermediates. The kinetic effects of H(2), propanal, and propanol pressures on turnover rates, taken together with measured selectivities and the established chemical events for base-catalyzed condensation and esterification reactions, indicate that both reactions involve kinetically relevant bimolecular steps in which propoxide species, acting as the base, abstract the α-hydrogen in adsorbed propanal (condensation) or attack the electrophilic C-atom at its carbonyl group (esterification). These weakly held basic alkoxides render Cu surfaces able to mediate C-C and C-O formation reactions typically catalyzed by basic sites inherent in the catalyst, instead of provided by coadsorbed organic moieties. Turnover rates for condensation and esterification reactions decrease with increasing Cu dispersion, because low-coordination corner and edge atoms prevalent on small clusters stabilize adsorbed intermediates and increase the activation barriers for the bimolecular kinetically relevant steps required for both reactions. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Nitric oxide formation from the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit hemoglobin at intermediate oxygen saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2008-01-01

    The nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin has received much recent interest because the nitric oxide produced in this reaction may participate in blood flow regulation during hypoxia. The present study used spectral deconvolution to characterize the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit...... hemoglobin at different constant oxygen tensions that generate the full range of physiological relevant oxygen saturations. Carp is a hypoxia-tolerant species with very high hemoglobin oxygen affinity, and the high R-state character and low redox potential of the hemoglobin is hypothesized to promote...... NO generation from nitrite. The reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin leads to a 1 : 1 formation of nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin in both species. At intermediate oxygen saturations, the reaction with deoxyhemoglobin is clearly favored over that with oxyhemoglobin, and the oxyhemoglobin reaction...

  1. Calculations of radiation defect formation cross sections in reactor materials in (n,p) and (n,α) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupchishin, A.A.; Kupchishin, A.I.; Omarbekova, Zh.

    2001-01-01

    In the work an experimental data analysis by integral σ(E 1 ) and differential [dσ(E 1 ,E 2 )]/dE 2 neutron interaction cross sections with reactor materials with the secondary protons and alpha particles generation as well as with the primarily knock-on atoms production in such reactions are carried out. It is shown, that in the (n,p) and (n',α) reactions the recoil nuclei receive essential energy portion and they are the patriarchs for atom-atom cascades in the substance. Nuclear reactions with formation of the secondary α-particles and and recoil nuclei are considered. It is shown, that these reactions are effectively proceeding within neutrons energy range 0.3-15 MeV. The nuclear reactions kinematics of above mentioned processes is studied. Energy conservation law for these reaction is applied. Deferential cross section conservation and transformation law for radiation defect formation in the (n,α) reaction are considered as well

  2. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-04-20

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  3. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-01-01

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  4. Reaction pathways of furfural, furfuryl alcohol and 2-methylfuran on Cu(111) and NiCu bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ke; Wan, Weiming; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is an important reaction for converting biomass-derived furfural to value-added 2-methylfuran, which is a promising fuel additive. In this work, the HDO of furfural to produce 2-methylfuran occurred on the NiCu bimetallic surfaces prepared on either Ni(111) or Cu(111). The reaction pathways of furfural were investigated on Cu(111) and Ni/Cu(111) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) experiments. These studies provided mechanistic insights into the effects of bimetallic formation on enhancing the HDO activity. Specifically, furfural weakly adsorbed on Cu(111), while it strongly adsorbed on Ni/Cu(111) through an η2(C,O) configuration, which led to the HDO of furfural on Ni/Cu(111). The ability to dissociate H2 on Ni/Cu(111) is also an important factor for enhancing the HDO activity over Cu(111).

  5. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin, E-mail: franklin.tao.2011@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily.

  6. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin

    2016-01-01

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily.

  7. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  8. The formation of urea in space. I. Ion-molecule, neutral-neutral, and radical gas-phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigiano, Flavio Siro; Jeanvoine, Yannick; Largo, Antonio; Spezia, Riccardo

    2018-02-01

    Context. Many organic molecules have been observed in the interstellar medium thanks to advances in radioastronomy, and very recently the presence of urea was also suggested. While those molecules were observed, it is not clear what the mechanisms responsible to their formation are. In fact, if gas-phase reactions are responsible, they should occur through barrierless mechanisms (or with very low barriers). In the past, mechanisms for the formation of different organic molecules were studied, providing only in a few cases energetic conditions favorable to a synthesis at very low temperature. A particularly intriguing class of such molecules are those containing one N-C-O peptide bond, which could be a building block for the formation of biological molecules. Urea is a particular case because two nitrogen atoms are linked to the C-O moiety. Thus, motivated also by the recent tentative observation of urea, we have considered the synthetic pathways responsible to its formation. Aims: We have studied the possibility of forming urea in the gas phase via different kinds of bi-molecular reactions: ion-molecule, neutral, and radical. In particular we have focused on the activation energy of these reactions in order to find possible reactants that could be responsible for to barrierless (or very low energy) pathways. Methods: We have used very accurate, highly correlated quantum chemistry calculations to locate and characterize the reaction pathways in terms of minima and transition states connecting reactants to products. Results: Most of the reactions considered have an activation energy that is too high; but the ion-molecule reaction between NH2OHNH2OH2+ and formamide is not too high. These reactants could be responsible not only for the formation of urea but also of isocyanic acid, which is an organic molecule also observed in the interstellar medium.

  9. C-13 isotopic studies of the surface catalysed reactions of methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, M.A.; He, S.J.X.; Adebajo, M.

    1997-01-01

    The ability of methane to methylate aromatic compounds, which are considered to be models for coal, is being studied. Related to this reaction, but at higher temperatures, is the direct formation of benzene from methane in the presence of these catalysts. Controversy exists in the literature on the former reaction, and 13 C isotope studies are being used to resolve the question. The interest in this reaction arises because the utilisation of methane, in the form of natural gas, in place of hydrogen for direct coal liquefaction would have major economic advantage. For this reason Isotope studies in this area have contributed significantly to an understanding of the methylation reactions. The paper describes experiments utilising methane 13 C, which show that methylation of aromatics such as naphthalene by the methane 13 C is catalysed by microporous, Cu-exchanged SAPO-5, at elevated pressures (6.8 MPa) and temperatures around 400 degree C. The mass spectrometric analysis and n.m.r. study of the isotopic composition of the products of the methylation reaction demonstrate unequivocally that methane provides the additional carbon atom for the methylated products. Thermodynamic calculations predict that the reaction is favourable at high methane pressures under these experimental conditions. The mechanism as suggested by the isotope study is discussed. The catalysts which show activity for the activation of methane for direct methylation of organic compounds, such as naphthalene, toluene, phenol and pyrene, are substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves, EIAPO-5 (where El=Pb, Cu, Ni and Si) and a number of metal substituted zeolites. Our earlier tritium studies had shown that these catalysts will activate alkanes, at least as far as isotope hydrogen exchange reactions are concerned

  10. Evaporation Rate Study and NDMA Formation from UDMH/NO2 Reaction Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Vanessa D.; Dee, Louis A.; Baker, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory samples of uns-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) fuel/oxidizer (nitrogen dioxide) non-combustion reaction products (UFORP) were prepared using a unique permeation tube technology. Also, a synthetic UFORP was prepared from UDMH, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), dimethylammonium nitrate, sodium nitrite and purified water. The evaporation rate of UFORP and synthetic UFORP was determined under space vacuum (approx 10(exp -3) Torr) at -40 ?C and 0 ?C. The material remaining was analyzed and showed that the UFORP weight and NDMA concentration decreased over time; however, NDMA had not completely evaporated. Over 85% of the weight was removed by subjecting the UFORP to 10(-3) Torr for 7 hours at -40 ?C and 4 hours at 0 ?C. A mixture of dimethylammonium nitrate and sodium nitrite formed NDMA at a rapid rate in a moist air environment. A sample of UFORP residue was analyzed for formation of NDMA under various conditions. It was found that NDMA was not formed unless nitrite was added.

  11. Chemistry of tetravalent plutonium and zirconium. Hydrolysis, solubility, colloid formation and redox reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hye-Ryun

    2006-01-01

    in acidic condition, the concentration of each oxidation state of Pu must be determined prior to each experiment. The solubility data are determined directly after preparation and then the redox reactions between four different plutonium oxidation states are observed at different pH and Pu concentrations as a function of time. The results indicate that the redox behavior of Pu cannot be described by disproportionation of Pu alone. Under the experimental conditions, the redox reactions of Pu seem to be divided into two groups, Pu(IV) aq <-> Pu(III) aq and Pu(IV) coll <-> Pu(V) aq <-> Pu(VI) aq . In the Pu solution containing initially only Pu(IV), the reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) aq dominates rather than the oxidation to Pu(V) aq and Pu(VI) aq . The observed two groups of reactions show the dependency of pH due to the related hydrolysis and colloid formation of Pu(IV). With increasing pH, the [Pu 4+ ] decreases either through its hydrolysis and colloid formation (increase of Pu(IV) coll ) or through its reduction (increase of Pu(III) aq ). The polymer species or colloids may dissolve to Pu(V)aq through the second reaction group (increase Pu(V) aq + Pu(VI) aq ). Consequently, it is observed that with increase of pH, [Pu(IV) aq ] decreases, [Pu(III) aq ] increases, and [Pu(IV) coll ]+[Pu(V) aq ]+[Pu(VI) aq ] increases. This study is also performed under inert gas conditions in order to investigate the influence of dissolved oxygen on the oxidation of Pu(IV) (Pu(IV) coll <-> Pu(V) aq ). From the relative abundance of the Pu oxidation states, namely the couples PuO 2 2+ /PuO 2 + and PuO 2 + /Pu(IV) coll , the redox potential Eh(V) can be obtained. The respective values agree well with the measured Eh values. In order to use the redox couple Pu 4+ /Pu 3+ , one has to take into account the strong hydrolysis of Pu(IV) which sets in below pH 1. When the abundance of Pu 4+ is calculated from the amount of [Pu(IV) aq. ]=[Pu 4+ ]+ sum y=1 4 [Pu(OH) y 4-y ] by use of hydrolysis

  12. In situ spectroscopy of ligand exchange reactions at the surface of colloidal gold and silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, Rebecca; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Gold and silver nanoparticles with their tunable optical and electronic properties are of great interest for a wide range of applications. Often the ligands at the surface of the nanoparticles have to be exchanged in a second step after particle formation in order to obtain a desired surface functionalization. For many techniques, this process is not accessible in situ . In this review, we present second-harmonic scattering (SHS) as an inherently surface sensitive and label-free optical technique to probe the ligand exchange at the surface of colloidal gold and silver nanoparticles in situ and in real time. First, a brief introduction to SHS and basic features of the SHS of nanoparticles are given. After that, we demonstrate how the SHS intensity decrease can be correlated to the thiol coverage which allows for the determination of the Gibbs free energy of adsorption and the surface coverage. (topical review)

  13. CCl 4 chemistry on the magnetite selvedge of single-crystal hematite: competitive surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, K.; Camillone, N., III; Fitts, J. P.; Rim, K. T.; Flynn, G. W.; Joyce, S. A.; Osgood, R. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Temperature programmed reaction/desorption (TPR/D) studies were undertaken to characterize the surface chemistry which occurs between CCl 4 and the Fe 3O 4 (1 1 1) selvedge of single crystal α-Fe 2O 3 (0 0 0 1). Six separate desorption events are clearly observed and four desorbing species are identified: CCl 4, OCCl 2, C 2Cl 4 and FeCl 2. It is proposed that OCCl 2, CCl 4 and C 2Cl 4 are produced in reactions involving the same precursor, CCl 2. Three reaction paths compete for the CCl 2 precursor: oxygen atom abstraction (for OCCl 2), molecular recombinative desorption (for CCl 4) and associative desorption (for C 2Cl 4). During the TPR/D temperature ramp, the branching ratio is observed to depend upon temperature and the availability of reactive sites. The data are consistent with a rich site-dependent chemistry.

  14. Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on surfaces of variable roughness and hydrophobicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Pillai, Saju; Iversen, Anders

    L.Biofilm formation on surfaces in food production and processing can deteriorate the quality of food products and be a hazard to consumers. The food industry currently uses a number of approaches to either remove biofilm or prevent its formation. Due to the inherent resilience of bacteria...... in biofilm, a particularly attractive approach is the modification of surfaces with the aim to impede the first step in biofilm formation, namely bacterial adhesion. Surface properties such as hydrophobicity, roughness and predisposition for fouling by protein are recognised as important in bacterial...... adhesion. Sol-gel technology and the recent availability of organic modified silicas have lead to development of hybrid organic/inorganic glass ceramic coatings with specialised surface properties. In this study we investigate bacterial adhesion and the subsequent biofilm formation on stainless steel (SS...

  15. XPS study on the surface reaction of uranium metal in H2 and H2-CO atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou

    1996-04-01

    The surface reactions of uranium metal in H 2 and H 2 -CO atmospheres and the effects of temperature and CO on the hydriding reaction have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The reaction between commercial H 2 and uranium metal at 25 degree C leads mainly to the further oxidation of surface layer of metal due to traces of water vapour. At 200 degree C, it may lead to the hydriding reaction of uranium and the hydriding increases with increasing the exposure of H 2 . Investigation indicates CO inhibits both the hydriding reaction and oxidation on the condition of H 2 -CO atmospheres. (13 refs., 10 figs.)

  16. Surface Reaction Kinetics of Ga(1-x)In(x)P Growth During Pulsed Chemical Beam Epitaxy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dietz, N; Beeler, S. C; Schmidt, J. W; Tran, H. T

    2000-01-01

    ... into the surface reaction kinetics during an organometallic deposition process. These insights will allow us to move the control point closer to the point where the growth occurs, which in a chemical been epitaxy process is a surface reaction layer (SRL...

  17. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Maíra Maciel Mattos de; Brugnera,Danilo Florisvaldo; Alves,Eduardo; Piccoli,Roberta Hilsdorf

    2010-01-01

    An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4) stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 ?C and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was de...

  18. Photo-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO) on protein surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusel, Hannah; Elshorbany, Yasin; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Selzle, Kathrin; Lelieveld, Jos; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang

    2014-05-01

    The study of nitrous acid (HONO) is of great interest, as the photolysis of HONO leads to the OH radical, which is the most important oxidant in the troposphere. HONO is directly emitted by combustion of fossil fuel and from soil biogenic nitrite (Su et al., 2011), and can also be formed by gas phase reactions of NO and OH and heterogeneous reactions of NO2. Previous atmospheric measurements have shown unexpectedly high HONO concentrations during daytime. Measured mixing ratios were about one order of magnitude higher than model simulations (Kleffmann et al. 2005, Vogel et al. 2003). The additional daytime source of HONO might be attributed to the photolysis of adsorbed nitric acid or heterogeneous photochemistry of NO2 on organic substrates, such as humic acids or polyphenolic compounds (Stemmler et al., 2006), or indirectly through nitration of phenols and subsequent photolysis of nitrophenols (Sosedova et al., 2011, Bejan et al., 2006). An important reactive surface for the heterogeneous formation of HONO could involve proteins, which are ubiquitous in the environment. They are part of coarse biological aerosol particles like pollen grains, fine particles (fragments of pollen, microorganism, plant debris) and dissolved in rainwater, soil and road dust (Miguel et al. 1999). In this project a thin film of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein with 67 kDa and 21 tyrosine residues per molecule, is irradiated and exposed to nitrogen dioxide in humidified nitrogen. The formation of HONO is measured with long path absorption photometry (LOPAP). The generated HONO is in the range of 100 to 1100 ppt depending on light intensity, NO2 concentration and film thickness. Light induced HONO formation on protein surfaces is stable over the 20-hours experiment of irradiation and exposure. On the other hand, light activated proteins reacting with NO2 form nitrated proteins, as detected by liquid chromatography (LC-DAD). Our experiments on tetranitromethane (TNM) nitrated

  19. Tin oxide surfaces--8. An infrared study of the mechanism of formation of a surface isocyanate species on SnO/sub 2//0. 55 CuO during catalysis of the oxidation of carbon monoxide by nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, P.G.; Thornton, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    In studies carried out at 470/sup 0/K, the measurements of the isotopic shifts of the 2189/cm pseudo-antisymmetric stretching vibration for carbon-13, nitrogen-15, and oxygen-18 substitution indicated that the oxygen atom of the surface isocyanate, formed as an intermediate in the reaction of CO with NO, originated from NO, not from CO as previously believed. The mechanism proposed involves the dissociative chemisorption of CO, the formation of a fulminate by the reaction of NO with the surface carbon atom, and rapid isomerization to the isocyanate.

  20. Ultrafine and fine particle formation in a naturally ventilated office as a result of reactions between ozone and scented products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Dijken, F. v.

    2003-01-01

    Ultrafine and fine particle formation as a result of chemical reactions between ozone and four different air fresheners and a typical lemon-scented domestic cleaner was studied in a fully furnished, naturally ventilated office. The study showed that under conditions representative of those...

  1. Adaptive Fuzzy Output Regulation for Formation Control of Unmanned Surface Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shaobao; Er, Meng Joo; Wang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the formation control problem of unmanned surface vehicles (USVs) is investigated. Unlike the classical formation control problem where the reference signal is required to be second-order differentiable with respect to time, we consider a more general autonomous dynamic system...

  2. Method and system for formation and withdrawal of a sample from a surface to be analyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2017-10-03

    A method and system for formation and withdrawal of a sample from a surface to be analyzed utilizes a collection instrument having a port through which a liquid solution is conducted onto the surface to be analyzed. The port is positioned adjacent the surface to be analyzed, and the liquid solution is conducted onto the surface through the port so that the liquid solution conducted onto the surface interacts with material comprising the surface. An amount of material is thereafter withdrawn from the surface. Pressure control can be utilized to manipulate the solution balance at the surface to thereby control the withdrawal of the amount of material from the surface. Furthermore, such pressure control can be coordinated with the movement of the surface relative to the port of the collection instrument within the X-Y plane.

  3. Mechanisms for formation and disruption of surface oxides: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumsden, J.B.

    1987-08-01

    Mill-annealed alloys 600, 690 and 800 were exposed to 10 and 50% caustic solutions containing 1% Na 2 CO 3 to initiate IGA. IGA reproducibly occurred in all three alloys in the 10% caustic solution at 350 0 C after a 240 h exposure and in the 50% caustic solution at 320 0 C after a 120 h exposure. Reproducible IGA did not occur in the 10% caustic solution at 320 0 C after a 120 h exposure. IGA was not observed in mill annealed plus thermally treated alloys 600 and 690 after exposure to any of the test conditions. IGA initiation was correlated with a dealloying mechanism in which the more active alloying metals, iron and chromium, selectively dissolve. Boric acid and calcium hydroxide additives were found to slow or prevent IGA by inhibiting dealloying. Titanates prevented IGA in alloys 600, 690 and 800, passivating the surface with a nickel titanate film

  4. Visualization of red-ox proteins on the gold surface using enzymatic polypyrrole formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanaviciene, A.; Kausaite-Minkstimiene, A.; Voronovic, J.; Ramanavicius, A.; Oztekin, Y.; Carac, G.; German, N.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new method for the visualization of the activity of red-ox proteins on a gold interface. Glucose oxidase was selected as a model system. Surfaces were modified by adhesion of glucose oxidase on (a) electrochemically cleaned gold; (b) gold films modified with gold nanoparticles, (c) a gold surface modified with self-assembled monolayer, and (d) covalent immobilization of protein on the gold surface modified with a self-assembled monolayer. The simple optical method for the visualization of enzyme on the surfaces is based on the enzymatic formation of polypyrrole. The activity of the enzyme was quantified via enzymatic formation of polypyrrole, which was detected and investigated by quartz microbalance and amperometric techniques. The experimental data suggest that the enzymatic formation of the polymer may serve as a method to indicate the adhesion of active redox enzyme on such surfaces. (author)

  5. Generating Converged Accurate Free Energy Surfaces for Chemical Reactions with a Force-Matched Semiempirical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P; Pietrucci, Fabio; Saitta, Antonino Marco; Goldman, Nir

    2018-04-10

    We demonstrate the capability of creating robust density functional tight binding (DFTB) models for chemical reactivity in prebiotic mixtures through force matching to short time scale quantum free energy estimates. Molecular dynamics using density functional theory (DFT) is a highly accurate approach to generate free energy surfaces for chemical reactions, but the extreme computational cost often limits the time scales and range of thermodynamic states that can feasibly be studied. In contrast, DFTB is a semiempirical quantum method that affords up to a thousandfold reduction in cost and can recover DFT-level accuracy. Here, we show that a force-matched DFTB model for aqueous glycine condensation reactions yields free energy surfaces that are consistent with experimental observations of reaction energetics. Convergence analysis reveals that multiple nanoseconds of combined trajectory are needed to reach a steady-fluctuating free energy estimate for glycine condensation. Predictive accuracy of force-matched DFTB is demonstrated by direct comparison to DFT, with the two approaches yielding surfaces with large regions that differ by only a few kcal mol -1 .

  6. Formation of Mg(OH)2 nanowhiskers on LTA zeolite surfaces using a sol–gel method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Junqiang

    2011-09-20

    A facile three step sol-gel-precipitation process is used to synthesize Mg(OH)2 nanowhiskers on micron-sized zeolite 5A particle surfaces at room temperature. The putative amorphous gelation product, Mg(OH) n(OR)2-n, forms first by a controlled hydrolysis and condensation reaction involving magnesium isopropoxide and water, ultimately leading to precipitation to form Mg(OH)2 structures on the zeolite surface. The optimum conditions for one dimensional Mg(OH)2 whisker formation are found to be six times the stoichiometric amount of water using 1 M HCl as the catalyst for the sol-gel reaction. The one-dimensional Mg(OH) 2 whiskers have an average diameter of 5-10 nm and length of 50-100 nm. The zeolite micropores are not affected by the Mg(OH)2 whiskers formed on the surface. The surface roughened zeolite 5A, with a Mg(OH) 2 content of about 9 wt%, showed improved adhesion between the zeolite and the polymer in a mixed-matrix composite membrane. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  7. Adsorption and surface reaction of bis-diethylaminosilane as a Si precursor on an OH-terminated Si (0 0 1) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung-Bin; Kim, Dae-Hee; Kim, Yeong-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption and the surface reaction of bis-diethylaminosilane (SiH 2 [N(C 2 H 5 ) 2 ] 2 , BDEAS) as a Si precursor on an OH-terminated Si (0 0 1) surface were investigated to understand the initial reaction mechanism of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) process using density functional theory. The bond dissociation energies between two atoms in BDEAS increased in the order of Si-H, Si-N, and the rest of the bonds. Therefore, the relatively weak Si-H and Si-N bonds were considered for bond breaking during the surface reaction. Optimum locations of BDEAS for the Si-H and Si-N bond breaking were determined on the surface, and adsorption energies of 0.43 and 0.60 eV, respectively, were obtained. The Si-H bond dissociation energy of the adsorbed BDEAS on the surface did not decrease, so that a high reaction energy barrier of 1.60 eV was required. On the other hand, the Si-N bond dissociation energy did decrease, so that a relatively low reaction energy barrier of 0.52 eV was required. When the surface reaction energy barrier was higher than the adsorption energy, BDEAS would be desorbed from the surface instead of being reacted. Therefore, the Si-N bond breaking would be dominantly involved during the surface reaction, and the result is in good agreement with the experimental data in the literature.

  8. Chemical waves in the O2 + H2 reaction on a Rh(111) surface alloyed with nickel. II. Photoelectron spectroscopy and microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinsky, Tim; Homann, Mathias; von Boehn, Bernhard; Gregoratti, Luca; Amati, Matteo; Al-Hada, Mohamed; Sezen, Hikmet; Imbihl, Ronald

    2018-04-01

    Chemical waves in the H2 + O2 reaction on a Rh(111) surface alloyed with Ni [ΘNi chemical attraction between O and Ni, has been explained with a phase separation of the oxygen covered Rh(111)/Ni surface into a 3D-Ni oxide and into a Ni poor metallic phase. Macroscopic NiO islands (≈1 μm size) formed under reaction conditions have been identified as 2D-Ni oxide. Titration experiments of the oxygen covered Rh(111)/Ni surface with H2 demonstrated that the reactivity of oxygen is decreased by an order of magnitude through the addition of 0.6 ML Ni. An excitation mechanism is proposed in which the periodic formation and reduction of NiO modulate the catalytic activity.

  9. Mechanisms and energetics of surface reactions at the copper-water interface. A critical literature review with implications for the debate on corrosion of copper in anoxic water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Adam Johannes; Brinck, Tore [Applied Physical Chemistry, KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    In order to make a critical analysis of the discussion of corrosion of copper in pure anoxic water it is necessary to understand the chemical reactivity at the copper-water interface. Even though the most fundamental issue, i.e. the nature and existence of a hypothetical product that is thermodynamically stable, is still under debate, it is clear that if anoxic corrosion really exists, it must be initiated through oxidative surface reactions at the copper-water interface. This report presents a survey of the peer reviewed literature on the reactivity of copper surfaces in water. Reactions discussed involve molecular adsorption of water, dissociation of the OH-bonds in adsorbed water molecules and hydroxyl groups, the disproportionation/synproportionation equilibrium between hydroxyl groups/hydroxide ions, water molecules and atomic oxygen, the surface diffusion of adsorbed species, and the formation of hydrogen gas (molecular hydrogen). Experimental, as well as theoretical (quantum chemical) studies are reviewed. It is concluded that a limited amount of hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) should be formed as the result of dissociative water adsorption at certain copper surfaces. Quantitative estimates of the amounts of H2 that could form at the copper-water interface are made. Assuming that the water-cleavage/hydrogen-formation reaction proceeds on an ideal [110] or [100] surface until a hydroxyl monolayer (ML) is reached, the amount of H{sub 2} formed is {approx} 2.4 ng cm{sup -2} copper surface. Based on the literature cited, this is most likely possible, thermodynamically as well as kinetically. Although not proven, it is not unlikely that the reaction can proceed until an oxide ML is formed, which would give 4.8 ng cm{sup -2}. If the formation of an oxide ML is thermodynamically feasible the surface will probably react further, since Cu{sub 2}O(s) is known to activate and cleave the water molecule when it adsorbs at the Cu{sub 2}O(s) surface. Assuming the formation of a

  10. Aldimine Formation Reaction, the First Step of the Maillard Early-phase Reaction, Might be Enhanced in Variant Hemoglobin, Hb Himeji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Masafumi; Inada, Shinya; Shimizu, Sayoko; Hatazaki, Masahiro; Umayahara, Yutaka; Nishihara, Eijun

    2015-01-01

    Hb Himeji (β140Ala→Asp) is known as a variant hemoglobin in which glycation is enhanced and HbA1c measured by immunoassay shows a high value. The phenomenon of enhanced glycation in Hb Himeji is based on the fact that the glycation product of variant hemoglobin (HbX1c) shows a higher value than HbA1c. In this study, we investigated whether aldimine formation reaction, the first step of the Maillard early-phase reaction, is enhanced in Hb Himeji in vitro. Three non-diabetic subjects with Hb Himeji and four non-diabetic subjects without variant hemoglobin were enrolled. In order to examine aldimine formation reaction, whole blood cells were incubated with 500 mg/dl of glucose at 37°C for 1 hour and were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Both HbA1c and HbX1c were not increased in this condition. After incubation with glucose, labile HbA1c (LA1c) fraction increased in the controls (1.1±0.3%). In subjects with Hb Himeji increases in the labile HbX1c (LX1c) fraction as well as the LA1c fraction were observed, and the degree of increase in the LX1c fraction was significantly higher than that of the LA1c fraction (1.8±0.1% vs. 0.5±0.2%, Preaction might be enhanced in Hb Himeji in vitro. The 140th amino acid in β chain of hemoglobin is suggested to be involved in aldimine formation reaction. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  11. Quantum chemical and thermodynamic calculations of fulvic and humic copper complexes in reactions of malachite and azurite formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomin, Vitaliy N.; Gogol, Daniil B.; Rozhkovoy, Ivan E.; Ponomarev, Dmitriy L.

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a thermodynamic evaluation of the reactions of humic and fulvic acids in the process of malachite and azurite mineralogenesis. Semi-empirical methods AM/1, MNDO, PM3, PM5, PM6 and PM7 were used to compute the heat of formation, enthalpy and entropy for thermodynamic calculations of the reactions performed on the basis of Hess's law. It is shown that methods PM6 and PM7 in the MOPAC software package provide good compliance with experimental and calculated heats of formation for copper complexes and alkaline earth metal complexes with organic acids. It is found that the malachite and azurite formation processes involving humus complexing substances are thermodynamically possible. - Highlights: • Copper and alkali-earth metal complexes with humic and fulvic acids are considered. • Quantum chemical calculation of thermodynamics for the structures was performed. • Semi-empirical methods PM6 and PM7 provide best correlation for the properties. • Parameters of basic copper carbonate formation reactions were obtained by Hess's law. • Processes of malachite and azurite formation from humus complexes are possible.

  12. Chicken Juice Enhances Surface Attachment and Biofilm Formation of Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Helen L.; Reuter, Mark; Salt, Louise J.; Cross, Kathryn L.; Betts, Roy P.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is primarily transmitted via the consumption of contaminated foodstuffs, especially poultry meat. In food processing environments, C. jejuni is required to survive a multitude of stresses and requires the use of specific survival mechanisms, such as biofilms. An initial step in biofilm formation is bacterial attachment to a surface. Here, we investigated the effects of a chicken meat exudate (chicken juice) on C. jejuni surface attachment and biofilm formation. Supplementation of brucella broth with ≥5% chicken juice resulted in increased biofilm formation on glass, polystyrene, and stainless steel surfaces with four C. jejuni isolates and one C. coli isolate in both microaerobic and aerobic conditions. When incubated with chicken juice, C. jejuni was both able to grow and form biofilms in static cultures in aerobic conditions. Electron microscopy showed that C. jejuni cells were associated with chicken juice particulates attached to the abiotic surface rather than the surface itself. This suggests that chicken juice contributes to C. jejuni biofilm formation by covering and conditioning the abiotic surface and is a source of nutrients. Chicken juice was able to complement the reduction in biofilm formation of an aflagellated mutant of C. jejuni, indicating that chicken juice may support food chain transmission of isolates with lowered motility. We provide here a useful model for studying the interaction of C. jejuni biofilms in food chain-relevant conditions and also show a possible mechanism for C. jejuni cell attachment and biofilm initiation on abiotic surfaces within the food chain. PMID:25192991

  13. Non-thermal desorption from interstellar dust grains via exothermic surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrod, R. T.; Wakelam, V.; Herbst, E.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:The gas-phase abundance of methanol in dark quiescent cores in the interstellar medium cannot be explained by gas-phase chemistry. In fact, the only possible synthesis of this species appears to be production on the surfaces of dust grains followed by desorption into the gas. Yet, evaporation is inefficient for heavy molecules such as methanol at the typical temperature of 10 K. It is necessary then to consider non-thermal mechanisms for desorption. But, if such mechanisms are considered for the production of methanol, they must be considered for all surface species. Methods: Our gas-grain network of reactions has been altered by the inclusion of a non-thermal desorption mechanism in which the exothermicity of surface addition reactions is utilized to break the bond between the product species and the surface. Our estimated rate for this process derives from a simple version of classical unimolecular rate theory with a variable parameter only loosely constrained by theoretical work. Results: Our results show that the chemistry of dark clouds is altered slightly at times up to 106 yr, mainly by the enhancement in the gas-phase abundances of hydrogen-rich species such as methanol that are formed on grain surfaces. At later times, however, there is a rather strong change. Instead of the continuing accretion of most gas-phase species onto dust particles, a steady-state is reached for both gas-phase and grain-surface species, with significant abundances for the former. Nevertheless, most of the carbon is contained in an undetermined assortment of heavy surface hydrocarbons. Conclusions: The desorption mechanism discussed here will be better constrained by observational data on pre-stellar cores, where a significant accretion of species such as CO has already occurred.

  14. Understanding the mechanisms of solid-water reactions through analysis of surface topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandstra, Joel Z; Brantley, Susan L

    2015-12-01

    The topography of a reactive surface contains information about the reactions that form or modify the surface and, therefore, it should be possible to characterize reactivity using topography parameters such as surface area, roughness, or fractal dimension. As a test of this idea, we consider a two-dimensional (2D) lattice model for crystal dissolution and examine a suite of topography parameters to determine which may be useful for predicting rates and mechanisms of dissolution. The model is based on the assumption that the reactivity of a surface site decreases with the number of nearest neighbors. We show that the steady-state surface topography in our model system is a function of, at most, two variables: the ratio of the rate of loss of sites with two neighbors versus three neighbors (d(2)/d(3)) and the ratio of the rate of loss of sites with one neighbor versus three neighbors (d(1)/d(3)). This means that relative rates can be determined from two parameters characterizing the topography of a surface provided that the two parameters are independent of one another. It also means that absolute rates cannot be determined from measurements of surface topography alone. To identify independent sets of topography parameters, we simulated surfaces from a broad range of d(1)/d(3) and d(2)/d(3) and computed a suite of common topography parameters for each surface. Our results indicate that the fractal dimension D and the average spacing between steps, E[s], can serve to uniquely determine d(1)/d(3) and d(2)/d(3) provided that sufficiently strong correlations exist between the steps. Sufficiently strong correlations exist in our model system when D>1.5 (which corresponds to D>2.5 for real 3D reactive surfaces). When steps are uncorrelated, surface topography becomes independent of step retreat rate and D is equal to 1.5. Under these conditions, measures of surface topography are not independent and any single topography parameter contains all of the available mechanistic

  15. Formation of the minor phase shell on the surface of hypermonotectic alloy powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.Z.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure evolution in an atomized hypermonotectic alloy drop is calculated. The results indicate that the formation of the minor phase shell on the surface of the powder is due to the heterogeneous nucleation of the minor phase droplets on the atomized drop surface and the resultant diffusional transfer of solute during the liquid-liquid phase transformation

  16. Numerical study on formation process of helical nonneutral plasmas using electron injection from outside magnetic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazutaka; Himura, Haruhiko; Masamune, Sadao; Sanpei, Akio; Isobe, Mitsutaka

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the formation process of helical nonneutral plasmas, we calculate the orbits of electron injected in the stochastic magnetic field when the closed helical magnetic surfaces is correspond with the equipotential surfaces. Contrary to the experimental observation, there are no electrons inward penetrating. (author)

  17. Mechanism of deposit formation on fuel-wetted metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stavinoha, L.L.; Westbrook, S.R.; McInnis, L.A. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Experiments were performed in a Single-Tube Heat Exchanger (STHE) apparatus and a Hot Liquid Process Simulator (HLPS) configured and operated to meet Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester (JFTOT) ASTM D 3241 requirements. The HLPS-JFTOT heater tubes used were 1018 mild steel, 316 stainless steel (SS), 304 stainless steel (SS), and 304 SS tubes coated with aluminum, magnesium, gold, and copper. A low-sulfur Jet A fuel with a breakpoint temperature of 254{degrees}C was used to create deposits on the heater tubes at temperatures of 300{degrees}C, 340{degrees}C, and 380{degrees}C. Deposit thickness was measured by dielectric breakdown voltage and Auger ion milling. Pronounced differences between the deposit thickness measuring techniques suggested that both the Auger milling rate and the dielectric strength of the deposit may be affected by deposit morphology/composition (such as metal ions that may have become included in the bulk of the deposit). Carbon burnoff data were obtained as a means of judging the validity of DMD-derived deposit evaluations. ESCA data suggest that the thinnest deposit was on the magnesium-coated test tube. The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs showed marked variations in the deposit morphology and the results suggested that surface composition has a significant effect on the mechanism of deposition. The most dramatic effect observed was that the bulk of deposits moved to tube locations of lower temperature as the maximum temperature of the tube was increased from 300{degrees} to 380{degrees}C, also verified in a single-tube heat exchanger. The results indicate that the deposition rate and quantity at elevated temperatures is not completely temperature dependent, but is limited by the concentration of dissolved oxygen and/or reactive components in the fuel over a temperature range.

  18. Effect of Reaction Conditions on the Surface Modification of Cellulose Nanofibrils with Aminopropyl Triethoxysilane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Robles

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nine different surface modifications of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (ATS by using three different solvent systems (water, ethanol, and a mixture of both were investigated. The effect of reaction conditions, such as silane to cellulose ratio and solvent type were evaluated to determine their contribution to the extent of the silane modification. Nanofibril properties were evaluated by infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, surface free energy, thermogravimetry, 13C and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance, and electronic microscopy. The influence of the solvent in the solvolysis of the silane was reflected in the presence or absence of ethoxy groups in the silane. On the other hand, whereas the surface modification was increased directly proportionally to silane ratio on the reaction, the aggregation of nanofibrils was also increased, which can play a negative role in certain applications. The increment of silane modification also had substantial repercussions on the crystallinity of the nanofibrils by the addition of amorphous components to the crystalline unit; moreover, silane surface modifications enhanced the hydrophobic character of the nanofibrils.

  19. Computerized infrared spectroscopic study of surface reactions on selected lanthanide oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellisante, G.N.

    1982-01-01

    The natures of adsorption sites on La 2 O 3 , Nd 2 O 3 , and selected praseodymium oxides were investigated by examining surface reactions of probe molecules using computerized transmission ir spectroscopy on unsupported samples. Additionally, the rehydration/dehydration behavior and crystallographic phase transitions of these oxides were examined in pretreatment temperature experiments involving rehydration of the sesquioxides to hydroxides by water exposure. Following rehydration of La 2 O 3 to La(OH) 3 , the effect of increasing vacuum pretreatment temperature (350 to 1000 0 C) is to gradually remove surface hydroxyl and carbonate entities (up to 650 0 C), and increase the degree of A-type crystallinity. Increasing crystallinity causes a concomitant decrease in surface oxide basicity. The removal of hydroxyl and carbonate species, as well as increases in oxide basicity, strongly correlated to increases in certain catalytic activities. The adsorption of NH 3 , CO 2 , mixtures of NH 3 and CO 2 , formic acid, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, and ethanol on the oxides was determined to weakly coordinate in Ln 3 + sites, and the surface reactions are discussed. Heating was found to desorb the adsorbed compounds and/or causes changes of the originally adsorbed form into other compounds. The effects of temperature on both adsorption and desorption are reported

  20. Study on interfacial reaction between lead-free solders and alternative surface finishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Rabiatul Aisha; Ourdjini, A.; Saliza Osman

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the interfacial reactions occurring during reflow soldering between Sn-Ag-Cu lead-free solder and two surface finishes: electroless nickel/ immersion gold (ENIG) and immersion silver (IAg). The study focuses on interfacial reactions evolution and growth kinetics of intermetallic compounds (IMC) formed during soldering and isothermal ageing at 150 degree Celsius for up to 2000 hours. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to measure IMC thickness and examine the morphology of IMC respectively, whereas the IMC phases were identified by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The results showed that the IMC formed on ENIG finish is thinner compared to that formed on IAg finish. For IAg surface finish, Cu 6 Sn 5 IMCs with scallop morphology are formed at the solder/ surface finish interface after reflow while a second IMC, Cu 3 Sn was formed between the copper and Cu 6 Sn 5 IMC after the isothermal ageing treatment. For ENIG surface finish both (Cu,Ni) 6 Sn 5 and (Ni,Cu) 3 Sn 4 are formed after soldering. Isothermal aging of the solder joints formed on ENIG finish was found to have a significant effect on the morphology of the intermetallics by transforming to more spherical and denser morphology in addition to increase i their thickness with increased ageing time. (author)

  1. Biofilm Formation of Staphylococcus aureus on Various Surfaces and Their Resistance to Chlorine Sanitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Su; Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Sook-Young; Lee, Sun-Young

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of material types (polystyrene, polypropylene, glass, and stainless steel) and glucose addition on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation, and the relationship between biofilm formation measured by crystal violet (CV) staining and the number of biofilm cells determined by cell counts was studied. We also evaluated the efficacy of chlorine sanitizer on inhibiting various different types of S. aureus biofilms on the surface of stainless steel. Levels of biofilm formation of S. aureus were higher on hydrophilic surfaces (glass and stainless steel) than on hydrophobic surfaces (polypropylene and polystyrene). With the exception of biofilm formed on glass, the addition of glucose in broth significantly increased the biofilm formation of S. aureus on all surfaces and for all tested strains (P ≤ 0.05). The number of biofilm cells was not correlated with the biomass of the biofilms determined using the CV staining method. The efficacy of chlorine sanitizer against biofilm of S. aureus was not significantly different depending on types of biofilm (P > 0.05). Therefore, further studies are needed in order to determine an accurate method quantifying levels of bacterial biofilm and to evaluate the resistance of bacterial biofilm on the material surface. Biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus on the surface was different depending on the surface characteristics and S. aureus strains. There was low correlation between crystal violet staining method and viable counts technique for measuring levels of biofilm formation of S. aureus on the surfaces. These results could provide helpful information for finding and understanding the quantification method and resistance of bacterial biofilm on the surface. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Crossed-beam reaction of carbon atoms with hydrocarbon molecules. IV. Chemical dynamics of methylpropargyl radical formation, C4H5, from reaction of C(3Pj) with propylene, C3H6 (X1A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, R.I.; Stranges, D.; Bevsek, H.M.; Lee, Y.T.; Suits, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The reaction between ground state carbon atoms and propylene, C 3 H 6 , was studied at average collision energies of 23.3 and 45.0 kJmol -1 using the crossed molecular beam technique. Product angular distributions and time-of-flight spectra of C 4 H 5 at m/e=53 were recorded. Forward-convolution fitting of the data yields a maximum energy release as well as angular distributions consistent with the formation of methylpropargyl radicals. Reaction dynamics inferred from the experimental results suggest that the reaction proceeds on the lowest 3 A surface via an initial addition of the carbon atom to the π-orbital to form a triplet methylcyclopropylidene collision complex followed by ring opening to triplet 1,2-butadiene. Within 0.3 endash 0.6 ps, 1,2-butadiene decomposes through carbon endash hydrogen bond rupture to atomic hydrogen and methylpropargyl radicals. The explicit identification of C 4 H 5 under single collision conditions represents a further example of a carbon endash hydrogen exchange in reactions of ground state carbon with unsaturated hydrocarbons. This versatile machine represents an alternative pathway to build up unsaturated hydrocarbon chains in combustion processes, chemical vapor deposition, and in the interstellar medium. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  3. Formation of nanostructures on HOPG surface in presence of surfactant atom during low energy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjan, M., E-mail: ranjanm@ipr.res.in; Joshi, P.; Mukherjee, S.

    2016-07-15

    Low energy ions beam often develop periodic patterns on surfaces under normal or off-normal incidence. Formation of such periodic patterns depends on the substrate material, the ion beam parameters, and the processing conditions. Processing conditions introduce unwanted contaminant atoms, which also play strong role in pattern formation by changing the effective sputtering yield of the material. In this work we have analysed the effect of Cu, Fe and Al impurities introduced during low energy Ar{sup +} ion irradiation on HOPG substrate. It is observed that by changing the species of foreign atoms the surface topography changes drastically. The observed surface topography is co-related with the modified sputtering yield of HOPG. Presence of Cu and Fe amplify the effective sputtering yield of HOPG, so that the required threshold for the pattern formation is achieved with the given fluence, whereas Al does not lead to any significant change in the effective yield and hence no pattern formation occurs.

  4. Formation of iodo-trihalomethanes, iodo-acetic acids, and iodo-acetamides during chloramination of iodide-containing waters: Factors influencing formation and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shaogang [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuang-qing Road, Beijing, 100085 (China); Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Food Safety and Pharmaceutical Analytical Chemistry, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Chemistry and Engineering of Forest Products, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University for Nationalities, Nanning, 530006, Guangxi (China); Li, Zhenlin [Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Food Safety and Pharmaceutical Analytical Chemistry, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Chemistry and Engineering of Forest Products, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University for Nationalities, Nanning, 530006, Guangxi (China); Dong, Huiyu [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuang-qing Road, Beijing, 100085 (China); Goodman, Bernard A. [College of Physical Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agro-Bioresources, Guangxi University, Nanning, 520004, Guangxi (China); Qiang, Zhimin, E-mail: qiangz@rcees.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuang-qing Road, Beijing, 100085 (China)

    2017-01-05

    This study investigated systematically the factors influencing the formation of iodinated disinfection by-products (I-DBPs) during chloramination of I{sup −}-containing waters, including reaction time, NH{sub 2}Cl dose, I{sup −} concentration, pH, natural organic matter (NOM) concentration, Br{sup −}/I{sup −} molar ratio, and water matrix. Among the I-DBPs detected, iodoform (CHI{sub 3}), iodoacetic acid (IAA), diiodoacetic acid (DIAA), triiodoacetic acid (TIAA), and diiodoacetamide (DIAcAm) were the major species produced from reactions between reactive iodine species (HOI/I{sub 2}) and NOM. A kinetic model involving the reactions of NH{sub 2}Cl auto-decomposition, iodine species transformation and NOM consumption was developed, which could well describe NH{sub 2}Cl decay and HOI/I{sub 2} evolution. Higher concentrations of CHI{sub 3}, IAA, DIAA, TIAA, and DIAcAm were observed in chloramination than in chlorination, whereas IO{sub 3}{sup −} was only formed significantly in chlorination. Maximum formation of I-DBPs occurred at pH 8.0, but acidic conditions favored the formation of iodinated haloacetic acids and DIAcAm. Increasing Br{sup −}/I{sup −} molar ratio from 1 to 10 did not increase the total amount of I-DBPs, but produced more bromine-substituting species. In addition, chloramination of 18 model compounds indicated that low-SUVA{sub 254} (specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm) NOM generally favored the formation of I-DBPs compared to high-SUVA{sub 254} NOM. Finally, potential pathways for I-DBPs formation from chloramination of NOM were proposed.

  5. Surface structure-dependent pyrite oxidation in relatively dry and moist air: Implications for the reaction mechanism and sulfur evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianxi; Xian, Haiyang; Lin, Xiaoju; Tang, Hongmei; Du, Runxiang; Yang, Yiping; Zhu, Runliang; Liang, Xiaoliang; Wei, Jingming; Teng, H. Henry; He, Hongping

    2018-05-01

    Pyrite oxidation not only is environmentally significant in the formation of acid mine (or acid rock) drainage and oxidative acidification of lacustrine sediment but also is a critical stage in geochemical sulfur evolution. The oxidation process is always controlled by the reactivity of pyrite, which in turn is controlled by its surface structure. In this study, the oxidation behavior of naturally existing {1 0 0}, {1 1 1}, and {2 1 0} facets of pyrite was investigated using a comprehensive approach combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry with periodic density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations. The experimental results show that (i) the initial oxidation rates of both pyrite {1 1 1} and {2 1 0} are much greater than that of pyrite {1 0 0}; (ii) the initial oxidation rate of pyrite {2 1 0} is greater than that of pyrite {1 1 1} in low relative humidity, which is reversed in high relative humidity; and (iii) inner sphere oxygen-bearing sulfur species are originally generated from surface reactions and then converted to outer sphere species. The facet dependent rate law can be expressed as: r{hkl} =k{hkl}haP0.5(t + 1) - 0.5 , where r{hkl} is the orientation dependent reaction rate, k{hkl} is the orientation dependent rate constant, h is the relative humidity, P is the oxygen partial pressure, and t is the oxidation time in seconds. {1 1 1} is the most sensitive facet for pyrite oxidation. Combined with DFT theoretical investigations, water catalyzed electron transfer is speculated as the rate-limiting step. These findings disclose the structure-reactivity dependence of pyrite, which not only presents new insight into the mechanism of pyrite oxidation but also provides fundamental data to evaluate sulfur speciation evolution, suggesting that the surface structure sensitivity should be considered to estimate the reactivity at the mineral

  6. Effects of surface properties on droplet formation inside a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Ben; Shen, Amy

    2004-11-01

    Micro-fluidic devices offer a unique method of creating and controlling droplets on small length scales. A microfluidic device is used to study the effects of surface properties on droplet formation of a 2-phase flow system. Four phase diagrams are generated to compare the dynamics of the 2 immiscible fluid system (silicone oil and water) inside microchannels with different surface properties. Results show that the channel surface plays an important role in determining the flow patterns and the droplet formation of the 2-phase fluid system.

  7. Surface relief grating formation on a single crystal of 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Hideyuki; Tanino, Takahiro; Shirota, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Surface relief grating (SRG) formation on an organic single crystal by irradiation with two coherent laser beams has been demonstrated by using 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene (DAAB). It was found that the SRG formation was greatly depending upon both the coordination of the crystal and the polarization of the writing beams. The dependence of the polarization of writing beams on the SRG formation using the single crystal was found to be quite different from that reported for amorphous polymers and photochromic amorphous molecular materials, suggesting that the mechanism of the SRG formation on the organic crystal is somewhat different from that on amorphous materials

  8. Novel ion-molecular surface reaction to result in CH3 adsorbates on (111) surface of chemical vapor deposition diamond from ethane and surface anionic sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Shojiro; Okada, Katsuyuki; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Moriyoshi, Yusuke

    2001-01-01

    The existence of CH 3 adsorbates on (111) surface of chemical vapor deposited diamond, which was observed by scanning tunneling microscopy, was explained by the following S N 2 (bimolecular, substitutional, and nucleophilic) type surface reaction; C(s) - +C 2 H 6 ->C(s)-CH 3 +CH 3 - , where C(s) denotes a surface carbon atom. The activation energy was estimated to be 36.78 kcal/mol and the reaction proved to be exothermic with the enthalpy change of -9.250 kcal/mol, according to ab initio molecular orbital calculations at MP2/3-21+G * //RHF/3-21G * level; this result is consistent with typical substrate temperatures, namely about 900 degree C, for chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Charge transfer from the highest occupied molecular orbital of the surface anionic site to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of ethane, that is antibonding at the CH 3 - CH 3 bond, has been clearly visualized. A characteristic configuration of an ethane molecule which is associated with an anionic vacant site C(s) - on hydrogenated (111) surface of diamond was also found. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  9. Formation of Nanostructures on the Nickel Metal Surface in Ionic Liquid under Anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, O. K.; Root, N. V.; Kultin, D. Yu.; Kalmykov, K. B.; Kustov, L. M.

    2018-05-01

    The formation of nanostructures in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide on the surface of a nickel electrode during anodizing was studied. Hexagonal ordered surface nanostructures were found to form in a narrow range of current densities. The form of the potential transients of the nickel electrode corresponded to the morphology of the nickel surface obtained which was studied by electron microscopy. No other types of nanostructures were found under the electrosynthesis conditions under study.

  10. Influence of surface finish on the plasma formation at the skin explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datsko, I M; Chaikovsky, S A; Labetskaya, N A; Rybka, D V; Oreshkin, V I; Khishchenko, K V

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports on experiments to investigate how the quality of surface finish, i.e., surface roughness, influences the plasma formation in a skin explosion of conductors. The experiments were performed on a MIG terawatt generator with a current amplitude of up to 2.5 MA and current rise time of 100 ns. The plasma formation at the conductor surface and the evolution of the plasma boundary was recorded using a four-frame optical camera with an exposure time of 3 ns per frame. It is shown that the quality of surface finish little affects the onset of plasma formation in a skin explosion of stainless steel and St3 steel conductors at a magnetic field of up to 400 T. (paper)

  11. Surface area-burnoff correlation for the steam--graphite reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, W.A. Jr.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1977-01-01

    The oxidation of core graphite by steam of air represents a problem area of significant concern in safety analyses for the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). Core and core-support graphite integrity and strength deteriorate with oxidation of the graphite, and oxidation furthermore could affect the rate of fission product release under upset conditions. Consequently, modeling of core response during steam or air ingress conditions requires an expression for the rate of graphite interaction with those impurities. The steam--graphite reaction in particular is a complex interaction of mass transport within the graphite with chemi-sorption and reaction on accessible surfaces; experimental results from graphite to graphite are highly variable, and the description of the reaction is not yet completely consistent. A simple etch pit model relating surface area to burnoff has been proposed and shown to provide reasonable correlation with experimental data obtained from steam oxidation studies of nuclear grade H-327 graphite. Unaccounted differences between theory and experiment arise at burnoffs exceeding 3 to 5 percent. The model, while not complete nor comprehensive, is consistent with experimental observations of graphite oxidation by O 2 (air), CO 2 , or H 2 O, and could have some utility in safety analysis

  12. Noise-and delay-induced phase transitions of the dimer–monomer surface reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chunhua; Wang Hua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We study the dimer–monomer surface reaction model. ► We show that noise induces first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT). ► Combination of noise and time-delayed feedback induce first- and second-order IPT. ► First- and second-order IPT is viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions. - Abstract: The effects of noise and time-delayed feedback in the dimer–monomer (DM) surface reaction model are investigated. Applying small delay approximation, we construct a stochastic delayed differential equation and its Fokker–Planck equation to describe the state evolution of the DM reaction model. We show that the noise can only induce first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT) characteristic of the DM model, however the combination of the noise and time-delayed feedback can simultaneously induce first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model. Therefore, it is shown that the well-known first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model may be viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions.

  13. Vibrational Mode-Specific Reaction of Methane with a Nickel Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Rainer

    2004-03-01

    The dissociation of methane on a nickel catalyst is a key step in steam reforming of natural gas for hydrogen production. Despite substantial effort in both experiment and theory, there is still no atomic scale description of this important gas-surface reaction. To elucidate its dynamics, we have performed quantum state resolved studies of vibrationally excited methane reacting on the Ni(100) surface using pulsed laser and molecular beam techniques. We observed up to a factor of 5 greater reaction probability for methane-d2 with two quanta of excitation in one C-H bond versus a nearly isoenergetic state with one quanta in each of two C-H bonds. The observed reactivities point to a transition state structure which has one of the C-H bonds significantly elongated. Our results also clearly exclude the possibility of statistical models correctly describing the mechanism of this process and emphasize the importance of full-dimensional calculations of the reaction dynamics.

  14. Aging promotes todorokite formation from layered manganese oxide at near-surface conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Haojie [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Urban Environment and Health; Huazhong Agricultural Univ., Ministry of Agriculture, Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment; Liu, Fan; Feng, Xionghan; Tan, Wenfeng [Huazhong Agricultural Univ., Ministry of Agriculture, Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment; Wang, Ming Kuang [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (China). Dept. of Agricultural Chemistry

    2010-12-15

    Todorokite is one common manganese oxide in soils and sediments and is commonly formed from layered Na-buserite. Aging processes can alter the physicochemical properties of freshly formed Na-buserite in natural environments. However, it is not clear whether and how aging affects the formation of todorokites. In the present paper, Na-buserite with aging treatment was employed to prepare todorokite at atmospheric pressure to investigate the effects of aging treatment of Na-buserite on the formation of todorokite. Four aged Na-buserite samples, which are produced through oxidation of Mn{sup 2+} in concentrated NaOH medium by O{sub 2} with aging for 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, were employed to investigate the effects of aging processes on the transformation from Na-buserite to todorokite by Mg{sup 2+}-templating reaction at atmospheric pressure. The manganese oxides were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), elemental analysis, determinations of the average manganese oxidation number, infrared spectroscopy (IR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The XRD, IR, and elemental analyses indicate that aging treatment can alter the substructure of the freshly synthesized Na-buserite. During the aging process, some of the Mn(III) may migrate into the interlayer region or disproportionate to form Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 4+} from the layer of Na-buserite and the concomitant formation of layer vacancies. The interlayer Mn{sup 3+} or Mn{sup 2+} occupied above or below the layer vacancy sites and become corner-sharing octahedral. XRD analyses and TEM clearly show that the transformation from Na-buserite to todorokite was promoted by aging treatments. The alterations of substructure of aged Na-buserites can promote the rearrangement of manganese to construct a tunnel structure during the transformation from layered manganese oxides to tunnel-structure todorokite at atmospheric pressure. The transformation from Na-buserite to todorokite was promoted by aging treatments at

  15. Computational study of ethanol adsorption and reaction over rutile TiO2 (110) surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Muir, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the modes of adsorption and the associated changes in electronic structures of renewable organic compounds are needed in order to understand the fundamentals behind surface reactions of catalysts for future energies. Using planewave density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the adsorption of ethanol on perfect and O-defected TiO 2 rutile (110) surfaces was examined. On both surfaces the dissociative adsorption mode on five-fold coordinated Ti cations (Ti 4+ 5c) was found to be more favourable than the molecular adsorption mode. On the stoichiometric surface E ads was found to be equal to 0.85 eV for the ethoxide mode and equal to 0.76 eV for the molecular mode. These energies slightly increased when adsorption occurred on the Ti 4+ 5c closest to the O-defected site. However, both considerably increased when adsorption occurred at the removed bridging surface O; interacting with Ti 3+ cations. In this case the dissociative adsorption becomes strongly favoured (E ads = 1.28 eV for molecular adsorption and 2.27 eV for dissociative adsorption). Geometry and electronic structures of adsorbed ethanol were analysed in detail on the stoichiometric surface. Ethanol does not undergo major changes in its structure upon adsorption with its C-O bond rotating nearly freely on the surface. Bonding to surface Ti atoms is a σ type transfer from the O2p of the ethanol-ethoxide species. Both ethanol and ethoxide present potential hole traps on O lone pairs. Charge density and work function analyses also suggest charge transfer from the adsorbate to the surface, in which the dissociative adsorptions show a larger charge transfer than the molecular adsorption mode. This journal is © 2012 the Owner Societies.

  16. N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation during ozonation of N,N-dimethylhydrazine compounds: Reaction kinetics, mechanisms, and implications for NDMA formation control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sungeun; Lee, Woongbae; Na, Soyoung; Shin, Jaedon; Lee, Yunho

    2016-11-15

    Compounds with N,N-dimethylhydrazine moieties ((CH 3 ) 2 N-N-) form N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) during ozonation, but the relevant reaction chemistry is hitherto poorly understood. This study investigated the reaction kinetics and mechanisms of NDMA formation during ozonation of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) and daminozide (DMZ) as structural model N,N-dimethylhydrazine compounds. The reaction of ozone with these NDMA precursor compounds was fast, and k O3 at pH 7 was 2 × 10 6  M -1  s -1 for UDMH and 5 × 10 5  M -1  s -1 for DMZ. Molar NDMA yields (i.e., Δ[NDMA]/Δ[precursor] × 100) were 84% and 100% for UDMH and DMZ, respectively, determined at molar ozone dose ratio ([O 3 ] 0 /[precursor] 0 ) of ≥4 in the presence of tert-butanol as hydroxyl radical (OH) scavenger. The molar NDMA yields decreased significantly in the absence of tert-butanol, indicating OH formation and its subsequent reaction with the parent precursors forming negligible NDMA. The k OH at pH 7 was 4.9 × 10 9  M -1  s -1 and 3.4 × 10 9  M -1  s -1 for UDMH and DMZ, respectively. Reaction mechanisms are proposed in which an ozone adduct is formed at the nitrogen next to N,N-dimethylamine which decomposes via homolytic and heterolytic cleavages of the -N + -O-O-O - bond, forming NDMA as a final product. The heterolytic cleavage pathway explains the significant OH formation via radical intermediates. Overall, significant NDMA formation was found to be unavoidable during ozonation or even O 3 /H 2 O 2 treatment of waters containing N,N-dimethylhydrazine compounds due to their rapid reaction with ozone forming NDMA with high yield. Thus, source control or pre-treatment of N,N-dimethylhydrazine precursors and post-treatment of NDMA are proposed as the mitigation options. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Roles of different initial Maillard intermediates and pathways in meat flavor formation for cysteine-xylose-glycine model reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li; Xie, Jianchun; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Mengyao; Fan, Mengdie; Xiao, Qunfei; Liang, Jingjing; Chen, Feng

    2017-10-01

    To explore initial Maillard reaction pathways and mechanisms for maximal formation of meaty flavors in heated cysteine-xylose-glycine systems, model reactions with synthesized initial Maillard intermediates, Gly-Amadori, TTCA (2-threityl-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids) and Cys-Amadori, were investigated. Relative relativities were characterized by spectrophotometrically monitoring the development of colorless degradation intermediates and browning reaction products. Aroma compounds formed were determined by solid-phase microextraction combined with GC-MS and GC-olfactometry. Gly-Amadori showed the fastest reaction followed by Cys-Amadori then TTCA. Free glycine accelerated reaction of TTCA, whereas cysteine inhibited that of Gly-Amadori due to association forming relatively stable thiazolidines. Cys-Amadori/Gly had the highest reactivity in development of both meaty flavors and brown products. TTCA/Gly favored yielding meaty flavors, whereas Gly-Amadori/Cys favored generation of brown products. Conclusively, initial formation of TTCA and pathway involving TTCA with glycine were more applicable to efficiently produce processed-meat flavorings in a cysteine-xylose-glycine system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Contribution to the U$_2$C$_3$ formation by the synthetic reaction and by the decomposition of UC$_2$; Beitrag zur U$_2$C$_3$-bildung nach der synthetischen reaktion und durch zerfall von UC$_2$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buschinelli, A. J.A.

    1974-06-01

    This work is a contribution to the study of the mechanism and of the kinetics of the U$_2$C$_3$ formation by the synthetic reaction. The influences of a mechanical and a thermical pre-treatment of the samples on the reaction kinetics were investigated and discussed taking into account other information from the literature. The relative increasing of the U$_2$C$_3$ nucleation rate due to the pulverization corresponds approximately to the surface enlargement of the pulverized material. The activation energy for the synthetic reaction in powder was found to be 94 +- 7 kcal/mol. The negative influence of nitrogen, oxygen and tungsten on the U$_2$C$_3$ formation was reported. In the decomposition of UC$_2$ to U$_2$C$_3$ and graphite, the influences of the morphology of the graphite precipitate and the fast neutron irradiation on the beginning of the U$_2$C$_3$ formation were also investigated.

  19. Challenge for real-time and real-space resolved spectroscopy of surface chemical reactions. Aiming at trace of irreversible and inhomogeneous reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    A novel experimental technique, time-resolved wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray imaging spectroscopy, is proposed in order to achieve real-time and real-space resolved spectroscopy for the observation of irreversible and inhomogeneous surface chemical reactions. By combining the wavelength-dispersed soft X rays, in which the X-ray wavelength (photon energy) changes as a function of position on the sample, with the photoelectron emission microscope, the soft X-ray absorption spectra are separately obtained at different positions on the sample without scanning the X-ray monochromator. Therefore, the real-time resolved measurement of site-selective soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy is realized in one event without repeating the chemical reaction. It is expected that the spatial distribution of different chemical species is traced during the surface chemical reaction, which is essential to understand the reaction mechanism. (author)

  20. Surface oxide formation during corona discharge treatment of AA 1050 aluminium surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minzari, Daniel; Møller, Per; Kingshott, Peter

    2008-01-01

    process modifies aluminium AA 1050 surface, the oxide growth and resulting corrosion properties. The corona treatment is carried out in atmospheric air. Treated surfaces are characterized using XPS, SEM/EDS, and FIB-FESEM and results suggest that an oxide layer is grown, consisting of mixture of oxide...

  1. The Mechanism of Redox Reaction between Palladium(II Complex Ions and Potassium Formate in Acidic Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojnicki M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics studies of redox reaction between palladium(II chloride complex ions and potassium formate in acidic aqueous solutions was investigated. It was shown, that the reduction reaction of Pd(II is selective in respect to Pd(II complex structure. The kinetic of the process was monitored spectrophotometrically. The influence of chloride ions concentration, Pd(II initial concentration, reductant concentration, ionic strength as well as the temperature were investigated in respect to the process dynamics. Arrhenius equation parameters were determined and are equal to 65.8 kJ/mol, and A = 1.12×1011 s−1.

  2. Study on reaction mechanism by analysis of kinetic energy spectra of light particles and formation of final products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, G.; Mandaglio, G.; Nasirov, A. K.; Anastasi, A.; Curciarello, F.; Fazio, G.

    2018-05-01

    The sensitivity of reaction mechanism in the formation of compound nucleus (CN) by the analysis of kinetic energy spectra of light particles and of reaction products are shown. The dependence of the P CN fusion probability of reactants and W sur survival probability of CN against fission at its deexcitation on the mass and charge symmetries in the entrance channel of heavy-ion collisions, as well as on the neutron numbers is discussed. The possibility of conducting a complex program of investigations of the complete fusion by reliable ways depends on the detailed and refined methods of experimental and theoretical analyses.

  3. Molecular treatment of the ion-pair formation reaction in H(1s) + H(1s) collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borondo, F.; Martin, F.; Yaez, M.

    1987-01-01

    All the available theoretical calculations of the cross section for the ion-pair formation reaction H(1s)+H(1s)..-->..H/sup +/H/sup -/(1s/sup 2/) have been performed using methods that are only valid at high collision energies. They get good agreement with the experiments for impact energies greater than 25 keV, but fail completely at smaller energies. In this work we report the cross section for this reaction at impact energies less than 10 keV, calculated in the framework of the impact-parameter approximation and using the molecular method with a common translation factor.

  4. Nonequilibrium transition and pattern formation in a linear reaction-diffusion system with self-regulated kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shibashis; Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2018-02-01

    We consider a reaction-diffusion system with linear, stochastic activator-inhibitor kinetics where the time evolution of concentration of a species at any spatial location depends on the relative average concentration of its neighbors. This self-regulating nature of kinetics brings in spatial correlation between the activator and the inhibitor. An interplay of this correlation in kinetics and disparity of diffusivities of the two species leads to symmetry breaking non-equilibrium transition resulting in stationary pattern formation. The role of initial noise strength and the linear reaction terms has been analyzed for pattern selection.

  5. Molecular treatment of the ion-pair formation reaction in H(1s) + H(1s) collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borondo, F.; Martin, F.; Yaez, M.

    1987-01-01

    All the available theoretical calculations of the cross section for the ion-pair formation reaction H(1s)+H(1s)→H + H - (1s 2 ) have been performed using methods that are only valid at high collision energies. They get good agreement with the experiments for impact energies greater than 25 keV, but fail completely at smaller energies. In this work we report the cross section for this reaction at impact energies less than 10 keV, calculated in the framework of the impact-parameter approximation and using the molecular method with a common translation factor

  6. The functional properties of chitosan-glucose-asparagine Maillard reaction products and mitigation of acrylamide formation by chitosans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Wen-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chou, Yu-Hao; Hsiao, Hsin-I

    2018-03-15

    This research aims to clarify the interactions that occur in a food model system consisting of glucose, asparagine and chitosans. Low molecular weight chitosan exerted a potent inhibitory effect (46.8%) on acrylamide and Maillard reaction products (MRPs) (>52.6%), respectively. Compared to a previous study conducted using the fructose system, the novel findings of this research demonstrate that the formation of acrylamide and Maillard reaction products was lower with glucose than with fructose when they were used as reducing sugars in food model systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. "Cleaning" the Surface of Hydroxyapatite Nanorods by a Reaction-Dissolution Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Binrui; Yang, Mingying; Wang, Lin; Xu, Hong; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-10-21

    Synthetic nanoparticles are always terminated with coating molecules, which are often cytotoxic and not desired in biomedicine. Here we propose a novel reaction-dissolution approach to remove the cytotoxic coating molecules. A two-component solution is added to the nanoparticle solution; one component reacts with the coating molecules to form a salt whereas another is a solvent for dissolving and thus removing the salt. As a proof of concept, this work uses a NaOH-ethanol solution to remove the cytotoxic linoleic acid molecules coated on the hydroxyapatite nanorods (HAP-NRs). The removal of the coating molecules not only significantly improves the biocompatibility of HAP-NRs but also enables their oriented attachment into tightly-bound superstructures, which mimic the organized HAP crystals in bone and enamel and can promote the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Our reaction-dissolution approach can be extended to the surface "cleaning" of other nanomaterials.

  8. Comparisons of predicted steady-state levels in rooms with extended- and local-reaction bounding surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Murray; Wareing, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    A combined beam-tracing and transfer-matrix model for predicting steady-state sound-pressure levels in rooms with multilayer bounding surfaces was used to compare the effect of extended- and local-reaction surfaces, and the accuracy of the local-reaction approximation. Three rooms—an office, a corridor and a workshop—with one or more multilayer test surfaces were considered. The test surfaces were a single-glass panel, a double-drywall panel, a carpeted floor, a suspended-acoustical ceiling, a double-steel panel, and glass fibre on a hard backing. Each test surface was modeled as of extended or of local reaction. Sound-pressure levels were predicted and compared to determine the significance of the surface-reaction assumption. The main conclusions were that the difference between modeling a room surface as of extended or of local reaction is not significant when the surface is a single plate or a single layer of material (solid or porous) with a hard backing. The difference is significant when the surface consists of multilayers of solid or porous material and includes a layer of fluid with a large thickness relative to the other layers. The results are partially explained by considering the surface-reflection coefficients at the first-reflection angles.

  9. Probing surface sites of TiO2: reactions with [HRe(CO)5] and [CH3Re(CO)5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo-Lapidus, Rodrigo J; Gates, Bruce C

    2010-10-04

    Two carbonyl complexes of rhenium, [HRe(CO)(5)] and [CH(3)Re(CO)(5)], were used to probe surface sites of TiO(2) (anatase). These complexes were adsorbed from the gas phase onto anatase powder that had been treated in flowing O(2) or under vacuum to vary the density of surface OH sites. Infrared (IR) spectra demonstrate the variation in the number of sites, including Ti(+3)-OH and Ti(+4)-OH. IR and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra show that chemisorption of the rhenium complexes led to their decarbonylation, with formation of surface-bound rhenium tricarbonyls, when [HRe(CO)(5)] was adsorbed, or rhenium tetracarbonyls, when [CH(3)Re(CO)(5)] was adsorbed. These reactions were accompanied by the formation of water and surface carbonates and removal of terminal hydroxyl groups associated with Ti(+3) and Ti(+4) ions on the anatase. Data characterizing the samples after adsorption of [HRe(CO)(5)] or [CH(3)Re(CO)(5)] determined a ranking of the reactivity of the surface OH sites, with the Ti(+3)-OH groups being the more reactive towards the rhenium complexes but the less likely to be dehydroxylated. The two rhenium pentacarbonyl probes provided complementary information, suggesting that the carbonate species originate from carbonyl ligands initially bonded to the rhenium and from hydroxyl groups of the titania surface, with the reaction leading to the formation of water and bridging hydroxyl groups on the titania. The results illustrate the value of using a family of organometallic complexes as probes of oxide surface sites.

  10. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Maciel Mattos de Oliveira

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4 stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 ºC and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was determined after 3, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 hours of biofilm formation and biotransfer potential from 96 hours. Stainless steel coupons were submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM after 3, 144 and 240 hours. Based on the number of adhered cells and SEM, it was observed that L. monocytogenes adhered rapidly to the stainless steel surface, with mature biofilm being formed after 240 hours. The biotransfer potential of bacterium to substrate occurred at all the stages analyzed. The rapid capacity of adhesion to surface, combined with biotransfer potential throughout the biofilm formation stages, make L. monocytogenes a potential risk to the food industry. Both the experimental model developed and the methodology used were efficient in the study of biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential.

  11. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Maíra Maciel Mattos; Brugnera, Danilo Florisvaldo; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2010-01-01

    An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4) stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 °C and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was determined after 3, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 hours of biofilm formation and biotransfer potential from 96 hours. Stainless steel coupons were submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) after 3, 144 and 240 hours. Based on the number of adhered cells and SEM, it was observed that L. monocytogenes adhered rapidly to the stainless steel surface, with mature biofilm being formed after 240 hours. The biotransfer potential of bacterium to substrate occurred at all the stages analyzed. The rapid capacity of adhesion to surface, combined with biotransfer potential throughout the biofilm formation stages, make L. monocytogenes a potential risk to the food industry. Both the experimental model developed and the methodology used were efficient in the study of biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential.

  12. Modelling of crater formation on anode surface by high-current vacuum arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yunbo; Wang, Zhenxing; Jiang, Yanjun; Ma, Hui; Liu, Zhiyuan; Geng, Yingsan; Wang, Jianhua; Nordlund, Kai; Djurabekova, Flyura

    2016-11-01

    Anode melting and crater formation significantly affect interruption of high-current vacuum arcs. The primary objective of this paper is to theoretically investigate the mechanism of anode surface crater formation, caused by the combined effect of surface heating during the vacuum arc and pressure exerted on the molten surface by ions and electrons from the arc plasma. A model of fluid flow and heat transfer in the arc anode is developed and combined with a magnetohydrodynamics model of the vacuum arc plasma. Crater formation is observed in simulation for a peak arcing current higher than 15 kA on 40 mm diam. Cu electrodes spaced 10 mm apart. The flow of liquid metal starts after 4 or 5 ms of arcing, and the maximum velocities are 0.95 m/s and 1.39 m/s for 20 kA and 25 kA arcs, respectively. This flow redistributes thermal energy, and the maximum temperature of the anode surface does not remain in the center. Moreover, the condition for the liquid droplet formation on the anode surfaces is developed. The solidification process after current zero is also analyzed. The solidification time has been found to be more than 3 ms after 25 kA arcing. The long solidification time and sharp features on crater rims induce Taylor cone formation.

  13. Selective scanning tunnelling microscope electron-induced reactions of single biphenyl molecules on a Si(100) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Damien; Bocquet, Marie-Laure; Lesnard, Hervé; Lastapis, Mathieu; Lorente, Nicolas; Sonnet, Philippe; Dujardin, Gérald

    2009-06-03

    Selective electron-induced reactions of individual biphenyl molecules adsorbed in their weakly chemisorbed configuration on a Si(100) surface are investigated by using the tip of a low-temperature (5 K) scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) as an atomic size source of electrons. Selected types of molecular reactions are produced, depending on the polarity of the surface voltage during STM excitation. At negative surface voltages, the biphenyl molecule diffuses across the surface in its weakly chemisorbed configuration. At positive surface voltages, different types of molecular reactions are activated, which involve the change of adsorption configuration from the weakly chemisorbed to the strongly chemisorbed bistable and quadristable configurations. Calculated reaction pathways of the molecular reactions on the silicon surface, using the nudge elastic band method, provide evidence that the observed selectivity as a function of the surface voltage polarity cannot be ascribed to different activation energies. These results, together with the measured threshold surface voltages and the calculated molecular electronic structures via density functional theory, suggest that the electron-induced molecular reactions are driven by selective electron detachment (oxidation) or attachment (reduction) processes.

  14. Surface zwitterionization: Effective method for preventing oral bacterial biofilm formation on hydroxyapatite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoungjin; Kim, Heejin; Seo, Jiae; Kang, Minji; Kang, Sunah; Jang, Joomyung; Lee, Yan; Seo, Ji-Hun

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we conducted surface zwitterionization of hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces by immersing them in the zwitterionic polymer solutions to provide anti-bacterial properties to the HA surface. Three different monomers containing various zwitterionic groups, i.e., phosphorylcholine (PC), sulfobetaine (SB), and carboxybetaine (CB), were copolymerized with the methacrylic monomer containing a Ca2+-binding moiety, using the free radical polymerization method. As a control, functionalization of the copolymer containing the Ca2+-binding moiety was synthesized using a hydroxy group. The stable immobilization of the zwitterionic functional groups was confirmed by water contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement conducted after the sonication process. The zwitterionized HA surface showed significantly decreased protein adsorption, whereas the hydroxyl group-coated HA surface showed limited efficacy. The anti-bacterial adhesion property was confirmed by conducting Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) adhesion tests for 6 h and 24 h. When furanone C-30, a representative anti-quorum sensing molecule for S. mutans, was used, only a small amount of bacteria adhered after 6 h and the population did not increase after 24 h. In contrast, zwitterionized HA surfaces showed almost no bacterial adhesion after 6 h and the effect was retained for 24 h, resulting in the lowest level of oral bacterial adhesion. These results confirm that surface zwitterionization is a promising method to effectively prevent oral bacterial adhesion on HA-based materials.

  15. Formation of nanocrystalline surface layers in various metallic materials by near surface severe plastic deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Sato, Nobuhiro Tsuji, Yoritoshi Minamino and Yuichiro Koizumi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface of the various kinds of metallic materials sheets were severely deformed by wire-brushing at ambient temperature to achieve nanocrystalline surface layer. The surface layers of the metallic materials developed by the near surface severe plastic deformation (NS-SPD were characterized by means of TEM. Nearly equiaxed nanocrystals with grain sizes ranging from 30 to 200 nm were observed in the near surface regions of all the severely scratched metallic materials, which are Ti-added ultra-low carbon interstitial free steel, austenitic stainless steel (SUS304, 99.99 wt.%Al, commercial purity aluminum (A1050 and A1100, Al–Mg alloy (A5083, Al-4 wt.%Cu alloy, OFHC-Cu (C1020, Cu–Zn alloy (C2600 and Pb-1.5%Sn alloy. In case of the 1050-H24 aluminum, the depth of the surface nanocrystalline layer was about 15 μm. It was clarified that wire-brushing is an effective way of NS-SPD, and surface nanocrystallization can be easily achieved in most of metallic materials.

  16. Achieving Chemical Equilibrium: The Role of Imposed Conditions in the Ammonia Formation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Under conditions of constant temperature T and pressure P, chemical equilibrium occurs in a closed system (fixed mass) when the Gibbs free energy G of the reaction mixture is minimized. However, when chemical reactions occur under other conditions, other thermodynamic functions are minimized or maximized. For processes at constant T and volume V,…

  17. The Surface Reactions of Ethanol over UO2(100) Thin Film

    KAUST Repository

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Burrell, Anthony K; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Idriss, Hicham

    2015-01-01

    The study of the reactions of oxygenates on well-defined oxide surfaces is important for the fundamental understanding of heterogeneous chemical pathways that are influenced by atomic geometry, electronic structure and chemical composition. In this work, an ordered uranium oxide thin film surface terminated in the (100) orientation is prepared on a LaAlO3 substrate and studied for its reactivity with a C-2 oxygenate, ethanol (CH3CH2OH). With the use of synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we have probed the adsorption and desorption processes observed in the valence band, C1s, O1s and U4f to investigate the bonding mode, surface composition, electronic structure and probable chemical changes to the stoichiometric-UO2(100) [smooth-UO2(100)] and Ar+-sputtered UO2(100) [rough-UO2(100)] surfaces. Unlike UO2(111) single crystal and UO2 thin film, Ar-ion sputtering of this UO2(100) did not result in noticeable reduction of U cations. The ethanol molecule has C-C, C-H, C-O and O-H bonds, and readily donates the hydroxyl H while interacting strongly with the UO2 surfaces. Upon ethanol adsorption (saturation occurred at 0.5 ML), only ethoxy (CH3CH2O-) species is formed on smooth-UO2(100) whereas initially formed ethoxy species are partially oxidized to surface acetate (CH3COO-) on the Ar+-sputtered UO2(100) surface. All ethoxy and acetate species are removed from the surface between 600 and 700 K.

  18. The Surface Reactions of Ethanol over UO2(100) Thin Film

    KAUST Repository

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.

    2015-10-08

    The study of the reactions of oxygenates on well-defined oxide surfaces is important for the fundamental understanding of heterogeneous chemical pathways that are influenced by atomic geometry, electronic structure and chemical composition. In this work, an ordered uranium oxide thin film surface terminated in the (100) orientation is prepared on a LaAlO3 substrate and studied for its reactivity with a C-2 oxygenate, ethanol (CH3CH2OH). With the use of synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we have probed the adsorption and desorption processes observed in the valence band, C1s, O1s and U4f to investigate the bonding mode, surface composition, electronic structure and probable chemical changes to the stoichiometric-UO2(100) [smooth-UO2(100)] and Ar+-sputtered UO2(100) [rough-UO2(100)] surfaces. Unlike UO2(111) single crystal and UO2 thin film, Ar-ion sputtering of this UO2(100) did not result in noticeable reduction of U cations. The ethanol molecule has C-C, C-H, C-O and O-H bonds, and readily donates the hydroxyl H while interacting strongly with the UO2 surfaces. Upon ethanol adsorption (saturation occurred at 0.5 ML), only ethoxy (CH3CH2O-) species is formed on smooth-UO2(100) whereas initially formed ethoxy species are partially oxidized to surface acetate (CH3COO-) on the Ar+-sputtered UO2(100) surface. All ethoxy and acetate species are removed from the surface between 600 and 700 K.

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of CO2 reaction with polycrystalline uranium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kezhao; Yu Yong; Zhou Juesheng; Wu Sheng; Wang Xiaolin; Fu Yibei

    1999-10-01

    The adsorption of CO 2 on 'clean' depleted polycrystalline uranium metal surface has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) at 300 K. The 'clean' surface were prepared by Ar + ion sputtering under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) condition with a base pressure 6.7 x 10 -8 Pa. The result s shows that adsorption of CO 2 on 'clean' uranium metal took place in total dissociation, and leads to the formation of uranium dioxide, uranium carbides and free carbon. The total dissociation of CO 2 produced carbon, oxygen species, CO 2 2- and CO 3 2- species. The diffusion tendency of carbon was much stronger than that of oxygen, and led to form a carbide in oxide-metal interface while the oxygen remained on their surface as an oxide

  20. Oriented nano-wire formation and selective adhesion on substrates by single ion track reaction in polysilanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Seki; Satoshi Tsukuda, Yoichi Yoshida; Seiichi Tagawa; Masaki Sugimoto; Shigeru Tanaka

    2002-01-01

    1-D nano-sized materials such as carbon nanotubes have attracted much attention as ideal quantum wires for future manufacturing techniques of nano-scaled opto-electronic devices. However it is still difficult to control the sizes, spatial distributions, or positions of nanotubes by conventional synthetic techniques to date. The MeV order heavy ion beams causes ultra-high density energy deposition which can not be realized by any other techniques (lasers, H, etc), and penetrate the polymer target straighforward as long as 1∼100 m depth. the energy deposited area produces non-homogeneous field can be controlled by changing the energy deposition rate of incident ions (LET: linear energy transfer, eV/nm). We found that cross-linking reaction of polysilane derivatives was predominantly caused and gave nano-gel in the chemical core, unlike main chain scission occurring at the outside of the area. high density energy deposition by ion beams causes non-homogeneous crosslinking reaction of polysilane derivatives within a nano-sized cylindrical area along an ion trajectory, and gives -SiC based nano-wires of which sizes (length, thickness) and number densities are completely under control by changing the parameters of incident ion beams and molecular sizes of target polymers. based on the concept pf the single track gelation, the present study demonstrates the formation of cross-linked polysilane nano-wires with the fairly controlled sizes. Recently the techniques of position-selective single ion hitting have been developed for MeV order ion beams, however it is not sufficient to control precisely the positions of the nano-wires on the substrates within sub- m area. in the present study, we report the selective adhesion of anno-wires on Si substrates by the surface treatments before coating, which enables the patterning of planted nano-wires on substrates and/or electrodes as candidates for nano-sized field emissive cathodes or electro-luminescent devices. Some examples of

  1. The Possibility of Ce3+ and Mn2+ Complex Ions Formation With Iodine Species in a Dushman Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iurie Ungureanu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents investigations into possible effects of Ce3+ and Mn2+ on the reduction of UV-spectral signal for I3- observed e.g. in the Dushman reaction. The potential of the metal ions to form complexes with iodine-containing species was analysed. It was shown that no complex ions are formed between Ce3+ and Mn2+ metals ions with IO3-, I-, I2 species. Only the formation of a very weak CeI32+ complex ion was found to occur. An effect of a complex formation on the studied systems could be excluded.

  2. Evaluation of modified stainless steel surfaces targeted to reduce biofilm formation by common milk sporeformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Shivali; Anand, Sanjeev; Huang, Kang; Goddard, Julie; Metzger, Lloyd; Amamcharla, Jayendra

    2016-12-01

    The development of bacterial biofilms on stainless steel (SS) surfaces poses a great threat to the quality of milk and other dairy products as the biofilm-embedded bacteria can survive thermal processing. Established biofilms offer cleaning challenges because they are resistant to most of the regular cleaning protocols. Sporeforming thermoduric organisms entrapped within biofilm matrix can also form heat-resistant spores, and may result in a long-term persistent contamination. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of different nonfouling coatings [AMC 18 (Advanced Materials Components Express, Lemont, PA), Dursan (SilcoTek Corporation, Bellefonte, PA), Ni-P-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Avtec Finishing Systems, New Hope, MN), and Lectrofluor 641 (General Magnaplate Corporation, Linden, NJ)] on SS plate heat exchanger surfaces, to resist the formation of bacterial biofilms. It was hypothesized that modified SS surfaces would promote a lesser amount of deposit buildup and bacterial adhesion as compared with the native SS surface. Vegetative cells of aerobic sporeformers, Geobacillus stearothermophilus (ATCC 15952), Bacillus licheniformis (ATCC 6634), and Bacillus sporothermodurans (DSM 10599), were used to study biofilm development on the modified and native SS surfaces. The adherence of these organisms, though influenced by surface energy and hydrophobicity, exhibited no apparent relation with surface roughness. The Ni-P-PTFE coating exhibited the least bacterial attachment and milk solid deposition, and hence, was the most resistant to biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy, which was used to visualize the extent of biofilm formation on modified and native SS surfaces, also revealed lower bacterial attachment on the Ni-P-PTFE as compared with the native SS surface. This study thus provides evidence of reduced biofilm formation on the modified SS surfaces. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier

  3. Identifying the Active Surfaces of Electrochemically Tuned LiCoO2 for Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Zhiyi; Chen, Guangxu; Li, Yanbin; Wang, Haotian; Xie, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Identification of active sites for catalytic processes has both fundamental and technological implications for rational design of future catalysts. Herein, we study the active surfaces of layered lithium cobalt oxide (LCO) for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) using the enhancement effect of electrochemical delithiation (De-LCO). Our theoretical results indicate that the most stable (0001) surface has a very large overpotential for OER independent of lithium content. In contrast, edge sites such as the nonpolar (1120) and polar (0112) surfaces are predicted to be highly active and dependent on (de)lithiation. The effect of lithium extraction from LCO on the surfaces and their OER activities can be understood by the increase of Co 4+ sites relative to Co 3+ and by the shift of active oxygen 2p states. Experimentally, it is demonstrated that LCO nanosheets, which dominantly expose the (0001) surface show negligible OER enhancement upon delithiation. However, a noticeable increase in OER activity (~0.1 V in overpotential shift at 10 mA cm –2 ) is observed for the LCO nanoparticles, where the basal plane is greatly diminished to expose the edge sites, consistent with the theoretical simulations. In addition, we find that the OER activity of De-LCO nanosheets can be improved if we adopt an acid etching method on LCO to create more active edge sites, which in turn provides a strong evidence for the theoretical indication.

  4. Delayed frost formation on hybrid nanostructured surfaces with patterned high wetting contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Youmin; Zhou, Peng; Yao, Shuhuai

    2014-11-01

    Engineering icephobic surfaces that can retard the frost formation and accumulation are important to vehicles, wind turbines, power lines, and HVAC systems. For condensation frosting, superhydrophobic surfaces promote self-removal of condensed droplets before freezing and consequently delay the frost growth. However, a small thermal fluctuation may lead to a Cassie-to-Wenzel transition, and thus dramatically enhance the frost formation and adhesion. In this work, we investigated the heterogeneous ice nucleation on hybrid nanostructured surfaces with patterned high wetting contrast. By judiciously introducing hydrophilic micro-patches into superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, we demonstrated that such a novel hybrid structure can efficiently defer the ice nucleation as compared to a superhydrophobic surface with nanostructures only. We observed efficient droplet jumping and higher coverage of droplets with diameter smaller than 10 μm, both of which suppress frost formation. The hybrid surface avoids the formation of liquid-bridges for Cassie-to-Wenzel transition, therefore eliminating the `bottom-up' droplet freezing from the cold substrate. These findings provide new insights to improve anti-frosting and anti-icing by using heterogeneous wettability in multiscale structures.

  5. Genetic adaptation of Streptococcus mutans during biofilm formation on different types of surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aharoni Reuven

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adhesion and successful colonization of bacteria onto solid surfaces play a key role in biofilm formation. The initial adhesion and the colonization of bacteria may differ between the various types of surfaces found in oral cavity. Therefore, it is conceivable that diverse biofilms are developed on those various surfaces. The aim of the study was to investigate the molecular modifications occurring during in vitro biofilm development of Streptococcus mutans UA159 on several different dental surfaces. Results Growth analysis of the immobilized bacterial populations generated on the different surfaces shows that the bacteria constructed a more confluent and thick biofilms on a hydroxyapatite surface compared to the other tested surfaces. Using DNA-microarray technology we identified the differentially expressed genes of S. mutans, reflecting the physiological state of biofilms formed on the different biomaterials tested. Eight selected genes were further analyzed by real time RT-PCR. To further determine the impact of the tested material surfaces on the physiology of the bacteria, we tested the secretion of AI-2 signal by S. mutans embedded on those biofilms. Comparative transcriptome analyses indicated on changes in the S. mutans genome in biofilms formed onto different types of surfaces and enabled us to identify genes most differentially expressed on those surfaces. In addition, the levels of autoinducer-2 in biofilms from the various tested surfaces were different. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that gene expression of S. mutans differs in biofilms formed on tested surfaces, which manifest the physiological state of bacteria influenced by the type of surface material they accumulate onto. Moreover, the stressful circumstances of adjustment to the surface may persist in the bacteria enhancing intercellular signaling and surface dependent biofilm formation.

  6. Surface alloy formation by adsorption of holmium on Ag/Mo(112) bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołaczkiewicz, Jan; Oleksy, Czesław

    2018-03-01

    Work function change measurements, low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and density functional theory (DFT) are used to determine the structures formed on Ag/Mo(112) bimetallic surfaces upon deposition of 0.5 monolayer (ML) of holmium. As the bimetallic surfaces, we have chosen the Mo(112) substrate covered with 1 or 2 ML of Ag. Such surfaces have the same symmetry as the Mo(112) face but different electronic properties. LEED experiment indicates that the c(2 × 2) structure is formed on (1 ML Ag)/Mo(112) bimetallic surface upon deposition of 0.5 ML of Ho. DFT calculations show that a type of Ag-Ho surface alloy is formed, with Ho atoms 0.6 Å below the distorted layer of Ag. This is neither a substitutional nor a subsurface alloy. It is found that the adsorption structure formed on the (2 ML Ag)/Mo(112) bimetallic surface depends on the annealing temperature. After deposition of 0.5 ML of Ho at 300 K, the LEED pattern of p(2 × 2) symmetry is observed. Annealing of the overlayer at 640 K irreversibly changes the p(2 × 2) pattern into a pattern of c(2 × 2) type. The results of DFT computations show that the c(2 × 2) structure of the Ag-Ho surface alloy is energetically most favorable. In this structure, 0.5 ML of Ho is between the two monolayers of Ag, and the symmetry of the topmost layer is changed. The work function change calculated for the c(2 × 2) structure is in a good agreement with the measured value (0.22 eV). The results show that adsorption of Ho on the Ag/Mo(112) bimetallic surfaces is substantially different than on the clean Mo(112).

  7. Real-time nonlinear feedback control of pattern formation in (bio)chemical reaction-diffusion processes: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt-Pollmann, U; Lebiedz, D; Diehl, M; Sager, S; Schlöder, J

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies related to manipulation of pattern formation in self-organizing reaction-diffusion processes by appropriate control stimuli become increasingly important both in chemical engineering and cellular biochemistry. In a model study, we demonstrate here exemplarily the application of an efficient nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm to real-time optimal feedback control of pattern formation in a bacterial chemotaxis system modeled by nonlinear partial differential equations. The corresponding drift-diffusion model type is representative for many (bio)chemical systems involving nonlinear reaction dynamics and nonlinear diffusion. We show how the computed optimal feedback control strategy exploits the system inherent physical property of wave propagation to achieve desired control aims. We discuss various applications of our approach to optimal control of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  8. The effect of iatrogenic Staphylococcus epidermidis intercellar adhesion operon on the formation of bacterial biofilm on polyvinyl chloride surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lianhua, Ye; Yunchao, Huang; Guangqiang, Zhao; Kun, Yang; Xing, Liu; Fengli, Guo

    2014-12-01

    The intercellular adhesion gene (ica) of Staphylococcus epidermidis is a key factor for bacterial aggregation. This study explored the effect of ica on the formation of bacterial biofilm on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces. Genes related to bacterial biofilm formation, including 16S rRNA, autolysin (atlE), fibrinogen binding protein gene (fbe), and ica were identified and sequenced from 112 clinical isolates of iatrogenic S. epidermidis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. Based on the sequencing result, ica operon-positive (icaADB+/atlE+/fbe+) and ica operon-negative (icaADB-/atlE+/fbe+) strains were separated and co-cultivated with PVC material. After 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 h of co-culture, the thickness of the bacterial biofilm and quantity of bacterial colony on the PVC surface were measured under the confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope. The positive rate of S. epidermidis-specific 16SrRNA in 112 iatrogenic strains was 100% (112/112). The genotype of ica-positive (icaADB+/atlE+/fbe+) strains accounted for 57.1% (64/112), and genotype of ica-negative (icaADB-/atlE+/fbe+) strains accounted for 37.5% (42/112). During 30 h of co-culture, no obvious bacterial biofilm formed on the surface of PVC in the ica-positive group, however, mature bacterial biofilm structure formed after 24 h. For all time points, thickness of bacterial biofilm and quantity of bacterial colony on PVC surfaces in the ica operon-positive group were significantly higher than those in ica operon-negative group (poperon-negative and ica operon-positive strains. The ica operon plays an important role in bacterial biofilm formation and bacterial multiplication on PVC material.

  9. Thermal Diffusion Processes in Metal-Tip-Surface Interactions: Contact Formation and Adatom Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Jonsson, Hannes

    1996-01-01

    and the surface can occur by a sequence of atomic hop and exchange processes which become active on a millisecond time scale when the tip is about 3-5 Angstrom from the surface. Adatoms on the surface are stabilized by the presence of the tip and energy barriers for diffusion processes in the region under the tip......We have carried out computer simulations to identify and characterize various thermally activated atomic scale processes that can play an important role in room temperature experiments where a metal tip is brought close to a metal surface. We find that contact formation between the tip...

  10. Control of reactivity and regioselectivity for on-surface dehydrogenative aryl-aryl bond formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kocić, N.; Liu, X.; Chen, S.; Decurtins, S.; Krejčí, Ondřej; Jelínek, Pavel; Repp, J.; Liu, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 17 (2016), s. 5585-5593 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC14-16963J Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : on-surface reaction * AFM * DFT * metal-organic coordination Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  11. A field ion microscope study of the surface reaction of tungsten with n-octanol under an applied positive voltage: reaction conditions for the 'splitting' of (110) plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, T.; Iwatsu, F.; Morikawa, H.

    1993-01-01

    Field ion microscopy is a powerful tool for the study of surface phenomena on an atomic scale, especially when they are crystal plane dependent, because the microscope shows many crystal planes of the sample tip simultaneously. Although a large number of FIM studies on vapor deposition, surface diffusion and surface reactions at a metal-gas interface have been reported, those on reactions at a metal-liquid interface are few. The authors have studied the corrosion or tungsten with aqueous solutions and found that water corroded the tungsten tips very severely to reduce the radius of curvature of the tip cap drastically. The reaction was so severe that it was not possible to trace it back to the very initial stages. They adopted, as a weaker reagent, one of the higher alcohols, n-octanol(C 8 H 17 OH), and found that it reacted with tungsten tips when an electrical pulse with a positive voltage between 5 and 10V was applied to the tip, giving very interesting field ion images in which the central (110) plane was divided into two parts located side by side across the [001] zone line. This means that some anisotropic surface reaction occurred which made a groove along the [001] zone line going through the (110) plane, usually the most stable plane chemically for bcc metals. They named this phenomenon 'splitting'. This reaction was less severe than that with water and some results on the morphology of the groove and on the reaction sequence have been reported. In the present paper more detailed reaction conditions which give rise to the splitting are described

  12. Reaction of ethane with deuterium over platinum(111) single-crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaera, F.; Somorhai, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Deuterium exchange and hydrogenolysis of ethane were studied over (111) platinum surfaces under atmospheric pressures and a temperature range of 475-625 K. Activation energies of 19 kcal/mol for exchange and 34 kcal/mol for hydrogenolysis were obtained. The exchange reaction rates displayed kinetic orders with respect to deuterium and ethane partial pressures of -0.55 and 1.2, respectively. The exchange production distribution was U-shaped, peaking at one and six deuterium atoms per ethane molecule, similar to results reported for other forms of platinum, e.g., supported, films, and foils. The pressure of ethylidyne moieties on the surface was inferred from low-energy electron diffraction and thermal desorption spectroscopy. A mechanism is proposed to explain the experimental results, in which ethylidyne constitutes an intermediate in one of two competitive pathways. 31 references, 9 figures, 3 tables

  13. An ab initio potential energy surface for the reaction N+ + H2→ NH+ + H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittins, M.A.; Hirst, D.M.

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary results of ab initio unrestricted Hartree-Fock calculations for the potential energy surface for the reaction N + + H 2 →NH + + H are reported. For the collinear approach of N + to H 2 , the 3 Σ - surface has no activation barrier and has a shallow well (ca.1eV). For perpendicular approach (Csub(2V)symmetry) the 3 B 2 states is of high energy, the 3 A 2 state has a shallow well but as the bond angle increases the 3 B 1 states decreases in energy to become the state of lowest energy. Neither the collinear nor the perpendicular approaches give adiabatic pathways to the deep potential well of 3 B 1 (HNH) + . (auth.)

  14. Cinnamon Oil and Chitosan Coating on Orthopaedic Implant Surface for Prevention of Staphylococcus Epidermidis Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    R Magetsari; P Dewo; BK Saputro; Z Lanodiyu

    2014-01-01

    S. Epidermidis is among the most frequently isolated microorganisms found in -infection related to implanted devices and the formation of biofilm will be more resistantcompared to the planktonic form. This study was carried out determine the effect of coating on stainless steel orthopaedic implants surfaces with cinnamon oil and chitosan as bioadhesive to prevent biofilms formation of S. Epidermidis.The rod shaped stainless steel 316 L orthopaedic implant with 5 mm diameters was coated 2 t...

  15. Adhesion, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, and antifungal planktonic susceptibility: relationship among Candida spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Silva-Dias, Ana; Miranda, Isabel M.; Branco, Joana; Monteiro-Soares, Matilde; Pina-Vaz, Cid?lia; Rodrigues, Ac?cio G.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed the characterization of the adhesion profile, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and antifungal susceptibility of 184 Candida clinical isolates obtained from different human reservoirs. Adhesion was quantified using a flow cytometric assay and biofilm formation was evaluated using two methodologies: XTT and crystal violet assay. CSH was quantified with the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons test while planktonic susceptibility was assessed accordingly the C...

  16. Water Mediated Wittig Reactions of Aldehydes in the Teaching Laboratory: Using Sodium Bicarbonate for the in Situ Formation of Stabilized Ylides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael J. B.; Fallot, Lucas B.; Gustafson, Jeffrey L.; Bergdahl, B. Mikael

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of alkenes using the Wittig reaction is a traditional part of many undergraduate organic chemistry teaching laboratory curricula. The aqueous medium version of the Wittig reaction presented is a reliable adaptation of this alkene formation reaction as a very safe alternative in the introductory organic chemistry laboratory. The…

  17. Electrodeposition of Pd based binary catalysts on Carbon paper via surface limited redox-replacement reaction for oxygen reduction reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) continue to extensive attention as potential power sources for portable and stationary applications. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) involving the four electron transfer remains a challenge for DAFCs due to its...

  18. Formation of self-assembled monolayer of curcuminoid molecules on gold surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlanga, Isadora; Etcheverry-Berríos, Álvaro; Mella, Andy; Jullian, Domingo; Gómez, Victoria Alejandra; Aliaga-Alcalde, Núria; Fuenzalida, Victor; Flores, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thiophene curcuminoid molecules deposited on a gold surface by immersion. • Molecular dynamic studies of the molecular arrangement approaching the surface. • XPS and STM studies showing different arrangement of the molecules on the surface. • Molecular Interaction with surface depends on the sulfur position in thiophene rings. • Temporal evolution of the molecular arrangement on the surface. - Abstract: We investigated the formation of self-assembled monolayers of two thiophene curcuminoid molecules, 2-thphCCM (1) and 3-thphCCM (2), on polycrystalline gold substrates prepared by immersion of the surfaces in a solution of the molecules during 24 h. The functionalized surfaces were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Despite the fact that both molecules have the same composition and almost the same structure, these molecules exhibit different behavior on the gold surface, which can be explained by the different positions of the sulfur atoms in the terminal aromatic rings. In the case of molecule 1, the complete formation of a SAM can be observed after 24 h of immersion. In the case of molecule 2, the transition from flat-lying to upright configuration on the surface is still in process after 24 h of immersion. This is attributed to the fact that molecule 2 have the sulfur atoms more exposed than molecule 1.

  19. Formation of self-assembled monolayer of curcuminoid molecules on gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlanga, Isadora [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Etcheverry-Berríos, Álvaro; Mella, Andy; Jullian, Domingo [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Beaucheff 851, Santiago (Chile); Gómez, Victoria Alejandra [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Aliaga-Alcalde, Núria [ICREA (Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats), Passeig Lluís Companys, 23, 08018, Barcelona (Spain); CSIC-ICMAB (Institut de Ciència dels Materials de Barcelona), Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Fuenzalida, Victor [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Flores, Marcos, E-mail: mflorescarra@ing.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Thiophene curcuminoid molecules deposited on a gold surface by immersion. • Molecular dynamic studies of the molecular arrangement approaching the surface. • XPS and STM studies showing different arrangement of the molecules on the surface. • Molecular Interaction with surface depends on the sulfur position in thiophene rings. • Temporal evolution of the molecular arrangement on the surface. - Abstract: We investigated the formation of self-assembled monolayers of two thiophene curcuminoid molecules, 2-thphCCM (1) and 3-thphCCM (2), on polycrystalline gold substrates prepared by immersion of the surfaces in a solution of the molecules during 24 h. The functionalized surfaces were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Despite the fact that both molecules have the same composition and almost the same structure, these molecules exhibit different behavior on the gold surface, which can be explained by the different positions of the sulfur atoms in the terminal aromatic rings. In the case of molecule 1, the complete formation of a SAM can be observed after 24 h of immersion. In the case of molecule 2, the transition from flat-lying to upright configuration on the surface is still in process after 24 h of immersion. This is attributed to the fact that molecule 2 have the sulfur atoms more exposed than molecule 1.

  20. Reactions at surfaces in the atmosphere: integration of experiments and theory as necessary (but not necessarily sufficient) for predicting the physical chemistry of aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2009-09-28

    While particles have significant deleterious impacts on human health, visibility and climate, quantitative understanding of their formation, composition and fates remains problematic. Indeed, in many cases, even qualitative understanding is lacking. One area of particular uncertainty is the nature of particle surfaces and how this determines interactions with gases in the atmosphere, including water, which is important for cloud formation and properties. The focus in this Perspective article is on some chemistry relevant to airborne particles and especially to reactions occurring on their surfaces. The intent is not to provide a comprehensive review, but rather to highlight a few selected examples of interface chemistry involving inorganic and organic species that may be important in the lower atmosphere. This includes sea salt chemistry, nitrate and nitrite ion photochemistry, organics on surfaces and heterogeneous reactions of oxides of nitrogen on proxies for airborne mineral dust and boundary layer surfaces. Emphasis is on the molecular level understanding that can only be gained by fully integrating experiment and theory to elucidate these complex systems.

  1. A Monte Carlo simulation of the exchange reaction between gaseous molecules and the atoms on a heterogeneous solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hisao

    1980-01-01

    A method of the Monte Carlo simulation of the isotopic exchange reaction between gaseous molecules and the atoms on an arbitrarily heterogeneous solid surface is described by employing hydrogen as an example. (author)

  2. Derivatization reaction-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of trace acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Chengbin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Li; Tian, Yunfei

    2016-08-01

    A facile method was developed for determination of trace volatile acetone by coupling a derivatization reaction to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). With iodide modified Ag nanoparticles (Ag IMNPs) as the SERS substrate, acetone without obvious Raman signal could be converted to SERS-sensitive species via a chemical derivatization reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). In addition, acetone can be effectively separated from liquid phase with a purge-sampling device and then any serious interference from sample matrices can be significantly reduced. The optimal conditions for the derivatization reaction and the SERS analysis were investigated in detail, and the selectivity and reproducibility of this method were also evaluated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for acetone was 5mgL(-1) or 0.09mM (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 80mgL(-1) acetone (n=9) was 1.7%. This method was successfully used for the determination of acetone in artificial urine and human urine samples with spiked recoveries ranging from 92% to 110%. The present method is convenient, sensitive, selective, reliable and suitable for analysis of trace acetone, and it could have a promising clinical application in early diabetes diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation Into Accessible Surface Vinyl Concentrations of Nonstoichiometric PDMS Microspheres from Hydrosilylation Reactions and Their Further Crosslinking Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Baoguang; Hansen, Jens Henrik; Hvilsted, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of surface vinyl groups to PDMS microspheres broadens the latter's applicability range since the microspheres can be further functionalized or crosslinked into elastomers. Quantification of the surface vinyl concentration of PDMS microspheres is therefore essential. Here, a novel...

  4. On-surface Fenton and Fenton-like reactions appraised by paper spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, S F; Oliveira, B S; Augusti, R

    2018-06-21

    On-surface degradation of sildenafil (an adequate substrate as it contains assorted functional groups in its structure) promoted by the Fenton (Fe 2+ / H 2 O 2 ) and Fenton-like (M n+ / H 2 O 2 ; M n+ = Fe 3+ , Co 2+ , Cu 2+ , Mn 2+ ) systems was investigated by using paper spray ionization mass spectrometry (PS-MS). The performance of each system was compared by measuring the ratio between the relative intensities of the ions of m/z 475 (protonated sildenafil) and m/z 235 (protonated lidocaine, used as a convenient internal standard and added to the paper just before the PS-MS analyzes). The results indicated the following order in the rates of such reactions: Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 > H 2 O 2 > Cu 2+ /H 2 O 2 > M n+ / H 2 O 2 (M n+ = Fe 3+ , Co 2+ , Mn 2+ ) ~ M n+ (M n+ = Fe 2+ , Fe 3+ , Co 2+ , Cu 2+ , Mn 2 . The superior capability of Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 in causing the degradation of sildenafil indicates that Fe 2+ efficiently decomposes H 2 O 2 to yield hydroxyl radicals, quite reactive species that cause the substrate oxidation. The results also indicate that H 2 O 2 can spontaneously decompose likely to yield hydroxyl radicals, although in a much smaller extension than the Fenton system. This effect, however, is strongly inhibited by the presence of the other cations, i. e. Fe 3+ , Co 2+ , Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ . A unique oxidation by-product was detected in the reaction between Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 with sildenafil and a possible structure for it was proposed based on the MS/MS data. The on-surface reaction of other substrates (trimethoprim and tamoxifen) with the Fenton system was also investigated. In conclusion, PS-MS shown to be a convenient platform to promptly monitor on-surface oxidation reactions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of surface functionalisation on the interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aysan, Ayse Beyza; Knejzlík, Zdeněk; Ulbrich, Pavel; Šoltys, Marek; Zadražil, Aleš; Štěpánek, František

    2017-05-01

    The combination of nanoparticles with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can have benefits such as easier sample handling or higher sensitivity, but also drawbacks such as loss of colloidal stability or inhibition of the PCR. The present work systematically investigates the interaction of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) with the PCR in terms of colloidal stability and potential PCR inhibition due to interaction between the PCR components and the nanoparticle surface. Several types of MIONs with and without surface functionalisation by sodium citrate, dextran and 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES) were prepared and characterised by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Colloidal stability in the presence of the PCR components was investigated both at room temperature and under PCR thermo-cycling. Dextran-stabilized MIONs show the best colloidal stability in the PCR mix at both room and elevated temperatures. Citrate- and APTES-stabilised as well as uncoated MIONs show a comparable PCR inhibition near the concentration 0.1mgml -1 while the inhibition of dextran stabilized MIONs became apparent near 0.5mgml -1 . It was demonstrated that the PCR could be effectively carried out even in the presence of elevated concentration of MIONs up to 2mgml -1 by choosing the right coating approach and supplementing the reaction mix by critical components, Taq DNA polymerase and Mg 2+ ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Light-Induced Surface Reactions at the Bismuth Vanadate/Potassium Phosphate Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, Marco; Abdi, Fatwa F; Lamers, Marlene; Crumlin, Ethan J; Liu, Zhi; van de Krol, Roel; Starr, David E

    2018-01-18

    Bismuth vanadate has recently drawn significant research attention as a light-absorbing photoanode due to its performance for photoelectrochemical water splitting. In this study, we use in situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with "tender" X-rays (4.0 keV) to investigate a polycrystalline bismuth vanadate (BiVO 4 ) electrode in contact with an aqueous potassium phosphate (KPi) solution at open circuit potential under both dark and light conditions. This is facilitated by the creation of a 25 to 30 nm thick electrolyte layer using the "dip-and-pull" method. We observe that under illumination bismuth phosphate forms on the BiVO 4 surface leading to an increase of the surface negative charge. The bismuth phosphate layer may act to passivate surface states observed in photoelectrochemical measurements. The repulsive interaction between the negatively charged surface under illumination and the phosphate ions in solution causes a shift in the distribution of ions in the thin aqueous electrolyte film, which is observed as an increase in their photoelectron signals. Interestingly, we find that such changes at the BiVO 4 /KPi electrolyte interface are reversible upon returning to dark conditions. By measuring the oxygen 1s photoelectron peak intensities from the phosphate ions and liquid water as a function of time under dark and light conditions, we determine the time scales for the forward and reverse reactions. Our results provide direct evidence for light-induced chemical modification of the BiVO 4 /KPi electrolyte interface.

  7. Toward an understanding of surface layer formation, growth, and transformation at the glass-fluid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopf, J.; Eskelsen, J. R.; Chiu, M.; Ievlev, A. V.; Ovchinnikova, O. S.; Leonard, D.; Pierce, E. M.

    2018-05-01

    Silicate glass is a metastable and durable solid that has application to a number of energy and environmental challenges (e.g., microelectronics, fiber optics, and nuclear waste storage). If allowed to react with water over time silicate glass develops an altered layer at the solid-fluid interface. In this study, we used borosilicate glass (LAWB45) as a model material to develop a robust understanding of altered layer formation (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products). Experiments were conducted at high surface area-to-volume ratio (∼200,000 m-1) and 90 °C in the pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) apparatus for 1.5-years to facilitate the formation of thick altered layers and allow for the effluent solution chemistry to be monitored continuously. A variety of microscopy techniques were used to characterize reacted grains and suggest the average altered layer thickness is 13.2 ± 8.3 μm with the hydrated and clay layer representing 74.8% and 25.2% of the total altered layer, respectively. The estimate of hydrated layer thickness is within the experimental error of the value estimated from the B release rate data (∼10 ± 1 μm/yr) over the 1.5-year duration. PeakForce® quantitative nanomechanical mapping results suggest the hydrated layer has a modulus that ranges between ∼20 and 40 GPa, which is in the range of porous silica that contains from ∼20 to ∼50% porosity, yet significantly lower than dense silica (∼70-80 GPa). Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images confirm the presence of pores and an analysis of a higher resolution image provides a qualitative estimate of ≥22% porosity in the hydrated layer with variations in void volume with increasing distance from the unaltered glass. Chemical composition analyses, based on a combination of time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and STEM-EDS, clearly show

  8. Chip formation and surface integrity in high-speed machining of hardened steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishawy, Hossam Eldeen A.

    Increasing demands for high production rates as well as cost reduction have emphasized the potential for the industrial application of hard turning technology during the past few years. Machining instead of grinding hardened steel components reduces the machining sequence, the machining time, and the specific cutting energy. Hard turning Is characterized by the generation of high temperatures, the formation of saw toothed chips, and the high ratio of thrust to tangential cutting force components. Although a large volume of literature exists on hard turning, the change in machined surface physical properties represents a major challenge. Thus, a better understanding of the cutting mechanism in hard turning is still required. In particular, the chip formation process and the surface integrity of the machined surface are important issues which require further research. In this thesis, a mechanistic model for saw toothed chip formation is presented. This model is based on the concept of crack initiation on the free surface of the workpiece. The model presented explains the mechanism of chip formation. In addition, experimental investigation is conducted in order to study the chip morphology. The effect of process parameters, including edge preparation and tool wear on the chip morphology, is studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The dynamics of chip formation are also investigated. The surface integrity of the machined parts is also investigated. This investigation focusses on residual stresses as well as surface and sub-surface deformation. A three dimensional thermo-elasto-plastic finite element model is developed to predict the machining residual stresses. The effect of flank wear is introduced during the analysis. Although residual stresses have complicated origins and are introduced by many factors, in this model only the thermal and mechanical factors are considered. The finite element analysis demonstrates the significant effect of the heat generated

  9. Reaction Mechanism for the Formation of Nitrogen Oxides (NO x ) During Coke Oxidation in Fluidized Catalytic Cracking Units

    KAUST Repository

    Chaparala, Sree Vidya

    2015-06-11

    Fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) units in refineries process heavy feedstock obtained from crude oil distillation. While cracking feed, catalysts get deactivated due to coke deposition. During catalyst regeneration by burning coke in air, nitrogen oxides (NOx) are formed. The increase in nitrogen content in feed over time has resulted in increased NOx emissions. To predict NOx concentration in flue gas, a reliable model for FCC regenerators is needed that requires comprehensive understanding and accurate kinetics for NOx formation. Based on the nitrogen-containing functional groups on coke, model molecules are selected to study reactions between coke-bound nitrogen and O2 to form NO and NO2 using density functional theory. The reaction kinetics for the proposed pathways are evaluated using transition state theory. It is observed that the addition of O2 on coke is favored only when the free radical is present on the carbon atom instead of nitrogen atom. Thus, NOx formation during coke oxidation does not result from the direct attack by O2 on N atoms of coke, but from the transfer of an O atom to N from a neighboring site. The low activation energies required for NO formation indicate that it is more likely to form than NO2 during coke oxidation. The favorable pathways for NOx formation that can be used in FCC models are identified. Copyright © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  10. Probing adsorption phenomena on a single crystal Pt-alloy surface under oxygen reduction reaction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, Alexander S.; Stephens, Ifan E.L.; Bech, Lone; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Impedance spectroscopy of Cu/Pt(1 1 1) near-surface alloy and Pt(1 1 1). ► Presence of oxygen changes little the adsorption dynamics. ► Adsorption dynamics similar on alloy and Pt(1 1 1). ► Electrosorption phenomena on alloy shifted in potential, relative to Pt(1 1 1). - Abstract: The adsorption dynamics of *OH and *O species at Pt(1 1 1) and Cu/Pt(1 1 1) near-surface alloy (NSA) surfaces in oxygen-free and O 2 -saturated 0.1 M HClO 4 was investigated. Subsurface Cu modifies the electronic structure at the Pt(1 1 1) surface resulting in weaker bonding to adsorbates like *OH, *H or *O. This provides a basis for the high oxygen reduction activity of the NSA, as predicted by density functional theory calculations. The shift in *OH adsorption of around 0.16 V towards more positive potentials can be clearly monitored in absence of O 2 and under the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) conditions for the Cu/Pt(1 1 1) NSA. In both cases, for Pt(1 1 1) and NSA, the *OH(*O) adsorption dynamics is very similar in the absence of oxygen and under ORR conditions. Therefore, theoretical assumptions about the coverage of adsorbates in the absence of oxygen can be reasonably extrapolated to the situation when oxygen reduction takes place at the surface. A ∼5-fold improvement in the ORR activity over the Pt(1 1 1) at 0.9 V (RHE) was measured for the Cu/Pt(1 1 1) near-surface alloy.

  11. Gas phase formation of extremely oxidized pinene reaction products in chamber and ambient air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ehn

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available High molecular weight (300–650 Da naturally charged negative ions have previously been observed at a boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland. The long-term measurements conducted in this work showed that these ions are observed practically every night between spring and autumn in Hyytiälä. The ambient mass spectral patterns could be reproduced in striking detail during additional measurements of α-pinene (C10H16 oxidation at low-OH conditions in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC. The ions were identified as clusters of the nitrate ion (NO3 and α-pinene oxidation products reaching oxygen to carbon ratios of 0.7–1.3, while retaining most of the initial ten carbon atoms. Attributing the ions to clusters instead of single molecules was based on additional observations of the same extremely oxidized organics in clusters with HSO4 (Hyytiälä and C3F5O2 (JPAC. The most abundant products in the ion spectra were identified as C10H14O7, C10H14O9, C10H16O9, and C10H14O11. The mechanism responsible for forming these molecules is still not clear, but the initial reaction is most likely ozone attack at the double bond, as the ions are mainly observed under dark conditions. β-pinene also formed highly oxidized products under the same conditions, but less efficiently, and mainly C9 compounds which were not observed in Hyytiälä, where β-pinene on average is 4–5 times less abundant than α-pinene. Further, to explain the high O/C together with the relatively high H/C, we propose that geminal diols and/or hydroperoxide groups may be important. We estimate that the night-time concentration of the sum of the neutral extremely oxidized products is on the order of 0.1–1 ppt (~10

  12. Extraordinary Mechanism of the Diels-Alder Reaction: Investigation of Stereochemistry, Charge Transfer, Charge Polarization, and Biradicaloid Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Thomas; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2016-02-25

    The Diels-Alder reaction between 1,3-butadiene and ethene is investigated from far-out in the entrance channel to the very last step in the exit channel thus passing two bifurcation points and extending the range of the reaction valley studied with URVA (Unified Reaction Valley Approach) by 300% compared to previous studies. For the first time, the pre- and postchemical steps of the reaction are analyzed at the same level of theory as the actual chemical processes utilizing the path curvature and its decomposition into internal coordinate or curvilinear coordinate components. A first smaller charge transfer to the dienophile facilitates the rotation of gauche butadiene into its cis form. The actual chemical processes are initiated by a second larger charge transfer to the dienophile that facilitates pyramidalization of the reacting carbon centers, bond equalization, and biradicaloid formation of the reactants. The transition state is aromatically stabilized and moved by five path units into the entrance channel in line with the Hammond-Leffler postulate. The pseudorotation of the boat form into the halfchair of cyclohexene is analyzed. Predictions are made for the Diels-Alder reaction based on a 11-phase mechanism obtained by the URVA analysis.

  13. The initial step of silicate versus aluminosilicate formation in zeolite synthesis: a reaction mechanism in water with a tetrapropylammonium template

    KAUST Repository

    Trinh, Thuat T.

    2012-01-01

    The initial step for silicate and aluminosilicate condensation is studied in water in the presence of a realistic tetrapropylammonium template under basic conditions. The model corresponds to the synthesis conditions of ZSM5. The free energy profile for the dimer formation ((OH) 3Si-O-Si-(OH) 2O - or [(OH) 3Al-O-Si-(OH) 3] -) is calculated with ab initio molecular dynamics and thermodynamic integration. The Si-O-Si dimer formation occurs in a two-step manner with an overall free energy barrier of 75 kJ mol -1. The first step is associated with the Si-O bond formation and results in an intermediate with a five-coordinated Si, and the second one concerns the removal of the water molecule. The template is displaced away from the Si centres upon dimer formation, and a shell of water molecules is inserted between the silicate and the template. The main effect of the template is to slow down the backward hydrolysis reaction with respect to the condensation one. The Al-O-Si dimer formation first requires the formation of a metastable precursor state by proton transfer from Si(OH) 4 to Al(OH) 4 - mediated by a solvent molecule. It then proceeds through a single step with an overall barrier of 70 kJ mol -1. The model with water molecules explicitly included is then compared to a simple calculation using an implicit continuum model for the solvent. The results underline the importance of an explicit and dynamical treatment of the water solvent, which plays a key role in assisting the reaction. © the Owner Societies 2012.

  14. Reactions of solid CaSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and formation of sodium carbonate sulfate double salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jinsheng; Wu, Yinghai; Anthony, Edward J. [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources Canada, 1 Haanel Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1M1 (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    High-temperature chemical reactions in mixtures of solid CaSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were investigated in order to explore the mechanisms of enhanced sulfur capture by limestones doped with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in fluidized bed combustion. Drastic weight loss of the mixtures was observed in a thermogravimetric analyzer near the melting temperature of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, indicating chemical reaction. X-ray diffraction analysis for a mixture of the solids following a heat treatment at 850 C revealed the existence of two sodium carbonate sulfate double salts that have not been reported before for the present system. The formation of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in the melt of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} appears to precede the formation of the double salts. The two double salts are believed to have high porosity and specific surface area similar to those of a better-known double salt, burkeite. The implications of these findings for the enhancement of limestone sulfation by Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} are also discussed. (author)

  15. Reactions of solid CaSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and formation of sodium carbonate sulfate double salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jinsheng [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources Canada, 1 Haanel Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1M1 (Canada)]. E-mail: jiwang@nrcan.gc.ca; Wu Yinghai [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources Canada, 1 Haanel Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1M1 (Canada); Anthony, Edward J. [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources Canada, 1 Haanel Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1M1 (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    High-temperature chemical reactions in mixtures of solid CaSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were investigated in order to explore the mechanisms of enhanced sulfur capture by limestones doped with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in fluidized bed combustion. Drastic weight loss of the mixtures was observed in a thermogravimetric analyzer near the melting temperature of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, indicating chemical reaction. X-ray diffraction analysis for a mixture of the solids following a heat treatment at 850 deg. C revealed the existence of two sodium carbonate sulfate double salts that have not been reported before for the present system. The formation of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in the melt of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} appears to precede the formation of the double salts. The two double salts are believed to have high porosity and specific surface area similar to those of a better-known double salt, burkeite. The implications of these findings for the enhancement of limestone sulfation by Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} are also discussed.

  16. Model of deep centers formation and reactions in electron irradiated InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.; Suski, J.; Gilleron, M.

    1986-01-01

    We present a model of the production of deep centers and their reactions following electron irradiations in InP. We propose that the dominant hole traps in p-InP and electron traps in p + n InP junctions are complexes between shallow acceptors and a common intrinsic entity, the phosphorus interstitial or vacancy. The reactions observed below and above room temperature are then due to a local mobility of this entity, which can be obtained as well by thermal as by electronic stimulation of the reactions. This model implies the long-range migration (at least down to 16 K) of this entity, and explains the strongly different behavior of n-InP compared to p-InP samples

  17. Neutralization of methyl cation via chemical reactions in low-energy ion-surface collisions with fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Arpád; Smith, Darrin L; Wysocki, Vicki H; Colorado, Ramon; Lee, T Randall

    2002-10-01

    Low-energy ion-surface collisions of methyl cation at hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces produce extensive neutralization of CH3+. These experimental observations are reported together with the results obtained for ion-surface collisions with the molecular ions of benzene, styrene, 3-fluorobenzonitrile, 1,3,5-triazine, and ammonia on the same surfaces. For comparison, low-energy gas-phase collisions of CD3+ and 3-fluorobenzonitrile molecular ions with neutral n-butane reagent gas were conducted in a triple quadrupole (QQQ) instrument. Relevant MP2 6-31G*//MP2 6-31G* ab initio and thermochemical calculations provide further insight in the neutralization mechanisms of methyl cation. The data suggest that neutralization of methyl cation with hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon SAMs occurs by concerted chemical reactions, i.e., that neutralization of the projectile occurs not only by a direct electron transfer from the surface but also by formation of a neutral molecule. The calculations indicate that the following products can be formed by exothermic processes and without appreciable activation energy: CH4 (formal hydride ion addition) and C2H6 (formal methyl anion addition) from a hydrocarbon surface and CH3F (formal fluoride addition) from a fluorocarbon surface. The results also demonstrate that, in some cases, simple thermochemical calculations cannot be used to predict the energy profiles because relatively large activation energies can be associated with exothermic reactions, as was found for the formation of CH3CF3 (formal addition of trifluoromethyl anion).

  18. The distribution of star formation and metals in the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. E.; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Wang, Sharon X.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce the MUSCEL Programme (MUltiwavelength observations of the Structure, Chemistry and Evolution of LSB galaxies), a project aimed at determining the star-formation histories of low surface brightness galaxies. MUSCEL utilizes ground-based optical spectra and space-based UV and IR photometry to fully constrain the star-formation histories of our targets with the aim of shedding light on the processes that led low surface brightness galaxies down a different evolutionary path from that followed by high surface brightness galaxies, such as our Milky Way. Here we present the spatially resolved optical spectra of UGC 628, observed with the VIRUS-P IFU at the 2.7-m Harlen J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory, and utilize emission-line diagnostics to determine the rate and distribution of star formation as well as the gas-phase metallicity and metallicity gradient. We find highly clustered star formation throughout UGC 628, excluding the core regions, and a log(O/H) metallicity around -4.2, with more metal-rich regions near the edges of the galactic disc. Based on the emission-line diagnostics alone, the current mode of star formation, slow and concentrated in the outer disc, appears to have dominated for quite some time, although there are clear signs of a much older stellar population formed in a more standard inside-out fashion.

  19. Formation and composition of adsorbates on hydrophobic carbon surfaces from aqueous laccase-maltodextrin mixture suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrales Ureña, Yendry Regina, E-mail: yendry386@hotmail.com [UNESP São Paulo State University, Av. Eng. Luiz Edmundo Carrijo Coube, 14-01, Bauru, São Paulo (Brazil); Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Lisboa-Filho, Paulo Noronha [UNESP São Paulo State University, Av. Eng. Luiz Edmundo Carrijo Coube, 14-01, Bauru, São Paulo (Brazil); Szardenings, Michael [Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology IZI, Perlickstrasse 1, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Gätjen, Linda; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Rischka, Klaus [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Less than 10 nm layer formed on carbon based materials composed by laccase and maltodextrin. • Improvement of the wettability of carbon based materials. • A protein-polysaccharide biofilm layer formation at solid liquid interface. • Stable layers formed under buffer and water rinsing. - Abstract: A robust procedure for the surface bio-functionalization of carbon surfaces was developed. It consists on the modification of carbon materials in contact with an aqueous suspension of the enzyme laccase from Trametes versicolor and the lyophilization agent maltodextrin, with the pH value adjusted close to the isoelectric point of the enzyme. We report in-situ investigations applying Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) for carbon-coated sensor surfaces and, moreover, ex-situ measurements with static contact angle measurements, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) for smooth Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) substrates, for contact times between the enzyme formulation and the carbon material surface ranging from 20 s to 24 h. QCM-D studies reveals the formation of rigid layer of biomaterial, a few nanometers thin, which shows a strongly improved wettability of the substrate surface upon contact angle measurements. Following spectroscopic characterization, these layers are composed of mixtures of laccase and maltodextrin. The formation of these adsorbates is attributed to attractive interactions between laccase, the maltodextrin-based lyophilization agent and the hydrophobic carbon surfaces; a short-term contact between the aqueous laccase mixture suspension and HOPG surfaces is shown to merely result in de-wetting patterns influencing the results of contact angle measurements. The new enzyme-based surface modification of carbon-based materials is suggested to be applicable for the improvement of not only the wettability of low energy substrate surfaces with fluid formulations like coatings

  20. Selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palnichenko, A.V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning was studied. DLC films was deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, filtered vacuum arc deposition, laser ablation, magnetron sputtering and ion-beam lithography methods. The DLC coatings were...

  1. Control and Prevention of Ice Formation on the Surface of an Aluminum Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Maral

    modified with (3-aminopropyl) triethoxy silane (APTES) exhibited longer freezing delays as compared to both more hydrophilic and more hydrophobic substrates. This is attributed to a particular surface chemistry of the APTES modification that prevents ice formation at the interface of the substrate due...

  2. Biofilm formation on surface characterized micro-implants for skeletal anchorage in orthodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, Yeen; Sandham, John; de Vries, Jacob; van der Mei, Henderina; Busscher, Hendrik

    Micro-implants are increasingly popular in clinical orthodontics to effect skeletal anchorage. However, biofilm formation on their surfaces and subsequent infection of peri-implant tissues can result in either exfoliation or surgical removal of these devices. The present study aimed to assess

  3. Greenland meltwater storage in firn limited by near-surface ice formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; MacFerrin, Mike; van As, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    above sea level), firn has undergone substantial densification, while at lower elevations, where melt is most abundant, porous firn has lost most of its capability to retain meltwater. Here, the formation of near-surface ice layers renders deep pore space difficult to access, forcing meltwater to enter...

  4. Field and laboratory emission cell automation and control system for investigating surface chemistry reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemmer, Michael M.; Ham, Jason E.; Wells, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    A novel system [field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) automation and control system] has been developed to deliver ozone to a surface utilizing the FLEC to simulate indoor surface chemistry. Ozone, humidity, and air flow rate to the surface were continuously monitored using an ultraviolet ozone monitor, humidity, and flow sensors. Data from these sensors were used as feedback for system control to maintain predetermined experimental parameters. The system was used to investigate the chemistry of ozone with α-terpineol on a vinyl surface over 72h. Keeping all other experimental parameters the same, volatile organic compound emissions from the vinyl tile with α-terpineol were collected from both zero and 100ppb(partsper109) ozone exposures. System stability profiles collected from sensor data indicated experimental parameters were maintained to within a few percent of initial settings. Ozone data from eight experiments at 100ppb (over 339h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.65ppb and a 95% tolerance of 3.3ppb. Humidity data from 17 experiments at 50% relative humidity (over 664h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.38% and a 95% tolerance of 2.77%. Data of the flow rate of air flowing through the FLEC from 14 experiments at 300ml/min (over 548h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 3.02ml/min and a 95% tolerance range of 6.03ml/min. Initial experimental results yielded long term emissions of ozone/α-terpineol reaction products, suggesting that surface chemistry could play an important role in indoor environments.

  5. Formation of metastable tetragonal zirconia nanoparticles: Competitive influence of the dopants and surface state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorban, Oksana, E-mail: matscidep@aim.com [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering named after A.A. Galkin of the NAS of Ukraine, Nauki av. 46, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Synyakina, Susanna; Volkova, Galina; Gorban, Sergey; Konstantiova, Tetyana [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering named after A.A. Galkin of the NAS of Ukraine, Nauki av. 46, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Lyubchik, Svetlana, E-mail: s_lyubchik@yahoo.com [REQUIMTE, Universida de Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2015-12-15

    The effect of the surface modification of the nanoparticles of amorphous and crystalline partially stabilized zirconia by fluoride ions on stability of the metastable tetragonal phase was investigated. Based on the DSC, titrimetry and FTIR spectroscopy data it was proven that surface modification of the xerogel resulted from an exchange of the fluoride ions with the basic OH groups. The effect of the powder pre-calcination temperature before modification on the formation of metastable tetragonal phase in partially stabilized zirconia was investigated. It was shown that the main factor of tetragonal zirconia stabilization is the state of nanoparticles surface at pre-crystallization temperatures.

  6. Formation of surface nano-structures by plasma expansion induced by highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt) and International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); El-Said, A. S. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt) and Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstr. 128, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Slow highly charged ions (HCIs) create surface nano-structures (nano-hillocks) on the quartz surface. The formation of hillocks was only possible by surpassing a potential energy threshold. By using the plasma expansion approach with suitable hydrodynamic equations, the creation mechanism of the nano-hillocks induced by HCIs is explained. Numerical analysis reveal that within the nanoscale created plasma region, the increase of the temperature causes an increase of the self-similar solution validity domain, and consequently the surface nano-hillocks become taller. Furthermore, the presence of the negative (positive) nano-dust particles would lead to increase (decrease) the nano-hillocks height.

  7. Enhancing the formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms on membranes by surface modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lackner, Susanne; Holmberg, Maria; Terada, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) membranes and polyethylene (PE) surfaces were modified to enhance formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms for wastewater treatment applications. A combination of plasma polymerization and wet chemistry was employed to ultimately introduce poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG......) chains with two different functional groups (-PEG-NH2 and -PEG-CH3). Biofilm growth experiments using a mixed nitrifying bacterial culture revealed that the specific combination of PEG chains with amino groups resulted in most biofilm formation on both PP and PE samples. Detachment experiments showed...... structure might be possible explanations of the superiority of the -PEG-NH2 modification. The success of the-PEG-NH2 modification was independent of the original surface and might, therefore, be used in wastewater treatment bioreactors to improve reactor performance by making biofilm formation more stable...

  8. A combined crossed molecular beam and theoretical investigation of the reaction of the meta-tolyl radical with vinylacetylene--toward the formation of methylnaphthalenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Muzangwa, Lloyd; Kaiser, Ralf I; Jamal, Adeel; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-09-07

    Crossed molecular beam experiments and electronic structure calculations on the reaction of the meta-tolyl radical with vinylacetylene were conducted to probe the formation of methyl-substituted naphthalene isomers. We present the compelling evidence that under single collision conditions 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene can be formed without an entrance barrier via indirect scattering dynamics through a bimolecular collision of two non-PAH reactants: the meta-tolyl radical and vinylacetylene. The electronic structure calculations, conducted at the UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVDZ//UM06-2x/cc-pVTZ + ZPE(UM06-2x/cc-pVTZ) level of theory, reveal that this reaction is initiated by the barrierless addition of the meta-tolyl radical to the terminal vinyl carbon (C1) of vinylacetylene, via a van-der-Waals complex implying that this mechanism can play a key role in forming methyl-substituted PAHs in low temperature extreme environments such as the low temperature interstellar medium and hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons in the outer solar system. The reaction mechanism, proposed from the C11H11 potential energy surface, involves a sequence of isomerizations involving hydrogen transfer and ring closure, followed by hydrogen dissociation, which eventually leads to 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene in an overall exoergic process.

  9. Thermal and UV Hydrosilylation of Alcohol-Based Bifunctional Alkynes on Si (111) surfaces: How surface radicals influence surface bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khung, Y L; Ngalim, S H; Scaccabarozi, A; Narducci, D

    2015-06-12

    Using two different hydrosilylation methods, low temperature thermal and UV initiation, silicon (111) hydrogenated surfaces were functionalized in presence of an OH-terminated alkyne, a CF3-terminated alkyne and a mixed equimolar ratio of the two alkynes. XPS studies revealed that in the absence of premeditated surface radical through low temperature hydrosilylation, the surface grafting proceeded to form a Si-O-C linkage via nucleophilic reaction through the OH group of the alkyne. This led to a small increase in surface roughness as well as an increase in hydrophobicity and this effect was attributed to the surficial etching of silicon to form nanosize pores (~1-3 nm) by residual water/oxygen as a result of changes to surface polarity from the grafting. Furthermore in the radical-free thermal environment, a mix in equimolar of these two short alkynes can achieve a high contact angle of ~102°, comparable to long alkyl chains grafting reported in literature although surface roughness was relatively mild (rms = ~1 nm). On the other hand, UV initiation on silicon totally reversed the chemical linkages to predominantly Si-C without further compromising the surface roughness, highlighting the importance of surface radicals determining the reactivity of the silicon surface to the selected alkynes.

  10. Probing adsorption phenomena on a single crystal Pt-alloy surface under oxygen reduction reaction conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondarenko, Alexander S.; Stephens, Ifan E.L.; Bech, Lone

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption dynamics of *OH and *O species at Pt(111) and Cu/Pt(111) near-surface alloy (NSA) surfaces in oxygen-free and O2-saturated 0.1M HClO4 was investigated. Subsurface Cu modifies the electronic structure at the Pt(111) surface resulting in weaker bonding to adsorbates like *OH, *H or *O....... This provides a basis for the high oxygen reduction activity of the NSA, as predicted by density functional theory calculations. The shift in *OH adsorption of around 0.16V towards more positive potentials can be clearly monitored in absence of O2 and under the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) conditions...... for the Cu/Pt(111) NSA. In both cases, for Pt(111) and NSA, the *OH(*O) adsorption dynamics is very similar in the absence of oxygen and under ORR conditions. Therefore, theoretical assumptions about the coverage of adsorbates in the absence of oxygen can be reasonably extrapolated to the situation when...

  11. Final Report Theoretical Studies of Surface Reactions on Metals and Electronic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry L. Whitten

    2012-04-23

    This proposal describes the proposed renewal of a theoretical research program on the structure and reactivity of molecules adsorbed on transition metal surfaces. A new direction of the work extends investigations to interfaces between solid surfaces, adsorbates and aqueous solutions and includes fundamental work on photoinduced electron transport into chemisorbed species and into solution. The goal is to discover practical ways to reduce water to hydrogen and oxygen using radiation comparable to that available in the solar spectrum. The work relates to two broad subject areas: photocatalytic processes and production of hydrogen from water. The objective is to obtain high quality solutions of the electronic structure of adsorbate-metal-surface-solution systems so as to allow activation barriers to be calculated and reaction mechanisms to be determined. An ab initio embedding formalism provides a route to the required accuracy. New theoretical methods developed during the previous grant period will be implemented in order to solve the large systems involved in this work. Included is the formulation of a correlation operator that is used to treat localized electron distributions such as ionic or regionally localized distributions. The correlation operator which is expressed as a two-particle projector is used in conjunction with configuration interaction.

  12. Study of the competitive reaction ability of harmine and harmaline during complex formation with transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chepulsky, S.A.; Kadirova, Z.Ch.; Parpiev, N.A.

    2006-01-01

    New coordination compounds of d-metals (Zn(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Mo(VI), Cr(VI)) β-carboline alkaloids were synthesized. The structure of obtained substances was established by IR, PMR spectroscopy. The quantum-chemical assessment of the harmine and harmaline reactivity in complexation reactions with d-metals was carried out. (author)

  13. Photoinduced ethane formation from reaction of ethene with matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew G K; Parnis, J Mark

    2005-10-27

    The reactions of matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms with ethene (C(2)H(4)) have been studied by FTIR absorption spectroscopy. Under conditions where the ethene dimer forms, metal atoms react with the ethene dimer to yield matrix-isolated ethane (C(2)H(6)) and methane. Under lower ethene concentration conditions ( approximately 1:70 ethene/Ar), hydridic intermediates of the types HMC(2)H(3) and H(2)MC(2)H(2) are also observed, and the relative yield of hydrocarbons is diminished. Reactions of these metals with perdeuterioethene, and equimolar mixtures of C(2)H(4) and C(2)D(4), yield products that are consistent with the production of ethane via a metal atom reaction involving at least two C(2)H(4) molecules. The absence of any other observed products suggests the mechanism also involves production of small, highly symmetric species such as molecular hydrogen and metal carbides. Evidence is presented suggesting that ethane production from the ethene dimer is a general photochemical process for the reaction of excited-state transition-metal atoms with ethene at high concentrations of ethene.

  14. Fast fission phenomenon, deep inelastic reactions and compound nucleus formation described within a dynamical macroscopic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, C.; Ngo, C.; Remaud, B.

    1982-01-01

    We present a dynamical model to describe dissipative heavy ion reactions. It treats explicitly the relative motion of the two ions, the mass asymmetry of the system and the projection of the isospin of each ion. The deformations, which are induced during the collision, are simulated with a time-dependent interaction potential. This is done by a time-dependent transition between a sudden interaction potential in the entrance channel and an adiabatic potential in the exit channel. The model allows us to compute the compound-nucleus cross section and multidifferential cross-sections for deep inelastic reactions. In addition, for some systems, and under certain conditions which are discussed in detail, a new dissipative heavy ion collision appears: fast-fission phenomenon which has intermediate properties between deep inelastic and compound nucleus reactions. The calculated properties concerning fast fission are compared with experimental results and reproduce some of those which could not be understood as belonging to deep inelastic or compound-nucleus reactions. (orig.)

  15. Kinetic modeling of acrylamide formation in aqueous reaction systems and potato crisps : Text & Figures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Acrylamide can be formed in foods that have undergone a high temperature treatment (>120 °C) such as French fries, crisps, coffee and bread, due to the Maillard reaction. The evidence of acrylamide in foods posing a risk for different types of cancer has been strengthened. Mitigation of